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Sample records for ischemic myocardiopathy trasplante

  1. [Acromegalic myocardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Clemente Gallego, David; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Lucas Morante, Tomás

    2009-02-01

    Acromegaly is characterized by chronic growth hormone hypersecretion. Cardiovascular alterations such as hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac rhythm disturbances and valvular disease are common in this disease and are the main cause of death. Control of acromegaly by surgery or pharmacotherapy has been shown to improve cardiovascular morbidity. We report a case of acromegalic myocardiopathy in a 59-year-old woman with dilated myocardiopathy who presented ventricular diameter and contractility normalization following medical treatment.

  2. Cardiac involvement in acromegaly: specific myocardiopathy or consequence of systemic hypertension?

    PubMed

    López-Velasco, R; Escobar-Morreale, H F; Vega, B; Villa, E; Sancho, J M; Moya-Mur, J L; García-Robles, R

    1997-04-01

    To evaluate the relative contributions of past or present GH hypersecretion and of hypertension to the cardiac abnormalities present in acromegaly, we have studied the serum GH and insulin-like growth factor I concentrations, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and morphological and functional cardiac indexes as measured by echocardiography-Doppler, in 39 patients with active or cured acromegaly, 16 hypertensive controls, and 17 normotensive controls. Hypertension was present in 42.8% of patients with active acromegaly and in 28.0% of patients in which acromegaly was cured. Hypertension was independently related to an increase in indexes of cardiac morphology (left ventricular mass, left ventricular posterior wall thickness, interventricular septum thickness, relative wall thickness with respect to the diastolic diameter of the left ventricle, and left atrial end-systolic diameter), systolic function (stroke volume, fractional shortening, and end-systolic stress), and diastolic function (isovolumic relaxation time and maximal late diastolic flow velocity) and to a reduction in the early to late maximal diastolic flow velocity ratio. Acromegaly was related to an increase in left ventricular mass, stroke volume, cardiac output, and isovolumic relaxation time, which were independent from the presence of hypertension. End-systolic stress was reduced by acromegaly. In the five patients in which active acromegaly was successfully treated, left ventricular mass and left ventricular posterior wall thickness were reduced 1 yr later. In conclusion, the asymptomatic morphological and functional cardiac abnormalities present in acromegalic patients are independently related to acromegaly and hypertension, pointing to the existence to a specific acromegalic myocardiopathy that might be aggravated by the coexistence of hypertension.

  3. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  4. Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, James F.; Hernandez III, Luis O.

    2015-01-01

    Most clinicians associate ischemic colitis with elderly patients who have underlying cardiovascular comorbidities. While the majority of cases probably occur in this population, the disease can present in younger patients as a result of different risk factors, making the diagnosis challenging. While a majority of patients respond to medical management, surgery is required in approximately 20% of the cases and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. PMID:26034405

  5. Thallium 201 imaging and gated cardiac blood pool scans in patients with ischemic and idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy. A clinical and pathologic study.

    PubMed

    Bulkley, B H; Hutchins, G M; Bailey, I; Strauss, H W; Pitt, B

    1977-05-01

    In ischemic cardiomyopathy (CM) fibrosis replaces large segments of myocardium, but in idiopathic congestive CM the myocardium contains only small foci of fibrosis or is morphologically normal. As coronary disease and myocardial infarction may be clinically silent, it is not always possible to distinguish ischemic from idiopathic congestive CM during life without cardiac catheterization. To determine whether noninvasive methods, thallium 201 myocardial (Tl) imaging and technetium 99m gated cardiac blood pool scans (GCBPS), could separate the entities, we evaluated radioisotope images of the heart in 13 patients with ischemic, and eight patients with idiopathic congestive CM, and 14 patients with normal hearts. Diagnosis was setablished by cardiac catherterization and/or autopsy in each of the 35 patients. The 14 normals could be readily distinguished from CM, and ischemic could be distinguished from idiopathic dilated CM in 20 of 21 patients. All patients with myocardiopathy showed hypokinetic and dilated left ventricles, but right ventricular dilatation was evident mainly in those with idiopathic CM. Tl images in the ischemic type had defects of greater than 40% of image circumference which corresponded to segmental wall motion abnormalities on GCBPS, whereas those with the idiopathic congestive form were homogeneous or had defects of less than 20% of image circumference. Autopsy studies in 7 of 35 patients correlated Tl defects of greater than 20% of circumference with transmural myocardial fibrosis. PMID:557377

  6. Ischemic preconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-meng; Liu, Mei; Liu, Ying-ying; Ma, Li-li; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Xiao-hong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that an increase in integrin αvβ3 and its co-activator vascular endothelial growth factor play important neuroprotective roles in ischemic injury. We performed ischemic preconditioning with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 5 minutes in C57BL/6J mice. This was followed by ischemic injury with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 30 minutes. The time interval between ischemic preconditioning and lethal ischemia was 48 hours. Histopathological analysis showed that ischemic preconditioning substantially diminished damage to neurons in the hippocampus 7 days after ischemia. Evans Blue dye assay showed that ischemic preconditioning reduced damage to the blood-brain barrier 24 hours after ischemia. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning. Western blot assay revealed a significant reduction in protein levels of integrin αvβ3, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor in mice given ischemic preconditioning compared with mice not given ischemic preconditioning 24 hours after ischemia. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning is associated with lower integrin αvβ3 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in the brain following ischemia. PMID:27335560

  7. Recurrence of ANCA-associated vasculitis in a patient with kidney trasplant.

    PubMed

    García Cosmes, Pedro; Fraile Gómez, Pilar; Lewczuk, Kamil; Rodríguez González, Marta; Ruiz Ferreras, Elena; Tabernero Fernández, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Renal disease secondary to vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) can lead to chronic renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy. In these patients, kidney transplantation offers excellent long-term rates of allograft and patient survival; consequently, they can be trasplanted when the clinical disease activity has remitted. However, the risk of disease relapses in the renal allograft remains, although at lower rates due to modern immunosuppressive regimens. We describe the case of a male patient with extracapillary glomerulonephritis type III C-ANCA (+) who developed a recurrence in the renal allograft 8 years after transplantation. Intensive immunosupression with plasmapheresis controlled the disease.

  8. Ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Athappilly, Geetha; Pelak, Victoria S; Mandava, Naresh; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2008-10-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most frequent cause of vision loss in middle age. Clinical and laboratory research studies have begun to clarify the natural history, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria and pathogenesis of various ischemic nerve injuries. As a result, physicians are acquiring new tools to aid in the diagnosis and potential treatment of ischemic nerve injury. The aim of this review is to examine recent data on anterior and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy and to provide a framework for physicians to manage and counsel affected individuals. PMID:18826805

  9. Transient Ischemic Attack

    MedlinePlus

    Transient Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery for a short time. The only ... TIA is that with TIA the blockage is transient (temporary). TIA symptoms occur rapidly and last a ...

  10. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  11. Astrocyte-mediated ischemic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yuri; Ikeda-Matsuo, Yuri; Notomi, Shoji; Enaida, Hiroshi; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2015-03-01

    Preconditioning (PC) using a preceding sublethal ischemic insult is an attractive strategy for protecting neurons by inducing ischemic tolerance in the brain. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms have been extensively studied, almost all studies have focused on neurons. Here, using a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in mice, we show that astrocytes play an essential role in the induction of brain ischemic tolerance. PC caused activation of glial cells without producing any noticeable brain damage. The spatiotemporal pattern of astrocytic, but not microglial, activation correlated well with that of ischemic tolerance. Interestingly, such activation in astrocytes lasted at least 8 weeks. Importantly, inhibiting astrocytes with fluorocitrate abolished the induction of ischemic tolerance. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we focused on the P2X7 receptor as a key molecule in astrocyte-mediated ischemic tolerance. P2X7 receptors were dramatically upregulated in activated astrocytes. PC-induced ischemic tolerance was abolished in P2X7 receptor knock-out mice. Moreover, our results suggest that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, a well known mediator of ischemic tolerance, is involved in P2X7 receptor-mediated ischemic tolerance. Unlike previous reports focusing on neuron-based mechanisms, our results show that astrocytes play indispensable roles in inducing ischemic tolerance, and that upregulation of P2X7 receptors in astrocytes is essential. PMID:25740510

  12. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  13. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  14. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  15. Remote Ischemic Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Heusch, Gerd; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Przyklenk, Karin; Redington, Andrew; Yellon, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) brief, reversible episodes of ischemia with reperfusion in one vascular bed, tissue or organ confer a global protective phenotype and render remote tissues and organs resistant to ischemia/reperfusion injury. The peripheral stimulus can be chemical, mechanical or electrical and involves activation of peripheral sensory nerves. The signal transfer to the heart or other organs is through neuronal and humoral communications. Protection can be transferred, even across species, with plasma-derived dialysate and involves nitric oxide, stromal derived factor-1α, microRNA-144, but also other, not yet identified factors. Intracardiac signal transduction involves: adenosine, bradykinin, cytokines, and chemokines, which activate specific receptors; intracellular kinases; and mitochondrial function. RIC by repeated brief inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff protects against endothelial dysfunction and myocardial injury in percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary artery bypass grafting and reperfused acute myocardial infarction. RIC is safe and effective, noninvasive, easily feasible and inexpensive. PMID:25593060

  16. Ischemic bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, M. F.; Qizilbash, A. H.; Salem, S.; Fyshe, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    The clinical, radiologic and pathologic features of 25 cases of ischemic bowel disease are presented. The majority of patients presented with the triad of abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting. In 13 patients the diarrhea was associated with the passage of bright red blood per rectum. There were 10 cases of infarction, 11 of enterocolitis and 4 had resulted in stricture formation. In five cases of enterocolitis the lesion was transient; symptoms improved with conservative medical management and the radiologic findings returned to normal. Barium enema examination yielded abnormal findings in the majority of the cases in which it was performed. Plain films of the abdomen, however, were not helpful. The actual mortality in this group of patients was 44%, 80% in those with infarction of the bowel and 20% in the other two groups. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7 PMID:4419659

  17. Preterm Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gopagondanahalli, Krishna Revanna; Li, Jingang; Fahey, Michael C.; Hunt, Rod W.; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic–ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic–ischemic injury (HII), its clinical course, monitoring, and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic–ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia–ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools, and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies. PMID:27812521

  18. Ischemic Stroke after Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Acampa, Maurizio; Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Guideri, Francesca; Tassi, Rossana; Martini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular complications after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) are more common in comparison with neurological sequelae subsequent to routine cardiac surgery. Ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are more common (with an incidence of up to 13%) than intracranial hemorrhage (2.5%). Clinically, ischemic stroke is manifested by the appearance of focal neurologic deficits, although sometimes a stroke may be silent or manifests itself by the appearance of encephalopathy, reflecting a diffuse brain disorder. Ischemic stroke subtypes distribution in perioperative and postoperative period after OHT is very different from classical distribution, with different pathogenic mechanisms. Infact, ischemic stroke may be caused by less common and unusual mechanisms, linked to surgical procedures and to postoperative inflammation, peculiar to this group of patients. However, many strokes (40%) occur without a well-defined etiology (cryptogenic strokes). A silent atrial fibrillation (AF) may play a role in pathogenesis of these strokes and P wave dispersion may represent a predictor of AF. In OHT patients, P wave dispersion correlates with homocysteine plasma levels and hyperhomocysteinemia could play a role in the pathogenesis of these strokes with multiple mechanisms increasing the risk of AF. In conclusion, stroke after heart transplantation represents a complication with considerable impact not only on mortality but also on subsequent poor functional outcome. PMID:26915504

  19. [Pregnancy and acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-05-15

    Pregnancy-related ischemic strokes play an important role in both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Changes in hemostaseology and hemodynamics as well as risk factors related to or independent from pregnancy contribute to the increased stroke-risk during gestation and the puerperium. Potential teratogenic effects make diagnostics, acute therapy and prevention challenging. Because randomized, controlled trials are not available, a multicenter registry of patients with gestational stroke would be desirable. Until definite guidelines emerge, management of acute ischemic stroke during pregnancy remains individual, involving experts and weighing the risks and benefits.

  20. Genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians who treat patients with stroke need to be aware of several single-gene disorders that have ischemic stroke as a major feature, including sickle cell disease, Fabry disease, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, and retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy. The reported genome-wide association studies of ischemic stroke and several related phenotypes (for example, ischemic white matter disease) have shown that no single common genetic variant imparts major risk. Larger studies with samples numbering in the thousands are ongoing to identify common variants with smaller effects on risk. Pharmacogenomic studies have uncovered genetic determinants of response to warfarin, statins and clopidogrel. Despite increasing knowledge of stroke genetics, incorporating this new knowledge into clinical practice remains a challenge. The goals of this article are to review common single-gene disorders relevant to ischemic stroke, summarize the status of candidate gene and genome-wide studies aimed at discovering genetic stroke risk factors, and to briefly discuss pharmacogenomics related to stroke treatment. PMID:21629240

  1. [Phenomenon of heart ischemic postconditioning].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Mrochek, A G; Hanus, L; Pei, J -M; Zhang, Y; Wang, H; Naryzhnaia, N V

    2012-08-01

    Authors of review analyzed papers on problem of heart ischemic postconditioning. In the review, it was demonstrated that postconditioning decreased an infarct size, prevented cardiomyocytes apoptosis, improved cardiac contractility in reperfusion period, augmented cardiac tolerance to arrhythmogenic impact ofreperfusion, prevented neutrophil invasion into the reperfused heart, abolished reperfusion endothelial dysfunction and suppressed reperfusion oxidative stress in myocardium. PMID:23155619

  2. White Matter Ischemic Changes in Hyperacute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Trouard, Theodore P; Lafleur, Scott R.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Salamon, Noriko; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in fractional anisotropy (FA), as measured by diffusion tensor imaging, of white matter (WM) infarction and hypoperfusion in patients with acute ischemic stroke using a quantitative voxel-based analysis. Methods— In this prospective study, diffusion tensor imaging and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion sequences were acquired in 21 patients with acute ischemic stroke who presented within 6 hours of symptom onset. The coregistered FA, apparent diffusion coefficient, and dynamic susceptibility contrast time to maximum (Tmax) maps were used for voxel-based quantification using a region of interest approach in the ipsilateral affected side and in the homologous contralateral WM. The regions of WM infarction versus hypoperfusion were segmented using a threshold method. Data were analyzed by regression and ANOVA. Results— There was an overall significant mean difference (P<0.001) for the apparent diffusion coefficient, Tmax, and FA values between the normal, hypoperfused, and infarcted WM. The mean±SD of FA was significantly higher (P<0.001) in hypoperfused WM (0.397±0.019) and lower (P<0.001) in infarcted WM (0.313±0.037) when compared with normal WM (0.360±0.020). Regression tree analysis of hypoperfused WM showed the largest mean FA difference at Tmax above versus below 5.4 s with a mean difference of 0.033 (P=0.0096). Conclusions— Diffusion tensor imaging-FA was decreased in regions of WM infarction and increased in hypoperfused WM in patients with hyperacute acute ischemic stroke. The significantly increased FA values in the hypoperfused WM with Tmax≥5.4 s are suggestive of early ischemic microstructural changes. PMID:25523053

  3. Arterial ischemic stroke in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bryer, Alan; Lucas, Sebastian; Stanley, Alan; Allain, Theresa J.; Joekes, Elizabeth; Emsley, Hedley; Turnbull, Ian; Downey, Colin; Toh, Cheng-Hock; Brown, Kevin; Brown, David; Ison, Catherine; Smith, Colin; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Nath, Avindra; Heyderman, Robert S.; Connor, Myles D.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection, and potentially its treatment, increases the risk of an arterial ischemic stroke. Multiple etiologies and lack of clear case definitions inhibit progress in this field. Several etiologies, many treatable, are relevant to HIV-related stroke. To fully understand the mechanisms and the terminology used, a robust classification algorithm to help ascribe the various etiologies is needed. This consensus paper considers the strengths and limitations of current case definitions in the context of HIV infection. The case definitions for the major etiologies in HIV-related strokes were refined (e.g., varicella zoster vasculopathy and antiphospholipid syndrome) and in some instances new case definitions were described (e.g., HIV-associated vasculopathy). These case definitions provided a framework for an algorithm to help assign a final diagnosis, and help classify the subtypes of HIV etiology in ischemic stroke. PMID:27386505

  4. Hyperacute management of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Song, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and currently the fourth leading cause of death in this country. Acute ischemic stroke is an emergency and requires effective triage, diagnosis, and critical management. The hyperacute management of ischemic stroke begins in the field, with recognition of stroke symptoms by emergency medical systems (EMS) personnel. The EMS is an important component to an effective stroke system of care, which also includes primary stroke centers, routing protocols for acute ischemic stroke, and telemedicine. Following the arrival of a potential stroke patient to the emergency room setting, patients should be stabilized and undergo assessment for potential intravenous alteplase (IV tPA) treatment. Assessments include diagnostic tests, neuroimaging, and standardized stroke evaluations. After these assessments have been performed, IV tPA, the only medication for acute stroke approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, can be considered using a variety of inclusion and exclusion criteria. Previously time restrictions limited the usage of IV tPA to 3 hours, but this time window has now been extended for eligible candidates to 4.5 hours. The administration of IV tPA has specific requirements for monitoring and should be standardized via protocol across hospitals.

  5. [Ischemic cerebrovascular accidents in childhood].

    PubMed

    Pascual Pascual, S I; Pascual Castroviejo, I; Vélez, A

    1988-04-01

    Authors review 53 children, aged 0 to 14 years, affected with cerebrovascular ischemic strokes. Largest aetiological groups were: a) congenital heart disease, 16 patients; b) arteritis of unknown cause, 11; c) idiopathic arterial occlusion without arteritis images on angiography, 7; d) moyamoya disease, 6; and d) local or systemic infections, 5. The mode of onset was as completed stroke in 72% and stroke in evolution in 24%. After acute stage 17.6% of patients presented other definitive strokes, 11.7% suffered only transient ischemic strokes (TIA), and 4% reversible ischemic neurologic deficits (RIND). Mean follow-up was 4.36 years, 9.8% of patients died, 11.8% recovered completely and 52.9% improved after initial stroke. Poor global evolution was associated with heart disease (p less than 0.05) and with onset of strokes before age 2 (p less than 0.05). Most important sequelae, besides motor impairment, were epilepsy (49%) and mental retardation (50% got less than IQ 80). Late epilepsy was associated with seizures at onset (p less than 0.05). Clinical factors of adverse mental development were: a) seizures at onset, b) late epilepsy and c) stroke before age 2. 66% of cases had two or more arterial lesions in the same or in different arterial trees. Therefore, embolic and arteritic factors probably play an important role in infancy and childhood stroke. PMID:3400936

  6. Echocardiographic assessment of ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Dudzinski, David M; Hung, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation is an important consequence of LV remodeling after myocardial infarction. Echocardiographic diagnosis and assessment of ischemic mitral regurgitation are critical to gauge its adverse effects on prognosis and to attempt to tailor rational treatment strategy. There is no single approach to the echocardiographic assessment of ischemic mitral regurgitation: standard echocardiographic measures of mitral regurgitation severity and of LV dysfunction are complemented by assessments of displacement of the papillary muscles and quantitative indices of mitral valve deformation. Development of novel approaches to understand mitral valve geometry by echocardiography may improve understanding of the mechanism, clinical trajectory, and reparability of ischemic mitral regurgitation.

  7. Pioglitazone after Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Kernan, W.N.; Viscoli, C.M.; Furie, K.L.; Young, L.H.; Inzucchi, S.E.; Gorman, M.; Guarino, P.D.; Lovejoy, A.M.; Peduzzi, P.N.; Conwit, R.; Brass, L.M.; Schwartz, G.G.; Adams, H.P.; Berger, L.; Carolei, A.; Clark, W.; Coull, B.; Ford, G.A.; Kleindorfer, D.; O’Leary, J.R.; Parsons, M.W.; Ringleb, P.; Sen, S.; Spence, J.D.; Tanne, D.; Wang, D.; Winder, T.R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are at increased risk for future cardiovascular events despite current preventive therapies. The identification of insulin resistance as a risk factor for stroke and myocardial infarction raised the possibility that pioglitazone, which improves insulin sensitivity, might benefit patients with cerebrovascular disease. METHODS In this multicenter, double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 3876 patients who had had a recent ischemic stroke or TIA to receive either pioglitazone (target dose, 45 mg daily) or placebo. Eligible patients did not have diabetes but were found to have insulin resistance on the basis of a score of more than 3.0 on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. The primary outcome was fatal or nonfatal stroke or myocardial infarction. RESULTS By 4.8 years, a primary outcome had occurred in 175 of 1939 patients (9.0%) in the pioglitazone group and in 228 of 1937 (11.8%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the pioglitazone group, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62 to 0.93; P = 0.007). Diabetes developed in 73 patients (3.8%) and 149 patients (7.7%), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.69; P<0.001). There was no significant between-group difference in all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.17; P = 0.52). Pioglitazone was associated with a greater frequency of weight gain exceeding 4.5 kg than was placebo (52.2% vs. 33.7%, P<0.001), edema (35.6% vs. 24.9%, P<0.001), and bone fracture requiring surgery or hospitalization (5.1% vs. 3.2%, P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS In this trial involving patients without diabetes who had insulin resistance along with a recent history of ischemic stroke or TIA, the risk of stroke or myocardial infarction was lower among patients who received pioglitazone than among those who received placebo. Pioglitazone was also associated with a lower risk of diabetes but with higher risks of

  8. Remote Ischemic Conditioning: Its Benefits and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Kloner, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    This editorial describes benefits and limitations of remote ischemic conditioning. Remote ischemic conditioning was shown to reduce myocardial intact size in at least 4 sizeable clinical trials of acute myocardial infarction. It was not effective in recent studies of cardiac surgery. Reasons for these differences are discussed.

  9. Cerebral ischemic stroke: is gender important?

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Claire L

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral stroke continues to be a major cause of death and the leading cause of long-term disability in developed countries. Evidence reviewed here suggests that gender influences various aspects of the clinical spectrum of ischemic stroke, in terms of influencing how a patients present with ischemic stroke through to how they respond to treatment. In addition, this review focuses on discussing the various pathologic mechanisms of ischemic stroke that may differ according to gender and compares how intrinsic and hormonal mechanisms may account for such gender differences. All clinical trials to date investigating putative neuroprotective treatments for ischemic stroke have failed, and it may be that our understanding of the injury cascade initiated after ischemic injury is incomplete. Revealing aspects of the pathophysiological consequences of ischemic stroke that are gender specific may enable gender relevant and effective neuroprotective strategies to be identified. Thus, it is possible to conclude that gender does, in fact, have an important role in ischemic stroke and must be factored into experimental and clinical investigations of ischemic stroke. PMID:23756694

  10. Hyperspectral imaging of ischemic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyawali, Surya C.; Elgharably, Haytham; Melvin, James; Huang, Kun; Bergdall, Valerie; Allen, David W.; Hwang, Jeeseong; Litorja, Maritoni; Shirley, Eric; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    Optical imaging has the potential to achieve high spatial resolution and high functional sensitivity in wound assessment. However, clinical acceptance of many optical imaging devices is hampered by poor reproducibility, low accuracy, and lack of biological interpretation. We developed an in vivo model of ischemic flap for non-contact assessment of wound tissue functional parameters and spectral characteristics. The model was created by elevating the bipedicle skin flaps of a domestic pig from the underlying vascular bed and inhibiting graft bed reperfusion by a silastic sheet. Hyperspectral imaging was carried out on the ischemic flap model and compared with transcutaneous oxygen tension and perfusion measurements at different positions of the wound. Hyperspectral images have also been captured continuously during a post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) procedure. Tissue spectral characteristics obtained by hyperspectral imaging correlated well with cutaneous tissue oxygen tension, blood perfusion, and microscopic changes of tissue morphology. Our experiments not only demonstrated the technical feasibility for quantitative assessment of chronic wound but also provided a potential digital phantom platform for quantitative characterization and calibration of medical optical devices.

  11. Ischemic preconditioning and clinical scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Srinivasan V.; Dave, Kunjan R.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is gaining attention as a novel neuroprotective therapy and could provide an improved mechanistic understanding of tolerance to cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this article is to review the recent work in the field of IPC and its applications to clinical scenarios. Recent findings The cellular signaling pathways that are activated following IPC are now better understood and have enabled investigators to identify several IPC mimetics. Most of these studies were performed in rodents, and efficacy of these mimetics remains to be evaluated in human patients. Additionally, remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) may have higher translational value than IPC. Repeated cycles of temporary ischemia in a remote organ can activate protective pathways in the target organ, including the heart and brain. Clinical trials are underway to test the efficacy of RIPC in protecting brain against subarachnoid hemorrhage. Summary IPC, RIPC, and IPC mimetics have the potential to be therapeutic in various clinical scenarios. Further understanding of IPC-induced neuroprotection pathways and utilization of clinically relevant animal models are necessary to increase the translational potential of IPC in the near future. PMID:23197083

  12. Peroxisomal Biogenesis in Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer M.; Nelson, Jonathan W.; Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Wenri; Mader, Sarah; Davis, Catherine M.; Morrison, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Peroxisomes are highly adaptable and dynamic organelles, adjusting their size, number, and enzyme composition to changing environmental and metabolic demands. We determined whether peroxisomes respond to ischemia, and whether peroxisomal biogenesis is an adaptive response to cerebral ischemia. Results: Focal cerebral ischemia induced peroxisomal biogenesis in peri-infarct neurons, which was associated with a corresponding increase in peroxisomal antioxidant enzyme catalase. Peroxisomal biogenesis was also observed in primary cultured cortical neurons subjected to ischemic insult induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). A catalase inhibitor increased OGD-induced neuronal death. Moreover, preventing peroxisomal proliferation by knocking down dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) exacerbated neuronal death induced by OGD, whereas enhancing peroxisomal biogenesis pharmacologically using a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonist protected against neuronal death induced by OGD. Innovation: This is the first documentation of ischemia-induced peroxisomal biogenesis in mammalian brain using a combined in vivo and in vitro approach, electron microscopy, high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy, and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that neurons respond to ischemic injury by increasing peroxisome biogenesis, which serves a protective function, likely mediated by enhanced antioxidant capacity of neurons. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 109–120. PMID:25226217

  13. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Geuskens, Ralph R. E. G.; Borst, Jordi; Lucas, Marit; Boers, A. M. Merel; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van Walderveen, Marianne A. A.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Marquering, Henk A.

    2015-01-01

    Background CT perfusion (CTP) is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess differences in volumetric and perfusion characteristics in these regions compared to areas that ended up as infarct on follow-up. Materials and Methods This study included 35 patients with >100 mm brain coverage CTP. CTP processing was performed using Philips software (IntelliSpace 7.0). Final infarct was automatically segmented on follow-up noncontrast CT and used as reference. CTP and follow-up noncontrast CT image data were registered. This allowed classification of ischemic lesion agreement (core on CTP: rMTT≥145%, aCBV<2.0 ml/100g and infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT) and misclassified ischemic core (core on CTP, not identified on follow-up noncontrast CT) regions. False discovery ratio (FDR), defined as misclassified ischemic core volume divided by total CTP ischemic core volume, was calculated. Absolute and relative CTP parameters (CBV, CBF, and MTT) were calculated for both misclassified CTP ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement regions and compared using paired rank-sum tests. Results Median total CTP ischemic core volume was 49.7ml (IQR:29.9ml-132ml); median misclassified ischemic core volume was 30.4ml (IQR:20.9ml-77.0ml). Median FDR between patients was 62% (IQR:49%-80%). Median relative mean transit time was 243% (IQR:198%-289%) and 342% (IQR:249%-432%) for misclassified and ischemic lesion agreement regions, respectively. Median absolute cerebral blood volume was 1.59 (IQR:1.43–1.79) ml/100g (P<0.01) and 1.38 (IQR:1.15–1.49) ml/100g (P<0.01) for misclassified ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement, respectively. All CTP parameter values differed significantly. Conclusion For all patients a considerable region of the CTP ischemic core

  14. Ischemic perinatal stroke: challenge and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Raju, Tonse N K

    2008-08-01

    The second highest risk group for developing a cerebral stroke is the perinatal period, generally defined as 20 weeks of gestation through 28th postnatal day of age. In this commentary, a brief overview of ischemic perinatal strokes is presented. Ischemic perinatal stroke (IPS) occurs at a rate of 1 : 2300 to 1 : 5000 births, accounting for 30% of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Thus, IPS is the most common known cause for CP [1-3]. Although they occur frequently, much remains to be studied about perinatal strokes in general and the ischemic variety in particular. PMID:18705894

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Oltean, Mihai; Jespersen, Bente; Dor, Frank J M F

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent part of the renal defense mechanism against ischemia and can be triggered by short periods of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion. Understanding the signaling transduction pathways of renal ischemic conditioning can promote further clinical translation and pharmacological advancements in this era. This review summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms underlying both local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning of the kidney. The different types of conditioning strategies in the kidney recruit similar powerful pro-survival mechanisms. Likewise, renal ischemic conditioning mobilizes many of the same protective signaling pathways as in other organs, but differences are recognized. PMID:26330099

  16. Novel therapeutic strategies for ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Adam J; Vander Heide, Richard S

    2014-11-01

    Despite significant advances in the physician's ability to initiate myocardial reperfusion and salvage heart tissue, ischemic heart disease remains one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Consequently, alternative therapeutic strategies have been intensively investigated, especially methods of enhancing the heart's resistance to ischemic cell death - so called "cardioprotective" interventions. However, although a great deal has been learned regarding the methods and mechanisms of cardioprotective interventions, an efficacious therapy has yet to be successfully implemented in the clinical arena. This review discusses the current understanding of cardioprotection in the context of ischemic heart disease pathophysiology, highlighting those elements of ischemic heart disease pathophysiology that have received less attention as potential targets of cardioprotective intervention.

  17. Histopathologic studies of ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, D L; Kerrison, J B; Green, W R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define the histopathologic features of eyes in which a pathologic diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy had been made in the years 1951 through 1998. METHODS: The following data were documented: age of patient, race, sex, source of tissue, cause of death, clinical history, interval from loss of vision to death, enucleation, exenteration, and biopsy. The histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy were the presence of localized ischemic edema, cavernous degeneration, or an area of atrophy located superior or inferior in the optic nerve. Cases with history of abrupt loss of vision were combined with reports from the literature to construct a time table of histopathologic features and associated conditions. RESULTS: Ischemic optic neuropathy was present in 193 eyes. There were 88 females and 65 males. The average age was 71.6 years. Ischemic edema without (early) and with (later) gitter macrophages was present in 26 (13.5%). Cavernous degeneration was present in 69 nerves (36%). Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) was present in 37 cavernous lesions 1 month or longer after loss of vision. Cavernous lesions were seen in 3 eyes in which peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer hemorrhage had been observed prior to death. Atrophic lesions, the most common pattern, were observed in 133 optic nerves (66.8%). More than 1 ischemic lesion was seen in 38 optic nerves (19.7%). Bilateral ischemic lesions were seen in 50 (35.2%) of 142 paired eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Ischemic optic nerve lesions are initially acellular and later show macrophage infiltration. Cavernous lesions with MPS are present 4 weeks or longer after vision loss. The location of MPS posteriorly and along the internal margin suggests that MPS is produced at the edges of lesions. Progressive vision loss in ischemic optic neuropathy may be secondary to compression of intact nerve from ischemic edema and cavernous swelling, or a second ischemic lesion. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5

  18. [Stunned myocardium after acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Varela, Daniel; Díaz, Fernanda; Hlavnicka, Alejandro; Wainsztein, Néstor; Leiguarda, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    The so-called stunned myocardium, defined as transitory myocardial contractile dysfunction, has been clearly demonstrated in diverse clinical situations. However, stunned myocardium related to ischemic stroke has been poorly identified. We describe two patients with diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke who developed eletrocardiographic changes, cardiac enzyme increasing levels and myocardial dysfunction secondary to abnormal cardiac wall motion. At the same time the patients developed acute lung injury with rapid resolution, perhaps as a consequence of neurocardiogenic components.

  19. Adiposity and ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Mary E.; Green, Jane; Beral, Valerie; Sudlow, Cathie L.M.; Brown, Anna; Kirichek, Oksana; Price, Alison; Yang, TienYu Owen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare associations of body mass index (BMI) with ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke risk, and to review the worldwide evidence. Methods: We recruited 1.3 million previously stroke-free UK women between 1996 and 2001 (mean age 57 years [SD 5]) and followed them by record linkage for hospital admissions and deaths. We used Cox regression to estimate adjusted relative risks for ischemic and hemorrhagic (intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage) stroke in relation to BMI. We conducted a meta-analysis of published findings from prospective studies on these associations. Results: During an average follow-up of 11.7 years, there were 20,549 first strokes, of which 9,993 were specified as ischemic and 5,852 as hemorrhagic. Increased BMI was associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke (relative risk 1.21 per 5 kg/m2 BMI, 95% confidence interval 1.18–1.23, p < 0.0001) but a decreased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (relative risk 0.89 per 5 kg/m2 BMI, 0.86–0.92, p < 0.0001). The BMI-associated trends for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were significantly different (heterogeneity: p < 0.0001) but were not significantly different for intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 2,790) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 3,062) (heterogeneity: p = 0.5). Published data from prospective studies showed consistently greater BMI-associated relative risks for ischemic than hemorrhagic stroke with most evidence (prior to this study) coming from Asian populations. Conclusions: In UK women, higher BMI is associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke but decreased risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The totality of the available published evidence suggests that BMI-associated risks are greater for ischemic than for hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:27605176

  20. Chinese Herbal Products for Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hung, I-Ling; Hung, Yu-Chiang; Wang, Lin-Yi; Hsu, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Tseng, Ying-Jung; Kuo, Chun-En; Hu, Wen-Long; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese herbal products (CHPs) have been described in ancient medicine systems as treatments for various stroke-associated ailments. This study is aimed to investigate the prescription patterns and combinations of CHPs for ischemic stroke in Taiwan. Prescriptions of CHPs for ischemic stroke were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan. Every prescription with a leading diagnosis of ischemic stroke made during 2000-2010 was analyzed. Descriptive statistics were applied to the pattern of co-prescriptions. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess demographic and risk factors that are correlated with CHP use. The dataset of inpatient claims data contained information on 15,896 subjects who experienced ischemic stroke from 2000 to 2010. There was an average of 5.82 CHPs in a single prescription for subjects with ischemic stroke. Bu-yang-huan-wu-tang (BYHWT) (40.32%) was by far the most frequently prescribed formula CHP for ischemic stroke, and the most commonly used combination of two-formula-CHP was BYHWT with Shu-jin-huo-xue-tang (SJHXT) (4.40%). Dan Shen (16.50%) was the most commonly used single CHP for ischemic stroke, and the most commonly used combination of two single CHPs was Shi Chang Pua with Yuan Zhi (4.79%). We found that BYHWT and Dan Shen were the most frequently prescribed formula and single CHP for ischemic stroke, respectively. These results provide information about individualized therapy and may contribute to further pharmacologic experiments and clinical trials. PMID:26477801

  1. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-03-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation.

  2. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-03-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation. PMID:25613166

  3. [Ocular ischemic syndrome--a case report].

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Avram, Corina Ioana; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Stamate, Alina Cristina; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara

    2013-01-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome, also known as hypoperfusion/ hypotensive retinopathy or as ischemic oculopathy is a rare ocular disease determined by chronic arterial hypoperfusion through central retinal artery, posterior and anterior ciliary arteries. It is bilateral in 20% of the cases. Most often it appears due to severe occlusion of the carotid arteries (ICA, MCA>ECA), described in 1963 by Kearns and Hollenhorst. Occasionally it can be determined by the obstruction of ophtalmic artery or some arterities (Takayasu, giant cell arteritis). The risk factors are: age between 50-80 years, males (M:F = 2:1), arterial hypertension, diabetes, coronary diseases (5% of the cases develop ocular ischemic syndrome), vascular stroke, hemodialysis. The case we present is of an 63 years old man known with primary arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes type 2 non insulin dependent and diagnosticated with ischemic cerebral stroke and bilateral obstruction of internal carotid arteries in march 2010, who is presenting for visual impairment in both eyes. The imaging investigations show important carotid occlusion and at the ophthalmologic evaluation there are ocular hypertension and rubeosis iridis at the right eye, optic atrophy at both eyes (complete in the right eye and partial in the left eye), with superior altitudinal visual field defect in left eye. The following diagnosis was established: Chronic ocular ischemic syndrome in both eyes with Neovascular glaucoma at the right eye, Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy at the left eye and laser panphotocoagulation at the right eye was started. PMID:24386788

  4. [Ocular ischemic syndrome--a case report].

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Avram, Corina Ioana; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Stamate, Alina Cristina; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara

    2013-01-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome, also known as hypoperfusion/ hypotensive retinopathy or as ischemic oculopathy is a rare ocular disease determined by chronic arterial hypoperfusion through central retinal artery, posterior and anterior ciliary arteries. It is bilateral in 20% of the cases. Most often it appears due to severe occlusion of the carotid arteries (ICA, MCA>ECA), described in 1963 by Kearns and Hollenhorst. Occasionally it can be determined by the obstruction of ophtalmic artery or some arterities (Takayasu, giant cell arteritis). The risk factors are: age between 50-80 years, males (M:F = 2:1), arterial hypertension, diabetes, coronary diseases (5% of the cases develop ocular ischemic syndrome), vascular stroke, hemodialysis. The case we present is of an 63 years old man known with primary arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes type 2 non insulin dependent and diagnosticated with ischemic cerebral stroke and bilateral obstruction of internal carotid arteries in march 2010, who is presenting for visual impairment in both eyes. The imaging investigations show important carotid occlusion and at the ophthalmologic evaluation there are ocular hypertension and rubeosis iridis at the right eye, optic atrophy at both eyes (complete in the right eye and partial in the left eye), with superior altitudinal visual field defect in left eye. The following diagnosis was established: Chronic ocular ischemic syndrome in both eyes with Neovascular glaucoma at the right eye, Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy at the left eye and laser panphotocoagulation at the right eye was started.

  5. Clusterin: a protective mediator for ischemic cardiomyocytes?

    PubMed

    Krijnen, P A J; Cillessen, S A G M; Manoe, R; Muller, A; Visser, C A; Meijer, C J L M; Musters, R J P; Hack, C E; Aarden, L A; Niessen, H W M

    2005-11-01

    We examined the relationship between clusterin and activated complement in human heart infarction and evaluated the effect of this protein on ischemic rat neonatal cardiomyoblasts (H9c2) and isolated adult ventricular rat cardiomyocytes as in vitro models of acute myocardial infarction. Clusterin protects cells by inhibiting complement and colocalizes with complement on jeopardized human cardiomyocytes after infarction. The distribution of clusterin and complement factor C3d was evaluated in the infarcted human heart. We also analyzed the protein expression of clusterin in ischemic H9c2 cells. The binding of endogenous and purified human clusterin on H9c2 cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the effect of clusterin on the viability of ischemically challenged H9c2 cells and isolated adult ventricular rat cardiomyocytes was analyzed. In human myocardial infarcts, clusterin was found on scattered, morphologically viable cardiomyocytes within the infarcted area that were negative for complement. In H9c2 cells, clusterin was rapidly expressed after ischemia. Its expression was reduced after reperfusion. Clusterin bound to single annexin V-positive or annexin V and propidium iodide-positive H9c2 cells. Clusterin inhibited ischemia-induced death in H9c2 cells as well as in isolated adult ventricular rat cardiomyocytes in the absence of complement. We conclude that ischemia induces the upregulation of clusterin in ischemically challenged, but viable, cardiomyocytes. Our data suggest that clusterin protects cardiomyocytes against ischemic cell death via a complement-independent pathway.

  6. [Experimental model of ocular ischemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, T N; Chudin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The review presents the most common methods of modeling of retinal ischemia in vitro (chemical ischemia with iodoacetic acid, incubation of the retinal pigment epithelium cells with oligomycin, deprivation of oxygen and glucose) and in vivo (a model with increased intraocular pressure, cerebral artery occlusion, chronic ligation of the carotid arteries, photocoagulation of the retinal vessels, occlusion of the central retinal artery, endothelin-1 administration). Modeling ischemic injury in rats is the most frequently used method in studies, because the blood supply of their eyes is similar to blood flow in the human eyes. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. Application of methods depends on the purpose of the experimental study. Currently model of ocular ischemic disease can be obtained easily by injecting vasoconstrictive drug endothelin-1. It is the most widely used method of high intraocular pressure induced ocular ischemic damage similar to glaucoma, occlusion of central retinal artery or ophthalmic artery in human. The development of experimental models of ocular ischemic diseases and detailed investigation of mechanisms of impairment of microcirculation are useful for improve the efficiency of diagnostic and treatment of ischemic diseases of retina and optic nerve. PMID:25971134

  7. Hypothermia for hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, C Michael; Shankaran, Seetha

    2010-01-01

    Moderate to severe hypoxic–ischemic injury in newborn infants, manifested as encephalopathy immediately or within hours after birth, is associated with a high risk of either death or a lifetime with disability. In recent multicenter clinical trials, hypothermia initiated within the first 6 postnatal hours has emerged as a therapy that reduces the risk of death or impairment among infants with hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy. Prior to hypothermia, no therapies directly targeting neonatal encephalopathy secondary to hypoxic–ischemic injury had convincing evidence of efficacy. Hypothermia therapy is now becoming increasingly available at tertiary centers. Despite the deserved enthusiasm for hypothermia, obstetric and neonatology caregivers, as well as society at large, must be reminded that in the clinical trials more than 40% of cooled infants died or survived with impairment. Although hypothermia is an evidence-based therapy, additional discoveries are needed to further improve outcome after HIE. In this article, we briefly present the epidemiology of neonatal encephalopathy due to hypoxic–ischemic injury, describe the rationale for the use of hypothermia therapy for hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy, and present results of the clinical trials that have demonstrated the efficacy of hypothermia. We also present findings noted during and after these trials that will guide care and direct research for this devastating problem. PMID:20625441

  8. [Echocardiographic evaluation of ischemic cardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Asin Cardiel, E; Yuste, P; Señor, J; Palma, J; Martínez-Bordiu, C

    1976-01-01

    We studied a group of patients with ischemic heart disease divided into two groups: Group I coronary insufficiency. Group II myocardial infaction. We centered the work on the following aspects: analysis of the contractility; evaluation of the movement of the ventricular wall and of the septum; movement of the mitral valve; diagnosis of ventricular dyskinesias, akinesias, and hypokinesias. The patients in group I did not show significant alterations in the values of the ejection fraction and speed of circunferential shortening. The mean values of these parimeters are significantly less than the group of patients with infarcts, and 41% of these patients have EF less than 50% and Vcf less than 0.9. We did not find a correlation between these perimeters and the localization of the infarct. The velocity of the posterior ventricular wall was disminished in both groups of patients. The amplitude of movement of the posterior wall was reduced in the group of patients with infarctions. These parimeters were more altered in the posterior infarcts than in those with anterior localization and they are more an index of the state of the posterior wall than of the ventricular contractility considered overall, contary to mitral descriptions. In 3 cases of acute infarct we found paradoxical movement of the septum, which normalized itself in one patient in 6 months. In 6 other patients with old infarct we observed localized dyskinesias of the septum and of the free wall of the left ventricle. The mitral valve appears altered in a great proportion of coronary patients the most notorious characteristics being: a decrease in the EF pendent; an increase of the F index. These findings are considered in relation with the ventricular pressures and with the degree of distensibility of the left ventricle.

  9. Cardiac magnetic resonance determinants of functional mitral regurgitation in ischemic and non ischemic left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; De Agustin, Alberto; Manzano, M Carmen; Bustos, Ana; Sánchez, Tibisay; Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Fuentes, Manuel; Macaya, Carlos; Zamorano, José

    2011-04-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is frequent in left ventricular (LV) dilatation/dysfunction. Echocardiographic predictors of FMR are known. However, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of FMR have not been fully addressed. The aim of the study was to evaluate CMR mitral valve (MV) parameters associated with FMR in ischemic and non ischemic LV dysfunction. 80 patients with LV ejection fraction below 45% and/or left ventricular dilatation of ischemic and non ischemic etiology were included. Cine-MR images (steady state free-precession) were acquired in a short-axis and 4 chambers views where MV evaluation was performed. Delayed enhancement was performed as well. Significant FMR was established as more than mild MR according to the echocardiographic report. Mean age was 59 years, males 79%. FMR was detected in 20 patients (25%) Significant differences were noted in LV functional parameters and in most MV parameters according to the presence of significant FMR. However, differences were noted between ischemic and non ischemic groups. In the first, differences in most MV parameters remained significant while in the non ischemic, only systolic and diastolic interpapillary muscle distance (1.60 vs. 2.19 cm, P = 0.001; 2. 51 vs. 3.04, P = 0.008) were predictors of FMR. FMR is associated with a more severe LV dilatation/dysfunction in the overall population. CMR MV parameters are associated with the presence of significant FMR and are different between ischemic and non ischemic patients. CMR evaluation of these patients may help in risk stratification as well as in surgical candidate selection.

  10. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Kidney Tissue Ischemic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Fitzgerald, J T; Michalopoulou, A P; Troppmann, C

    2004-03-11

    Noninvasive evaluation of tissue viability of donor kidneys used for transplantation is an issue that current technology is not able to address. In this work, we explore optical spectroscopy for its potential to assess the degree of ischemic damage in kidney tissue. We hypothesized that ischemic damage to kidney tissue will give rise to changes in its optical properties which in turn may be used to asses the degree of tissue injury. The experimental results demonstrate that the autofluorescence intensity of the injured kidney is decreasing as a function of time exposed to ischemic injury. Changes were also observed in the NIR light scattering intensities most probably arising from changes due to injury and death of the tissue.

  11. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  12. Cerebrovascular arteriopathy (arteriosclerosis) and ischemic childhood stroke.

    PubMed

    Daniels, S R; Bates, S; Lukin, R R; Benton, C; Third, J; Glueck, C J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the intracranial cerebrovascular abnormalities and clinical status of 8 children who had familial lipoprotein disorders and evidence of thromboembolic cerebrovascular disease. Six of the 8 children had low levels of plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol, two had high triglyceride levels, and all came from kindreds characterized by familial lipoprotein abnormalities and premature cardio- and/or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis. Vascular occlusion, irregularities of the arterial lumen, beading, tortuosity, and evidence of collateralization were consistently noted. We speculate that cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis in pediatric ischemic stroke victims who have familial lipoprotein abnormalities may be related to lipoprotein-mediated endothelial damage and thrombosis formation, or to the failure to restore endothelial cells' integrity following damage. The apparent association of lipoproteins and strokes in children and their families merits further exploration, particularly when assessing cerebral angiograms in pediatric ischemic stroke victims. In children with unexplained ischemic cerebrovascular accidents, the diagnostic possibility of occlusive arteriosclerosis with thrombosis must be entertained.

  13. [Vascular brain lesions and ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Levin, G Z

    1979-01-01

    The role of essential hypertension in the pathogenesis of cerebral vessel disorders (not only hemorrhagic, but also ischemic) is greater than in the pathogenesis of the heart ischemic disease. An analysis of the evidences left by ancient doctors, when compared with statistical data of our time, gives one grounds to believe that cerebral hemorrhages have been a rather common disease, at least, since the time of the antique civilization of Greece and Rome, whereas ischemic heart disease has become a widespread disease among the population of the developed countries only in our time. This makes it possible to assume that the role of essential hypertension and that of atherosclerosis are not equal in the "diseases of civilization", if the diseases of today's developed society are meant.

  14. The association of migraine with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Tobias

    2010-03-01

    Migraine is a common, chronic-intermittent primary headache disorder affecting mostly women. The migraine pathophysiology involves both the neuronal and vascular systems, and in some patients, transient neurologic symptoms occur, which are known as migraine aura. A large body of literature supports an association between migraine and ischemic stroke, which is apparent mostly in young women with migraine with aura. Further increased risks have been observed particularly in smokers and women who use oral contraceptives. The vast majority of individual studies, as well as a recent meta-analysis, did not find an association between migraine without aura and ischemic stroke. Although there are several hypotheses about potential biological mechanisms linking migraine with aura to ischemic stroke, the precise causes remain unclear. Because the absolute risk of stroke is considerably low in patients with migraine, the vast majority of migraine patients will not experience a stroke event because of the migraine.

  15. Drug Delivery to the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia occurs when blood flow to the brain is insufficient to meet metabolic demand. This can result from cerebral artery occlusion that interrupts blood flow, limits CNS supply of oxygen and glucose, and causes an infarction/ischemic stroke. Ischemia initiates a cascade of molecular events inneurons and cerebrovascular endothelial cells including energy depletion, dissipation of ion gradients, calcium overload, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, and accumulation of ions and fluid. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with cerebral ischemia and leads to vasogenic edema, a primary cause of stroke-associated mortality. To date, only a single drug has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for acute ischemic stroke treatment, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). While rt-PA therapy restores perfusion to ischemic brain, considerable tissue damage occurs when cerebral blood flow is re-established. Therefore, there is a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can “rescue” salvageable brain tissue and/or protect BBB integrity during ischemic stroke. One class of drugs that may enable neural cell rescue following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins). Understanding potential CNS drug delivery pathways for statins is critical to their utility in ischemic stroke. Here, we review molecular pathways associated with cerebral ischemia and novel approaches for delivering drugs to treat ischemic disease. Specifically, we discuss utility of endogenous BBB drug uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs/Oatps) and nanotechnology-based carriers for optimization of CNS drug delivery. Overall, this chapter highlights state-of-the-art technologies that may improve pharmacotherapy of cerebral ischemia. PMID:25307217

  16. Neural Stem Cells and Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenggang; Chopp, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Stroke activates neural stem cells in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) of the lateral ventricle, which increases neuroblasts and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Within the ischemic brain, neural stem cells, neuroblasts and OPCs appear to actively communicate with cerebral endothelial cells and other brain parenchymal cells to mediate ischemic brain repair; however, stroke-induced neurogenesis unlikely plays any significant roles in neuronal replacement. In this mini-review, we will discuss recent findings how intercellular communications between stroke-induced neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis and brain parenchymal cells could potentially facilitate brain repair processes. PMID:27488979

  17. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  18. An overview of antithrombotics in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Patricia A; Gaughen, John R; Kreitel, Elizabeth M; Shephard, Timothy J; Solenski, Nina J; Jensen, Mary E

    2016-06-19

    The use of antithrombotic medications is an important component of ischemic stroke treatment and prevention. This article reviews the evidence for best practices for antithrombotic use in stroke with focused discussion on the specific agents used to treat and prevent stroke. PMID:27153001

  19. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, decreases apoptosis and leads to protection in the ischemic heart. Stem cell therapy augmented with gene therapy used for myogenesis has proven to be beneficial in numerous animal models of myocardial ischemia. Gene therapy coding for antioxidants, eNOS, HSP, mitogen-activated protein kinase and numerous other anti apoptotic proteins have demonstrated significant cardioprotection in animal models. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety in humans apart from symptomatic and objective improvements in cardiac function. Current research efforts are aimed at refining various gene transfection techniques and regulation of gene expression in vivo in the heart and circulation to improve clinical outcomes in patients that suffer from ischemic heart disease. In this review article we will attempt to summarize the current state of both preclinical and clinical studies of gene therapy to combat myocardial ischemic disease. PMID:20600100

  20. Systemic corticosteroids in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Zhang, Jason; Spitze, Arielle; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most prevalent optic nerve disorders seen in ophthalmic practice. The role of corticosteroid therapy in NAION remains a highly controversial area of debate in ophthalmology. This brief review will provide an overview of the current clinical evidence on this topic as well as some comment on the medical debate. PMID:25449939

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid may mediate CNS ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanming F; Gwathmey, Judith K; Zhang, Guorong; Soriano, Sulpicio G; He, Shunli; Wang, Yanguang

    2005-01-01

    Background The central nervous system (CNS) is extremely vulnerable to ischemic injury. The details underlying this susceptibility are not completely understood. Since the CNS is surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that contains a low concentration of plasma protein, we examined the effect of changing the CSF in the evolution of CNS injury during ischemic insult. Methods Lumbar spinal cord ischemia was induced in rabbits by cross-clamping the descending abdominal aorta for 1 h, 2 h or 3 h followed by 7 d of reperfusion. Prior to ischemia, rabbits were subjected to the following procedures; 1) CSF depletion, 2) CSF replenishment at 0 mmHg intracranial pressure (ICP), and 3) replacement of CSF with 8% albumin- or 1% gelatin-modified artificial CSF, respectively. Motor function of the hind limbs and histopathological changes of the spinal cord were scored. Post-ischemic microcirculation of the spinal cord was visualized by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) albumin. Results The severity of histopathological damage paralleled the neurological deficit scores. Paraplegia and associated histopathological changes were accompanied by a clear post-ischemic deficit in blood perfusion. Spinal cord ischemia for 1 h resulted in permanent paraplegia in the control group. Depletion of the CSF significantly prevented paraplegia. CSF replenishment with the ICP reduced to 0 mmHg, did not prevent paraplegia. Replacement of CSF with albumin- or gelatin-modified artificial CSF prevented paraplegia in rabbits even when the ICP was maintained at 10–15 mmHg. Conclusion We conclude that the presence of normal CSF may contribute to the vulnerability of the spinal cord to ischemic injury. Depletion of the CSF or replacement of the CSF with an albumin- or gelatin-modified artificial CSF can be neuroprotective. PMID:16174300

  2. Role of thioredoxin-1 in ischemic preconditioning, postconditioning and aged ischemic hearts.

    PubMed

    D'Annunzio, Veronica; Perez, Virginia; Boveris, Alberto; Gelpi, Ricardo J; Poderoso, Juan J

    2016-07-01

    Thioredoxin is one of the most important cellular antioxidant systems known to date, and is responsible of maintaining the reduced state of the intracellular space. Trx-1 is a small cytosolic protein whose transcription is induced by stress. Therefore it is possible that this antioxidant plays a protective role against the oxidative stress caused by an increase of reactive oxygen species concentration, as occurs during the reperfusion after an ischemic episode. However, in addition to its antioxidant properties, it is able to activate other cytoplasmic and nuclear mediators that confer cardioprotection. It is remarkable that Trx-1 also participates in myocardial protection mechanisms such as ischemic preconditioning and postconditioning, activating proteins related to cellular survival. In this sense, it has been shown that Trx-1 inhibition abolished the preconditioning cardioprotective effect, evidenced through apoptosis and infarct size. Furthermore, ischemic postconditioning preserves Trx-1 content at reperfusion, after ischemia. However, comorbidities such as aging can modify this powerful cellular defense leading to decrease cardioprotection. Even ischemic preconditioning and postconditioning protocols performed in aged animal models failed to decrease infarct size. Therefore, the lack of success of antioxidants therapies to treat ischemic heart disease could be solved, at least in part, avoiding the damage of Trx system. PMID:26987940

  3. Aspirin resistant patients with recent ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Navas-Alcántara, M S; Fernández-Moreno, M C

    2014-04-01

    Some patients with a recent ischemic stroke who are being treated with aspirin as an antiaggregant suffer a new ischemic stroke. These patients (15-25%) have been called unresponsive to aspirin or aspirin resistant. The aspirin-resistant patients have a four-time greater risk of suffering a stroke. Furthermore, these strokes are generally more severe, with increased infarct volume and greater risk of recurrence. There is currently no ideal laboratory test to detect the resistance to the antiaggregant effect of aspirin. The study of resistance to aspirin would only be indicated in selected cases. In these patients, one should first rule out any "pseudo-resistance" to aspirin (lack of compliance, concomitant treatments that interfere with the action of the aspirin). PMID:24211052

  4. Isolated naratriptan-associated ischemic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Nissan, George; Chaudhry, Priyanka; Rangasamy, Priya; Mudrovich, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report a 41-year-old woman who developed histology- and colonoscopy-proven ischemic colitis with the use of naratriptan not exceeding the maximum 2 doses a day and 3 days per week and without a known medical or cardiovascular history. By exclusion of other causes of colonic ischemia, naratriptan was considered the sole causal agent. Discontinuation of naratriptan resulted in a complete clinical recovery. To date, our patient is the youngest known patient to develop ischemic colitis on isolated naratriptan in the setting of no known medical risk factors or predisposing medical condition. Even though triptans are commonly used for the abortive treatment of migraine headaches, such a reported side effect is rare; however, careful assessment and individual patient-based treatment is advised.

  5. [Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack].

    PubMed

    Sahara, Noriyuki; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Okada, Yasushi

    2016-04-01

    Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015 was published. Here, we describe several points revised from the 2009 edition about "Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack (TIA)". The revision points are as follows; 1. Extension of possible time window of intravenous recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator treatment (from within 3 hours to within 4.5 hours); 2. Antiplatelet therapy in acute stage (dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA); 3. Endovascular recanalization therapy in acute stage; 4. Antiplatelet therapy in chronic stage (Cilostazol is recommended similar to aspirin or clopidogrel); 5. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) stroke or TIA patients; 6. Management of TIA. We explain the revised points of the guideline in the text.

  6. [Ischemic cholangiopathy induced by extended burns].

    PubMed

    Cohen, Laurence; Angot, Emilie; Goria, Odile; Koning, Edith; François, Arnaud; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2013-04-01

    Ischemic cholangiopathy is a recently described entity occurring mainly after hepatic grafts. Very few cases after intensive care unit (ICU) for extended burn injury were reported. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman consulting in an hepatology unit, for a jaundice appearing during a hospitalisation in an intensive care unit and increasing from her leaving from ICU, where she was treated for an extended burn injury. She had no pre-existing biological features of biliary disease. Biological tests were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of biliary tracts pointed out severe stenosing lesions of diffuse cholangiopathy concerning intrahepatic biliary tract, mainly peri-hilar. Biopsie from the liver confirmed the diagnosis, showing a biliary cirrhosis with bile infarcts. This case is the fourth case of ischemic cholangiopathy after extended burn injury, concerning a patient without a prior history of hepatic or biliary illness and appearing after hospitalisation in intensive care unit.

  7. Isolated naratriptan-associated ischemic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Nissan, George; Chaudhry, Priyanka; Rangasamy, Priya; Mudrovich, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report a 41-year-old woman who developed histology- and colonoscopy-proven ischemic colitis with the use of naratriptan not exceeding the maximum 2 doses a day and 3 days per week and without a known medical or cardiovascular history. By exclusion of other causes of colonic ischemia, naratriptan was considered the sole causal agent. Discontinuation of naratriptan resulted in a complete clinical recovery. To date, our patient is the youngest known patient to develop ischemic colitis on isolated naratriptan in the setting of no known medical risk factors or predisposing medical condition. Even though triptans are commonly used for the abortive treatment of migraine headaches, such a reported side effect is rare; however, careful assessment and individual patient-based treatment is advised. PMID:27695179

  8. [Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack].

    PubMed

    Sahara, Noriyuki; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Okada, Yasushi

    2016-04-01

    Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015 was published. Here, we describe several points revised from the 2009 edition about "Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack (TIA)". The revision points are as follows; 1. Extension of possible time window of intravenous recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator treatment (from within 3 hours to within 4.5 hours); 2. Antiplatelet therapy in acute stage (dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA); 3. Endovascular recanalization therapy in acute stage; 4. Antiplatelet therapy in chronic stage (Cilostazol is recommended similar to aspirin or clopidogrel); 5. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) stroke or TIA patients; 6. Management of TIA. We explain the revised points of the guideline in the text. PMID:27333757

  9. Ischemic Colitis in an Endurance Runner

    PubMed Central

    Grames, Chase; Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S.

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old female running the Marine Corps Marathon developed diarrhea at mile 12. After finishing the race she noted that she was covered in bloody stool. A local emergency department suspected ischemic colitis. After discharge, her primary care physician instructed her to discontinue the use of all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Her symptoms resolved and she returned to running without any complications. This paper describes the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and management options. PMID:23091744

  10. White matter injury in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Gang; Hong, Dandan; Chen, Fenghua; Ji, Xunming; Cao, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability and mortality worldwide. It is well known that ischemic stroke can cause gray matter injury. However, stroke also elicits profound white matter injury, a risk factor for higher stroke incidence and poor neurological outcomes. The majority of damage caused by stroke is located in subcortical regions and, remarkably, white matter occupies nearly half of the average infarct volume. Indeed, white matter is exquisitely vulnerable to ischemia and is often injured more severely than gray matter. Clinical symptoms related to white matter injury include cognitive dysfunction, emotional disorders, sensorimotor impairments, as well as urinary incontinence and pain, all of which are closely associated with destruction and remodeling of white matter connectivity. White matter injury can be noninvasively detected by MRI, which provides a three-dimensional assessment of its morphology, metabolism, and function. There is an urgent need for novel white matter therapies, as currently available strategies are limited to preclinical animal studies. Optimal protection against ischemic stroke will need to encompass the fortification of both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss white matter injury after ischemic stroke, focusing on clinical features and tools, such as imaging, manifestation, and potential treatments. We also briefly discuss the pathophysiology of WMI and future research directions. PMID:27090751

  11. Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele; Rabinov, James; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular thrombectomy is an effective treatment for major acute ischemic stroke syndromes caused by major anterior circulation artery occlusions (commonly referred to as large vessel occlusion) and is superior to intravenous thrombolysis and medical management. Treatment should occur as quickly as is reasonably possible. All patients with moderate to severe symptoms (National Institutes of Health stroke scale >8) and a treatable occlusion should be considered. The use of neuroimaging is critical to exclude hemorrhage and large ischemic cores. Very shortly after stroke onset (<3 hours) computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography provide sufficient information to proceed; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is less reliable during this early stage. After 3 hours from onset diffusion MRI is the most reliable method to define ischemic core size and should be used in centers that can offer it rapidly. Recanalization is highly effective with a stentriever or using a direct aspiration technique, with the patient awake or under conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, if it may be performed safely. After thrombectomy the patient should be admitted to an intensive care setting and inpatient rehabilitation undertaken as soon as feasible. Patient outcomes should be assessed at 3 months, preferably using the modified Rankin score. PMID:27430469

  12. White matter injury in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Gang; Hong, Dandan; Chen, Fenghua; Ji, Xunming; Cao, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability and mortality worldwide. It is well known that ischemic stroke can cause gray matter injury. However, stroke also elicits profound white matter injury, a risk factor for higher stroke incidence and poor neurological outcomes. The majority of damage caused by stroke is located in subcortical regions and, remarkably, white matter occupies nearly half of the average infarct volume. Indeed, white matter is exquisitely vulnerable to ischemia and is often injured more severely than gray matter. Clinical symptoms related to white matter injury include cognitive dysfunction, emotional disorders, sensorimotor impairments, as well as urinary incontinence and pain, all of which are closely associated with destruction and remodeling of white matter connectivity. White matter injury can be noninvasively detected by MRI, which provides a three-dimensional assessment of its morphology, metabolism, and function. There is an urgent need for novel white matter therapies, as currently available strategies are limited to preclinical animal studies. Optimal protection against ischemic stroke will need to encompass the fortification of both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss white matter injury after ischemic stroke, focusing on clinical features and tools, such as imaging, manifestation, and potential treatments. We also briefly discuss the pathophysiology of WMI and future research directions.

  13. Neurovascular Regulation in the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The brain has high energetic requirements and is therefore highly dependent on adequate cerebral blood supply. To compensate for dangerous fluctuations in cerebral perfusion, the circulation of the brain has evolved intrinsic safeguarding measures. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: The vascular network of the brain incorporates a high degree of redundancy, allowing the redirection and redistribution of blood flow in the event of vascular occlusion. Furthermore, active responses such as cerebral autoregulation, which acts to maintain constant cerebral blood flow in response to changing blood pressure, and functional hyperemia, which couples blood supply with synaptic activity, allow the brain to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion in the face of varying supply or demand. In the presence of stroke risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes, these protective processes are impaired and the susceptibility of the brain to ischemic injury is increased. One potential mechanism for the increased injury is that collateral flow arising from the normally perfused brain and supplying blood flow to the ischemic region is suppressed, resulting in more severe ischemia. Future Directions: Approaches to support collateral flow may ameliorate the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia by rescuing cerebral perfusion in potentially viable regions of the ischemic territory. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 149–160. PMID:24328757

  14. Cardioprotection by remote ischemic conditioning: Mechanisms and clinical evidences

    PubMed Central

    Aimo, Alberto; Borrelli, Chiara; Giannoni, Alberto; Pastormerlo, Luigi Emilio; Barison, Andrea; Mirizzi, Gianluca; Emdin, Michele; Passino, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC), several cycles of ischemia and reperfusion render distant organ and tissues more resistant to the ischemia-reperfusion injury. The intermittent ischemia can be applied before the ischemic insult in the target site (remote ischemic preconditioning), during the ischemic insult (remote ischemic perconditioning) or at the onset of reperfusion (remote ischemic postconditioning). The mechanisms of RIC have not been completely defined yet; however, these mechanisms must be represented by the release of humoral mediators and/or the activation of a neural reflex. RIC has been discovered in the heart, and has been arising great enthusiasm in the cardiovascular field. Its efficacy has been evaluated in many clinical trials, which provided controversial results. Our incomplete comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the RIC could be impairing the design of clinical trials and the interpretation of their results. In the present review we summarize current knowledge about RIC pathophysiology and the data about its cardioprotective efficacy. PMID:26516416

  15. Cellular Basis of Anoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bronshvag, Michael M.

    1978-01-01

    Anoxic-ischemic cerebral disease is an important primary cause of morbidity and mortality, and also complicates a number of systemic diseases. Its clinical manifestations, such as hemiparesis and coma, represent cellular injury sustained by the complex, inhomogeneous brain. An understanding of the nature and pattern of anoxic-ischemic cerebral injury, and of the logical basis for avenues of therapy, is necessary to the management of patients with the various anoxic-ischemic disorders. PMID:685270

  16. The Influence of Diabetes Mellitus in Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Paulo Cury; Rahmi, Rosa Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) is a powerful mechanism of protection discovered in the heart in which ischemia paradoxically protects the myocardium against other ischemic insults. Many factors such as diseases and medications may influence IP expression. Although diabetes poses higher cardiovascular risk, the physiopathology underlying this condition is uncertain. Moreover, although diabetes is believed to alter intracellular pathways related to myocardial protective mechanisms, it is still controversial whether diabetes may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and whether this might influence clinical outcomes. This review article looks at published reports with animal models and humans that tried to evaluate the possible influence of diabetes in myocardial ischemic preconditioning.

  17. The Influence of Diabetes Mellitus in Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Paulo Cury; Rahmi, Rosa Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) is a powerful mechanism of protection discovered in the heart in which ischemia paradoxically protects the myocardium against other ischemic insults. Many factors such as diseases and medications may influence IP expression. Although diabetes poses higher cardiovascular risk, the physiopathology underlying this condition is uncertain. Moreover, although diabetes is believed to alter intracellular pathways related to myocardial protective mechanisms, it is still controversial whether diabetes may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and whether this might influence clinical outcomes. This review article looks at published reports with animal models and humans that tried to evaluate the possible influence of diabetes in myocardial ischemic preconditioning. PMID:27656659

  18. Ischemic postconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury by up-regulation of acid-sensing ion channel 2a

    PubMed Central

    Duanmu, Wang-sheng; Cao, Liu; Chen, Jing-yu; Ge, Hong-fei; Hu, Rong; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning renders brain tissue tolerant to brain ischemia, thereby alleviating ischemic brain injury. However, the exact mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study, a rat model of global brain ischemia was subjected to ischemic postconditioning treatment using the vessel occlusion method. After 2 hours of ischemia, the bilateral common carotid arteries were blocked immediately for 10 seconds and then perfused for 10 seconds. This procedure was repeated six times. Ischemic postconditioning was found to mitigate hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage in rats with brain ischemia, and up-regulate acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression at the mRNA and protein level. These findings suggest that ischemic postconditioning up-regulates acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression in the rat hippocampus after global brain ischemia, which promotes neuronal tolerance to ischemic brain injury. PMID:27212927

  19. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  20. Transient ischemic attack as a medical emergency.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Since transient ischemic attack (TIA) is regarded as a medical emergency with high risk for early stroke recurrence, the underlying mechanisms should be immediately clarified to conclude a definitive diagnosis and provide early treatment. Early risk stratification using ABCD(2) scores can predict the risk of ischemic stroke occurring after TIA. Carotid ultrasonography (US) can evaluate the degree of stenosis, plaque properties and flow velocity of ICA lesions. High-risk mobile plaques can be classified by carotid US, and aortogenic sources of emboli can be detected by transesophageal echocardiography. Cardiac monitoring and blood findings are thought to play a key role in a diagnosis of cardioembolic TIA. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-MRI and MR angiography are also indispensable to understand the mechanism of TIA and cerebral circulation. To prevent subsequent stroke arising from TIA, antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies should be started immediately along with comprehensive management of life-style, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and other atherosclerotic diseases. Carotid endarterectomy and endovascular intervention are critical for treating symptomatic patients with significant stenosis of ICA. A novel concept of acute cerebrovascular syndrome (ACVS) has recently been advocated to increase awareness of TIA among citizens, patients and medical professionals. TIA should be recognized as the last opportunity to avoid irreversible ischemic stroke and its sequelae. The clinical relevance of the new concept of ACVS is advocated by early recurrence after TIA, analysis of high-risk TIA, treatment strategies and the optimal management of TIA. Raising TIA awareness should also proceed across many population sectors. PMID:24157554

  1. Cardiogenic embolism producing crescendo transient ischemic attacks.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Patrick J; Oak, Jack; Choi, Eric T

    2005-09-01

    Lateralizing, repetitive transient ischemic attacks are characteristic of symptomatic carotid bifurcation atherosclerotic plaques. We report a case in which a cardiogenic embolus, after lodging at the left carotid bifurcation, produced crescendo episodes of expressive aphasia and mild right upper extremity weakness. Complete neurological recovery was achieved following emergent carotid embolectomy and endarterectomy. This case demonstrates that the laminar nature of internal carotid blood flow may result in the localization of embolic events to a single region of the cerebral vasculature, regardless of the source lesion in the carotid artery. The role of endoluminal techniques in the diagnosis and management of such lesions is discussed.

  2. [Results of rehabilitation after ischemic cerebrovascular stroke].

    PubMed

    Turkalj, Z; Colja-Matić, S; Vlah, N; Topoljak, D; Pokos, L; Zadravec, S

    1995-01-01

    The results of the prospective study of functional recovery after ischemic stroke in 50 patients are presented. Rehabilitation program was performed in the "Special hospital for medical rehabilitation Varazdinski Toplice", after an average of 18-day treatment at a neurological department. Rehabilitation team included: physiatrist, logopedist, psychologist, nurse, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, neurologist, internist and urologist. At admission and upon completed rehabilitation the patients were evaluated by "Functional independence measure" (FIM). Descriptive statistical methods were used in data analysis. The highest grades of recovery were achieved in sphincter control and general mobility. We advocate team work with individual approach to patient rehabilitation, and employment of FIM. PMID:8691971

  3. Oxidative stress--assassin behind the ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Hanumanthappa; Diya, Joseph B; Shashikumar, Shivaiah; Rajanikant, Golgodu K

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the second leading cause of death and disability worldwide and is associated with significant clinical and socioeconomic implications, emphasizing the need for effective therapies. Several neuroprotective strategies have failed in clinical trials because of poor knowledge of the molecular processes flanked with ischemic stroke. Therefore, uncovering the molecular processes involved in ischemic brain injury is of critical importance. Therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke remain ineffective, though rapid advances occur in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. The oxidative stress is one such high-potential phenomenon, the precise role of which needs to be understood during ischemic events. Nevertheless, the studies carried out in preclinical models of ischemic stroke have pointed to the major role of oxidative stress in exacerbating the ischemic injury. Oxidative stress leading to cell death requires generation of free radicals through multiple mechanisms, such as respiratory inhibition, Ca(2+) imbalance, excitotoxicity, reperfusion injury and inflammation. Free radicals are highly reactive to all the molecular targets: lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, modifying their chemical structure and generating oxidation-derived products. This review discusses molecular aspects of oxidative stress in ischemic stroke and catastrophes that set up as an aftermath of the trauma. PMID:23023336

  4. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: role of inflammatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Yang, Guojun; Li, Guohong

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Experimentally and clinically, the brain responds to ischemic injury with an acute and prolonged inflammatory process, characterized by rapid activation of resident cells (mainly microglia), production of proinflammatory mediators, and infiltration of various types of inflammatory cells (including neutrophils, different subtypes of T cells, monocyte/macrophages, and other cells) into the ischemic brain tissue. These cellular events collaboratively contribute to ischemic brain injury. Despite intense investigation, there are still numerous controversies concerning the time course of the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the brain and their pathogenic roles in ischemic brain injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the time-dependent recruitment of different inflammatory cells following focal cerebral I/R. We discuss how these cells contribute to ischemic brain injury and highlight certain recent findings and currently unanswered questions about inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. PMID:20130219

  5. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Evolving Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Leslee J.; Bugiardini, Raffaelle; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2009-01-01

    Evolving knowledge regarding sex differences in coronary heart disease (CHD) is emerging. Given the lower burden of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and preserved systolic function in women contrasted by higher rates of myocardial ischemia and near-term mortality compared to men, we propose the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) as appropriate for this discussion specific to women, rather than CAD or CHD. This paradoxical difference where women have lower rates of anatomical CAD but more symptoms, ischemia, and outcomes appear linked to coronary reactivity which includes microvascular dysfunction. Novel risk factors can improve the Framingham risk score, including inflammatory markers and reproductive hormones, as well as noninvasive imaging and functional capacity measurements. Risk for women with obstructive CAD is elevated compared to men, yet women are less likely to receive guideline-indicated therapies. In the setting of non-ST elevation acute myocardial infarction, interventional strategies are equally effective in biomarker positive women and men, while conservative management is indicated for biomarker negative women. For women with evidence of ischemia but no obstructive CAD, anti-anginal and anti-ischemic therapies can improve symptoms, endothelial function, and quality of life; however trials evaluating adverse outcomes are needed. We hypothesize that women experience more adverse outcomes compared to men because obstructive CAD remains the current focus of therapeutic strategies. Continued research is indicated to devise therapeutic regimens to improve symptom burden and reduce risk in women with IHD. PMID:19833255

  6. Complement in the Homeostatic and Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Alawieh, Ali; Elvington, Andrew; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a component of the immune system involved in both recognition and response to pathogens, and it is implicated in an increasing number of homeostatic and disease processes. It is well documented that reperfusion of ischemic tissue results in complement activation and an inflammatory response that causes post-reperfusion injury. This occurs following cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and triggers secondary damage that extends beyond the initial infarcted area, an outcome that has rationalized the use of complement inhibitors as candidate therapeutics after stroke. In the central nervous system, however, recent studies have revealed that complement also has essential roles in synaptic pruning, neurogenesis, and neuronal migration. In the context of recovery after stroke, these apparent divergent functions of complement may account for findings that the protective effect of complement inhibition in the acute phase after stroke is not always maintained in the subacute and chronic phases. The development of effective stroke therapies based on modulation of the complement system will require a detailed understanding of complement-dependent processes in both early neurodegenerative events and delayed neuro-reparatory processes. Here, we review the role of complement in normal brain physiology, the events initiating complement activation after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, and the contribution of complement to both injury and recovery. We also discuss how the design of future experiments may better characterize the dual role of complement in recovery after ischemic stroke. PMID:26322048

  7. Creatine kinase in ischemic and inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Kitzenberg, David; Colgan, Sean P; Glover, Louise E

    2016-12-01

    The creatine/phosphocreatine pathway plays a conserved and central role in energy metabolism. Compartmentalization of specific creatine kinase enzymes permits buffering of local high energy phosphates in a thermodynamically favorable manner, enabling both rapid energy storage and energy transfer within the cell. Augmentation of this metabolic pathway by nutritional creatine supplementation has been shown to elicit beneficial effects in a number of diverse pathologies, particularly those that incur tissue ischemia, hypoxia or oxidative stress. In these settings, creatine and phosphocreatine prevent depletion of intracellular ATP and internal acidification, enhance post-ischemic recovery of protein synthesis and promote free radical scavenging and stabilization of cellular membranes. The creatine kinase energy system is itself further regulated by hypoxic signaling, highlighting the existence of endogenous mechanisms in mammals that can enhance creatine metabolism during oxygen deprivation to promote tissue resolution and homeostasis. Here, we review recent insights into the creatine kinase pathway, and provide rationale for dietary creatine supplementation in human ischemic and inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27527620

  8. [Neuroimaging of the penumbra in ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, M Iu; Korobkova, D Z; Krotenkova, M V

    2013-01-01

    Brain ischemia has been recently a central problem in basic and applied studies in angioneurology. The latest investigations that give an insight into a relationship between metabolic changes and cerebral blood flow and make it possible to study ischemia at the molecular level and its changes over time have promoted the accumulation of fundamentally new facts and some reappraisal of existing ideas. Ischemic semishadow or penumbra is one of the most important presently studied phenomena. Detection of penumbra signs suggests that it is expedient to evaluate cerebral blood flow and metabolism when planning treatment (thrombolysis or neuroprotective therapy) and that it is important to predict the severity of ischemic stroke. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the reference method for detecting the penumbra; however, its application is limited in clinical practice. Computed tomography (CT) perfusion and perfusion MRI, a combination of diffusion-weighted and perfusion MRI, single-photon emission CT, and xenon-enhanced CT are most frequently used to evaluate a cerebral ischemia area and its blood flow. However, there are no standardized approaches to quantifying the thresholds for cerebral blood flow or unified algorithms for penumbra verification, which calls for further investigations. PMID:25702445

  9. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  10. Adult neurogenesis and the ischemic forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lichtenwalner, Robin J; Parent, Jack M

    2006-01-01

    The recent identification of endogenous neural stem cells and persistent neuronal production in the adult brain suggests a previously unrecognized capacity for self-repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis not only continues in discrete regions of the adult mammalian brain, but new evidence also suggests that neural progenitors form new neurons that integrate into existing circuitry after certain forms of brain injury in the adult. Experimental stroke in adult rodents and primates increases neurogenesis in the persistent forebrain subventricular and hippocampal dentate gyrus germinative zones. Of greater relevance for regenerative potential, ischemic insults stimulate endogenous neural progenitors to migrate to areas of damage and form neurons in otherwise dormant forebrain regions, such as the neostriatum and hippocampal pyramidal cell layer, of the mature brain. This review summarizes the current understanding of adult neurogenesis and its regulation in vivo, and describes evidence for stroke-induced neurogenesis and neuronal replacement in the adult. Current strategies used to modify endogenous neurogenesis after ischemic brain injury also will be discussed, as well as future research directions with potential for achieving regeneration after stroke and other brain insults. PMID:15959458

  11. Altering 5-hydroxymethylcytosine modification impacts ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhigang; He, Yuquan; Xin, Ning; Sun, Miao; Chen, Li; Lin, Li; Li, Jizhen; Kong, Jiming; Jin, Peng; Xu, Xingshun

    2015-10-15

    Epigenetic modifications such as cytosine methylation and histone modification are linked to the pathology of ischemic brain injury. Recent research has implicated 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a DNA base derived from 5-methylcytosine (5mC) via oxidation by ten-eleven translocation (Tet) enzymes, in DNA methylation-related plasticity. Here we show that 5hmC abundance was increased after ischemic injury, and Tet2 was responsible for this increase; furthermore, inhibiting Tet2 expression abolished the increase of 5hmC caused by ischemic injury. The decrease in 5hmC modifications from inhibiting Tet2 activity was accompanied by increased infarct volume after ischemic injury. Genome-wide profiling of 5hmC revealed differentially hydroxymethylated regions (DhMRs) associated with ischemic injury, and DhMRs were enriched among the genes involved in cell junction, neuronal morphogenesis and neurodevelopment. In particular, we found that 5hmC modifications at the promoter region of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increased, which was accompanied by increased BDNF mRNA, whereas the inhibition of Tet2 reduced BDNF mRNA and protein expression. Finally, we show that the abundance of 5hmC in blood samples from patients with acute ischemic stroke was also significantly increased. Together, these data suggest that 5hmC modification could serve as both a potential biomarker and a therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  12. Central Nervous System Agents for Ischemic Stroke: Neuroprotection Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Rachna S.; Mao, Lijuan; Zhou, Hua; Zhou, Shuanhu; Zeng, Jiang; Popp, A. John; Wang, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality and disability in the United States. Ischemic stroke constitutes 85% of all stroke cases. However, no effective treatment has been found to prevent damage to the brain in such cases except tissue plasminogen activator with narrow therapeutic window, and there is an unmet need to develop therapeutics for neuroprotection from ischemic stroke. Studies have shown that mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, immune modulation, and oxidative stress and mediators such as excitatory amino acids, nitric oxide, inflammatory mediators, neurotransmitters, reactive oxygen species, and withdrawal of trophic factors may lead to the development of the ischemic cascade. Hence, it is essential to develop neuroprotective agents targeting either the mechanisms or the mediators leading to development of ischemic stroke. This review focuses on central nervous system agents targeting these biochemical pathways and mediators of ischemic stroke, mainly those that counteract apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidation, and well as glutamate inhibitors which have been shown to provide neuroprotection in experimental animals. All these agents have been shown to improve neurological outcome after ischemic insult in experimental animals in vivo, organotypic brain slice/acute slice ex vivo, and cell cultures in vitro and may therefore aid in preventing long-term morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:21521165

  13. Bone Fracture Pre-Ischemic Stroke Exacerbates Ischemic Cerebral Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dingquan; Zhan, Lei; Li, Zhengxi; Zhu, Wan; Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a devastating complication of bone fracture. Bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury by augmenting inflammation. We hypothesize that bone fracture shortly before ischemic stroke also exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Tibia fracture was performed 6 or 24 hours before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) on C57BL/6J mice or Ccr2RFP/+Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice that have the RFP gene knocked into one allele of Ccr2 gene and GFP gene knocked into one allele of Cx3cr1 gene. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Infarct volume, the number of CD68+ cells, apoptotic neurons, bone marrow-derived macrophages (RFP+), and microgila (GFP+) in the peri-infarct region were quantified. Compared to mice subjected to pMCAO only, bone fracture 6 or 24 hours before pMCAO increased behavioral deficits, the infarct volume, and the number of CD68+ cells and apoptotic neurons in the peri-infarct area. Both bone marrow-derived macrophages (CCR2+) and microglia (CX3CR1+) increased in the peri-infarct regions of mice subjected to bone fracture before pMCAO compared to stroke-only mice. The mice subjected to bone fracture 6 hours before pMCAO had more severe injury than mice that had bone fracture 24 hours before pMCAO. Our data showed that bone fracture shortly before stroke also increases neuroinflammation and exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Our findings suggest that inhibition of neuroinflammation or management of stroke risk factors before major bone surgery would be beneficial for patients who are likely to suffer from stroke. PMID:27089041

  14. An update on brain imaging in transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Souillard-Scemama, R; Tisserand, M; Calvet, D; Jumadilova, D; Lion, S; Turc, G; Edjlali, M; Mellerio, C; Lamy, C; Naggara, O; Meder, J-F; Oppenheim, C

    2015-02-01

    Neuroimaging is critical in the evaluation of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and MRI is the recommended modality to image an ischemic lesion. The presence of a diffusion (DWI) lesion in a patient with transient neurological symptoms confirms the vascular origin of the deficit and is predictive of a high risk of stroke. Refinement of MR studies including high resolution DWI and perfusion imaging using either MRI or CT further improve the detection of ischemic lesions. Rapid etiological work-up includes non-invasive imaging of cervical and intracranial arteries to search for symptomatic stenosis/occlusion associated with an increased risk of stroke.

  15. A simplified technique for producing an ischemic wound model.

    PubMed

    Chien, Sufan; Wilhelmi, Bradon J

    2012-05-02

    One major obstacle in current diabetic wound research is a lack of an ischemic wound model that can be safely used in diabetic animals. Drugs that work well in non-ischemic wounds may not work in human diabetic wounds because vasculopathy is one major factor that hinders healing of these wounds. We published an article in 2007 describing a rabbit ear ischemic wound model created by a minimally invasive surgical technique. Since then, we have further simplified the procedure for easier operation. On one ear, three small skin incisions were made on the vascular pedicles, 1-2 cm from the ear base. The central artery was ligated and cut along with the nerve. The whole cranial bundle was cut and ligated, leaving only the caudal branch intact. A circumferential subcutaneous tunnel was made through the incisions, to cut subcutaneous tissues, muscles, nerves, and small vessels. The other ear was used as a non-ischemic control. Four wounds were made on the ventral side of each ear. This technique produces 4 ischemic wounds and 4 non-ischemic wounds in one animal for paired comparisons. After surgery, the ischemic ear was cool and cyanotic, and showed reduced movement and a lack of pulse in the ear artery. Skin temperature of the ischemic ear was 1-10 °C lower than that on the normal ear and this difference was maintained for more than one month. Ear tissue high-energy phosphate contents were lower in the ischemic ear than the control ear. Wound healing times were longer in the ischemic ear than in the non-ischemic ear when the same treatment was used. The technique has now been used on more than 80 rabbits in which 23 were diabetic (diabetes time ranging from 2 weeks to 2 years). No single rabbit has developed any surgical complications such as bleeding, infection, or rupture in the skin incisions. The model has many advantages, such as little skin disruption, longer ischemic time, and higher success rate, when compared to many other models. It can be safely used in

  16. Irradiation-related ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Corn, B.W.; Trock, B.J.; Goodman, R.L. )

    1990-04-01

    An expectation for long-term survival has emerged among several groups of cancer patients treated with therapeutic irradiation (eg, Hodgkin's disease, early stage breast cancer). Therefore, the cardiovascular sequelae of thoracic irradiation have recently come under scrutiny. Animal models have demonstrated that cardiac irradiation can directly damage the myocardial microvasculature and can indirectly damage the coronary macrovasculature when coupled with cholesterol feeding. A clear association between thoracic radiotherapy and ischemic heart disease was observed among older clinical studies using radiotherapeutic techniques that are no longer optimal by today's standards. Such a relationship could not be confirmed in modern studies in which treatment factors (such as dose and volume of heart irradiated) were more carefully controlled. 56 references.

  17. [Current registry studies of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Veltkamp, R; Jüttler, E; Pfefferkorn, T; Purrucker, J; Ringleb, P

    2012-10-01

    Study registries offer the opportunity to evaluate the effects of new therapies or to observe the consequences of new treatments in clinical practice. The SITS-MOST registry confirmed the validity of findings from randomized trials on intravenous thrombolysis concerning safety and efficacy in the clinical routine. Current study registries concerning new interventional thrombectomy techniques suggest a high recanalization rate; however, the clinical benefit can only be evaluated in randomized, controlled trials. Similarly, the experiences of the BASICS registry on basilar artery occlusion have led to the initiation of a controlled trial. The benefit of hemicraniectomy in malignant middle cerebral artery infarction has been demonstrated by the pooled analysis of three randomized trials. Numerous relevant aspects are currently documented in the DESTINY-R registry. Finally, the recently started RASUNOA registry examines diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke occurring during therapy with new oral anticoagulants.

  18. Acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Gorchynski, Julie; Herrick, John; Cortes, Edgar

    2008-11-01

    Acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient is a complex disease with a variety of etiologies that differ from adults. Though rare, they are a real phenomenon with potentially devastating consequences. Some treating institutions are using anti-thrombotic drug therapy with unclear benefits. Available literature, which is limited to case reports and retrospective reviews of databases, clouds this topic with both positive and negative outcomes. Emergency department management should focus on stabilization and resuscitation with immediate involvement of a pediatric neurologist and intensivist. The decision to use anti-thrombotic drug therapy, including anti-platelet drugs and thrombolytics, should be in consult with the specialists involved until randomized controlled trials determine their safety and efficacy in the pediatric population.

  19. The effects of estrogen in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Koellhoffer, Edward C; McCullough, Louise D

    2013-08-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and the most common cause of long-term disability in the USA. Women have a lower incidence of stroke compared with men throughout most of the lifespan which has been ascribed to protective effects of gonadal steroids, most notably estrogen. Due to the lower stroke incidence observed in pre-menopausal women and robust preclinical evidence of neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of estrogen, researchers have focused on the potential benefits of hormones to reduce ischemic brain injury. However, as women age, they are disproportionately affected by stroke, coincident with the loss of estrogen with menopause. The risk of stroke in elderly women exceeds that of men and it is clear that in some settings estrogen can have pro-inflammatory effects. This review will focus on estrogen and inflammation and its interaction with aging.

  20. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  1. Remote ischemic conditioning: Current clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Le Page, Sophie; Prunier, Fabrice

    2015-08-01

    Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) constitutes a promising method in which a tissue or organ is exposed to intermittent ischemia/reperfusion periods enabling it to provide protection to a distant target organ. RIC has been tested in various clinical settings through its simple application by means of intermittent inflation of a blood pressure cuff placed on a limb, primarily evaluating its potential abilities to decrease myocardial injury biomarkers. Its use on other organs, such as the kidneys or brain, has recently been a topic of research. To date, no study has yet been powerful enough to reach a conclusion on the potential benefit of RIC on clinical outcomes. The future role of RIC in the clinical arena could be clarified by the large phase III trials currently underway targeting major outcomes as primary endpoints.

  2. [Ischemic stroke following a scorpion sting].

    PubMed

    Elkhayari, M; Hachimi, A; Ziadi, A; Abdenasser Samkaoui, M

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion envenomation is caused by an accidental scorpion sting. In its severe form, it involves life-threatening respiratory or cardiac damage; it may also cause the neurological severity of systemic manifestations. We report the case of a young 35-year-old woman stung by an Androctonus mauretanicus scorpion, who developed impaired consciousness, hemiplegia and respiratory distress. At admission, the brain computed tomography showed a hypodense area in the right parietal region; the chest radiograph revealed a bilateral alveolar syndrome. Troponin was elevated and hemostasis disorders were present. The clinical course was remarkable: cardiogenic shock with multiple organ failure followed by death on day 3. This case illustrates a rare complication of scorpion envenomation: ischemic stroke due to an undetermined mechanism, which in addition to the cardiac and respiratory injuries, led to the serious complications and fatal outcome. PMID:23648127

  3. Use of nitrates in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Cocco; Paul, Jerie; Hans-Ulrich, Iselin

    2015-01-01

    Short-acting nitrates are beneficial in acute myocardial ischemia. However, many unresolved questions remain about the use of long-acting nitrates in stable ischemic heart disease. The use of long-acting nitrates is weakened by the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Also, we currently ignore whether lower doses of transdermal nitroglycerin would be better than those presently used. Multivariate analysis data from large nonrandomized studies suggested that long-acting nitrates increase the incidence of acute coronary syndromes, while data from another multivariate study indicate that they have positive effects. Because of methodological differences and open questions, the two studies cannot be compared. A study in Japanese patients with vasospastic angina has shown that, when compared with calcium antagonists, long-acting nitrates do not improve long-term prognosis and that the risk for cardiac adverse events increases with the combined therapy. We have many unanswered questions.

  4. Leukocyte Recruitment and Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Leukocytes are recruited into the cerebral microcirculation following an ischemic insult. The leukocyte–endothelial cell adhesion manifested within a few hours after ischemia (followed by reperfusion, I/R) largely reflects an infiltration of neutrophils, while other leukocyte populations appear to dominate the adhesive interactions with the vessel wall at 24 h of reperfusion. The influx of rolling and adherent leukocytes is accompanied by the recruitment of adherent platelets, which likely enhances the cytotoxic potential of the leukocytes to which they are attached. The recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the postischemic brain is mediated by specific adhesion glycoproteins expressed by the activated blood cells and on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. This process is also modulated by different signaling pathways (e.g., CD40/CD40L, Notch) and cytokines (e.g., RANTES) that are activated/released following I/R. Some of the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including hypercholesterolemia and obesity appear to exacerbate the leukocyte and platelet recruitment elicited by brain I/R. Although lymphocyte–endothelial cell and –platelet interactions in the postischemic cerebral microcirculation have not been evaluated to date, recent evidence in experimental animals implicate both CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the cerebral microvascular dysfunction, inflammation, and tissue injury associated with brain I/R. Evidence implicating regulatory T-cells as cerebroprotective modulators of the inflammatory and tissue injury responses to brain I/R support a continued focus on leukocytes as a target for therapeutic intervention in ischemic stroke. PMID:19579016

  5. Risk of Remote Seizures After Perinatal Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, David G

    2016-08-01

    Investigators from the University of California San Francisco and Kaiser Permanente Medical Centers in Oakland report outcome of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (PAIS) in a population-based cohort, with particular attention to the incidence of seizures. PMID:27649623

  6. School-Aged Outcomes After Neonatal Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Czech, Theresa; Pardo, Andrea C

    2016-02-01

    Investigators from the Accident Vasculaire Cérébral de nouveau-né (AVCnn) Study Group, a multicenter registry in France, examined outcomes at 7 years of age in children previously identified with neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (NAIS).

  7. Developing practice recommendations for endovascular revascularization for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Marc A.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Darkhabani, Ziad; Edgell, Randall C.; English, Joey; Frei, Donald; Jamieson, Dara G.; Janardhan, Vallabh; Janjua, Nazli; Janjua, Rashid M.; Katzan, Irene; Khatri, Pooja; Kirmani, Jawad F.; Liebeskind, David S.; Linfante, Italo; Nguyen, Thanh N.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Shutter, Lori; Xavier, Andrew; Yavagal, Dileep; Zaidat, Osama O.

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines have been established for the management of acute ischemic stroke; however, specific recommendations for endovascular revascularization therapy are lacking. Burgeoning investigation of endovascular revascularization therapies for acute ischemic stroke, rapid device development, and a diverse training background of the providers performing the procedures underscore the need for practice recommendations. This review provides a concise summary of the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology endovascular acute ischemic stroke roundtable meeting. This document was developed to review current clinical efficacy of pharmacologic and mechanical revascularization therapy, selection criteria, periprocedure management, and endovascular time metrics and to highlight current practice patterns. It therefore provides an outline for the future development of multisociety guidelines and recommendations to improve patient selection, procedural management, and organizational strategies for revascularization therapies in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23008406

  8. Cognitive outcomes following arterial ischemic stroke in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Christine A; Yeates, Keith Owen; Anderson, Vicki; Mackay, Mark; Greenham, Mardee; Gomes, Alison; Lo, Warren

    2014-07-01

    This study sought to investigate cognitive outcomes following pediatric arterial ischemic stroke and explore predictors. Participants included 36 children with perinatal or childhood arterial ischemic stroke and a comparison group of 15 children with asthma. Outcomes included cognitive ability, executive functions, and neurological function (Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure). Magnetic resonance imaging measured lesion location and volume. Mean cognitive scores were at the low end of the average range. Children with arterial ischemic stroke performed significantly below normative populations and significantly below the asthma group on inhibitory control (Cohen's d = .68). Both the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure and lesion volume were negatively correlated with cognitive outcome (Spearman r = -.01 to -.42 Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure; r =-.14 to -.32 Volume). Following arterial ischemic stroke, children performed at the low end of the average range on measures of cognitive functioning. Cognitive outcomes depend on a variety of factors.

  9. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2) migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3) the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4) migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions. PMID:21197470

  10. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia. PMID:26805916

  11. Life style modification for patients with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, V

    2013-01-01

    With a view to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle modification in patients with ischemic heart disease, a quasi-experimental study with quantitative approach was undertaken on 60 patients of ischemic heart disease. Purposive sampling technique was used in selecting the patients. The results showed that educating the patients about cessation of smoking, taking proper diet, anxiety reduction and counselling helped in preventing the progression of ischaemic heart disease.

  12. Anticoagulation for the Acute Management of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Austin A.; Ikuta, Kevin; Soverow, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Few prospective studies support the use of anticoagulation during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, though observational data suggest a role in certain populations. Depending on the mechanism of stroke, systemic anticoagulation may prevent recurrent cerebral infarction, but concomitantly carries a risk of hemorrhagic transformation. In this article, we describe a case where anticoagulation shows promise for ischemic stroke and review the evidence that has discredited its use in some circumstances while showing its potential in others. PMID:24910565

  13. Hypothermia for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Infants ≥ 36 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Rosemary D.; Shankaran, Seetha

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting infants which can result in death and disability. This is a summary of pathogenesis of HIE, animal studies of cooling for hypoxic and ischemic models, human hypothermia trials, and the American Academy of Pediatrics publication on hypothermia for HIE. Hypothermia for neonatal HIE is continuing to evolve as a therapy. Studies, gaps in knowledge and opportunities for research are presented herein. PMID:19762176

  14. Systemic chemokine levels, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke events

    PubMed Central

    Canouï-Poitrine, F.; Luc, G.; Mallat, Z.; Machez, E.; Bingham, A.; Ferrieres, J.; Ruidavets, J.-B.; Montaye, M.; Yarnell, J.; Haas, B.; Arveiler, D.; Morange, P.; Kee, F.; Evans, A.; Amouyel, P.; Ducimetiere, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the association between systemic levels of the chemokine regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and eotaxin-1 (CCL11) with future coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke events and to assess their usefulness for CHD and ischemic stroke risk prediction in the PRIME Study. Methods: After 10 years of follow-up of 9,771 men, 2 nested case-control studies were built including 621 first CHD events and 1,242 matched controls and 95 first ischemic stroke events and 190 matched controls. Standardized hazard ratios (HRs) for each log-transformed chemokine were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Results: None of the 4 chemokines were independent predictors of CHD, either with respect to stable angina or to acute coronary syndrome. Conversely, RANTES (HR = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.74), IP-10 (HR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.06–2.20), and eotaxin-1 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI 1.02–2.46), but not MCP-1 (HR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.68–1.46), were associated with ischemic stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. When the first 3 chemokines were included in the same multivariate model, RANTES and IP-10 remained predictive of ischemic stroke. Their addition to a traditional risk factor model predicting ischemic stroke substantially improved the C-statistic from 0.6756 to 0.7425 (p = 0.004). Conclusions: In asymptomatic men, higher systemic levels of RANTES and IP-10 are independent predictors of ischemic stroke but not of CHD events. RANTES and IP-10 may improve the accuracy of ischemic stroke risk prediction over traditional risk factors. PMID:21849651

  15. HIV status and the risk of ischemic stroke among men

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chung-Chou H.; So-Armah, Kaku; Justice, Amy C.; Hylek, Elaine; Skanderson, Melissa; McGinnis, Kathleen; Kuller, Lewis H.; Kraemer, Kevin L.; Rimland, David; Bidwell Goetz, Matthew; Butt, Adeel A.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Gibert, Cynthia; Leaf, David; Brown, Sheldon T.; Samet, Jeffrey; Kazis, Lewis; Bryant, Kendall; Freiberg, Matthew S.; Chang, Chung-Chou H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Given conflicting data regarding the association of HIV infection and ischemic stroke risk, we sought to determine whether HIV infection conferred an increased ischemic stroke risk among male veterans. Methods: The Veterans Aging Cohort Study–Virtual Cohort consists of HIV-infected and uninfected veterans in care matched (1:2) for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and clinical site. We analyzed data on 76,835 male participants in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study–Virtual Cohort who were free of baseline cardiovascular disease. We assessed demographics, ischemic stroke risk factors, comorbid diseases, substance use, HIV biomarkers, and incidence of ischemic stroke from October 1, 2003, to December 31, 2009. Results: During a median follow-up period of 5.9 (interquartile range 3.5–6.6) years, there were 910 stroke events (37.4% HIV-infected). Ischemic stroke rates per 1,000 person-years were higher for HIV-infected (2.79, 95% confidence interval 2.51–3.10) than for uninfected veterans (2.24 [2.06–2.43]) (incidence rate ratio 1.25 [1.09–1.43]; p < 0.01). After adjusting for demographics, ischemic stroke risk factors, comorbid diseases, and substance use, the risk of ischemic stroke was higher among male veterans with HIV infection compared with uninfected veterans (hazard ratio 1.17 [1.01–1.36]; p = 0.04). Conclusions: HIV infection is associated with an increased ischemic stroke risk among HIV-infected compared with demographically and behaviorally similar uninfected male veterans. PMID:25862803

  16. Polygenic risk of ischemic stroke is associated with cognitive ability

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rainer; Marioni, Riccardo; Campbell, Archie; Seshadri, Sudha; Worrall, Bradford B.; Sudlow, Cathie L.M.; Hayward, Caroline; Bastin, Mark E.; Starr, John M.; Porteous, David J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated the correlation between polygenic risk of ischemic stroke (and its subtypes) and cognitive ability in 3 relatively healthy Scottish cohorts: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936), the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 (LBC1921), and Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS). Methods: Polygenic risk scores for ischemic stroke were created in LBC1936 (n = 1005), LBC1921 (n = 517), and GS (n = 6,815) using genome-wide association study summary data from the METASTROKE collaboration. We investigated whether the polygenic risk scores correlate with cognitive ability in the 3 cohorts. Results: In the largest cohort, GS, polygenic risk of all ischemic stroke, small vessel disease stroke, and large vessel disease stroke, but not cardioembolic stroke, were correlated with both fluid and crystallized cognitive abilities. The highest correlation was between a polygenic risk score for all ischemic stroke and general cognitive ability (r = −0.070, p = 1.95 × 10−8). Few correlations were identified in LBC1936 and LBC1921, but a meta-analysis of all 3 cohorts supported the correlation between polygenic risk of ischemic stroke and cognitive ability. Conclusions: The findings from this study indicate that even in the absence of stroke, being at high polygenic risk of ischemic stroke is associated with lower cognitive ability. PMID:26695942

  17. Relationship Between Ischemic Heart Disease and Sexual Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Afra, Leila Ghanbari; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Gilasi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ischemic heart disease is a life-threatening condition. Considerable doubts exist over the effects of this disease on patients’ sexual activity and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ischemic heart disease and sexual satisfaction. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the convenience sample of 150 patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and 150 people without exposure it was drawn from Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran. Sampling was performed from March to September 2014. We employed the Larson’s Sexual Satisfaction Questionnaire for gathering the data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square, t-test and linear regression analysis. Results: The means of sexual satisfaction in patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and among the subjects without exposure it were 101.47±13.42 and 100.91±16.52, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding sexual satisfaction. However, sexual satisfaction was significantly correlated with gender and the use of cardiac medications (P value < 0.05). Conclusion: The level of sexual satisfaction in patients with exposure ischemic heart disease is similar to the people without exposure it. Moreover, the men and the patients who do not receive cardiac medications have higher levels of sexual satisfaction. Nurses who are providing care to patients with ischemic heart disease need to pay closer attention to patient education about sexual issues. PMID:26234982

  18. Therapeutic hypothermia and ischemic stroke: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Rizwan A.; Pabaney, Aqueel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ischemic stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the US. Clinical techniques aimed at helping to reduce the morbidity associated with stroke have been studied extensively, including therapeutic hypothermia. In this study, the authors review the literature regarding the role of therapeutic hypothermia in ischemic stroke to appreciate the evolution of hypothermia technology over several decades and to critically analyze several early clinical studies to validate its use in ischemic stroke. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Search terms included “hypothermia and ischemic stroke” and “therapeutic hypothermia.” A comprehensive search of the current clinical trials using clinicaltrials.gov was conducted using the keywords “stroke and hypothermia” to evaluate early and ongoing clinical trials utilizing hypothermia in ischemic stroke. Results: A comprehensive review of the evolution of hypothermia in stroke and the current status of this treatment was performed. Clinical studies were critically analyzed to appreciate their strengths and pitfalls. Ongoing and future registered clinical studies were highlighted and analyzed compared to the reported results of previous trials. Conclusion: Although hypothermia has been used for various purposes over several decades, its efficacy in the treatment of ischemic stroke is debatable. Several trials have proven its safety and feasibility; however, more robust, randomized clinical trials with large volumes of patients are needed to fully establish its utility in the clinical setting. PMID:27313963

  19. The Many Roles of Statins in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingru; Zhang, Xiangjian; Dong, Lipeng; Wen, Ya; Cui, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of human death. Endothelial dysfunction, thrombogenesis, inflammatory and oxidative stress damage, and angiogenesis play an important role in cerebral ischemic pathogenesis and represent a target for prevention and treatment. Statins have been found to improve endothelial function, modulate thrombogenesis, attenuate inflammatory and oxidative stress damage, and facilitate angiogenesis far beyond lowering cholesterol levels. Statins have also been proved to significantly decrease cardiovascular risk and to improve clinical outcome. Could statins be the new candidate agent for the prevention and therapy in ischemic stroke? In recent years, a vast expansion in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and the pleiotropic effects of statins has occurred and clinical trials involving statins for the prevention and treatment of ischemic stroke have begun. These facts force us to revisit ischemic stroke and consider new strategies for prevention and treatment. Here, we survey the important developments in the non-lipid dependent pleiotropic effects and clinical effects of statins in ischemic stroke. PMID:25977681

  20. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  1. Prevention of ischemic complications during aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Andreas; Seidel, Kathleen

    2016-03-01

    Ischemic complications during aneurysm surgery are a frequent cause of postoperative infarctions and new neurological deficits. In this article, we discuss imaging and neurophysiological tools that may help the surgeon to detect intraoperative ischemia. The strength of intraoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the full view of the arterial and venous vessel. DSA is the gold standard in complex and giant aneurysms, but due to certain disadvantages, it cannot be considered standard of care. Microvascular Doppler sonography is probably the fastest diagnostic tool and can quickly aid diagnosis of large vessel occlusions. Intraoperative indocyanine green videoangiography is the best tool to assess flow in perforating and larger arteries, as well as occlusion of the aneurysm sac. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring with somatosensory and motor evoked potentials indirectly measures blood flow by recording neuronal function. It covers all causes of intraoperative ischemia, provided that ischemia occurs in the brain areas under surveillance. However, every method has advantages and disadvantages. No single method is superior to the others in every aspect. Therefore, it is very important for the neurosurgeon to know the strengths and weaknesses of each tool in order to have them available, to know how to use them for each individual situation, and to be ready to apply them within the time window for reversible cerebral ischemia.

  2. Dynamic changes in neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following permanent ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi-Hao; He, Hong-Yun; Yang, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Peng-Yue

    2016-07-01

    The temporal dynamics of neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following stroke remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the dynamic changes in autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra to provide insight into potential therapeutic targets for stroke. An adult Sprague-Dawley rat model of permanent ischemic stroke was prepared by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra post-ischemia were evaluated by western blot assay and immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3, respectively. Levels of both LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 in the penumbra gradually increased within 5 hours post-ischemia. Thereafter, levels of both proteins declined, especially LC3-II. The cerebral infarct volume increased slowly 1-4 hours after ischemia, but subsequently increased rapidly until 5 hours after ischemia. The severity of the neurological deficit was positively correlated with infarct volume. LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 levels were high in the penumbra within 5 hours after ischemia, and after that, levels of these proteins decreased at different rates. LC3-II levels were reduced to a very low level, but cleaved caspase-3 levels remained high 72 hours after ischemia. These results indicate that there are temporal differences in the activation status of the autophagic and apoptotic pathways. This suggests that therapeutic targeting of these pathways should take into consideration their unique temporal dynamics. PMID:27630694

  3. Dynamic changes in neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following permanent ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi-hao; He, Hong-yun; Yang, Li-qiang; Zhang, Peng-yue

    2016-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following stroke remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the dynamic changes in autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra to provide insight into potential therapeutic targets for stroke. An adult Sprague-Dawley rat model of permanent ischemic stroke was prepared by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra post-ischemia were evaluated by western blot assay and immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3, respectively. Levels of both LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 in the penumbra gradually increased within 5 hours post-ischemia. Thereafter, levels of both proteins declined, especially LC3-II. The cerebral infarct volume increased slowly 1–4 hours after ischemia, but subsequently increased rapidly until 5 hours after ischemia. The severity of the neurological deficit was positively correlated with infarct volume. LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 levels were high in the penumbra within 5 hours after ischemia, and after that, levels of these proteins decreased at different rates. LC3-II levels were reduced to a very low level, but cleaved caspase-3 levels remained high 72 hours after ischemia. These results indicate that there are temporal differences in the activation status of the autophagic and apoptotic pathways. This suggests that therapeutic targeting of these pathways should take into consideration their unique temporal dynamics. PMID:27630694

  4. Myocardial neutrophil accumulation during reperfusion after reversible or ischemic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Go, L.O.; Murry, C.E.; Richard, V.J.; Weischedel, G.R.; Jennings, R.B.; Reimer, K.A. )

    1988-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) may cause additional myocyte injury during reperfusion of ischemic myocardium. The present study was done to investigate whether PMNs accumulate in myocardium during early reperfusion after reversible or irreversible ischemic injury. Open-chest anesthetized dogs underwent circumflex coronary occlusions for 12 min, 40 min, or 90 min, followed by 1 h of reperfusion. Autologous PMNs were radiolabeled with {sup 111}In and reinjected to quantitate myocardial PMN influx during reflow. {sup 125}I-labeled albumin was injected simultaneously to correct for {sup 111}In associated with plasma proteins in myocardial tissue. The number of PMNs was determined in the inner, middle, and outer one-third of nonischemic and ischemic-reperfused myocardium. In the 12-min group, 40% fewer PMNs were present in the reperfused than in the nonischemic control tissue. In contrast, in both the 40- and 90-min groups, PMN accumulation was two- to six-fold greater in the ischemic-reperfused than nonischemic myocardium, with a transmural gradient of PMN influx increasing from the outer to inner layers. Collateral blood flow, measured with radioactive microspheres, was not significantly different among the three groups. The failure of PMNs to accumulate during reperfusion after 12 min of ischemia does not support the hypothesis that PMNs contribute to postischemic dysfunction of reversibly injured myocytes. Whether PMNs cause cell death during early reperfusion after longer ischemic episodes remains unknown; however, the rapidity of PMN accumulation in the zones of predicted infarction is consistent with this possibility.

  5. Ischemic stroke associated with immune thrombocytopenia: lesion patterns and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Kyun; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Although the patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) have a very low platelet count, which usually causes hemorrhagic complications, they occasionally experience ischemic stroke. However, the mechanism underlying ITP-related ischemic stroke (ITP-IS) has not been fully clarified. We aim to elucidate the ITP-IS mechanism by analyzing the ischemic lesion patterns and clinical characteristics. We assessed consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients with ITP admitted to Seoul National University Hospital between October 2002 and October 2011. The stroke lesion pattern and clinical characteristics of ITP-IS patients were analyzed. Of the 2,185 patients with first-ever AIS, seven patients (4 women) with ITP-IS were identified. Of these seven patients, 3 (43 %) who were classified as undetermined stroke etiology indicated an embolic stroke pattern, and had no remarkable atherosclerotic risk factors, no steno-occlusive lesions in their relevant artery, and no cardioembolic etiologies or conditions causing secondary ITP. Moreover, compared with the patients without ITP, the patients with ITP were younger and had lower platelet counts. Thus, we noted that ITP is a rare cause of ischemic stroke, which primarily occurs due to the development of a thromboembolism in the brain. We believe that this paradoxical mechanism of ITP-associated thrombus formation requires further investigation.

  6. Normobaric hyperoxia-based neuroprotective therapies in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability due to disturbance of blood supply to the brain. As brain is highly sensitive to hypoxia, insufficient oxygen supply is a critical event contributing to ischemic brain injury. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO) that aims to enhance oxygen delivery to hypoxic tissues has long been considered as a logical neuroprotective therapy for ischemic stroke. To date, many possible mechanisms have been reported to elucidate NBO’s neuroprotection, such as improving tissue oxygenation, increasing cerebral blood flow, reducing oxidative stress and protecting the blood brain barrier. As ischemic stroke triggers a battery of damaging events, combining NBO with other agents or treatments that target multiple mechanisms of injury may achieve better outcome than individual treatment alone. More importantly, time loss is brain loss in acute cerebral ischemia. NBO can be a rapid therapy to attenuate or slow down the evolution of ischemic tissues towards necrosis and therefore “buy time” for reperfusion therapies. This article summarizes the current literatures on NBO as a simple, widely accessible, and potentially cost-effective therapeutic strategy for treatment of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23298701

  7. Dynamic Changes in DNA Methylation in Ischemic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Meller, Robert; Pearson, Andrea; Simon, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mediators of gene expression are hypothesized to regulate transcriptomic responses to preconditioning ischemia and ischemic tolerance. Here, we utilized a methyl-DNA enrichment protocol and sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify patterns of DNA methylation in an established model of ischemic tolerance in neuronal cultures (oxygen and glucose deprivation: OGD). We observed an overall decrease in global DNA methylation at 4 h following preconditioning ischemia (30 min OGD), harmful ischemia (120 min OGD), and in ischemic tolerant neuronal cultures (30 min OGD, 24 h recovery, 120 min OGD). We detected a smaller cohort of hypermethylated regions following ischemic conditions, which were further analyzed revealing differential chromosomal localization of methylation, and a differential concentration of methylation on genomic regions. Together, these data show that the temporal profiles of DNA methylation with respect to chromatin hyper- and hypo-methylation following various ischemic conditions are highly dynamic, and may reveal novel targets for neuroprotection. PMID:26029158

  8. Migraine prophylaxis, ischemic depolarizations and stroke outcomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yalcin, Nilufer; Yu, Esther Sori; Daneshmand, Ali; Wei, Ying; Zheng, Yi; Can, Anil; Sengul, Buse; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Ayata, Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine with aura is an established stroke risk factor, and excitatory mechanisms such as spreading depression are implicated in the pathogenesis of both migraine and stroke. Spontaneous spreading depression waves originate within the peri-infarct tissue and exacerbate the metabolic mismatch during focal cerebral ischemia. Genetically enhanced spreading depression susceptibility facilitates anoxic depolarizations and peri-infarct spreading depressions and accelerates infarct growth, suggesting that susceptibility to spreading depression is a critical determinant of vulnerability to ischemic injury. Because chronic treatment with migraine prophylactic drugs suppresses spreading depression susceptibility, we tested whether migraine prophylaxis can also suppress ischemic depolarizations and improve stroke outcome. Methods We measured the cortical susceptibility to spreading depression and ischemic depolarizations, and determined tissue and neurological outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion in wild type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 knock-in mice treated with vehicle, topiramate or lamotrigine daily for 7 weeks or as a single dose shortly before testing. Results Chronic treatment with topiramate or lamotrigine reduces the susceptibility to KCl- or electrical stimulation-induced spreading depressions as well as ischemic depolarizations in both wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice. Consequently, both tissue and neurological outcomes are improved. Notably, treatment with a single dose of either drug is ineffective. Conclusions These data underscore the importance of hyperexcitability as a mechanism for increased stroke risk in migraineurs, and suggest that migraine prophylaxis may not only prevent migraine attacks but also protect migraineurs against ischemic injury. PMID:25424478

  9. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  10. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  11. Global DNA Methylation of Ischemic Stroke Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Tárraga, Carolina; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Mola, Marina; Ois, Ángel; Rodríguez-Campello, Ana; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Carrera, Caty; Montaner, Joan; Elosua, Roberto; Roquer, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS), a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder, is among the leading causes of mortality and long-term disability in the western world. Epidemiological data provides evidence for a genetic component to the disease, but its epigenetic involvement is still largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, change over time and may be associated with aging processes and with modulation of the risk of various pathologies, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. We analyzed 2 independent cohorts of IS patients. Global DNA methylation was measured by luminometric methylation assay (LUMA) of DNA blood samples. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the methylation differences between the 3 most common IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA), small-artery disease (SAD), and cardio-aortic embolism (CE). A total of 485 IS patients from 2 independent hospital cohorts (n = 281 and n = 204) were included, distributed across 3 IS subtypes: LAA (78/281, 59/204), SAD (97/281, 53/204), and CE (106/281, 89/204). In univariate analyses, no statistical differences in LUMA levels were observed between the 3 etiologies in either cohort. Multivariate analysis, adjusted by age, sex, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habit, confirmed the lack of differences in methylation levels between the analyzed IS subtypes in both cohorts. Despite differences in pathogenesis, our results showed no global methylation differences between LAA, SAD, and CE subtypes of IS. Further work is required to establish whether the epigenetic mechanism of methylation might play a role in this complex disease. PMID:24788121

  12. Bone Fracture Exacerbates Murine Ischemic Cerebral Injury

    PubMed Central

    Degos, Vincent; Maze, Mervyn; Vacas, Susana; Hirsch, Jan; Guo, Yi; Shen, Fanxia; Jun, Kristine; van Rooijen, Nico; Gressens, Pierre; Young, William L.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone fracture increases alarmins and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood, and provokes macrophage infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the hippocampus. We recently reported that stroke is an independent risk factor after bone surgery for adverse outcome, the impact of bone fracture on stroke outcome is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that bone fracture, shortly after ischemic stroke, enhances stroke-related injuries by augmenting the neuroinflammatory response. Methods Tibia fracture (bone fracture) was induced in mice one day after permanent occlusion of the distal middle cerebral artery (stroke). High-mobility-group box chromosomal protein-1 (HMGB1) was tested to mimic the bone fracture effects. HMGB1 neutralizing antibody and clodrolip (macrophage depletion) were tested to attenuate the bone fracture effects. Neurobehavioral function (n=10), infarct volume, neuronal death, and macrophages/microglia-infiltration (n=6–7) were analyzed three days after. Results We found that mice with both stroke and bone fracture had larger infarct volumes (mean percentage of ipsilateral hemisphere±SD: 30±7% vs. 12±3%, n=6, P<0.001) more severe neurobehavioral dysfunction, and more macrophages/microglia in the peri-infarct region than mice with stroke only. Intraperitoneal injection of HMGB1 mimicked, whereas neutralizing HMGB1 attenuated, the bone fracture effects and the macrophage/microglia infiltration. Depleting macrophages with clodrolip also attenuated the aggravating effects of bone fracture on stroke lesion and behavioral dysfunction. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury via augmented inflammation through HMGB1 and macrophage/microglia infiltration. Interventions to modulate early macrophage/microglia activation could be therapeutic goals to limit the adverse consequences of bone fracture after stroke. PMID:23438676

  13. Morinda citrifolia fruit juice prevents ischemic neuronal damage through suppression of the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinichi; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Kamiya, Kohei; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Satake, Toshiko; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2010-10-01

    Fruit juice of Morinda citrifolia (Noni juice) is a well-known health drink and has various pharmacological properties including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We have hitherto found the protective effect of Noni juice on brain damage caused by ischemic stress in mice. In addition, we also recently reported that regulation of post-ischemic glucose intolerance might be important for good prognosis. Here, we focused on the effect of Noni juice on the development of the post-ischemic glucose intolerance as a cerebral protective mechanism. Noni juice was obtained from the mature fruit grown in Okinawa (about 1.5 L/4 kg of fruit; 100% ONJ). Male ddY mice were given 10% ONJ in drinking water for 7 days. Then, mice were subjected to 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Ingestion of 10% ONJ suppressed the development of neuronal damage after MCAO. Interestingly, glucose intolerance observed on the 1st day after MCAO completely disappeared after 10% ONJ administration. Furthermore, ONJ treatment significantly increased serum insulin levels much further than the control group on the 1st day, while serum adiponectin levels were not affected at all. These results suggest that ONJ could facilitate insulin secretion after ischemic stress and may attenuate the development of glucose intolerance. These mechanisms may contribute to the neuronal protective effect of ONJ against ischemic stress.

  14. The Effects of Methylene Blue on Autophagy and Apoptosis in MRI-Defined Normal Tissue, Ischemic Penumbra and Ischemic Core

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhao; Watts, Lora Talley; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Rodriguez, Pavel; Chen, Chunhua; Zhou, Changman; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) USP, which has energy-enhancing and antioxidant properties, is currently used to treat methemoglobinemia and cyanide poisoning in humans. We recently showed that MB administration reduces infarct volume and behavioral deficits in rat models of ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. This study reports the underlying molecular mechanisms of MB neuroprotection following transient ischemic stroke in rats. Rats were subjected to transient (60-mins) ischemic stroke. Multimodal MRI during the acute phase and at 24hrs were used to define three regions of interest (ROIs): i) the perfusion-diffusion mismatch salvaged by reperfusion, ii) the perfusion-diffusion mismatch not salvaged by reperfusion, and iii) the ischemic core. The tissues from these ROIs were extracted for western blot analyses of autophagic and apoptotic markers. The major findings were: 1) MB treatment reduced infarct volume and behavioral deficits, 2) MB improved cerebral blood flow to the perfusion-diffusion mismatch tissue after reperfusion and minimized harmful hyperperfusion 24hrs after stroke, 3) MB inhibited apoptosis and enhanced autophagy in the perfusion-diffusion mismatch, 4) MB inhibited apoptotic signaling cascades (p53-Bax-Bcl2-Caspase3), and 5) MB enhanced autophagic signaling cascades (p53-AMPK-TSC2-mTOR). MB induced neuroprotection, at least in part, by enhancing autophagy and reducing apoptosis in the perfusion-diffusion mismatch tissue following ischemic stroke. PMID:26121129

  15. Detection of atrial fibrillation with concurrent holter monitoring and continuous cardiac telemetry following ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Marc A; Krishnan, Kousik; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for recurrent ischemic stroke. We aimed to compare the detection rate of AF using continuous cardiac telemetry (CCT) versus Holter monitoring in hospitalized patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Between June 2007 and December 2008, 133 patients were admitted to an academic institution for ischemic stroke or TIA and underwent concurrent inpatient CCT and Holter monitoring. Rates of AF detection by CCT and Holter monitoring were compared using the McNemar paired proportion test. Among the 133 patients, 8 (6.0%) were diagnosed with new-onset AF. On average, Holter monitoring was performed for 29.8 hours, and CCT was performed for 73.6 hours. The overall rate of AF detection was higher for Holter monitoring compared with CCT (6.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-11.6 vs 0; 95% CI, 0-3.4; P = .008). Holter detection of AF was even higher in specific subgroups (those with an embolic infarct pattern, those age >65 years, and those with coronary artery disease). Holter monitoring detected AF in 6% of hospitalized ischemic stroke and TIA patients, with higher proportions in high-risk subgroups. Compared with CCT, Holter monitoring is significantly more likely to detect arrhythmias.

  16. Perioperative ischemic injury after coronary bypass graft surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hanelin, L.G.; Riggins, R.C.; Agnew, R.C.; Annest, L.S.; Anderson, R.P.

    1985-07-01

    Two hundred twelve patients who underwent isolated coronary bypass graft surgery were prospectively evaluated for perioperative ischemic injury. All patients underwent preoperative and postoperative testing with technetium 99m pyrophosphate first-pass ventriculography combined with myocardial uptake scans, 12-lead electrocardiography, and serial creatinine phosphokinase MB determination. Fifteen percent of the patients had ischemic injury with at least two test results positive, but only 4 percent had positive results of all three tests. No single test proved adequate. Enzyme levels were highly sensitive and had value as a screening test. The electrocardiogram was specific but only moderately sensitive. The single best test was the radionuclide scan with good sensitivity and no false-positive results. All three tests are required to rigorously diagnose ischemic injury.

  17. [Ischemic colitis: an uncommon manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Medina, Viviana; Bulgach, Valeria; Lagandara, Pamela; Berner, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    We present the case of an adolescent with ischemic colitis, an infrequent pathology in this age group, worsened in the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient, aged 20, was diagnosed SLE at 6. She consulted for fever, abdominal pain in the side and right iliac fossa and diarrhea lasting 48 hours. It was assumed as acute gastroenteritis but given the persistent pain, incoercible vomiting and abdominal distension she was hospitalized. The abdominal X-ray showed distended loops, abundant feces, without air-fluid levels. The ultrasound showed erosions and ulcerations, edema and bleeding in the descending colon submucosal layer. The CT scan evidenced an ischemic lesion in the right colon. Ischemic colitis is a severe condition, infrequent in young individuals. Signs, symptoms, abdominal CT scan and colonoscopy are the elements of choice for the diagnosis.

  18. [Ischemic colitis: an uncommon manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Medina, Viviana; Bulgach, Valeria; Lagandara, Pamela; Berner, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    We present the case of an adolescent with ischemic colitis, an infrequent pathology in this age group, worsened in the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient, aged 20, was diagnosed SLE at 6. She consulted for fever, abdominal pain in the side and right iliac fossa and diarrhea lasting 48 hours. It was assumed as acute gastroenteritis but given the persistent pain, incoercible vomiting and abdominal distension she was hospitalized. The abdominal X-ray showed distended loops, abundant feces, without air-fluid levels. The ultrasound showed erosions and ulcerations, edema and bleeding in the descending colon submucosal layer. The CT scan evidenced an ischemic lesion in the right colon. Ischemic colitis is a severe condition, infrequent in young individuals. Signs, symptoms, abdominal CT scan and colonoscopy are the elements of choice for the diagnosis. PMID:23568076

  19. Ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Kaiser Junior, Roberto Luiz; Ruiz, Lilian Piron; Ruiz, Milton Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease. Case report This report presents a case of a 28-year-old female patient with Crohn’s disease and sudden decrease of visual acuity in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal electroretinography confirmed the clinical features of ischemic retinopathy. After systemic corticosteroid treatment, the patient developed epiretinal membrane without significant improvement in visual acuity. Discussion The patient presented with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease with deficiency of central visual acuity. Periodic examination by a retina specialist is recommended for patients being treated for Crohn’s disease. PMID:27524921

  20. Sudden cardiac death markers in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Mauricio; Rohde, Luis Eduardo; Zimerman, André; Zimerman, Leandro Ioschpe

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is an increasingly prevalent disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. In 30-40% of patients, the etiology is non-ischemic. In this group of patients, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) prevents sudden death and decreases total mortality. However, due to burden of cost, the fact that many ICD patients will never need any therapy, and possible complications involved in implant and follow-up, the device should not be implanted in every patient with non-ischemic heart failure. There is an urgent need to adequately identify patients with highest sudden death risk, in whom the implant is most cost-effective. In the present paper, the authors discuss current available tests for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death in patients with non-ischemic heart failure. PMID:27016256

  1. Persimmon leaf flavonoid induces brain ischemic tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mingsan; Zhang, Xuexia; Wang, Linan

    2013-05-25

    The persimmon leaf has been shown to improve cerebral ischemic outcomes; however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, mice were subjected to 10 minutes of ischemic preconditioning, and persimmon leaf flavonoid was orally administered for 5 days. Results showed that the persimmon leaf flavonoid significantly improved the content of tissue type plasminogen activator and 6-keto prostaglandin-F1 α in the cerebral cortex, decreased the content of thromboxane B2, and reduced the content of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in mice. Following optical microscopy, persimmon leaf flavonoid was also shown to reduce cell swelling and nuclear hyperchromatism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. These results suggested that persimmon leaf flavonoid can effectively inhibit brain thrombosis, improve blood supply to the brain, and relieve ischemia-induced pathological damage, resulting in brain ischemic tolerance.

  2. Intermittent fasting attenuates inflammasome activity in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Santro, Tomislav; Manzanero, Silvia; Widiapradja, Alexander; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lee, Seung-Yoon; Chunduri, Prasad; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Stranahan, Alexis M; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2014-07-01

    Recent findings have revealed a novel inflammatory mechanism that contributes to tissue injury in cerebral ischemia mediated by multi-protein complexes termed inflammasomes. Intermittent fasting (IF) can decrease the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periphery and brain. Here we investigated the impact of IF (16h of food deprivation daily) for 4months on NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activities following cerebral ischemia. Ischemic stroke was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion (I/R). IF decreased the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, the expression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome proteins, and both IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain tissue. These findings demonstrate that IF can attenuate the inflammatory response and tissue damage following ischemic stroke by a mechanism involving suppression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. PMID:24805069

  3. IL1RN VNTR Polymorphism in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Bradford B.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Brown, W. Mark; Rich, Stephen S.; Arepalli, Sampath; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Duckworth, Jaime; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Meschia, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Genetic factors influence risk for ischemic stroke and likely do so at multiple steps in the pathogenic process. Variants in genes related to inflammation contribute to risk of stroke. The purpose of this study was to confirm our earlier finding of an association between allele 2 of a variable number tandem repeat of the IL-1 receptor antagonist gene (IL1RN) and cerebrovascular disease. Methods An association study of the variable number tandem repeat genotype with ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes was performed on samples from a North American study of affected sibling pairs concordant for ischemic stroke and 2 North American cohorts of prospectively ascertained ischemic stroke cases and unrelated controls. DNA analysis was performed on cases and controls, stratified by race. Results After adjustment for age, sex, and stroke risk factors, the odds ratio for association of allele 2 and ischemic stroke was 2.80 (95% confidence interval, 1.29 to 6.11; P=0.03) for the white participants. The effect of allele 2 of IL1RN on stroke risk most closely fits a recessive genetic model (P=0.009). For the smaller sample of nonwhite participants, the results were not significant. Conclusions Allele 2 of IL1RN, present in nearly one-quarter of stroke patients, may contribute to genetic risk for ischemic stroke and confirm the previously identified association with cerebrovascular disease. These results are driven by the association in the white participants. Further exploration in a larger nonwhite sample is warranted. PMID:17332449

  4. Suppression of Acid Sphingomyelinase Protects the Retina from Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Wu, Bill X.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and mediates multiple responses involved in inflammatory and apoptotic signaling. However, the role ASMase plays in ischemic retinal injury has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how reduced ASMase expression impacts retinal ischemic injury. Methods Changes in ceramide levels and ASMase activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis and ASMase activity. Retinal function and morphology were assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and morphometric analyses. Levels of TNF-α were determined by ELISA. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results In wild-type mice, ischemia produced a significant increase in retinal ASMase activity and ceramide levels. These increases were associated with functional deficits as measured by ERG analysis and significant structural degeneration in most retinal layers. In ASMase+/− mice, retinal ischemia did not significantly alter ASMase activity, and the rise in ceramide levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in retinas from wild-type mice. In ASMase+/− mice, functional and morphometric analyses of ischemic eyes revealed significantly less retinal degeneration than in injured retinas from wild-type mice. The ischemia-induced increase in retinal TNF-α levels was suppressed by the administration of the ASMase inhibitor desipramine, or by reducing ASMase expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that reducing ASMase expression provides partial protection from ischemic injury. Hence, the production of ceramide and subsequent mediators plays a role in the development of ischemic retinal injury. Modulating ASMase may present new opportunities for adjunctive therapies when treating retinal ischemic disorders. PMID:27571014

  5. [THE MECHANISMS OF ISCHEMIC MITRAL VALVE INSUFFICIENCY FORMATION].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, S A

    2015-07-01

    In clinic in the period from 2012 to 2014 in 142 patients were performed interventions on the mitral valve for coronary heart disease and ischemic mitral valve insufficiency (MVI). The majority of patients were able to work, its witness for social-economic significance of problem. The main reason of the ischemic MVI arised were the dilatation of mitral valve fibrousing and substitution of papillar muscles for left ventricle remodelling. Symmetrical deformation of mitral valve arised in most cases after anterior-septal myocardium infarction, left ventricle global remodelling and apical substitution of papillar muscles; asymmetrical ones--after posterior myocardial infarction for local left ventricle papillar muscles. PMID:26591216

  6. Ischemic preconditioning for cell-based therapy and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sarah T; Dilley, Rodney J; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2014-05-01

    Cell- and tissue-based therapies are innovative strategies to repair and regenerate injured hearts. Despite major advances achieved in optimizing these strategies in terms of cell source and delivery method, the clinical outcome of cell-based therapy remains unsatisfactory. The non-genetic approach of ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning to enhance cell- and tissue-based therapies has received much attention in recent years due to its non-invasive drug-free application. Here we discuss the current development of hypoxic/ischemic preconditioning to enhance stem cell-based cardiac repair and regeneration.

  7. Personalized approach to primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke represents a significant part of stroke management and health care. Although there are official guidelines concerning stroke management, new knowledge are introduced to them with a slight delay. This article provides an overview of current information on primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. It summarizes information especially in the field of cardioembolic stroke, the use of new anticoagulants and the management of carotid stenosis based on the results of recent clinical studies. The optimal approach in stroke management is to follow these recommendations, to know new strategies and to apply an individual personalized approach in our clinical decisions. PMID:24949113

  8. Anesthesia for Endovascular Approaches to Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Avitsian, Rafi; Machado, Sandra B

    2016-09-01

    Involvement of the Anesthesiologist in the early stages of care for acute ischemic stroke patient undergoing endovascular treatment is essential. Anesthetic management includes the anesthetic technique (general anesthesia vs sedation), a matter of much debate and an area in need of well-designed prospective studies. The large numbers of confounding factors make the design of such studies a difficult process. A universally agreed point in the endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke is the importance of decreasing the time to revascularization. Hemodynamic and ventilatory management and implementation of neuroprotective modalities and treatment of acute procedural complications are important components of the anesthetic plan. PMID:27521194

  9. Diagnostic pitfalls: posterior ischemic optic neuropathy mimicking optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Lysandropoulos, Andreas P; Carota, Antonio

    2011-02-01

    In young people, the most frequent cause of isolated monocular visual loss due to an optic neuropathy is optic neuritis. We present the case of a 27 year old woman who presented monocular visual loss, excruciating orbital pain and unusual temporal headache. The initial diagnosis of optic neuritis revealed later to be a posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). In this case, PION was the first unique presentation of a non-traumatic carotid dissection, and it was followed 24h later by an ischemic stroke. Sudden monocular visual loss associated with a new-onset headache are clinical symptoms that should immediately prompt to a carotid dissection. PMID:21056537

  10. Perfusion patterns of ischemic stroke on computed tomography perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Parsons, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) has been applied increasingly in research of ischemic stroke. However, in clinical practice, it is still a relatively new technology. For neurologists and radiologists, the challenge is to interpret CTP results properly in the context of the clinical presentation. In this article, we will illustrate common CTP patterns in acute ischemic stroke using a case-based approach. The aim is to get clinicians more familiar with the information provided by CTP with a view towards inspiring them to incorporate CTP in their routine imaging workup of acute stroke patients.

  11. New method of posterior scallop augmentation for ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masakazu; Ito, Toshiaki

    2015-03-01

    We report a new method of posterior middle scallop (P2) augmentation for ischemic mitral regurgitation to achieve deep coaptation. First, P2 was divided straight at the center and partially detached from the annulus in a reverse T shape. A narrow pentagon-shaped section of pericardium was sutured to the divided P2 and annular defect. The tip of the pentagon was attached directly to the papillary muscle, thus creating a very large P2 scallop. A standard-sized ring was placed. We adopted this technique in 2 patients with advanced ischemic cardiomyopathy, and no mitral regurgitation was observed during a 1-year follow-up. PMID:25742844

  12. Phosphoproteomic Profiling of Human Myocardial Tissues Distinguishes Ischemic from Non-Ischemic End Stage Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Linda W.; Thompson, J. Will; Soderblom, Erik J.; Feger, Bryan J.; Troupes, Constantine D.; Hershberger, Kathleen A.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Nagel, Whitney L.; Landinez, Gina P.; Shah, Kishan M.; Burns, Virginia A.; Santacruz, Lucia; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Foster, Matthew W.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Piacentino, Valentino; Bowles, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular differences between ischemic (IF) and non-ischemic (NIF) heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins) and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins) from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins) exhibited a ≥2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05) when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure. PMID:25117565

  13. Characterization of pericardial and plasma ghrelin levels in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sax, Balazs; Merkely, Béla; Túri, Katalin; Nagy, Andrea; Ahres, Abdelkrim; Hartyánszky, István; Hüttl, Tivadar; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Cseh, Károly; Kékesi, Violetta

    2013-09-10

    Ghrelin is an endocrine regulatory peptide with multiple functions including cardioprotective effects. It is produced in various tissues among others in the myocardium. Pericardial fluid has been proven to be a biologically active compartment of the heart that communicates with the myocardial interstitium. Thus, pericardial level of certain agents may reflect their concentration in the myocardium well. In our study we measured acylated (active) and total (acylated and non-acylated) pericardial and plasma ghrelin levels of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Pericardial fluid and plasma samples were obtained from patients with coronary artery disease (ISCH, n=54) or valvular heart disease (VHD, n=41) undergoing cardiac surgery. Acylated pericardial ghrelin concentrations were found to be significantly higher in patients with ischemic heart disease (ISCH vs. VHD, 32±3 vs. 16±2pg/ml, p<0.01), whereas plasma levels of the peptide showed no difference between patient groups. Pericardial-to-plasma ratio, an index abolishing systemic effects on local ghrelin level was also significantly higher in ISCH group for both acylated and total ghrelin. Plasma total ghrelin showed negative correlation to BMI, plasma insulin and insulin resistance index HOMA-A. Pericardial acylated and total ghrelin concentrations were negatively correlated with posterior wall thickness (R=-0.31, p<0.05 and R=-0.35, p<0.01, respectively). Plasma insulin concentration and HOMA-A showed significant negative correlation with pericardial ghrelin levels. In conclusion, increased pericardial active ghrelin content and higher pericardial-to-plasma ghrelin ratio were found in ischemic heart disease as compared to non-ischemic patients suggesting an increased ghrelin production of the chronically ischemic myocardium. According to our results, pericardial ghrelin content is negatively influenced by left ventricular hypertrophy and insulin resistance.

  14. Interaction of heritable and estrogen-induced thrombophilia: possible etiologies for ischemic optic neuropathy and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Glueck, C J; Fontaine, R N; Wang, P

    2001-02-01

    Our specific aim was to assess how thrombophilic exogenous estrogens interacted with heritable thrombophilias leading to non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and ischemic stroke. Coagulation measures were performed in a 74 year old patient and her immediate family. The proband had a 47 year history of 9 previous thrombotic episodes, and developed unilateral NAION 4 years after starting estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). The proband was heterozygous for two thrombophilic gene mutations (G20210A prothrombin gene, platelet glycoprotein IIIa P1A1/A2 polymorphism), and homozygous for the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. Of 238 normal controls, none had these 3 gene mutations together. The proband's mother and brother had deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The proband's brother, sister, nephew, daughter, and two granddaughters were homozygous for the C677T MTHFR mutation. The proband's brother was heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The proband's niece was heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation, homozygous for the C677T MTHFR mutation, homozygous for the hypofibrinolytic 4G polymorphism of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene, and heterozygous for the platelet glycoprotein IIIa P1A1/A2 polymorphism. Of 238 normal controls, none had the niece's combination of 4 gene mutations. When ERT-mediated thrombophilia was superimposed on the proband's heritable thrombophilias, unilateral ischemic optic neuropathy developed, her tenth thrombotic event over a 5 decade period. When estrogen-progestin oral contraceptives were given to the proband's niece, she had an ischemic stroke at age 22. Exogenous estrogen-mediated thrombophilia superimposed on heritable thrombophilia and hypofibrinolysis is associated with arterial and venous thrombi, and appears to be a preventable, and potentially reversible etiology for ischemic optic neuropathy and ischemic stroke. PMID:11246543

  15. Evolving Role of Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    del Zoppo, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The perceived advantages of endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke in terms of recanalization, the multimodal and targeted approaches, and perhaps the more permissive rules on devices than on medications for their licensing favored the assumption that endovascular treatment is superior to intravenous thrombolysis for acute treatment of ischemic stroke, and its adoption in more advanced stroke centers. However, this assumption has been questioned by recent clinical trial experience showing that endovascular treatment is not superior to intravenous thrombolysis. The new evidence has changed the perception and the importance of conducting randomized trials in this area. This summary examines the background and outcomes of the latest experience with endovascular techniques in acute stroke treatment based on historical data. The new challenge is how to study the latest generation of devices called stent retrievers, which are faster in recanalizing and easier to use, in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. In the meantime, the available evidence does not provide support for the use of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke in clinical practice. PMID:24258466

  16. Remote limb ischemic conditioning enhances motor learning in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Cherry-Allen, Kendra M; Gidday, Jeff M; Lee, Jin-Moo; Hershey, Tamara; Lang, Catherine E

    2015-06-01

    Brief bouts of sublethal ischemia have been shown to protect exposed tissue (ischemic conditioning) and tissues at remote sites (remote ischemic conditioning) against subsequent ischemic challenges. Given that the mechanisms of this protective phenomenon are multifactorial and epigenetic, we postulated that remote limb ischemic conditioning (RLIC) might enhance mechanisms responsible for neural plasticity, and thereby facilitate learning. Specifically, we hypothesized that conditioning of the nervous system with RLIC, achieved through brief repetitive limb ischemia prior to training, would facilitate the neurophysiological processes of learning, thus making training more effective and more long-lasting. Eighteen healthy adults participated in this study; nine were randomly allocated to RLIC and nine to sham conditioning. All subjects underwent seven consecutive weekday sessions and 2-wk and 4-wk follow-up sessions. We found that RLIC resulted in significantly greater motor learning and longer retention of motor performance gains in healthy adults. Changes in motor performance do not appear to be due to a generalized increase in muscle activation or muscle strength and were not associated with changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration. Of note, RLIC did not enhance cognitive learning on a hippocampus-dependent task. While future research is needed to establish optimal conditioning and training parameters, this inexpensive, clinically feasible paradigm might ultimately be implemented to enhance motor learning in individuals undergoing neuromuscular rehabilitation for brain injury and other pathological conditions. PMID:25867743

  17. [Myocardial serotonin metabolism after local ischemia and ischemic precondition].

    PubMed

    Naumenko, S E; Latysheva, T V; Gilinskiĭ, M A

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effect of ischemic preconditioning upon myocardial serotonin and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) dynamic in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. 28 male Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane were randomly divided into 2 groups. In the control group (n = 13) rats were subjected to 30 min coronary occlusion and subsequent 120 min reperfusion. In the ex- perimental group (n = 15) ischemic preconditioning (3 x 3 min ischemia + 3 x 3 min reperfusion) before prolonged ischemia was used. Myocardial interstitial serotonin and 5-HIAA were measured using a microdialysis technique. Myocardial serotonin and 5-HIAA significantly increased af- ter ischemic preconditioning (p = 0.00298; p = 0.00187). In prolonged ischemia interstitial serotonin level was lower in the experimental group vs. control up to 20 min of ischemia (p < 0.05). We conclude that ischemic preconditioning increases interstitial myocardial serotonin, but inhibit serotonin increase in subsequent prolonged myocardial ischemia. After 20 minutes of reperfusion the lack of correlation between serotonin and 5-HIAA levels appeared which may be the evidence of serotonin uptake activation.

  18. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Hypoxic/Ischemic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengbao; Shi, Jian; Shi, Qianqian; Xu, Xianlin; Xia, Ying; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia/ischemia is a pathological feature of many human disorders including stroke, myocardial infarction, hypoxic/ischemic nephropathy, as well as cancer. In the kidney, the combination of limited oxygen supply to the tissues and high oxygen demand is considered the main reason for the susceptibility of the kidney to hypoxic/ischemic injury. In recent years, increasing evidence has indicated that a reduction in renal oxygen tension/blood supply plays an important role in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and renal tumorigenesis. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms, whereby hypoxia alters cellular behaviors, remain poorly understood. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key signal-transducing enzymes activated by a wide range of extracellular stimuli, including hypoxia/ischemia. There are four major family members of MAPKs: the extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2), the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), p38 MAPKs, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5/BMK1). Recent studies, including ours, suggest that these MAPKs are differentially involved in renal responses to hypoxic/ischemic stress. This review will discuss their changes in hypoxic/ischemic pathophysiology with acute kidney injury, chronic kidney diseases and renal carcinoma. PMID:27544204

  19. [Two cases of cryptococcal meningitis revealed by an ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Kouame-Assouan, A E; Cowppli-Bony, P; Aka-Anghui Diarra, E; Assi, B; Doumbia, M; Diallo, L; Adjien, K C; Akani, E; Sonan, T; Diagana, M; Boa, Y E; Kouassi, B

    2007-02-01

    The usual clinical expression of neuromeningeal cryptococcosis is a meningoencephalitis. We report two cases of neurocryptococcosis which have been revealed by an unusual clinical aspect: an ischemic stroke with a vasculitis mechanism. The two patients had a positive reaction for the HIV and we discussed the responsibility of the HIV or the Cryptococcus in the occurrence of the cerebral infarct.

  20. Risk factors and outcomes of childhood ischemic stroke in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying-Ying; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Chou, Min-Liang; Hung, Po-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Ying; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Wong, Alex Mun-Ching

    2008-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we reviewed the charts and collected clinical and radiographic data on children (age range, 1 month to 18 years) with symptoms and radiographic confirmation of ischemic stroke for the period of January 1996 to July 2006. Ninety-four children were enrolled. Eighty-eight had arterial ischemic stroke and six had sinovenous thrombosis. Twenty-nine percent of the children had seizures. Twenty-six percent had diffuse neurological signs and 76% had focal neurological signs. Risk factors included vascular disease (33%), infection (27%), metabolic disorders (18%), trauma (11%), prothrombotic states (13%), cardiac disease (10%), and mitochondrial disease (6%). Ten percent (n=9) had no identifiable cause. Twenty-two percent of the children had more than one risk factor. Anterior territory (70%) was more involved than posterior territory (18%) in arterial ischemic stroke. Unilateral infarctions were more common on the left side (51%) than on the right (24.5%). Neurological deficits were present in 45% (n=34/75) of the children; the most frequent deficit was motor impairment (24%). Seven children (9%) died in the acute stage. There were 12 children (16%) who had recurrent stroke and 8 children (8/12) who had underlying vascular disease. The vascular disease included moyamoya disease (5), CNS lupus (1) and ill-defined vasculopathy (2). The etiology pattern in Taiwan was different from that in Western countries. Vascular disease was a significant risk factor for recurrence in childhood ischemic stroke. PMID:17573220

  1. Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Max; Sanelli, Pina C.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bello, Jacqueline A.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Hetts, Steven W.; Johnson, Michele H.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Rowley, Howard A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Meltzer, Carolyn C.

    2014-01-01

    In the article entitled “Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients: A Joint Statement by the American Society of Neuroradiology, the American College of Radiology and the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery”, we are proposing a simple, pragmatic approach that will allow the reader to develop an optimal imaging algorithm for stroke patients at their institution. PMID:23948676

  2. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Damani A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  3. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  4. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase Polymorphisms in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason J.; Stanfill, Ansley; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains the fifth leading cause of mortality in the United States with an annual rate of over 128,000 deaths per year. Differences in incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcome have long been noted when comparing ischemic stroke among different ethnicities. The observation that racial disparities exist in clinical outcomes after stroke has resulted in genetic studies focusing on specific polymorphisms. Some studies have focused on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are a ubiquitous group of proteins with extensive roles that include extracellular matrix remodeling and blood-brain barrier disruption. MMPs play an important role in ischemic stroke pathophysiology and clinical outcome. This review will evaluate the evidence for associations between polymorphisms in MMP-1, 2, 3, 9, and 12 with ischemic stroke incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical outcome. The role of polymorphisms in MMP genes may influence the presentation of ischemic stroke and be influenced by racial and ethnic background. However, contradictory evidence for the role of MMP polymorphisms does exist in the literature, and further studies will be necessary to consolidate our understanding of these multi-faceted proteins. PMID:27529234

  5. Medications Used in the Treatment of Ischemic Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on medications used in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  6. [Ischemic colitis after renal transplantation:etiology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Alperovich, G; Idiarte, L; Besasso, O; Avagnina, A

    2003-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is a well-recognized complication occurring in renal transplant recipients. It has often been associated with cytomegalovirus (CMV) vasculitis. However, the diagnosis of this pathology in the absence of CMV suggests that other etiological factors might be involved. Drugs inducing mesenteric vasoconstriction, such as non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclosporine could be related to this entity.

  7. Brainstem ischemic stroke after to Bothrops atrox snakebite.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Carlos A

    2016-09-15

    We report case of a 48 years old woman bitten on her right foot by a Bothrops atrox viper. As a result, she developed a severe coagulopathy which improved with application of polyvalent antivenom. Four days after bite she suffered a devastating brainstem ischemic stroke. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:27527269

  8. Heat shock proteins, end effectors of myocardium ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed Central

    Guisasola, María Concepcion; Desco, Maria del Mar; Gonzalez, Fernanda Silvana; Asensio, Fernando; Dulin, Elena; Suarez, Antonio; Garcia Barreno, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) whether ischemia-reperfusion increased the content of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) transcripts and (2) whether myocardial content of Hsp72 is increased by ischemic preconditioning so that they can be considered as end effectors of preconditioning. Twelve male minipigs (8 protocol, 4 sham) were used, with the following ischemic preconditioning protocol: 3 ischemia and reperfusion 5-minute alternative cycles and last reperfusion cycle of 3 hours. Initial and final transmural biopsies (both in healthy and ischemic areas) were taken in all animals. Heat shock protein 72 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression was measured by a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method using complementary DNA normalized against the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. The identification of heat shock protein 72 was performed by immunoblot. In our “classic” preconditioning model, we found no changes in mRNA hsp72 levels or heat shock protein 72 content in the myocardium after 3 hours of reperfusion. Our experimental model is valid and the experimental techniques are appropriate, but the induction of heat shock proteins 72 as end effectors of cardioprotection in ischemic preconditioning does not occur in the first hours after ischemia, but probably at least 24 hours after it, in the so-called “second protection window.” PMID:17009598

  9. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase Polymorphisms in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason J; Stanfill, Ansley; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains the fifth leading cause of mortality in the United States with an annual rate of over 128,000 deaths per year. Differences in incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcome have long been noted when comparing ischemic stroke among different ethnicities. The observation that racial disparities exist in clinical outcomes after stroke has resulted in genetic studies focusing on specific polymorphisms. Some studies have focused on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are a ubiquitous group of proteins with extensive roles that include extracellular matrix remodeling and blood-brain barrier disruption. MMPs play an important role in ischemic stroke pathophysiology and clinical outcome. This review will evaluate the evidence for associations between polymorphisms in MMP-1, 2, 3, 9, and 12 with ischemic stroke incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical outcome. The role of polymorphisms in MMP genes may influence the presentation of ischemic stroke and be influenced by racial and ethnic background. However, contradictory evidence for the role of MMP polymorphisms does exist in the literature, and further studies will be necessary to consolidate our understanding of these multi-faceted proteins. PMID:27529234

  10. Automated core-penumbra quantification in neonatal ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Nirmalya; Yuan, Xiangpeng; Turenius, Christine I; Tone, Beatriz; Ambadipudi, Kamalakar; Snyder, Evan Y; Obenaus, Andre; Ashwal, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HII) and arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) result in irreversibly injured (core) and salvageable (penumbral) tissue regions. Identification and reliable quantification of salvageable tissue is pivotal to any effective and safe intervention. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the current standard to distinguish core from penumbra using diffusion-perfusion mismatch (DPM). However, subtle MR signal variations between core-penumbral regions make their visual delineation difficult. We hypothesized that computational analysis of MRI data provides a more accurate assessment of core and penumbral tissue evolution in HII/AIS. We used two neonatal rat-pup models of HII/AIS (unilateral and global hypoxic-ischemia) and clinical data sets from neonates with AIS to test our noninvasive, automated computational approach, Hierarchical Region Splitting (HRS), to detect and quantify ischemic core-penumbra using only a single MRI modality (T2- or diffusion-weighted imaging, T2WI/DWI). We also validated our approach by comparing core-penumbral images (from HRS) to DPM with immunohistochemical validation of HII tissues. Our translational and clinical data results showed that HRS could accurately and reliably distinguish the ischemic core from penumbra and their spatiotemporal evolution, which may aid in the vetting and execution of effective therapeutic interventions as well as patient selection.

  11. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.

  12. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Damani A; Carroll, Karen C; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  13. Advances in the Treatment of Ischemic Diseases by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujing; Wang, Xianyun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong; Li, Quanhai

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic diseases are a group of diseases, including ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), and diabetic foot as well as other diseases which are becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to treat a variety of ischemic diseases in animal models and clinical trials. Lots of recent publications demonstrated that MSCs therapy was safe and relieved symptoms in patients of ischemic disease. However, many factors could influence therapeutic efficacy including route of delivery, MSCs' survival and residential rate in vivo, timing of transplantation, particular microenvironment, and patient's clinical condition. In this review, the current status, therapeutic potential, and the detailed factors of MSCs-based therapeutics for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ICM, and diabetic foot are presented and discussed. We think that MSCs transplantation would constitute an ideal option for patients with ischemic diseases. PMID:27293445

  14. Advances in the Treatment of Ischemic Diseases by Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujing; Wang, Xianyun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong; Li, Quanhai

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic diseases are a group of diseases, including ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), and diabetic foot as well as other diseases which are becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to treat a variety of ischemic diseases in animal models and clinical trials. Lots of recent publications demonstrated that MSCs therapy was safe and relieved symptoms in patients of ischemic disease. However, many factors could influence therapeutic efficacy including route of delivery, MSCs' survival and residential rate in vivo, timing of transplantation, particular microenvironment, and patient's clinical condition. In this review, the current status, therapeutic potential, and the detailed factors of MSCs-based therapeutics for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ICM, and diabetic foot are presented and discussed. We think that MSCs transplantation would constitute an ideal option for patients with ischemic diseases. PMID:27293445

  15. Protective effect of ischemic postconditioning against ischemia reperfusion-induced myocardium oxidative injury in IR rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Ma, Jiangwei; Liu, Huajin

    2012-03-27

    Brief episodes of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) employed during reperfusion after a prolonged ischemic insult may attenuate the total ischemia-reperfusion injury. This phenomenon has been termed ischemic postconditioning. In the present study, we studied the possible effect of ischemic postconditioning on an ischemic reperfusion (IR)-induced myocardium oxidative injury in rat model. Results showed that ischemic postconditioning could improve arrhythmia cordis, reduce myocardium infarction and serum creatin kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate transaminase (AST) activities in IR rats. In addition, ischemic postconditioning could still decrease myocardium malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and increased myocardium Na+-K+-ATPase, Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities. It can be concluded that ischemic postconditioning possesses strong protective effects against ischemia reperfusion-induced myocardium oxidative injury in IR rats.

  16. Advances in the Treatment of Ischemic Diseases by Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujing; Wang, Xianyun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong; Li, Quanhai

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic diseases are a group of diseases, including ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), and diabetic foot as well as other diseases which are becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to treat a variety of ischemic diseases in animal models and clinical trials. Lots of recent publications demonstrated that MSCs therapy was safe and relieved symptoms in patients of ischemic disease. However, many factors could influence therapeutic efficacy including route of delivery, MSCs' survival and residential rate in vivo, timing of transplantation, particular microenvironment, and patient's clinical condition. In this review, the current status, therapeutic potential, and the detailed factors of MSCs-based therapeutics for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ICM, and diabetic foot are presented and discussed. We think that MSCs transplantation would constitute an ideal option for patients with ischemic diseases.

  17. Etiologic Ischemic Stroke Phenotypes in the NINDS Stroke Genetics Network

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Robert D.; Chapman, Sherita N.; Cole, John W.; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P.; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Labovitz, Daniel L.; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S.; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose NINDS Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of etiologic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. Methods Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major etiologic groups without weighting towards the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16,954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded re-adjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. Results The distribution of etiologic categories varied by study, age, sex, and race (p<0.001 for each). Overall, only 40% to 54% of cases with a given major ischemic stroke etiology (phenotypic subtype) were classified into the same final causative category with high confidence. There was good agreement for both causative (kappa 0.72, 95%CI:0.69-0.75) and phenotypic classifications (kappa 0.73, 95%CI:0.70-0.75). Conclusions This study demonstrates that etiologic subtypes can be determined with good reliability in studies that include investigators with different expertise and background, institutions with different stroke evaluation protocols and geographic location, and patient populations with different epidemiological characteristics. The discordance between phenotypic and causative stroke subtypes highlights the fact that the presence of an abnormality in a stroke patient does not necessarily mean that it is the cause of stroke. PMID:25378430

  18. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    White, Laura E; Santora, Rachel J; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A; Hassoun, Heitham T

    2012-09-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1-/- mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets.

  19. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35-54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55-64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  20. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura E.; Santora, Rachel J.; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1−/− mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets. PMID:22728466

  1. Pharmacologic inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome preserves cardiac function after ischemic and non-ischemic injury in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Carlo; Toldo, Stefano; Chojnacki, Jeremy; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Liu, Kai; Salloum, Fadi N.; Nordio, Andrea; Carbone, Salvatore; Mauro, Adolfo Gabriele; Das, Anindita; Zalavadia, Ankit A.; Halquist, Matthew S.; Federici, Massimo; Van Tassell, Benjamin W.; Zhang, Shijun; Abbate, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Sterile inflammation resulting from myocardial injury activates the NLRP3 inflammasome and amplifies the inflammatory response mediating further damage. Methods We used two experimental models of ischemic injury (acute myocardial infarction [AMI] with and without reperfusion) and a model of non-ischemic injury due to doxorubicin 10 mg/Kg, to determine whether the NLRP3 inflammasome preserved cardiac function after injury. Results Treatment with the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor in the reperfused AMI model caused a significant reduction in infarct size measured at pathology or as serum cardiac troponin I level (−56% and −82% respectively, both p<0.001), and preserved LV fractional shortening (LVFS, 31±2 vs vehicle 26±1%, p=0.003). In the non-reperfused AMI model treatment with the NLRP3 inhibitor significantly limited LV systolic dysfunction at 7 days (LVFS of 20±2 vs 14±1%, p=0.002), without a significant effect on infarct size. In the DOX model, a significant increase in myocardial interstitial fibrosis and a decline in systolic function were seen in vehicle-treated mice, whereas treatment with the NLRP3 inhibitor significantly reduced fibrosis (−80%, p=0.001) and preserved systolic function (LVFS 35±2 vs vehicle 27±2%, p=0.017). Conclusion Pharmacological inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome limits cell death and LV systolic dysfunction following ischemic and non-ischemic injury in the mouse. PMID:25915511

  2. Myocardial ischemic conditioning: Physiological aspects and clinical applications in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bousselmi, Radhouane; Lebbi, Mohamed Anis; Ferjani, Mustapha

    2014-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion is a major determinant of myocardial impairment in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The main goal of research in cardioprotection is to develop effective techniques to avoid ischemia-reperfusion lesions. Myocardial ischemic conditioning is a powerful endogenous cardioprotective phenomenon. First described in animals in 1986, myocardial ischemic conditioning consists of applying increased tolerance of the myocardium to sustained ischemia by exposing it to brief episodes of ischemia-reperfusion. Several studies have sought to demonstrate its effective cardioprotective action in humans and to understand its underlying mechanisms. Myocardial ischemic conditioning has two forms: ischemic preconditioning (IPC) when the conditioning stimulus is applied before the index ischemia and ischemic postconditioning when the conditioning stimulus is applied after it. The cardioprotective action of ischemic conditioning was reproduced by applying the ischemia-reperfusion stimulus to organs remote from the heart. This non-invasive manner of applying ischemic conditioning has led to its application in clinical settings. Clinical trials for the different forms of ischemic conditioning were mainly developed in cardiac surgery. Many studies suggest that this phenomenon can represent an interesting adjuvant to classical cardioprotection during on-pump cardiac surgery. Ischemic conditioning was also tested in interventional cardiology with interesting results. Finally, advances made in the understanding of mechanisms that underlie the cardioprotective action of ischemic conditioning have paved the way to a new form of myocardial conditioning which is pharmacological conditioning.

  3. Remote ischemic preconditioning improves post resuscitation cerebral function via overexpressing neuroglobin after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ran; Yu, Tao; Lin, Jia-Li; Ren, Guang-Dong; Li, Yi; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Huang, Zi-Tong; Jiang, Chong-Hui

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on post resuscitation cerebral function in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The animals were randomized into six groups: 1) sham operation, 2) lateral ventricle injection and sham operation, 3) cardiac arrest induced by ventricular fibrillation, 4) lateral ventricle injection and cardiac arrest, 5) remote ischemic preconditioning initiated 90min before induction of ventricular fibrillation, and 6) lateral ventricle injection and remote ischemic preconditioning before cardiac arrest. Reagent of Lateral ventricle injection is neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which initiated 24h before sham operation, cardiac arrest or remote ischemic preconditioning. Remote ischemic preconditioning was induced by four cycles of 5min of limb ischemia, followed by 5min of reperfusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by current and lasted for 6min. Defibrillation was attempted after 6min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The animals were then monitored for 2h and observed for an additionally maximum 70h. Post resuscitation cerebral function was evaluated by neurologic deficit score at 72h after return of spontaneous circulation. Results showed that remote ischemic preconditioning increased neurologic deficit scores. To investigate the neuroprotective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning, we observed neuronal injury at 48 and 72h after return of spontaneous circulation and found that remote ischemic preconditioning significantly decreased the occurrence of neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. To further comprehend mechanism of neuroprotection induced by remote ischemic preconditioning, we found expression of neuroglobin at 24h after return of spontaneous circulation was enhanced. Furthermore, administration of neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides before induction of remote ischemic preconditioning showed that the level of neuroglobin was decreased then partly abrogated

  4. Evaluation of ischemic heart disease and viability by cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Mona

    2014-01-01

    In ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI, besides being the gold standard for evaluation of quantitative ventricular function, enables evaluation of myocardial wall thickness, T2-weighted imaging for myocardial edema and infarct quantification and transmurality. Delayed hyperenhancement sequences are highly predictive of scar formation, being associated with myocyte necrosis. The extent and transmurality of delayed hyperenhancement has prognostic implications and is inversely proportional to the degree of functional recovery after acute myocardial infarction. A greater transmural extent of infarction (eg, hyperenhancement involving >50% of the wall thickness) can predict regions that are less likely to improve in function after therapy. The ultimate focus of MRI in ischemic heart disease is in diagnosis, quantification of myocardium at risk, salvageable myocardium, perfusion defects and differentiation of viable myocardium from non viable myocardium to enable prognostication.

  5. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): A Progress Report

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Kissela, Brett M.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Beck, Jeanne; Skarp, Alexa N.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genetic factors are associated with ischemic stroke, including multiple recent reports of association with the gene PDE4D, encoding phosphodiesterase 4D, on chromosome 5q12. Genetic studies of stroke are important but can be logistically difficult to perform. This article reviews the design of the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) and discusses problems in performing a sibling-based pedigree study where proband-initiated consent is used to enroll pedigree members. Proband-initiated enrollment optimizes privacy protections for family members, but it is associated with a substantial pedigree non-completion rate such that 3 to 4 probands must be identified to obtain one completed sibling pedigree. This report updates the progress of enrollment in the SWISS protocol, discusses barriers to pedigree completion and describes innovative approaches used by the SWISS investigators to enhance enrollment. PMID:16595789

  6. Trypanosomiasis, cardiomyopathy and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2010-05-01

    American (Chagas disease) and African (sleeping sickness) trypanosomiasis are neglected tropical diseases and are a heavy burden in Latin America and Africa, respectively. Chagas disease is an independent risk factor for stroke. Apical aneurysm, heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias are associated with ischemic stroke in chagasic cardiomyopathy. Not all chagasic patients who suffer an ischemic stroke have a severe cardiomyopathy, and stroke may be the first manifestation of Chagas disease. Cardioembolism affecting the middle cerebral artery is the most common stroke subtype. Risk of recurrence is high and careful evaluation of recurrence risk should be addressed. Repolarization changes, low voltage and prolonged QT interval are common electrocardiography alterations in human African trypanosomiasis, and can be found in more than 70% of patients. Epidemiological studies are needed to asses the risk of stroke in African trypanosomiasis perimyocarditis.

  7. Melatonin and Ischemic Stroke: Mechanistic Roles and Action

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Syed Suhail; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological disabilities and brain's vulnerability towards it proves to be fatal and socio-economic loss of millions of people worldwide. Ischemic stroke remains at the center stage of it, because of its prevalence amongst the several other types attacking the brain. The various cascades of events that have been associated with stroke involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, upregulation of Ca2+ level, and so forth. Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by pineal and extra pineal tissues responsible for various physiological processes like sleep and mood behaviour. Melatonin has been implicated in various neurological diseases because of its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. We have previously reviewed the neuroprotective effect of melatonin in various models of brain injury like traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In this review, we have put together the various causes and consequence of stroke and protective role of melatonin in ischemic stroke. PMID:26435711

  8. Interactions between Age, Sex, and Hormones in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fudong; McCullough, Louise D.

    2012-01-01

    Age, sex, and gonadal hormones have profound effects on ischemic stroke outcomes, although how these factors impact basic stroke pathophysiology remains unclear. There is a plethora of inconsistent data reported throughout the literature, primarily due to differences in the species examined, the timing and methods used to evaluate injury, the models used, and confusion regarding differences in stroke incidence as seen in clinical populations versus effects on acute neuroprotection or neurorepair in experimental stroke models. Sex and gonadal hormone exposure have considerable independent impact on stroke outcome, but these factors also interact with each other, and the contribution of each differs throughout the lifespan. The contribution of sex and hormones to experimental stroke will be the focus of this review. Recent advances and our current understanding of age, sex, and hormone interactions in ischemic stroke with a focus on inflammation will be discussed. PMID:23068990

  9. Ischemic infarction in 25 children with tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Leiguarda, R; Berthier, M; Starkstein, S; Nogués, M; Lylyk, P

    1988-02-01

    Twenty-five cases (38%) of ischemic infarction occurred among 65 cases of tuberculous meningitis in patients less than 14 years of age. The male:female ratio was 1.3:1. The most frequent clinical findings were meningeal signs, fever, alteration of consciousness, cranial nerve involvement, seizures, and focal neurologic deficit. Twenty-three patients had anterior circulation infarcts, and two more had infarcts in the vertebrobasilar territories. Distribution of infarcts in the anterior circulation was shown by computed tomography in the territories of the following arteries: lenticulostriate, 10 cases unilateral and 6 bilateral; middle cerebral, 3 cases; internal carotid, 1 case; multiple areas, 3 cases. Of the 25 ischemic infarction cases, 23 (92%) had hydrocephalus, 19 (76%) basal exudates, and 2 (8%) tuberculomas. Outcome was poor since no patient with infarction recovered completely. Six died and bilateral subcortical infarcts led to a considerably higher mortality than unilateral ones, whether cortical or subcortical.

  10. Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Gonzales, Ernie; Soetikno, Brian; Gong, Enhao; Yan, Ping; Maslov, Konstantin; Lee, Jin-Moo; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    A major obstacle in understanding the mechanism of ischemic stroke is the lack of a tool to noninvasively or minimally invasively monitor cerebral hemodynamics longitudinally. Here, we applied optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) to longitudinally study ischemic stroke induced brain injury in a mouse model with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). OR-PAM showed that, during MCAO, the average hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) values of feeder arteries and draining veins within the stroke core region dropped ~10% and ~34%, respectively. After reperfusion, arterial sO2 recovered back to the baseline; however, the venous sO2 increased above the baseline value by ~7%. Thereafter, venous sO2 values were close to the arterial sO2 values, suggesting eventual brain tissue infarction.

  11. [Cardiac resynchronization therapy in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Weretka, S; Rüb, N; Weig, H J; Laszlo, R; Dörnberger, V; Gawaz, M; Schreieck, J

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy is recommended in patients with advanced heart failure (usually NYHA class III or IV) despite optimal pharmacologic therapy, severe systolic dysfunction (eg, left ventricular ejection fraction < 35 percent) and intraventricular conduction delay or echocardiographic indices of dyssynchrony and wide QRS complex (eg, QRS > or = 120 ms). Viral infection is the most common cause of myocarditis and has been implicated in the development of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. We report on a patient who developed progressive congestive heart failure caused by non-ischemic cardiomyopathy after liver transplantation and reactivation of the underlying hepatitis C. Due to an insufficient response to optimized pharmacological therapy, the patient was successfully treated using cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  12. Investigation of Reperfusion Injury and Ischemic Preconditioning in Microsurgry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is inevitable in many vascular and musculoskeletal traumas, diseases, free tissue transfers, and during time-consuming reconstructive surgeries in the extremities. Salvage of a prolonged ischemic extremity or flap still remains a challenge for the microvascular surgeon. One of the common complications after microsurgery is I/R-induced tissue death or I/R injury. Twenty years after the discovery, ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has emerged as a powerful method for attenuating I/R injury in a variety of organs or tissues. However, its therapeutic expectations still need to be fulfilled. In this article, the author reviews some important experimental evidences of I/R injury as well as preconditioning-induced protection in the fields relevant to microsurgery. PMID:18946882

  13. Oxaloacetate: a novel neuroprotective for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Sobrino, Tomás; Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Castillo, José

    2012-02-01

    It is well established that glutamate acts as an important mediator of neuronal degeneration during cerebral ischemia. Different kind of glutamate antagonists have been used to reduce the deleterious effects of glutamate. However, their preclinical success failed to translate into practical treatments. Far from the classical use of glutamate antagonists employed so far, the systemic administration of oxaloacetate represents a novel neuroprotective strategy to minimize the deleterious effect of glutamate in the brain tissue after ischemic stroke. The neuroprotective effect of oxaloacetate is based on the capacity of this molecule to reduce the brain and blood glutamate levels as a result of the activation of the blood-resident enzyme glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase. Here we review the recent experimental and clinical results where it is demonstrated the potential applicability of oxaloacetate as a novel and powerful neuroprotective treatment against ischemic stroke.

  14. Antisense oligonucleotide for tissue factor inhibits hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kadotani, Yayoi; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Akioka, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Masahiko; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Yoshimura, Rikio; Yoshimura, Norio

    2002-09-27

    Tissue factor (TF) is an initiation factor for blood coagulation and its expression is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory or immune responses. We designed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-1/TF) for rat TF and studied its effect on hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury. AS-1/TF was delivered intravenously to Lewis rats. After 10 h, hepatic artery and portal vein were partially clamped. Livers were reperfused after 180 min and harvested. TF expression was studied using immunohistochemical staining. One of 10 rats survived in a 5-day survival rate and TF was strongly stained on endothelial cells in non-treatment group. However, by treatment with AS-1/TF, six of seven survived and TF staining was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we observed that fluorescein-labeled AS-1/TF was absorbed into endothelial cells. These results suggest that AS-1/TF can strongly suppress the expression of TF and thereby inhibit ischemic reperfusion injury to the rat liver. PMID:12270110

  15. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peilang; Pei, Qing; Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8 weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds.

  16. Single coronary artery anomaly causing ischemic mitral insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ay, Yasin; Aydın, Cemalettin; Ay, Nuray Kahraman; Inan, Bekir; Başel, Halil; Zeybek, Rahmi

    2014-05-01

    Single coronary artery anomaly is rarely seen, and although it can present with sudden death, chest pain, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, or congestive heart failure, it can also be asymptomatic. We describe the case of a 58-year-old man with single coronary artery anomaly in whom the coronary artery stemmed from the left coronary sinus and caused ischemic mitral insufficiency due to left anterior descending artery stenosis. He underwent successful mitral valve repair and coronary bypass. PMID:24771737

  17. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    PubMed

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities.

  18. "Cat scratch colon" in a patient with ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Eui Ju; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Tae Hee; Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Eui Bae; Jeon, Seong Ran; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jin-Oh

    2015-03-01

    "Cat scratch colon" is a gross finding characterized by hemorrhagic mucosal scratches on colonoscopy. It is usually associated with a normal colon and is rarely associated with collagenous colitis. In a previous report, cat scratch colon was noted in the cecum and ascending colon, but has also been observed in the distal transverse colon. The patient in this study was also diagnosed with ischemic colitis that may have played a role in the development of cat scratch colon.

  19. Use of Antithrombotic Medications among Elderly Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lichtman, Judith H.; Naert, Lisa; Allen, Norrina B.; Watanabe, Emi; Jones, Sara B.; Barry, Lisa C.; Bravata, Dawn M.; Goldstein, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of antithrombotic medications after ischemic stroke is recommended for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis and secondary stroke prevention. We assessed the rate of receipt of these therapies among eligible ischemic stroke patients aged ≥65 years and determined the effects of age and other patient characteristics on treatment. Methods and Results The analysis included Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries discharged with ischemic stroke (ICD-9 433, 434, 436) randomly selected for inclusion in the Medicare Health Care Quality Improvement Program’s National Stroke Project 1998–1999, 2000–2001. Patients discharged from non-acute facilities, transferred, or terminally ill were excluded. Receipt of in-hospital pharmacological DVT prophylaxis, antiplatelet medication, anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation, and antithrombotic medications at discharge were assessed in eligible patients, stratified by age (65–74, 75–84, 85+ yrs). Descriptive models identified characteristics associated with treatment. Among 31,554 patients, 14.9% of those eligible received pharmacologic DVT prophylaxis, 83.9% antiplatelet drugs, 82.8% anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation, and 74.2% were discharged on an antithrombotic medication. Rates of treatment decreased with age, and were lowest for patients aged 85 years or older. Admission from a skilled nursing facility and functional dependence were associated with lower treatment rates. Conclusions There was substantial underuse of antithrombotic therapies among elderly ischemic stroke patients, particularly among the very elderly, those admitted from skilled nursing facilities, and patients with functional dependence. The reasons for low use of antithrombotic therapies, including the apparent underuse of DVT prophylaxis in otherwise eligible patients, require further investigation. PMID:21098780

  20. Angiogenesis-regulating microRNAs and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ke-Jie; Hamblin, Milton; Chen, Y Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Ischemic stroke is the dominant subtype of stroke and results from focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of major cerebral arteries. Thus, the restoration or improvement of reduced regional cerebral blood supply in a timely manner is very critical for improving stroke outcomes and poststroke functional recovery. The recovery from ischemic stroke largely relies on appropriate restoration of blood flow via angiogenesis. Newly formed vessels would allow increased cerebral blood flow, thus increasing the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to affected brain tissue. Angiogenesis is strictly controlled by many key angiogenic factors in the central nervous system, and these molecules have been well-documented to play an important role in the development of angiogenesis in response to various pathological conditions. Promoting angiogenesis via various approaches that target angiogenic factors appears to be a useful treatment for experimental ischemic stroke. Most recently, microRNAs (miRs) have been identified as negative regulators of gene expression in a post-transcriptional manner. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that miRs are essential determinants of vascular endothelial cell biology/angiogenesis as well as contributors to stroke pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the knowledge of stroke-associated angiogenic modulators, as well as the role and molecular mechanisms of stroke-associated miRs with a focus on angiogenesis-regulating miRs. Moreover, we further discuss their potential impact on miR-based therapeutics in stroke through targeting and enhancing post-ischemic angiogenesis.

  1. Cytoprotective-selective activated protein C therapy for ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mosnier, Laurent O.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.; Griffin, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite years of research and efforts to translate stroke research to clinical therapy, ischemic stroke remains a major cause of death, disability, and diminished quality of life. Primary and secondary preventive measures combined with improved quality of care have made significant progress. However, no novel drug for ischemic stroke therapy has been approved in the past decade. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of activated protein C (APC) in rodent stroke models. In addition to its natural anticoagulant functions, APC conveys multiple direct cytoprotective effects on many different cell types that involve multiple receptors including protease activated receptor (PAR) 1, PAR3, and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR). Application of molecular engineered APC variants with altered selectivity profiles to rodent stroke models demonstrated that the beneficial effects of APC primarily require its cytoprotective activities but not its anticoagulant activities. Extensive basic, preclinical, and clinical research provided a compelling rationale based on strong evidence for translation of APC therapy that has led to the clinical development of the cytoprotective-selective APC variant, 3K3A-APC, for ischemic stroke. Recent identification of non-canonical PAR1 and PAR3 activation by APC that give rise to novel tethered-ligands capable of inducing biased cytoprotective signaling as opposed to the canonical signaling provides a mechanistic explanation for how APC-mediated PAR activation can selectively induce cytoprotective signaling pathways. Collectively, these paradigm-shifting discoveries provide detailed insights into the receptor targets and the molecular mechanisms for neuroprotection by cytoprotective-selective 3K3A-APC, which is currently a biologic drug in clinical trials for ischemic stroke. PMID:25230930

  2. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  3. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  4. [Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: pathogenesis and neuropathology].

    PubMed

    Radulova, P; Slancheva, B

    2014-01-01

    The perinatal period represents a clinical setting of potential risk for injury to developing brain secondary to many causes, with the chance for long-lasting, profound neurocognitive deficits. Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury leads to serious long-term morbidities. The leading pathogenetic mechanisms are hypoxia and/or ischemia, as a result of perinatal asphyxia. Understanding of the underlying pathophysiology will help the physicians in the general supportive management and neuroprotection of the neonatal brain.

  5. Classifiers for Ischemic Stroke Lesion Segmentation: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Oskar; Schröder, Christoph; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Martinetz, Thomas; Handels, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Ischemic stroke, triggered by an obstruction in the cerebral blood supply, leads to infarction of the affected brain tissue. An accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation is of high interest, since the lesion volume is an important end-point for clinical trials. However, various factors, such as the high variance in lesion shape, location and appearance, render it a difficult task. Methods In this article, nine classification methods (e.g. Generalized Linear Models, Random Decision Forests and Convolutional Neural Networks) are evaluated and compared with each other using 37 multiparametric MRI datasets of ischemic stroke patients in the sub-acute phase in terms of their accuracy and reliability for ischemic stroke lesion segmentation. Within this context, a multi-spectral classification approach is compared against mono-spectral classification performance using only FLAIR MRI datasets and two sets of expert segmentations are used for inter-observer agreement evaluation. Results and Conclusion The results of this study reveal that high-level machine learning methods lead to significantly better segmentation results compared to the rather simple classification methods, pointing towards a difficult non-linear problem. The overall best segmentation results were achieved by a Random Decision Forest and a Convolutional Neural Networks classification approach, even outperforming all previously published results. However, none of the methods tested in this work are capable of achieving results in the range of the human observer agreement and the automatic ischemic stroke lesion segmentation remains a complicated problem that needs to be explored in more detail to improve the segmentation results. PMID:26672989

  6. Myogenic tone as a therapeutic target for ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Sara M; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke causes vascular paralysis and impaired autoregulation in the brain, the degree of which is dependent on the depth and duration of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Ischemic stroke also impairs the myogenic response of middle cerebral arteries (MCA) that may be an underlying mechanism by which autoregulation is impaired. Myogenic responses are affected by I/R through several mechanisms, including production of peroxynitrite, depolymerization of F-actin in vascular smooth muscle, and circulating vasoactive factors. The vascular endothelium is also significantly affected during focal ischemia that has a particularly large influence on vascular tone in the cerebral circulation. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) are important endothelium-dependent vasoactive substances that can influence the level of myogenic tone in cerebral arteries and arterioles that are significantly affected during ischemic stroke. Unlike MCA, brain penetrating arterioles have considerable myogenic tone that appears less affected by focal ischemia. The persistent tone of brain parenchymal arterioles during focal ischemia could contribute to perfusion deficit and infarct expansion. These arterioles within the cerebral cortex are also unique from MCA in that they constrict to small- and intermediate- conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SKCa and IKCa, respectively) inhibition, suggesting basal endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) is preserved during focal ischemia. This review will highlight our current understanding of the effects of I/R on myogenic response in both MCA and parenchymal arterioles and discuss underlying mechanisms by which focal ischemia affects myogenic tone in these different vascular segments.

  7. Ginsenoside Rd and ischemic stroke; a short review of literatures☆

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Habtemariam, Solomon; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Panax ginseng is a well-known economic medical plant that is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine. This species contains a unique class of natural products—ginsenosides. Recent clinical and experimental studies have presented numerous lines of evidence on the promising role of ginsenosides on different diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and certain types of cancer. Nowadays, most of the attention has focused on ginsenoside Rd as a neuroprotective agent to attenuate ischemic stroke damages. Some of the evidence showed that ginsenoside Rd ameliorates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation. Ginsenoside Rd can prolong neural cells' survival through the upregulation of the endogenous antioxidant system, phosphoinositide-3-kinase/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 pathways, preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential, suppression of the nuclear factor-kappa B, transient receptor potential melastatin, acid sensing ion channels 1a, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, protein tyrosine kinase activation, as well as reduction of cytochrome c-releasing and apoptosis-inducing factor. In the current work, we review the available reports on the promising role of ginsenoside Rd on ischemic stroke. We also discuss its chemistry, source, and the molecular mechanism underlying this effect. PMID:26869821

  8. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia.

  9. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Florian, A.; Jurcut, R.; Ginghina, C.; Bogaert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a prime player in the clinical and preclinical detection of ischemic heart disease (IHD) as well in the prognosis assessment by offering a comprehensive approach for all spectrums of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. The aim of this review is to provide the reader a state–of–the art on how the newest cardiac MRI techniques can be used to study IHD patients. In patients with suspected/stable CAD, functional and perfusion imaging both at rest and during vasodilatatory stress (adenosine, dypiridamole)/dobutamine stress can accurately depict ischemic myocardium secondary to significant coronary artery stenosis. In patients with acute MI, MRI is a robust tool for differentiating and sizing the jeopardized and the infarcted myocardium by using a combination of functional, edema, perfusion and Gd contrast imaging. Moreover, important prognostic factors like myocardial salvage, the presence of microvascular obstruction (MVO), post reperfusion myocardial hemorrhage, RV involvement and infarct related complications can be assessed in the same examination. In patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, the role of the MRI extends from diagnosis by means of Gadolinium contrast scar imaging to therapy and prognosis by functional assessment and viability testing with rest and dobutamine stress imaging. In all the circumstances mentioned, MRI derived information has been proven valuable in every day clinical decision making and prognosis assessment. Thus, MRI is becoming more and more an accepted alternative to other imaging modalities both in the acute and chronic setting. PMID:22514564

  10. Substrate use in ischemic and reperfused canine myocardium: quantitative considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Myears, D.W.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.

    1987-07-01

    The patterns of use of substrate in reperfused myocardium are not yet well elucidated, and their delineation is essential for adequate interpretation of results of analyses performed after positron emission tomography with labeled substrates to differentiate normal from abnormal heart muscle. Accordingly, in open-chest, anesthetized dogs the authors measured glucose and fatty acid utilization in normal, ischemic, and reperfused myocardium and assessed the contributions of metabolism of each substrate to overall oxidative metabolism. Intracoronary (/sup 3/H)glucose and (/sup 14/C)palmitate were administered in five control dogs, eight dogs subjected to 1 h of coronary occlusion, and nine dogs subjected to reperfusion after 1 h of ischemia. Regional coronary venous blood samples were assayed sequentially. In reperfused myocardium, utilization of glucose was 103% greater than that in ischemic and 273% greater than in normal myocardium. Utilization of fatty acid during reperfusion, although greater than that in ischemic myocardium, was significantly less than that in normal myocardium despite restoration of flow to 80% of control values. Despite diminished net uptake of fatty acid, oxidation of fatty acid accounted for 63% of total oxygen consumption in reperfused myocardium. These studies indicate that canine myocardium reperfused after 1 h of ischemia exhibits enhanced uptake of glucose and impaired utilization of palmitate. Nevertheless, palmitate continues to comprise the substrate primarily utilized for oxidative metabolism.

  11. Racial Differences by Ischemic Stroke Subtype: A Comprehensive Diagnostic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sarah; Burgess, Richard E.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have suggested that black populations have more small-vessel and fewer cardioembolic strokes. We sought to analyze racial differences in ischemic stroke subtype employing a comprehensive diagnostic workup with magnetic resonance-imaging-(MRI-) based evaluation including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Methods. 350 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to an urban hospital with standardized comprehensive diagnostic evaluations were retrospectively analyzed. Ischemic stroke subtype was determined by three Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification systems. Results. We found similar proportions of cardioembolic and lacunar strokes in the black and white cohort. The only subtype category with a significant difference by race was “stroke of other etiology,” more common in whites. Black stroke patients were more likely to have an incomplete evaluation, but this did not reach significance. Conclusions. We found similar proportions by race of cardioembolic and lacunar strokes when employing a full diagnostic evaluation including DWI MRI. The relatively high rate of cardioembolism may have been underappreciated in black stroke patients when employing a CT approach to stroke subtype diagnosis. Further research is required to better understand the racial differences in frequency of “stroke of other etiology” and explore disparities in the extent of diagnostic evaluations. PMID:22645703

  12. Current and experimental pharmacological approaches in neonatal hypoxic- ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zalewska, Teresa; Jaworska, Joanna; Ziemka-Nalecz, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury still remains an important issue as it is a frequent cause of neonatal death and life-long neurobehavioral and cognitive dysfunction. In spite of the decades of research which led us to a better knowledge of the pathological mechanism of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, the clinical use of potential neuroprotective drugs (including, among others, excitatory amino acids antagonists, free radical inhibitors and scavengers, growth factors, xenon, cannabinoids, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic agents) became avoided owing to insufficiency and /or treatment-induced undesirable side effects. The only available effective treatment, hypothermia, neither provides complete brain protection nor stimulates the repair necessary for neurodevelopmental outcome. This fact brings about increased interest in alternative methods of therapy, such as regenerative medicine using stem cells. Growing number of in vivo preclinical studies revealed that mesenchymal stem cells as well as human cord blood cells may improve functional outcome after HI insult and may represent a new beneficial treatment modality for infants developing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In this review we briefly highlight the present and potential forthcoming therapeutic treatments aimed at attenuation of the detrimental effects of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

  13. Reperfusion Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke. PMID:24646159

  14. Do energy drinks cause epileptic seizure and ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Dikici, Suber; Saritas, Ayhan; Besir, Fahri Halit; Tasci, Ahmet Hakan; Kandis, Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Energy drinks are popular among young individuals and marketed to college students, athletes, and active individuals between the ages of 21 and 35 years. We report a case that had ischemic stroke and epileptic seizure after intake of energy drink with alcohol. To the best of our knowledge, the following case is the first report of ischemic stroke after intake of energy drink. A previously healthy 37-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a witnessed tonic-clonic seizure. According to his wife's testimony, just before loss of consciousness, the patient had been drinking 3 boxes of energy drinks (Redbull, Istanbul, Turkey, 250 mL) with vodka on an empty stomach. He did not have a history of seizures, head trauma, or family history of seizures or another disease. In cranial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, there were hyperintense signal changes in bilateral occipital area (more pronounced in the left occipital lobe), right temporal lobe, frontal lobe, and posterior parietal lobe. All tests associated with possible etiologic causes of ischemic stroke in young patients were negative. Herein, we want to attract attention to adverse effect of energy drink usage. PMID:22867827

  15. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia. PMID:22771710

  16. Surgical Management and Outcome in Acute Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Beck, David E.; de Aguilar-Nascimento, Jose Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemic colitis is the most common form of gastrointestinal ischemia. Patients usually present with abdominal discomfort and bloody diarrhea. Treatment is contingent on the severity of disease. Mucosal/nongangrenous ischemia requires only supportive measures and medical management, whereas transmural/gangrenous ischemia may require prompt surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to review the surgical management of ischemic colitis in a tertiary referral center. Methods Retrospective chart review of patients with ischemic colitis managed from 1995 to 2000 at the Ochsner Foundation Hospital. Results Forty-eight patients were identified. Ten of these had disease significant enough to require surgery (21%) and are the basis of this review. Eight were women, and the mean age was 71.4 years (range 43-85 years). Distribution of the disease was the right colon in 4 cases, pancolitis in 3, sigmoid in 2, and the left colon in 1. Nine patients underwent bowel resection: primary anastomosis in 3 and creation of a stoma in the other 6 (5 ileostomies and 1 transverse colostomy). Follow-up ranged from 3 days to 13.8 years. One patient died perioperatively. Conclusion Surgical management produced good results. PMID:21960763

  17. Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Therapy Mitigated Ischemic Stroke Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moldthan, Huong L.; Hirko, Aaron C.; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; Grant, Maria; Li, Zhimin; Peris, Joanna; Lu, Yuanqing; Elshikha, Ahmed; King, Michael A.; Hughes, Jeffrey A.; Song, Sihong

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the only effective therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the thrombolytic agent recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. α1-Antitrypsin, an endogenous inhibitor of serine proteinases and a primary acute phase protein with potent anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antimicrobial and cytoprotective activities, could be beneficial in stroke.. The goal of this study was to test whether α1-antitrypsin could improve ischemic stroke outcome in an established rat model. Middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male rats via intracranial microinjection of endothelin-1. Five to ten minutes following stroke induction rats received either intracranial or intravenous delivery of human α1-antitrypsin. Cylinder and vibrissae tests were used to evaluate sensorimotor function before and 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Infarct volumes were examined via either 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride assay or magnetic resonance imaging 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Despite equivalent initial strokes, at 72 hours the infarct volumes of the human α1-antitrypsin treatment groups (local and systemic injection) were statistically significantly reduced by 83% and 63% (p<0.0001 and p < 0.05 respectively) compared with control rats. Human α1-antitrypsin significantly limited sensory motor systems deficits. Human α1-antitrypsin could be a potential novel therapeutic drug for the protection against neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke, but more studies are needed to investigate the protective mechanisms and efficacy in other animal models. PMID:24582784

  18. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q < 0.05) between lesions in the right insular, right frontal and right parietal cortex as well as the right amygdala, basal ganglia and thalamus and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  19. Long-Term Prognosis of Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Varona, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    There is limited information about long-term prognosis of ischemic stroke in young adults. Giving the potentially negative impact in physical, social, and emotional aspects of an ischemic stroke in young people, providing early accurate long-term prognostic information is very important in this clinical setting. Moreover, detection of factors associated with bad outcomes (death, recurrence, moderate-to-severe disability) help physicians in optimizing secondary prevention strategies. The present paper reviews the most relevant published information concerning long-term prognosis and predictors of unfavorable outcomes of ischemic stroke affecting young adults. As a summary, we can conclude that, in the long term, stroke in the young adult increases slightly the risk of mortality, implies higher risk of future cardiovascular events, and determines functional limitations in a significant percentage of patients. Nevertheless, in every individual case the prognosis has to be considered depending on several factors (stroke subtype, initial severity, cardiovascular risk factors) that determine the long-term outcomes. PMID:21197408

  20. Macrophage-Mediated Injury and Repair After Ischemic Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Sarah C.; Cantley, Lloyd G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic kidney injury is a common complication in hospitalized patients. Currently no treatment is available for augmenting kidney repair or preventing progressive kidney fibrosis. Animal models of acute kidney injury demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system plays a major role in the systemic response to ischemia/reperfusion injury. Macrophage depletion studies suggest that macrophages, key participants in the innate immune response, augment the initial injury after reperfusion, but also promote tubular repair and contribute to long-term kidney fibrosis after ischemic injury. The distinct functional outcomes seen following macrophage depletion at different time points after ischemia/reperfusion injury suggest heterogeneity in macrophage activation states. Identifying the pathways that regulate the transitions of macrophage activation is thus critical for understanding the mechanisms that govern both macrophage-mediated injury and repair in the post-ischemic kidney. This review examines our current understanding of the complex and intricately controlled pathways that determine monocyte recruitment, macrophage activation, and macrophage effector functions after renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Careful delineation of repair and resolution pathways could provide therapeutic targets for the development of effective treatments to offer patients with acute kidney injury. PMID:24442822

  1. Curcumin protects against ischemic spinal cord injury: The pathway effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhua; Wei, Hao; Lin, Meimei; Chen, Chunmei; Wang, Chunhua; Liu, Maobai

    2013-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors have been shown to participate in nerve cell injury during spinal cord ischemia. This study observed a protective effect of curcumin on ischemic spinal cord injury. Models of spinal cord ischemia were established by ligating the lumbar artery from the left renal artery to the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. At 24 hours after model establishment, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with curcumin. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after spinal cord ischemia, inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression significantly increased. However, curcumin significantly decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic spinal cord. Tarlov scale results showed that curcumin significantly improved motor function of the rat hind limb after spinal cord ischemia. The results demonstrate that curcumin exerts a neuroprotective fect against ischemic spinal cord injury by decreasing inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression. PMID:25206661

  2. Sex differences in antiplatelet response in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Dawn M; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Compton, Margaret P; Gylys, Karen; Zivin, Justin A; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2011-07-01

    Sex differences exist in the occurrence, treatment and outcome of ischemic stroke. Compared with men, women have more stroke events and are less likely to fully recover from a stroke. Given the rapidly aging population, stroke incidence and mortality among women are projected to substantially rise by 2050. This has important public health consequences. Mitigating the burden of stroke among women will require a fundamental understanding of sex differences and sex-specific issues including cerebrovascular disease pathophysiology, treatment and outcome. An aspect of stroke treatment receiving increasing but insufficient attention involves possible interactions between estrogen levels, antiplatelet drugs and stroke outcome. Emerging evidence suggests that antiplatelet therapy may provide primary stroke protection but not primary myocardial infarction prevention in women, while the opposite may be true among men. Understanding sex-specific issues related to women who experience stroke is critical to clinicians who treat women with antiplatelet medications as part of a secondary stroke prevention regimen; however, the ideal antiplatelet medication, and dose, in women requires further research. In this article we present a conceptual framework for sex differences in antiplatelet treatment response in ischemic stroke, thrombus formation and the mediating role of estrogen, sex differences in antiplatelet treatment response in clinical trials, and sex differences in antiplatelet treatment use in ischemic stroke.

  3. Cell therapy for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro M; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia

    2010-03-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a common cause of long-term neurological disability in children. Despite advances in supportive care, no treatments for HIE are available at present. The potential use of stem/progenitor cell therapies for neuroprotection or regeneration of the damaged adult brain has been evaluated in several preclinical studies, and the most promising results are now being tested in clinical trials. In recent years, the use of stem/progenitor cell transplantation in animal models of HIE has also been evaluated in several laboratories. It was shown that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may have a therapeutic potential through multiple mechanisms acting locally in the central nervous system and possibly in peripheral organs of hypoxic-ischemic animals. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) have also been transplanted in animal models of HIE, migrating long distances to ischemic brain areas and differentiating into neurons. The results of these studies have raised important questions that must be addressed before these findings can be translated to the bedside. In this review, we give a critical overview of the different studies published up to now, and we discuss the endogenous regenerative potential of NSCs of the newborn brain when challenged by an HIE insult. We also discuss the use of cell therapies for the encephalopathy of prematurity.

  4. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  5. Histamine Blood Concentration in Ischemic Heart Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zdravkovic, Vladimir; Pantovic, Suzana; Rosic, Gvozden; Tomic-Lucic, Aleksandra; Zdravkovic, Nemanja; Colic, Maja; Obradovic, Zdravko; Rosic, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histamine blood concentration in subjects suffering from different types of ischemic heart diseases during the period of eight days. Our results showed that the histamine blood level was associated with different types of ischemic heart diseases. The blood histamine level in all investigated patients was significantly higher when compared to control subjects (44.87 ± 1.09 ng mL−1), indicating the increase of histamine release in patients suffering from coronary diseases. In patients suffering from ACS-UA and ACS-STEMI, the second day peak of histamine level occurs (90.85 ± 6.34 ng mL−1 and 121.7 ± 6.34 ng mL−1, resp.) probably as the reperfusion event. Furthermore, our data suggest that histamine can be additional parameter of myocardial ischemia along with cardiac specific enzymes and may prove to be an excellent single prognostic marker for multitude of ischemic heart diseases. PMID:21687546

  6. Ultrasound accelerates healing of normal wounds but not of ischemic ones.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Mariane; Nascimento, Adriana P; Romana-Souza, Bruna; Amadeu, Thaís P; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2009-01-01

    To examine the influence of therapeutic ultrasound (US) on repair of standard and ischemic cutaneous lesions, full-thickness excisional wounds were made in rats and treated with a US 3 MHz, 0.5 W/cm(2) pulsed duty cycle. We used five experimental groups: control (received US powered off on the day of surgery, and on the second and fourth day), control US (received US on the day of surgery, and on the second and fourth day), ischemic (received US powered off on the day of surgery, and on the second and fourth day), ischemic US 3X (received US on the day of surgery, and on the second and fourth day) and ischemic US 5X (received US in the day of surgery, first, second, third and fourth day). The control US group showed acceleration in wound contraction 7 days after wounding, an increase in collagen density, and only focal inflammatory areas. Neo-epidermis formation was more advanced in the control US group than in the control one. Wound contraction was delayed in the ischemic group when compared with the control group as well as the ischemic US 3X group, was but slightly accelerated in the ischemic US 5X group when compared with the ischemic group 7 days after wounding. Reepithelialization was delayed in both ischemic US groups when compared with the ischemic group. The number of inflammatory cells was higher in both US ischemic groups. We conclude that US therapy accelerates wound healing in normal wounds and delays wound healing in ischemic wounds.

  7. NEUROPROTECTION FOR ISCHEMIC STROKE: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Myron D.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroprotection for ischemic stroke refers to strategies, applied singly or in combination, that antagonize the injurious biochemical and molecular events that eventuate in irreversible ischemic injury. There has been a recent explosion of interest in this field, with over 1000 experimental papers and over 400 clinical articles appearing within the past 6 years. These studies, in turn, are the outgrowth of three decades of investigative work to define the multiple mechanisms and mediators of ischemic brain injury, which constitute potential targets of neuroprotection. Rigorously conducted experimental studies in animal models of brain ischemia provide incontrovertible proof-of-principle that high-grade protection of the ischemic brain is an achievable goal. Nonetheless, many agents have been brought to clinical trial without a sufficiently compelling evidence-based pre-clinical foundation. At this writing, around 160 clinical trials of neuroprotection for ischemic stroke have been initiated. Of the approximately 120 completed trials, two-thirds were smaller early-phase safety-feasibility studies. The remaining one-third were typically larger (>200 subjects) phase II or III trials, but, disappointingly, only fewer than one-half of these administered neuroprotective therapy within the 4–6 hour therapeutic window within which efficacious neuroprotection is considered to be achievable. This fact alone helps to account for the abundance of “failed” trials. This review presents a close survey of the most extensively evaluated neuroprotective agents and classes and considers both the strengths and weakness of the pre-clinical evidence as well as the results and shortcomings of the clinical trials themselves. Among the agent-classes considered are calcium channel blockers; glutamate antagonists; GABA agonists; antioxidants/radical scavengers; phospholipid precursor; nitric oxide signal-transduction down-regulator; leukocyte inhibitors; hemodilution; and a miscellany

  8. Association of selenoprotein S gene polymorphism with ischemic stroke in a Chinese case-control study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Xia; Guan, Hong-Jun; Liu, Jian-Ping; Guo, Yu-Peng; Yang, Yong; Niu, Ying-Ying; Yao, Li-Yan; Yang, Yin-Dong; Yue, Hong-Yu; Meng, Li-Li; Cui, Xin-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Wei; Gao, Jin-Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies showed that selenoprotein S (SELS) was associated with a range of inflammatory markers, and its gene expression was influenced by a polymorphism in the promoter region. The genetic basis of the ischemic stroke has now been largely determined, so the aim of the study was to examine the role of SELS genetic variants in the ischemic stroke risk in a Chinese population. We conducted a case-control study with 239 ischemic stroke patients and 240 controls. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SELS genes were analyzed for association with the risk of ischemic stroke in the Chinese Han population. No evidence of ischemic stroke association was observed with the SNP rs34713741. Interestingly, the strongest evidence showed that SELS SNP rs4965814 was associated with ischemic stroke (P < 0.05). We found a significant association with increased ischemic stroke risk in women carrying the CC genotype of rs4965814 [hazard ratio: 2.43(1.03-5.75)]; a similar trend was also found in men carrying the TC genotype of rs4965814 [hazard ratio: 1.81(1.06-3.08)]. SNP rs4965814 of SELS may affect the susceptibility to ischemic stroke. Understanding the inflammatory mechanisms of ischemic stroke may give new therapeutic targets to pharmacologists. PMID:25390504

  9. Ischemic Compression After Trigger Point Injection Affect the Treatment of Myofascial Trigger Points

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo A; Oh, Ki Young; Choi, Won Hyuck

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of trigger point injection with or without ischemic compression in treatment of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. Methods Sixty patients with active myofascial trigger points in upper trapezius muscle were randomly divided into three groups: group 1 (n=20) received only trigger point injections, group 2 (n=20) received trigger point injections with 30 seconds of ischemic compression, and group 3 (n=20) received trigger point injections with 60 seconds of ischemic compression. The visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold, and range of motion of the neck were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 1 week after treatment. Korean Neck Disability Indexes were assessed before treatment and 1 week after treatment. Results We found a significant improvement in all assessment parameters (p<0.05) in all groups. But, receiving trigger point injections with ischemic compression group showed significant improvement as compared with the receiving only trigger point injections group. And no significant differences between receiving 30 seconds of ischemic compression group and 60 seconds of ischemic compression group. Conclusion This study demonstrated the effectiveness of ischemic compression for myofascial trigger point. Trigger point injections combined with ischemic compression shows better effects on treatment of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle than the only trigger point injections therapy. But the duration of ischemic compression did not affect treatment of myofascial trigger point. PMID:24020035

  10. The potential for remote ischemic conditioning to improve outcomes in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bøtker, Hans Erik; Schmidt, Michael Rahbek

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure is the end-stage of a variety of underlying cardiovascular diseases and carries a poor prognosis. The condition is caused by a complex interaction between many pathophysiological processes including ischemia, fibrosis, ventricular remodeling, abnormal neurohumoral balance and inflammation. While traditional pharmacological treatment of heart failure often targets only one pathophysiological mechanism, remote ischemic conditioning induces a multitude of cardioprotective effects. In particular, the anti-ischemic, anti-remodeling and anti-inflammatory properties of remote ischemic conditioning may be of relevance. We propose that remote ischemic conditioning may offer a novel strategy to improve outcomes in heart failure.

  11. Imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke patients: current neuroradiological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Na, Dong Gyu; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Eung Yeop

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke now provide crucial information such as infarct core, ischemic penumbra/degree of collaterals, vessel occlusion, and thrombus that helps in the selection of the best candidates for reperfusion therapy. It also predicts thrombolytic efficacy and benefit or potential hazards from therapy. Thus, radiologists should be familiar with various imaging studies for patients with acute ischemic stroke and the applicability to clinical trials. This helps radiologists to obtain optimal rapid imaging as well as its accurate interpretation. This review is focused on imaging studies for acute ischemic stroke, including their roles in recent clinical trials and some guidelines to optimal interpretation.

  12. The Role of Monocytes in Ischemic Stroke Pathobiology: New Avenues to Explore.

    PubMed

    ElAli, Ayman; Jean LeBlanc, Noëmie

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for the majority of stroke cases and constitutes a major cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. Inflammation has been reported to constitute a major component of ischemic stroke pathobiology. In the acute phase of ischemic stroke, microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, are activated, followed by several infiltration waves of different circulating immune cells into the brain. Among these circulating immune cells, monocytes have been shown to play a particularly important role. Following their infiltration, monocytes differentiate into potent phagocytic cells, the monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs), in the ischemic brain. Initially, the presence of these cells was considered as marker of an exacerbated inflammatory response that contributes to brain damage. However, the recent reports are suggesting a more complex and multiphasic roles of these cells in ischemic stroke pathobiology. Monocytes constitute a heterogeneous group of cells, which comprises two major subsets in rodent and three major subsets in human. In both species, two equivalent subsets exist, the pro-inflammatory subset and the anti-inflammatory subset. Recent data have demonstrated that ischemic stroke differentially regulate monocyte subsets, which directly affect ischemic stroke pathobiology and may have direct implications in ischemic stroke therapies. Here, we review the recent findings that addressed the role of different monocyte subsets in ischemic stroke pathobiology, and the implications on therapies. PMID:26941641

  13. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tilan, Jason U.; Everhart, Lindsay M.; Abe, Ken; Kuo-Bonde, Lydia; Chalothorn, Dan; Kitlinska, Joanna; Burnett, Mary Susan; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faber, James E.; Zukowska, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the sympathetic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) is potently angiogenic, primarily through its Y2 receptor, and that endogenous NPY is crucial for capillary angiogenesis in rodent hindlimb ischemia. Here we sought to identify the source of NPY responsible for revascularization and its mechanisms of action. At d 3, NPY−/− mice demonstrated delayed recovery of blood flow and limb function, consistent with impaired collateral conductance, while ischemic capillary angiogenesis was reduced (∼70%) at d 14. This biphasic temporal response was confirmed by 2 peaks of NPY activation in rats: a transient early increase in neuronally derived plasma NPY and increase in platelet NPY during late-phase recovery. Compared to NPY-null platelets, collagen-activated NPY-rich platelets were more mitogenic (∼2-fold vs. ∼1.6-fold increase) for human microvascular endothelial cells, and Y2/Y5 receptor antagonists ablated this difference in proliferation. In NPY+/+ mice, ischemic angiogenesis was prevented by platelet depletion and then restored by transfusion of platelets from NPY+/+ mice, but not NPY−/− mice. In thrombocytopenic NPY−/− mice, transfusion of wild-type platelets fully restored ischemia-induced angiogenesis. These findings suggest that neuronally derived NPY accelerates the early response to femoral artery ligation by promoting collateral conductance, while platelet-derived NPY is critical for sustained capillary angiogenesis.—Tilan, J. U., Everhart, L. M., Abe, K., Kuo-Bonde, L., Chalothorn, D., Kitlinska, J., Burnett, M. S., Epstein, S. E., Faber, J. E., Zukowska, Z. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice. PMID:23457218

  14. Sex differences in quality of life after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Mathew J.; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Wenqin; Prvu-Bettger, Janet; Zimmer, Louise; Olson, DaiWai; Peterson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to compare quality of life (QOL) in women and men after ischemic stroke or TIA, and to determine the incremental impact of demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and stroke-specific effects on longitudinal QOL. Methods: We assessed QOL in patients with ischemic stroke or TIA at 3 and 12 months postdischarge in the Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal Registry using the European Quality of Life–5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) instrument. We generated multivariable linear regression models to evaluate the association between sex and EQ-5D while sequentially adjusting for sociodemographic, clinical, and stroke-related variables. We also used a proportional odds model to assess sex differences in the change in EQ-5D scores from 3 to 12 months. Results: A total of 1,370 patients were included, 53.7% male, median age 65 years (interquartile range 56–77 years). Women had significantly lower QOL at 3 months (unadjusted EQ-5D 0.81 in women vs 0.84 in men; p < 0.001) and 12 months (0.83 vs men 0.84; p < 0.001) poststroke. After multivariable adjustment for sociodemographic, clinical, and stroke-related factors, women continued to have lower QOL at 3 months (mean difference −0.036; p = 0.003) and at 12 months (mean difference −0.022; p = 0.046). Women fared worse in the dimensions of mobility, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression at 3 and 12 months. There were no sex differences in change in EQ-5D score from 3 to 12 months. Conclusion: Women have worse QOL than men up to 12 months after stroke, even after adjusting for important sociodemographic variables, stroke severity, and disability. PMID:24510493

  15. Sex stratified neuronal cultures to study ischemic cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, Stacy L; Vest, Rebekah; Verma, Saurabh; Traystman, Richard J; Herson, Paco S

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury and neurodegenerative disease have long been observed, but the signaling mechanisms responsible for those differences remain unclear. Primary disassociated embryonic neuronal culture provides a simplified experimental model with which to investigate the neuronal cell signaling involved in cell death as a result of ischemia or disease; however, most neuronal cultures used in research today are mixed sex. Researchers can and do test the effects of sex steroid treatment in mixed sex neuronal cultures in models of neuronal injury and disease, but accumulating evidence suggests that the female brain responds to androgens, estrogens, and progesterone differently than the male brain. Furthermore, neonate male and female rodents respond differently to ischemic injury, with males experiencing greater injury following cerebral ischemia than females. Thus, mixed sex neuronal cultures might obscure and confound the experimental results; important information might be missed. For this reason, the Herson Lab at the University of Colorado School of Medicine routinely prepares sex-stratified primary disassociated embryonic neuronal cultures from both hippocampus and cortex. Embryos are sexed before harvesting of brain tissue and male and female tissue are disassociated separately, plated separately, and maintained separately. Using this method, the Herson Lab has demonstrated a male-specific role for the ion channel TRPM2 in ischemic cell death. In this manuscript, we share and discuss our protocol for sexing embryonic mice and preparing sex-stratified hippocampal primary disassociated neuron cultures. This method can be adapted to prepare sex-stratified cortical cultures and the method for embryo sexing can be used in conjunction with other protocols for any study in which sex is thought to be an important determinant of outcome. PMID:24378980

  16. Intracoronary Delivery of Mitochondria to the Ischemic Heart for Cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Douglas B; Yao, Rouan; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Snay, Erin R; Thedsanamoorthy, Jerusha K; Zurakowski, David; Ericsson, Maria; Friehs, Ingeborg; Wu, Yaotang; Levitsky, Sidney; Del Nido, Pedro J; Packard, Alan B; McCully, James D

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that transplantation of autologously derived, respiration-competent mitochondria by direct injection into the heart following transient ischemia and reperfusion enhances cell viability and contractile function. To increase the therapeutic potential of this approach, we investigated whether exogenous mitochondria can be effectively delivered through the coronary vasculature to protect the ischemic myocardium and studied the fate of these transplanted organelles in the heart. Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and then reperfused for 10 minutes. Mitochondria were labeled with 18F-rhodamine 6G and iron oxide nanoparticles. The labeled mitochondria were either directly injected into the ischemic region or delivered by vascular perfusion through the coronary arteries at the onset of reperfusion. These hearts were used for positron emission tomography, microcomputed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging with subsequent microscopic analyses of tissue sections to confirm the uptake and distribution of exogenous mitochondria. Injected mitochondria were localized near the site of delivery; while, vascular perfusion of mitochondria resulted in rapid and extensive dispersal throughout the heart. Both injected and perfused mitochondria were observed in interstitial spaces and were associated with blood vessels and cardiomyocytes. To determine the efficacy of vascular perfusion of mitochondria, an additional group of rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of regional ischemia and reperfused for 120 minutes. Immediately following regional ischemia, the hearts received unlabeled, autologous mitochondria delivered through the coronary arteries. Autologous mitochondria perfused through the coronary vasculature significantly decreased infarct size and significantly enhanced post-ischemic myocardial function. In conclusion, the delivery of mitochondria through the coronary arteries resulted in their rapid

  17. Recent Progress in Therapeutic Strategies for Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Possible strategies for treating stroke include neuroprotection in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia and stem cell therapy in the chronic phase of cerebral ischemia. Previously, we have studied the temporal and spatial expression patterns of c-fos, hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and annexin V after 90 min of transient middle cerebral occlusion in rats and concluded that there is a time window for neuroprotection from 12 to 48 h after ischemia. In addition, we have estimated the neuroprotective effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) by injecting Sendai viral vector containing the GDNF gene into the postischemic brain. This Sendai virus-mediated gene transfer of GDNF showed a significant neuroprotective effect in the ischemic brain. Additionally, we have administered GDNF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) protein into the postischemic rat brain and estimated the infarct size and antiapoptotic and antiautophagic effects. GDNF and HGF significantly reduced infarct size, the number of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-positive cells, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin in situ nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells, indicating that GDNF and HGF were greatly associated with not only the antiapoptotic effect but also the antiautophagic effects. Finally, we have previously transplanted undifferentiated iPSCs into the ipsilateral striatum and cortex at 24 h after cerebral ischemia. Histological analysis was performed at 14 and 28 days after cell transplantation, and we found that iPSCs could supply a great number of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts but also formed tridermal teratoma in the ischemic brain. Our results suggest that iPSCs have a potential to provide neural cells after ischemic brain injury if tumorigenesis is properly controlled. In the future, we will combine these strategies to develop more effective therapies for the treatment of

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Ischemic Colitis According to Location

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ho Jin; Chung, Chul Woon; Ko, Kwang Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze various clinical characteristics of ischemic colitis according to its location. Methods The medical records of 92 cases of gastrointestinal ischemic colitis (IC) diagnosed at Bundang CHA Hospital from 1995 to 2008 were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. The patients were diagnosed by using colonoscopic biopsies or laparotomy findings. The patients were divided into two groups, right and left, according to the main involvement area of the IC at the embryologic boundary line of the distal transverse colon, and the two groups were compared as to clinical characteristics and co-morbid diseases. Results Left IC was present in 59 patients (64.1%) and right IC in 33 patients (35.9%). No differences between the two groups in terms of clinical characteristics, cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus were observed. However, in 16 cases with renal failure, 10 patient had right IC and 6 patients had left IC, and this difference had statistical significance (P = 0.014). Among the 16, the 11 patients requiring hemodialysis included 8 with right IC (24.2%) and 3 with left IC (5.1%; P = 0.009). Among the 19 cases of severe IC requiring surgical treatment or involving mortality, irrespective of surgery, 11 patients showed right IC and 8 patients showed left IC (P = 0.024). Conclusion Right-side ischemic colitis was significantly associated with renal failure and disease severity, so patients with right-side colon ischemia should be more carefully observed and managed. PMID:22259742

  19. Carbohydrate utilization by the ischemic perfused heart: an NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, J.R.; Hutson, J.Y.; Hoekenga, D.E.; Lenhoff, R.J.

    1987-05-01

    During ischemia, carbohydrate is necessarily the primary fuel for generation of energy by anaerobic glycolysis. The relative contributions of glycogen and exogenous glucose to glycolysis in the ischemic guinea pig heart were determined by /sup 13/C labeling and NMR. Glycogen was labeled by preischemic perfusion with (1-/sup 13/C)glucose. (2-/sup 13/C)glucose was then supplied in fresh perfusate during 17 minutes of ischemia. Insulin was included in each case. The relative contribution of glycogen and glucose to glycolysis was determined from /sup 13/C spectra obtained during ischemia and by analysis of /sup 1/H spectra of lactate isolated from hearts freeze-clamped at the end of ischemia. The relative amounts of (2-/sup 13/C)lactate, (3-/sup 13/C)lactate, and natural abundance lactate produced during ischemia correspond to contributions to glycolysis by (2-/sup 13/C)glucose, (1-/sup 13/C)glycogen, and natural abundance glycogen, respectively. Glucose utilization during 17 minutes of ischemia, determined from integration of labeled lactate peaks from /sup 13/C spectra, increased from 11 to 35% of the labeled carbohydrate utilization when perfusate glucose increased from 3 to 11.7 mM. Analysis of labeled lactate formation as a function of time during ischemia suggests that glucose is preferentially utilized early during the ischemic period. They conclude that glucose can contribute significantly as a fuel source in the ischemic heart; the extent depends on the concentration of glucose available to the heart and on the duration of ischemia.

  20. Intracoronary Delivery of Mitochondria to the Ischemic Heart for Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Douglas B.; Yao, Rouan; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Snay, Erin R.; Thedsanamoorthy, Jerusha K.; Zurakowski, David; Ericsson, Maria; Friehs, Ingeborg; Wu, Yaotang; Levitsky, Sidney; del Nido, Pedro J.; Packard, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that transplantation of autologously derived, respiration-competent mitochondria by direct injection into the heart following transient ischemia and reperfusion enhances cell viability and contractile function. To increase the therapeutic potential of this approach, we investigated whether exogenous mitochondria can be effectively delivered through the coronary vasculature to protect the ischemic myocardium and studied the fate of these transplanted organelles in the heart. Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and then reperfused for 10 minutes. Mitochondria were labeled with 18F-rhodamine 6G and iron oxide nanoparticles. The labeled mitochondria were either directly injected into the ischemic region or delivered by vascular perfusion through the coronary arteries at the onset of reperfusion. These hearts were used for positron emission tomography, microcomputed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging with subsequent microscopic analyses of tissue sections to confirm the uptake and distribution of exogenous mitochondria. Injected mitochondria were localized near the site of delivery; while, vascular perfusion of mitochondria resulted in rapid and extensive dispersal throughout the heart. Both injected and perfused mitochondria were observed in interstitial spaces and were associated with blood vessels and cardiomyocytes. To determine the efficacy of vascular perfusion of mitochondria, an additional group of rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of regional ischemia and reperfused for 120 minutes. Immediately following regional ischemia, the hearts received unlabeled, autologous mitochondria delivered through the coronary arteries. Autologous mitochondria perfused through the coronary vasculature significantly decreased infarct size and significantly enhanced post-ischemic myocardial function. In conclusion, the delivery of mitochondria through the coronary arteries resulted in their rapid

  1. Celiac territory ischemic syndrome in a patient on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ori, Y; Korzets, A; Neyman, H; Herman, M; Baytner, S; Gafter, U; Atar, E

    2007-10-01

    Mesenteric ischemia among chronic dialysis patients is usually of the nonocclusive type. Chronic occlusive mesenteric ischemia has been reported rarely in the dialysis population. The subset of"celiac-territory ischemic syndrome" has not been described in dialysis. The current report involves a 66-year-old female on chronic dialysis for 11 years. She experienced abdominal pain following sessions of hemodialysis, that later became more pronounced after eating. Abdominal angiography showed heavily calcified aorta, celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), with a 50% narrowing of the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries. During the following 9 months the symptoms worsened and weight loss set in. She was admitted with an episode of upper abdominal pain. Acalculous cholecystitis was found, along with multiple gastric and duodenal erosions including the second part, with an antral ulcer and multiple duodenal bulb ulcers. Repeated abdominal angiography showed progression of the stenotic lesions with significant narrowing of both the celiac trunk and the SMA. A stent was placed in the SMA. Following the procedure, the patient noted marked symptomatic improvement. On follow-up gastroduodenoscopy, all ischemic ulcers had healed completely. Serum albumin rose from a nadir of 31 to 40 g/l, and an extremely elevated c-reactive protein of 205,000 microg/l returned to normal (8,000 microg/l). The diagnosis of chronic occlusive mesenteric ischemia should be suspected among dialysis patients with post-prandial pain and weight loss in the face of calcified vessels. Predominant celiac territory ischemic syndrome presents as gastric and duodenal erosions and ulcers with or without acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:17969495

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  3. Estetrol attenuates neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tskitishvili, Ekaterine; Nisolle, Michelle; Munaut, Carine; Pequeux, Christel; Gerard, Celine; Noel, Agnes; Foidart, Jean-Michel

    2014-11-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a recently described natural estrogen with four hydroxyl-groups that is synthesized exclusively during pregnancy by the human fetal liver. It has important antioxidative activity. The aim of the present study was to define the importance of E4 in the attenuation of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Antioxidative effect of 650μM, 3.25mM and 6.5mM E4 on primary hippocampal cell cultures was studied before/after H202-induced oxidative stress. To examine oxidative stress and cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase activity and cell proliferation colorimetric assays were performed. To study the neuroprotective and therapeutic effects of E4 in vivo neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy model of 7-day-old newborn rat pups was used. The neuroprotective and therapeutic effects of estetrol before/after hypoxic-ischemic insult was studied in 1mg/kg/day, 5mg/kg/day, 10mg/kg/day, 50mg/kg/day E4 pretreated/treated groups and compared with the sham and the vehicle treated groups. The body temperature of the rat pups was examined along with their body and brain weights. Brains were studied at the level of the hippocampus and cortex. Intact cell counting and expressions of microtubule-associated protein-2, doublecortin and vascular-endothelial growth factor were evaluated by histo- and immunohistochemistry. ELISAs were performed on blood samples to detect concentrations of S100B and glial fibrillary acidic protein as brain damage markers. This work reveals for the first time that E4 significantly decreases LDH activity and enhances cell proliferation in primary hippocampal neuronal cell cultures in vitro, and decreases the early gray matter loss and promotes neuro- and angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:25079370

  4. Sex differences in predictors of ischemic stroke: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Samai, Alyana A; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Globally, stroke is a significant public health concern affecting more than 33 million individuals. Of growing importance are the differences between males and females in the predictors and overall risk of stroke. Given that women have a higher lifetime risk for stoke and account for more than half of all stroke deaths, sex-specific stroke risk factors merit investigation and may help target public health interventions. This review aims to discuss the current body of knowledge regarding sex-specific predictors of ischemic stroke including both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors, as well as specific pathologies known to increase stroke risk. PMID:26251609

  5. [Ischemic heart disease (myocardial perfusion and viability): techniques and results].

    PubMed

    Croisille, P

    2004-10-01

    Over the last two decades, the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease have made tremendous progress, in particular with the help of the development of non-invasive methodologies for assessing myocardial perfusion and viability. Clinically, nuclear medicine techniques (particularly SPECT imaging) have predominated. With the recent technical developments allowing for a combined assessment of perfusion and irreversible damage with late enhancement imaging, MRI will now play a major role in the assessment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:15507837

  6. 'Crescendo' transient ischemic attacks: clinical and angiographic correlations.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, J F; Lyden, P D; Yee, J; Wiederholt, W C

    1988-02-01

    Forty-seven consecutive patients presenting acutely with repetitive symptoms indicative of anterior circulation ischemia ("crescendo" transient ischemic attacks) were evaluated to identify clinical features that might reliably predict the presence of significant stenosis, ulceration, or both in the presumably symptomatic internal carotid artery. Angiographic or intraoperative correlation was obtained in all patients, and 26 (55%) were found to have anatomically significant disease. Of 20 patients with signs or symptoms suggestive of cortical ischemia, amaurosis fugax, or both, 17 (85%) had "positive" angiograms; of 18 with numbness/weakness only, 9 (50%) had positive angiograms; of 9 whose symptoms suggested lacunar ischemia, none had positive angiograms.

  7. Pathobiology of Ischemic Heart Disease: Past, Present and Future.

    PubMed

    Buja, L Maximilian; Vander Heide, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    This review provides a perspective on knowledge of ischemic heart disease (IHD) obtained from the contemporary era of research which began in the 1960s and has continued to the present day. Important discoveries have been made by basic and translational scientists and clinicians. Pathologists have contributed significantly to insights obtained from experimental studies and clinicopathological studies in humans. The review also provides a perspective for future directions in research in IHD aimed at increasing basic knowledge and developing additional therapeutic options for patients with IHD. PMID:26897485

  8. Adolescent ischemic stroke associated with anabolic steroid and cannabis abuse.

    PubMed

    El Scheich, Tarik; Weber, Artur-Aron; Klee, Dirk; Schweiger, Daniel; Mayatepek, Ertan; Karenfort, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 16-year-old body builder who suffered from an acute ischemic stroke. In the urine, cannabis metabolites as well as metabolites of the oral androgenic-anabolic steroid methandrostenolone were detected, both known to be associated with stroke events. This report highlights the role of cannabis and steroid abuse that induce strokes in the absence of arteriopathy, cardioembolism or thrombophilia. Owing to new upcoming socio-behavioral aspects of late childhood and early adolescent life, this formally rare abuse of cannabis and/or anabolic steroids as well as their associations with strokes becomes more current than ever. PMID:23382306

  9. Cellular compartmentation in ischemic myocardium: indirect analysis by electron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, L.G.; Tormey, J.M.

    1988-10-01

    Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) was carried out directly on myocardial cells and on the myofibrils and the mitochondria within them. A third subcellular compartment, which contains sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), was measured indirectly. The percent of the total cell calcium content that resides within this ''hidden'' compartment was calculated from cell data minus weighted myofibril and mitochondria data. This approach was applied to control, ischemic, and reperfused myocardium, and other elements were also quantified. We found that the calcium content of this third compartment is little changed during global ischemia but is markedly depleted after 5 min reperfusion. We conclude that these changes are ascribable to changes in SR function.

  10. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros; Fitzgerald, Jason; Troppmann, Christoph; Michalopoulou, Andromachi

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  11. Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao; Jin, Zhu-Qiu

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood-heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC

  12. Anton's Syndrome due to Bilateral Ischemic Occipital Lobe Strokes.

    PubMed

    Zukić, Sanela; Sinanović, Osman; Zonić, Lejla; Hodžić, Renata; Mujagić, Svjetlana; Smajlović, Edina

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with Anton's syndrome (i.e., visual anosognosia with confabulations), who developed bilateral occipital lobe infarct. Bilateral occipital brain damage results in blindness, and patients start to confabulate to fill in the missing sensory input. In addition, the patient occasionally becomes agitated and talks to himself, which indicates that, besides Anton's syndrome, he might have had Charles Bonnet syndrome, characterized by both visual loss and hallucinations. Anton syndrome, is not so frequent condition and is most commonly caused by ischemic stroke. In this particular case, the patient had successive bilateral occipital ischemia as a result of massive stenoses of head and neck arteries.

  13. Myricetin and quercetin attenuate ischemic injury in glial cultures by different mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have demonstrated that polyphenols from cinnamon and green tea reduce cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction in C6 glial cultures following ischemic injury. We tested the protective effects of the flavonoid polyphenols, myricetin and quercetin, on key features of ischemic injury. C6 cultures...

  14. FACTOR V LEIDEN AND ISCHEMIC STROKE RISK: THE GENETICS OF EARLY ONSET STROKE (GEOS) STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Hamedani, Ali G.; Cole, John W.; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Stine, Oscar C.; Wozniak, Marcella A.; Stern, Barney J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been associated with ischemic stroke in children, but not in adults. Although the FVL mutation is associated with increased risk for venous thrombosis, its association with ischemic stroke in young adults remains uncertain. Therefore, we examined the association between FVL and ischemic stroke in participants of the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) Study. Methods A population-based case-control study identified 354 women and 476 men aged 15–49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke, and 907 controls. Participant-specific data included vascular risk factors, FVL genotype and, for cases, the ischemic stroke subtype by modified TOAST criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for the entire population and for subgroups stratified by risk factors and ischemic stroke subtype. Results The frequency of the FVL mutation was similar between ischemic stroke patients (3.6%, 95% CI: 2.5%–5.1%) and non-stroke controls (3.8%, 95% CI: 2.7%–5.2%). This frequency did not change significantly when cases were restricted to patients with stroke of undetermined etiology (4.1%, 95% CI: 2.6%–6.4%). Conclusions Among young adults, we found no evidence for an association between Factor V Leiden and either all ischemic stroke or the subgroup with stroke of undetermined etiology. PMID:22100829

  15. The P2X4 receptor is required for neuroprotection via ischemic preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Rieko; Sasai, Miwa; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kubota, Yoshiaki; Fujinaka, Toshiyuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), a procedure consisting of transient ischemia and subsequent reperfusion, provides ischemic tolerance against prolonged ischemia in the brain. Although the blood flow changes mediated by IPC are primarily perceived by vascular endothelial cells, the role of these cells in ischemic tolerance has not been fully clarified. In this study, we found that the P2X4 receptor, which is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells, is required for ischemic tolerance following middle artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice. Mechanistically, the P2X4 receptor was stimulated by fluid shear stress, which mimics reperfusion, thus promoting the increased expression of osteopontin, a neuroprotective molecule. Furthermore, we found that the intracerebroventricular administration of osteopontin was sufficient to exert a neuroprotective effect mediated by preconditioning-stimulated P2X4 receptor activation. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby vascular endothelial cells are involved in ischemic tolerance. PMID:27173846

  16. Investigation of myocardial photodynamic revascularization method on ischemic rat myocardium model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilchenko, S. Yu.; Stratonnikov, A. A.; Volkova, A. I.; Loschenov, V. B.; Sheptak, E. A.; Kharnas, S. S.

    2006-08-01

    Ischemic heart disease is one of the leading reasons of invalidisation and death rate of able-bodied citizens in the world. There are many various surgical and medicamentous methods of its treatment for today, however all these methods have restrictions in application. Our work was directed at initiation possibility clarification of ischemic myocardium revascularization by means of making necrosis with photodynamic therapy. The investigation was carried out in rats with the ischemia artificial made by means of left coronary artery ligation. Level of Photosense photosensitizer accumulation in ischemic and normal rat myocardium zones was defined. Myocardial photodynamic revascularization procedure of ischemic rat myocardium was carried out. Morphological analysis of the myocardium preparations showed the presence of active revascularization of ischemic myocardium after photodynamic therapy. The method of ischemia level estimation based on spectral optical definition of blood oxygen saturation was developed.

  17. εPKC confers acute tolerance to cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Rachel; Sun, Guo-Hua; Yenari, Midori A.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2008-01-01

    In response to mild ischemic stress, the brain elicits endogenous survival mechanisms to protect cells against a subsequent lethal ischemic stress, referred to as ischemic tolerance. The molecular signals that mediate this protection are thought to involve the expression and activation of multiple kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC). Here we demonstrate that εPKC mediates cerebral ischemic tolerance in vivo. Systemic delivery of ψεRACK, an εPKC-selective peptide activator, confers neuroprotection against a subsequent cerebral ischemic event when delivered immediately prior to stroke. In addition, activation of εPKC by ψεRACK treatment decreases vascular tone in vivo, as demonstrated by a reduction in microvascular cerebral blood flow. Here we demonstrate the role of acute and transient εPKC in early cerebral tolerance in vivo and suggest that extra-parenchymal mechanisms, such as vasoconstriction, may contribute to the conferred protection. PMID:18586397

  18. Protein nitration impairs the myogenic tone of rat middle cerebral arteries in both ischemic and nonischemic hemispheres after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Coucha, Maha; Li, Weiguo; Johnson, Maribeth H; Fagan, Susan C; Ergul, Adviye

    2013-12-01

    The myogenic response is crucial for maintaining vascular resistance to achieve constant perfusion during pressure fluctuations. Reduced cerebral blood flow has been reported in ischemic and nonischemic hemispheres after stroke. Ischemia-reperfusion injury and the resulting oxidative stress impair myogenic responses in the ischemic hemisphere. Yet, the mechanism by which ischemia-reperfusion affects the nonischemic side is still undetermined. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of ischemia-reperfusion injury on the myogenic reactivity of cerebral vessels from both hemispheres and whether protein nitration due to excess peroxynitrite production is the underlying mechanism of loss of tone. Male Wistar rats were subjected to sham operation or 30-min middle cerebral artery occlusion/45-min reperfusion. Rats were administered saline, the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)prophyrinato iron (III), or the nitration inhibitor epicatechin at reperfusion. Middle cerebral arteries isolated from another set of control rats were exposed to ex vivo oxygen-glucose deprivation with and without glycoprotein 91 tat (NADPH oxidase inhibitor) or N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. Myogenic tone and nitrotyrosine levels were determined. Ischemia-reperfusion injury impaired the myogenic tone of vessels in both hemispheres compared with the sham group (P < 0.001). Vessels exposed to ex vivo oxygen-glucose deprivation experienced a similar loss of myogenic tone. Inhibition of peroxynitrite parent radicals significantly improved the myogenic tone. Peroxynitrite scavenging or inhibition of nitration improved the myogenic tone of vessels from ischemic (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) and nonischemic (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) hemispheres. Nitration was significantly increased in both hemispheres versus the sham group and was normalized with epicatechin treatment. In conclusion, ischemia-reperfusion injury impairs

  19. Novel Oral Anticoagulant Use Among Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Hospitalized with Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyesh A.; Zhao, Xin; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Lytle, Barbara L.; Smith, Eric E.; Xian, Ying; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Peterson, Eric D.; Schwamm, Lee H.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been shown to be at least as good as warfarin for preventing stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), yet diffusion of these therapies and patterns of use among AF patients with ischemic stroke and TIA have not been well characterized. Methods and Results Using data from Get With The Guidelines®–Stroke, we identified a cohort of 61,655 AF patients with ischemic stroke or TIA hospitalized between 10/2010–09/2012 and discharged on warfarin or NOAC (either dabigatran or rivaroxaban). Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with NOAC versus warfarin therapy. In our study population, warfarin was prescribed to 88.9%, dabigatran to 9.6%, and rivaroxaban to 1.5%. NOAC use increased from 0.04% to a 16–17% plateau during the study period, though anticoagulation rates among eligible patients did not change appreciably (93.7% vs. 94.1% from first quarter 2011 to second quarter 2012), suggesting a trend of switching from warfarin to NOACs rather than increased rates of anticoagulation among eligible patients. Several bleeding risk factors and CHA2DS2-VASc scores were lower among those discharged on NOAC versus warfarin therapy (47.9% vs. 40.9% with CHA2DS2-VASc ≤5, p<0.001 for difference in CHA2DS2-VASc). Conclusions NOACs have had modest but growing uptake over time among AF patients hospitalized with stroke or TIA and are prescribed to patients with lower stroke risk compared to warfarin. PMID:26058721

  20. Concordant and Discordant Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Delayed Hyperenhancement Patterns in Patients with Ischemic and Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Choi, Jin-Oh; Glockner, James; Shapiro, Brian; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Fine, Nowell; Jang, Shin Yi; Kim, Sung-Mok; Miller, Wayne; Lee, Sang-Chol; Oh, Jae K.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The diagnosis of ischemic (ICM) and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) is conventionally determined by the presence or absence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the setting of a reduced left systolic function. However the presence of CAD may not always indicate that the actual left ventricular (LV) dysfunction mechanism is ischemia, as other non-ischemic etiologies can be responsible. We investigated patterns of myocardial fibrosis using delayed hyperenhancement (DHE) on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in ICM and NICM. Subjects and Methods Patients with systolic heart failure who underwent a CMR were prospectively analyzed. The heart failure diagnosis was based on the modified Framingham criteria and LVEF <35%. LV dysfunction was classified as ICM or NICM based on coronary anatomy. Results A total of 101 subjects were analyzed; 34 were classified as ICM and 67 as NICM. The DHE pattern was concordant with the conventional diagnosis in 27 (79.4%) of the patients with ICM and 62 (92.5%) of the patients with NCIM. A discordant NICM DHE pattern was present in 8.8% of patients with ICM, and an ICM pattern was detected 6.0% of the patients with NICM. Furthermore, 11.8% of the patients with ICM and 1.5% of those with NICM demonstrated a mixed pattern. Conclusion A subset of patients conventionally diagnosed with ICM or NICM based on coronary anatomy demonstrated a discordant or mixed DHE pattern. CMR-DHE imaging can be helpful to determine the etiology of heart failure in patients with persistent LV systolic dysfunction. PMID:26798384

  1. A patient with atonic seizures mimicking transient ischemic attacks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Ju; Choi, Jun Young; An, Young-Sil; Park, Ki-Hyung; Park, Hyeon-Mi; Lee, Yeong-Bae; Shin, Dong-Jin; Sung, Young Hee; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    A focal atonic seizure is a partial seizure in which the ictal manifestation consists of paresis of the extremities or muscles on one side of the body, and this phenomenon can easily be misdiagnosed as a transient ischemic attack. An 86-year-old woman visited our hospital complaining of transient right upper extremity weakness lasting for 10 min following an unusual sensation in her chest accompanied by palpitations. On the third hospital day, she again complained of right arm weakness, which progressed to jerky movements of her right extremity accompanied by facial twitching and then generalized into a tonic–clonic seizure. The EEG displayed several interictal spikes in the contralateral temporal area, and the ictal SPECT, analyzed using the SISCOM system, showed an increased signal in both the contralateral superior parietal area and the mesial frontal area. In this case, the patient was diagnosed with focal atonic seizures as the cause of the monolimb weakness, which had been initially misdiagnosed aas transient ischemic attacks. In cases in which a patient presents with monolimb paresis, physicians should consider the possibility of an atonic seizure as the cause. PMID:25870790

  2. Suppression of Etk/Bmx protects against ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Yun; Wu, Chung-Che; Chang, Cheng-Fu; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Lou, Ya-Hsin; Chen, Yen-Hua; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao

    2012-01-01

    Etk/Bmx (epithelial and endothelial tyrosine kinase, also known as BMX), a member of the Tec (tyrosine kinase expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma) family of protein-tyrosine kinases, is an important regulator of signal transduction for the activation of cell growth, differentiation, and development. We have previously reported that activation of Etk leads to apoptosis in MDA-MB-468 cells. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of Etk in neuronal injury induced by H(2)O(2) or ischemia. Using Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, we found that treatment with H(2)O(2) significantly enhanced phosphorylation of Etk and its downstream signaling molecule Stat1 in primary cortical neurons. Inhibiting Etk activity by LFM-A13 or knocking down Etk expression by a specific shRNA increased the survival of primary cortical neurons. Similarly, at 1 day after a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in adult rats, both phosphorylated Etk and Stat1 were coexpressed with apoptotic markers in neurons in the penumbra. Pretreatment with LFM-A13 or an adenoviral vector encoding the kinase deletion mutant Etkk attenuated caspase-3 activity and infarct volume in ischemic brain. All together, our data suggest that Etk is activated after neuronal injury. Suppressing Etk activity protects against neurodegeneration in ischemic brain. PMID:21929872

  3. [Microvolt T-wave alternans. Ischemic vs. nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Klingenheben, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) for primary preventive therapy of sudden arrhythmogenic death has become a mainstay in selected patients with systolic congestive heart failure, particularly in the setting of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy (Moss et al., N Engl J Med 346:877–883, 2002; Bardy et al., N Engl J Med 352:225–237, 2005). However, more accurate identification of high-risk patients is desirable in order to avoid unnecessary ICD implants. Since currently available risk stratification methods have limited predictive accuracy, development of new techniques is important in order to noninvasively assess arrhythmogenic risk in patients prone to sudden death.Microvolt level T-wave alternans (mTWA) has recently been proposed to assess abnormalities in ventricular repolarization favoring the occurrence of reentrant arrhythmias (Adam et al., J Electrocardiol 17:209–218, 1984; Pastore et al., Circulation 99:1385–1394, 1999). In 1994, a preliminary clinical study by Rosenbaum et al. convincingly demonstrated that mTWA is closely related to arrhythmia induction in the electrophysiology laboratory as well as to the occurrence of spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias during follow-up (Rosenbaum et al., N Engl J Med 330:235–241,1994). More recently, a number of clinical studies have examined its clinical applicability in ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy.

  4. Athletics, minor trauma, and pediatric arterial ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sepelyak, Kathryn; Gailloud, Philippe; Jordan, Lori C

    2010-05-01

    Pediatric arterial ischemic stroke may occur as the result of trivial head or neck trauma sustained during a sports activity. We describe three cases of sports-related stroke in previously healthy school-age children and discuss acute and long-term stroke care. Possible mechanisms of sports-related stroke are addressed, as is evaluation for cause of stroke in children. In one of the reported cases, the child was found to have a vertebral artery dissection as the cause of his stroke, but no definitive cause of stroke was identified in the other two cases despite extensive evaluation. The advisability and timing of returning to athletic activities after stroke is also discussed. Many children with sports-related stroke are initially seen by a sports trainer, a pediatrician, or an ER physician. Thus, it is particularly important that these professionals are aware of the possibility of ischemic stroke occurring after even mild athletic injury. Childhood stroke may result from injuries sustained during athletic activities and should be considered when a child has acute focal neurologic signs. PMID:19760434

  5. Minor Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Yakhkind, Aleksandra; McTaggart, Ryan A.; Jayaraman, Mahesh V.; Siket, Matthew S.; Silver, Brian; Yaghi, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    A majority of patients with ischemic stroke present with mild deficits for which aggressive management is not often pursued. Comprehensive work-up and appropriate intervention for minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) point toward better patient outcomes, lower costs, and fewer cases of disability. Imaging is a key modality to guide treatment and predict stroke recurrence. Patients with large vessel occlusions have been found to suffer worse outcomes and could benefit from intervention. Whether intravenous thrombolytic therapy decreases disability in minor stroke patients and whether acute endovascular intervention improves functional outcomes in patients with minor stroke and known large vessel occlusion remain controversial. Studies are ongoing to determine ideal antiplatelet therapy for stroke and TIA, while ongoing statin therapy, surgical management for patients with carotid stenosis, and anticoagulation for patients with atrial fibrillation have all been proven to decrease the rate of stroke recurrence and improve outcomes. This review summarizes the current evidence and discusses the standard of care for patients with minor stroke and TIA. PMID:27375548

  6. Coupling of Neurogenesis and Angiogenesis After Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Linhui; Wang, Brian; ZhuGe, Qichuan; Jin, Kunlin

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and severe long-term disability worldwide. Development of effective treatment or new therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke patients is therefore crucial. Ischemic stroke promotes neurogenesis by several growth factors including FGF-2, IGF-1, BDNF, VEGF and chemokines including SDF-1, MCP-1. Stroke-induced angiogenesis is similarly regulated by many factors most notably, eNOS and CSE, VEGF/VEGFR2, and Ang-1/Tie2. Important findings in the last decade have revealed that neurogenesis is not the stand-alone consideration in the fight for full functional recovery from stroke. Angiogenesis has been also shown to be critical in improving post-stroke neurological functional recovery. More than that, recent evidence has shown a highly possible interplay or dependence between stroke-induced neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Moving forward, elucidating the underlying mechanisms of this coupling between stroke-induced neurogenesis and angiogenesis will be of great importance, which will provide the basis for neurorestorative therapy. PMID:25736182

  7. Increased risk of ischemic stroke in patients with pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Hsu, Kuo-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng

    2015-02-01

    Although past studies have confirmed that chronic dust exposure is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the relationship between it and cerebrovascular disease is still unclear. We aimed to determine whether pneumoconiosis is related to increased incidence of ischemic stroke in the following 5 to 11 years. We selected 1238 patients with pneumoconiosis from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database as our study cohort. After matching for age, sex and the date of ambulatory care visit, another 4952 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected as the comparison cohort. Each patient was individually followed up until the end of 2010 to track the incidence of stroke, and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to compute the relative hazard ratio of stroke. Our results showed 19.6% of pneumoconiosis patients and 15.8% of non-pneumoconiosis patients developed stroke. After statistically adjusting for age, sex, and medical comorbidities, the hazard of developing stroke was 1.36 times greater for those with pneumoconiosis compared to those without. Even in those with pneumoconiosis excluding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the hazard of developing stroke was still 1.31 times greater than those without pneumoconiosis. Our study revealed that pneumoconiosis patients are at a higher risk of ischemic stroke, and primary prevention of stroke is particularly important in this group of patients.

  8. Effects of topical oxygen therapy on ischemic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Rao, Congqiang; Xiao, Liling; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Shenghong; Lu, Jinqiang; Li, Jiangxuan; Gu, Shixing

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of topical oxygen therapy on the hind limb wounds of rats under ischemic conditions. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve injured rats were treated with topical oxygen on skin wounds located on the hind limb and compared with twelve injured control rats. Indexes including gross morphology of the wound, wound healing time, wound healing rate, and histological and immunohistochemical staining of sections of wound tissue were examined at different time points after intervention. [Results] The wound healing time was shorter in the topical oxygen therapy group than the control group. The wound healing rate and granulation tissue formation in the topical oxygen therapy group showed significant improvement on days 3, 7, and 14. Through van Gieson staining, the accumulation of collagen fiber in the topical oxygen therapy group was found to have improved when compared with the control group on day 7. Through semiquantitative immunohistochemical staining, many more new vessels were found in the topical oxygen therapy group compared with the model control group on day 7. [Conclusion] The results of the experiment showed that topical oxygen therapy improved ischemic wound healing.

  9. [Therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Gulczyńska, Ewa; Gadzinowski, Janusz

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia in the perinatal period is a serious condition affecting infants, which can result in death and cerebral palsy and associated disabilities. There has been significant research progress in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy over the last 2 decades. Many new molecular mechanisms of asphyxia have been identified. Despite all these advances, therapeutic interventions in HIE remain to be limited. Recently it has been revealed that mild therapeutic hypothermia is the only modality shown to improve neurologic outcome. The authors present a summary of pathogenesis of HIE, animal studies of cooling for hypoxic and ischemic models, and first publications on human therapeutic hypothermia trials. The diagnosis of encephalopathy in full-term neonates and enrollment criteria for hypothermia are also discussed. The current data from randomized control trials of hypothermia as neuroprotection for full and near-term infants are presented along with the results of meta-analyses of these trials. Finally the status of ongoing neonatal hypothermia trials as well as status of therapeutic hypothermia in Poland is summarized.

  10. [PROBLEM OF END EFFECTOR OF ISCHEMIC POSTCONDITIONING OF THE HEART].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Naryzhnaya, N V; Pei, J-M; Zhang, Y; Wang, H; Khaliulin, I J; Lishmanov, Yu B

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that cardiovascular disease and in particular acute myocardial infarction are a major cause of death among working-age population in Russia. Some of the patients die after successful recanalization of the infarct-related coronary artery as a result of ischemic and reperfusion injury of the heart. It is obvious that there is an urgent need to develop new approaches to prevention reoxygenation heart damages. In this regard the study of adaptive phenomenon postconditioning is of particular interest. This analysis of literature source preformed by authors of the article indicates that main pretenders to the role of end-effectors of ischemic postconditioning of the heart are: (1) Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channel of BK-type (big conductance K+ channel), (2) mitoKATp channel (mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel), (3) MPT pore (mitochondrial permeability transition pore). At the same time, some investigators consider that mitoK(ATP) channel is only an intermediate link in the series of signaling events ensured an increase in cardiac tolerance to impact of ischemia-reperfusion. The most likely end effector of these three structures is MPT pore. Alternatively, it is possible, that unique molecular complex appearing a single end effector of postconditioning does not exist. Perhaps, that there are several effectors ensured cardioprotective effect of an adaptive phenomenon of postconditioning. PMID:26470485

  11. Cardioprotection Acquired Through Exercise: The Role of Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Marongiu, Elisabetta; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    A great bulk of evidence supports the concept that regular exercise training can reduce the incidence of coronary events and increase survival chances after myocardial infarction. These exercise-induced beneficial effects on the myocardium are reached by means of the reduction of several risk factors relating to cardiovascular disease, such as high cholesterol, hypertension, obesity etc. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that exercise can reproduce the “ischemic preconditioning” (IP), which refers to the capacity of short periods of ischemia to render the myocardium more resistant to subsequent ischemic insult and to limit infarct size during prolonged ischemia. However, IP is a complex phenomenon which, along with infarct size reduction, can also provide protection against arrhythmia and myocardial stunning due to ischemia-reperfusion. Several clues demonstrate that preconditioning may be directly induced by exercise, thus inducing a protective phenotype at the heart level without the necessity of causing ischemia. Exercise appears to act as a physiological stress that induces beneficial myocardial adaptive responses at cellular level. The purpose of the present paper is to review the latest data on the role played by exercise in triggering myocardial preconditioning. PMID:24720421

  12. Amelioration of myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury with Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Ray, Diptarka; Mukherjee, Subhendu; Falchi, Mario; Bertelli, Aldo; Das, Dipak K

    2010-12-01

    Calendula officinalis of family Asteraceae, also known as marigold, has been widely used from time immemorial in Indian and Arabic cultures as an anti-inflammatory agent to treat minor skin wound and infections, burns, bee stings, sunburn and cancer. At a relatively high dose, calendula can lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Since inflammatory responses are behind many cardiac diseases, we sought to evaluate if calendula could be cardioprotective against ischemic heart disease Two groups of hearts were used: the treated rat hearts were perfused with calendula solution at 50 mM in KHB buffer (in mM: sodium chloride 118, potassium chloride 4.7, calcium chloride 1.7, sodium bicarbonate 25, potassium biphosphate 0.36, magnesium sulfate 1.2, and glucose 10) for 15 min prior to subjecting the heart to ischemia, while the control group was perfused with the buffer only. Calendula achieved cardioprotection by stimulating left ventricular developed pressure and aortic flow as well as by reducing myocardial infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Cardioprotection appears to be achieved by changing ischemia reperfusion-mediated death signal into a survival signal by modulating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory pathways as evidenced by the activation of Akt and Bcl2 and depression of TNFα. The results further strengthen the concept of using natural products in degeneration diseases like ischemic heart disease.

  13. Cardioprotection acquired through exercise: the role of ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Elisabetta; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    A great bulk of evidence supports the concept that regular exercise training can reduce the incidence of coronary events and increase survival chances after myocardial infarction. These exercise-induced beneficial effects on the myocardium are reached by means of the reduction of several risk factors relating to cardiovascular disease, such as high cholesterol, hypertension, obesity etc. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that exercise can reproduce the "ischemic preconditioning" (IP), which refers to the capacity of short periods of ischemia to render the myocardium more resistant to subsequent ischemic insult and to limit infarct size during prolonged ischemia. However, IP is a complex phenomenon which, along with infarct size reduction, can also provide protection against arrhythmia and myocardial stunning due to ischemia-reperfusion. Several clues demonstrate that preconditioning may be directly induced by exercise, thus inducing a protective phenotype at the heart level without the necessity of causing ischemia. Exercise appears to act as a physiological stress that induces beneficial myocardial adaptive responses at cellular level. The purpose of the present paper is to review the latest data on the role played by exercise in triggering myocardial preconditioning.

  14. Glucose modulation of ischemic brain injury: review and clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Wass, C T; Lanier, W L

    1996-08-01

    Ischemic brain injury is the third-leading cause of death among Americans and the leading cause of serious disability. Based on studies of animal models, a substantial amount of experimental evidence shows that hyperglycemia at the onset of brain ischemia worsens postischemic neurologic outcome. Consistent with these observations, hyperglycemia also is associated with a worsening of postischemic brain injury in humans. In humans, however, data are often difficult to interpret because of problems in determining the timing of hyperglycemia relative to a critical ischemic event and in elucidating the effect of coexisting pathophysiologic processes (for example, a stress response) on outcome. Glucose modulation of neurologic injury is observed when ischemia is either global (for example, that accompanying cardiac arrest or severe systemic hypotension) or focal (for example, that accompanying thrombotic or embolic stroke). Toxicity is probably the result of an intracellular lactic acidosis. Specifically, the associated hydrogen ions are injurious to neurons and glia. On the basis of these factors, we recommend diligent monitoring of blood glucose concentrations in patients who are at increased risk for new-onset, ongoing, or recurring cerebral ischemia. In such patients, the use of fluid infusions, corticosteroid drugs, and insulin, as well as stress management, should be tailored to treat preexisting hyperglycemia and prevent new-onset hyperglycemia. Maintenance of normoglycemia is recommended. When one attempts to treat preexisting hyperglycemia, care should be taken to avoid rapid fluid shifts, electrolyte abnormalities, and hypoglycemia, all of which can be detrimental to the brain.

  15. The Clinical Status of Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianyun; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Li, Jing; Li, Yaqi; Tan, Zirui; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Stem cell-based therapy is emerging as a promising option for treatment of ICM. Several stem cell types including cardiac-derived stem cells (CSCs), bone marrow-derived stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), skeletal myoblasts (SMs), and CD34+ and CD 133+ stem cells have been applied in clinical researches. The clinical effect produced by stem cell administration in ICM mainly depends on the transdifferentiation and paracrine effect. One important issue is that low survival and residential rate of transferred stem cells in the infracted myocardium blocks the effective advances in cardiac improvement. Many other factors associated with the efficacy of cell replacement therapy for ICM mainly including the route of delivery, the type and number of stem cell infusion, the timing of injection, patient's physical condition, the particular microenvironment onto which the cells are delivered, and clinical condition remain to be addressed. Here we provide an overview of the pros and cons of these transferred cells and discuss the current state of their therapeutic potential. We believe that stem cell translation will be an ideal option for patients following ischemic heart disease in the future. PMID:26101528

  16. 25. Ischemic pain in the extremities and Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Devulder, Jacques; van Suijlekom, Hans; van Dongen, Robert; Diwan, Sudhir; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Huygen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Two important groups of disorders result from an insufficient blood supply to the extremities: critical vascular disease and the Raynaud's phenomenon. The latter can be subdivided into a primary and a secondary type. Critical ischemic disease is often caused by arteriosclerosis due to hypertension or diabetes. Primary Raynaud's is idiopathic and will be diagnosed as such if underlying systemic pathology has been excluded. Secondary Raynaud's is often a manifestation of a systemic disease. It is essential to try to establish a diagnosis as soon as possible in order to influence the evolution of the disease. A sympathetic nerve block can be considered in patients with critical ischemic vascular disease after extensive conservative treatment, preferably in the context of a study (2B±). If this has insufficient effect, spinal cord stimulation can be considered in a selected patient group (2B±). In view of the degree of invasiveness and the costs involved, this treatment should preferably be applied in the context of a study and with the use of transcutaneous pO(2) measurements. In case of primary Raynaud's, life style changes are the first step. Sympathectomy can be considered as a treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon (2C+), but only after multidisciplinary evaluation of the patient and in close consultation with the patient's rheumatologist, vascular surgeon or internist.

  17. Plasminogen Activators and Ischemic Stroke: Conditions for Acute Delivery

    PubMed Central

    del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate acute treatment with plasminogen activators (PAs) can significantly increase the probability of minimal or no disability in selected ischemic stroke patients. There is a great deal of evidence showing that intravenous recombinant tissue PAs (rt-PA) infusion accomplishes this goal, recanalization with other PAs has also been demonstrated in the development of this treatment. Recanalization of symptomatic, documented carotid or vertebrobasilar arterial territory occlusions have also been achieved by local intra-arterial PA delivery, although only a single prospective double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study has been reported. The increase in intracerebral hemorrhage with these agents by either delivery approach underscores the need for careful patient selection, dose-appropriate safety and efficacy, proper clinical trial design, and an understanding of the evolution of cerebral tissue injury due to focal ischemia. Principles underlying the evolution of focal ischemia have been expanded by experience with acute PA intervention. Several questions remain open that concern the manner in which PAs can be applied acutely in ischemic stroke and how injury development can be limited. PMID:23539414

  18. Profile of prothrombotic factors in Indian children with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Konanki, Ramesh; Gulati, Sheffali; Saxena, Renu; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Seith, Ashu; Kumar, Ashok; Saxena, Anita; Kabra, Madhulika; Kalra, Veena; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan

    2014-08-01

    This study was undertaken in view of paucity of data regarding the profile of prothrombotic factors in children with ischemic stroke. Sixty-four children with ischemic stroke were prospectively evaluated for prothrombotic factors over a 2 year period. The blood samples were analyzed for protein C (PC), protein S (PS), activated protein C resistance (APCR), factor V Leiden (FVL), anti-thrombin-III (AT-III), lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], lupus anticoagulant (LA), anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL) immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG, homocysteine, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) at least 3 months after the onset of stroke. At least one prothrombotic factor was identified in 45.3% children (29/64). These included hyperhomocysteinemia (11/64), PC deficiency (9/64), aCL (8/64), PS deficiency (5/64), APCR (3/64), AT-III deficiency (2/64) and LA (1/64). Multiple factors were coexistent in 17.2% (11/64). The prevalence of PC deficiency, PS deficiency and co-existence of multiple abnormalities observed were similar to the published literature. Elevated Lp(a) and APCR were less prevalent. FVL and MTHFR were not seen in any of the study children. Forty-five percent of children had at least one prothrombotic abnormality. Hyperhomocysteinemia, PC deficiency, aCL and PS deficiency were the most frequent prothrombotic abnormalities. PMID:24629397

  19. Protective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning in isolated rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xiao; Yuan, Xin; Tang, Yue; Shi, Jingqian

    2015-01-01

    To use Langendorff model to investigate whether remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) attenuates post-ischemic mechanical dysfunction on isolated rat heart and to explore possible mechanisms. SD rats were randomly divided into RIPC group, RIPC + norepinephrine (NE) depletion group, RIPC + pertussis toxin (PTX) pretreatment group, ischemia/reperfusion group without treatment (ischemia group) and time control (TC) group. RIPC was achieved through interrupted occlusion of anterior mesenteric artery. Then, Langendorff model was established using routine methods. Heart function was tested; immunohistochemistry and ELISA methods were used to detect various indices related to myocardial injury. Compared with ischemia group in which the hemodynamic parameters deteriorated significantly, heart function recovered to a certain degree among the RIPC, RIPC + NE depletion, and RIPC + PTX groups (P<0.05). More apoptotic nuclei were observed in ischemia group than in the other three groups (P<0.05); more apoptotic nuclei were detected in NE depletion and PTX groups than in RIPC group (P<0.05). While, there was no significant difference between NE depletion and PTX groups. In conclusion, RIPC protection on I/R myocardium extends to the period after hearts are isolated. NE and PTX-sensitive inhibitory G protein might have a role in the protection process. PMID:26550168

  20. Ischemic hepatitis after percutaneous nephrolitotomy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Temiz, Mustafa Zafer; Yuruk, Emrah; Teberik, Kutlu; Akbas, Burcu Kadriye; Piroglu, Mustafa Devrim; Oztorun, Hande Selvi; Kandirali, Engin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ischemic hepatitis (IH) is the necrosis of the centrilobular hepatocytes of liver and is secondary to liver hypoperfusion in most of the cases. The diagnosis is usually based on biochemical findings due to the absence of symptoms and signs. Although the disease course is often mild, and sometimes is even not diagnosed, the outcome is poor if the etiology of hypotension and liver anoxia is not promptly corrected. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 64-year-old patient who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) for right renal pelvic stone developed acute IH at first postoperative day as a result of hemorrhage related severe hypotension. After restoring hemodynamic parameters, she completely recovered 2 weeks after the operation. DISCUSSION IH is a frequent cause of marked serum aminotransferase elevation and most commonly occurs as a result of arterial hypoxemia and insufficient hepatic perfusion. Although no specific treatment of IH exists, stabilizing the hemodynamic parameters of the patient resolves the problem in most of the cases. CONCLUSION This case is presented to demonstrate that ischemic hepatitis should be kept in mind if severe hemorrhage occurs during PNL. PMID:25437690

  1. [Gene-stem Cell therapy for ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Abe, Koji

    2009-09-01

    Besides blood flow restoration, neuroprotection is essential for treating strokes at an acute stage. Both neurotrophic factors (NTFs) and free radical scavengers can act as neuroprotective agents with abilities to inhibit cell death and facilitate cell survival under cerebral ischemia. For example, topical application of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) remarkably reduced infarct size and brain edema after middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in rats. Reduction in the infarct size was not found to be related to a change in the cerebral blood flow (CBF), but was accompanied by marked reduction in BrdU-positive cells in the affected area after TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) for caspses. Thus, GDNF elicited a direct protective effect against ischemic brain damage, but without improving CBF. Sendai virus vectors harboring the GDNF gene led to a remarkable reduction in infract volume without affecting regional CBF but reduced the translocation of apoptosis inducible factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to cytoplasm. Regenerative therapy involving neural stem cells which are intrinsically activated or exogenously transplanted, is an important treatment strategy. To facilitate stem cell migration, an artificial scaffold can be implanted into the injured brain for promoting ischemic brain repair. Addition of NTFs greatly enhanced an intrinsic migration or invasion of stem cells into the scaffold: this strategy could be used in the future for enhancing regenerative potential of brain cells after chronic ischemia-induced brain damage. PMID:19803403

  2. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  3. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  4. Thrombin induces ischemic LTP (iLTP): implications for synaptic plasticity in the acute phase of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Efrat Shavit; Itsekson-Hayosh, Zeev; Aronovich, Anna; Reisner, Yair; Bushi, Doron; Pick, Chaim G.; Tanne, David; Chapman, Joab; Vlachos, Andreas; Maggio, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain ischemia modifies synaptic plasticity by inducing ischemic long-term potentiation (iLTP) of synaptic transmission through the activation of N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR). Thrombin, a blood coagulation factor, affects synaptic plasticity in an NMDAR dependent manner. Since its activity and concentration is increased in brain tissue upon acute stroke, we sought to clarify whether thrombin could mediate iLTP through the activation of its receptor Protease-Activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Extracellular recordings were obtained in CA1 region of hippocampal slices from C57BL/6 mice. In vitro ischemia was induced by acute (3 minutes) oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). A specific ex vivo enzymatic assay was employed to assess thrombin activity in hippocampal slices, while OGD-induced changes in prothrombin mRNA levels were assessed by (RT)qPCR. Upon OGD, thrombin activity increased in hippocampal slices. A robust potentiation of excitatory synaptic strength was detected, which occluded the ability to induce further LTP. Inhibition of either thrombin or its receptor PAR1 blocked iLTP and restored the physiological, stimulus induced LTP. Our study provides important insights on the early changes occurring at excitatory synapses after ischemia and indicates the thrombin/PAR1 pathway as a novel target for developing therapeutic strategies to restore synaptic function in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. PMID:25604482

  5. Current knowledge on the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties of citicoline in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Martynov, Mikhail Yu; Gusev, Eugeny I

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of long-lasting disability and death. Two main strategies have been proposed for the treatment of ischemic stroke: restoration of blood flow by thrombolysis or mechanical thrombus extraction during the first few hours of ischemic stroke, which is one of the most effective treatments and leads to a better functional and clinical outcome. The other direction of treatment, which is potentially applicable to most of the patients with ischemic stroke, is neuroprotection. Initially, neuroprotection was mainly targeted at protecting gray matter, but during the past few years there has been a transition from a neuron-oriented approach toward salvaging the whole neurovascular unit using multimodal drugs. Citicoline is a multimodal drug that exhibits neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in a variety of experimental and clinical disorders of the central nervous system, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and global cerebral hypoxia. Citicoline has a prolonged therapeutic window and is active at various temporal and biochemical stages of the ischemic cascade. In acute ischemic stroke, citicoline provides neuroprotection by attenuating glutamate exitotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and blood–brain barrier dysfunction. In the subacute and chronic phases of ischemic stroke, citicoline exhibits neuroregenerative effects and activates neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis and enhances neurotransmitter metabolism. Acute and long-term treatment with citicoline is safe and in most clinical studies is effective and improves functional outcome. PMID:27186142

  6. Acute extensive ischemic enteritis in a young man diagnosed with wireless capsule endoscopy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Seong; Song, Hyun Joo; Na, Soo Young; Boo, Sun Jin; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jinseok; Choi, Guk Myung

    2013-03-25

    Ischemic enteritis is caused by either the interruption or significant reduction of arterial inflow to the small intestine. Risk factors are old age, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. It is very rare in young patients. We experienced a 21-year-old man with recurrent acute ischemic enteritis who was diagnosed with capsule endoscopy. He had previously taken medications for pulmonary hypertension and obstruction of both carotid arteries, and about 20 months earlier, he had been admitted due to hematochezia. Two sessions of angiography did not reveal the cause of hematochezia. At that time, capsule endoscopy showed mucosal edema and erythema in the terminal ileum, suggesting healed ischemic enteritis. The patient was admitted again due to hematochezia. Abdominal computed tomography showed focal celiac trunk stenosis and diffuse wall thickening of the small intestine, suggesting ischemic enteritis. Capsule endoscopy showed multiple active ulcers and severe hemorrhage with exudate, extending from the proximal jejunum to the terminal ileum. Using capsule endoscopy, the patient was diagnosed with acute extensive ischemic enteritis. Because endoscopic images of ischemic enteritis have rarely been reported, we report a case of a 21-year-old man who was diagnosed acute extensive ischemic enteritis with capsule endoscopy.

  7. The Time of Maximum Post-Ischemic Hyperperfusion Indicates Infarct Growth Following Transient Experimental Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, Susanne; Artmann, Judith; Luft, Andreas R.; Buxton, Richard B.; Weller, Michael; Wong, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    After recanalization, cerebral blood flow (CBF) can increase above baseline in cerebral ischemia. However, the significance of post-ischemic hyperperfusion for tissue recovery remains unclear. To analyze the course of post-ischemic hyperperfusion and its impact on vascular function, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL) and measured CBF quantitatively during and after a 60 minute transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in adult rats. We added a 5% CO2 - challenge to analyze vasoreactivity in the same animals. Results from MRI were compared to histological correlates of angiogenesis. We found that CBF in the ischemic area recovered within one day and reached values significantly above contralateral thereafter. The extent of hyperperfusion changed over time, which was related to final infarct size: early (day 1) maximal hyperperfusion was associated with smaller lesions, whereas a later (day 4) maximum indicated large lesions. Furthermore, after initial vasoparalysis within the ischemic area, vasoreactivity on day 14 was above baseline in a fraction of animals, along with a higher density of blood vessels in the ischemic border zone. These data provide further evidence that late post-ischemic hyperperfusion is a sequel of ischemic damage in regions that are likely to undergo infarction. However, it is transient and its resolution coincides with re-gaining of vascular structure and function. PMID:23741488

  8. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 as a Therapeutic Target in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, H

    2010-01-01

    In stroke research, a significant focus is to develop therapeutic strategies that prevent neuronal death and improve recovery. Yet, few successful therapeutic strategies have emerged. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a key regulator in hypoxia. It has been suggested to be an important player in neurological outcomes following ischemic stroke due to the functions of its downstream genes. These include genes that promote glucose metabolism, angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, and cell survival. Many lines of evidence have shown that HIF-1 is induced in ischemic brains. Importantly, it seems that HIF-1 is primarily induced in the salvageable tissue of an ischemic brain, penumbra. However, the effect of HIF-1 on neuronal tissue injuries is still debatable based on evidence from in vitro and preclinical studies. Furthermore, it is of importance to understand the mechanism of HIF-1 degradation after its induction in ischemic brain. This review provides a present understanding of the mechanism of HIF-1 induction in ischemic neurons and the potential effect of HIF-1 on ischemic brain tissue. The author also elaborates on potential therapeutic approaches through understanding of the induction mechanism and of the potential role of HIF-1 in ischemic stroke. PMID:19903149

  9. Recombinant human erythropoietin stimulates angiogenesis and healing of ischemic skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Michele; Galeano, Mariarosaria; Sturiale, Alessio; Ientile, Riccardo; Crisafulli, Costantino; Parisi, Alessandra; Catania, MariaAntonietta; Calapai, Gioacchino; Impalà, Patrizia; Aloisi, Carmela; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Bitto, Alessandra; Tuccari, Giovanni; Frisina, Nicola

    2004-08-01

    Wound healing in ischemic tissues such as flap margins due to inadequate blood supply is still a source of considerable morbidity in surgical practice. Adequate tissue perfusion is particularly important in wound healing. We investigated the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) on wound healing in an ischemic skin wound model. Sixty-three Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Normal incisional wound and H-shaped double flaps were used as the wound models. Animals were treated with rHuEPO (400 IU/kg) or its vehicle. Rats were killed on different days (3, 5, and 10 days after skin injury) and the wounded skin tissues were used for immunohistochemistry and for analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor content and collagen content. Tissue transglutaminase immunostaining of histological specimens was used as a vascular marker to determine the level of microvessel density. The results showed a higher level of vascular endothelial growth factor protein and an increased microvessel density in ischemic wounds with rHuEPO treatment than the normal incisional wounds and ischemic control wounds. Collagen content was higher in the incisional wounds and in the ischemic wounds with rHuEPO treatment compared with the ischemic control wounds. Our results suggest that erythropoietin may be an effective therapeutic approach in improving healing in ischemic skin wounds.

  10. Assessment of Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina Ivette; Mullins, Carola; Solberg, Agnieszka; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. In the last two decades, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has emerged as the primary imaging tool in the detection and prognostic assessment of ischemic heart disease. In a single study, CMRI allows evaluation of not only myocardial wall perfusion, but also the presence, acuity, and extent of myocardial ischemia and infarction complications. Also, rest and stress perfusion imaging can accurately depict inducible ischemia secondary to significant coronary artery stenosis. We present a pictorial review of the assessment of ischemic cardiomyopathy with an emphasis on CMRI features. PMID:26085960

  11. [Dynamics of intracranial pressure in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A S; Burov, S A; Petrikov, S S; Asratian, S A; Gorshkov, K M; Krylov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was assessment of the value of ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy. 12 patients with massive ischemic stroke were performed ICP monitoring after decompressive craniotomy. We identified 3 types of ICP dynamics: a) normal ICP, which no need to treat; b) ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more in postoperative period, which can be treated by nonsurgical therapy; c) refractory to therapy ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more with development of intracranial hypertension. We consider that ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy can be useful for optimization of the therapy and correction of intracranial hypertension.

  12. [NDT-Bobath method used in the rehabilitation of patients with a history of ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Kubsik, Anna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and disability in human. The vitally important problem after ischemic stroke is hemiparesis of the body. The most common methods used in improving the mobility of patients after ischemic stroke is a Bobath-NDT (Neuro-Developmental Treatment - Bobath), which initiated the Berta and Karel Bobath for children with cerebral palsy. It is a method designed to neurophysiological recovery of these vital functions that the patient was lost due to illness, and wants it back. PMID:23289255

  13. The emotional stress and risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kotlęga, Dariusz; Gołąb-Janowska, Monika; Masztalewicz, Marta; Ciećwież, Sylwester; Nowacki, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide, and the leading cause of acquired disability in adults in most regions. There have been distinguished modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors of stroke. Among them the emotional stress was presented as a risk factor. The aim of this review was to present available data regarding the influence of acute and chronic mental stress on the risk of ischemic stroke as well as discussing the potential pathomechanisms of such relationship. There is an evident association between both acute and chronic emotional stress and risk of stroke. Several potential mechanisms are discussed to be the cause. Stress can increase the cerebrovascular disease risk by modulating symphaticomimetic activity, affecting the blood pressure reactivity, cerebral endothelium, coagulation or heart rhythm. The emotional stress seems to be still underestimated risk factor in neurological practice and research. Further studies and analyses should be provided for better understanding of this complex, not fully known epidemiological problem.

  14. Acute adenosinergic cardioprotection in ischemic-reperfused hearts.

    PubMed

    Headrick, John P; Hack, Ben; Ashton, Kevin J

    2003-11-01

    Cells of the cardiovascular system generate and release purine nucleoside adenosine in increasing quantities when constituent cells are "stressed" or subjected to injurious stimuli. This increased adenosine can interact with surface receptors in myocardial, vascular, fibroblast, and inflammatory cells to modulate cellular function and phenotype. Additionally, adenosine is rapidly reincorporated back into 5'-AMP to maintain the adenine nucleotide pool. Via these receptor-dependent and independent (metabolic) paths, adenosine can substantially modify the acute response to ischemic insult, in addition to generating a more sustained ischemia-tolerant phenotype (preconditioning). However, the molecular basis for acute adenosinergic cardioprotection remains incompletely understood and may well differ from more widely studied preconditioning. Here we review current knowledge and some controversies regarding acute cardioprotection via adenosine and adenosine receptor activation.

  15. Motor performance improved by exercises in cerebral ischemic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yea-Ru; Chang, Heng-Chih; Wang, Paulus S; Wang, Ray-Yau

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise may induce neuroprotective effects against brain damage after stroke. The authors aimed to investigate the effects of various exercises on motor function, striatal angiogenesis, and infarct volume in cerebral ischemic rats. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion and randomly assigned to 1 of the 4 groups: Rota-rod training, lower speed treadmill training, higher speed treadmill training, or no exercise control. Motor function, striatal angiogenesis, and infarct volume were evaluated before or after motor training. After training, motor function and striatal angiogenesis changed significantly in Rota-rod and higher speed treadmill training groups as compared with the control group. Improvement in motor function significantly correlated with striatal angiogenesis after motor training. Infarct volumes were significantly decreased in lower and higher speed treadmill training groups. The results indicated that both motor training procedures can be used as effective training programs in stroke rehabilitation.

  16. Emergency EEG and continuous EEG monitoring in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Kenneth G

    2004-01-01

    There is physiologic coupling of EEG morphology, frequencies, and amplitudes with cerebral blood flow. Intraoperative continuous electroencephalographic monitoring (CEEG) is an established modality that has been used for 30 years to detect cerebral ischemia during carotid surgery. These facts have generated interest in applying EEG/CEEG in the intensive care unit to monitor cerebral ischemia. However, its use in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has been limited, and its value has been questioned in comparison with modern MRI imaging techniques and the clinical neurologic examination. This review presents evidence that EEG/CEEG adds value to early diagnosis, outcome prediction, patient selection for treatment, clinical management, and seizure detection in AIS. Research studies correlating EEG/CEEG and advanced imaging techniques in AIS are encouraged. Improvements in real-time ischemia detection systems are needed for EEG/CEEG to have wider application in AIS. PMID:15592008

  17. Nitrite as a mediator of ischemic preconditioning and cytoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, Daniel; Kamga, Christelle; Mo, Li; Shiva, Sruti

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury is a central component in the pathogenesis of several diseases and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Subcellularly, mitochondrial dysfunction, characterized by depletion of ATP, calcium-induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and exacerbated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, plays an integral role in the progression of IR injury. Nitric oxide (NO) and more recently nitrite (NO2-) are known to modulate mitochondrial function, mediate cytoprotection after IR and have been implicated in the signaling of the highly protective ischemic preconditioning (IPC) program. Here, we review what is known about the role of NO and nitrite in cytoprotection after IR and consider the putative role of nitrite in IPC. Focus is placed on the potential cytoprotective mechanisms involving NO and nitrite-dependent modulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:21277988

  18. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration

  19. [The neurovascular unit in health and ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Ago, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    The neurovascular unit (NVU), a minimal unit to exert neurological functions, is composed of neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes, and extracellular matrix proteins forming basal membranes. The cell components interact with one another and function cooperatively under both physiological and pathological conditions. Pericytes and astrocytes participate crucially in the formation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the tight junction formed by endothelial cells, and regulate cerebral blood flow in response to neurological activities. The BBB actively regulate molecular import and export. The concept of the NVU is also useful for understanding pathogenesis and exploring therapeutic targets in various CNS disorders. In this review, recent research advances regarding the NVU and its components in health and ischemic stroke are summarized. PMID:27333744

  20. Ischemic Heart Disease in Women: A Focus on Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Puja K.; Wei, Janet; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease remains a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in women in the United States and worldwide. This review highlights known and emerging risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in women. Traditional Framingham risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, as well as lifestyle habits such as unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle are all modifiable. Health care providers should be aware of emerging cardiac risk factors in women such as adverse pregnancy outcomes, systemic autoimmune disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, and radiation-induced heart disease; psychosocial factors such as mental stress, depression, anxiety, low socioeconomic status, and work and marital stress play an important role in IHD in women. Appropriate recognition and management of an array of risk factors is imperative given the growing burden of IHD and need to deliver cost-effective, quality care for women. PMID:25453985

  1. Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Vascular Ischemic (Occlusive) Diseases: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is primarily considered to be an autoimmune pathological condition that is also referred to as "Hughes syndrome". It is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and pregnancy pathologies in the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant. APS can occur either as a primary disease or secondary to a connective tissue disorder, most frequently systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Damage to the nervous system is one of the most prominent clinical constellations of sequelae in APS and includes (i) arterial/venous thrombotic events, (ii) psychiatric features and (iii) other non-thrombotic neurological syndromes. In this overview we compare the most important vascular ischemic (occlusive) disturbances (VIOD) with neuro-psychiatric symptomatics, together with complete, updated classifications and hypotheses for the etio-pathogenesis of APS with underlying clinical and laboratory criteria for optimal diagnosis and disease management. PMID:18159581

  2. Arterial ischemic stroke in children: 22 cases from southern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Sfaihi, Lamia; Elloumi, Sana; Fourati, Hela; Kamoun, Thouraya; Mnif, Zeineb; Hachicha, Mongia

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to review the cases of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) in children in our department to evaluate the clinical and neuroimaging features, the etiologies and the treatment. This study retrospectively reviewed the records of all children aged between 1 month and 16 years who were admitted from 2000 to 2010 for AIS in the pediatrics department of Hedi Chaker University hospital in Sfax, Tunisia. Twenty-two children were enrolled. The average age at stroke was 3 years and 2 months. Cardiac disease (27%) and moyamoya disease (18%) were the most common etiologies. Adverse outcome after childhood stroke includes death in 9%, recurrence in 18% and neurologic deficits in 45%.

  3. Neuroprotective agents for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiaofeng; Chen, Wu; Sinha, Bharati; Tu, Yanyang; Manning, Simon; Thomas, Niranjan; Zhou, Shuanhu; Jiang, Hong; Ma, He; Kroessler, Daphne A; Yao, Jiemin; Li, Zhipu; Inder, Terry E; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) brain injury in newborns is a major cause of morbidity and mortality that claims thousands of lives each year. In this review, we summarize the promising neuroprotective agents tested on animal models and pilot clinical studies of neonatal H-I brain injury according to the different phases of the disease. These agents target various phases of injury including the early phase of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis as well as late-phase inflammatory reaction and neural repair. We analyze the cell survival and cell death pathways modified by these agents in neonatal H-I brain injury. We aim to 'build a bridge' between animal trials of neuroprotective agents and potential candidate treatments for future clinical applications against H-I encephalopathy. PMID:26360053

  4. Ischemic stroke injury is mediated by aberrant Cdk5.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Douglas A; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Tan, Zhenjun; Tozzi, Alessandro; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; DiNapoli, Vincent; Plattner, Florian; Kansy, Janice W; Benkovic, Stanley A; Huber, Jason D; Miller, Diane B; Greengard, Paul; Calabresi, Paolo; Rosen, Charles L; Bibb, James A

    2014-06-11

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Treatment options are limited and only a minority of patients receive acute interventions. Understanding the mechanisms that mediate neuronal injury and death may identify targets for neuroprotective treatments. Here we show that the aberrant activity of the protein kinase Cdk5 is a principal cause of neuronal death in rodents during stroke. Ischemia induced either by embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in vivo or by oxygen and glucose deprivation in brain slices caused calpain-dependent conversion of the Cdk5-activating cofactor p35 to p25. Inhibition of aberrant Cdk5 during ischemia protected dopamine neurotransmission, maintained field potentials, and blocked excitotoxicity. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or conditional knock-out (CKO) of Cdk5 prevented neuronal death in response to ischemia. Moreover, Cdk5 CKO dramatically reduced infarctions following MCAO. Thus, targeting aberrant Cdk5 activity may serve as an effective treatment for stroke.

  5. Can anaerobic performance be improved by remote ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed

    Lalonde, François; Curnier, Daniel Y

    2015-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) provides a substantial benefit for heart protection during surgery. Recent literature on RIPC reveals the potential to benefit the enhancement of sports performance as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of RIPC on anaerobic performance. Seventeen healthy participants who practice regular physical activity participated in the project (9 women and 8 men, mean age 28 ± 8 years). The participants were randomly assigned to an RIPC intervention (four 5-minute cycles of ischemia reperfusion, followed by 5 minutes using a pressure cuff) or a SHAM intervention in a crossover design. After the intervention, the participants were tested for alactic anaerobic performance (6 seconds of effort) followed by a Wingate test (lactic system) on an electromagnetic cycle ergometer. The following parameters were evaluated: average power, peak power, the scale of perceived exertion, fatigue index (in watt per second), peak power (in Watt), time to reach peak power (in seconds), minimum power (in Watt), the average power-to-weight ratio (in watt per kilogram), and the maximum power-to-weight ratio (in watt per kilogram). The peak power for the Wingate test is 794 W for RIPC and 777 W for the control group (p = 0.208). The average power is 529 W (RIPC) vs. 520 W for controls (p = 0.079). Perceived effort for RIPC is 9/10 on the Borg scale vs. 10/10 for the control group (p = 0.123). Remote ischemic preconditioning does not offer any significant benefits for anaerobic performance.

  6. Ethanol Promotes Arteriogenesis and Restores Perfusion to Chronically Ischemic Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Lassaletta, Antonio D.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Liu, Yuhong; Feng, Jun; Burgess, Thomas A.; Karlson, Nicholas W.; Laham, Roger J.; Sellke, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Moderate alcohol consumption is known to be cardioprotective as compared to either heavy drinking or complete abstinence. We assessed the hypothesis that ethanol supplementation would improve myocardial function in the setting of chronic ischemia. Methods and Results Sixteen male Yorkshire swine underwent placement of an ameroid constrictor to the left circumflex artery to induce chronic myocardial ischemia. Post-operatively animals were supplemented with either 90 ml of ethanol daily (50%/V, EtOH) or 80 g of sucrose of equal caloric value (SUC) serving as controls. Seven weeks after ameroid placement, arteriolar density (1.74 ± 0.210 vs. 3.11 ± 0.368 % area of arterioles per low-powered field in SUC vs. EtOH, p = 0.004), myocardial perfusion (ratio of blood flow to the at-risk myocardium compared to the normal ventricle during demand pacing was 0.585 ± 0.107 vs. 1.08 ± 0.138 for SUC vs. EtOH, p = 0.014), and microvascular reactivity were significantly increased in the ethanol-treated animals compared to controls in the at-risk myocardium. Analysis of VEGF and NOTCH pathway signaling suggested pro-neovascular and proliferative activity in the ischemic area. The average peak blood alcohol level in the treatment group was 40 ± 4 mg/dL consistent with levels of moderate drinking in humans. Conclusions Ethanol supplementation increased arteriolar density and significantly improved myocardial perfusion and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in chronically ischemic myocardium. These findings suggest that at moderate doses, ethanol directly promotes vasculogenesis and improves microvascular function resulting in significant improvements in myocardial perfusion in the setting of chronic ischemia. PMID:24030397

  7. Proton relaxation in acute and subacute ischemic brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Boisvert, D.P.; Handa, Y.; Allen, P.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The relation between regional ischemic brain edema and tissue proton relaxation rates (R1 = 1/T1; R2 = 1/T2) were studied in 16 macaque monkeys subjected to MCA occlusion. In vivo R2 measurements were obtained from multiple spin-echo (eight echoes) images taken at 2-, 3-, 4-, and 72-hr postischemia. In vitro R1 and R2 values were determined for corresponding regions after sacrifice at 4 hr (n = 8) or at 72-hr postischemia in seven surviving animals. The water content of the white and gray matter tissue samples was measured by the wet/dry method. Four animals (25%) showed ipsilateral regions of increased signal intensity as early as 2 hr after MCA occlusion. All seven animals imaged at 72 hr displayed such regions. Despite the absence of measured changes in tissue water content, significant decreases in R2, but not in R1, occurred at 4 hr. At this stage, R2 values correlated more closely than R1 with individual variations in water content. At 72 hr, marked decreases in both R1 and R2 were measured in ischemic deep gray matter and white matter. Cortical gray matter was unchanged. In edematous gray and white matter, both R1 and R2 correlated closely with tissue water content, but R2 was consistently 10 to 20 times more sensitive than R1. Biexponential R2 decay was observed at 4 and 72 hr, but only in the white matter region that became severely edematous at 72 hr.

  8. Buyanghuanwu Tang therapy for neonatal rats with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiyao; Min, Yue; Gu, Weiwang; Wang, Yujue; Tian, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a clinical syndrome manifested by neurological symptoms in the first days of life in term infants. Purpose: To investigate the therapy effect of Buyanghuanwu Tang (BYHWT), a decoction with 7 herbal ingredients, on neonatal rats with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and its mechanism. Methods: 50 3-week male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into normal control group, model group, BYHWT 1d group, BYHWT 3d group and BYHWT 7d group, 10 rats in each group. The HIE model of was established in later 4 groups. The later 3 groups were treated with BYHWT for 1, 3 and 7 days, respectively, and the normal control group and model group were treated with PBS. The Morris water maze test and dynamic 18F-FDG-PET/CT imaging were performed. The changes of hippocampal tissue observed by histopathologic examination, and the expressions of JNK1/JNK2 and TNF-α protein were observed western blotting. Results: Compared with model group, the impaired performance on distance and latency parameters was mitigated in BYHWT 1d group, BYHWT 3d group and BYHWT 7d group (P < 0.01), the FDG uptake was decreased in BYHWT 3d group and BYHWT 7d group, the apoptotic cells and inflammatory cells were significantly decreased in BYHWT 3d group and BYHWT 7d group, and the expressions of JNK1/JNK2 and TNF-α protein were significantly decreased in BYHWT 7d group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: BYHWT can delay the HIE onset and preserve the motor function, primarily by regulating inflammation, apoptosis and inhibition by mediating JNK signaling. PMID:26770451

  9. Risk factors of transient ischemic attack: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Supreet

    2016-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a transient episode of neurologic dysfunction caused due to loss of blood flow to the brain or spinal cord without acute infarction. Depending on the area of the brain involved, symptoms of TIA vary widely from patient to patient. Since the blockage period in TIA is very short-lived, there is no permanent damage. Risk factors for TIA include family history of stroke or TIA, age above 55 years or older, higher risk of TIA in males than females, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco smoking. Genetics, race, and imbalance in lipid profile are other risk factors of TIA. TIA is usually diagnosed after taking a thorough history and a physical examination. Several radiological tests such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in the evaluation of patients who have had a TIA. Ultrasound of the neck and an echocardiogram of the heart are other tests useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of the attack. The treatment following acute recovery from a TIA depends on the underlying cause. Patients who have more than 70% stenosis of the carotid artery, removal of atherosclerotic plaque is usually done by carotid endarterectomy surgery. One-third of the people with TIA can later have recurrent TIAs and one-third can have a stroke because of permanent nerve cell loss. Having a TIA is a risk factor for eventually having a stroke. Educating the patients and inculcating lifestyle modifications in them are initial steps to minimize the prevalence of transient ischemic attack. PMID:27134474

  10. Risk factors of transient ischemic attack: An overview.

    PubMed

    Khare, Supreet

    2016-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a transient episode of neurologic dysfunction caused due to loss of blood flow to the brain or spinal cord without acute infarction. Depending on the area of the brain involved, symptoms of TIA vary widely from patient to patient. Since the blockage period in TIA is very short-lived, there is no permanent damage. Risk factors for TIA include family history of stroke or TIA, age above 55 years or older, higher risk of TIA in males than females, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco smoking. Genetics, race, and imbalance in lipid profile are other risk factors of TIA. TIA is usually diagnosed after taking a thorough history and a physical examination. Several radiological tests such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in the evaluation of patients who have had a TIA. Ultrasound of the neck and an echocardiogram of the heart are other tests useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of the attack. The treatment following acute recovery from a TIA depends on the underlying cause. Patients who have more than 70% stenosis of the carotid artery, removal of atherosclerotic plaque is usually done by carotid endarterectomy surgery. One-third of the people with TIA can later have recurrent TIAs and one-third can have a stroke because of permanent nerve cell loss. Having a TIA is a risk factor for eventually having a stroke. Educating the patients and inculcating lifestyle modifications in them are initial steps to minimize the prevalence of transient ischemic attack.

  11. Neurotoxic lipid peroxidation species formed by ischemic stroke increase injury

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Stephanie L. H.; Musiek, Erik S.; Zanoni, Giuseppe; Vidari, Giovanni; Morrow, Jason D.; Milne, Ginger J.; McLaughlin, BethAnn

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States yet no neuroprotective agents for treatment are clinically available. There is a pressing need to understand the signaling molecules which mediate ischemic cell death and identify novel neuroprotective targets. Cyclopentenone isoprostanes (IsoP), formed following free radical mediated peroxidation of arachidonic acid, are used as markers of stress but their bioactivity is poorly understood. We have recently shown that 15-A2t-Isop is a potent neurotoxin in vitro and increases the free radical burden in neurons. In this work, we demonstrate that 15-A2t-IsoP is abundantly produced in stroke infarcted human cortical tissue. Using primary neuronal cultures we found that minimally toxic exposure to 15-A2t-IsoP does not alter ATP content, but in combination with oxygen glucose deprivation resulted in a significant hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and dramatically increased neuronal cell death. In the presence of Ca2+, 15-A2t-IsoP led to a rapid induction of the permeability transition pore and release of cytochrome c. Taken with our previous work, these data support a model in which ischemia causes generation of reactive oxygen species, calcium influx, lipid peroxidation and 15-A2t-IsoP formation. These factors combine to enhance opening of the permeability transition pore leading to cell death subsequent to mitochondrial cytochrome c release. This data is the first documentation of significant 15-A2t-IsoP formation following acute ischemic stroke and suggests addition of 15-A2t-IsoP to in vitro models of ischemia may help to more fully recapitulate stroke injury. PMID:19699297

  12. Current trends in the management of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability and most of the cases are those of ischemic stroke. Management strategies especially for large vessel occlusive stroke have undergone a significant change in the recent years that include widespread use of thrombolytic medications followed by endovascular clot removal. For successful treatment by endovascular thrombectomy, the important factors are patient selection based on clinical criterion including age, time of onset, premorbid clinical condition, co-morbidities, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, and imaging criterion including computed tomography (CT) head, CT angiogram and CT perfusion. Patients presenting within 4.5 hours of onset are considered for intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment. Mechanical clot retrieval devices have evolved over the past decade. The Mechanical Embolus Removal in Cerebral Ischemia device was approved first followed by the penumbra revascularization system. They have proven in various studies to improve recanalization with acceptable rates of symptomatic intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Introduction of stent retrievers has led to a new era in the interventional management of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Recent trials namely MRCLEAN, ESCAPE, SWIFT PRIMEs, and EXTEND-IA have used the stent retriever predominantly and have shown unequivocal benefit in the outcome at 90 days for AIS patients with large vessel occlusion. More recently, a new catheter namely 5 MAX ACE was introduced along with improvement in the suction device. This has led to a direct aspiration first pass technique resulting in faster recanalization. Advancements in the endovascular management of AIS with large vessel occlusion have resulted in a paradigm shift in the way this disease is managed. Improvements in patient selection using clinical and imaging criterion along with technical and technological advancements in mechanical thrombectomy have made possible a significantly improved outcome

  13. Lived experiences of women with ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Moeini, Mahin; Naseri, Nayereh; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death and disability among young and older women, respectively. Researches in this area mostly focused on manifestations, risk factors, and treatment of the patients with IHD. Therefore, there is a lack of information on the aspects of affects and feelings of such patients. This study aimed to describe lived experience of women with IHD to provide a suitable guide for nursing practice. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive phenomenological study. Participants were 8 women with IHD who were hospitalized in critical care units (CCUs) and ambulatory cardiac care centers of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Iran. They voluntarily responded to open-ended questions of semi-structured interviews. Data was analyzed using Colaizzi’s method to extract meanings and concepts. Findings: After analyzing the statements of the participants, 14 subthemes forming 5 main concepts of pain and relief, resistance, introversion, loss of control, and mutual communication were emerged. Conclusions: Ischemic heart event is an experience with multidimensional impact on various aspects of the patient’s life. This study demonstrated this experience as having 5 fundamental elements. Women with IHD expressed their suffering from frequent cycles of pain that drove their feelings and thoughts toward themselves and provoked their sense of resistance. They also faced loss of control on various aspects of their lives and changes in their relationships with others, too. This image would help nurses design their care plan based on a better understanding of these patients. PMID:23833596

  14. Ischemic heart disease, serum cholesterol, and apolipoproteins in CAPD.

    PubMed

    Gault, M H; Longerich, L; Prabhakaran, V; Purchase, L

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-one patients, mean age 54 years, had been on chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for an average of 38 months. Mean values (mg/dl) for triglycerides (567), total-C (267), LDL-C (133), and Apo-B (154) were elevated, and HDL-C (30) were low. The low values for total-C/Apo-B and LDL-C/Apo-B suggest an increase in the number of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, rather than in the amount of cholesterol per LDL particle. Without knowledge of lipids, ischemic heart disease for the 31 patients was categorized into five grades in the following manner. All patients were graded based on history (angina, myocardial infarction, and bypass surgery), electrocardiogram (EKG), and echocardiography. In addition, five patients underwent coronary angiography, the results of which were considered in their grading. The five grades were assigned as follows: Grade I, no evidence (n = 15); Grade II, angina with EKG ischemia (n = 4); Grade III, myocardial infarction (MI) (n = 1); Grade IV, MI with dyskinesia-akinesia on echo (n = 4); Grade V, severe three vessel disease on angiography, or multiple infarcts, or Grade IV with heart failure (n = 7). Only Apo-B (r = 0.56) and total-C/HDL-C (r = 0.57) correlated with severity of grade, with p less than 0.001. When patients with and without detectable ischemic heart disease were compared by stepwise logistic regression, Apo-B was the only variable that independently predicted heart disease (p = 0.001). However, contribution of the lipid changes induced by CAPD has not been established.

  15. Simulation of human ischemic stroke in realistic 3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Thierry; Duarte, Max; Descombes, Stéphane; Dronne, Marie-Aimée; Massot, Marc; Louvet, Violaine

    2013-06-01

    In silico research in medicine is thought to reduce the need for expensive clinical trials under the condition of reliable mathematical models and accurate and efficient numerical methods. In the present work, we tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling human ischemic stroke. This problem induces peculiar difficulties like potentially large stiffness which stems from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of steep spatial gradients in the reaction fronts, spatially very localized. Furthermore, simulations on realistic 3D geometries are mandatory in order to describe correctly this type of phenomenon. The main goal of this article is to obtain, for the first time, 3D simulations on realistic geometries and to show that the simulation results are consistent with those obtain in experimental studies or observed on MRI images in stroke patients. For this purpose, we introduce a new resolution strategy based mainly on time operator splitting that takes into account complex geometry coupled with a well-conceived parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures. We consider then a high order implicit time integration for the reaction and an explicit one for the diffusion term in order to build a time operator splitting scheme that exploits efficiently the special features of each problem. Thus, we aim at solving complete and realistic models including all time and space scales with conventional computing resources, that is on a reasonably powerful workstation. Consequently and as expected, 2D and also fully 3D numerical simulations of ischemic strokes for a realistic brain geometry, are conducted for the first time and shown to reproduce the dynamics observed on MRI images in stroke patients. Beyond this major step, in order to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of the simulations, we indicate how the present numerical strategy can be coupled with spatial

  16. Current trends in the management of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability and most of the cases are those of ischemic stroke. Management strategies especially for large vessel occlusive stroke have undergone a significant change in the recent years that include widespread use of thrombolytic medications followed by endovascular clot removal. For successful treatment by endovascular thrombectomy, the important factors are patient selection based on clinical criterion including age, time of onset, premorbid clinical condition, co-morbidities, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, and imaging criterion including computed tomography (CT) head, CT angiogram and CT perfusion. Patients presenting within 4.5 hours of onset are considered for intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment. Mechanical clot retrieval devices have evolved over the past decade. The Mechanical Embolus Removal in Cerebral Ischemia device was approved first followed by the penumbra revascularization system. They have proven in various studies to improve recanalization with acceptable rates of symptomatic intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Introduction of stent retrievers has led to a new era in the interventional management of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Recent trials namely MRCLEAN, ESCAPE, SWIFT PRIMEs, and EXTEND-IA have used the stent retriever predominantly and have shown unequivocal benefit in the outcome at 90 days for AIS patients with large vessel occlusion. More recently, a new catheter namely 5 MAX ACE was introduced along with improvement in the suction device. This has led to a direct aspiration first pass technique resulting in faster recanalization. Advancements in the endovascular management of AIS with large vessel occlusion have resulted in a paradigm shift in the way this disease is managed. Improvements in patient selection using clinical and imaging criterion along with technical and technological advancements in mechanical thrombectomy have made possible a significantly improved outcome

  17. Nitrates and nitrites in the treatment of ischemic cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Nossaman, Vaughn E; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    The organic nitrite, amyl of nitrite, was initially used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of angina pectoris, but was replaced over a decade later by the organic nitrate, nitroglycerin (NTG), due to the ease of administration and longer duration of action. The administration of organic nitrate esters, such as NTG, continues to be used in the treatment of angina pectoris and heart failure since the birth of modern pharmacology. Their clinical effectiveness is due to vasodilator activity in large veins and arteries through an as yet unidentified method of delivering nitric oxide (NO), or a NO-like compound. The major drawback is the development of tolerance with NTG, and the duration and route of administration with amyl of nitrite. Although the nitrites are no longer used in the treatment of hypertension or ischemic heart disease, the nitrite anion has recently been discovered to possess novel pharmacologic actions, such as modulating hypoxic vasodilation, and providing cytoprotection in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Although the actions of these 2 similar chemical classes (nitrites and organic nitrates) have often been considered to be alike, we still do not understand their mechanism of action. Finally, the nitrite anion, either from sodium nitrite or an intermediate NTG form, may act as a storage form for NO and provide support for investigating the use of these agents in the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular states. We review what is presently known about the use of nitrates and nitrites including the historical, current, and potential uses of these agents, and their mechanisms of action.

  18. The impact of P2Y12 promoter DNA methylation on the recurrence of ischemic events in Chinese patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Gang; Ma, Ning; Wang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Qing; Mei, Sheng-Hui; Zhao, Kun; Wang, Yong-Jun; Li, Wei; Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Sun, Shu-Sen; Miao, Zhong-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The primary mechanism of clopidogrel resistance is still unclear. We aimed to investigate whether the methylation status of the P2Y12 promoter has effects on platelet function and clinical ischemic events. Patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease were enrolled into our study. Venous blood samples were drawn for thrombelastograpy (TEG) and active metabolite assay. Patients were divided into a case- or control-group based on the occurrence of ischemic events during a one year follow-up. Two TEG parameters between the case and control groups were statistically significant [ADP inhibition rate (ADP%): P = 0.018; ADP-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength (MAADP): P = 0.030]. The concentrations of clopidogrel active metabolite had no significant difference (P = 0.281). Sixteen CpG dinucleotides on P2Y12 promoter were tested. Three CpG sites (CpG11 and CpG12 + 13) showed lower methylation status, which correlated with a strong association with increased risk of clinical events. Changes of MAADP and ADP% were also associated with methylation levels of CpG 11 and CpG 12 + 13. Hypomethylation of the P2Y12 promoter is associated with a higher platelet reactivity and increased risk of ischemic events in our patients. Methylation analysis of peripheral blood samples might be a novel molecular marker to help early identification of patients at high risk for clinical ischemic events. PMID:27686864

  19. Limb remote ischemic per-conditioning in combination with post-conditioning reduces brain damage and promotes neuroglobin expression in the rat brain after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changhong; Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Brian; Li, Ning; Li, Weiguang; Zhang, Chenggang; Jin, Kunlin; Ji, Xunming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Limb remote ischemic per-conditioning or post-conditioning has been shown to be neuroprotective after cerebral ischemic stroke. However, the effect of combining remote per-conditioning with post-conditioning on ischemic/reperfusion injury as well as the underlying mechanisms are largely unexplored. Methods: Here, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The limb ischemic stimulus was immediately applied after onset of focal ischemia (per-conditioning), followed by repeated short episodes of remote ischemia 24 hr after reperfusion (post-conditioning). The infarct volume, motor function, and the expression of neuroglobin (Ngb) were measured at different durations after reperfusion. Results: We found that a single episode of limb remote per-conditioning afforded short-term protection, but combining repeated remote post-conditioning during the 14 days after reperfusion significantly ameliorated cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Interestingly, we also found that ischemic per- and post-conditioning significantly increased expression of Ngb, an oxygen-binding globin protein that has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective against stroke, at peri-infarct regions from day 1 to day 14 following ischemia/reperfusion. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the conventional per-conditioning combined with post-conditioning may be used as a novel neuroprotective strategy against ischemia-reperfusion injury, and Ngb seems to be one of the important players in limb remote ischemia-mediated neuroprotection. PMID:25868435

  20. Diagnosing Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Ischemic Strokes and Transient Ischemic Attacks Using Echocardiographic Measurements of Left Atrium Function.

    PubMed

    Skaarup, Kristoffer Grundtvig; Christensen, Hanne; Høst, Nis; Mahmoud, Masti Mahdy; Ovesen, Christian; Olsen, Flemming Javier; Biering-Sørensen, Tor

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five to 35 percentage of stroke cases are cryptogenic, and it has been demonstrated that paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) is the causal agent in up to 25% of these incidents. The purpose of this study was to investigate if left atrial (LA) parameters have value for diagnosing paroxysmal AF in patients with ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA). We retrospectively analyzed 219 patients who after acute IS or TIA underwent a transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Patients were designated as patients with paroxysmal AF if they had one or more reported incidents of AF before or after their echocardiographic examination. Patients in the paroxysmal AF group were significantly older and had higher CHA2DS2-VASc score than patients without paroxysmal AF (p <0.05 for both). None of the conventional echocardiographic parameters were significantly associated with paroxysmal AF. However, the atrial measurements evaluating LA function (min LA volume and LA emptying fraction) were significantly different (LA emptying fraction: 45% ± 10% vs 50% ± 10%, p = 0.004; minimal LA volume: 30.2 ml ± 17.3 ml vs 24 ml ± 10 ml, p = 0.035 in patients with paroxysmal AF, even after adjustment for age, gender, CHA2DS2-VASc score, and stroke severity [p <0.05 for both]). By combining the cut-off values of age, LA emptying fraction, and minimal LA volume the diagnostic accuracy of paroxysmal AF was improved, resulting in a sensitivity of 95% and negative predictive value of 97%. In conclusion, in patients with IS and TIA, LA function measurements (minimal LA volume and LA emptying fraction) are independently associated with paroxysmal AF and may improve risk stratification for paroxysmal AF presence after IS or TIA.

  1. Antiplatelet Agents for the Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Weiming; Zhu, Qin; Lan, Qing; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-05-01

    Stroke can cause high morbidity and mortality, and ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients have a high stroke recurrence rate. Antiplatelet agents are the standard therapy for these patients, but it is often difficult for clinicians to select the best therapy from among the multiple treatment options. We therefore performed a network meta-analysis to estimate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke. We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane) for relevant studies published through August 2015. The primary end points of this meta-analysis were overall stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and fatal stroke. A total of 30 trials were included in our network meta-analysis and abstracted data. Among the therapies evaluated in the included trials, the estimates for overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke for cilostazol (Cilo) were significantly better than those for aspirin (odds ratio [OR] = .64, 95% credibility interval [CrI], .45-.91; OR = .23, 95% CrI, .08-.58). The estimate for fatal stroke was highest for Cilo plus aspirin combination therapy, followed by Cilo therapy. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that Cilo significantly improves overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke in IS or TIA patients and reduces fatal stroke, but with low statistical significance. Our results also show that Cilo was significantly more efficient than other therapies in Asian patients; therefore, future trials should focus on Cilo treatment for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke in non-Asian patients.

  2. Two children with both arm ischemia and arterial ischemic stroke during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    McKasson, Marilyn J; Golomb, Meredith R

    2011-12-01

    It is rare for both limb ischemia and arterial ischemic stroke to occur in the same child during the perinatal period. Two children who appear to have had perinatal emboli to both an arm and a middle cerebral artery territory are presented here. One child required amputation of the ischemic limb below the shoulder, and the other required skin grafts to the distal ischemic fingers. Each of these children later received cerebral magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of developmental delay and was found to have what appeared to be old perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. Both children were homozygous for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene variant. Eight other children with perinatal limb ischemia and stroke were found on literature review; several also had delayed diagnosis of perinatal stroke. This report examines the approach to diagnosis and treatment in each of these and makes suggestions for the similar cases in the future. PMID:21862833

  3. Unilateral Ischemic Maculopathy Associated with Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Patients with AIDS: Optical Coherence Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, J. Fernando; Garcia, Reinaldo A.; Arevalo, Fernando A.; Fernandez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) characteristics of ischemic maculopathy in two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis developed ischemic maculopathy. Both patients presented with central visual loss and active granular CMV retinitis. The presence of opacification of the superficial retina in the macular area and intraretinal edema suggested the diagnosis. Fluorescein angiography changes were similar in the two cases with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and late staining of juxtafoveal vessels. OCT changes were suggestive of retinal ischemia: Increased reflectivity from the inner retinal layer and decreased backscattering from the retinal photoreceptors due to fluid and retinal edema. Ischemic maculopathy may cause a severe and permanent decrease in vision in AIDS patients. Fluorescein angiography and OCT should be considered in any patient with AIDS and unexplained visual loss. The mechanism of ischemic maculopathy may be multifactorial. PMID:27051496

  4. [CHARACTERISTIC OF ALTERATIONS OF ARTERIES IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE AND CHRONIC HEPATITIS C].

    PubMed

    Guliaev, N I; Kuznetsov, V V; Poltareĭko, D S; Qleksiuk, I B; Gordienko, A V; Barsukov, A V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an assessment of degree and type of atherosclerosis of coronary and non-coronary vessels in old patients with ischemic heart disease associated with chronic viral hepatitis C (VHC), the incidence of myocardial infarction and the possibility of participation chronic VHC in atherogenesis. Patients with ischemic heart disease have correlation of atherosclerosis of arteries with age, hypercholesterinemia. Patients without chronic VHC more often give a higher risk of myocardial infarction, especially in early period (1-1,5 years) of onset of ischemic heart disease clinical implications. Patients with ischemic heart disease associated with chronic viral hepatitis C more often have generalized alterations in vessels, multifocal type of alteration. So, participation of VHC in atherogenesis is most probably connected with maintenance of chronic immune inflammation in vascular endothelium.

  5. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathies: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina I; Mullins, Carola; Stewart, Kevan; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are defined as either primary or secondary diseases of the myocardium resulting in cardiac dysfunction. While primary cardiomyopathies are confined to the heart and can be genetic or acquired, secondary cardiomyopathies show involvement of the heart as a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease including metabolic, inflammatory, granulomatous, infectious, or autoimmune entities. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are currently classified as hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, or unclassifiable, including left ventricular non-compaction. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) not only has the capability to assess cardiac morphology and function, but also the ability to detect edema, hemorrhage, fibrosis, and intramyocardial deposits, providing a valuable imaging tool in the characterization of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This pictorial essay shows some of the most important non-ischemic cardiomyopathies with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features.

  7. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-05-16

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients.

  8. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions. PMID:27672603

  9. Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke: The Role of Leukocytes and Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Park, Joohyun; Chang, Ji Young; Kim, Sa-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The immune response after stroke is known to play a major role in ischemic brain pathobiology. The inflammatory signals released by immune mediators activated by brain injury sets off a complex series of biochemical and molecular events which have been increasingly recognized as a key contributor to neuronal cell death. The primary immune mediators involved are glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocyte. After ischemic stroke, activation of glial cells and subsequent release of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals are important for modulating both neuronal cell damage and wound healing. Infiltrated leukocytes release inflammatory mediators into the site of the lesion, thereby exacerbating brain injury. This review describes how the roles of glial cells and circulating leukocytes are a double-edged sword for neuroinflammation by focusing on their detrimental and protective effects in ischemic stroke. Here, we will focus on underlying characterize of glial cells and leukocytes under inflammation after ischemic stroke. PMID:27790058

  10. Long-term maternal morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic placental disease.

    PubMed

    Adams, Tracy; Yeh, Corinne; Bennett-Kunzier, Nadia; Kinzler, Wendy L

    2014-04-01

    Ischemic placental disease can have long-term maternal health implications. In this article, we discuss the three conditions of ischemic placental disease (preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and abruption placenta) and its associated long-term maternal morbidity. Retrospective observational studies comparing pregnancies complicated by ischemic placental disease to uncomplicated pregnancies suggest an increased long-term risk of hypertension, cardiovascular death, metabolic syndrome, and cerebrovascular disease. This association is much stronger in women who had an indicated-preterm delivery due to ischemic placental disease. It is important to adequately counsel women who are diagnosed with these conditions about their future health risks. Increased awareness of the potential health risks and multidisciplinary collaboration remains paramount to instituting the appropriate screening and preventative strategies (i.e., behavior modification) for affected women.

  11. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-05-16

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  12. A Qualitative Study of Physician Perspectives on Prognostication in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lisa Anne; Bell, Emily; Racine, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is the most frequent cause of neonatal encephalopathy and yields a great degree of morbidity and mortality. From an ethical and clinical standpoint, neurological prognosis is fundamental in the care of neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. This qualitative study explores physician perspectives about neurological prognosis in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. This study aimed, through semistructured interviews with neonatologists and pediatric neurologists, to understand the practice of prognostication. Qualitative thematic content analysis was used for data analysis. The authors report 2 main findings: (1) neurological prognosis remains fundamental to quality-of-life predictions and considerations of best interest, and (2) magnetic resonance imaging is presented to parents with a greater degree of certainty than actually exists. Further research is needed to explore both the parental perspective and, prospectively, the impact of different clinical approaches and styles to prognostication for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

  13. Unilateral Ischemic Maculopathy Associated with Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Patients with AIDS: Optical Coherence Tomography Findings.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, J Fernando; Garcia, Reinaldo A; Arevalo, Fernando A; Fernandez, Carlos F

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) characteristics of ischemic maculopathy in two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis developed ischemic maculopathy. Both patients presented with central visual loss and active granular CMV retinitis. The presence of opacification of the superficial retina in the macular area and intraretinal edema suggested the diagnosis. Fluorescein angiography changes were similar in the two cases with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and late staining of juxtafoveal vessels. OCT changes were suggestive of retinal ischemia: Increased reflectivity from the inner retinal layer and decreased backscattering from the retinal photoreceptors due to fluid and retinal edema. Ischemic maculopathy may cause a severe and permanent decrease in vision in AIDS patients. Fluorescein angiography and OCT should be considered in any patient with AIDS and unexplained visual loss. The mechanism of ischemic maculopathy may be multifactorial. PMID:27051496

  14. Reduction of the prenatal hypoxic-ischemic brain edema with noscapine.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, M; Siadatpour, Zahra; Ziai, S A; Mehrpour, M; Benaissa, Faouzya; Nobakht, M

    2003-01-01

    Cytotoxic free radicals and release of several neurotransmitters such as bradykinin contribute to the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. We have studied the efficacy of noscapine, an opium alkaloid and a bradykinin antagonist, in reducing post-hypoxic-ischemic damage in developing brain of 7-d-old rat pups. Hypoxic-ischemic injury to the right cerebral hemisphere was produced by legation of the right common carotid artery followed by 3 h of hypoxia with 8% oxygen. Thirty to 45 min before hypoxia the rat pups received noscapine (dose = 0.5-2 mg/kg) or saline. Pups were scarified at 24 h post recovery for the assessment of cerebral damage by histological methods. Our results showed that noscapine was an effective agent in reducing the extent of brain injury after hypoxic-ischemic insult to neonatal rats. Therefore, it is concluded that noscapine may be a useful drug in the managements of patients after stroke.

  15. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions. PMID:27672603

  16. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-01-01

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  17. [Current concepts of perinatal ischemic injury in the brain neurovascular unit: molecular targets for neuroprotection].

    PubMed

    Morgun, A V; Kuvacheva, N V; Taranushenko, T E; Khilazheva, E D; Malinovskaia, N A; Gorina, Ia V; Pozhilenkova, E A; Frolova, O V; Salmina, A B

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is a relevant medical and social problem. Among many pathological processes in the neonatal period perinatal hypoxic-ischemic injury is a major cause of further hemorrhage, necrotic and atrophic changes in the brain. This review presents recent data on the basic mechanisms of the hypoxic-ischemic brain injury along the concept of neurovascular unit (neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes) with the focus on alterations in cell-to-cell communication. Pathological changes caused by ischemia-hypoxia are considered within two phases of injury (ischemic phase and reperfusion phase). The review highlights changes in each individual component of the neurovascular unit and their interactions. Molecular targets for pharmacological improvement of intercellular communication within neurovascular unit as a therapeutic strategy in perinatal brain injury are discussed.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathies: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina I; Mullins, Carola; Stewart, Kevan; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are defined as either primary or secondary diseases of the myocardium resulting in cardiac dysfunction. While primary cardiomyopathies are confined to the heart and can be genetic or acquired, secondary cardiomyopathies show involvement of the heart as a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease including metabolic, inflammatory, granulomatous, infectious, or autoimmune entities. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are currently classified as hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, or unclassifiable, including left ventricular non-compaction. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) not only has the capability to assess cardiac morphology and function, but also the ability to detect edema, hemorrhage, fibrosis, and intramyocardial deposits, providing a valuable imaging tool in the characterization of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This pictorial essay shows some of the most important non-ischemic cardiomyopathies with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features. PMID:26199786

  19. Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology?

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Amir; Stone, Gregg W; Leipsic, Jonathon; Shaw, Leslee J; Villines, Todd C; Kern, Morton J; Hecht, Harvey; Erlinge, David; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Maehara, Akiko; Arbustini, Eloisa; Serruys, Patrick; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Narula, Jagat

    2016-07-01

    Risk stratification in patients with stable ischemic heart disease is essential to guide treatment decisions. In this regard, whether coronary anatomy, physiology, or plaque morphology is the best determinant of prognosis (and driver an effective therapeutic risk reduction) remains one of the greatest ongoing debates in cardiology. In the present report, we review the evidence for each of these characteristics and explore potential algorithms that may enable a practical diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease.

  20. Variation in mortality of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in relation to high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Kim, Ho; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor temperature has been reported to have a significant influence on the seasonal variations of stroke mortality, but few studies have investigated the effect of high temperature on the mortality of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. The main study goal was to examine the effect of temperature, particularly high temperature, on ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. We investigated the association between outdoor temperature and stroke mortality in four metropolitan cities in Korea during 1992-2007. We used time series analysis of the age-adjusted mortality rate for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke deaths by using generalized additive and generalized linear models, and estimated the percentage change of mortality rate associated with a 1°C increase of mean temperature. The temperature-responses for the hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality differed, particularly in the range of high temperature. The estimated percentage change of ischemic stroke mortality above a threshold temperature was 5.4 % (95 % CI, 3.9-6.9 %) in Seoul, 4.1 % (95 % CI, 1.6-6.6 %) in Incheon, 2.3 % (-0.2 to 5.0 %) in Daegu and 3.6 % (0.7-6.6 %) in Busan, after controlling for daily mean humidity, mean air pressure, day of the week, season, and year. Additional adjustment of air pollution concentrations in the model did not change the effects. Hemorrhagic stroke mortality risk significantly decreased with increasing temperature without a threshold in the four cities after adjusting for confounders. These findings suggest that the mortality of hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes show different patterns in relation to outdoor temperature. High temperature was harmful for ischemic stroke but not for hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of high temperature to ischemic stroke did not differ by age or gender.

  1. Surgical Management of Stuttering Ischemic Priapism: A Case Report and Concise Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Raslan, M; Hiew, K; Hoyle, A; Ross, D G; Betts, C D; Maddineni, S B

    2016-03-01

    Stuttering priapism is an extremely rare and poorly understood entity. We present a rare case of a 47-year-old Afro-Caribbean gentleman who required proximal shunt procedure to treat his ischemic stuttering priapism after he had failed medical management. We provided a concise review of the literature on the surgical management of ischemic priapism. This case highlighted the importance of prompt surgical intervention in prolonged stuttering priapism to avoid serious psychological and functional complications. PMID:26977408

  2. Variation in mortality of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in relation to high temperature.

    PubMed

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Kim, Ho; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor temperature has been reported to have a significant influence on the seasonal variations of stroke mortality, but few studies have investigated the effect of high temperature on the mortality of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. The main study goal was to examine the effect of temperature, particularly high temperature, on ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. We investigated the association between outdoor temperature and stroke mortality in four metropolitan cities in Korea during 1992-2007. We used time series analysis of the age-adjusted mortality rate for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke deaths by using generalized additive and generalized linear models, and estimated the percentage change of mortality rate associated with a 1°C increase of mean temperature. The temperature-responses for the hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality differed, particularly in the range of high temperature. The estimated percentage change of ischemic stroke mortality above a threshold temperature was 5.4 % (95 % CI, 3.9-6.9 %) in Seoul, 4.1 % (95 % CI, 1.6-6.6 %) in Incheon, 2.3 % (-0.2 to 5.0 %) in Daegu and 3.6 % (0.7-6.6 %) in Busan, after controlling for daily mean humidity, mean air pressure, day of the week, season, and year. Additional adjustment of air pollution concentrations in the model did not change the effects. Hemorrhagic stroke mortality risk significantly decreased with increasing temperature without a threshold in the four cities after adjusting for confounders. These findings suggest that the mortality of hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes show different patterns in relation to outdoor temperature. High temperature was harmful for ischemic stroke but not for hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of high temperature to ischemic stroke did not differ by age or gender.

  3. Circadian rhythm of onset of stroke - in 50 cases of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M S; Hoque, M I; Uddin, M K; Kamol, S A; Chowdhury, R H

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. While the immediate consequence of stroke include permanent cognitive deficits, paralysis, visual impairment and sensory disturbances; stroke also results in long term dysregulation of sleep and mood, which may be equally disabling. The influence of ischemic stroke on circadian rhythm regulation, which is strongly linked to sleep and mood, may thus potentially influence long term recovery in stroke patients. Stroke induces immediate changes in the timing of pineal melatonin secretion, indicating that cortical and basal ganglia infarction impacts the timing of melatonin rhythms. This study was done to find out the time of onset of most of the ischemic stroke attack and to determine the outcome of ischemic stroke during hospital stay. All ischemic stroke patients admitted in Medicine wards in Comilla Medical College Hospital during the period of 1st November 2010 to 30th April 2011 included in this study. After admission, a careful history and a thorough clinical examination was carried out. Data collection was done on a preset questionnaire which involved to identify the risk factors, the time of onset of ischemic stroke, and outcome during hospital stay. All the cases were investigated. Among the 50 ischemic stroke patients, 68% were male and 32% female. Maximum age groups were 61-70 years (50%). By occupational category, maximum were retired persons (46%); 68% were hypertensive, 38% smoker and 16% had diabetes. Dyslipidemia was present in 44% patients. Most of the ischemic stroke (44%) occurred in the morning to late morning (6:01AM-12:00PM) and majority (80%) of the patients was discharged with residual neurological dysfunction. This study supports the presence of a circadian pattern in the onset of ischemic stroke, with higher risk in the morning to late morning. Most of the patients were discharged with residual neurological dysfunction. PMID:25725678

  4. PACAP38/PAC1 Signaling Induces Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Homing to Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Huan; Chiu, Lian; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chiang, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shih-Ping; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Hsu, Chung Y; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Shyu, Woei-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding stem cell homing, which is governed by environmental signals from the surrounding niche, is important for developing effective stem cell-based repair strategies. The molecular mechanism by which the brain under ischemic stress recruits bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) to the vascular niche remains poorly characterized. Here we report that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation upregulates pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide 38 (PACAP38), which in turn activates PACAP type 1 receptor (PAC1) under hypoxia in vitro and cerebral ischemia in vivo. BMDCs homing to endothelial cells in the ischemic brain are mediated by HIF-1α activation of the PACAP38-PAC1 signaling cascade followed by upregulation of cellular prion protein and α6-integrin to enhance the ability of BMDCs to bind laminin in the vascular niche. Exogenous PACAP38 confers a similar effect in facilitating BMDCs homing into the ischemic brain, resulting in reduction of ischemic brain injury. These findings suggest a novel HIF-1α-activated PACAP38-PAC1 signaling process in initiating BMDCs homing into the ischemic brain for reducing brain injury and enhancing functional recovery after ischemic stroke. Stem Cells 2015;33:1153–1172 PMID:25523790

  5. Simple Machine Perfusion Significantly Enhances Hepatocyte Yields of Ischemic and Fresh Rat Livers

    PubMed Central

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Calhoun, Candice; Uygun, Basak E.; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Price, Gavrielle; Luitje, Martha; Saeidi, Nima; Yarmush, Martin L.; Uygun, Korkut

    2013-01-01

    The scarcity of viable hepatocytes is a significant bottleneck in cell transplantation, drug discovery, toxicology, tissue engineering, and bioartificial assist devices, where trillions of high-functioning hepatocytes are needed annually. We took the novel approach of using machine perfusion to maximize cell recovery, specifically from uncontrolled cardiac death donors, the largest source of disqualified donor organs. In a rat model, we developed a simple 3-h room temperature (20 ± 2°C) machine perfusion protocol to treat nonpremedicated livers exposed to 1 h of warm (34°C) ischemia. Treated ischemic livers were compared to fresh, fresh-treated, and untreated ischemic livers using viable hepatocyte yields and in vitro performance as quantitative endpoints. Perfusion treatment resulted in both a 25-fold increase in viable hepatocytes from ischemic livers and a 40% increase from fresh livers. While cell morphology and function in suspension and plate cultures of untreated warm ischemic cells was significantly impaired, treated warm ischemic cells were indistinguishable from fresh hepatocytes. Furthermore, a strong linear correlation between tissue ATP and cell yield enabled accurate evaluation of the extent of perfusion recovery. Maximal recovery of warm ischemic liver ATP content appears to be correlated with optimal flow through the microvasculature. These data demonstrate that the inclusion of a simple perfusion-preconditioning step can significantly increase the efficiency of functional hepatocyte yields and the number of donor livers that can be gainfully utilized. PMID:25431743

  6. Using the endocannabinoid system as a neuroprotective strategy in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Celador, I.; Goñi-de-Cerio, F.; Alvarez, Antonia; Hilario, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important causes of brain injury in the neonatal period is a perinatal hypoxic-ischemic event. This devastating condition can lead to long-term neurological deficits or even death. After hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, a variety of specific cellular mechanisms are set in motion, triggering cell damage and finally producing cell death. Effective therapeutic treatments against this phenomenon are still unavailable because of complex molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. After a thorough understanding of the mechanism underlying neural plasticity following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, various neuroprotective therapies have been developed for alleviating brain injury and improving long-term outcomes. Among them, the endocannabinoid system emerges as a natural system of neuroprotection. The endocannabinoid system modulates a wide range of physiological processes in mammals and has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in different paradigms of acute brain injury, acting as a natural neuroprotectant. The aim of this review is to study the use of different therapies to induce long-term therapeutic effects after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and analyze the important role of the endocannabinoid system as a new neuroprotective strategy against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:25206720

  7. Comparative risk of ischemic stroke among users of clopidogrel together with individual proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bilker, Warren B.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Flockhart, David A.; Freeman, Cristin P.; Kasner, Scott E.; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Hennessy, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is controversy and little information concerning whether individual proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) differentially alter the effectiveness of clopidogrel in reducing ischemic stroke risk. We therefore aimed to elucidate the risk of ischemic stroke among concomitant users of clopidogrel and individual PPIs. Methods We conducted a propensity score-adjusted cohort study of adult new users of clopidogrel, using 1999–2009 Medicaid claims from 5 large states. Exposures were defined by prescriptions for esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole—with pantoprazole serving as the referent. The endpoint was hospitalization for acute ischemic stroke, defined by International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision Clinical Modification codes in the principal position on inpatient claims, within 180 days of concomitant therapy initiation. Results Among 325,559 concomitant users of clopidogrel and a PPI, we identified 1,667 ischemic strokes for an annual incidence of 2.4% (95% confidence interval: 2.3–2.5). Adjusted hazard ratios for ischemic stroke vs. pantoprazole were: 0.98 (0.82–1.17) for esomeprazole; 1.06 (0.92–1.21) for lansoprazole; 0.98 (0.85–1.15) for omeprazole; and 0.85 (0.63–1.13) for rabeprazole. Conclusions PPIs of interest did not increase the rate of ischemic stroke among clopidogrel users when compared to pantoprazole, a PPI thought to be devoid of the potential to interact with clopidogrel. PMID:25657176

  8. Epidemiology and risk factors of cerebral ischemia and ischemic heart diseases: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Soler, Ernest Palomeras; Ruiz, Virgina Casado

    2010-08-01

    Cerebral ischemia and ischemic heart diseases, common entities nowadays, are the main manifestation of circulatory diseases. Cardiovascular diseases, followed by stroke, represent the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Both entities share risk factors, pathophisiology and etiologic aspects by means of a main common mechanism, atherosclerosis. However, each entity has its own particularities. Ischemic stroke shows a variety of pathogenic mechanisms not present in ischemic heart disease. An ischemic stroke increases the risk of suffering a coronary heart disease, and viceversa. The aim of this chapter is to review data on epidemiology, pathophisiology and risk factors for both entities, considering the differences and similarities that could be found in between them. We discuss traditional risk factors, obtained from epidemiological data, and also some novel ones, such as hyperhomocisteinemia or sleep apnea. We separate risk factors, as clasically, in two groups: nonmodifiables, which includes age, sex, or ethnicity, and modifiables, including hypertension, dyslipidemia or diabetis, in order to discuss the role of each factor in both ischemic events, ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease.

  9. [The intracellular metabolism of neutrophils under different forms of ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kratnov, A E

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with the results of study of the intracellular metabolism of neutrophils in 96 patients including 56 (58.3%) patients with ischemic heart disease. It is established that in patients with ischemic heart disease as compared with patients without ischemic heart disease occurs the increase of neutrophils producing of active forms of oxygen against the background of decrease of intracellular activity of catalase and increase of concentration of lactate in phagocytes. Under severing of ischemic heart disease from unstable stenocardia to cardiac infarction the activation of oxygen-depending metabolism of neutrophils conditioned by increase of concentration of immune complexes circulating in blood was not compensated by increasing of intracellular activity of enzymes of system of antioxidant defense. The maximum activation of NAD(F)N-oxidase of neutrophils (production of superoxide anion-radical) was detected in patients with cardiac infarction with Q-wave. This condition was accompanied by maximal increase of concentration of lactate in phagocytes up to twice higher exceed the level of indicators in patients without ischemic heart disease. It can be assumed that in conditions of acute hypoxia occurring under myocardium ischemia in patients with ischemic heart disease, the lactate production increases in neutrophils hence the triggering of development of intracellular acidosis, impact of oxygen-depending factors and phagocytes destruction.

  10. Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Cerebral Ischemia and Ischemic Heart Diseases: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Ernest Palomeras; Ruiz, Virgina Casado

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia and ischemic heart diseases, common entities nowadays, are the main manifestation of circulatory diseases. Cardiovascular diseases, followed by stroke, represent the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Both entities share risk factors, pathophisiology and etiologic aspects by means of a main common mechanism, atherosclerosis. However, each entity has its own particularities. Ischemic stroke shows a variety of pathogenic mechanisms not present in ischemic heart disease. An ischemic stroke increases the risk of suffering a coronary heart disease, and viceversa. The aim of this chapter is to review data on epidemiology, pathophisiology and risk factors for both entities, considering the differences and similarities that could be found in between them. We discuss traditional risk factors, obtained from epidemiological data, and also some novel ones, such as hyperhomocisteinemia or sleep apnea. We separate risk factors, as clasically, in two groups: nonmodifiables, which includes age, sex, or ethnicity, and modifiables, including hypertension, dyslipidemia or diabetis, in order to discuss the role of each factor in both ischemic events, ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease. PMID:21804773

  11. Interleukin-16 Polymorphism Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-li; Du, Jian-zong; Zhou, Yu-miao; Shu, Qin-fen; Li, Ya-guo

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and experimental data have demonstrated that inflammation plays fundamental roles in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Interleukin-16 (IL-16) is identified as a proinflammatory cytokine that is a key element in the ischemic cascade after cerebral ischemia. We aimed to examine the relationship between the IL-16 polymorphisms and the risk of ischemic stroke in a Chinese population. A total of 198 patients with ischemic stroke and 236 controls were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and DNA sequencing method. We found that the rs11556218TG genotype and G allele of IL-16 were associated with significantly increased risks of ischemic stroke (TG versus TT, adjusted OR = 1.88; 95% CI, 1.15–3.07; G versus T, adjusted OR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.05–2.27, resp.). However, there were no significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies of IL-16 rs4778889 T/C and rs4072111 C/T polymorphisms between the two groups, even after stratification analyses by age, gender, and the presence or absence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. These findings indicate that the IL-16 polymorphism may be related to the etiology of ischemic stroke in the Chinese population. PMID:24288444

  12. Behavior outcome after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, with similar brain damage, in rats.

    PubMed

    Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Saur, Lisiani; Boisserand, Lígia Simões Braga; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Xavier, Léder Leal; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    Stroke causes disability and mortality worldwide and is divided into ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes. Although clinical trials suggest distinct recovery profiles for ischemic and hemorrhagic events, this is not conclusive due to stroke heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to produce similar brain damage, using experimental models of ischemic (IS) and hemorrhagic (HS) stroke and evaluate the motor spontaneous recovery profile. We used 31 Wistar rats divided into the following groups: Sham (n=7), ischemic (IS) (n=12) or hemorrhagic (HS) (n=12). Brain ischemia or hemorrhage was induced by endotelin-1 (ET-1) and collagenase type IV-S (collagenase) microinjections, respectively. All groups were evaluated in the open field, cylinder and ladder walk behavioral tests at distinct time points as from baseline to 30 days post-surgery (30 PS). Histological and morphometric analyses were used to assess the volume of lost tissue and lesion length. Present results reveal that both forms of experimental stroke had a comparable long-term pattern of damage, since no differences were found in volume of tissue lost or lesion size 30 days after surgery. However, behavioral data showed that hemorrhagic rats were less impaired at skilled walking than ischemic ones at 15 and 30 days post-surgery. We suggest that experimentally comparable stroke design is useful because it reduces heterogeneity and facilitates the assessment of neurobiological differences related to stroke subtypes; and that spontaneous skilled walking recovery differs between experimental ischemic and hemorrhagic insults. PMID:23403282

  13. The application of stem cells in the treatment of ischemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lee, Y J; Chiu, S T; Shyu, W C; Lee, M Y; Huang, S P; Li, H

    2006-11-01

    Ischemia causes oxygen deprivation, cell injury and related organ dysfunction. Although ischemic injury may be local, it involves many biochemical changes in different cell types. The ability of stem cells to differentiate into different cell lineages provides the possibility of their use in treating a variety of diseases requiring tissue repair or reconstitution, such as stroke, ischemic retinopathy, myocardial infarction, ischemic disorders of the liver, ischemic renal failure, and ischemic limb dysfunction. Several cell types including embryonic stem cells, various progenitor and stem cells of hematopoietic or mesenchymal origin have been used in attempts to reconstitute injured tissue. Xenologous or autologous stem cells may be administered either through the peripheral vascular system or directly by regional injection. The stem cells are then guided to the infarct site by homing signals. Either by cell differentiation or paracrine effects, stem cells or progenitor cells participate in the reconstruction of a favorable microenvironment resulting in neovascularization and tissue regeneration that eventually improve the physiological function of organs with ischemic damage. PMID:16874664

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen suppresses hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Lu, Mengru; Li, Qing-Jie; Zhang, Zhuo; Wu, Zheng-Zheng; Li, Jie; Qian, Lai; Xu, Yun; Wang, Zhong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The optimal therapeutic time-window and protective mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of hyperbaric oxygen. Following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage modeling in neonatal rats, hyperbaric oxygen was administered at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours and 1 week after hypoxia, respectively, once daily for 1 week. Fourteen days after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, cell density and apoptosis rate, number of Fas-L+, caspase-8+, and caspase-3+ neuronal cells, levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase in hippocampus were examined. Morris water maze test was conducted 28 days after insult. Significant improvements were found in cell density, rate of apoptosis, oxidative stress markers, FasL, and caspases in rats treated with hyperbaric oxygen within 72 hours compared to hypoxic-ischemic injury. Similarly, time-dependent behavioral amelioration was observed in pups treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Our findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by inhibiting oxidative stress and FasL-induced apoptosis, and optimal therapeutic time window is within 72 hours after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  15. Consequences of age on ischemic wound healing in rats: altered antioxidant activity and delayed wound closure.

    PubMed

    Moor, Andrea N; Tummel, Evan; Prather, Jamie L; Jung, Michelle; Lopez, Jonathan J; Connors, Sarah; Gould, Lisa J

    2014-04-01

    Advertisements targeted at the elderly population suggest that antioxidant therapy will reduce free radicals and promote wound healing, yet few scientific studies substantiate these claims. To better understand the potential utility of supplemental antioxidant therapy for wound healing, we tested the hypothesis that age and tissue ischemia alter the balance of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Using a bipedicled skin flap model, ischemic and non-ischemic wounds were created on young and aged rats. Wound closure and the balance of the critical antioxidants superoxide dismutase and glutathione in the wound bed were determined. Ischemia delayed wound closure significantly more in aged rats. Lower superoxide dismutase 2 and glutathione in non-ischemic wounds of aged rats indicate a basal deficit due to age alone. Ischemic wounds from aged rats had lower superoxide dismutase 2 protein and activity initially, coupled with decreased ratios of reduced/oxidized glutathione and lower glutathione peroxidase activity. De novo glutathione synthesis, to restore redox balance in aged ischemic wounds, was initiated as evidenced by increased glutamate cysteine ligase. Results demonstrate deficiencies in two antioxidant pathways in aged rats that become exaggerated in ischemic tissue, culminating in profoundly impaired wound healing and prolonged inflammation.

  16. Color Doppler sonography in the study of chronic ischemic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Meola, M; Petrucci, I

    2008-06-01

    In western countries, the risk of cardiovascular disease has increased considerably in recent decades. This trend has been paralleled by an increase in cases of atherosclerotic renal disease, which is related to the improved prognosis of cardiovascular diseases, aging, and the increasing mean age of the general population. It is reasonable to expect that in the near future, there will be a sharp increase in the number of elderly patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease in chronic dialysis programs. The result will be a dramatic rise in the social and economic costs of dialysis that could constitute a true clinical emergency. In this epidemiologic scenario, one of the most important targets of 21st century nephrology will be the early diagnosis of chronic ischemic nephropathy and the development of new and more effective strategies for its treatment.Color Doppler (CD) ultrasonography has displayed high sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values in the diagnosis of this disease in selected population, making it an ideal tool for use in screening programs. Eligibility for screening should be based on clinical criteria. For the most part, it will be aimed at adults (especially those who are elderly) with atherosclerotic vascular disease involving multiple districts and chronic kidney disease (CKD), stage 2-3, in the absence of a documented history of renal disease. In these patients, hypertension may be a secondary manifestation or a symptom of the ischemic nephropathy itself. The objectives of sonographic screening should be (1) to identify subjects in the population at risk who are affected by stenosis of the main renal artery (RAS); (2) to identify and characterize patients without RAS who have chronic ischemic nephropathy caused by nephroangiosclerosis and/or atheroembolic disease. The former group will require second-level diagnostic studies or angioplasty with stenting; the latter can be managed conservatively. The most important

  17. Traditional Chinese Patent Medicine for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Xue-Ting; Kang, De-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to conduct an overview of systematic reviews (SRs) to provide a contemporary review of the evidence for delivery of Traditional Chinese Patent Medicine (TCPMs) for patients with acute ischemic stroke. SRs were assessed for quality using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool and the Oxman-Guyatt Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire (OQAQ). We assessed the quality of the evidence of high methodological quality (an AMSTAR score ≥9 or an OQAQ score ≥7) for reported outcomes using the GRADE (the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. (1) Dan Shen agents: tiny trends toward the improvement in different neurological outcomes (RR = 1.16, 1.10, 1.23, 1.08, 1.12); (2) Mailuoning: a tiny trend toward improvement in the neurological outcome (RR = 1.18); (3) Ginkgo biloba: tiny trends toward improvement in the neurological outcome (RR = 1.18, MD = 0.81); (4) Dengzhanhua: a tiny trend toward an improvement in neurological (RR = 1.23); (5) Acanthopanax: a small positive (RR = 1.17, 1.31) result on neurological improvement reported; (6) Chuanxiong-type preparations: neurological functional improved (MD = 2.90);(7) Puerarin: no better effect on the rate of death or disability (OR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.35–1.87); (8) Milk vetch: no better effect on the rate of death (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.11–2.83);(9) Qingkailing: rate of death reduced (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.11–2.83). Limitations in the methodological quality of the RCTs, inconsistency and imprecision led to downgrading of the quality of the evidence, which varied by review and by outcome. Consequently, there are currently only weak evidences to support those TCPMs. The 9 TCPMs may be effective in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, as the GRADE approach indicated a weak recommendation for those TCPMs’ usage. PMID:27015174

  18. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets’ tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight

  19. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  20. Prognostic Significance of Uric Acid Levels in Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Zhi-Chao; Lu, Tao-Sheng; You, Shou-Jiang; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The importance and function of serum uric acid (UA) levels in patients with cardiovascular disease or stroke are unclear. We sought to evaluate the appropriate UA levels for stroke patients and the association between endogenous UA levels and clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, particularly regarding the possible interaction between gender and UA levels with respect to AIS prognosis. We examined 303 patients who had an onset of ischemic stroke within 48 h. Of those, 101 patients received thrombolytic treatment. Serum UA (μmol/L) levels were measured the second morning after admission. Patient prognosis was evaluated 90 days after clinical onset by modified Rankin Scale. Patients were divided into four groups according to serum UA quartiles. A binary multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess clinical relevance in regard to functional outcome and endogenous UA levels. Analysis of subgroups by gender and normal glomerular filtration rate were also been done. Poor functional outcome was associated with older age, history of atrial fibrillation, or higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with higher UA levels (>380 μmol/L) or lower UA levels (≤250 μmol/L) were 2-3 times more likely to have a poor outcome (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.14-7.61; OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.02-7.58, respectively) compared to the baseline group (UA level 316-380 μmol/L). The same results were observed in thrombolyzed patients. Patients with high and low UA levels were 9-18 times more likely to having poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 316-380 μmol/L; OR 18.50, 95% CI: 2.041-167.67; OR 9.66, 95% CI 1.42-65.88, respectively). In men, patients with high UA levels were 6 times more likely to have poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 279-334 μmol/L; OR 6.10, 95% CI 1.62-22.93). However, female patients with UA level 271-337 μmol/L were seven times more

  1. Management of Hypertension in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Agbor-Etang, Brian B; Setaro, John F

    2015-12-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) affects about 16 million adults in the USA. Many more individuals likely harbor subclinical coronary disease. Hypertension (HTN) continues to be a potent and widespread risk factor for IHD. Among other Framingham risk factors of tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and left ventricular hypertrophy, HTN plays an independent role in augmenting IHD risk, as well as a multiplicative role with respect to adverse outcomes when HTN is present concurrently with the other major IHD risk factors listed above. Over the past two decades, numerous studies and guideline reports have been presented with the aims of (a) elucidating the pathophysiology of IHD, (b) delineating an ideal blood pressure (BP) threshold at which to institute pharmacotherapy, and (c) defining the optimal pharmacologic elements of a therapeutic regimen. While there are active debates surrounding the existence and relevance of the J curve in IHD patients who have HTN, as well as the numerical level of the BP cutoff justifying drug therapy in the general population, there is a general consensus that the BP target in IHD patients should be lower than 140/90 mmHg. The most appropriate class (or classes) of medication recommended will depend on the comorbid conditions associated with each individual patient. Overall, however, there is no major evidence underscoring a significant difference between drug classes, provided the target BP is achieved, although it should be pointed out that the most recent (2015) American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Society of Hypertension (ASH) guideline statement now elevates beta-blockers (BB) to the same level of recommendation as other classes of hypertension drugs in the treatment of patients who have hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Although most agents that reduce blood pressure will correspondingly lower myocardial workload, BB may exhibit a special advantage in IHD patients because BB

  2. Hypophosphatemic effect of niacin extended release in ischemic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Yasmeen, Ghazala; Dawani, Manohar Lal; Mahboob, Tabassum

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic nephropathy is an emerging cause of end stage renal disease, associated with many co-morbidities especially cardiovascular disease risk and derangement in calcium-phosphorus homeostasis resulting in hyperphosphatemia, influencing bones, a characteristic of advancing chronic kidney disease. The management of elevated serum phosphorus has been a challenge in this patient population with compromised kidney performance, as available phosphorus lowering agents possess many undesirable hazardous secondary effects and/or are very expensive. While niacin in different formulation is known to not only correct dyslipidemia but also reduce phosphorus level, but its clinical use restricted owing to side effects. The objective of present study is to evaluate such effect of niacin extended release (NER) in ischemic nephropathy. The chronic kidney disease patients fulfilling the pre-defined criteria were randomly categorized into two groups of equal size (n=60) and prescribed either atorvastatin 20 mg/day or NER 500 mg/day with the same dose of statin for four months. A control of 50 healthy characters matched was also incorporated for local reference range. Baseline and follow up phosphorus concentration was measured and means were compared using t-test at SPSS version 17 with 0.05 chosen alpha. There was no difference in the baseline levels in both groups while significant (p<0.001) hyperphosphatemia was observed in both units as compared with healthy controls. The administration of atorvastatin alone for four weeks showed an insignificant decrease in phosphorus, whereas, NER significantly reduced phosphorus (p<0.001). The mean percent change from baseline to follow up further endorsed the finding as statin alone brought -13.8 % reduction in phosphorus and NER -47 % from baseline. NER, at its lowest prescribed dose once a day was well tolerated by most of the patients and demonstrated significant goal achievement of phosphorus reduction. It is concluded that NER even at

  3. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  4. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika; Asp, Julia; Synnergren, Jane; Johansson, Cecilia Thalen; Palmqvist, Lars; Jeppsson, Anders; Hulten, Lillemor Mattsson

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 in the ischemic heart. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incubation of human muscle cells in hypoxia showed a 22-fold upregulation of ALOX15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed increased levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggesting a link between ischemia and inflammation in ischemic heart biopsies. -- Abstract: A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield

  5. Brain Connectivity Plasticity in the Motor Network after Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lin; Xu, Huijuan

    2013-01-01

    The motor function is controlled by the motor system that comprises a series of cortical and subcortical areas interacting via anatomical connections. The motor function will be disturbed when the stroke lesion impairs either any of these areas or their connections. More and more evidence indicates that the reorganization of the motor network including both areas and their anatomical and functional connectivity might contribute to the motor recovery after stroke. Here, we review recent studies employing models of anatomical, functional, and effective connectivity on neuroimaging data to investigate how ischemic stroke influences the connectivity of motor areas and how changes in connectivity relate to impaired function and functional recovery. We suggest that connectivity changes constitute an important pathophysiological aspect of motor impairment after stroke and important mechanisms of motor recovery. We also demonstrate that therapeutic interventions may facilitate motor recovery after stroke by modulating the connectivity among the motor areas. In conclusion, connectivity analyses improved our understanding of the mechanisms of motor recovery after stroke and may help to design hypothesis-driven treatment strategies and sensitive measures for outcome prediction in stroke patients. PMID:23738150

  6. Cardioprotection against experimental myocardial ischemic injury using cornin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y.; Xu, Y.; Luan, H.; Jiang, Y.; Tian, X.; Zhang, S.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylated-cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (Phospho-CREB) has an important role in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia. We isolated the iridoid glycoside cornin from the fruit of Verbena officinalis L, investigated its effects against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury in vivo, and elucidated its potential mechanism in vitro. Effects of cornin on cell viability, as well as expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in hypoxic H9c2 cells in vitro, and myocardial I/R injury in vivo, were investigated. Cornin attenuated hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity significantly in H9c2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of H9c2 cells with cornin (10 µM) blocked the reduction of expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in a hypoxic condition. Treatment of rats with cornin (30 mg/kg, iv) protected them from myocardial I/R injury as indicated by a decrease in infarct volume, improvement in hemodynamics, and reduction of severity of myocardial damage. Cornin treatment also attenuated the reduction of expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in ischemic myocardial tissue. These data suggest that cornin exerts protective effects due to an increase in expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt. PMID:26871971

  7. Cardioprotection against experimental myocardial ischemic injury using cornin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Xu, Y; Luan, H; Jiang, Y; Tian, X; Zhang, S

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorylated-cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (Phospho-CREB) has an important role in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia. We isolated the iridoid glycoside cornin from the fruit of Verbena officinalis L, investigated its effects against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury in vivo, and elucidated its potential mechanism in vitro. Effects of cornin on cell viability, as well as expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in hypoxic H9c2 cells in vitro, and myocardial I/R injury in vivo, were investigated. Cornin attenuated hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity significantly in H9c2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of H9c2 cells with cornin (10 µM) blocked the reduction of expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in a hypoxic condition. Treatment of rats with cornin (30 mg/kg, iv) protected them from myocardial I/R injury as indicated by a decrease in infarct volume, improvement in hemodynamics, and reduction of severity of myocardial damage. Cornin treatment also attenuated the reduction of expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in ischemic myocardial tissue. These data suggest that cornin exerts protective effects due to an increase in expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt.

  8. Increased risk of ischemic heart disease among subjects with cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Syun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Fong; Chang, Kuan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Association between cataract and the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) development is not completely clear. Purpose: The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the association between cataract and the risk of incident IHD. The secondary aim was to investigate the subsequent IHD risk of patients with cataracts undergoing cataract surgery. Methods: Retrospective data from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000) was analyzed. Study participants were composed of patients with cataracts (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 366) (n = 32,456), and a comparison cohort without the cataracts (n = 32,456) from 2000 to 2010. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to address the hazard ratio (HR) of IHD associated with cataract. Results: Within 12 years of follow up, the overall incidence rates of IHD were 24.2 per 1000 person-years in the cataract cohort and 18.2 per 1000 person-years in the noncataract cohort with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.35 (95% CI = 1.29–1.41; P < 0.001). Furthermore, the cataract patients undergoing cataract surgery were associated with a higher risk of IHD compared with those cataract patients without surgery (aHR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.01–1.14; P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our finding suggested that patients with cataracts are at an increased risk of subsequent IHD development. PMID:27428198

  9. Shared genetic basis for migraine and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rainer; Freilinger, Tobias; Winsvold, Bendik S.; Anttila, Verneri; Vander Heiden, Jason; Traylor, Matthew; de Vries, Boukje; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Terwindt, Gisela M.; Sturm, Jonathan; Bis, Joshua C.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ferrari, Michel D.; Rannikmae, Kristiina; Wessman, Maija; Kallela, Mikko; Kubisch, Christian; Fornage, Myriam; Meschia, James F.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sudlow, Cathie; Clarke, Robert; Chasman, Daniel I.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Maguire, Jane; Kaprio, Jaakko; Farrall, Martin; Raitakari, Olli T.; Kurth, Tobias; Ikram, M. Arfan; Reiner, Alex P.; Longstreth, W.T.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Strachan, David P.; Sharma, Pankaj; Seshadri, Sudha; Quaye, Lydia; Cherkas, Lynn; Schürks, Markus; Rosand, Jonathan; Ligthart, Lannie; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Davey Smith, George; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Stefansson, Kari; Worrall, Bradford B.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Markus, Hugh S.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.; Cotsapas, Chris; Zwart, John A.; Palotie, Aarno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To quantify genetic overlap between migraine and ischemic stroke (IS) with respect to common genetic variation. Methods: We applied 4 different approaches to large-scale meta-analyses of genome-wide data on migraine (23,285 cases and 95,425 controls) and IS (12,389 cases and 62,004 controls). First, we queried known genome-wide significant loci for both disorders, looking for potential overlap of signals. We then analyzed the overall shared genetic load using polygenic scores and estimated the genetic correlation between disease subtypes using data derived from these models. We further interrogated genomic regions of shared risk using analysis of covariance patterns between the 2 phenotypes using cross-phenotype spatial mapping. Results: We found substantial genetic overlap between migraine and IS using all 4 approaches. Migraine without aura (MO) showed much stronger overlap with IS and its subtypes than migraine with aura (MA). The strongest overlap existed between MO and large artery stroke (LAS; p = 6.4 × 10−28 for the LAS polygenic score in MO) and between MO and cardioembolic stroke (CE; p = 2.7 × 10−20 for the CE score in MO). Conclusions: Our findings indicate shared genetic susceptibility to migraine and IS, with a particularly strong overlap between MO and both LAS and CE pointing towards shared mechanisms. Our observations on MA are consistent with a limited role of common genetic variants in this subtype. PMID:25934857

  10. Intestinal ischemic preconditioning reduces liver ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    XUE, TONG-MIN; TAO, LI-DE; ZHANG, JIE; ZHANG, PEI-JIAN; LIU, XIA; CHEN, GUO-FENG; ZHU, YI-JIA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate whether intestinal ischemic preconditioning (IP) reduces damage to the liver during hepatic ischemia reperfusion (IR). Sprague Dawley rats were used to model liver IR injury, and were divided into the sham operation group (SO), IR group and IP group. The results indicated that IR significantly increased Bax, caspase 3 and NF-κBp65 expression levels, with reduced expression of Bcl-2 compared with the IP group. Compared with the IR group, the levels of AST, ALT, MPO, MDA, TNF-α and IL-1 were significantly reduced in the IP group. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2 and Bax indicated that Bcl-2 expression in the IP group was significantly increased compared with the IR group. In addition, IP reduced Bax expression compared with the IR group. The average liver injury was worsened in the IR group and improved in the IP group, as indicated by the morphological evaluation of liver tissues. The present study suggested that IP may alleviates apoptosis, reduce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, ameloriate reductions in liver function and reduce liver tissue injury. To conclude, IP provided protection against hepatic IR injury. PMID:26821057

  11. Animal Models of Ischemic Stroke. Part One: Modeling Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bacigaluppi, Marco; Comi, Giancarlo; Hermann, Dirk M.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability and death in developed and developing countries. As emerging disease, stroke related mortality and morbidity is going to step up in the next decades. This is both due to the poor identification of risk factors and persistence of unhealthy habits, as well as to the aging of the population. To counteract the estimated increase in stroke incidence, it is of primary importance to identify risk factors, study their effects, to promote primary and secondary prevention, and to extend the therapeutic repertoire that is currently limited to the very first hours after stroke. While epidemiologic studies in the human population are essential to identify emerging risk factors, adequate animal models represent a fundamental tool to dissect stroke risk factors to their molecular mechanism and to find efficacious therapeutic strategies for this complex multi- factorial disorder. The present review is organized into two parts: the first part deals with the animal models that have been developed to study stroke and its related risk factors and the second part analyzes the specific stroke models. These models represent an indispensable tool to investigate the mechanisms of cerebral injury and to develop novel therapies. PMID:20802809

  12. Agreement between TOAST and CCS ischemic stroke classification

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Patrick F.; Kittner, Steven J.; Ay, Hakan; Brown, Robert D.; Meschia, James F.; Rundek, Tatjana; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Woo, Daniel; Andsberg, Gunnar; Biffi, Alessandro; Brenner, David A.; Cole, John W.; Corriveau, Roderick; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Grewal, Raji P.; Gwinn, Katrina; Huq, Mohammed; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Kaplan, Robert C.; Katschnig, Petra; Katsnelson, Michael; Labovitz, Daniel L.; Lemmens, Robin; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S.; Peddareddygari, Leema R.; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Redfors, Petra; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rost, Natalia S.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Tiedt, Steffen; Valenti, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the level of agreement between stroke subtype classifications made using the Trial of Org 10172 Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) and Causative Classification of Stroke (CCS) systems. Methods: Study subjects included 13,596 adult men and women accrued from 20 US and European genetic research centers participating in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN). All cases had independently classified TOAST and CCS stroke subtypes. Kappa statistics were calculated for the 5 major ischemic stroke subtypes common to both systems. Results: The overall agreement between TOAST and CCS was moderate (agreement rate, 70%; κ = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58–0.60). Agreement varied widely across study sites, ranging from 28% to 90%. Agreement on specific subtypes was highest for large-artery atherosclerosis (κ = 0.71, 95% CI 0.69–0.73) and lowest for small-artery occlusion (κ = 0.56, 95% CI 0.54–0.58). Conclusion: Agreement between TOAST and CCS diagnoses was moderate. Caution is warranted when comparing or combining results based on the 2 systems. Replication of study results, for example, genome-wide association studies, should utilize phenotypes determined by the same classification system, ideally applied in the same manner. PMID:25261504

  13. Effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemic preservation injury

    PubMed Central

    Aslaner, Arif; Gunal, Omer; Turgut, Hamdi Taner; Celik, Erdal; Yildirim, Umran; Demirci, Rojbin Karakoyun; Gunduz, Umut Riza; Calis, Hasan; Dogan, Sami

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a potent free radical scavenger of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and a well-known antioxidant secreted from pineal gland. This hormone has been reported to protect tissue from oxidative damage. In this study, we aim to investigate the effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemia time when added to preservation solution. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided equally into three groups; Ringer Lactate (RL) solution, University of Wisconsin (UW) solution with and without melatonin. The serum Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activities of the preservation solutions at 2nd, 24th, 36th, and 48th hours were determined. Tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also measured and a histological examination was performed at 48th hour. Melatonin that added to preservation solution prevented enzyme elevation and decreased lipid peroxidation in preservation solution when compared to the control group (p<0.05). The histological examination revealed that UW solution containing melatonin significantly prevented the kidney from pathological injury (p<0.05). Melatonin added to preservation solutions such as UW solution seemed to protect the tissue preserved effectively from cold ischemic injury for up to 48 hour. PMID:24179573

  14. Peripapillary Pachychoroid in Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagia, Lina; Huisingh, Carrie; Johnstone, John; Kline, Lanning B.; Clark, Mark; Girard, Michael J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Girkin, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the peripapillary choroidal thickness (PCT) in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) in comparison to contralateral eyes and normal eyes. Methods We used enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to image the optic nerve head of 20 NAION, 10 contralateral eyes, and 102 normal eyes. Following compensation, the scans were manually delineated to identify relevant surfaces including Bruch's membrane opening (BMO), Bruch's membrane, and anterior sclera. The PCT was defined as the measurement between Bruch's membrane and the anterior sclera and was measured at increasing distance from BMO. Models adjusted for age, BMO area, and axial length were used to compare the mean PCT between NAION and normal eyes, and contralateral eyes and normal eyes. Paired t-tests were used to compare the PCT between NAION and contralateral eyes. Results The mean PCT was thicker in NAION and contralateral eyes when compared with normal eyes at all distances from BMO (P < 0.001). The PCT was not significantly thicker in contralateral eyes when compared with affected NAION eyes. Choroidal thickness was thinnest in the inferior quadrant in all eyes regardless of the group. Conclusions Increased peripapillary choroidal thickness was noted in both NAION and contralateral eyes. The thicker choroid may be an associated feature or a result of the disorder. Although further longitudinal study is required to determine causation, these findings may suggest that a thickened peripapillary choroid may be a component of the disk-at-risk clinical phenotype. PMID:27583829

  15. Carotid and vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks: clinical and angiographic correlation.

    PubMed

    Ueda, K; Toole, J F; McHenry, L C

    1979-08-01

    Carotid and vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) were clinically and angiographically correlated in 85 patients who had four-vessel angiography within 2 weeks after a TIA. The patients were divided into carotid and vertebrobasilar groups by clinical criteria. In the correlations of symptoms with arteriography, lesions of the contralateral internal carotid artery were observed in 54 percent of the patients. Of 39 patients with vertebrobasilar symptoms, 34 percent also had one carotid lesion and six patients had combinations of symptoms of both carotid and vertebrobasilar disease. In correlation with carotid bruits of the 85 patients, bruits were heard over one carotid artery in 42 percent. Subclavian bruits were heard in 47 percent of the patients with vertebrobasilar symptomatology. TIAs owing to arteriosclerosis of the cervical arteries occurred in 85 percent of the patients, but there was no significant difference in the incidence of atherosclerosis-induced TIA in the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. For accurate population surveys of the prevalence of TIAs, and for clinical decisions, proper categorization of patients is necessary.

  16. Ischemic spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Jessica R.; Golomb, Meredith R.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord infarction in children is a rare condition which is becoming more widely recognized. There are few reports in the pediatric literature characterizing etiology, diagnosis, treament and prognosis. The risk factors for pediatric ischemic spinal cord infarction include obstruction of blood flow associated with cardiovascular compromise or malformation, iatrogenic or traumatic vascular inujury, cerebellar herniation, thrombotic or embolic disease, infection, and vasculitis. In many children the cause of spinal cord ischemia in the absence of vertebral fracture is unknown. Imaging diagnosis of spinal cord ischemia is often difficult due to the small transverse area of the cord, cerebrospinal fluid artifact and inadequate resolution of MRI. Physical therapy is the most important treatment option. The prognosis is dependent on the level of spinal cord damage, early identification and reversal of ischemia, and follow-up with intensive physical therapy and medical support. In addition to summarizing the literature regarding spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture, this review article adds two cases to the literature which highlight the difficulties and controversies in the management of this condition. PMID:17437902

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fatal ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burstyn, I.; Kromhout, H.; Partanen, T.; Svane, O.; Langard, S.; Ahrens, W.; Kauppinen, T.; Stucker, I.; Shaham, J.; Heederik, D.; Ferro, G.; Heikkila, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Johansen, C.; Randem, B.G.; Boffetta, P.

    2005-11-01

    Several toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have produced evidence that occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, a clear exposure-response relation has not been demonstrated. We studied a relation between exposure to PAH and mortality from IHD (418 cases) in a cohort of 12,367 male asphalt workers from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands and Norway. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene were assessed quantitatively using measurement-driven exposure models. Exposure to coal tar was assessed in a semiquantitative manner on the basis of information supplied by company representatives. We carried out sensitivity analyses to assess potential confounding by tobacco smoking. Both cumulative and average exposure indices for benzo(a)pyrene were positively associated with mortality from IHD. The highest relative risk for fatal IHD was observed for average benzo(a)pyrene exposures of 273 ng/m{sup 3} or higher, for which the relative risk was 1.64(95% confidence interval = 1.13-2.38). Similar results were obtained for coal tar exposure. Sensitivity analysis indicated that even in a realistic scenario of confounding by smoking, we would observe approximately 20% to 40% excess risk in IHD in the highest PAH-exposure categories. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that occupational PAH exposure causes fatal IHD and demonstrate a consistent exposure-response relation for this association.

  18. Movement disorders in ischemic stroke: clinical study of 22 patients.

    PubMed

    D'Olhaberriague, L; Arboix, A; Martí-Vilalta, J L; Moral, A; Massons, J

    1995-12-01

    Movement disorders (bemichorea-hemiballismus, hemidystonia and isolated tremor) are an uncommon clinical manifestation in ischemic stroke (IS), and their anatomical basis is poorly understood. We analyzed the clinical and neuroimaging characteristics of 22 consecutive patients who bad movement disorders associated with cerebral infarction (MDCI), studied at four institutions over 8 years. In one institution (from the La Alianza-Central Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry) nine patients with MDCI were identified among 1099 consecutive first ever stroke patients (0.8%) (908 with IS, 1%). Fifteen out of 22 patients (68%) had hemichorea-hemiballismus, five (23%) hemidystonia and two (9%) isolated tremor. MDCI were more often left sided (n = 15, 68%), being bilateral in one patient (4.5%). A lesion was found on neuroimaging (CT and/or MRI) in 15 patients (68%), in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (n = 8) and middle cerebral artery (six deep and one superficial). The most commonly involved structure was the thalamus (n = 8, 36.5%). IS subtypes were; presumed lacunar infarcts in 14 patients (64%), atherothrombotic infarcts in two patients (9%), cardioembolic infarcts in two patients (9%) and infarcts of unknown etiology in four patients (18%). Hemichorea-hemiballismus was the most common type of MDCI in our study, usually being the result of a thalamic infarction. The thalamus was the most frequently damaged structure underlying all types of MDCI. There was a striking propensity of MDCI which resulted from nondominant deep hemispheric small vessel infarctions.

  19. Ischemic stroke assessment with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiguo; Li, Pengcheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Hu, Bo

    1999-09-01

    Many authors have elucidated the theory about oxygenated hemoglobin, deoxygenated hemoglobin absorption in near-infrared spectrum. And the theory has opened a window to measure the hemodynamic changes caused by stroke. However, no proper animal model still has established to confirm the theory. The aim of this study was to validate near-infrared cerebral topography (NCT) as a practical tool and to try to trace the focal hemodynamic changes of ischemic stroke. In the present study, middle cerebral artery occlusion model and the photosensitizer induced intracranial infarct model had been established. NCT and functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) were obtained during pre- and post-operation. The geometric shape and infarct area of NCT image was compared with the fMRI images and anatomical samples of each rat. The results of two occlusion models in different intervene factors showed the NCT for infarct focus matched well with fMRI and anatomic sample of each rats. The instrument might become a practical tool for short-term prediction of stroke and predicting the rehabilitation after stroke in real time.

  20. Stem Cell Therapy for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S.; Reyes, Stephanny; Aguirre, Daniela; Pabon, Mibel M.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2014-01-01

    Treatments for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) have been limited. The aim of this paper is to offer translational research guidance on stem cell therapy for neonatal HIE by examining clinically relevant animal models, practical stem cell sources, safety and efficacy of endpoint assays, as well as a general understanding of modes of action of this cellular therapy. In order to do so, we discuss the clinical manifestations of HIE, highlighting its overlapping pathologies with stroke and providing insights on the potential of cell therapy currently investigated in stroke, for HIE. To this end, we draw guidance from recommendations outlined in stem cell therapeutics as an emerging paradigm for stroke or STEPS, which have been recently modified to Baby STEPS to cater for the “neonatal” symptoms of HIE. These guidelines recognized that neonatal HIE exhibit distinct disease symptoms from adult stroke in need of an innovative translational approach that facilitates the entry of cell therapy in the clinic. Finally, new information about recent clinical trials and insights into combination therapy are provided with the vision that stem cell therapy may benefit from available treatments, such as hypothermia, already being tested in children diagnosed with HIE. PMID:25161645

  1. Language in children with neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Chenia; Carneiro, Luciana; Vernier, Luíza; Cesa, Carla; Guardiola, Ana; Vidor, Deisi

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (NHIE) is a common neurologic injury, and it may compromise the child's language and cognition. Understanding the process of language acquisition becomes possible with concise knowledge about children's global development. Objective The aim of this study was to observe if language acquisition and development are impaired in children with NHIE. Methods Seventy children with NHIE from 1 to 24 months old were analyzed in a Pediatric Neurology Service of Hospital of Porto Alegre, South of Brazil using the Brunet-Lezine Scale. Statistical analysis used SPSS 13.0 software. Results Twenty-four (60%) of the subjects were boys, with mean gestational age of 35.8 weeks (standard deviation of 4.6) and mean Apgar score of 6.0 at 1 minute and 7.1 at 5 minutes. The variables age versus language showed significant inverse correlation (r =  - 0.566; p = 0.028). As the subjects aged, language tasks became more specific and dependent on the subject's direct action, rather than the subjective interpretation of their guardian. This correlation seems to be closely associated with scale configuration and with consequences of neurologic disorder, evincing the delays in language development. Conclusion This study achieved the goals proposed and highlights the necessity of greater attention by professionals to language skills during the initial period of child development. PMID:25992102

  2. Sleep deprivation attenuates inflammatory responses and ischemic cell death.

    PubMed

    Weil, Zachary M; Norman, Greg J; Karelina, Kate; Morris, John S; Barker, Jacqueline M; Su, Alan J; Walton, James C; Bohinc, Steven; Nelson, Randy J; DeVries, A Courtney

    2009-07-01

    Although the biological function of sleep remains uncertain, the consequences of sleep deprivation are well-described and are reported to be detrimental to cognitive function and affective well-being. Sleep deprivation also is strongly associated with elevated risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We used a mouse model of cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation to test the hypothesis that acute sleep deprivation would exacerbate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration after global ischemia. The resulting data led to a rejection of our hypothesis that sleep deprivation is necessarily detrimental. Indeed, acute sleep deprivation (ASD) was associated with a reduction in ischemia-induced interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) gene expression and attenuation of neuronal damage in the hippocampus. Further, sleep deprivation increased gene expression of two anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-10 that are associated with improved ischemic outcome. To determine whether the anti-inflammatory properties of ASD were specific to ischemia, mice were treated systemically with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent inflammogen. Acute sleep deprivation attenuated the central and peripheral increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and increased IL-10 expression. Together, the ischemia and LPS data suggest that, ASD produces an anti-inflammatory bias that could be exploited to improve medical procedures that are compromised by inflammation. PMID:19409382

  3. Lasers in the treatment of ischemic heart disease in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongzhen; Chen, Mingzhe

    2000-10-01

    Myocardial revascularization by laser is a new treatment modality for chronic, severe, refractory angina in the patients with coronary heart disease that is not amenable to angioplasty (PTCA) or bypass surgery (CABG). Transmyocardial revascularization (TMR), typically requiring open thoracotomy, uses laser to create channels that would directly carry blood from left ventricular cavity into the ischemic myocardium. Current data indicate that TMR may provide these patients with improvement in angina severity, quality of life, and myocardial perfusion. The greatest potential future use of TMR is as an adjunct to CABG in patients with disease that prevents bypass grafting due to lack of distal targets or a conduit. Recently, as percutaneous (catheter-based) myocardial revascularization (PMR) has been developed with laser technology that permits the creation of channels from the endocardial surface of the left ventricle. The early results with PMR seem encouraging. Randomized clinical trial has demonstrated symptomatic improvement and increased exercise capacity. The risk: benefit ratio for PMR appears to be much more favorable than that for TMR. The mechanisms of action of them have not yet been clearly elucidated, and several theories have been proposed, including channel patency, angiogenesis, denervation, and placebo effect. The challenge of TMR/PMR is related to improvement of perioperative outcomes and long-term survival without worsening of left ventricular function. In future, it may be feasible to combine TMR/PMR with intramyocardial delivery of angiogenic growth factors to induce further new blood vessel formation.

  4. Applications of laser in ischemic heart disease in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingzhe; Zhang, Yongzhen

    1999-09-01

    Current data demonstrate that laser coronary angioplasty is most useful in complex lesions not well suited for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). It is not `stand-alone' procedure, and should be considered an adjunct to PTCA or stenting. To date, there are not data supporting reduction of restenosis. Direct myocardial revascularization (DMR), either transmyocardial revascularization (TMR) or percutaneous (catheter-based) myocardial revascularization (PMR), uses laser to create channels between ischemic myocardium and left ventricular cavity. Candidates include patients with chronic, severe, refractory angina and those unable to undergo angioplasty or bypass surgery because conduits or acceptable target vessels are lacking. Although the mechanisms of action of DMR have not yet been clearly elucidated, but several theories have been proposed, including channel patency, angiogenesis, and denervation. TMR, typically requiring open thoracotomy, is effective for improving myocardial perfusion and reducing angina. Pilot studies demonstrate that clinical application of PMR is feasible and safe and effective for decreasing angina. Late sequelae also remain to be determined. An ongoing randomized clinical trial is comparing PMR with conventional medical therapy in patients with severe, refractory angina and disease unamenable to angioplasty or bypass surgery.

  5. Effects of kinesiotherapy in ischemic lesion and reperfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Moscardini, Flavia; Barbosa, Everton Horiquini; Garcia, Estela Fagionato; Borges, Ana Paula Oliveira; Bachur, José Alexandre; Quemelo, Paulo Roberto Veiga

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of kinesiotherapy on the functionality of the pelvic limb of rats after ischemic and reperfusion injury. Methods 10 rats were divided into two groups, GI (control) and GII (kinesiotherapy). All the animals underwent ischemia for a period of three hours, followed by tissue reperfusion. In Group GII, non-resistive systemic kinesiotherapy was performed (swimming) in three weekly sessions of 50 minutes, over a period of four weeks, while the GI animals remained at rest. Functional analysis of motor behavior was evaluated weekly. The animals were then sacrificed, and the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles and the sciatic nerve removed for histopathological analysis. Results There was a significant recovery of motor behavior with kinesiotherapeutic treatment during the four weeks of treatment. However, the histological examination of the tissues showed no morphological changes of cell injury and repair. Conclusion It was not possible to affirm that the exercise was effective in cell repair, because neither of the groups (control and experimental) showed any histological difference. On the other hand, systemic kinesiotherapy showed a beneficial effect on functional rehabilitation after ischemia and reperfusion. Level of evidence III, Case-Control Study. PMID:24453592

  6. Acute ischemic colitis secondary to air embolism after diving.

    PubMed

    Payor, Austin Daniel; Tucci, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic colitis (IC) secondary to air embolism from decompression sickness or barotrauma during diving is an extremely rare condition. After extensive review of the available literature, we found that there has been only one reported case of IC secondary to air embolism from diving. Although air embolization from diving and the various medical complications that follow have been well documented, the clinical manifestation of IC from an air embolism during diving is very rare and thus far unstudied. Common symptoms of IC include abdominal pain, bloody or non-bloody diarrhea or nausea or vomiting or any combination. Emergency physicians and Critical Care specialists should consider IC as a potential diagnosis for a patient with the above-mentioned symptoms and a history of recent diving. We report a case of IC from air embolism after a routine dive to 75 feet below sea level in a 53-year-old White female who presented to a community Emergency Department complaining of a 2-day history of diffuse abdominal pain and nausea. She was diagnosed by colonoscopy with biopsies and treated conservatively with antibiotics, bowel rest, and a slow advancement in diet.

  7. Risk of ischemic heart disease among primary aluminum production workers

    SciTech Connect

    Theriault, G.P.; Tremblay, C.G.; Armstrong, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    The risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) has been studied in relation to working conditions encountered in a primary aluminum smelter employing over 6,000 men. During the period 1975-1983, 306 new cases of IHD were identified which were matched with 575 referents. A logistic regression analysis was performed to adjust for differences in smoking habits, high blood pressure, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity. Results from this showed that white collar workers had a significantly lower risk of IHD (odds ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.31-0.70). Among blue collar workers, a significantly higher risk was observed for workers in the reduction division of the plant (OR 1.72, CI 1.09-2.97) including, in particular, Soderberg (OR 1.71, CI 1.07-2.72) and prebake (OR 2.26, CI. 1.27-4.02) potroom workers. The risk of IHD did not increase with the length of time worked in these occupations. The search for associations (among blue collar workers) of risk with nine specific contaminants (benzene soluble material, fluoride, total dust, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, thermal stress, noise, physical load, and mental load) proved inconclusive, with no association reaching statistical significance.

  8. The Effects of Air Pollution on Ischemic Stroke Admission Rate

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Hossein; Fakhri, Sara; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationship between the level of air pollutants and the rate of ischemic stroke (IS) admissions to hospitals. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, stroke admissions (January-March 2012 and 2013) to an emergency department and air pollution and meteorological data were gathered. The relationship between air pollutant levels and hospital admission rates were evaluated using the generalize additive model. In all 379 patients with IS were referred to the hospital (52.5% male; mean age 68.2±13.3 years). Both transient (p<0.001) and long-term (p<0.001) rises in CO level increases the risk of IS. Increased weekly (p<0.001) and monthly (p<0.001) average O3 levels amplifies this risk, while a transient increase in NO2 (p<0.001) and SO2 (p<0.001) levels has the same effect. Long-term changes in PM10 (p<0.001) and PM2.5 (p<0.001) also increase the risk of IS. The findings showed that the level of air pollutants directly correlates with the number of stroke admissions to the emergency department. PMID:26866000

  9. Language in Children with Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Chenia; Carneiro, Luciana; Vernier, Luíza; Cesa, Carla; Guardiola, Ana; Vidor, Deisi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (NHIE) is a common neurologic injury, and it may compromise the child's language and cognition. Understanding the process of language acquisition becomes possible with concise knowledge about children's global development. Objective The aim of this study was to observe if language acquisition and development are impaired in children with NHIE. Methods Seventy children with NHIE from 1 to 24 months old were analyzed in a Pediatric Neurology Service of Hospital of Porto Alegre, South of Brazil using the Brunet-Lezine Scale. Statistical analysis used SPSS 13.0 software. Results Twenty-four (60%) of the subjects were boys, with mean gestational age of 35.8 weeks (standard deviation of 4.6) and mean Apgar score of 6.0 at 1 minute and 7.1 at 5 minutes. The variables age versus language showed significant inverse correlation (r =  − 0.566; p = 0.028). As the subjects aged, language tasks became more specific and dependent on the subject's direct action, rather than the subjective interpretation of their guardian. This correlation seems to be closely associated with scale configuration and with consequences of neurologic disorder, evincing the delays in language development. Conclusion This study achieved the goals proposed and highlights the necessity of greater attention by professionals to language skills during the initial period of child development. PMID:25992102

  10. Tissue pertechnetate and iodinated contrast material ischemic stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.C.; Coss, D.T.; Jacobson, R.L.; Meyer, M.W.

    1980-11-01

    Isotope uptake during static radionuclide scanning and contrast enhancement during CT scanning, which may result from similar pathophysiologic mechanisms after ischemic infarction, were investigated in an animal model. Infarction was produced by transorbital occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in cats killed one, 2, 4, 8, or 16 days later. Sodium pertechnetate containing technetium-99m and 30% methylglucamine iothalamate labeled with I-125 were administered intravenously 60 and 15 min respectively prior to sacrifice. A coronal section through the infarct was parceled into 30 portions which were assayed for concentration of each isotope. Adjacent brain was prepared for histopathologic correlation. Concentrations of the 2 materials were highest in infarcted brain at 4 and 8 days. Strong positive correlation was found between tissue concentrations of the 2 materials in all brain samples. Elevated tissue levels correlated with necrosis, macrophage infiltration, and vascular hyperplasia. The results support the probability that radionuclide scan positivity and CT contrast enhancement reflect the same pathophysiologic development, probably extravasation of the respective labels, after schemic stroke.

  11. A Combination of Remote Ischemic Perconditioning and Cerebral Ischemic Postconditioning Inhibits Autophagy to Attenuate Plasma HMGB1 and Induce Neuroprotection Against Stroke in Rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Han, Dong; Sun, Miao; Feng, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) and ischemic postconditioning (IPOC) are well-acknowledged neuroprotective procedures during ischemic injury. The present study established a combined RIPerC and IPOC (RIPerC + IPOC) model in rats and studied how it would regulate the autophagy process and affect HMGB1 levels in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Rats with MCAO were treated with RIPerC by fastening and release of the left hind limb to achieve 4 cycles of 5 min remote ischemia reperfusion, 40 min prior to cerebral reperfusion, and then treated with IPOC by exposing the cerebral middle artery to 3 cycles of 30 s reperfusion/30 s occlusion at the onset of cerebral reperfusion. Infarction volumes, neurological deficits, and pathological changes were assessed 24 h after ischemia. The autophagy activator rapamycin (RAP) and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were administrated for further mechanism. The expression and location of HMGB1 and the autophagy-related proteins like LC3, Beclin1, and P62 as well as plasma HMGB1 levels were measured. Our results suggested that RIPerC + IPOC attenuated plasma HMGB1 levels to intensify its neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury via inhibiting the autophagy process. PMID:26852332

  12. Polymorphism of Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Affects the Clinical Phenotypes of Ischemic Stroke in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Don; Yun, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hee-Sang; Kim, Su Kang; Kim, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Je, Goun; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Chung, Seung Joon; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2293054 [Ile734Ile], rs1047735 [His902His], rs2293044 [Val1353Val], rs2682826 (3'UTR) of nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are associated with the development and clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke. Methods We enrolled 120 ischemic stroke patients and 314 control subjects. Ischemic stroke patients were divided into subgroups according to the scores of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Survey (NIHSS, <6 and ≥6) and Modified Barthel Index (MBI, <60 and ≥60). SNPStats, SNPAnalyzer, and HelixTree programs were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and p-values. Multiple logistic regression models were performed to analyze genetic data. Results No SNPs of the NOS1 gene were found to be associated with ischemic stroke. However, in an analysis of clinical phenotypes, we found that rs2293054 was associated with the NIHSS scores of ischemic stroke patients in codominant (p=0.019), dominant (p=0.007), overdominant (p=0.033), and log-additive (p=0.0048) models. Also, rs2682826 revealed a significant association in the recessive model (p=0.034). In allele frequency analysis, we also found that the T alleles of rs2293054 were associated with lower NIHSS scores (p=0.007). Respectively, rs2293054 had a significant association in the MBI scores of ischemic stroke in codominant (p=0.038), dominant (p=0.031), overdominant (p=0.045), and log-additive (p=0.04) models. Conclusion These results suggest that NOS1 may be related to the clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke in Korean population. PMID:26949676

  13. Hyperpolarized 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging of a rat model of transient Ischemic Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walvick, Ronn P.; Bastan, Birgul; Reno, Austin; Mansour, Joey; Sun, Yanping; Zhou, Xin; Mazzani, Mary; Fisher, Marc; Sotak, Christopher H.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2009-02-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for nearly 80% of all stroke cases. Although proton diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the gold standards in ischemic stroke diagnostics, the use of hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI has a potential role to contribute to the diagnostic picture. The highly lipophilic hyperpolarized 129Xe can be non-invasively delivered via inhalation into the lungs where it is dissolved into the blood and delivered to other organs such as the brain. As such, we expect hyperpolarized 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer which will result in a signal deficit in areas of blood deprived tissue. In this work, we present imaging results from an animal model of transient ischemic stroke characterized through 129Xe MRI. In this model, a suture is used to occlude the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in the rat brain, thus causing an ischemic event. After a period of MCA occlusion, the suture can then be removed to reperfuse the ischemic area. During the ischemic phase of the stroke, a signal void was observed in the MCA territory; which was subsequently restored by normal 129Xe MRI signal once perfusion was reinstated. Further, a higher resolution one-dimensional chemical shift image shows a sharp signal drop in the area of ischemia. Validation of ischemic damage was shown through both proton diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazoliumchloride (TTC) staining. The results show the potential of 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer; information that may add to the diagnostic and prognostic utility of the clinical picture of stroke.

  14. Fruit and vegetable consumption, ethnicity and risk of fatal ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sangita; Vik, Shelly; Kolonel, Laurence N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mortality rates from ischemic heart disease vary among ethnic groups. Dietary intake of fruit and vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of ischemic heart disease, but ethnic-specific data are limited. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Hawaii and Los Angeles County, between 1993 and 1996. Participants These analyses included 164,617 older adults age 45 to 75, representing five ethnic groups who were enrolled in the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Dietary data were collected at baseline using a validated food frequency questionnaire and fatal ischemic heart disease cases were identified up to December 31, 2001. Associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and fatal ischemic heart disease were examined using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results The associations between fruit and vegetable intake and fatal ischemic heart disease were similar among the five ethnic groups. When data for the ethnic groups were combined, higher vegetable intake was associated with a protective effect against ischemic heart disease in men with all intake levels above 2.3 servings per day (over 6.6 servings per day: hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.58–0.92), and for women with intakes levels between 3.4 and 6.6 servings per day (4.6 to 6.6 servings per day: hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.59–0.99). There was no evidence of an association for fruit intake. Conclusions Associations between fruit and vegetable intake and ischemic heart disease do not appear to vary among ethnic groups. Additional research is needed to clarify associations for fruit versus vegetable intake and impact on cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:24950146

  15. Intake of antioxidants and B vitamins is inversely associated with ischemic stroke and cerebral atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hansaem; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Yun, Jin A; Kim, Ji-Myung; Song, Tae-Jin; Chang, Namsoo; Kim, Yong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study was conducted to examine relationships between dietary habits and intakes of antioxidants and B vitamins and the risk of ischemic stroke, and to compare dietary factors according to the presence of cerebral artery atherosclerosis and stroke subtypes. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 147 patients and 144 control subjects were recruited consecutively in the metropolitan area of Seoul, Korea. Sixty participants each in the case and control groups were included in analyses after 1:1 frequency matching. In addition, 117 acute ischemic stroke patients were classified into subtypes according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) guidelines. Dietary intake was measured using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire composed of 111 food items and plasma lipid and homocysteine levels were analyzed. RESULTS When compared with control subjects, stroke patients had unfavorable dietary behaviors and lower intakes of fruits (73.1 ± 83.2 g vs. 230.9 ± 202.1 g, P < 0.001), vegetables (221.1 ± 209.0 g vs. 561.7 ± 306.6 g, P < 0.001), and antioxidants, including vitamins C, E, B6, β-carotene, and folate. The intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamin C, and folate were inversely associated with the risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for confounding factors. Intakes of vegetables, vitamins C, B6, B12, and folate per 1,000 kcal were lower in ischemic stroke with cerebral atherosclerosis than in those without. Overall vitamin B12 intake per 1,000 kcal differed according to the TOAST classification (P = 0.004), but no differences among groups existed based on the post-hoc test. CONCLUSIONS When compared with control subjects, ischemic stroke patients, particularly those with cerebral atherosclerosis, had unfavorable dietary intake, which may have contributed to the development of ischemic stroke. These results indicate that proper dietary recommendations are important for the prevention of ischemic stroke. PMID:27698959

  16. Intake of antioxidants and B vitamins is inversely associated with ischemic stroke and cerebral atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hansaem; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Yun, Jin A; Kim, Ji-Myung; Song, Tae-Jin; Chang, Namsoo; Kim, Yong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study was conducted to examine relationships between dietary habits and intakes of antioxidants and B vitamins and the risk of ischemic stroke, and to compare dietary factors according to the presence of cerebral artery atherosclerosis and stroke subtypes. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 147 patients and 144 control subjects were recruited consecutively in the metropolitan area of Seoul, Korea. Sixty participants each in the case and control groups were included in analyses after 1:1 frequency matching. In addition, 117 acute ischemic stroke patients were classified into subtypes according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) guidelines. Dietary intake was measured using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire composed of 111 food items and plasma lipid and homocysteine levels were analyzed. RESULTS When compared with control subjects, stroke patients had unfavorable dietary behaviors and lower intakes of fruits (73.1 ± 83.2 g vs. 230.9 ± 202.1 g, P < 0.001), vegetables (221.1 ± 209.0 g vs. 561.7 ± 306.6 g, P < 0.001), and antioxidants, including vitamins C, E, B6, β-carotene, and folate. The intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamin C, and folate were inversely associated with the risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for confounding factors. Intakes of vegetables, vitamins C, B6, B12, and folate per 1,000 kcal were lower in ischemic stroke with cerebral atherosclerosis than in those without. Overall vitamin B12 intake per 1,000 kcal differed according to the TOAST classification (P = 0.004), but no differences among groups existed based on the post-hoc test. CONCLUSIONS When compared with control subjects, ischemic stroke patients, particularly those with cerebral atherosclerosis, had unfavorable dietary intake, which may have contributed to the development of ischemic stroke. These results indicate that proper dietary recommendations are important for the prevention of ischemic stroke.

  17. Lipocalin-2 as an Infection-Related Biomarker to Predict Clinical Outcome in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hochmeister, Sonja; Engel, Odilo; Adzemovic, Milena Z.; Pekar, Thomas; Kendlbacher, Paul; Zeitelhofer, Manuel; Haindl, Michaela; Meisel, Andreas; Fazekas, Franz; Seifert-Held, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives From previous data in animal models of cerebral ischemia, lipocalin-2 (LCN2), a protein related to neutrophil function and cellular iron homeostasis, is supposed to have a value as a biomarker in ischemic stroke patients. Therefore, we examined LCN2 expression in the ischemic brain in an animal model and measured plasma levels of LCN2 in ischemic stroke patients. Methods In the mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), LCN2 expression in the brain was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and correlated to cellular nonheme iron deposition up to 42 days after tMCAO. In human stroke patients, plasma levels of LCN2 were determined one week after ischemic stroke. In addition to established predictive parameters such as age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and thrombolytic therapy, LCN2 was included into linear logistic regression modeling to predict clinical outcome at 90 days after stroke. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of LCN2 in the mouse brain already at one day following tMCAO, and the amount of LCN2 subsequently increased with a maximum at 2 weeks after tMCAO. Accumulation of cellular nonheme iron was detectable one week post tMCAO and continued to increase. In ischemic stroke patients, higher plasma levels of LCN2 were associated with a worse clinical outcome at 90 days and with the occurrence of post-stroke infections. Conclusions LCN2 is expressed in the ischemic brain after temporary experimental ischemia and paralleled by the accumulation of cellular nonheme iron. Plasma levels of LCN2 measured in patients one week after ischemic stroke contribute to the prediction of clinical outcome at 90 days and reflect the systemic response to post-stroke infections. PMID:27152948

  18. Polyhydroxylated fullerene nanoparticles attenuate brain infarction and oxidative stress in rat model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vani, Javad Rasouli; Mohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Foroshani, Mahsa Sarami; Jafari, Mahvash

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the common underlying mechanism of damage in ischemic stroke. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the possible protective effects of polyhydroxylated fullerene derivatives on brain infarction and oxidative/nitrosative stress in a rat model of ischemic stroke. The experiment was performed by four groups of rats (each; n=12); Sham, Control ischemia, and ischemic treatment groups (Pretreatment and Posttreatment). Brain ischemia was induced by 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 24 hours reperfusion. Rats received fullerene nanoparticles at dose of 1 mg/kg 30 min before MCAO and immediately after beginning of reperfusion. Infarct volume, contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and nitrate as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were assessed 24 hours after termination of MCAO. Brain infarct volume was 310 ± 21 mm3 in control group. Administration of fullerene nanoparticles before and after MCAO significantly decreased the infarct volume by 53 % (145 ± 45 mm3) and 81 % (59 ± 13 mm3), respectively. Ischemia also enhanced MDA and nitrate contents of ischemic hemispheres by 45 % and 25 % , respectively. Fullerene nanoparticles considerably reduced the MDA and nitrate contents of ischemic hemispheres before MCAO by 58 % and 17 % , respectively, and after MCAO by 38 % and 21 % , respectively. Induction of MCAO significantly decreased GSH content (19 % ) and SOD activity (52 % ) of ischemic hemispheres, whereas fullerene nanoparticles increased the GSH content and SOD activity of ischemic hemispheres by 19 % and 52 % before MCAO, respectively, and 21 % and 55 % after MCAO, respectively. Our findings indicate that fullerene nanoparticles, as a potent scavenger of free radicals, protect the brain cells against ischemia/reperfusion injury and inhibit brain oxidative/nitrosative damage. PMID:27540350

  19. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; de Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Methods Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes. PMID:25004417

  20. Electroacupuncture increased cerebral blood flow and reduced ischemic brain injury: dependence on stimulation intensity and frequency

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fei; Guo, Jingchun; Cheng, Jieshi; Wu, Gencheng

    2011-01-01

    Stroke causes ischemic brain injury and is a leading cause of neurological disability and death. There is, however, no promising therapy to protect the brain from ischemic stress to date. Here we show an exciting finding that optimal electroacupuncture (EA) effectively protects the brain from ischemic injury. The experiments were performed on rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with continuous monitoring of cerebral blood flow. EA was delivered to acupoints of “Shuigou” (Du 26) and “Baihui” (Du 20) with different intensities and frequencies to optimize the stimulation parameters. The results showed that 1) EA at 1.0–1.2 mA and 5–20 Hz remarkably reduced ischemic infarction, neurological deficit, and death rate; 2) the EA treatment increased the blood flow by >100%, which appeared immediately after the initiation of EA and disappeared after the cessation of EA; 3) the EA treatment promoted the recovery of the blood flow after MCAO; 4) “nonoptimal” parameters of EA (e.g., <0.6 mA or >40 Hz) could not improve the blood flow or reduce ischemic injury; and 5) the same EA treatment with optimal parameters could not increase the blood flow in naive brains. These novel observations suggest that appropriate EA treatment protects the brain from cerebral ischemia by increasing blood flow to the ischemic brain region via a rapid regulation. Our findings have far-reaching impacts on the prevention and treatment of ischemic encephalopathy, and the optimized EA parameters may potentially be a useful clue for the clinical application of EA. PMID:21836043

  1. Temporal Exposure of Cryptic Collagen Epitopes within Ischemic Muscle during Hindlimb Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gagne, Paul J.; Tihonov, Nikita; Li, Xialou; Glaser, Joseph; Qiao, Jhenrong; Silberstein, Michael; Yee, Herman; Gagne, Elizabeth; Brooks, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Chronic limb-threatening ischemia is a devastating disease with limited surgical options. However, inducing controlled angiogenesis and enhancing reperfusion holds therapeutic promise. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to limb reperfusion, we examined the temporal biochemical and structural changes occurring within the extracellular matrix of ischemic skeletal muscle. Both the latent and active forms of MMP-2 and -9 significantly increased during the active phase of limb reperfusion. Moreover, small but significant alterations in tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase levels also occurred during a similar time course, consistent with a net increase in extracellular matrix remodeling. This temporal increase in MMP activity coincided with enhanced exposure of the unique HU177 cryptic collagen epitope. Although the HUIV26 cryptic collagen epitope has been implicated in angiogenesis, little is known concerning such epitopes within ischemic muscle tissue. Here, we provide the first evidence that a functionally distinct cryptic collagen epitope (HU177) is temporally exposed in ischemic muscle tissue during the active phase of reperfusion. Interestingly, the exposure of the HU177 epitope was greatly diminished in MMP-9 null mice, corresponding with significantly reduced limb reperfusion. Therefore, the regulated exposure of a unique cryptic collagen epitope within ischemic muscle suggests an important role for collagen remodeling during the active phase of ischemic limb reperfusion. PMID:16251419

  2. Targeting acid sphingomyelinase reduces cardiac ceramide accumulation in the post-ischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Klevstig, Martina; Ståhlman, Marcus; Lundqvist, Annika; Scharin Täng, Margareta; Fogelstrand, Per; Adiels, Martin; Andersson, Linda; Kolesnick, Richard; Jeppsson, Anders; Borén, Jan; Levin, Malin C

    2016-04-01

    Ceramide accumulation is known to accompany acute myocardial ischemia, but its role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease is unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine how ceramides accumulate in the ischemic heart and to determine if cardiac function following ischemia can be improved by reducing ceramide accumulation. To investigate the association between ceramide accumulation and heart function, we analyzed myocardial left ventricle biopsies from subjects with chronic ischemia and found that ceramide levels were higher in biopsies from subjects with reduced heart function. Ceramides are produced by either de novo synthesis or hydrolysis of sphingomyelin catalyzed by acid and/or neutral sphingomyelinase. We used cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes to investigate these pathways and showed that acid sphingomyelinase activity rather than neutral sphingomyelinase activity or de novo sphingolipid synthesis was important for hypoxia-induced ceramide accumulation. We also used mice with a partial deficiency in acid sphingomyelinase (Smpd1(+/-) mice) to investigate if limiting ceramide accumulation under ischemic conditions would have a beneficial effect on heart function and survival. Although we showed that cardiac ceramide accumulation was reduced in Smpd1(+/-) mice 24h after an induced myocardial infarction, this reduction was not accompanied by an improvement in heart function or survival. Our findings show that accumulation of cardiac ceramides in the post-ischemic heart is mediated by acid sphingomyelinase. However, targeting ceramide accumulation in the ischemic heart may not be a beneficial treatment strategy. PMID:26930027

  3. Central Role of Maladapted Astrocytic Plasticity in Ischemic Brain Edema Formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema formation and the ensuing brain damages are the major cause of high mortality and long term disability following the occurrence of ischemic stroke. In this process, oxygen and glucose deprivation and the resulting reperfusion injury play primary roles. In response to the ischemic insult, the neurovascular unit experiences both intracellular and extracellular edemas, associated with maladapted astrocytic plasticity. The astrocytic plasticity includes both morphological and functional plasticity. The former involves a reactive gliosis and the subsequent glial retraction. It relates to the capacity of astrocytes to buffer changes in extracellular chemical levels, particularly K(+) and glutamate, as well as the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter involves the expression and activity of a series of ion and water transport proteins. These molecules are grouped together around glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and water channel protein aquaporin 4 (AQP4) to form functional networks, regulate hydromineral balance across cell membranes and maintain the integrity of the BBB. Intense ischemic challenges can disrupt these capacities of astrocytes and result in their maladaptation. The maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke cannot only disrupt the hydromineral homeostasis across astrocyte membrane and the BBB, but also leads to disorders of the whole neurovascular unit. This review focuses on how the maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke plays the central role in the brain edema formation. PMID:27242440

  4. Cytokine levels in cerebrospinal fluid and delayed ischemic deficits in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, K. Y.; Jeon, B. C.

    2001-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) induces an inflammatory reaction and may lead to ischemic brain damage. The pathogenesis of brain dysfunction and delayed ischemic symptoms remain difficult to understand despite extensive surveys of such reactions. Cytokine production in the central nervous system following SAH and its relation with clinical outcome have hardly been studied. This study was aimed to determine whether the levels of IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the initial cerebrospinal fluid would increase following aneurysmal SAH, and be related with development of delayed ischemic deficit and clinical outcome. Nineteen patients suffering from aneurysmal SAH and 12 control volunteers were the subjects in this study. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were obtained on admission and the levels of each cytokine were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage showed elevated levels of IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha on admission. The patients with poor neurological status showed high levels of IL-1 beta, and IL-6. The patients who developed delayed ischemic deficit had high level of IL-6. We suggest that elevated level of IL-6 in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal SAH on admission can predict the high risk of delayed ischemic deficit. PMID:11748361

  5. Angiogenesis in Ischemic Stroke and Angiogenic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Sai-Wang; Chang, Dennis; Jenkins, Anita; Bensoussan, Alan; Kiat, Hosen

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and adult disability worldwide. The underlying pathophysiology of stroke is highly complicated, consisting of impairments of multiple signalling pathways, and numerous pathological processes such as acidosis, glutamate excitotoxicity, calcium overload, cerebral inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The current treatment for ischemic stroke is limited to thromolytics such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). tPA has a very narrow therapeutic window, making it suitable to only a minority of stroke patients. Hence, there is great urgency to develop new therapies that can protect brain tissue from ischemic damage. Recent studies have shown that new vessel formation after stroke not only replenishes blood flow to the ischemic area of the brain, but also promotes neurogenesis and improves neurological functions in both animal models and patients. Therefore, drugs that can promote angiogenesis after ischemic stroke can provide therapeutic benefits in stroke management. In this regard, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has a long history in treating stroke and the associated diseases. A number of studies have demonstrated the pro-angiogenic effects of various Chinese herbs and herbal formulations in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on angiogenesis in the context of ischemic stroke and discuss the potential use of CHM in stroke management through modulation of angiogenesis. PMID:27275837

  6. Global profiling of influence of intra-ischemic brain temperature on gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Megumi Sugahara; Asai, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Koichi; Nishida, Yayoi; Nagata, Toshihito; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2008-06-01

    Mild to moderate differences in brain temperature are known to greatly affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. The impact of brain temperature on ischemic disorders has been mainly evaluated through pathological analysis. However, no comprehensive analyses have been conducted at the gene expression level. Using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray, we screened 24000 genes in the hippocampus under hypothermic (32 degrees C), normothermic (37 degrees C), and hyperthermic (39 degrees C) conditions in a rat ischemia-reperfusion model. When the ischemic group at each intra-ischemic brain temperature was compared to a sham-operated control group, genes whose expression levels changed more than three-fold with statistical significance could be detected. In our screening condition, thirty-three genes (some of them novel) were obtained after screening, and extensive functional surveys and literature reviews were subsequently performed. In the hypothermic condition, many neuroprotective factor genes were obtained, whereas cell death- and cell damage-associated genes were detected as the brain temperature increased. At all intra-ischemic brain temperatures, multiple molecular chaperone genes were obtained. The finding that intra-ischemic brain temperature affects the expression level of many genes related to neuroprotection or neurotoxicity coincides with the different pathological outcomes at different brain temperatures, demonstrating the utility of the genetic approach.

  7. Factor V Leiden does not have a role in cryptogenic ischemic stroke among Iranian young adults

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Ehsan; Pourhossein, Meraj; Amini, Gilda; Saadatnia, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Different risk factors have been suggested for ischemic stroke in young adults. In a group of these patients despite of extensive diagnostic work-up, the primary cause remains unknown. Coagulation tendency is accounted as a possible cause in these patients. Previous studies on factor V Leiden (FVL) as the main cause of inherited thrombophilia for clarifying the role of FVL in stroke have resulted in controversial findings. The current study investigates the role of this factor in ischemic stroke among Iranians. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed between September 2007 and December 2008 in Isfahan, Iran. The case group comprised of 22 patients of which 15 were males and 7 were females with age range of ≤50 years, diagnosed as ischemic stroke without classic risk factors and the control group consisted of 54 healthy young adults. After filling consent form, venous blood samples were obtained and sent to the laboratory for genetic examination. Results: No FVL mutation was found in the case group. There was one carrier of the mutation as heterozygous in the control group (relative frequency = 1.85%). Conclusions: Based on our study, FVL might not be considered as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke in Iranian individuals who are not suffering from other risk factors of ischemic stroke. PMID:24761388

  8. Non-Coding RNAs as Potential Neuroprotectants against Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prameet; Liu, Fujia; Tan, Jun Rong; Lim, Kai Ying; Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2013-03-20

    Over the past decade, scientific discoveries have highlighted new roles for a unique class of non-coding RNAs. Transcribed from the genome, these non-coding RNAs have been implicated in determining the biological complexity seen in mammals by acting as transcriptional and translational regulators. Non-coding RNAs, which can be sub-classified into long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs and several others, are widely expressed in the nervous system with roles in neurogenesis, development and maintenance of the neuronal phenotype. Perturbations of these non-coding transcripts have been observed in ischemic preconditioning as well as ischemic brain injury with characterization of the mechanisms by which they confer toxicity. Their dysregulation may also confer pathogenic conditions in neurovascular diseases. A better understanding of their expression patterns and functions has uncovered the potential use of these riboregulators as neuroprotectants to antagonize the detrimental molecular events taking place upon ischemic-reperfusion injury. In this review, we discuss the various roles of non-coding RNAs in brain development and their mechanisms of gene regulation in relation to ischemic brain injury. We will also address the future directions and open questions for identifying promising non-coding RNAs that could eventually serve as potential neuroprotectants against ischemic brain injury.

  9. Effects of passive smoking on ischemic heart disease mortality of nonsmokers. A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, C.; Barrett-Connor, E.; Suarez, L.; Criqui, M.H.; Wingard, D.L.

    1985-05-01

    The mortality attributable to ischemic heart disease as a result of cigarette smoking is greater of a community of older adults in southern California, the authors tested the hypothesis that nonsmoking women exposed to their husband's cigarette smoke would have an elevated risk of fatal ischemic heart disease. Married women aged 50-79 years who had never smoked cigarettes (n = 695) were classified according to the husband's self-reported smoking status at entry into the study: never, former, or current smoker. After 10 years, nonsmoking wives of current or former cigarette smokers had a higher total (p less than or equal to 0.05) and age-adjusted (p less than or equal to 0.10) death rate from ischemic heart disease than women whose husbands never smoked. After adjustment for differences in risk factors for heart disease, the relative risk for death from ischemic heart disease in nonsmoking women married to current or former cigarette smokers was 14.9 (p less than or equal to 0.10). These data are compatible with the hypothesis that passive cigarette smoking carries an excess risk of fatal ischemic heart disease.

  10. Targeting acid sphingomyelinase reduces cardiac ceramide accumulation in the post-ischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Klevstig, Martina; Ståhlman, Marcus; Lundqvist, Annika; Scharin Täng, Margareta; Fogelstrand, Per; Adiels, Martin; Andersson, Linda; Kolesnick, Richard; Jeppsson, Anders; Borén, Jan; Levin, Malin C

    2016-04-01

    Ceramide accumulation is known to accompany acute myocardial ischemia, but its role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease is unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine how ceramides accumulate in the ischemic heart and to determine if cardiac function following ischemia can be improved by reducing ceramide accumulation. To investigate the association between ceramide accumulation and heart function, we analyzed myocardial left ventricle biopsies from subjects with chronic ischemia and found that ceramide levels were higher in biopsies from subjects with reduced heart function. Ceramides are produced by either de novo synthesis or hydrolysis of sphingomyelin catalyzed by acid and/or neutral sphingomyelinase. We used cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes to investigate these pathways and showed that acid sphingomyelinase activity rather than neutral sphingomyelinase activity or de novo sphingolipid synthesis was important for hypoxia-induced ceramide accumulation. We also used mice with a partial deficiency in acid sphingomyelinase (Smpd1(+/-) mice) to investigate if limiting ceramide accumulation under ischemic conditions would have a beneficial effect on heart function and survival. Although we showed that cardiac ceramide accumulation was reduced in Smpd1(+/-) mice 24h after an induced myocardial infarction, this reduction was not accompanied by an improvement in heart function or survival. Our findings show that accumulation of cardiac ceramides in the post-ischemic heart is mediated by acid sphingomyelinase. However, targeting ceramide accumulation in the ischemic heart may not be a beneficial treatment strategy.

  11. Visible aging signs as risk markers for ischemic heart disease: Epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Association of common aging signs (i.e., male pattern baldness, hair graying, and facial wrinkles) as well as other age-related appearance factors (i.e., arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, and earlobe crease) with increased risk of ischemic heart disease was initially described in anecdotal reports from clinicians observing trends in the physical appearance of patients with ischemic heart disease. Following these early observations numerous epidemiological studies have reported these associations. Since the prevalences of both visible aging signs and ischemic heart disease have a strong correlation with increasing age, it has been extensively debated whether the observed associations could be entirely explained by a common association with age. Furthermore, the etiologies of the visible aging signs are rarely fully understood, and pathophysiological explanations for these associations remain controversial, and are mostly speculative. As a consequence of inconsistent findings and lack of mechanistic explanations for the observed associations with ischemic heart disease, consensus on the clinical importance of these visible aging signs has been lacking. The aim of this review is for each of the visible aging signs to (i) review the etiology, (ii) to discuss the current epidemiological evidence for an association with risk of ischemic heart disease, and (iii) to present possible pathophysiological explanations for these associations. Finally this review discusses the potential clinical implications of these findings.

  12. Ischemic neurons prevent vascular regeneration of neural tissue by secreting semaphorin 3A

    PubMed Central

    Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Sitaras, Nicholas; Binet, François; Rivera, Jose Carlos; Stahl, Andreas; Zaniolo, Karine; Shao, Zhuo; Polosa, Anna; Zhu, Tang; Hamel, David; Djavari, Mikheil; Kunik, Dario; Honoré, Jean-Claude; Picard, Emilie; Zabeida, Alexandra; Varma, Daya R.; Hickson, Gilles; Mancini, Joseph; Klagsbrun, Michael; Costantino, Santiago; Beauséjour, Christian; Lachapelle, Pierre; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2011-01-01

    The failure of blood vessels to revascularize ischemic neural tissue represents a significant challenge for vascular biology. Examples include proliferative retinopathies (PRs) such as retinopathy of prematurity and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, which are the leading causes of blindness in children and working-age adults. PRs are characterized by initial microvascular degeneration, followed by a compensatory albeit pathologic hypervascularization mounted by the hypoxic retina attempting to reinstate metabolic equilibrium. Paradoxically, this secondary revascularization fails to grow into the most ischemic regions of the retina. Instead, the new vessels are misdirected toward the vitreous, suggesting that vasorepulsive forces operate in the avascular hypoxic retina. In the present study, we demonstrate that the neuronal guidance cue semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is secreted by hypoxic neurons in the avascular retina in response to the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. Sema3A contributes to vascular decay and later forms a chemical barrier that repels neo-vessels toward the vitreous. Conversely, silencing Sema3A expression enhances normal vascular regeneration within the ischemic retina, thereby diminishing aberrant neovascularization and preserving neuroretinal function. Overcoming the chemical barrier (Sema3A) released by ischemic neurons accelerates the vascular regeneration of neural tissues, which restores metabolic supply and improves retinal function. Our findings may be applicable to other neurovascular ischemic conditions such as stroke. PMID:21355092

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Kirchgessner, Annette; Tepper, Deborah; Leonard, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke continues to be one of the most challenging diseases in translational neurology. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use is limited to the first hours after stroke onset due to an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation over time resulting in enhanced brain injury. In this review we discuss the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption as a consequence of ischemic stroke. MMP-9 in particular appears to play an important role in tPA-associated hemorrhagic complications. Reactive oxygen species can enhance the effects of tPA on MMP activation through the loss of caveolin-1 (cav-1), a protein encoded in the cav-1 gene that serves as a critical determinant of BBB permeability. This review provides an overview of MMPs’ role in BBB breakdown during acute ischemic stroke. The possible role of MMPs in combination treatment of acute ischemic stroke is also examined. PMID:23565108

  14. Apolipoprotein A1-Unique Peptide as a Diagnostic Biomarker for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xu; Yu, Yue; Xu, Wenlong; Dong, Lei; Wang, Yuan; Gao, Bing; Li, Guangyu; Zhang, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Clinically-informative biomarkers of ischemic stroke are needed for rapid diagnosis and timely treatment. In the present study, APOA1 unique peptide (APOA1-UP), a novel peptide biomarker, was identified and quantified by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using labeled reference peptide (LRP). Serum samples of 94 patients in the ischemic stroke group and 37 patients in the non-stroke group were analyzed for the levels of total APOA1-UP, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and total cholesterol (TC). Median ratio of total APOA1-UP/LRP was 2.14 (interquartile range, 0.40) in the non-stroke group and 1.32 (0.44) in the ischemic stroke group (p < 0.0001). The serum level of total APOA1-UP was independently correlated with the presence of ischemic stroke by multivariate logistic regression analysis (p < 0.0001). From the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.9750 and the optimal cutoff value of the serum APOA1-UP level was 1.80, which yielded a sensitivity of 90.63% and a specificity of 97.14%. The diagnostic efficiency of HDL-C was lower, with an AUC of 0.7488. Therefore, the serum level of APOA1-UP is a diagnostic biomarker candidate for ischemic stroke in the early stage. PMID:27043525

  15. Angiogenesis in Ischemic Stroke and Angiogenic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Seto, Sai-Wang; Chang, Dennis; Jenkins, Anita; Bensoussan, Alan; Kiat, Hosen

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and adult disability worldwide. The underlying pathophysiology of stroke is highly complicated, consisting of impairments of multiple signalling pathways, and numerous pathological processes such as acidosis, glutamate excitotoxicity, calcium overload, cerebral inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The current treatment for ischemic stroke is limited to thromolytics such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). tPA has a very narrow therapeutic window, making it suitable to only a minority of stroke patients. Hence, there is great urgency to develop new therapies that can protect brain tissue from ischemic damage. Recent studies have shown that new vessel formation after stroke not only replenishes blood flow to the ischemic area of the brain, but also promotes neurogenesis and improves neurological functions in both animal models and patients. Therefore, drugs that can promote angiogenesis after ischemic stroke can provide therapeutic benefits in stroke management. In this regard, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has a long history in treating stroke and the associated diseases. A number of studies have demonstrated the pro-angiogenic effects of various Chinese herbs and herbal formulations in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on angiogenesis in the context of ischemic stroke and discuss the potential use of CHM in stroke management through modulation of angiogenesis.

  16. The Quest for Arterial Recanalization in Acute Ischemic Stroke-The Past, Present and the Future

    PubMed Central

    L.L.Yeo, Leonard; Sharma, Vijay K

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the major causes of mortality and long-term disability. In the recent past, only very few treatment options were available and a considerable proportion of stroke survivors remained permanently disabled. However, over the last 2 decades rapid advances in acute stroke care have resulted in a corresponding improvement in mortality rates and functional outcomes. In this review, we describe the evolution of systemic thrombolytic agents and various interventional devices, their current status as well as some of the future prospects. We reviewed literature pertaining to acute ischemic stroke reperfusion treatment. We explored the current accepted treatment strategies to attain cerebral reperfusion via intravenous modalities and compare and contrast them within the boundaries of their clinical trials. Subsequently we reviewed the trials for interventional devices for acute ischemic stroke, categorizing them into thrombectomy devices, aspiration devices, clot disruption devices and thrombus entrapment devices. Finally we surveyed several of the alternative reperfusion strategies available. We also shed some light on the controversies surrounding the current strategies of treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Acute invasive interventional strategies continue to improve along with the noninvasive modalities. Both approaches appear promising. We conducted a comprehensive chronological review of the existing treatments as well as upcoming remedies for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23864913

  17. Association of apolipoprotein M gene polymorphisms with ischemic stroke in a Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongxue; He, Zhiyi; Qin, Xue; Li, Lei; Liu, Fang; Deng, Shumin

    2011-03-01

    The apolipoprotein M (ApoM) gene is critical in the formation of pre-β-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and cholesterol efflux to HDL. In this case and control study, 314 ischemic stroke patients and 389 healthy controls were analyzed for three ApoM gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e., C-1065A, T-855C, and T-778C, using a SNaPshot Multiplex sequencing assay. The genotype and allele frequencies of the T-855C were similar in both ischemic stroke patients and the controls. But the frequency of the TC genotype, the C allele of T-778C, and the A allele of the C-1065A SNPs in ischemic stroke patients was significantly higher than that of the healthy controls. After adjusting for confounding risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, tobacco smoking, and alcohol consumption), the ApoM gene TC genotype, C allele of T-778C, and A allele of C-1065A were associated with a risk of ischemic stroke. Moreover, plasma levels of total cholesterol were significantly higher in patients with CC or CT genotypes of T-778C than those with TT genotype in the controls. The current data demonstrated that ApoM T-778 C and C-1065A SNPs were associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke in this Han Chinese population.

  18. Semi-rigid penile prosthesis as a salvage management of idiopathic ischemic stuttering priapism

    PubMed Central

    Faddan, Amr A; Aksenov, Alexey V; Naumann, Carsten M; Jünemann, Klaus P; Osmonov, Daniar K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Priapism is the persistent erection resulting from dysfunction of the mechanisms that regulate penile swelling, stiffness, and sagging. It is a full or partial erection that persists for a period more than 4 hours beyond sexual stimulation and/or orgasm or is unrelated to sexual stimulation. Ischemic priapism should be managed in a step-by-step fashion. Objective To demonstrate step-by-step management of stuttering refractory ischemic priapism. We report a case of stuttering refractory ischemic priapism. Moreover, we reviewed different approaches to priapism management in the literature. Case presentation A 53-year-old male presented with a painful erection of 29 hours’ duration, probably caused by consumption of alcohol. The penile blood gas showed a pH of 7.08, PCO2 of 75 mmHg and PO2 of 39 mmHg. Aspiration was followed by irrigation of an α-adrenergic, Winter and T-shunt operations were preformed, and finally a semi-rigid penile prosthesis was implanted to overcome the refractory stuttering ischemic priapism. Conclusion In case of stuttering refractory ischemic priapism, immediate implantation of a penile prosthesis is a simple and effective procedure that manages both the acute episode and the inevitable erectile dysfunction that would otherwise occur, while preserving penile length. PMID:26380229

  19. Optimal therapeutic dose and time window of picroside II in cerebral ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangyi; Zhao, Li; Wang, Tingting; Zhang, Meizeng; Pei, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary study from our research group showed that picroside II inhibited neuronal apoptosis in ischemic penumbra, reduced ischemic volume, and improved neurobehavioral function in rats with cerebral ischemia. The aim of the present study was to validate the neuroprotective effects of picroside II and optimize its therapeutic time window and dose in a rat model of cerebral ischemia. We found that picroside II inhibited cell apoptosis and reduced the expression of neuron-specific enolase, a marker of neuronal damage, in rats after cerebral ischemic injury. The optimal treatment time after ischemic injury and dose were determined, respectively, as follows: (1) 2.0 hours and 10 mg/kg according to the results of toluidine blue staining; (2) 1.5 hours and 10 mg/kg according to early apoptotic ratio by flow cytometry; (3) 2.0 hours and 10 mg/kg according to immunohistochemical and western blot analysis; and (4) 1.5 hours and 10 mg/kg according to reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The present findings suggest that an intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg picroside II 1.5–2.0 hours after cerebral ischemic injury in rats is the optimal dose and time for therapeutic benefit. PMID:25317155

  20. Neuroprotective effect of oxaloacetate in a focal brain ischemic model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Knapp, L; Gellért, L; Kocsis, K; Kis, Z; Farkas, T; Vécsei, L; Toldi, J

    2015-01-01

    During an ischemic event, the well-regulated glutamate (Glu) homeostasis is disturbed, which gives rise to extremely high levels of this excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain tissues. It was earlier reported that the administration of oxaloacetate (OxAc) as a Glu scavenger reduces the Glu level in the brain by enhancing the brain-to-blood Glu efflux. Here, we studied the neuroprotective effect of OxAc administration in a new focal ischemic model in rats. Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery resulted in immediate reduction of the somatosensory-evoked responses (SERs), and the amplitudes remained at the reduced level throughout the whole ischemic period. On reperfusion, the SERs started to increase, but never reached the control level. OxAc proved to be protective, since the amplitudes started to recover even during the ischemia, and finally fully regained the control level. The findings of the histological measurements were in accordance with the electrophysiological data. After Fluoro Jade C staining, significantly fewer labeled cells were detected in the OxAc-treated group relative to the control. These results provide new evidence of the neuroprotective effect of OxAc against ischemic injury, which strengthens the likelihood of its future applicability as a novel neuroprotective agent for the treatment of ischemic stroke patients.

  1. Central Role of Maladapted Astrocytic Plasticity in Ischemic Brain Edema Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema formation and the ensuing brain damages are the major cause of high mortality and long term disability following the occurrence of ischemic stroke. In this process, oxygen and glucose deprivation and the resulting reperfusion injury play primary roles. In response to the ischemic insult, the neurovascular unit experiences both intracellular and extracellular edemas, associated with maladapted astrocytic plasticity. The astrocytic plasticity includes both morphological and functional plasticity. The former involves a reactive gliosis and the subsequent glial retraction. It relates to the capacity of astrocytes to buffer changes in extracellular chemical levels, particularly K+ and glutamate, as well as the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter involves the expression and activity of a series of ion and water transport proteins. These molecules are grouped together around glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and water channel protein aquaporin 4 (AQP4) to form functional networks, regulate hydromineral balance across cell membranes and maintain the integrity of the BBB. Intense ischemic challenges can disrupt these capacities of astrocytes and result in their maladaptation. The maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke cannot only disrupt the hydromineral homeostasis across astrocyte membrane and the BBB, but also leads to disorders of the whole neurovascular unit. This review focuses on how the maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke plays the central role in the brain edema formation. PMID:27242440

  2. Impact of in Vivo Ischemic Time on RNA Quality--Experiences from a Colon Cancer Biobank.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jesper; Kirkeby, Lene T; Eiholm, Susanne; Jess, Per; Troelsen, Jesper T; Gögenür, Ismail; Olsen, Jorgen

    2015-08-01

    Considerable effort has been made to improve differentiated diagnostics as well as personalized treatment for colorectal cancer patients. High-quality fresh frozen tissue is often required to investigate relevant molecular signatures in these patients. In RNA expression studies, the "RNA integrity number" is widely accepted as a reliable marker of RNA quality. Here, we investigate the feasibility of obtaining high-quality tissue from a colon cancer biobank and the impact of in vivo ischemic time and various technical and clinicopathological factors on RNA quality. Biopsies were obtained immediately following the tumor removal. The time from clamping the main arterial supply to resection and removal of the tumor was used to estimate the in vivo ischemic time. We did not observe a significant difference in RNA quality between normal tissue and tumor tissue. We observed a significant correlation between in vivo ischemic time and RNA quality in normal tissue (r = -0.24, p<0.001) but not in tumor tissue. Male gender and laparoscopic procedure were also significantly associated with lower RNA quality in normal tissue only. In tumor tissue, poor differentiation was associated with low RNA quality. In conclusion, in vivo ischemic time, surgical procedure, and gender have minor but significant effects on the quality of RNA from normal colon tissue but not tumor tissue. Poorly differentiated tumors are associated with lower RNA quality. Although its impact is low, it can still be considered to note in vivo ischemic time in colon cancer specimen procurement.

  3. Occupational noise and ischemic heart disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dzhambov, Angel M; Dimitrova, Donka D

    2016-01-01

    Noise exposure might be a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). Unlike residential exposure, however, evidence for occupational noise is limited. Given that high-quality quantitative synthesis of existing data is highly warranted for occupational safety and policy, we aimed at conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of the risks of IHD morbidity and mortality because of occupational noise exposure. We carried out a systematic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and on the Internet since April 2, 2015, in English, Spanish, Russian, and Bulgarian. A quality-scoring checklist was developed a priori to assess different sources of methodological bias. A qualitative data synthesis was performed. Conservative assumptions were applied when appropriate. A meta-analysis was not feasible because of unresolvable methodological discrepancies between the studies. On the basis of five studies, there was some evidence to suggest higher risk of IHD among workers exposed to objectively assessed noise >75-80 dB for <20 years (supported by one high, one moderate, and one low quality study, opposed by one high and one moderate quality study). Three moderate and two low quality studies out of six found self-rated exposure to be associated with higher risk of IHD, and only one moderate quality study found no effect. Out of four studies, a higher mortality risk was suggested by one moderate quality study relying on self-rated exposure and one of high-quality study using objective exposure. Sensitivity analyses showed that at higher exposures and in some vulnerable subgroups, such as women, the adverse effects were considerably stronger. Despite methodological discrepancies and limitations of the included studies, occupational noise appeared to be a risk factor for IHD morbidity. Results suggested higher risk for IHD mortality only among vulnerable subgroups. Workers exposed to high occupational noise should be considered at higher overall risk of IHD. PMID:27569404

  4. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Mi; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines.

  5. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS. We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05. The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease. PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  6. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  7. Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Hooman; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Bhave, Prashant D.; Navi, Babak B.; Okin, Peter M.; Iadecola, Costantino; Devereux, Richard B.; Fink, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is unknown whether supraventricular arrhythmias other than atrial fibrillation or flutter are associated with stroke. Methods To examine the association between paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and stroke, we performed a retrospective cohort study using administrative claims data from all emergency department encounters and hospitalizations at California’s nonfederal acute care hospitals in 2009. Our cohort comprised all adult patients with ≥1 emergency department visit or hospitalization from which they were discharged alive and without a diagnosis of stroke. Our primary exposure was a diagnosis of PSVT recorded at an encounter before stroke or documented as present-on-admission at the time of stroke. To reduce confounding, we excluded patients with diagnoses of atrial fibrillation. We defined PSVT, stroke, and atrial fibrillation using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes previously validated by detailed chart review. Results Of 4 806 830 eligible patients, 14 121 (0.29%) were diagnosed with PSVT and 14 402 (0.30%) experienced a stroke. The cumulative rate of stroke after PSVT diagnosis (0.94%; 95% confidence interval, 0.76%–1.16%) significantly exceeded the rate among patients without a diagnosis of PSVT (0.21%; 95% confidence interval, 0.21%–0.22%). In Cox proportional hazards analysis controlling for demographic characteristics and potential confounders, PSVT was independently associated with a higher risk of subsequent stroke (hazard ratio, 2.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.69–2.62). Conclusions In a large and demographically diverse sample of patients, we found an independent association between PSVT and ischemic stroke. PSVT seems to be a novel risk factor that may account for some proportion of strokes that are currently classified as cryptogenic. PMID:23632982

  8. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and its experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L.; Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) can be divided into nonarteritic (NAION) and arteritic (AAION) forms. NAION makes up ~85% of all cases of AION, and until recently was poorly understood. There is no treatment for NAION, and its initiating causes are poorly understood, in part because NAION is not lethal, making it difficult to obtain fresh, newly affected tissue for study. In-vivo electrophysiology and post-mortem studies reveal specific responses that are associated with NAION. New models of NAION have been developed which enable insights into the pathophysiological events surrounding this disease. These models include both rodent and primate species, and the power of a `vertically integrated' multi-species approach can help in understanding the common cellular mechanisms and physiological responses to clinical NAION, and to identify potential approaches to treatment. The models utilize laser light to activate intravascular photoactive dye to induce capillary vascular thrombosis, while sparing the larger vessels. The observable optic nerve changes associated with rodent models of AION (rAION) and primate NAION (pNAION) are indistinguishable from that seen in clinical disease, including sectoral axonal involvement, and in-vivo electrophysiological data from these models are consistent with clinical data. Early post-infarct events reveal an unexpected inflammatory response, and changes in intraretinal gene expression for both stress response, while sparing outer retinal function, which occurs in AAION models. Histologically, the NAION models reveal an isolated loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. There are changes detectable by immunohistochemistry suggesting that other retinal cells mount a brisk response to retinal ganglion cell distress without themselves dying. The optic nerve ultimately shows axonal loss and scarring. Inflammation is a prominent early histological feature. This suggests that clinically, specific modulation of inflammation may

  9. Effects of ischemic preconditioning on short-duration cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rogério Santos de Oliveira; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Turnes, Tiago; Salvador, Amadeo Félix; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that ischemic preconditioning (IPC) improves endurance performance. However, the potential benefits during anaerobic events and the mechanism(s) underlying these benefits remain unclear. Fifteen recreational cyclists were assessed to evaluate the effects of IPC of the upper thighs on anaerobic performance, skeletal muscle activation, and metabolic responses during a 60-s sprint performance. After an incremental test and a familiarization visit, subjects were randomly submitted in visits 3 and 4 to a performance protocol preceded by intermittent bilateral cuff inflation (4 × (5 min of blood flow restriction + 5 min reperfusion)) at either 220 mm Hg (IPC) or 20 mm Hg (control). To increase data reliability, each intervention was replicated, which was also in a random manner. In addition to the mean power output, the pulmonary oxygen uptake, blood lactate kinetics, and quadriceps electromyograms (EMGs) were analyzed during performance and throughout 45 min of passive recovery. After IPC, performance was improved by 2.1% compared with control (95% confidence intervals of 0.8% to 3.3%, P = 0.001), followed by increases in (i) the accumulated oxygen deficit, (ii) the amplitude of blood lactate kinetics, (iii) the total amount of oxygen consumed during recovery, and (iv) the overall EMG amplitude (P < 0.05). In addition, the ratio between EMG and power output was higher during the final third of performance after IPC (P < 0.05). These results suggest an increased skeletal muscle activation and a higher anaerobic contribution as the ultimate responses of IPC on short-term exercise performance.

  10. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Mi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines. PMID:27482251

  11. Carbonic Anhydrase Protects Fatty Liver Grafts against Ischemic Reperfusion Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bejaoui, Mohamed; Pantazi, Eirini; De Luca, Viviana; Panisello, Arnau; Folch-Puy, Emma; Hotter, Georgina; Capasso, Clemente; T. Supuran, Claudiu; Rosselló-Catafau, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are ubiquitous metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and a proton. CAs are involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including acid-base homeostasis, electrolyte balance, oxygen delivery to tissues and nitric oxide generation. Given that these processes are found to be dysregulated during ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI), and taking into account the high vulnerability of steatotic livers to preservation injury, we hypothesized a new role for CA as a pharmacological agent able to protect against ischemic damage. Two different aspects of the role of CA II in fatty liver grafts preservation were evaluated: 1) the effect of its addition to Institut Georges Lopez (IGL-1) storage solution after cold ischemia; 2) and after 24h of cold storage followed by two hours of normothermic ex-vivo perfusion. In all cases, liver injury, CA II protein concentration, CA II mRNA levels and CA II activity were determined. In case of the ex-vivo perfusion, we further assessed liver function (bile production, bromosulfophthalein clearance) and Western blot analysis of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen activated protein kinases family (MAPKs) and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) parameters (GRP78, PERK, IRE, eIF2α and ATF6). We found that CA II was downregulated after cold ischemia. The addition of bovine CA II to IGL-1 preservation solution efficiently protected steatotic liver against cold IRI. In the case of reperfusion, CA II protection was associated with better function, AMPK activation and the prevention of ERS and MAPKs activation. Interestingly, CA II supplementation was not associated with enhanced CO2 hydration. The results suggest that CA II modulation may be a promising target for fatty liver graft preservation. PMID:26225852

  12. Remote ischemic preconditioning in hemodialysis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongha; Ann, Soe Hee; Chung, Hyun Chul; Lee, Jong Soo; Kim, Shin-Jae; Garg, Scot; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD)-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with an elevated cardiac troponin T, and is common in asymptomatic patients undergoing conventional HD. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has a protective effect against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. We hypothesized that RIPC also has a protective effect on HD-induced myocardial injury. Chronic HD patients were randomized to the control group or the RIPC group. RIPC was induced by transient occlusion of blood flow to the arm with a blood-pressure cuff for 5 min, followed by 5 min of deflation. Three cycles of inflation and deflation were undertaken before every HD session for 1 month (total 12 times). The primary outcome was the change in cardiac troponin T (cTnT) level at day 28 from baseline. Demographic and baseline laboratory values were not different between the control (n = 17) and the RIPC groups (n = 17). cTnT levels tended to decrease from day 2 in the RIPC group through to 28 days, in contrast to no change in the control group. There were significant differences in the change of cTnT level at day 28 from baseline [Control, median; -0.002 ng/ml (interquartile range -0.008 to 0.018) versus RIPC, median; -0.015 ng/ml (interquartile range -0.055 to 0.004), P = 0.012]. RIPC reduced cTnT release in chronic conventional HD patients, suggesting that this simple, cheap, safe, and well-tolerated procedure has a protective effect against HD-induced ischemia.

  13. Cilostazol: therapeutic potential against focal cerebral ischemic damage.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ki Whan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kima, Ki Young; Park, So Youn; Lee, Won Suk

    2006-01-01

    Cilostazol was developed as a selective inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3). The anti-platelet and vasodilator properties of cilostazol have been extensively characterized and considered to contribute to the variety of clinical effects such as intermittent claudication and recurrent stroke. In this review, the novel action mechanism (s) of cilostazol are overviewed with the focus on the action of cilostazol in in vitro and in vivo studies as a maxi-K channel opener targeting anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. Under treatment with cilostazol (10 mg/kg intravenously or 30 mg/kg orally), a significant reduction in cerebral infarct area was evident in rats subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. Increase in cyclic AMP and decrease in TNF-alpha levels were identified in the ipsilateral cortex under treatment with cilostazol accompanied by decreased Bax formation and cytochrome c release with increased Bcl-2 production in the penumbral area as well as in the in vitro human umbilical endothelial cells. Cilostazol suppressed TNF-alpha-induced decrease in viability of SK-N-SH (human neuroblastoma) cells and HCN-1A (human cortical neuron) cells in association with decrease in PTEN phosphorylation and increase in Akt/CREB phosphorylation with suppression of DNA fragmentation, all of which were antagonized by iberiotoxin, a maxi-K(+) channel blocker. Further, cilostazol prevented TNF-alpha-induced PTEN phosphorylation and apoptotic cell death via increased CK2 phosphorylation in the SK-N-SH cells. Cilostazol increased K(+) current in SK-N-SH cells by opening the maxi-K channels. Thus, it was suggested that the action of cilostazol to promote cell survival was ascribed to the maxi-K channel opening-coupled upregulation of CK2 phosphorylation and downregulation of PTEN phosphorylation with resultant increased phosphorylation of Akt and CREB. These in vitro data were confirmed in the in vivo results of rats subjected to focal transient ischemic damage.

  14. Alcohol consumption, Lewis phenotypes, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, H.O.; Suadicani, P.; Gyntelberg, F. . Epidemiological Research Unit); Sorenson, H. . Dept. of Chemical Immunology); Hein, H.O. . Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1993-02-13

    The authors have previously found an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in men with the Lewis phenotype Le(a[minus]b[minus]) and suggested that the Lewis blood group has a close genetic relation with insulin resistance. The authors have investigated whether any conventional risk factors explain the increased risk in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men. 3,383 men aged 53-75 years were examined in 1985-86, and morbidity and mortality during the next 4 years were recorded. At baseline, the authors excluded 343 men with a history of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, intermittent claudication, or stroke. The potential risk factors examined were alcohol consumption, physical activity, tobacco smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, body-mass index, blood pressure, prevalence of hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and social class. In 280 (9.6%) men with Le(a[minus]b[minus]), alcohol was the only risk factor significantly associated with risk of IHD. There was a significant inverse dose-effect relation between alcohol consumption and risk; trend tests, with adjustment for age, were significant for fatal IHD (p=0.02), all IHD (p=0.03), and all causes of death (p=0.02). In 2649 (90.4%) men with other phenotypes, there was a limited negative association with alcohol consumption. In Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men, a group genetically at high risk of IHD, alcohol consumption seems to be especially protective. The authors suggest that alcohol consumption may modify insulin resistance in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men.

  15. Mechanics of the Mitral Annulus in Chronic Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Manuel K.; Tibayan, Frederick A.; Ingels, Neil B.; Miller, D. Craig; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Approximately one third of all patients undergoing open-heart surgery for repair of ischemic mitral regurgitation present with residual and recurrent mitral valve leakage upon follow up. A fundamental quantitative understanding of mitral valve remodeling following myocardial infarction may hold the key to improved medical devices and better treatment outcomes. Here we quantify mitral annular strains and curvature in nine sheep 5 ± 1 weeks after controlled inferior myocardial infarction of the left ventricle. We complement our marker-based mechanical analysis of the remodeling mitral valve by common clinical measures of annular geometry before and after the infarct. After 5 ± 1 weeks, the mitral annulus dilated in septal-lateral direction by 15.2% (p=0.003) and in commissure-commissure direction by 14.2% (p<0.001). The septal annulus dilated by 10.4% (p=0.013) and the lateral annulus dilated by 18.4% (p<0.001). Remarkably, in animals with large degree of mitral regurgitation and annular remodeling, the annulus dilated asymmetrically with larger distortions toward the lateral-posterior segment. Strain analysis revealed average tensile strains of 25% over most of the annulus with exception for the lateral-posterior segment, where tensile strains were 50% and higher. Annular dilation and peak strains were closely correlated to the degree of mitral regurgitation. A complementary relative curvature analysis revealed a homogenous curvature decrease associated with significant annular circularization. All curvature profiles displayed distinct points of peak curvature disturbing the overall homogenous pattern. These hinge points may be the mechanistic origin for the asymmetric annular deformation following inferior myocardial infarction. In the future, this new insight into the mechanism of asymmetric annular dilation may support improved device designs and possibly aid surgeons in reconstructing healthy annular geometry during mitral valve repair. PMID:23636575

  16. Effects of ischemic stroke on dynamics of cerebral autoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Hu, Kun; Stanley, Eugene; Novak, Vera

    2004-03-01

    Cerebral vasoregulation involves several complex mechanisms adapting blood flow to fluctuations of systemic blood pressure (BP). Autonomic BP and metabolic vasoregulation are impaired after stroke and cerebral blood flow depends on systemic BP. To probe the mechanisms of cerebral autoregulation we study levels of nonlinear synchronization between cerebral blood flow velocity (BFV) and peripheral BP. We quantify the instantaneous phase of each signal employing analytic signal approach and Hilbert transform. As a marker of synchronization, we introduce a measure of cross-correlation between the instantaneous phase increments of the BFV and BP signals at different time lags. We have studied 12 subjects with minor chronic ischemic stroke and 11 matched normotensive controls (age<65years). BFV and BP of these subjects are continuously recorded during supine baseline, head-up tilt, hyperventilation and CO2 rebreathing. For control subjects we find significant synchronization between cerebral BFV and peripheral BP only for short time lags of up to 5-6 seconds, suggesting a rapid return to a steady cerebral blood flow after initial blood pressure perturbations. In contrast, for stroke subjects BFV/BP we find enhanced synchronization over longer time lags of up to 20 seconds, suggesting entrainment of cerebral blood flow velocity by slow vasomotor rhythms. These findings suggest that cerebral vasoregulation is impaired and cerebral blood flow follows the fluctuations of systemic BP in a synchronous manner. Our analysis shows that cerebral autoregulation is impaired in 10 out of the 12 stroke subjects, which is typically difficult to diagnose with conventional methods. Thus, our novel synchronization approach offers a new tool sensitive for evaluation of changes in the dynamics of cerebral autoregulation under stroke.

  17. End-ischemic reconditioning of liver allografts: Controlling the rewarming.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Dieter Paul; Paul, Andreas; Luer, Sebastian; Reis, Henning; Efferz, Patrik; Minor, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Different nonhypothermic preservation modalities have shown beneficial effects in liver transplantation models. This study compares controlled oxygenated rewarming (COR) to normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) to resuscitate liver grafts following cold storage (CS). Porcine livers were preserved for 18 hours by CS. Before reperfusion, the grafts were put on a machine perfusion device (Liver Assist) for 3 hours and were randomly assigned to COR (n = 6) or NMP (n = 5) and compared to standard CS. COR was carried out with the new Custodiol-N solution, slowly increasing temperature from 8 °C to 20 °C during the first 90 minutes. NMP was carried out with diluted autologous blood at 37 °C for 3 hours. In both cases, the perfusate was oxygenated to partial pressure of oxygen > 500 mm Hg. Then liver viability was tested for 180 minutes during in vitro isolated sanguineous reperfusion. Activity of the mitochondrial caspase 9 was lower after COR. Measurement of tissue adenosine triphosphate and total adenine nucleotides at the end of the reconditioning period showed better energetic recovery after COR. COR also resulted in significantly lower enzyme leakage and higher bile production (P < 0.05) during reperfusion. This first comparison of COR and NMP as end-ischemic reconditioning modalities demonstrates superior results in terms of mitochondrial integrity resulting in better energetic recovery, less hepatocellular injury, and ultimately superior function in favor of COR. Liver Transplantation 22 1223-1230 2016 AASLD. PMID:27398813

  18. Hyperinsulinemia improves ischemic LV function in insulin resistant subjects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucose is a more efficient substrate for ATP production than free fatty acid (FFA). Insulin resistance (IR) results in higher FFA concentrations and impaired myocardial glucose use, potentially worsening ischemia. We hypothesized that metabolic manipulation with a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) would affect a greater improvement in left ventricular (LV) performance during dobutamine stress echo (DSE) in subjects with IR. Methods 24 subjects with normal LV function and coronary disease (CAD) awaiting revascularization underwent 2 DSEs. Prior to one DSEs they underwent an HEC, where a primed infusion of insulin (rate 43 mU/m 2/min) was co-administered with 20% dextrose at variable rates to maintain euglycemia. At steady-state the DSE was performed and images of the LV were acquired with tissue Doppler at each stage for offline analysis. Segmental peak systolic velocities (Vs) were recorded, as well as LV ejection fraction (EF). Subjects were then divided into two groups based on their insulin sensitivity during the HEC. Results HEC changed the metabolic environment, suppressing FFAs and thereby increasing glucose use. This resulted in improved LV performance at peak stress, measured by EF (IS group mean difference 5.3 (95% CI 2.5-8) %, p = 0.002; IR group mean difference 8.7 (95% CI 5.8-11.6) %, p < 0.0001) and peak V s in ischemic segments (IS group mean improvement 0.7(95% CI 0.07-1.58) cm/s, p = 0.07; IR group mean improvement 1.0 (95% CI 0.54-1.5) cm/s, p < 0.0001) , that was greater in the subjects with IR. Conclusions Increased myocardial glucose use induced by HEC improves LV function under stress in subjects with CAD and IR. Cardiac metabolic manipulation in subjects with IR is a promising target for future therapy. PMID:20576156

  19. Clinical trial design for endovascular ischemic stroke intervention

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.; Edgell, Randall C.; Amlie-Lefond, Catherine M.; Kalia, Junaid S.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials have significant impact on clinical practice. The ultimate goal of a clinical trial of therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is to compare 2 interventions. Challenges may include interventional therapy standardization, enrollment rate, patient selection, biases, data and safety monitoring, reporting, and financial and logistical support. Method: Selected randomized and single-arm prospective AIS trial designs. Clinical trial elements and their challenges are reviewed. Innovative designs and proposed recommendations to overcome some of the specific challenges and limitations are discussed. Results: AIS therapy trials have specific challenges related to ethical issues, enrollment rate, outcome measures, limited time to treatment, efficacy, safety, and limited or variable operator experience with complex technology in a delicate end organ. Proposed suggestions for improving trial design include the following: incorporation of a lead-in phase; careful patient and outcome measure selection; historical, concurrent, or hybrid controls; open data access; and a Bayesian approach. An open data paradigm may facilitate creation of computerized prediction models for future trials (minimizing cost by decreasing sample size or providing futility analyses and directing resources to other trials). Collaborative, consortium, and network infrastructures may allow more effective and efficient study completion. Self-learning, self-correcting trials with intrinsic flexibility to adapt may help future clinical trial design in AIS. Conclusion: The randomized clinical trial design in AIS endovascular therapy is challenging. Lead-in phases, careful patient selection, use of innovative outcome measures, control groups, and newer clinical trial design may enhance conduct of future trials, their validity, and their results. PMID:23008403

  20. Effects of ischemic preconditioning on short-duration cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rogério Santos de Oliveira; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Turnes, Tiago; Salvador, Amadeo Félix; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that ischemic preconditioning (IPC) improves endurance performance. However, the potential benefits during anaerobic events and the mechanism(s) underlying these benefits remain unclear. Fifteen recreational cyclists were assessed to evaluate the effects of IPC of the upper thighs on anaerobic performance, skeletal muscle activation, and metabolic responses during a 60-s sprint performance. After an incremental test and a familiarization visit, subjects were randomly submitted in visits 3 and 4 to a performance protocol preceded by intermittent bilateral cuff inflation (4 × (5 min of blood flow restriction + 5 min reperfusion)) at either 220 mm Hg (IPC) or 20 mm Hg (control). To increase data reliability, each intervention was replicated, which was also in a random manner. In addition to the mean power output, the pulmonary oxygen uptake, blood lactate kinetics, and quadriceps electromyograms (EMGs) were analyzed during performance and throughout 45 min of passive recovery. After IPC, performance was improved by 2.1% compared with control (95% confidence intervals of 0.8% to 3.3%, P = 0.001), followed by increases in (i) the accumulated oxygen deficit, (ii) the amplitude of blood lactate kinetics, (iii) the total amount of oxygen consumed during recovery, and (iv) the overall EMG amplitude (P < 0.05). In addition, the ratio between EMG and power output was higher during the final third of performance after IPC (P < 0.05). These results suggest an increased skeletal muscle activation and a higher anaerobic contribution as the ultimate responses of IPC on short-term exercise performance. PMID:27404398

  1. A Piglet Model of Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kyng, Kasper J; Skajaa, Torjus; Kerrn-Jespersen, Sigrid; Andreassen, Christer S; Bennedsgaard, Kristine; Henriksen, Tine B

    2015-05-16

    Birth asphyxia, which causes hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), accounts for 0.66 million deaths worldwide each year, about a quarter of the world's 2.9 million neonatal deaths. Animal models of HIE have contributed to the understanding of the pathophysiology in HIE, and have highlighted the dynamic process that occur in brain injury due to perinatal asphyxia. Thus, animal studies have suggested a time-window for post-insult treatment strategies. Hypothermia has been tested as a treatment for HIE in pdiglet models and subsequently proven effective in clinical trials. Variations of the model have been applied in the study of adjunctive neuroprotective methods and piglet studies of xenon and melatonin have led to clinical phase I and II trials(1,2). The piglet HIE model is further used for neonatal resuscitation- and hemodynamic studies as well as in investigations of cerebral hypoxia on a cellular level. However, it is a technically challenging model and variations in the protocol may result in either too mild or too severe brain injury. In this article, we demonstrate the technical procedures necessary for establishing a stable piglet model of neonatal HIE. First, the newborn piglet (< 24 hr old, median weight 1500 g) is anesthetized, intubated, and monitored in a setup comparable to that found in a neonatal intensive care unit. Global hypoxia-ischemia is induced by lowering the inspiratory oxygen fraction to achieve global hypoxia, ischemia through hypotension and a flat trace amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG) indicative of cerebral hypoxia. Survival is promoted by adjusting oxygenation according to the aEEG response and blood pressure. Brain injury is quantified by histopathology and magnetic resonance imaging after 72 hr.

  2. Trans-system mechanisms against ischemic myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu Q; Ma, Xin-Liang; Qin, Gangjian; Liu, Qingping; Li, Yan-Chun; Wu, Yu H

    2015-01-01

    A mammalian organism possesses a hierarchy of naturally evolved protective mechanisms against ischemic myocardial injury at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. These mechanisms comprise regional protective processes, including upregulation and secretion of paracrine cell-survival factors, inflammation, angiogenesis, fibrosis, and resident stem cell-based cardiomyocyte regeneration. There are also interactive protective processes between the injured heart, circulation, and selected remote organs, defined as trans-system protective mechanisms, including upregulation and secretion of endocrine cell-survival factors from the liver and adipose tissue as well as mobilization of bone marrow, splenic, and hepatic cells to the injury site to mediate myocardial protection and repair. The injured heart and activated remote organs exploit molecular and cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, mobilization, and/or extracellular matrix production, to establish protective mechanisms. Both regional and trans-system cardioprotective mechanisms are mediated by paracrine and endocrine messengers and act in coordination and synergy to maximize the protective effect, minimize myocardial infarction, and improve myocardial function, ensuring the survival and timely repair of the injured heart. The concept of the trans-system protective mechanisms may be generalized to other organ systems-injury in one organ may initiate regional as well as trans-system protective responses, thereby minimizing injury and ensuring the survival of the entire organism. Selected trans-system processes may serve as core protective mechanisms that can be exploited by selected organs in injury. These naturally evolved protective mechanisms are the foundation for developing protective strategies for myocardial infarction and injury-induced disorders in other organ systems.

  3. Gallstone Disease and the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Qi, Lu; Yu, Canqing; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Yiping; Yang, Ling; Shen, Jie; Wang, Shanqing; Li, Mingqiang; Liu, Yongmei; Zhang, Libo; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gallstone disease (GSD) is related to multiple cardiovascular risk factors; the present study was to prospectively examine the association between GSD and ischemic heart disease (IHD). Approach and Results We examined the association of GSD with IHD among 199,292 men and 288,081 women aged 30–79 years in the China Kadoorie Biobank study. Participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline were excluded. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the association of GSD with IHD. The prevalence of self-reported GSD was 3.7% in men and 7.3% in women at baseline. During 3,431,124 person-years of follow-up between 2004 and 2013 (median, 7.2 years), we documented 10,245 incident IHD cases in men and 14,714 in women. As compared with men without GSD at baseline, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for IHD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.22) for men with GSD; the respective hazard ratio was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.20–1.34) in women and 1.23 (95% CI, 1.17–1.28) in the whole cohort. The sex difference in IHD risk associated with GSD was statistically significant (P=0.009 for interaction with sex). In addition, we found the association between GSD and IHD was stronger in non-hypertensive than hypertensive women (P<0.001 for interaction). Conclusions In this large prospective study, the presence of GSD was associated with an increased risk of incident IHD, independent of other risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Our findings suggest novel prevention strategy to mitigate heart disease through improvement of gastrointestinal health. PMID:26272939

  4. Cost - effectiveness analysis of the antiplatelet treatment administered on ischemic stroke patients using goal programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Rasvini; Zainuddin, Zaitul Marlizawati; Idris, Badrisyah

    2014-09-01

    There are numerous ways to prevent or treat ischemic stroke and each of these competing alternatives is associated with a different effectiveness and a cost. In circumstances where health funds are budgeted and thus fixed, cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) can provide information on how to comprehend the largest health gains with that limited fund as CEA is used to compare different strategies for preventing or treating a single disease. The most common medications for ischemic stroke are the anti-platelet drugs. While some drugs are more effective than others, they are also more expensive. This paper will thus assess the CEA of anti-platelet drug available for ischemic stroke patients using goal programming (GP) approach subject to in-patients days and patients' quality-of-life. GP presents a way of striving towards several objectives simultaneously whereby in this case we will consider minimizing the cost and maximizing the effectiveness.

  5. Impact of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in non-ischemic cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kalisz, Kevin; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies include a wide spectrum of disease states afflicting the heart, whether a primary process or secondary to a systemic condition. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has established itself as an important imaging modality in the evaluation of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. CMR is useful in the diagnosis of cardiomyopathy, quantification of ventricular function, establishing etiology, determining prognosis and risk stratification. Technical advances and extensive research over the last decade have resulted in the accumulation of a tremendous amount of data with regards to the utility of CMR in these cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review CMR findings of various non-ischemic cardiomyopathies and focus on current literature investigating the clinical impact of CMR on risk stratification, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:26981210

  6. Remote preconditioning-endocrine factors in organ protection against ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Craig S; Liao, Siyun; Gross, Garrett J; Schultz, Jo El J

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and developing world. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a number of interventions including brief periods of ischemia or hypoxia and certain endogenous factors such as opioids, bradykinin, growth factors or pharmacological agents are capable of protecting the heart against post-ischemic contractile dysfunction, arrhythmias and myocardial infarction. This conventional cardioprotection occurs via an autocrine or paracrine action in which these protective factors are released from the heart to act upon itself. Over the last ten years, a growing body of evidence indicates that a brief ischemic insult on one organ releases endogenous factors that protect other organs against a prolonged ischemic insult. This phenomenon, termed remote preconditioning or preconditioning at a distance, implicates an endocrine action, and may involve humoral or neural-endocrine signaling. This review will summarize the endocrine factors identified and implicated in this inter-organ cytoprotection. PMID:17897043

  7. [The effect of cerebrolysin in dosage 50 ml on the volume of lesion in ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Shamalov, N A; Stakhovskaia, L V; Burenchev, D V; Kichuk, I V; Tvorogova, T V; Botsina, A Iu; Smychkov, A S; Kerbikov, O B; Moessler, H; Novak, P; Skvortsova, V I

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to assess safety and efficacy of cerebrolysin used in dosage 50 ml in acute ischemic stroke. Forty-seven patients with ischemic stroke, aged 45-85 years, who were admitted to a clinical unit within the first 12 h after stroke onset were included in the study. A quantitative time-related MRI analysis of the dynamics of neurological deficit revealed the more rapid decrease of stroke volume to the 28th day in the group treated with cerebrolysin (45.4% versus 43.6% in the placebo-group (p < 0.05)). No side-effects of treatment with cerebrolysin was found. The results of this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study suggest the positive effect of cerebrolysin on the dynamics of volume lesion in patients with ischemic stroke.

  8. Acute Stress Decreases but Chronic Stress Increases Myocardial Sensitivity to Ischemic Injury in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Eric D.; Rorabaugh, Boyd R.; Zoladz, Phillip R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the largest cause of mortality worldwide, and stress is a significant contributor to the development of CVD. The relationship between acute and chronic stress and CVD is well evidenced. Acute stress can lead to arrhythmias and ischemic injury. However, recent evidence in rodent models suggests that acute stress can decrease sensitivity to myocardial ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). Conversely, chronic stress is arrhythmogenic and increases sensitivity to myocardial IRI. Few studies have examined the impact of validated animal models of stress-related psychological disorders on the ischemic heart. This review examines the work that has been completed using rat models to study the effects of stress on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury. Utilization of animal models of stress-related psychological disorders is critical in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders in patients experiencing stress-related psychiatric conditions. PMID:27199778

  9. Incidence of Ischemic Complications after Endovascular Treatment for Ruptured Dissecting Vertebral Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, T.; Iihara, K.; Satow, T.; Murao, K.; Miyamoto, S.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We analyzed the incidence of ischemic complications after internal trapping for ruptured VA dissecting aneurysms. Between April 2001 and August 2005, nine cases of ruptured VA dissecting aneurysms, five in women, "proximal" or distal (distal type) to the origin of the PICA, were treated by internal trapping in the acute stage after SAH. There were four cases of proximal type and five of distal type. The demographics of the patients were reviewed in the medical charts and radiological findings were evaluated by neuroradiologists. The dissected site was completely obliterated and PICA was preserved in all cases. Follow-up angiography performed five to 19 days after treatment revealed complete obliteration of the aneurysm and patency of the PICA. The incidence of perioprocedural ischemic complications for the PICA-distal type (75%) was higher than that for the PICA-proximal type (20%). Here we retrospectively analyzed and discussed the incidence and mechanisms of ischemic complications. PMID:20566095

  10. New objective criterion for determining, noninvasively, the healing potential of an ischemic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.E.; Stewart, C.A.; Wagner, W.; Sakimura, I.

    1981-02-01

    Peripheral vascular perfusion studies using intravenously administered thallium-201 were performed on 13 patients suffering from ischemic ulcer of the lower extermities. Scintillation camera views and point counting over the lesion and adjacent region were utilized to define qualitatively and quantitatively the relative hyperemia of the lesion. The preliminary findings demonstrate that when the relative hyperemia was equal to or greater than 1.5, 100% (seven of seven) went on to heal their ulcer with conservative management. Of those without this degree of hyperemia, 83% (five of six) will require amputation. Based on this limited series, noninvasive assessment of the relative hyperemia of an ischemic ulcer using thallium-201 is a new, useful, and objective indicator of the healing potential of a so-called ischemic ulcer.

  11. [Changes in the hemoglobin A2 level of patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Damianova, L; Popnikolov, S; Pencheva, B; Angelova, A

    1989-01-01

    40 patients with ischemic heart disease were studied. In 60% of them a higher content of HbA2 was found. These data for higher frequency of HbA2 among the patients with ischemic heart disease do not correspond with the average incidence of the genetically determined anomaly A2-beta-thalassemia among the Bulgarian population. The negative data for increased methemoglobin, the shift of the oxygen dissociation curve to the right toward increased oxygen release from the hemoglobin molecule, the normalization of HbA2 after several days, the lack of anomalous fraction in the analyses lead to the conclusion that HbA2 plays a compensatory role in patients with ischemic heart disease and its dynamic changes could be used as a diagnostic test for ischemia.

  12. [Transtibial amputation of the lower extremity in patients with ischemic foot contracture].

    PubMed

    Liabakh, A P; Mikhnevych, O E; Dolhopolov, O V

    2014-07-01

    The results of operative treatment of 8 patients was analyzed, in whom the lower extremity amputation on the upper third of the shin was performed for severe stage of the ischemic foot contacture. Operative interventions is expedient to perform in a specialized stationary, were exists possibility of further prosthesis. It is necessary to perform the extremity amputation in a residual period of the foot ischemic contracture, when operations for restoration of the sole sensitivity are nonperspective as well as in presence of severe trophic disorders on the sole and the shin, but without purulent--necrotic signs. Confirmed data of clinic--instrumental investigations for chronic course of the ischemic process constitutes an absolute indication for operation.

  13. Radon inhalation protects against transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Etani, Reo; Takata, Yuji; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Kawabe, Atsushi; Kumashiro, Masayuki; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2014-10-01

    Although brain disorders are not the main indication for radon therapy, our previous study suggested that radon inhalation therapy might mitigate brain disorders. In this study, we assessed whether radon inhalation protects against transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils. Gerbils were treated with inhaled radon at a concentration of 2,000 Bq/m(3) for 24 h. After radon inhalation, transient global cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. Results showed that transient global cerebral ischemia induced neuronal damage in hippocampal CA1, and the number of damaged neurons was significantly increased compared with control. However, radon treatment inhibited ischemic damage. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the radon-treated gerbil brain was significantly higher than that in sham-operated gerbils. These findings suggested that radon inhalation activates antioxidative function, especially SOD, thereby inhibiting transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils.

  14. Recovery of Small-Sized Blood Vessels in Ischemic Bone Under Static Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shenzhi; Ikeuchi, Ken; Ikada, Yoshito

    2007-01-01

    Effects of static magnetic field (SMF) on the vascularization in bone were evaluated using an ischemic bone model, where rat femoral artery was ligated. Magnetized and unmagnetized samarium–cobalt rods were implanted transcortically into the middle diaphysis of the ischemic femurs. Collateral circulation was evaluated by injection of microspheres into the abdominal aorta at the third week after ligation. It was found that the bone implanted with a magnetized rod showed a larger amount of trapped microspheres than that with an unmagnetized rod at the proximal and the distal region (P < 0.05 proximal region). There were no significant differences at the middle and the distal region. This tendency was similar to that of the bone mineral density in the SMF-exposed ischemic bone. PMID:17342242

  15. Deep vein thrombosis after ischemic stroke: rationale for a therapeutic trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, N.M.; Norris, J.W.

    1988-11-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the legs occurs in 23% to 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke, and pulmonary embolism accounts for about 5% of deaths. New heparinoid substances, lacking the hazards of more established anticoagulants, raise the question of DVT prophylaxis for these patients. Two hundred fifty consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients were evaluated for the presence of DVT of the legs in a feasibility study for a trial of low-molecular-weight heparin prophylaxis. Forty-nine patients were found suitable for the study, of whom 11 (22.5%) developed DVT. All patients underwent clinical examination, I-125 fibrinogen leg scanning, and impedance plethysmography. Five patients were sufficiently alert and without serious neurologic deficits to justify DVT prophylaxis. Recent advances in noninvasive diagnostic techniques to detect DVT early and the development of relatively safe heparinoid compounds increase the need for a prophylactic study in patients with ischemic stroke.

  16. Anterior Mitral Leaflet Augmentation for Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation Performed Via a Right Thoracotomy Approach.

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Pineda, Andres M; Horvath, Sofia A; Santana, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) after myocardial infarction is associated with poor long-term survival, and the optimal treatment strategy remains debated. The most common repair technique used is a restrictive annuloplasty. However, up to 15% to 30% of patients experience recurrent MR owing to progressive left ventricular remodeling and geometric distortion of the mitral valve apparatus. Anterior mitral leaflet augmentation using a pericardial patch, in combination with a true-sized mitral annuloplasty, has been proposed as an adjunctive technique to increase the durability of valve repair for ischemic MR. Herein, we describe 2 cases of anterior mitral leaflet augmentation with annuloplasty repair for severe ischemic MR via a minimally invasive right thoracotomy, and review the literature regarding patient selection and clinical outcomes of this technique.

  17. Medullary Hemorrhage after Ischemic Wallenberg's Syndrome in a Patient with Cavernous Angioma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoe

    2010-01-01

    Background The main complication of cerebral cavernous angioma is hemorrhage. Ischemic stroke as a complication of cerebral cavernous angioma has rarely been described, and hemorrhage after ischemic Wallenberg's syndrome has not been reported before. Case Report A 45-year-old woman presented with perioral numbness, hoarseness, dysphagia, and worsening of her previous sensory symptoms. The patient had been taking aspirin for 3 years after suffering from ischemic Wallenberg's syndrome with left paresthesia as a residual symptom. Brain computed tomography revealed an acute medullary hematoma in the previously infarcted area. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cavernous angioma in the right medulla. Conclusions We presume that cerebral cavernous angioma was responsible for both the ischemia and the hemorrhage, and we also cautiously speculate that the aspirin contributed to the development of hemorrhage in the previously infarcted area. PMID:21264204

  18. Inhibitory Effects of Medium Molecular Weight Heparinyl Amino Acid Derivatives on Ischemic Paw Edema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Seiichi; Toda, Takao; Nakamura, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the radical-scavenging effects of heparin (HE), medium molecular weight heparinyl phenylalanine (MHF), and medium molecular weight heparinyl leucine (MHL) using ischemic paw edema in mice. We also examined the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of mice that were administered these compounds as an index of their side-effects. HE had a preventative effect and significant reduced ischemic paw edema. However, its effect was not dose-dependent and the dose-response curve was bell-shaped. The effective dose of HE also exhibited a prolonged APTT. Pretreatment using MHF and MHL were effective against ischemic paw edema without a prolonged APTT. Remarkably, the action of MHF was not only preventively, but also therapeutically active. These results suggest that MHF and MHL are superior to HE as safe radical scavengers in vivo. PMID:27381605

  19. The iron-regulatory peptide hepcidin is upregulated in the ischemic and in the remote myocardium after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Simonis, Gregor; Mueller, Katrin; Schwarz, Peggy; Wiedemann, Stephan; Adler, Guido; Strasser, Ruth H; Kulaksiz, Hasan

    2010-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that iron metabolism contributes to the ischemic damage after myocardial infarction. Hepcidin, a recently discovered peptide hormone, regulates iron uptake and metabolism, protecting the body from iron overload. In this study we analyzed the regulation of hepcidin in the heart and blood of rats after myocardial infarction. To induce a myocardial infarction in the rats, left anterior descending coronary artery ligation was performed. After 1-24h, biopsies from the ischemic and the non-ischemic myocardium were taken. In these biopsies, the mRNA levels and the protein expression of hepcidin were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis, respectively. In parallel, the serum levels of prohepcidin were measured by ELISA. Six hours after myocardial infarction, the hepcidin mRNA expression was temporally upregulated in the ischemic and in the non-ischemic myocardium. The upregulation was specific for hepcidin, since other iron-related genes (hemojuvelin, IREG-1) remained unchanged. Furthermore, the alteration of the hepcidin protein expression in the ischemic area was connected to the level of hepcidin in the serum of the infarcted rats, where hepcidin also raised up. Angiotensin receptor blockade with candesartan did not influence the mRNA regulation of hepcidin. Together, these data show a particular upregulation of the iron-regulatory peptide hepcidin in the ischemic and the non-ischemic myocardium after myocardial infarction. It is speculated that upregulation of hepcidin may reduce iron toxicity and thus infarct size expansion in an infarcted heart.

  20. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Reduces Cerebral Oxidative Stress Following Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Arvola, Oiva; Haapanen, Henri; Herajärvi, Johanna; Anttila, Tuomas; Puistola, Ulla; Karihtala, Peeter; Tuominen, Hannu; Anttila, Vesa; Juvonen, Tatu

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic precondition has become prominent as one of the most promising methods to mitigate neurological damage following ischemic insult. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in the markers of oxidative stress or in redox-regulating enzymes in a porcine model. A total of 12 female piglets were randomly assigned to 2 groups. The study group underwent an intervention of 4 cycles of 5-minute ischemic preconditioning on the right hind leg. All piglets underwent 60-minute hypothermic circulatory arrest. Oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was measured from blood samples with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After 7 days of follow-up, samples from the brain, heart, kidney, and ovary were harvested for histopathologic examination. The immunohistochemical stainings of hypoxia marker hypoxia-inducible factor-1-α, oxidative stress marker 8-OHdG, DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, and antioxidant response regulators nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and protein deglycase were analyzed. The level of 8-OHdG referred to baseline was decreased in the sagittal sinus׳ blood samples in the study group after a prolonged deep hypothermic circulatory arrest at 360 minutes after reperfusion. Total histopathologic score was 3.8 (1.8-6.0) in the study group and was 4.4 (2.5-6.5) in the control group (P = 0.72), demonstrating no statistically significant difference in cerebral injury. Our findings demonstrate that the positive effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in cellular oxidative balance regulators in an animal model after 7 days of preconditioned ischemic insult. PMID:27568144

  1. Early afterdepolarizations promote transmural reentry in ischemic human ventricles with reduced repolarization reserve

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sara; Mincholé, Ana; Zacur, Ernesto; Quinn, T. Alexander; Taggart, Peter; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Aims Acute ischemia is a major cause of sudden arrhythmic death, further promoted by potassium current blockers. Macro-reentry around the ischemic region and early afterdepolarizations (EADs) caused by electrotonic current have been suggested as potential mechanisms in animal and isolated cell studies. However, ventricular and human-specific arrhythmia mechanisms and their modulation by repolarization reserve remain unclear. The goal of this paper is to unravel multiscale mechanisms underlying the modulation of arrhythmic risk by potassium current (IKr) block in human ventricles with acute regional ischemia. Methods and results A human ventricular biophysically-detailed model, with acute regional ischemia is constructed by integrating experimental knowledge on the electrophysiological ionic alterations caused by coronary occlusion. Arrhythmic risk is evaluated by determining the vulnerable window (VW) for reentry following ectopy at the ischemic border zone. Macro-reentry around the ischemic region is the main reentrant mechanism in the ischemic human ventricle with increased repolarization reserve due to the ATP-sensitive potassium current (IK(ATP)) activation. Prolongation of refractoriness by 4% caused by 30% IKr reduction counteracts the establishment of macro-reentry and reduces the VW for reentry (by 23.5%). However, a further decrease in repolarization reserve (50% IKr reduction) is less anti-arrhythmic despite further prolongation of refractoriness. This is due to the establishment of transmural reentry enabled by electrotonically-triggered EADs in the ischemic border zone. EADs are produced by L-type calcium current (ICaL) reactivation due to prolonged low amplitude electrotonic current injected during the repolarization phase. Conclusions Electrotonically-triggered EADs are identified as a potential mechanism facilitating intramural reentry in a regionally-ischemic human ventricles model with reduced repolarization reserve. PMID:26850675

  2. Adjuvant Chinese Herbal Products for Preventing Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Muo, Chih-Hsin; Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Liu, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chinese herbal products (CHPs) are widely used for atrial fibrillation (AF) in Taiwan. We investigated the effect of adjuvant CHPs in preventing ischemic stroke in patients with AF. Methods Taiwanese patients in the Health Insurance Database newly diagnosed with AF during 2000–2011 were enrolled. Medication treatment with/without CHPs was administered within 7 days after the AF diagnosis. The clinical endpoint was an ischemic stroke. The Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Student t test were used to examine differences between the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and non-TCM cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess the risk for ischemic stroke between two cohorts. Results Three hundred and eleven patients underwent TCM treatment and 1715 patients did not. Compared to non-TCM users, TCM users had a lower incidence of stroke (12.59% vs. 1.93%, respectively) and lower risk of stroke [CHA2DS2-VASc score = 0–2 (hazard ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval = 0.06–0.65)]. Compared to non-TCM users, the stroke risk was significantly lower in TCM users with AF who were female or younger than 65 years, but not in males, people more than 65 years old, or people with comorbidities. Compared to TCM users, non-TCM users who received conventional treatment had a higher ischemic stroke risk. The risk for AF-related hospitalization was significantly lower in TCM users (0.64%) than in non-TCM users (38.1%). Conclusions Users of TCM with AF have a lower risk of new-onset ischemic stroke. Therefore, adjuvant CHP therapy may have a protective effect and may be used in AF patients to prevent ischemic stroke. PMID:27428543

  3. The relevance of hemodynamic factors to perioperative ischemic complications in childhood moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Iwama, T; Hashimoto, N; Yonekawa, Y

    1996-06-01

    Of 124 children younger than 15 years who underwent surgery for moyamoya disease, 21 (16.9%) experienced perioperative ischemic complications that could not be unequivocally attributed to the surgery. Eleven of the 21 patients experienced infarctions, and 10 experienced reversible ischemic neurological deficits without new lesions, as revealed by computed tomographic scans. An examination of the patients' perioperative clinical and laboratory data revealed that the mean values of intra- and postoperative minimum arterial carbon dioxide pressure, maximum arterial carbon dioxide pressure, and mean arterial pressure were similar in patients with and without ischemic complications. However, in patients with perioperative complications, the incidence of preoperative transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) and intra- and postoperative hypercapnia (maximum arterial carbon dioxide pressure > 45 mm Hg) was significantly higher. In addition, 7 of the 11 perioperative infarctions occurred in patients with frequent preoperative TIAs and intra- and postoperative hypercapnia. Cerebral blood flow studies with preoperative acetazolamide loading showed that the new infarctions were located in areas in which the cerebral blood flow had been compromised. Our results suggest that the occurrence of frequent preoperative TIA is an important indicator of the instability of the cerebral hemodynamics and of the risk of perioperative ischemic complications. To prevent these complications, preoperative management aimed at stabilizing the hemodynamic status is very important. Children who have moyamoya disease and who experience frequent preoperative TIAs are at risk for ischemic brain damage caused by hypercapnia as well as hypocapnia and hypotension. The establishment and maintenance of normocapnia with normotension are highly desirable for the perioperative management of moyamoya disease in children.

  4. Preventive Effects of Antioxidants and Exercise on Muscle Atrophy Induced by Ischemic Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Umei, Namiko; Ono, Takeya; Oki, Sadaaki; Otsuka, Akira; Otao, Hiroshi; Tsumiyama, Wakako; Tasaka, Atsushi; Ishikura, Hideki; Aihara, Kazuki; Sato, Yuta; Shimizu, Michele Eisemann

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine whether muscle atrophy induced by ischemic reperfusion injury in rats can be prevented by the administration of antioxidants and exercise. [Subjects] Rats were randomly divided into five groups: non-treated, ischemic, exercise, ascorbic acid and exercise, and tocopherol and exercise. [Methods] The relative weight ratio of the soleus muscle and the length of the soleus muscle fiber cross-section minor axis were used for the evaluation of muscle atrophy. Pain was assessed as the weight-bearing ratio of the ischemic side. A multiple comparison test and the paired t-test were used for the statistical analyses. [Results] Compared with the non-treated group, the relative weight ratios of the soleus muscle and the lengths of the soleus muscle fiber cross-section minor axis significantly decreased in the other groups. Excluding the non-treated group, the relative weight ratios of the soleus muscle were heaviest in the tocopherol and exercise group. Excluding the non-treated group, the lengths of the soleus muscle fiber cross-section minor axis were longest in the tocopherol and exercise group, followed by the ischemic, exercise, and ascorbic acid and exercise groups. The amount of antioxidant substances did not decrease on the weight-bearing ratio of the ischemic side. [Conclusion] In this study, using an experimental rat model, we confirmed that antioxidants and exercise effect muscle atrophy induced by ischemic reperfusion. The results show that muscle regeneration was facilitated by phagocytosis in the tocopherol and exercise group. PMID:25540491

  5. Rational modulation of the innate immune system for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amantea, Diana; Micieli, Giuseppe; Tassorelli, Cristina; Cuartero, María I.; Ballesteros, Iván; Certo, Michelangelo; Moro, María A.; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system plays a dualistic role in the evolution of ischemic brain damage and has also been implicated in ischemic tolerance produced by different conditioning stimuli. Early after ischemia, perivascular astrocytes release cytokines and activate metalloproteases (MMPs) that contribute to blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption and vasogenic oedema; whereas at later stages, they provide extracellular glutamate uptake, BBB regeneration and neurotrophic factors release. Similarly, early activation of microglia contributes to ischemic brain injury via the production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-1, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and proteases. Nevertheless, microglia also contributes to the resolution of inflammation, by releasing IL-10 and tumor growth factor (TGF)-β, and to the late reparative processes by phagocytic activity and growth factors production. Indeed, after ischemia, microglia/macrophages differentiate toward several phenotypes: the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype is classically activated via toll-like receptors or interferon-γ, whereas M2 phenotypes are alternatively activated by regulatory mediators, such as ILs 4, 10, 13, or TGF-β. Thus, immune cells exert a dualistic role on the evolution of ischemic brain damage, since the classic phenotypes promote injury, whereas alternatively activated M2 macrophages or N2 neutrophils prompt tissue remodeling and repair. Moreover, a subdued activation of the immune system has been involved in ischemic tolerance, since different preconditioning stimuli act via modulation of inflammatory mediators, including toll-like receptors and cytokine signaling pathways. This further underscores that the immuno-modulatory approach for the treatment of ischemic stroke should be aimed at blocking the detrimental effects, while promoting the beneficial responses of the immune reaction. PMID:25972779

  6. Systemic neutrophil activation in a mouse model of ischemic stroke and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Helena; McKee, Dana; Ritter, Leslie

    2011-04-01

    As a natural response to injury and disease, neutrophils activate, adhere to the microvasculature, migrate into brain tissue, and release toxic substances such as reactive oxygen species and proteases. This neutrophil response occurs when blood flow is returned to brain tissue (reperfusion) after ischemic stroke. Thus, the presence of activated systemic neutrophils increases the potential for tissue injury during reperfusion after ischemic stroke. Although experiments in rat models suggest that activated neutrophils play a pivotal role in cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury, little is known about systemic neutrophil activation during reperfusion following ischemic stroke in a mouse model. The purpose of this study was to characterize systemic leukocyte responses and neutrophil CD11b expression 15-min and 24-hr post-reperfusion in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. The intraluminal filament method of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) with reperfusion or a sham procedure was performed in male C57Bl/6 mice. Automated leukocyte counts and manual white blood cell (WBC) differential counts were measured. Flow cytometry was used to assess systemic neutrophil surface CD11b expression. The data suggest that the damaging potential of systemic neutrophil activation begins as early as 15 min and remains evident at 24 hr after the initiation of reperfusion. In addition, because transgenic mouse models, bred on a C57Bl/6 background, are increasingly used to elucidate single mechanisms of reperfusion injury after ischemic stroke, findings from this study are foundational for future investigations examining the damaging potential of neutrophil responses post-reperfusion after ischemic stroke in genetically altered mouse models within this background strain. PMID:21044968

  7. Long-term window of ischemic tolerance: An evolutionarily conserved form of metabolic plasticity regulated by epigenetic modifications?

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Nathalie; Koronowski, Kevin B.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of effective neuroprotective agents in the clinic, ischemic and pharmacological preconditioning are gaining increased interest in the field of cerebral ischemia. Our lab recently reported that resveratrol preconditioning affords tolerance against a focal cerebral ischemic insult in mice that can last for at least 14 days in vivo making it the longest window of ischemic tolerance discovered to date by a single administration of a pharmacological agent. The mechanism behind this novel extended window of ischemic tolerance remains elusive. In the below commentary we discuss potential mechanisms that could explain this novel extended window of ischemic tolerance in the context of previously identified windows and the known mechanisms behind them. We also draw parallels from the fields of hibernation and hypoxia-tolerance, which are chronic adaptations to severe conditions of hypoxia and ischemia known to be mediated by a form of metabolic depression. We also briefly discuss the importance of epigenetic modifications in maintaining this depressed state of metabolism.

  8. Functional Genomics of Cardioprotection by Ischemic Conditioning and the Influence of Comorbid Conditions: Implications in Target Identification.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltan V; Giricz, Zoltan; Bencsik, Peter; Madonna, Rosalinda; Gyongyosi, Mariann; Schulz, Rainer; Mayr, Manuel; Thum, Thomas; Puskas, Laszlo G; Ferdinandy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease including myocardial infarction develops on the basis of several risk-factors and comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, therefore, identification of novel drug targets for cardioprotection is of great importance. Ischemic preconditioning, postconditioning, and remote conditioning trigger endogenous cardioprotective mechanisms that render the heart more resistant to lethal ischemic-reperfusion injury. However, major cardiovascular co-morbidities such as hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and their co-medications interfere with these cardioprotective mechanisms thereby limiting the efficacy of cardioprotective ischemic conditioning maneuvers. Ischemia reperfusion injury and cardioprotection by conditioning have been shown to affect global myocardial gene expression profile at the transcript level. Further understanding and the comprehensive analysis of the cardioprotective gene expression fingerprint in normal, protected, and in comorbid conditions may lead to identification of novel molecular targets for cardioprotection.

  9. Safety of early initiation of rivaroxaban or dabigatran after thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ritzenthaler, T; Derex, L; Davenas, C; Bnouhanna, W; Farghali, A; Mechtouff, L; Cho, T-H; Nighoghossian, N

    2015-09-01

    The introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOA) in the early stage of cerebral infarction after thrombolysis may reduce the recurrence rate but raises safety concern. We sought to study the feasibility and safety of the introduction of rivaroxaban or dabigatran in this context. Thirty-four consecutive patients admitted for ischemic stroke related to non-valvular atrial fibrillation in whom DOA were given within the first two weeks following intravenous rt-PA were studied. A clinical and radiological monitoring protocol was established to ensure the safety of the prescription. None of the patients experienced symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation or a symptomatic recurrent ischemic event after early rivaroxaban or dabigatran introduction.

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor: an attractive target in the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Zhou, Hui; Lu, Jie; Qu, Yi; Yu, Dan; Tong, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia or ischemia results in cell death and cerebral edema, as well as other cellular reactions such as angiogenesis and the reestablishment of functional microvasculature to promote recovery from brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor is expressed in the central nervous system after hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and is involved in the process of brain repair via the regulation of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, and cerebral edema, which all require vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. In this review, we focus on the role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the response to hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and discuss potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26981109

  11. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia. PMID:24908957

  12. Outcomes of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in neonates treated with hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Seetha

    2014-03-01

    This article examines the evidence regarding mortality and neurodevelopmental outcomes following hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Data from randomized controlled trials regarding neurodevelopmental outcome at the end point of the major trials, and from 2 of the trials on childhood outcome following hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are presented. The predictors of outcome that can be evaluated in the neonatal period are also reviewed, as this information may assist in the counseling of families. Most trials of hypothermia have been performed in high-resource countries; published studies from the low- and middle-income countries are also reviewed.

  13. Successful hypothermia treatment of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in a neonate with epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Nilgun; Beken, Serdar; Dilli, Dilek; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Okumus, Nurullah

    2014-08-01

    Despite advances in the neonatal care, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in late preterm and term infants remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. There is lack of data on the application of therapeutic hypothermia in the existence of severe skin lesions. Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare group of inherited conditions which causes blisters in skin and mucosal membranes. In this report, the authors describe a successful whole-body hypothermia treatment of severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in a term newborn with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. They observed that therapeutic hypothermia may also be given in newborns with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa without any complications.

  14. Association of TOMM40 and SLC22A4 polymorphisms with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    YAMASE, YUICHIRO; HORIBE, HIDEKI; UEYAMA, CHIKARA; FUJIMAKI, TETSUO; OGURI, MITSUTOSHI; KATO, KIMIHIKO; ARAI, MASAZUMI; WATANABE, SACHIRO; YAMADA, YOSHIJI

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and their meta-analyses have identified various genes and loci underlying the predisposition to ischemic stroke or coronary artery disease in Caucasian populations. Given that ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease may have a shared genetic architecture, certain polymorphisms may confer genetic susceptibility to these two diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible association of ischemic stroke with 29 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously identified by the meta-analyses of GWASs as susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease. The study population comprised 3,187 Japanese individuals, including 894 subjects with ischemic stroke and 2,293 controls. The genotypes for the 29 SNPs of the 28 genes were determined by a method that combines the polymerase chain reaction and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes with suspension array technology. Comparisons of the allele frequencies by the χ2 test between subjects with ischemic stroke and controls revealed that rs9319428 (G→A) of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 gene (P=0.0471), rs2075650 (G→A) of the translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog gene (TOMM40, P=0.0102) and rs273909 (T→C) of the solute carrier family 22, member 4 gene (SLC22A4, P=0.0097) were significantly (P<0.05) associated with the prevalence of ischemic stroke. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, smoking status and the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia revealed that rs2075650 of TOMM40 (P=0.0443; recessive model; odds ratio=0.50) and rs273909 of SLC22A4 (P=0.0123; dominant model; odds ratio=0.45) were significantly associated with ischemic stroke with the minor G and C allele, respectively, being protective against this condition. TOMM40 and SLC22A4 may thus be susceptibility loci for ischemic stroke in Japanese individuals. PMID:26171154

  15. Fast surface alignment for cardiac spatio-temporal modeling: application to Ischemic cardiac shape modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Heng; Shen, Li; Zhang, Rong; Makedon, Fillia; Hettleman, Bruce; Pearlman, Justin

    2006-03-01

    The visualization and comparison of local deformation from 3D image sequences is of critical importance in understanding the etiology of Ischemic cardiac disease. In this paper we describe a framework to combine our previous fast spherical harmonic surface alignment algorithm with a new local special surface reconstruction method to reconstruct the surface of LV with Ischaemic cardiac disease. Our new surface computational model allows people to extract the valuable ischemic tissues behavior from the dynamic shape. We have demonstrated our approaches by the experiments on cardiac MRI. A brief description of motivation is put forth, as well as an overview of the approaches and some initial results are described.

  16. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke in pregnancy using the penumbra system.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Sanjith; Shyamkumar, N K; Alexander, Sunithi; Babu, P Suresh; Prabhakar, A T; Moses, Vinu; Murthy, T V; Alexander, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Even though intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) is the standard of care in acute ischemic stroke, its use in pregnancy is not clearly defined. Mechanical thrombectomy devices can be an option; however, literature on the use of such mechanical devices in stroke in pregnancy is lacking. Here we describe two cases that developed acute embolic stroke during pregnancy who were successfully treated by mechanical clot retrieval using the Penumbra system 28 (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA). To the best of our knowledge, these are the only case reports on the use of the Penumbra device in pregnant patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27293343

  17. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  18. [Changes of homeostasis and immunity in the acute period of ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Burtsev, E M; Grinshteĭn, V B; Nazarov, S B

    2001-01-01

    We studied homeostasis, immunity and rheological blood properties in the acute period of ischemic stroke. As intravascular blood coagulation and depression of fibrinolysis happen the amount of "rough" red blood cells increased as well as their aggregates enlarged in size. These changes haven't been seen in patients with lacunar stroke and transient ischemic attacks. Deep depression of T-cell immunity in stroke and inhibition of total fibrinolysis were observed. The most significant depression of cells immunity was found in patients with poor outcome. We recommend to evaluate T-cell immunity in stroke patients and proceed immunocorrection of necessity. PMID:12830541

  19. Cranial anatomy and detection of ischemic stroke in the cat by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Buonanno, F.S.; Pykett, I.L.; Kistler, J.P.; Vielma, J.; Brady, T.J.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Goldman, M.R.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-04-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of cat heads were obtained using a small, experimental imaging system. As a prelude to the study of experimental ischemic brain infarction, the normal cat head was imaged for identification of anatomical features. Images of one cat which had undergone ligation of the middle cerebral artery three weeks previously showed brain changes associated with chronic ischemic stroke and compared favorably with findings on computed tomography (CT). The NMR images have millimetric spatial resolution. NMR parameters inherent in the tissues provide intensity variations and are sufficiently sensitive to yield contrast resolution surpassing that of CT.

  20. CTS Trials Network: A paradigm shift in the surgical treatment of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation?

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiothoracic Surgery Trials Network has reported results of the one-year follow up of their randomized trial "Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation". They studied 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with or without mitral repair with the primary end-point of change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) at one year and multiple clinical and echocardiographic secondary endpoints. Although their results were against repairing the mitral valve, the debate on surgical management of moderate IMR remains unsettled.

  1. CTS Trials Network: A paradigm shift in the surgical treatment of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation?

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiothoracic Surgery Trials Network has reported results of the one-year follow up of their randomized trial “Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation”. They studied 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with or without mitral repair with the primary end-point of change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) at one year and multiple clinical and echocardiographic secondary endpoints. Although their results were against repairing the mitral valve, the debate on surgical management of moderate IMR remains unsettled. PMID:26779511

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor: an attractive target in the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui; Zhou, Hui; Lu, Jie; Qu, Yi; Yu, Dan; Tong, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia or ischemia results in cell death and cerebral edema, as well as other cellular reactions such as angiogenesis and the reestablishment of functional microvasculature to promote recovery from brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor is expressed in the central nervous system after hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and is involved in the process of brain repair via the regulation of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, and cerebral edema, which all require vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. In this review, we focus on the role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the response to hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and discuss potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26981109

  3. Transient Ischemic Attacks of Spinal Cord due to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Thrombus.

    PubMed

    Ates, Ihsan; Kaplan, Mustafa; Özçalık, Merve; Yılmaz, Nisbet

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis due to abdominal aortic aneurysm is a rare condition that causes high mortality. Transient ischemic attack of the spinal cord can occur as a result of trash emboli from thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysm. This condition generally occurs during operation of abdominal aortic aneurysm; very rarely, it can also be seen in laminated abdominal aortic aneurysm. Here, we present a case of a patient presenting with bilateral lower extremity paralysis resulting from transient ischemic attack of the spinal cord due to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:26520423

  4. Effects of cervical-lymphatic blockade on brain edema and infarction volume in cerebral ischemic rats.

    PubMed

    Si, Jinchao; Chen, Lianbi; Xia, Zuoli

    2006-10-31

    To observe the effects of cervical-lymphatic blockade (CLB) on brain edema and infarction volume of ischemic (MCAO) rat, we examined changes in cerebral water content, Ca2+ and glutamate concentrations, cerebral infarction volume and mRNA expression levels of N-methyl-D-aspartame receptor 1 (NMDA receptor 1) in the ischemic (left) hemisphere. The present results demonstrated that all the above indices in rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion plus cervical lymphatic blockade (MCAO+CLB) were markedly higher than those with only middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) at different time points. These results indicated [corrected] that CLB can aggravate cerebral ischemia by increasing brain edema and infarction volume.

  5. Relation of left atrial dysfunction to ischemic stroke in patients with coronary heart disease (from the heart and soul study).

    PubMed

    Wong, Jonathan M; Welles, Christine C; Azarbal, Farnaz; Whooley, Mary A; Schiller, Nelson B; Turakhia, Mintu P

    2014-05-15

    This study sought to determine whether left atrial (LA) dysfunction independently predicts ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation (AF) impairs LA function and is associated with ischemic stroke. However, ischemic stroke frequently occurs in patients without known AF. The direct relation between LA function and risk of ischemic stroke is unknown. We performed transthoracic echocardiography at rest in 983 subjects with stable coronary heart disease. To quantify LA dysfunction, we used the left atrial function index (LAFI), a validated formula incorporating LA volumes at end-atrial systole and diastole. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between LAFI and ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Over a mean follow-up of 7.1 years, 58 study participants (5.9%) experienced an ischemic stroke or TIA. In patients without known baseline AF or warfarin therapy (n = 893), participants in the lowest quintile of LAFI had >3 times the risk of ischemic stroke or TIA (hazard ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 9.7, p = 0.03) compared with those in the highest quintile. For each standard deviation (18.8 U) decrease in LAFI, the hazard of ischemic stroke or TIA increased by 50% (hazard ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 2.1, p = 0.04). Among measured echocardiographic indexes of LA function, including LA volume, LAFI was the strongest predictor of ischemic stroke or TIA. In conclusion, LA dysfunction is an independent risk factor for stroke or TIA, even in patients without baseline AF.

  6. Coronary-Artery Bypass Surgery in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez, Eric J.; Lee, Kerry L.; Jones, Robert H.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Hill, James A.; Panza, Julio A.; Michler, Robert E.; Bonow, Robert O.; Doenst, Torsten; Petrie, Mark C.; Oh, Jae K.; She, Lilin; Moore, Vanessa L.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Sopko, George; Rouleau, Jean L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The survival benefit of a strategy of coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) added to guideline-directed medical therapy, as compared with medical therapy alone, in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure, and severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction remains unclear. METHODS From July 2002 to May 2007, a total of 1212 patients with an ejection fraction of 35% or less and coronary artery disease amenable to CABG were randomly assigned to undergo CABG plus medical therapy (CABG group, 610 patients) or medical therapy alone (medical-therapy group, 602 patients). The primary outcome was death from any cause. Major secondary outcomes included death from cardiovascular causes and death from any cause or hospitalization for cardiovascular causes. The median duration of follow-up, including the current extended-follow-up study, was 9.8 years. RESULTS A primary outcome event occurred in 359 patients (58.9%) in the CABG group and in 398 patients (66.1%) in the medical-therapy group (hazard ratio with CABG vs. medical therapy, 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 0.97; P = 0.02 by log-rank test). A total of 247 patients (40.5%) in the CABG group and 297 patients (49.3%) in the medical-therapy group died from cardiovascular causes (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.66 to 0.93; P = 0.006 by log-rank test). Death from any cause or hospitalization for cardiovascular causes occurred in 467 patients (76.6%) in the CABG group and in 524 patients (87.0%) in the medical-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.82; P<0.001 by log-rank test). CONCLUSIONS In a cohort of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, the rates of death from any cause, death from cardiovascular causes, and death from any cause or hospitalization for cardiovascular causes were significantly lower over 10 years among patients who underwent CABG in addition to receiving medical therapy than among those who received medical therapy alone. (Funded by the National Institutes of

  7. Machine Perfusion Enhances Hepatocyte Isolation Yields From Ischemic Livers

    PubMed Central

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Perk, Sinem; Calhoun, Candice; Uygun, Korkut; Yarmush, Martin L.; Berthiaume, François

    2015-01-01

    Background High-quality human hepatocytes form the basis of drug safety and efficacy tests, cell-based therapies, and bridge-to-transplantation devices. Presently the only supply of cells derives from an inadequate pool of suboptimal disqualified donor livers. Here we evaluated whether machine perfusion could ameliorate ischemic injury that many of these livers experience prior to hepatocyte isolation. Methods Non-heparinized female Lewis rat livers were exposed to an hour of warm ischemia (34°C) and then perfused for 3 hours. Five different perfusion conditions that utilized the cell isolation apparatus were investigated, namely: (1) modified Williams Medium E and (2) Lifor, both with active oxygenation (95%O2/5%CO2), as well as (3) Lifor passively oxygenated with ambient air (21%O2/0.04%CO2), all at ambient temperatures (20±2°C). At hypothermic temperatures (5±1°C) and under passive oxygenation were (4) University of Wisconsin solution (UW) and (5) Vasosol. Negative and positive control groups comprised livers that had ischemia (WI) and livers that did not (Fresh) prior to cell isolation, respectively. Results Fresh livers yielded 32±9 million cells/g liver while an hour of ischemia reduced the cell yield to 1.6±0.6 million cells/g liver. Oxygenated Williams medium E and Lifor recovered yields of 39±11 and 31±2.3 million cells/g liver, respectively. The passively oxygenated groups produced 15±7 (Lifor), 13±7 (Vasosol), and 10±6 (UW) million cells/g liver. Oxygenated Williams Medium E was most effective at sustaining pH values, avoiding the accumulation of lactate, minimizing edematous weight gain and producing bile during perfusion. Conclusions Machine perfusion results in a dramatic increase in cell yields from livers that have had up to an hour of warm ischemia, but perfusate choice significantly impacts the extent of recovery. Oxygenated Williams Medium E at room temperature is superior to Lifor, UW and Vasosol, largely facilitated by its high

  8. Risk factors associated with the development of ischemic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Joaquín Cubiella; Calvo, Luisa Núñez; Vázquez, Elvira González; García, Maria Jesús García; Pérez, Maria Teresa Alves; Silva, Isabel Martínez; Seara, Javier Fernández

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To ascertain the role of cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular diseases, standard treatments and other diseases in the development of ischemic colitis (IC). METHODS: A retrospective, case-control study was designed, using matched data and covering 161 incident cases of IC who required admission to our hospital from 1998 through 2003. IC was diagnosed on the basis of endoscopic findings and diagnostic or compatible histology. Controls were randomly chosen from a cohort of patients who were admitted in the same period and required a colonoscopy, excluding those with diagnosis of colitis. Cases were matched with controls (ratio 1:2), by age and sex. A conditional logistic regression was performed. RESULTS: A total of 483 patients (161 cases, 322 controls) were included; mean age 75.67 ± 10.03 years, 55.9% women. The principal indications for colonoscopy in the control group were lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage (35.4%), anemia (33.9%), abdominal pain (19.9%) and diarrhea (9.6%). The endoscopic findings in this group were hemorrhoids (25.5%), diverticular disease (30.4%), polyps (19.9%) and colorectal cancer (10.2%). The following variables were associated with IC in the univariate analysis: arterial hypertension (P = 0.033); dyslipidemia (P < 0.001); diabetes mellitus (P = 0.025); peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.004); heart failure (P = 0.026); treatment with hypotensive drugs (P = 0.023); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; (P = 0.018); calcium channel antagonists (P = 0.028); and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) (P < 0.001). Finally, the following variables were independently associated with the development of IC: diabetes mellitus [odds ratio (OR) 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.001-3.077, P = 0.046]; dyslipidemia (OR 2.12, 95% CI: 1.26-3.57, P = 0.004); heart failure (OR 3.17, 95% CI: 1.31-7.68, P = 0.01); peripheral arterial disease (OR 4.1, 95% CI: 1.32-12.72, P = 0.015); treatment with digoxin (digitalis) (OR 0.27, 95% CI: 0.084-0.857, P

  9. Shared genetic contribution to ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Adib‐Samii, Poneh; Harold, Denise; Dichgans, Martin; Williams, Julie; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Fornage, Myriam; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sharma, Pankaj; Bis, Joshua C; Psaty, Bruce M; Seshadri, Sudha; Nalls, Mike A; Devan, William J; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Malik, Rainer; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Ikram, M Arfan; Clarke, Robert; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Kilarski, Laura L; Walters, Matthew; Thijs, Vincent; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lambert, Jean‐Charles; Ibrahim‐Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier‐Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton‐Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao‐Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie‐Thçrèse; Choi, Seung‐Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiçvet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger‐Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George‐Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez‐Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Del Zompo, Maria; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton‐Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li‐San; Dartigues, Jean‐François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak‐Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increasing evidence suggests epidemiological and pathological links between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated the evidence that shared genetic factors underpin the two diseases. Methods Using genome‐wide association study (GWAS) data from METASTROKE + (15,916 IS cases and 68,826 controls) and the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP; 17,008 AD cases and 37,154 controls), we evaluated known associations with AD and IS. On the subset of data for which we could obtain compatible genotype‐level data (4,610 IS cases, 1,281 AD cases, and 14,320 controls), we estimated the genome‐wide genetic correlation (rG) between AD and IS, and the three subtypes (cardioembolic, small vessel, and large vessel), using genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. We then performed a meta‐analysis and pathway analysis in the combined AD and small vessel stroke data sets to identify the SNPs and molecular pathways through which disease risk may be conferred. Results We found evidence of a shared genetic contribution between AD and small vessel stroke (rG [standard error] = 0.37 [0.17]; p = 0.011). Conversely, there was no evidence to support shared genetic factors in AD and IS overall or with the other stroke subtypes. Of the known GWAS associations with IS or AD, none reached significance for association with the other trait (or stroke subtypes). A meta‐analysis of AD IGAP and METASTROKE + small vessel stroke GWAS data highlighted a region (ATP5H/KCTD2/ICT1) associated with both diseases (p = 1.8 × 10−8). A pathway analysis identified four associated pathways involving cholesterol transport and immune response. Interpretation Our findings indicate shared genetic susceptibility to AD and small vessel stroke and highlight potential causal pathways and loci. Ann Neurol 2016;79:739–747 PMID:26913989

  10. Pioglitazone for Secondary Prevention after Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Rationale and Design of the Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke (IRIS) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Viscoli, Catherine M.; Brass, Lawrence M.; Carolei, Antonio; Conwit, Robin; Ford, Gary A.; Furie, Karen L.; Gorman, Mark; Guarino, Peter D.; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Lovejoy, Anne M.; Parsons, Mark W.; Peduzzi, Peter N.; Ringleb, Peter; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Spence, J. David; Tanne, David; Young, Lawrence H.; Kernan, Walter N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recurrent vascular events remain a major source of morbidity and mortality after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke (IRIS) trial is evaluating an approach to secondary prevention based on the established association between insulin resistance and increased risk for ischemic vascular events. Specifically, IRIS will test the effectiveness of pioglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug of the thiazolidinedione class, for reducing the risk for stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) among insulin resistant, non-diabetic patients with a recent ischemic stroke or TIA. Design: Eligible patients for IRIS must have had insulin resistance defined by a Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance greater than 3.0 without meeting criteria for diabetes. Within 6 months of the index stroke or TIA, patients were randomly assigned to pioglitazone (titrated from 15mg to 45mg/day) or matching placebo and followed for up to 5 years. The primary outcome is time to stroke or MI. Secondary outcomes include time to stroke alone, acute coronary syndrome, diabetes, cognitive decline and all-cause mortality. Enrollment of 3876 participants from 179 sites in seven countries was completed in January, 2013. Participant follow-up will continue until July, 2015. Summary: The IRIS Trial will determine whether treatment with pioglitazone improves cardiovascular outcomes of non-diabetic, insulin-resistant patients with stroke or TIA. Results are expected in early 2016. PMID:25458644

  11. Preparation of normal and ischemic myocardial tissue for scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, M

    1982-01-01

    Normal and ischemic myocardium was prepared by slicing and cryofracture techniques for examination with the SEM. The tissues were dehydrated in ethanol and Freon 113 (slicing method) or were cryofractured in Freon 113 cooled with liquid nitrogen, followed by critical point drying and coating with gold and palladium. Some osmicated tissue pieces were treated with thiocarbohydrazide for examination without metal coating. Some hearts were infiltrated with silver particles and were examined with backscattered electron imaging technique (BSI). The cryofractured tissue provided the most useful and consistent surface features of the cell organelles with a minimum of mechanical disorder compared to other methods. Although the myocardium prepared by slicing method revealed the interior of the cells, it contained several frayed edges and loose myofibrils making interpretation of the ischemic myocardium difficult. The normal cells exhibited myofibrils covered by transverse tubules at the level of Z bands as confirmed by BSI using silver particles as an extracellular tracer and numerous oval to elongated mitochondria located between the myofibrils. An extensive network of tubules (sarcoplasmic reticulum) over the sarcomeres and nuclei were observed. The changes observed by SEM in the ischemic hearts were consistent with those seen in TEM. With prolonged coronary ligation the changes became obvious. The T-tubules were often broken and nuclei were distorted. The myofibrils were disorganized and formed homogeneous bands. These SEM studies suggest that myocardium prepared by cryofracture technique yields information on normal and ischemic cell structure consistent with data obtained by TEM. PMID:7167767

  12. APOLIPOPROTEIN E GENOTYPE AND INCIDENT ISCHEMIC STROKE: THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK IN COMMUNITY STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A relationship between the apolipoprotein E (apoE) genotype and ischemic stroke has been inconsistently reported. We explored this relation in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC). METHODS: The ARIC cohort involves 15,792 men and women, aged 45 to 64 years at ...

  13. Ischemic colitis induced by the newly reformulated multicomponent weight-loss supplement Hydroxycut®

    PubMed Central

    Sherid, Muhammed; Samo, Salih; Sulaiman, Samian; Gaziano, Joseph H

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic colitis accounts for 6%-18% of causes of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. It is more often multifactorial and more common in elderly. Drugs are considered important causative agents of this disease with different mechanisms. In this paper, we describe a 37-year-old otherwise healthy female presented with sudden onset diffuse abdominal pain and bloody stool. Radiologic, colonoscopic and histopathologic findings were all consistent with ischemic colitis. Her only suspected factor was hydroxycut which she had been taking for a period of 1 mo prior to her presentation. Her condition improved uneventfully after cessation of hydroxycut, bowel rest, intravenous hydration, and antibiotics. This is a first case of ischemic colitis with clear relationship with hydroxycut use (Naranjo score of 7). Our case demonstrates the importance of questioning patients regarding the usage of dietary supplements; especially since many patients consider them safe and do not disclose their use voluntarily to their physicians. Hydroxycut has to be considered as a potential trigger for otherwise unexplained ischemic colitis. PMID:23596542

  14. Cytomegalovirus colitis followed by ischemic colitis in a non-immunocompromised adult: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Aomatsu, Kazuki; Nakamura, Masanori; Aomatsu, Naoki; Aomatsu, Keiho

    2015-03-28

    We report a rare case of cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis followed by severe ischemic colitis in a non-immunocompromised patient. An 86-year-old woman was admitted after experiencing episodes of vomiting and diarrhea. The next day, hematochezia was detected without abdominal pain. The initial diagnosis of ischemic colitis was based on colonoscopy and histological findings. The follow-up colonoscopy revealed a prolonged colitis. Immunohistochemical staining detected CMV-positive cells following conservative therapy. Intravenous ganciclovir therapy led to successful healing of ulcers and disappearance of CMV-positive cells. The prevalence of CMV infection is common in adults. CMV colitis is relatively common in immunocompromised patients; however, it is rare in immunocompetent patients. In our case, CMV infection was allowed to be established due to the disruption of the colonic mucosa by the prior severe ischemic colitis. Our experience suggests that biopsies may be necessary to detect CMV and the prompt management of CMV colitis should be instituted when intractable ischemic colitis is observed.

  15. Postoperative posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) following right pterional meningioma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Sundar, Shyam; Thomas, Dalvin; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is an unpredictable complication of nonocular surgeries. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) is particularly feared in spinal surgeries in the prone position. We report a rare case of PION occurring after surgery for a pterional meningioma and discuss the various factors implicated in POVL. PMID:27570391

  16. Neuroprotective actions of taurine on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Yun; Ma, Peng-Sheng; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Ru; Hao, Yin-Ju; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Yu-Xiang; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Taurine is an abundant amino acid in the nervous system, which has been proved to possess antioxidation, osmoregulation and membrane stabilization. Previously it has been demonstrated that taurine exerts ischemic brain injury protective effect. This study was designed to investigate whether the protective effect of taurine has the possibility to be applied to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with left carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to 8% oxygen to generate the experimental group. The cerebral damage area was measured after taurine post-treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, Hematoxyline-Eosin (HE) staining and Nissl staining. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), myeloperoxtidase (MPO), ATP and Lactic Acid productions were assayed with ipsilateral hemisphere homogenates. Western-blot and immunofluorescence assay were processed to detect the expressions of AIF, Cyt C, Bax, Bcl-2 in brain. We found that taurine significantly reduced brain infarct volume and ameliorated morphological injury obviously reversed the changes of SOD, MDA, GSH-Px, T-AOC, ATP, MPO, and Lactic Acid levels. Compared with hypoxic-ischemic group, it showed marked reduction of AIF, Cyt C and Bax expressions and increase of Bcl-2 after post-treatment. We conclude that taurine possesses an efficacious neuroprotective effect after cerebral hypoxic-ischemic damage in neonatal rats. PMID:27345710

  17. Non-ischemic diabetic cardiomyopathy may initially exhibit a transient subclinical phase of hyperdynamic myocardial performance.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Kai O

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the key cause for mortality in diabetes mellitus. Besides ischemia-related cardiac malfunction there is growing evidence for non-ischemic diabetes-associated heart failure in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The underlying pathophysiology of non-ischemic diabetic cardiomyopathy (NIDC) is poorly understood and data on myocardial mechanics in early stages of the disease are rare. However, several studies in both human and experimental animal settings have reported prima facie unexplained features indicating myocardial hyperdynamics early in the course of the disease. The new hypothesis is that - other than previously thought - NIDC may be non-linear and initially feature an asymptomatic subclinical phase of myocardial hypercontractility that precedes the long-term development of diabetes-associated cardiac dysfunction and ultimately heart failure. Diabetes-induced metabolic imbalances may lead to a paradoxic inotropic increase and inefficient myocardial mechanics that finally result in a gradual deterioration of myocardial performance. In conclusion, diabetic patients should be screened regularly and early in the course of the disease utilizing ultra-sensitive myocardial deformation imaging in order to identify patients at risk for diabetes-associated heart failure. Moreover, hyperdynamic myocardial deformation might help distinguish non-ischemic from ischemic diabetic cardiomyopathy. Further studies are needed to illuminate the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, the exact spatiotemporal evolvement of diabetic cardiomyopathy and its long-term relation to clinical outcome parameters. PMID:27515189

  18. Methyleugenol reduces cerebral ischemic injury by suppression of oxidative injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoo Keum; Cho, Geum-Sil; Hwang, Sunyoung; Kim, Byung Woo; Lim, Ji H; Lee, Jae-Chul; Kim, Hyoung Chun; Kim, Won-Ki; Kim, Yeong Sik

    2010-08-01

    The present study tested the cytoprotective effect of methyleugenol in an in vivo ischemia model (i.e. middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 1.5 h and subsequent reperfusion for 24 h) and further investigated its mechanism of action in in vitro cerebral ischemic models. When applied shortly after reperfusion, methyleugenol largely reduced cerebral ischemic injury. Methyleugenol decreased the caspase-3 activation and death of cultured cerebral cortical neurons caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 1 h and subsequent re-oxygenation for 24 h. Methyleugenol markedly reduced superoxide generation in the ischemic brain and decreased the intracellular oxidative stress caused by OGD/re-oxygenation. It was found that methyleugenol elevated the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Further, methyleugenol inhibited the production of nitric oxide and decreased the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Methyleugenol down-regulated the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the ischemic brain as well as in immunostimulated mixed glial cells. The results indicate that methyleugenol could be useful for the treatment of ischemia/inflammation-related diseases.

  19. Cardiovascular risk factors cause premature rarefaction of the collateral circulation and greater ischemic tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Scott M.; Zhang, Hua; Maeda, Nobuyo; Doerschuk, Claire M.; Faber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Collaterals lessen tissue injury in occlusive disease. However, aging causes progressive decline in their number and smaller diameters in those that remain (collateral rarefaction), beginning at 16 months-age in mice (ie, middle age), and worse ischemic injury—effects that are accelerated in even 3 months-old eNOS−/− mice. These findings have found indirect support in recent human studies. Objective We sought to determine if other cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) associated with endothelial dysfunction cause collateral rarefaction, investigate possible mechanisms, and test strategies for prevention. Methods and Results Mice with nine different models of CVRFs of 4–12 months-age were assessed for number and diameter of native collaterals in skeletal muscle and brain, and for collateral-dependent perfusion and ischemic injury after arterial occlusion. Hypertension caused collateral rarefaction whose severity increased with duration and level of hypertension, accompanied by greater hindlimb ischemia and cerebral infarct volume. Chronic treatment of wildtype mice with L-NG-nitro-arginine methylester caused similar rarefaction and worse ischemic injury that were not prevented by lowering arterial pressure with hydralazine. Metab