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Sample records for ischemic myocardiopathy trasplante

  1. AUGMENTATION OF THE VIRULENCE OF MURINE COXSACKIE-VIRUS B-3 MYOCARDIOPATHY BY EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    Gatmaitan, Bienvenido G.; Chason, Jacob L.; Lerner, A. Martin

    1970-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B-3 myocardiopathy was induced in weanling mice by intraperitoneal and intracerebral inoculations of the Nancy strain. Acute mortality was 5.5%. The cardiomyopathy is characterized by an early phase lasting about 9 days with myocardial necrosis, associated inflammation, and healing by fibrosis and calcification involving 25 to 50% of the contractile fibers in each affected mouse. Infectious coxsackievirus may be recovered from the heart during this phase. Continuing myocardial inflammatory lesions follow during the later phase, but infectious virus is no longer present. When mice were forced to swim in a preheated pool (33°C) during both phases of their myocardiopathy, virulence was strikingly augmented. Fully half of the mice died of congestive failure, the majority while swimming. Hearts were dilated, hypertrophied, and grossly necrotic. The myocardium was transformed to a completely necrotic, inflammatory, calcifying mass. At the peak of the infectious phase, myocardial replication of coxsackievirus was increased 530 times in nurslings which had been forced to swim. Myositis in hind limbs was more frequent, and inflammatory lesions in perirenal and pericardial fat were more severe in the mice which were forced to swim. When swimming was begun on the 9th day after infection, the virulence and lethality (13.8%) of infection were moderately increased. PMID:4246139

  2. Augmentation of the virulence of murine coxsackie-virus B-3 myocardiopathy by exercise.

    PubMed

    Gatmaitan, B G; Chason, J L; Lerner, A M

    1970-06-01

    Coxsackievirus B-3 myocardiopathy was induced in weanling mice by intraperitoneal and intracerebral inoculations of the Nancy strain. Acute mortality was 5.5%. The cardiomyopathy is characterized by an early phase lasting about 9 days with myocardial necrosis, associated inflammation, and healing by fibrosis and calcification involving 25 to 50% of the contractile fibers in each affected mouse. Infectious coxsackievirus may be recovered from the heart during this phase. Continuing myocardial inflammatory lesions follow during the later phase, but infectious virus is no longer present. When mice were forced to swim in a preheated pool (33 degrees C) during both phases of their myocardiopathy, virulence was strikingly augmented. Fully half of the mice died of congestive failure, the majority while swimming. Hearts were dilated, hypertrophied, and grossly necrotic. The myocardium was transformed to a completely necrotic, inflammatory, calcifying mass. At the peak of the infectious phase, myocardial replication of coxsackievirus was increased 530 times in nurslings which had been forced to swim. Myositis in hind limbs was more frequent, and inflammatory lesions in perirenal and pericardial fat were more severe in the mice which were forced to swim. When swimming was begun on the 9th day after infection, the virulence and lethality (13.8%) of infection were moderately increased.

  3. [Anaesthetic management of caesarean section in pregnancy with diabetes and hypertrophic myocardiopathy with restrictive diastolic dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Holgado, C M; Coves, S

    2013-02-01

    Haemodynamic changes that occur during pregnancy are maximal between 28 and 34 weeks. In the pregnant woman with several associated diseases, such as hypertensive myocardiopathy and pre-gestational diabetes, these changes can lead to a difficult control of pulmonary hypertension and acute pulmonary oedema. We report the case of a pregnant woman with long term type 1 diabetes mellitus who suffered pre-eclampsia in a previous pregnancy, and since then developed hypertensive cardiomyopathy. She was admitted at 30 week gestation for metabolic and blood pressure control, and developed congestive cardiac failure after the administration of betamethasone for foetal lung maturity. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed a non-dilated hypertrophic left ventricle with good systolic function, restrictive diastolic dysfunction and moderate pulmonary arterial hypertension. When her general condition improved, we performed a caesarean section under regional anaesthesia to prevent the complications of pulmonary and systemic hypertension. We present the anaesthetic management and resolution of complications after oxytocin administration.

  4. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  5. Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, James F.; Hernandez III, Luis O.

    2015-01-01

    Most clinicians associate ischemic colitis with elderly patients who have underlying cardiovascular comorbidities. While the majority of cases probably occur in this population, the disease can present in younger patients as a result of different risk factors, making the diagnosis challenging. While a majority of patients respond to medical management, surgery is required in approximately 20% of the cases and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. PMID:26034405

  6. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Nov 9,2016 Ischemic stroke accounts ... strokes. Read more about silent strokes . TIA and Stroke: Medical Emergencies When someone has shown symptoms of ...

  7. Recurrence of ANCA-associated vasculitis in a patient with kidney trasplant.

    PubMed

    García Cosmes, Pedro; Fraile Gómez, Pilar; Lewczuk, Kamil; Rodríguez González, Marta; Ruiz Ferreras, Elena; Tabernero Fernández, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Renal disease secondary to vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) can lead to chronic renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy. In these patients, kidney transplantation offers excellent long-term rates of allograft and patient survival; consequently, they can be trasplanted when the clinical disease activity has remitted. However, the risk of disease relapses in the renal allograft remains, although at lower rates due to modern immunosuppressive regimens. We describe the case of a male patient with extracapillary glomerulonephritis type III C-ANCA (+) who developed a recurrence in the renal allograft 8 years after transplantation. Intensive immunosupression with plasmapheresis controlled the disease.

  8. [Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive myocardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Espínola Zavaleta, N; Maribel Vogel, L; Isaac Tazar, J; Yánac Chávez, P; Romero Cárdenas, A; Vargas Barrón, J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of constrictive pericarditis (CP) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RC) and to compare them with the results obtained with cardiac catheterization. Clinical history, electrocardiogram and X-ray were taken in all patients, and transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography were performed. Cardiac catheterization with transmyocardial biopsy was performed on only 5 patients. Wall thickness and left ventricular dimensions were normal in all patients with CP. Wall thickness was increased in those with RC. No patients demonstrated alterations in segmental wall movement. The pericardium was thickened and abnormally bright in the 3 patients with CP. In patients with CP the percentage of atrioventricular, semilunar, pulmonary and hepatic flow changes with respiration were more than 10%. In patients with RC this flow variation was less notable. However, the percentage of systolic and diastolic flow velocity increase of hepatic veins during expiration was greater than in CP. We can conclude that M-mode, two dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is extremely useful noninvasive method to differentiate CP and RC with good correlation with cardiac catheterization.

  9. Lubiprostone induced ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Sherid, Muhammed; Sifuentes, Humberto; Samo, Salih; Deepak, Parakkal; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2013-01-14

    Ischemic colitis accounts for 6%-18% of the causes of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. It is often multifactorial and more commonly encountered in the elderly. Several medications have been implicated in the development of colonic ischemia. We report a case of a 54-year old woman who presented with a two-hour history of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and bloody stool. The patient had recently used lubiprostone with close temporal relationship between the increase in the dose and her symptoms of rectal bleeding. The radiologic, colonoscopic and histopathologic findings were all consistent with ischemic colitis. Her condition improved without any serious complications after the cessation of lubiprostone. This is the first reported case of ischemic colitis with a clear relationship with lubiprostone (Naranjo score of 10). Clinical vigilance for ischemic colitis is recommended for patients receiving lubiprostone who are presenting with abdominal pain and rectal bleeding.

  10. Ischemic Colitis Revealing Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Amira; Litaiem, Noureddine; Smiti Khanfir, M.; Ayadi, Sofiene; Nfoussi, Haifa; Houman, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is one of the most common intestinal ischemic injuries. It results from impaired perfusion of blood to the bowel and is rarely caused by vasculitis. We report a case of ischemic colitis revealing polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) in a 55-year-old man. Histological examination of the resected colon led to the diagnosis of PAN. PMID:24382967

  11. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  12. Ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2009-01-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is one of the major causes of blindness or seriously impaired vision, yet there is disagreement as to its pathogenesis, clinical features and especially its management. This is because ischemic optic neuropathy is not one disease but a spectrum of several different types, each with its own etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and management. They cannot be lumped together. Ischemic optic neuropathy is primarily of two types: anterior (AION) and posterior (PION), involving the optic nerve head (ONH) and the rest of the optic nerve respectively. Furthermore, both AION and PION have different subtypes. AION comprises arteritic (A-AION - due to giant cell arteritis) and, non-arteritic (NA-AION - due to causes other than giant cell arteritis); NA-AION can be further classified into classical NA-AION and incipient NA-AION. PION consists of arteritic (A-PION - due to giant cell arteritis), non-arteritic (NA-PION - due to causes other than giant cell arteritis), and surgical (a complication of several systemic surgical procedures). Thus, ischemic optic neuropathy consists of six distinct types of clinical entities. NA-AION is by far the most common type and one of the most prevalent and visually crippling diseases in the middle-aged and elderly. A-AION, though less common, is an ocular emergency and requires early diagnosis and immediate treatment with systemic high dose corticosteroids to prevent further visual loss, which is entirely preventable. Controversy exists regarding the pathogenesis, clinical features and especially management of the various types of ischemic optic neuropathy because there are multiple misconceptions about its many fundamental aspects. Recently emerging information on the various factors that influence the optic nerve circulation, and also the various systemic and local risk factors which play important roles in the development of various types of ischemic optic neuropathy have given us a better understanding of

  13. DRESS and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Cahyanur, Rahmat; Oktavia, Dina; Koesno, Sukamto

    2012-07-01

    DRESS (drug rash eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is a life threatening condition characterized by skin rash, fever, leucocytosis with eosinophilia or atypical lymphocytosis, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ involvement. This case report would like to describe an interesting case of DRESS coincidence with ischemic stroke. A 38 year old woman had been admitted with skin rash and fever since four days before. Four weeks before admission she received antibiotic and multivitamin for one week. The patient looked ill, with body temperature 38.0°C. Marked physical findings were cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. Dermatological examination finding was generalized exanthema. Laboratory evaluation showed leucocytosis, eosinophilia, and increased level of ALT and AST. During hospitalization the patient also suffered from ischemic stroke. Treatments administered in this patient were oxygen, adequate intravenous fluid, parenteral nutrition, methyl prednisolone, cethirizin bid, ranitidin bid, and antibiotic. The antibiotic treatment in this case was performed with graded challenge or test dosing.

  14. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  15. Ischemic mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Cristiano, Spadaccio; Nenna, Antonio; Chello, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic mitral prolapse (IMP) is a pathologic entity encountered in about one-third among the patients undergoing surgery for ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR). IMP is generally the result of a papillary muscle injury consequent to myocardial, but the recent literature is progressively unveiling a more complex pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying its development regards the impairment of one or more components of the mitral apparatus, which comprises the annulus, the chordae tendineae, the papillary muscle and the left ventricular wall. IMP is not only a disorder of valvular function, but also entails coexistent aspects of a geometric disturbance of the mitral valve configuration and of the left ventricular function and dimension and a correct understanding of all these aspects is crucial to guide and tailor the correct therapeutic strategy to be adopted. Localization of prolapse, anatomic features of the prolapsed leaflets and the subvalvular apparatus should be carefully evaluated as also constituting the major determinants defining patient’s outcomes. This review will summarize our current understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical evidence on IMP with a particular focus on the surgical treatment. PMID:28149574

  16. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  17. Preterm Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gopagondanahalli, Krishna Revanna; Li, Jingang; Fahey, Michael C.; Hunt, Rod W.; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic–ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic–ischemic injury (HII), its clinical course, monitoring, and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic–ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia–ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools, and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies. PMID:27812521

  18. Ischemic ulcers - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can cause ischemic wounds include: Diseases that cause inflammation, such as lupus High blood pressure High cholesterol levels Chronic kidney disease Blockage of the lymph vessels , which causes fluid ...

  19. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  20. [Antioxidant therapy in ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Suslina, Z A; Federova, T N; Maksimova, M Iu; Riasina, T V; Stvolinskiĭ, S L; Khrapova, E V; Boldyrev, A A

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of emoxipin, an antioxidant synthetic drug, for treatment of patients with ischemic disorders of cerebral circulation. The drug produced a beneficial clinical effect in patients with lacunar and cardioembolic strokes of moderate severity. Therapy with emoxipin increased endogenic antioxidant activity and improved a clinical status of the patients. The protective effect of carnosine was demonstrated in experimental acute hypobaric hypoxia and cerebral ischemia in rats. The results obtained permit to recommend an inclusion of both emoxipin and carnosine in a combined treatment of ischemic disorders of cerebral circulation.

  1. Arterial ischemic stroke in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bryer, Alan; Lucas, Sebastian; Stanley, Alan; Allain, Theresa J.; Joekes, Elizabeth; Emsley, Hedley; Turnbull, Ian; Downey, Colin; Toh, Cheng-Hock; Brown, Kevin; Brown, David; Ison, Catherine; Smith, Colin; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Nath, Avindra; Heyderman, Robert S.; Connor, Myles D.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection, and potentially its treatment, increases the risk of an arterial ischemic stroke. Multiple etiologies and lack of clear case definitions inhibit progress in this field. Several etiologies, many treatable, are relevant to HIV-related stroke. To fully understand the mechanisms and the terminology used, a robust classification algorithm to help ascribe the various etiologies is needed. This consensus paper considers the strengths and limitations of current case definitions in the context of HIV infection. The case definitions for the major etiologies in HIV-related strokes were refined (e.g., varicella zoster vasculopathy and antiphospholipid syndrome) and in some instances new case definitions were described (e.g., HIV-associated vasculopathy). These case definitions provided a framework for an algorithm to help assign a final diagnosis, and help classify the subtypes of HIV etiology in ischemic stroke. PMID:27386505

  2. Renalase protects against ischemic AKI.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Thomas; Kim, Joo Yun; Kim, Mihwa; Wang, Peili; Tang, Lieqi; Baroni, Sara; D'Agati, Vivette D; Desir, Gary V

    2013-02-01

    Elevated levels of plasma catecholamines accompany ischemic AKI, possibly contributing the inflammatory response. Renalase, an amine oxidase secreted by the proximal tubule, degrades circulating catecholamines and reduces myocardial necrosis, suggesting that it may protect against renal ischemia reperfusion injury. Here, mice subjected to renal ischemia reperfusion injury had significantly lower levels of renalase in the plasma and kidney compared with sham-operated mice. Consistent with this, plasma NE levels increased significantly after renal ischemia reperfusion injury. Furthermore, renal tubular inflammation, necrosis, and apoptosis were more severe and plasma catecholamine levels were higher in renalase-deficient mice subjected to renal ischemia reperfusion compared with wild-type mice. Administration of recombinant human renalase reduced plasma catecholamine levels and ameliorated ischemic AKI in wild-type mice. Taken together, these data suggest that renalase protects against ischemic AKI by reducing renal tubular necrosis, apoptosis, and inflammation, and that plasma renalase might be a biomarker for AKI. Recombinant renalase therapy may have potential for the prevention and treatment of AKI.

  3. Hyperspectral imaging of ischemic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyawali, Surya C.; Elgharably, Haytham; Melvin, James; Huang, Kun; Bergdall, Valerie; Allen, David W.; Hwang, Jeeseong; Litorja, Maritoni; Shirley, Eric; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    Optical imaging has the potential to achieve high spatial resolution and high functional sensitivity in wound assessment. However, clinical acceptance of many optical imaging devices is hampered by poor reproducibility, low accuracy, and lack of biological interpretation. We developed an in vivo model of ischemic flap for non-contact assessment of wound tissue functional parameters and spectral characteristics. The model was created by elevating the bipedicle skin flaps of a domestic pig from the underlying vascular bed and inhibiting graft bed reperfusion by a silastic sheet. Hyperspectral imaging was carried out on the ischemic flap model and compared with transcutaneous oxygen tension and perfusion measurements at different positions of the wound. Hyperspectral images have also been captured continuously during a post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) procedure. Tissue spectral characteristics obtained by hyperspectral imaging correlated well with cutaneous tissue oxygen tension, blood perfusion, and microscopic changes of tissue morphology. Our experiments not only demonstrated the technical feasibility for quantitative assessment of chronic wound but also provided a potential digital phantom platform for quantitative characterization and calibration of medical optical devices.

  4. Erythropoietin: Powerful Protection of Ischemic and Post-Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh Q.; Cherry, Brandon H.; Scott, Gary F.; Ryou, Myoung-Gwi; Mallet, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury inflicted by stroke and cardiac arrest ranks among the leading causes of death and long-term disability in the United States. The brain consumes large amounts of metabolic substrates and oxygen to sustain its energy requirements. Consequently, the brain is exquisitely sensitive to interruptions in its blood supply, and suffers irreversible damage after 10–15 minutes of severe ischemia. Effective treatments to protect the brain from stroke and cardiac arrest have proven elusive, due to the complexities of the injury cascades ignited by ischemia and reperfusion. Although recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and therapeutic hypothermia have proven efficacious for stroke and cardiac arrest, respectively, these treatments are constrained by narrow therapeutic windows, potentially detrimental side effects and the limited availability of hypothermia equipment. Mounting evidence demonstrates the cytokine hormone erythropoietin (EPO) to be a powerful neuroprotective agent and a potential adjuvant to established therapies. Classically, EPO originating primarily in the kidneys promotes erythrocyte production by suppressing apoptosis of proerythroid progenitors in bone marrow. However, the brain is capable of producing EPO, and EPO’s membrane receptors and signaling components also are expressed in neurons and astrocytes. EPO activates signaling cascades that increase the brain’s resistance to ischemia-reperfusion stress by stabilizing mitochondrial membranes, limiting formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates, and suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production and neutrophil infiltration. Collectively, these mechanisms preserve functional brain tissue and, thus, improve neurocognitive recovery from brain ischemia. This article reviews the mechanisms mediating EPO-induced brain protection, critiques the clinical utility of exogenous EPO to preserve brain threatened by ischemic stroke and cardiac arrest, and discusses the

  5. Histopathologic studies of ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, D L; Kerrison, J B; Green, W R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define the histopathologic features of eyes in which a pathologic diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy had been made in the years 1951 through 1998. METHODS: The following data were documented: age of patient, race, sex, source of tissue, cause of death, clinical history, interval from loss of vision to death, enucleation, exenteration, and biopsy. The histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy were the presence of localized ischemic edema, cavernous degeneration, or an area of atrophy located superior or inferior in the optic nerve. Cases with history of abrupt loss of vision were combined with reports from the literature to construct a time table of histopathologic features and associated conditions. RESULTS: Ischemic optic neuropathy was present in 193 eyes. There were 88 females and 65 males. The average age was 71.6 years. Ischemic edema without (early) and with (later) gitter macrophages was present in 26 (13.5%). Cavernous degeneration was present in 69 nerves (36%). Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) was present in 37 cavernous lesions 1 month or longer after loss of vision. Cavernous lesions were seen in 3 eyes in which peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer hemorrhage had been observed prior to death. Atrophic lesions, the most common pattern, were observed in 133 optic nerves (66.8%). More than 1 ischemic lesion was seen in 38 optic nerves (19.7%). Bilateral ischemic lesions were seen in 50 (35.2%) of 142 paired eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Ischemic optic nerve lesions are initially acellular and later show macrophage infiltration. Cavernous lesions with MPS are present 4 weeks or longer after vision loss. The location of MPS posteriorly and along the internal margin suggests that MPS is produced at the edges of lesions. Progressive vision loss in ischemic optic neuropathy may be secondary to compression of intact nerve from ischemic edema and cavernous swelling, or a second ischemic lesion. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5

  6. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-03-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation.

  7. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K.; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation. PMID:25613166

  8. Ischemic brain injury in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    van Veluw, Susanne J; Greenberg, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a common form of cerebral small vessel disease and an important risk factor for intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment. While the majority of research has focused on the hemorrhagic manifestation of CAA, its ischemic manifestations appear to have substantial clinical relevance as well. Findings from imaging and pathologic studies indicate that ischemic lesions are common in CAA, including white-matter hyperintensities, microinfarcts, and microstructural tissue abnormalities as detected with diffusion tensor imaging. Furthermore, imaging markers of ischemic disease show a robust association with cognition, independent of age, hemorrhagic lesions, and traditional vascular risk factors. Widespread ischemic tissue injury may affect cognition by disrupting white-matter connectivity, thereby hampering communication between brain regions. Challenges are to identify imaging markers that are able to capture widespread microvascular lesion burden in vivo and to further unravel the etiology of ischemic tissue injury by linking structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities to their underlying pathophysiology and histopathology. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of ischemic brain injury in CAA will be a key step toward new interventions to improve long-term cognitive outcomes for patients with CAA. PMID:25944592

  9. [Ocular ischemic syndrome--a case report].

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Avram, Corina Ioana; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Stamate, Alina Cristina; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara

    2013-01-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome, also known as hypoperfusion/ hypotensive retinopathy or as ischemic oculopathy is a rare ocular disease determined by chronic arterial hypoperfusion through central retinal artery, posterior and anterior ciliary arteries. It is bilateral in 20% of the cases. Most often it appears due to severe occlusion of the carotid arteries (ICA, MCA>ECA), described in 1963 by Kearns and Hollenhorst. Occasionally it can be determined by the obstruction of ophtalmic artery or some arterities (Takayasu, giant cell arteritis). The risk factors are: age between 50-80 years, males (M:F = 2:1), arterial hypertension, diabetes, coronary diseases (5% of the cases develop ocular ischemic syndrome), vascular stroke, hemodialysis. The case we present is of an 63 years old man known with primary arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes type 2 non insulin dependent and diagnosticated with ischemic cerebral stroke and bilateral obstruction of internal carotid arteries in march 2010, who is presenting for visual impairment in both eyes. The imaging investigations show important carotid occlusion and at the ophthalmologic evaluation there are ocular hypertension and rubeosis iridis at the right eye, optic atrophy at both eyes (complete in the right eye and partial in the left eye), with superior altitudinal visual field defect in left eye. The following diagnosis was established: Chronic ocular ischemic syndrome in both eyes with Neovascular glaucoma at the right eye, Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy at the left eye and laser panphotocoagulation at the right eye was started.

  10. Radionuclide imaging in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Wolf-Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused by interruption or significant impairment of blood supply to the brain, which leads to a cascade of metabolic and molecular alterations resulting in functional disturbance and morphologic damage. The changes in regional cerebral blood flow and regional metabolism can be assessed by radionuclide imaging, especially SPECT and PET. SPECT and PET have broadened our understanding of flow and metabolic thresholds critical for maintenance of brain function and morphology: PET was essential in the transfer of the concept of the penumbra to clinical stroke and thereby had a great impact on developing treatment strategies. Receptor ligands can be applied as early markers of irreversible neuronal damage and can predict the size of the final infarcts, which is important for decisions on invasive therapy in large ("malignant") infarction. With SPECT and PET, the reserve capacity of the blood supply can be tested in obstructive arteriosclerosis, which is essential for planning interventions. The effect of a stroke on surrounding and contralateral primarily unaffected tissue can be investigated, helping to understand symptoms caused by disturbance in functional networks. Activation studies are useful to demonstrate alternative pathways to compensate for lesions and to test the effect of rehabilitative therapy. Radioisotope studies help to detect neuroinflammation and its effect on extension of tissue damage. Despite the limitations of broad clinical application of radionuclide imaging, this technology has a great impact on research in cerebrovascular diseases and still has various applications in the management of stroke.

  11. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lei-Lei; Dong, Yan-Min; Zong, Yao; Zheng, Qi-Shan; Fu, Yue; Yuan, Yong-Guang; Huang, Xia; Qian, Garrett; Gao, Qian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26) and non-ischemic (n=24) groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively) were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%), instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%), showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5%) in the contralateral eyes (P<0.05). The oxygen saturations of the central vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO. PMID:26949618

  12. Genetic Predisposition to Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kamatani, Yoichiro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Hata, Jun; Furukawa, Ryohei; Shiwa, Yuh; Yamaji, Taiki; Hara, Megumi; Tanno, Kozo; Ohmomo, Hideki; Ono, Kanako; Takashima, Naoyuki; Matsuda, Koichi; Wakai, Kenji; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Ago, Tetsuro; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Fukushima, Akimune; Hozawa, Atsushi; Minegishi, Naoko; Satoh, Mamoru; Endo, Ryujin; Sasaki, Makoto; Sakata, Kiyomi; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Hitomi, Jiro; Kita, Yoshikuni; Tanaka, Keitaro; Iso, Hiroyasu; Kitazono, Takanari; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sobue, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— The prediction of genetic predispositions to ischemic stroke (IS) may allow the identification of individuals at elevated risk and thereby prevent IS in clinical practice. Previously developed weighted multilocus genetic risk scores showed limited predictive ability for IS. Here, we investigated the predictive ability of a newer method, polygenic risk score (polyGRS), based on the idea that a few strong signals, as well as several weaker signals, can be collectively informative to determine IS risk. Methods— We genotyped 13 214 Japanese individuals with IS and 26 470 controls (derivation samples) and generated both multilocus genetic risk scores and polyGRS, using the same derivation data set. The predictive abilities of each scoring system were then assessed using 2 independent sets of Japanese samples (KyushuU and JPJM data sets). Results— In both validation data sets, polyGRS was shown to be significantly associated with IS, but weighted multilocus genetic risk scores was not. Comparing the highest with the lowest polyGRS quintile, the odds ratios for IS were 1.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.33–2.31) and 1.99 (95% confidence interval, 1.19–3.33) in the KyushuU and JPJM samples, respectively. Using the KyushuU samples, the addition of polyGRS to a nongenetic risk model resulted in a significant improvement of the predictive ability (net reclassification improvement=0.151; P<0.001). Conclusions— The polyGRS was shown to be superior to weighted multilocus genetic risk scores as an IS prediction model. Thus, together with the nongenetic risk factors, polyGRS will provide valuable information for individual risk assessment and management of modifiable risk factors. PMID:28034966

  13. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  14. Mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Mohebali, Jahan; Chen, Frederick Y

    2015-05-01

    Mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral valve regurgitation remains controversial. In moderate mitral regurgitation (MR), controversy exists whether revascularization alone will be adequate to restore native valve geometry or whether intervention on the valve (repair) should be performed concomitantly. When MR is severe, the need for valve intervention is not disputed. Rather, the controversy is whether repair versus replacement should be undertaken. In contrast to degenerative or myxomatous disease that directly affects leaflet integrity and morphology, ischemic FMR results from a distortion and dilation of native ventricular geometry that normally supports normal leaflet coaptation. To address this, the first and most crucial step in successful valve repair is placement of an undersized, complete remodeling annuloplasty ring to restore the annulus to its native geometry. The following article outlines the steps for repair of ischemic mitral regurgitation.

  15. Spectroscopic monitoring of kidney tissue ischemic injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Jason T.; Michalopoulou, Andromachi P.; Troppmann, Christoph; Demos, Stavros G.

    2004-07-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of tissue viability of donor kidneys used for transplantation is an issue that current technology is not able to address. In this work, we explore optical spectroscopy for its potential to assess the degree of ischemic damage in kidney tissue. We hypothesized that ischemic damage to kidney tissue will give rise to changes in its optical properties which in turn may be used to asses the degree of tissue injury. The experimental results demonstrate that the autofluorescence intensity of the injured kidney is decreasing as a function of time exposed to ischemic injury. Changes were also observed in the NIR light scattering intensities most probably arising from changes due to injury and death of the tissue.

  16. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Kidney Tissue Ischemic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Fitzgerald, J T; Michalopoulou, A P; Troppmann, C

    2004-03-11

    Noninvasive evaluation of tissue viability of donor kidneys used for transplantation is an issue that current technology is not able to address. In this work, we explore optical spectroscopy for its potential to assess the degree of ischemic damage in kidney tissue. We hypothesized that ischemic damage to kidney tissue will give rise to changes in its optical properties which in turn may be used to asses the degree of tissue injury. The experimental results demonstrate that the autofluorescence intensity of the injured kidney is decreasing as a function of time exposed to ischemic injury. Changes were also observed in the NIR light scattering intensities most probably arising from changes due to injury and death of the tissue.

  17. Drug Delivery to the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia occurs when blood flow to the brain is insufficient to meet metabolic demand. This can result from cerebral artery occlusion that interrupts blood flow, limits CNS supply of oxygen and glucose, and causes an infarction/ischemic stroke. Ischemia initiates a cascade of molecular events inneurons and cerebrovascular endothelial cells including energy depletion, dissipation of ion gradients, calcium overload, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, and accumulation of ions and fluid. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with cerebral ischemia and leads to vasogenic edema, a primary cause of stroke-associated mortality. To date, only a single drug has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for acute ischemic stroke treatment, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). While rt-PA therapy restores perfusion to ischemic brain, considerable tissue damage occurs when cerebral blood flow is re-established. Therefore, there is a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can “rescue” salvageable brain tissue and/or protect BBB integrity during ischemic stroke. One class of drugs that may enable neural cell rescue following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins). Understanding potential CNS drug delivery pathways for statins is critical to their utility in ischemic stroke. Here, we review molecular pathways associated with cerebral ischemia and novel approaches for delivering drugs to treat ischemic disease. Specifically, we discuss utility of endogenous BBB drug uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs/Oatps) and nanotechnology-based carriers for optimization of CNS drug delivery. Overall, this chapter highlights state-of-the-art technologies that may improve pharmacotherapy of cerebral ischemia. PMID:25307217

  18. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever.

  19. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever. PMID:27843231

  20. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  1. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir; Khoury, Tawfik

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk.

  2. Luxury perfusion following anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Friedland, S; Winterkorn, J M; Burde, R M

    1996-09-01

    We present five patients who developed luxury perfusion following anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in whom fluorescein angiography was misinterpreted as "capillary hemangioma" or neovascularization of the disc. In each case, the segment of disc hyperemia corresponded to a spared region of visual field. Luxury perfusion represents a reparative autoregulatory reaction to ischemia.

  3. Pathways for ischemic cytoprotection: Role of sirtuins in caloric restriction, resveratrol, and ischemic preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kahlilia C; Lin, Hung Wen; Thompson, John W; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), resveratrol, and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) have been shown to promote protection against ischemic injury in the heart and brain, as well as in other tissues. The activity of sirtuins, which are enzymes that modulate diverse biologic processes, seems to be vital in the ability of these therapeutic modalities to prevent against cellular dysfunction and death. The protective mechanisms of the yeast Sir2 and the mammalian homolog sirtuin 1 have been extensively studied, but the involvement of other sirtuins in ischemic protection is not yet clear. We examine the roles of mammalian sirtuins in modulating protective pathways against oxidative stress, energy depletion, excitotoxicity, inflammation, DNA damage, and apoptosis. Although many of these sirtuins have not been directly implicated in ischemic protection, they may have unique roles in enhancing function and preventing against stress-mediated cellular damage and death. This review will include in-depth analyses of the roles of CR, resveratrol, and IPC in activating sirtuins and in mediating protection against ischemic damage in the heart and brain. PMID:21224864

  4. Cost and Outcome in Pediatric Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, William; Huang, Haijuan; Seiber, Eric; Lo, Warren

    2015-10-01

    The cost of childhood stroke receives little notice. The authors examined potential drivers of cost and outcome to test whether (1) neonatal strokes cost less than childhood strokes, (2) associated diseases influence cost, (3) arterial ischemic stroke is more costly than sinovenous thrombosis, and (4) cost correlates with outcome. The authors reviewed records of 111 children who sustained arterial ischemic stroke or sinovenous thrombosis between 2005 and 2010 to identify costs for the following year. They assessed outcomes in 46 with the Recovery and Recurrence Questionnaire and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Neonatal strokes cost less than childhood stroke. Strokes associated with congenital heart disease or vasculopathy cost the most, while perinatal or idiopathic strokes cost the least. Higher costs are correlated with worse impairment and poorer quality of life. Stroke etiology significantly influences the cost of pediatric stroke. Future cost-benefit studies must consider etiology when estimating the incremental costs associated with stroke.

  5. Aspirin resistant patients with recent ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Navas-Alcántara, M S; Fernández-Moreno, M C

    2014-04-01

    Some patients with a recent ischemic stroke who are being treated with aspirin as an antiaggregant suffer a new ischemic stroke. These patients (15-25%) have been called unresponsive to aspirin or aspirin resistant. The aspirin-resistant patients have a four-time greater risk of suffering a stroke. Furthermore, these strokes are generally more severe, with increased infarct volume and greater risk of recurrence. There is currently no ideal laboratory test to detect the resistance to the antiaggregant effect of aspirin. The study of resistance to aspirin would only be indicated in selected cases. In these patients, one should first rule out any "pseudo-resistance" to aspirin (lack of compliance, concomitant treatments that interfere with the action of the aspirin).

  6. Isolated naratriptan-associated ischemic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Nissan, George; Chaudhry, Priyanka; Rangasamy, Priya; Mudrovich, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report a 41-year-old woman who developed histology- and colonoscopy-proven ischemic colitis with the use of naratriptan not exceeding the maximum 2 doses a day and 3 days per week and without a known medical or cardiovascular history. By exclusion of other causes of colonic ischemia, naratriptan was considered the sole causal agent. Discontinuation of naratriptan resulted in a complete clinical recovery. To date, our patient is the youngest known patient to develop ischemic colitis on isolated naratriptan in the setting of no known medical risk factors or predisposing medical condition. Even though triptans are commonly used for the abortive treatment of migraine headaches, such a reported side effect is rare; however, careful assessment and individual patient-based treatment is advised. PMID:27695179

  7. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Cong; Ju, Wei-na; Jin, Hang; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In this review, we

  8. Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in the Term Infant

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Ali; Wilson, Mary Ann; Johnston, Michael V.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Hypoxia-ischemia in the perinatal period is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated disabilities in children. There has been significant research progress in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy over the last two decades and many new molecular mechanisms have been identified. Despite all these advances, therapeutic interventions are still limited. In this review paper, we discuss a number of molecular pathways involved in hypoxia-ischemia, and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:19944838

  9. Hydrophilic Polymer-associated Ischemic Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Jesus A; Chen, Wei; Frankel, Wendy L; Arnold, Christina A

    2017-02-01

    Hydrophilic polymer coating of medical devices serves to lubricate the device and prevent device-related complications. The coating can be mechanically disrupted and result in downstream injury via presumed thromboembolism. This process has been reported in the brain, heart, lung, and skin, and has been replicated through animal studies and in vitro histologic processing of the polymer coating. We report the first description of hydrophilic polymer-associated ischemic enterocolitis in a series of 7 specimens (small bowel=2, colon=4, aortic thrombus=1) from 3 patients. We report a 4% incidence among all patients with an ischemic bowel resection between April 29, 2014 and August 8, 2016. All patients developed bowel ischemia within 1 day of aortic repair, and all bowel resection specimens showed polymers, mainly in the submucosal vessels in areas of extensive ischemia. The polymers appeared as basophilic, intravascular, serpiginous structures. In a patient who developed acute paralysis after the aortic repair, identical polymers were identified in the aortic thrombus and the ischemic bowel segment. We demonstrate that the polymers display an altered morphology over time and with various graft types, and that the degrading polymers are associated with a foreign body giant cell reaction. Special stains can aid in diagnosis, with the polymers turquoise on a colloidal iron stain, pink on von Kossa and mucicarmine stains, and pale blue on trichrome. Clinical follow-up was available up to 115 weeks: 1 patient died, and 2 are alive and well. In summary, we report a new diagnostic entity to be considered in the differential diagnosis of iatrogenic ischemic injuries in the gastrointestinal tract. Awareness of this entity is important to elucidate the cause of ischemia and to prevent misdiagnosis of the polymers and their associated giant cell reaction as a parasitic infection, granulomatous vasculitis, sarcoidosis, and idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Ischemic Colitis in an Endurance Runner

    PubMed Central

    Grames, Chase; Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S.

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old female running the Marine Corps Marathon developed diarrhea at mile 12. After finishing the race she noted that she was covered in bloody stool. A local emergency department suspected ischemic colitis. After discharge, her primary care physician instructed her to discontinue the use of all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Her symptoms resolved and she returned to running without any complications. This paper describes the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and management options. PMID:23091744

  11. White matter injury in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Gang; Hong, Dandan; Chen, Fenghua; Ji, Xunming; Cao, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability and mortality worldwide. It is well known that ischemic stroke can cause gray matter injury. However, stroke also elicits profound white matter injury, a risk factor for higher stroke incidence and poor neurological outcomes. The majority of damage caused by stroke is located in subcortical regions and, remarkably, white matter occupies nearly half of the average infarct volume. Indeed, white matter is exquisitely vulnerable to ischemia and is often injured more severely than gray matter. Clinical symptoms related to white matter injury include cognitive dysfunction, emotional disorders, sensorimotor impairments, as well as urinary incontinence and pain, all of which are closely associated with destruction and remodeling of white matter connectivity. White matter injury can be noninvasively detected by MRI, which provides a three-dimensional assessment of its morphology, metabolism, and function. There is an urgent need for novel white matter therapies, as currently available strategies are limited to preclinical animal studies. Optimal protection against ischemic stroke will need to encompass the fortification of both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss white matter injury after ischemic stroke, focusing on clinical features and tools, such as imaging, manifestation, and potential treatments. We also briefly discuss the pathophysiology of WMI and future research directions.

  12. Neurovascular Regulation in the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The brain has high energetic requirements and is therefore highly dependent on adequate cerebral blood supply. To compensate for dangerous fluctuations in cerebral perfusion, the circulation of the brain has evolved intrinsic safeguarding measures. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: The vascular network of the brain incorporates a high degree of redundancy, allowing the redirection and redistribution of blood flow in the event of vascular occlusion. Furthermore, active responses such as cerebral autoregulation, which acts to maintain constant cerebral blood flow in response to changing blood pressure, and functional hyperemia, which couples blood supply with synaptic activity, allow the brain to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion in the face of varying supply or demand. In the presence of stroke risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes, these protective processes are impaired and the susceptibility of the brain to ischemic injury is increased. One potential mechanism for the increased injury is that collateral flow arising from the normally perfused brain and supplying blood flow to the ischemic region is suppressed, resulting in more severe ischemia. Future Directions: Approaches to support collateral flow may ameliorate the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia by rescuing cerebral perfusion in potentially viable regions of the ischemic territory. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 149–160. PMID:24328757

  13. [Ischemic stroke in the young adult].

    PubMed

    Calvet, D

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is not rare in young adults since one in ten stroke patients are less than 50 years old. This incidence increased over the past last years, mainly due to the rise in the prevalence of traditional vascular risk factors in this sub-group of age but also of illegal drug use. Even though both survival and functional outcome of young stroke patients are better than those observed in older patients, socio-economic and quality of life consequences make this disease a main objective in terms of primary and secondary prevention. Identifying the cause of ischemic stroke in young adults is of major importance to prevent stroke recurrence. However, given the wide variety of potential underlying causes, the etiologic work-up of stroke in young adults requires a different approach from that in the elderly. In this context, a sequential diagnostic work-up is needed in order to optimize the yield of diagnostic tests, to reduce their cost and risks for the patient. Arterial dissection is the most frequent cause of stroke in young adults but other less frequent causes are numerous. Despite a comprehensive work-up, about one third of cases remains unexplained leading to the diagnosis of cryptogenic ischemic stroke.

  14. Applicability of biomarkers in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Mar; Serena, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia results in the activation of a cascade of molecular events as a result of which several substances with the potential characteristics of biomarkers are released into the peripheral blood. Although still in the research phase, the analysis of these biomarkers in the serum has proved to be useful for stroke diagnosis, as well as for the prediction of the evolution of the ischemic lesion and the clinical prognosis. In fact, the feasibility and applicability of a panel of biomarkers for the diagnosis of stroke has recently been tested. Biomarkers of excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress have been demonstrated as being useful in the prediction of ischemic lesion enlargement and secondary neurological deterioration. On the other hand, biomarkers of endothelial damage have been shown to be especially helpful in the prediction of hemorrhagic transformation of the ischemic lesion, both spontaneously and after the administration of thrombolytic therapy, as well as in the prediction of brain edema with the secondary development of malignant middle-cerebral-artery infarction. Moreover, coagulation and fibrinolytic-cascade markers have been reported as being correlated with the recanalization rate after the administration of thrombolysis, and they might therefore be useful in estimating the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy. However, for these biomarkers to become applicable to routine clinical practice, faster tests to perform the analyses are required and further studies must be undertaken to validate and generalize the results.

  15. Cardioprotection by remote ischemic conditioning: Mechanisms and clinical evidences

    PubMed Central

    Aimo, Alberto; Borrelli, Chiara; Giannoni, Alberto; Pastormerlo, Luigi Emilio; Barison, Andrea; Mirizzi, Gianluca; Emdin, Michele; Passino, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC), several cycles of ischemia and reperfusion render distant organ and tissues more resistant to the ischemia-reperfusion injury. The intermittent ischemia can be applied before the ischemic insult in the target site (remote ischemic preconditioning), during the ischemic insult (remote ischemic perconditioning) or at the onset of reperfusion (remote ischemic postconditioning). The mechanisms of RIC have not been completely defined yet; however, these mechanisms must be represented by the release of humoral mediators and/or the activation of a neural reflex. RIC has been discovered in the heart, and has been arising great enthusiasm in the cardiovascular field. Its efficacy has been evaluated in many clinical trials, which provided controversial results. Our incomplete comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the RIC could be impairing the design of clinical trials and the interpretation of their results. In the present review we summarize current knowledge about RIC pathophysiology and the data about its cardioprotective efficacy. PMID:26516416

  16. Arterial Spin Label Imaging of Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Since acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are fundamentally disruptions of brain hemodynamics, neuroimaging of brain perfusion might be expected to be of clinical utility. Recently, a noncontrast method of measuring CBF using arterial spin labeling (ASL) has become feasible in the clinical setting. It has advantages when compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) bolus contrast perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) that include lack of exposure to gadolinium-based contrast materials, improved quantitation, and decreased sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and motion. Drawbacks of ASL include reduced signal-to-noise (SNR) and high sensitivity to arterial transit delays. While deleterious for quantitative perfusion measurements, the sensitivity of ASL to late arriving blood can be beneficial to visualize collateral flow. This chapter will discuss ASL imaging findings in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke and TIA, focusing on typical appearances, common artifacts, and comparisons with bolus contrast PWI. PMID:21640300

  17. New Treatments for Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Foroozan, Rod

    2017-02-01

    Despite increasing knowledge about the risk factors and clinical findings of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), the treatment of this optic neuropathy has remained limited and without clear evidence-based benefit. Historical treatments of NAION are reviewed, beginning with the Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Decompression Trial. More recent treatments are placed within the historical context and illustrate the need for evidence-based therapy for ischemic optic neuropathy.

  18. Ischemic postconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury by up-regulation of acid-sensing ion channel 2a

    PubMed Central

    Duanmu, Wang-sheng; Cao, Liu; Chen, Jing-yu; Ge, Hong-fei; Hu, Rong; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning renders brain tissue tolerant to brain ischemia, thereby alleviating ischemic brain injury. However, the exact mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study, a rat model of global brain ischemia was subjected to ischemic postconditioning treatment using the vessel occlusion method. After 2 hours of ischemia, the bilateral common carotid arteries were blocked immediately for 10 seconds and then perfused for 10 seconds. This procedure was repeated six times. Ischemic postconditioning was found to mitigate hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage in rats with brain ischemia, and up-regulate acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression at the mRNA and protein level. These findings suggest that ischemic postconditioning up-regulates acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression in the rat hippocampus after global brain ischemia, which promotes neuronal tolerance to ischemic brain injury. PMID:27212927

  19. Myocardial Ischemic Memory Imaging With Molecular Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Flordeliza S.; Lu, Erxiong; Bowry, Shivani; Kilic, Sevgi; Tom, Eric; Wang, Jianjun; Gretton, Joan; Pacella, John J.; Wagner, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosing acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting with chest discomfort is a challenge. Because acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion is associated with endothelial upregulation of leukocyte adhesion molecules, which persist even after ischemia has resolved, we hypothesized that microbubbles designed to adhere to endothelial selectins would permit echocardiographic identification of recently ischemic myocardium. Methods and Results Lipid microbubbles (diameter, 3.3±1.7 μm) were synthesized. The selectin ligand sialyl Lewisx was conjugated to the microbubble surface (MBsLex). Control bubbles (MBCTL) bore surface Lewisx or sialyl Lewisc. Intravital microscopy of mouse cremaster muscle was performed after intravenous injection of MBsLex (n=11) or MBCTL (n=9) with or without prior intrascrotal tumor necrosis factor–α. There was greater adhesion of MBsLex to inflamed versus noninflamed endothelium (P=0.0081). Rats (n=12) underwent 15 minutes of anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. After 30 minutes and 1 hour of reperfusion, high-mechanical-index nonlinear echocardiographic imaging was performed in which single frames were acquired at 3.5 and 4 minutes after intravenous injection of MBsLex or MBCTL. Video intensity at 4 minutes was subtracted from that at 3.5 minutes to derive target-specific acoustic signal. MBsLex caused greater opacification in postischemic versus nonischemic myocardium at both time points (P≤0.002). Immunostaining confirmed endothelial P-selectin expression in the ischemic bed. Conclusions Echocardiographic identification of recently ischemic myocardium is possible using ultrasound contrast agents targeted to selectins. This may offer a new approach to the more timely and precise diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting with chest pain of uncertain cardiac origin. PMID:17210843

  20. Ischemic preconditioning. Experimental facts and clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Post, H; Heusch, G

    2002-12-01

    Brief periods of non-lethal ischemia and reperfusion render the myocardium more resistant to subsequent ischemia. This adaption occurs in a biphasic pattern: the first being active immediately and lasting for 2-3 hrs (early preconditioning), the second starting at 24 hrs until 72 hrs after the initial ischemia (delayed preconditioning) and requiring genomic activation with de novo protein synthesis. Early preconditioning is more potent than delayed preconditioning in reducing infarct size; delayed preconditioning also attenuates myocardial stunning. Early preconditioning depends on the ischemia-induced release of adenosine and opioids and, to a lesser degree, also bradykinin and prostaglandins. These molecules activate G-protein coupled receptors, initiate the activation of KATP channels and generation of oxygen radicals, and stimulate a series of protein kinases with essential roles for protein kinase C, tyrosine kinases and members of the MAP kinase family. Delayed preconditioning is triggered by a similar sequence of events, but in addition essentially depends on eNOS-derived NO. Both early and pharmacological preconditioning can be pharmacologically mimicked by exogenous adenosine, opioids, NO and activators of protein kinase C. Newly synthetized proteins associated with delayed preconditioning comprise iNOS, COX-2, manganese superoxide dismutase and possibly heat shock proteins. The final mechanism of protection by preconditioning is yet unknown; energy metabolism, KATP channels, the sodium-proton exchanger, stabilisation of the cytoskeleton and volume regulation will be discussed. For ethical reasons, evidence for ischemic preconditioning in humans is hard to provide. Clinical findings that parallel experimental ischemic preconditioning are reduced ST-segment elevation and pain during repetitive PTCA or exercise tests, a better prognosis of patients in whom myocardial infarction was preceded by angina, and reduced serum markers of myocardial necrosis after

  1. [Pulmonary function in chronic ischemic cardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez Guerra, M L; Gómez González, A; Fernández Bonetti, P; Martínez Ríos, M A

    1983-01-01

    Twenty patients with heart disease were prospectively studied. Seven of them had an old myocardial infarction and thirteen, ischemic symptoms without infarction. Pulmonary function was studied focusing on small airway disease and gas exchange abnormalities. Our results showed that a mild degree of abnormality exists as reflected by bronchial obstruction with origin in small airways, V/Q disturbed and hypoxemia. In 88% these seem to be related to left ventricular disfunction. Twenty four hours after pulmonary function test all patients underwent left heart catheterization with coronarography and ventriculography.

  2. Ischemic cardiac complications following G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Peter M; Bertog, Stefan C; Wilson, Robert F; Henry, Timothy D

    2010-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly used in bone marrow transplant donors to increase the number of circulating progenitor cells. G-CSF has also been studied following myocardial infarction, but concern has been raised about the risks of G-CSF administration in patients with coronary artery disease. We present two cases of ischemic cardiac complications that are likely to be related to administration of G-CSF and provide a contemporary overview of the literature on the cardiovascular risks of G-CSF.

  3. Fyn in Neurodevelopment and Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Renatta; Jiang, Xiangning

    2016-01-01

    The Src Family kinases (SFKs) are nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases that are implicated in many normal and pathological processes in the nervous system. The SFKs Fyn, Src, Yes, Lyn and Lck are expressed in the brain. This review will focus on Fyn, as Fyn mutant mice have striking phenotypes in the brain and Fyn has been shown to be involved in ischemic brain injury in adult rodents, and with our work, in neonatal animals. An understanding of Fyn’s role in neurodevelopment and disease will allow researchers to target pathological pathways while preserving protective ones. PMID:25720756

  4. Ischemic Neuropathy Associated with Livedoid Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee-Eun; Park, Su-Yeon; Sinn, Dong In; Kim, Sung-Min; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Park, Kyung Seok; Lee, Kwang-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Background Livedoid vasculitis is a chronic dermatological problem with an unclear etiology. Clinical findings are petechiae with painful ulcers in both lower extremities, which heal to become hyperpigmented and porcelain-white satellite lesions. There are only a few reported cases of livedoid vasculitis presenting in combination with peripheral neuropathy. Case Report We report the first case of a Korean patient presenting with mononeuritis multiplex combined with livedoid vasculitis, which was confirmed by electrophysiological and pathological studies. Conclusions Our report supports the possible vaso-occlusive etiology of livedoid vasculitis in multifocal ischemic neuropathy. PMID:22259622

  5. Screening for coagulation disorders in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    de Lau, Lonneke Ml; Leebeek, Frank Wg; de Maat, Moniek Pm; Koudstaal, Peter J; Dippel, Diederik Wj

    2010-08-01

    The role of coagulation disorders in the pathogenesis of (recurrent) ischemic stroke is uncertain. Therefore, the clinical utility of screening patients with ischemic stroke for these conditions and the therapeutic implications of a detected coagulation disorder in a patient who experienced ischemic stroke are uncertain. We reviewed the currently available data on the relationship between various inherited and acquired coagulation abnormalities (factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations, deficiencies of protein C, protein S and anti-thrombin, hyperhomocysteinemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and increased levels of fibrinogen) and ischemic stroke. Based on the existing evidence we discuss the usefulness of screening stroke patients for prothrombotic conditions and current recommendations regarding the optimal management of ischemic stroke patients in whom a coagulation disorder is found.

  6. SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, George; Giamouzis, Gregory; Karagiannis, Georgios; Butler, Javed; Tsougos, Ioannis; Valotassiou, Varvara; Giannakoulas, George; Dimakopoulos, Nikolaos; Xanthopoulos, Andrew; Skoularigis, John; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2017-02-02

    Heart failure is a common clinical syndrome associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of heart failure, at least in the industrialized countries. Proper diagnosis of the syndrome and management of patients with heart failure require anatomical and functional information obtained through various imaging modalities. Nuclear cardiology techniques play a main role in the evaluation of heart failure. Myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with thallium-201 or technetium-99 m labelled tracers offer valuable data regarding ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, viability, and intraventricular synchronism. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) permits accurate evaluation of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and viability, providing high-quality images and the ability of quantitative analysis. As these imaging techniques assess different parameters of cardiac structure and function, variations of sensitivity and specificity have been reported among them. In addition, the role of SPECT and PET guided therapy remains controversial. In this comprehensive review, we address these controversies and report the advances in patient's investigation with SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure. Furthermore, we present the innovations in technology that are expected to strengthen the role of nuclear cardiology modalities in the investigation of heart failure.

  7. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  8. Genistein: A Boon for Mitigating Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Daglia, Maria; Tundis, Rosa; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Sobarzo-Sanchez, Eduardo; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    In last decades, diet and dietary components have been regarded as important strategies to prevent the development or mitigate numerous chronic diseases, including inflammation, cardiovascular pathologies, cancer, etc. One of the most common dietary components of Asian population is soy. A plethora of research shows the promising effect of soy soy-based foodstuffs and genistein, which is one of the predominant isoflavone compounds, in the prevention and mitigation of stroke. Growing evidence shows that genistein, which is a selective estrogen receptor modulator, mitigates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the modification of oxidative stress and molecular pathways. The promising pharmacological role of genistein is attributed to its ability to suppress nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B and Akt signaling pathway, direct antioxidant action, and targeting estrogen and androgen-mediated molecular pathways which help to mitigate stroke damages and prolong cell survival. In this work, we systematically review the current reports on the therapeutic role of genistein against ischemic stroke and its molecular mechanism of actions.

  9. Plasma desmoplakin I biomarker of vascular recurrence after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    López-Farré, Antonio J; Zamorano-León, José J; Segura, Antonio; Mateos-Cáceres, Petra J; Modrego, Javier; Rodríguez-Sierra, Pablo; Calatrava, Laura; Tamargo, Juan; Macaya, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Stroke patients have a high risk of vascular recurrence. Biomarkers related to vascular recurrence, however, remain to be identified. The aim of the study was to identify, through proteomic analysis, plasma biomarkers associated with vascular recurrence within one year after the first ischemic stroke. This is a substudy (n = 134) of a large prospective multicenter study of post-stroke patients with an ischemic stroke. Plasma samples were obtained at inclusion. Among the identified proteins, only plasma levels of desmoplakin I were associated with protection against a new vascular event (Odds ratio: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.46-0.89; p = 0.009) after adjustment for hypercholesterolemia, statins and previous atherothrombotic stroke subtype. A greater number of patients without vascular recurrence had been treated with statins within three months of the recent ischemic stroke. Only patients who had been taking statins for 3 months after the ischemic stroke and did not suffer vascular recurrence over a follow-up year, have higher levels of desmoplakin I at the time of inclusion (Odds ratio 0.49; 95% CI: 0.28-0.86; p = 0.013). Increased desmoplakin I levels, determined within 1-3 months of the first ischemic stroke, could be a biomarker for statin responsiveness against a new vascular event in post-ischemic stroke patients taking statins early (1-3 months) after the ischemic stroke.

  10. PTEN degradation after ischemic stroke: a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Huang, R; Chen, Z; Yan, L-J; Simpkins, J W; Yang, S-H

    2014-08-22

    Tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is highly expressed in neurons and PTEN inhibition has been reported to be neuroprotective against ischemic stroke in experimental models. On the other hand, PTEN deletion has been shown to lead to cognitive impairment. In the current study, we examined the expression and functions of PTEN in an ischemic stroke rodent model. We found rapid S-nitrosylation and degradation of PTEN after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PTEN degradation leads to activation of Akt. PTEN partial deletion or PTEN inhibition increased the expression of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) γ2 subunit and enhanced GABAA receptor current. After cerebral ischemia, increased expression of GABAAR γ2 subunit was observed in the ischemia region and the penumbra area. We also observed PTEN loss in astrocytes after cerebral ischemia. Astrocytic PTEN partial knockout increased astrocyte activation and exacerbated ischemic damage. We speculated that ischemic stroke induced neuronal PTEN degradation, hence enhanced GABAA receptor-medicated neuronal activity inhibition which could attenuate excitotoxicity and provide neuroprotection during the acute phase after stroke, while inhibiting long-term functional recovery and contributing to vascular cognitive impairment after stroke. On the other hand, ischemic stroke induced astrocytic PTEN loss and enhanced ischemic damage and astrogliosis. Taken together, our study indicates that ischemic stroke induces rapid PTEN degradation in both neurons and astrocytes which play both protective and detrimental action in a spatiotemporal- and cell-type-dependent manner. Our study provides critical insight for targeting PTEN signaling pathway for stroke treatment.

  11. Transferring Xenogenic Mitochondria Provides Neural Protection Against Ischemic Stress in Ischemic Rat Brains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Lee, Hsiu-Chin; Shen, Ching-I; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Wu, Shih-Fang; Chang, Jui-Chih; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Liu, Chin-San; Su, Hong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Transferring exogenous mitochondria has therapeutic effects on damaged heart, liver, and lung tissues. Whether this protective effect requires the symbiosis of exogenous mitochondria in host cells remains unknown. Here xenogenic mitochondria derived from a hamster cell line were applied to ischemic rat brains and rat primary cortical neurons. Isolated hamster mitochondria, either through local intracerebral or systemic intra-arterial injection, significantly restored the motor performance of brain-ischemic rats. The brain infarct area and neuronal cell death were both attenuated by the exogenous mitochondria. Although internalized mitochondria could be observed in neurons and astrocytes, the low efficacy of mitochondrial internalization could not completely account for the high rate of rescue of the treated neural cells. We further illustrated that disrupting electron transport or ATPase synthase in mitochondria significantly attenuated the protective effect, suggesting that intact respiratory activity is essential for the mitochondrial potency on neural protection. These results emphasize that nonsymbiotic extracellular mitochondria can provide an effective cell defense against acute injurious ischemic stress in the central nervous system.

  12. Severe ischemic colitis following olanzapine use - A case report.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Samuel R; Alves, Rosa; Araújo Correia, Luís; Rita Gonçalves, Ana; Malaquias, João; Oliveira, Emilia; Velosa, José

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic colitis is the most common subtype of intestinal ischemia usually resulting from vasospasm, vessel occlusion or mesenteric hypoperfusion. Neuroleptics have seldom been linked to ischemic colitis by blocking peripheral anticholinergic and antiserotonergic receptors inducing severe gastrointestinal paresis. We report a young patient with severe ischemic colitis requiring surgery due to necrosis of the bowel. After exclusion of other potential causes, olanzapine was admitted as the cause of ischemia. Clinicians should be aware of how to recognize and treat the potentially life-threatening effects of neuroleptics.

  13. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  14. Use of nitrates in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Cocco; Paul, Jerie; Hans-Ulrich, Iselin

    2015-01-01

    Short-acting nitrates are beneficial in acute myocardial ischemia. However, many unresolved questions remain about the use of long-acting nitrates in stable ischemic heart disease. The use of long-acting nitrates is weakened by the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Also, we currently ignore whether lower doses of transdermal nitroglycerin would be better than those presently used. Multivariate analysis data from large nonrandomized studies suggested that long-acting nitrates increase the incidence of acute coronary syndromes, while data from another multivariate study indicate that they have positive effects. Because of methodological differences and open questions, the two studies cannot be compared. A study in Japanese patients with vasospastic angina has shown that, when compared with calcium antagonists, long-acting nitrates do not improve long-term prognosis and that the risk for cardiac adverse events increases with the combined therapy. We have many unanswered questions.

  15. Remote ischemic preconditioning enhances fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Çatma, Mehmet Faruk; Şeşen, Hakan; Aydın, Aytekin; Ünlü, Serhan; Demirkale, İsmail; Altay, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We hypothesized that RIP accelerates fracture healing. Methods Rats (n = 48) were used for the technique of ischemic preconditioning involved applying 35 min of intermittent pneumatic tourniquet for 7 cycles of 5 min each to the fractured hind limb. Results We observed greater callus maturity in RIP group at first week after fracture when compared to controls (p < 0,0001). The serum MDA levels demonstrated statistically lower values at the RIP group at the first week after fracture; however, there were not significant differences at 3rd and 5th weeks (p = 0.0001, p = 0.725, p = 0.271, respectively). Conclusions Greater callus maturity was obtained in RIP group. PMID:26566314

  16. Molecular mechanisms of ischemic preconditioning in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Volker H.

    2015-01-01

    More effective therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI) are needed to improve the high morbidity and mortality associated with this frequently encountered clinical condition. Ischemic and/or hypoxic preconditioning attenuates susceptibility to ischemic injury, which results from both oxygen and nutrient deprivation and accounts for most cases of AKI. While multiple signaling pathways have been implicated in renoprotection, this review will focus on oxygen-regulated cellular and molecular responses that enhance the kidney's tolerance to ischemia and promote renal repair. Central mediators of cellular adaptation to hypoxia are hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs play a crucial role in ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning through the reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism, and by coordinating adenosine and nitric oxide signaling with antiapoptotic, oxidative stress, and immune responses. The therapeutic potential of HIF activation for the treatment and prevention of ischemic injuries will be critically examined in this review. PMID:26311114

  17. [Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Fukujima, M M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1996-06-01

    Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1) were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2). The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  18. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2) migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3) the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4) migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions. PMID:21197470

  19. Developing practice recommendations for endovascular revascularization for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Marc A.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Darkhabani, Ziad; Edgell, Randall C.; English, Joey; Frei, Donald; Jamieson, Dara G.; Janardhan, Vallabh; Janjua, Nazli; Janjua, Rashid M.; Katzan, Irene; Khatri, Pooja; Kirmani, Jawad F.; Liebeskind, David S.; Linfante, Italo; Nguyen, Thanh N.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Shutter, Lori; Xavier, Andrew; Yavagal, Dileep; Zaidat, Osama O.

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines have been established for the management of acute ischemic stroke; however, specific recommendations for endovascular revascularization therapy are lacking. Burgeoning investigation of endovascular revascularization therapies for acute ischemic stroke, rapid device development, and a diverse training background of the providers performing the procedures underscore the need for practice recommendations. This review provides a concise summary of the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology endovascular acute ischemic stroke roundtable meeting. This document was developed to review current clinical efficacy of pharmacologic and mechanical revascularization therapy, selection criteria, periprocedure management, and endovascular time metrics and to highlight current practice patterns. It therefore provides an outline for the future development of multisociety guidelines and recommendations to improve patient selection, procedural management, and organizational strategies for revascularization therapies in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23008406

  20. Ischemia reperfusion injury, ischemic conditioning and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lejay, Anne; Fang, Fei; John, Rohan; Van, Julie A D; Barr, Meredith; Thaveau, Fabien; Chakfe, Nabil; Geny, Bernard; Scholey, James W

    2016-02-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion, which is characterized by deficient oxygen supply and subsequent restoration of blood flow, can cause irreversible damages to tissue. Mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of ischemia reperfusion injury are complex, multifactorial and highly integrated. Extensive research has focused on increasing organ tolerance to ischemia reperfusion injury, especially through the use of ischemic conditioning strategies. Of morbidities that potentially compromise the protective mechanisms of the heart, diabetes mellitus appears primarily important to study. Diabetes mellitus increases myocardial susceptibility to ischemia reperfusion injury and also modifies myocardial responses to ischemic conditioning strategies by disruption of intracellular signaling responsible for enhancement of resistance to cell death. The purpose of this review is twofold: first, to summarize mechanisms underlying ischemia reperfusion injury and the signal transduction pathways underlying ischemic conditioning cardioprotection; and second, to focus on diabetes mellitus and mechanisms that may be responsible for the lack of effect of ischemic conditioning strategies in diabetes.

  1. Role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory response is a double-edged sword, as it not only exacerbates secondary brain injury in the acute stage of stroke but also beneficially contributes to brain recovery after stroke. In this article, we provide an overview on the role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke. We discuss various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in different phases after ischemic stroke and the possible reasons for their failures in clinical trials. Undoubtedly, there is still much to be done in order to translate promising pre-clinical findings into clinical practice. A better understanding of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses and identifying the discrepancies between pre-clinical studies and clinical trials may serve as a basis for designing effective therapies. PMID:24006091

  2. Normobaric oxygen treatment in acute ischemic stroke: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-hai; Qi, Zhi-feng; Luo, Yu-min; Ji, Xun-ming; Liu, Ke Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common and serious neurological disease. Oxygen therapy has been shown to increase oxygen supply to ischemic tissues and improve outcomes after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO), an easily applicable and non-invasive method, shows protective effects on acute ischemic stroke animals and patients in pilot studies. However, many critical scientific questions are still unclear, such as the therapeutic time window of NBO, the long-term effects and the benefits of NBO in large clinic trials. In this article, we review the current literatures on NBO treatment of acute ischemic stroke in preclinical and clinical studies and try to analyze and identify the key gaps or unknowns in our understanding about NBO. Based on these analyses, we provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:27867482

  3. Systemic chemokine levels, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke events

    PubMed Central

    Canouï-Poitrine, F.; Luc, G.; Mallat, Z.; Machez, E.; Bingham, A.; Ferrieres, J.; Ruidavets, J.-B.; Montaye, M.; Yarnell, J.; Haas, B.; Arveiler, D.; Morange, P.; Kee, F.; Evans, A.; Amouyel, P.; Ducimetiere, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the association between systemic levels of the chemokine regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and eotaxin-1 (CCL11) with future coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke events and to assess their usefulness for CHD and ischemic stroke risk prediction in the PRIME Study. Methods: After 10 years of follow-up of 9,771 men, 2 nested case-control studies were built including 621 first CHD events and 1,242 matched controls and 95 first ischemic stroke events and 190 matched controls. Standardized hazard ratios (HRs) for each log-transformed chemokine were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Results: None of the 4 chemokines were independent predictors of CHD, either with respect to stable angina or to acute coronary syndrome. Conversely, RANTES (HR = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.74), IP-10 (HR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.06–2.20), and eotaxin-1 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI 1.02–2.46), but not MCP-1 (HR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.68–1.46), were associated with ischemic stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. When the first 3 chemokines were included in the same multivariate model, RANTES and IP-10 remained predictive of ischemic stroke. Their addition to a traditional risk factor model predicting ischemic stroke substantially improved the C-statistic from 0.6756 to 0.7425 (p = 0.004). Conclusions: In asymptomatic men, higher systemic levels of RANTES and IP-10 are independent predictors of ischemic stroke but not of CHD events. RANTES and IP-10 may improve the accuracy of ischemic stroke risk prediction over traditional risk factors. PMID:21849651

  4. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia.

  5. Relationship Between Ischemic Heart Disease and Sexual Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Afra, Leila Ghanbari; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Gilasi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ischemic heart disease is a life-threatening condition. Considerable doubts exist over the effects of this disease on patients’ sexual activity and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ischemic heart disease and sexual satisfaction. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the convenience sample of 150 patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and 150 people without exposure it was drawn from Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran. Sampling was performed from March to September 2014. We employed the Larson’s Sexual Satisfaction Questionnaire for gathering the data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square, t-test and linear regression analysis. Results: The means of sexual satisfaction in patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and among the subjects without exposure it were 101.47±13.42 and 100.91±16.52, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding sexual satisfaction. However, sexual satisfaction was significantly correlated with gender and the use of cardiac medications (P value < 0.05). Conclusion: The level of sexual satisfaction in patients with exposure ischemic heart disease is similar to the people without exposure it. Moreover, the men and the patients who do not receive cardiac medications have higher levels of sexual satisfaction. Nurses who are providing care to patients with ischemic heart disease need to pay closer attention to patient education about sexual issues. PMID:26234982

  6. Attenuating Ischemic Disruption of K(+) Homeostasis in the Cortex of Hypoxic-Ischemic Neonatal Rats: DOR Activation vs. Acupuncture Treatment.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dongman; Wang, Qinyu; Balboni, Gianfranco; Ding, Guanghong; Xia, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury results in death or profound long-term neurologic disability in both children and adults. However, there is no effective pharmacological therapy due to a poor understanding of HI events, especially the initial triggers for hypoxic-ischemic injury such as disrupted ionic homeostasis and the lack of effective intervention strategy. In the present study, we showed that neonatal brains undergo a developmental increase in the disruption of K(+) homeostasis during simulated ischemia, oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and neonatal HI cortex has a triple phasic response (earlier attenuation, later enhancement, and then recovery) of disrupted K(+) homeostasis to OGD. This response partially involves the activity of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) since the earlier attenuation of ischemic disruption of K(+) homeostasis could be blocked by DOR antagonism, while the later enhancement was reversed by DOR activation. Similar to DOR activation, acupuncture, a strategy to promote DOR activity, could partially reverse the later enhanced ischemic disruption of K(+) homeostasis in the neonatal cortex. Since maintaining cellular K(+) homeostasis and inhibiting excessive K(+) fluxes in the early phase of hypoxic-ischemic insults may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of ischemic brain injury and related neurodegenerative conditions, and since many neurons and other cells can be rescued during the "window of opportunity" after HI insults, our first findings regarding the role of acupuncture and DOR in attenuating ischemic disruption of K(+) homeostasis in the neonatal HI brain suggest a potential intervention therapy in the treatment of neonatal brain injury, especially hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  7. Role of Homocysteine in the Ischemic Stroke and Development of Ischemic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lehotský, Ján; Tothová, Barbara; Kovalská, Maria; Dobrota, Dušan; Beňová, Anna; Kalenská, Dagmar; Kaplán, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a toxic, sulfur-containing intermediate of methionine metabolism. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcy), as a consequence of impaired Hcy metabolism or defects in crucial co-factors that participate in its recycling, is assumed as an independent human stroke risk factor. Neural cells are sensitive to prolonged hHcy treatment, because Hcy cannot be metabolized either by the transsulfuration pathway or by the folate/vitamin B12 independent remethylation pathway. Its detrimental effect after ischemia-induced damage includes accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and posttranslational modifications of proteins via homocysteinylation and thiolation. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is an adaptive response of the CNS to sub-lethal ischemia, which elevates tissues tolerance to subsequent ischemia. The main focus of this review is on the recent data on homocysteine metabolism and mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. In this context, the review documents an increased oxidative stress and functional modification of enzymes involved in redox balance in experimentally induced hyperhomocysteinemia. It also gives an interpretation whether hyperhomocysteinemia alone or in combination with IPC affects the ischemia-induced neurodegenerative changes as well as intracellular signaling. Studies document that hHcy alone significantly increased Fluoro-Jade C- and TUNEL-positive cell neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus as well as in the cortex. IPC, even if combined with hHcy, could still preserve the neuronal tissue from the lethal ischemic effects. This review also describes the changes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) protein pathways following ischemic injury and IPC. These studies provide evidence for the interplay and tight integration between ERK and p38 MAPK signaling mechanisms in response to the hHcy and also in association of hHcy with ischemia/IPC challenge in the rat brain. Further investigations of the protective factors leading to ischemic

  8. Human Data Supporting Glyburide in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Kevin N.; Simard, J. Marc; Elm, Jordan; Kronenberg, Golo; Kunte, Hagen; Kimberly, W. Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The SUR1-TRPM4 channel is a critical determinant of edema and hemorrhagic transformation after focal ischemia. Blockade of this channel by the small molecule glyburide results in improved survival and neurological outcome in multiple preclinical models of ischemic stroke. A robust, compelling body of evidence suggests that an intravenous (IV) formulation of glyburide, RP-1127, can prevent swelling and improve outcome in patients with stroke. Retrospective studies of diabetic stroke patients show improved outcomes in patients who are continued on sulfonylureas after stroke onset. Early phase II study of MRI and plasma biomarkers support the conclusion that RP-1127 may decrease swelling and hemorrhagic transformation. Finally, the ongoing phase II RP-1127 development program has demonstrated continued safety as well as feasibility of enrollment and tolerability of the intervention. Continued efforts to complete the ongoing phase IIb study and definitive efficacy studies are urgently needed to bring a candidate pharmacotherapy to a population of severe stroke patients that currently have no alternative. PMID:26463916

  9. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  10. Angiographic findings of ischemic stroke in children.

    PubMed

    Shirane, R; Sato, S; Yoshimoto, T

    1992-12-01

    A cooperative study was undertaken in the Tohoku district of Japan to investigate the relatively rare phenomenon of cerebral infarction in children. The purpose of the present paper is to describe the cerebral angiographic findings in 48 children whose ischemic lesions were confirmed by CT scan. The majority of lesions were considered to be idiopathic. The areas of cerebral infarction appearing in the CT scans were located in the territory of the middle cerebral artery including the basal ganglia. Angiographical abnormalities were observed in 40 patients (83%). The majority occurred in the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery and in the cisternal portion of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Multiple lesions, such as in the C1, A1, and M1 or the C1, M1, and M2 segments were observed in 22 cases. These lesions generally appeared in continuation; no bilateral intracranial lesions were observed. Repeated angiography was performed in 22 cases, and in 55% of these some recovery of the lesions was seen.

  11. The changing pattern of ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, T. W.

    1973-01-01

    Male and female death rates from all the major forms of cardiovascular disease were approximately equal until about 1920. Since that time the male:female ratio in fatal ischemic heart disease (IHD) has risen dramatically, but some closely related diseases such as cerebrovascular disease and uncomplicated angina pectoris have maintained sex ratios close to unity. It is difficult to reconcile this divergent trend in the sex ratio of IHD with a simple stenotic-thrombotic view of myocardial infarction (MI) and it is suggested that the modern epidemic of MI in men may be the result of a disorder of muscle metabolism (“vulnerable myocardium”) superimposed on a relatively stable background of stenotic-thrombotic arterial disease. The proposed mechanism would also help to explain the selective action of some modern “coronary risk factors” (such as cigarette smoking and physical inactivity) which increase the risk of MI but have little or no effect on the risk of developing cerebrovascular disease or uncomplicated angina pectoris. PMID:4714875

  12. Persistent Ischemic Stroke Disparities despite Declining Incidence in Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Smith, Melinda A.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Brown, Devin L.; Zahuranec, Darin B.; Garcia, Nelda; Kerber, Kevin A.; Skolarus, Lesli E.; Meurer, William J.; Burke, James F.; Adelman, Eric E.; Baek, Jonggyu; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine trends in ischemic stroke incidence among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Methods We performed population-based stroke surveillance from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010 in Corpus Christi, Texas. Ischemic stroke patients 45 years and older were ascertained from potential sources, and charts were abstracted. Neurologists validated cases based on source documentation blinded to ethnicity and age. Crude and age-, sex-, and ethnicity-adjusted annual incidence was calculated for first ever completed ischemic stroke. Poisson regression models were used to calculate adjusted ischemic stroke rates, rate ratios, and trends. Results There were 2,604 ischemic strokes in Mexican Americans and 2,042 in non-Hispanic whites. The rate ratios (Mexican American:non-Hispanic white) were 1.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.67–2.25), 1.50 (95% CI = 1.35– 1.67), and 1.00 (95% CI = 0.90–1.11) among those aged 45 to 59, 60 to 74, and 75 years and older, respectively, and 1.34 (95% CI = 1.23–1.46) when adjusted for age. Ischemic stroke incidence declined during the study period by 35.9% (95% CI = 25.9–44.5). The decline was limited to those aged ≥60 years, and happened in both ethnic groups similarly (p > 0.10), implying that the disparities seen in the 45- to 74-year age group persist unabated. Interpretation Ischemic stroke incidence rates have declined dramatically in the past decade in both ethnic groups for those aged ≥60 years. However, the disparity between Mexican American and non-Hispanic white stroke rates persists in those <75 years of age. Although the decline in stroke is encouraging, additional prevention efforts targeting young Mexican Americans are warranted. PMID:23868398

  13. Remote ischemic preconditioning as treatment for non-ischemic gastrointestinal disorders: Beyond ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Common gastrointestinal diseases such as radiation enteritis (RE), acute pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and drug-induced hepatotoxicity share pathophysiological mechanisms at the molecular level, mostly involving the activation of many pathways of the immune response, ultimately leading to tissue injury. Increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine release, inflammatory cell infiltration and activation and the up-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors participate in the pathophysiology of these complex entities. Treatment varies in each specific disease, but at least in the cases of RE and IBD immunosuppressors are effective. However, full therapeutic responses are not always achieved. The pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury shares many of these mechanisms. Brief and repetitive periods of ischemia in an organ or limb have been shown to protect against subsequent major IR injury in distant organs, a phenomenon called remote ischemic preconditioning (RIP). This procedure has been shown to protect the gut, pancreas and liver by modulating many of the same inflammatory mechanisms. Since RIP is safe and tolerable, and has shown to be effective in some recent clinical trials, I suggest that RIP could be used as a physiologically relevant adjunct treatment for non-ischemic gastrointestinal inflammatory conditions. PMID:24707140

  14. Pre-ischemic treadmill training alleviates brain damage via GLT-1-mediated signal pathway after ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhang, M; Yang, S-D; Li, W-B; Ren, S-Q; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2014-08-22

    Physical exercise could play a neuroprotective role in both human and animals. However, the involved signal pathways underlying the neuroprotective effect are still not well established. This study was to investigate the possible signal pathways involved in the neuroprotection of pre-ischemic treadmill training after ischemic stroke. Seventy-two SD rats were randomly assigned into three groups (n=24/group): sham surgery group, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) group and MCAO with exercise group. Following three weeks of treadmill training exercise, ischemic stroke was induced by occluding the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in rat for 2 h, followed by reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after MCAO/reperfusion, 12 rats in each group were evaluated for neurological deficit scores and then sacrificed to measure the infarct volume (n=6) and cerebral edema (n=6). Six rats in each group were sacrificed to measure the expression level of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), protein kinase C-α (PKC-α), Akt, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) (n=6). Two hundred and eighty minutes (4.67 h) after occlusion, six rats in each group were decapitated to detect the mRNA expression level of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit type 2B (NR2B) (n=6).The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training exercise reduced brain infarct volume, cerebral edema and neurological deficits, also decreased the over expression of PKC-α and increased the expression level of GLT-1, Akt and PI3K after ischemic stroke (p<0.05). The over-expression of mGluR5 and NR2B mRNA was also inhibited by pre-ischemic exercise (p<0.05). In summary, exercise preconditioning ameliorated brain damage after ischemic stroke, which might be involved in two signal pathways: PKC-α-GLT-1-Glutamate and PI3K/Akt-GLT-1-Glutamate.

  15. Novel pathogenetic mechanisms and structural adaptations in ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Silbiger, Jeffrey J

    2013-10-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common complication of myocardial infarction thought to result from leaflet tethering caused by displacement of the papillary muscles that occurs as the left ventricle remodels. The author explores the possibility that left atrial remodeling may also play a role in the pathogenesis of ischemic MR, through a novel mechanism: atriogenic leaflet tethering. When ischemic MR is hemodynamically significant, the left ventricle compensates by dilating to preserve forward output using the Starling mechanism. Left ventricular dilatation, however, worsens MR by increasing the mitral valve regurgitant orifice, leading to a vicious cycle in which MR begets more MR. The author proposes that several structural adaptations play a role in reducing ischemic MR. In contrast to the compensatory effects of left ventricular enlargement, these may reduce, rather than increase, its severity. The suggested adaptations involve the mitral valve leaflets, the papillary muscles, the mitral annulus, and the left ventricular false tendons. This review describes the potential role each may play in reducing ischemic MR. Therapies that exploit these adaptations are also discussed.

  16. Ischemic contracture of the left ventricle. Production and prevention.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, D C; Wilson, G J; Tanaka, S; Holness, D E; Lixfeld, W; Silver, M D; Rubis, L J; Goldstein, W; Gunstensen, J; Bigelow, W G

    1975-12-01

    Ischemic contracture of the left ventricle ("stone heart") is a recognized complication of prolonged periods of interruption of the coronary circulation during open-heart surgery. We have examined the effects of moderate hypothermia (28 degrees C.) and preoperative beta-adrenergic blockade (propranolol, 0.5 mg. per kilogram; 1.0 mg. per kilogram) on contracture development during ischemic arrest of the heart. Four groups of 8 dogs each were placed on total cardiopulmonary bypass, and ischemic arrest of the heart was produced by cross-clamping the ascending aorta and venting the left ventricle. Intramyocardial carbon dioxide tension was continuously monitored by mass spectrometry. When anaerobic energy production ceased, as indicated by a final plateau in the intramyocardial carbon dioxide accumulation curve, the ischemic arrest was terminated and the contractile state of the heart observed. These results are given in the text. We conclude that beta-adrenergic blockade delays, but does not prevent, the onset of ischemic contracture of the left ventricle under normothermic conditions. Moderate hypothermia appears to prevent this complication completely.

  17. Xanthine oxidase inhibition attenuates ischemic-reperfusion lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.J.; Grum, C.M.; Gallagher, K.P.; Bolling, S.F.; Deeb, G.M.; Morganroth, M.L.

    1988-05-01

    Ischemic-reperfusion lung injury is a factor potentially limiting the usefulness of distant organ procurement for heart-lung transplantation. Toxic oxygen metabolites are considered a major etiologic factor in reperfusion injury. Although oxygen-free radicals may be generated by many mechanisms, we investigated the role of xanthine oxidase in this injury process by using lodoxamide, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, to inhibit ischemic-reperfusion injury in an isolated rat lung model. Isolated rat lungs were perfused with physiologic salt solution (PSS) osmotically stabilized with Ficoll until circulating blood elements were nondetectable in the pulmonary venous effluent. Lungs were rendered ischemic by interrupting ventilation and perfusion for 2 hr at 37/sup 0/C. After the ischemic interval, the lungs were reperfused with whole blood and lung injury was determined by measuring the accumulation of /sup 125/I-bovine serum albumin in lung parenchyma and alveolar lavage fluid as well as by gravimetric measurements. Lung effluent was collected immediately pre- and postischemia for analysis of uric acid by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Lodoxamide (1 mM) caused significant attenuation of postischemic lung injury. Uric acid levels in the lung effluent confirmed inhibition of xanthine oxidase. Protection from injury was not complete, however, implying that additional mechanisms may contribute to ischemic-reperfusion injury in the lung.

  18. Ischemic stroke patients are biologically older than their chronological age

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Tárraga, Carolina; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Mola-Caminal, Marina; Vivanco-Hidalgo, Rosa M.; Ois, Angel; Rodríguez-Campello, Ana; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi; Elosua, Roberto; Roquer, Jaume; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is associated with aging. It is possible to predict chronological age by measuring age-related changes in DNA methylation from multiple CpG sites across the genome, known as biological age. The difference between biological age and actual chronological age would indicate an individual's level of aging. Our aim was to determine the biological age of ischemic stroke patients and compare their aging with controls of the same chronological age. A total of 123 individuals, 41 controls and 82 patients with ischemic stroke were paired by chronological age, ranging from 39 to 82 years. Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array was used to measure DNA methylation in CpG sites in both groups, and biological age was estimated using methylation values of specific CpGs. Ischemic stroke patients were biologically an average 2.5 years older than healthy controls (p-value=0.010). Stratified by age tertiles, younger stroke patients (≤57 years old) were biologically older than controls (OR=1.19; 95%CI 1.00-1.41, p-value=0.046). The older groups showed no biological age differences between cases and controls, but were close to reaching the significance level. Ischemic stroke patients are biologically older than controls. Biological age should be considered as a potential new biomarker of stroke risk. PMID:27922817

  19. Stroke bricks - spatial brain regions to assess ischemic stroke localization.

    PubMed

    Ciszek, Bogdan; Jóźwiak, Rafał; Sobieszczuk, Ewa; Przelaskowski, Artur; Skadorwa, Tymon

    2017-03-29

    Computer-aided analysis of non-contrast CT (NCCT) images for rapid diagnosis of ischemic stroke is based on the augmented visualization of evolving ischemic lesions. Computerized support of NCCT often leads to overinterpretation of ischemic areas, thus it is of great interest to provide neurologically verified regions in order to improve accuracy of subsequent radiological assessment. We propose Stroke Bricks (StBr) as an arbitrary spatial division of brain tissue into the regions associated with specific clinical symptoms of ischemic stroke. Neurological stroke deficit is formally translated into respective areas of possible ischemic lesions. StBr were designed according to formalized mapping of neurological symptoms and were attributed to the uniquely defined areas of impaired blood supply. StBr concept may be useful for an integrated radiological CT-based assessment of suspected stroke cases or can be included into computer-aided tools to optimize the evaluation of stroke site and its extent. These data in turn are appropriable for further diagnosis, predicting the therapeutic outcome as well as for patients' qualification for an appropriate form of reperfusion therapy. The usefulness of Stroke Bricks was illustrated in the case studies.

  20. Migraine prophylaxis, ischemic depolarizations and stroke outcomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yalcin, Nilufer; Yu, Esther Sori; Daneshmand, Ali; Wei, Ying; Zheng, Yi; Can, Anil; Sengul, Buse; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Ayata, Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine with aura is an established stroke risk factor, and excitatory mechanisms such as spreading depression are implicated in the pathogenesis of both migraine and stroke. Spontaneous spreading depression waves originate within the peri-infarct tissue and exacerbate the metabolic mismatch during focal cerebral ischemia. Genetically enhanced spreading depression susceptibility facilitates anoxic depolarizations and peri-infarct spreading depressions and accelerates infarct growth, suggesting that susceptibility to spreading depression is a critical determinant of vulnerability to ischemic injury. Because chronic treatment with migraine prophylactic drugs suppresses spreading depression susceptibility, we tested whether migraine prophylaxis can also suppress ischemic depolarizations and improve stroke outcome. Methods We measured the cortical susceptibility to spreading depression and ischemic depolarizations, and determined tissue and neurological outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion in wild type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 knock-in mice treated with vehicle, topiramate or lamotrigine daily for 7 weeks or as a single dose shortly before testing. Results Chronic treatment with topiramate or lamotrigine reduces the susceptibility to KCl- or electrical stimulation-induced spreading depressions as well as ischemic depolarizations in both wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice. Consequently, both tissue and neurological outcomes are improved. Notably, treatment with a single dose of either drug is ineffective. Conclusions These data underscore the importance of hyperexcitability as a mechanism for increased stroke risk in migraineurs, and suggest that migraine prophylaxis may not only prevent migraine attacks but also protect migraineurs against ischemic injury. PMID:25424478

  1. Dynamic Changes in DNA Methylation in Ischemic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Meller, Robert; Pearson, Andrea; Simon, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mediators of gene expression are hypothesized to regulate transcriptomic responses to preconditioning ischemia and ischemic tolerance. Here, we utilized a methyl-DNA enrichment protocol and sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify patterns of DNA methylation in an established model of ischemic tolerance in neuronal cultures (oxygen and glucose deprivation: OGD). We observed an overall decrease in global DNA methylation at 4 h following preconditioning ischemia (30 min OGD), harmful ischemia (120 min OGD), and in ischemic tolerant neuronal cultures (30 min OGD, 24 h recovery, 120 min OGD). We detected a smaller cohort of hypermethylated regions following ischemic conditions, which were further analyzed revealing differential chromosomal localization of methylation, and a differential concentration of methylation on genomic regions. Together, these data show that the temporal profiles of DNA methylation with respect to chromatin hyper- and hypo-methylation following various ischemic conditions are highly dynamic, and may reveal novel targets for neuroprotection. PMID:26029158

  2. Rotating night shift work and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Brown, Devin L; Feskanich, Diane; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Schernhammer, Eva S; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2009-06-01

    Rotating night shift work disrupts circadian rhythms and is associated with coronary heart disease. The relation between rotating night shift work and ischemic stroke is unclear. The Nurses' Health Study, an ongoing cohort study of registered female nurses, assessed in 1988 the total number of years the nurses had worked rotating night shifts. The majority (69%) of stroke outcomes from 1988 to 2004 were confirmed by physician chart review. The authors used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the relation between years of rotating night shift work and ischemic stroke, adjusting for multiple vascular risk factors. Of 80,108 subjects available for analysis, 60% reported at least 1 year of rotating night shift work. There were 1,660 ischemic strokes. Rotating night shift work was associated with a 4% increased risk of ischemic stroke for every 5 years (hazard ratio = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.07; P(trend) = 0.01). This increase in risk was similar when limited to the 1,152 confirmed ischemic strokes (hazard ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.07; P(trend) = 0.10) and may be confined to women with a history of 15 or more years of rotating shift work. Women appear to have a modestly increased risk of stroke after extended periods of rotating night shift work.

  3. Expression of Alzheimer's disease risk genes in ischemic brain degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Januszewski, Sławomir; Kocki, Janusz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-12-01

    We review the Alzheimer-related expression of genes following brain ischemia as risk factors for late-onset of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and their role in Alzheimer's disease ischemia-reperfusion pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding ischemic etiology of Alzheimer's disease have revealed dysregulation of Alzheimer-associated genes including amyloid protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin 1 and 2, autophagy, mitophagy and apoptosis. We review the relationship between these genes dysregulated by brain ischemia and the cellular and neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here we summarize the latest studies supporting the theory that Alzheimer-related genes play an important role in ischemic brain injury and that ischemia is a needful and leading supplier to the onset and progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact molecular mechanisms of ischemic dependent neurodegenerative disease and neuronal susceptibility finally are unknown, a downregulated expression of neuronal defense genes like alfa-secretase in the ischemic brain makes the neurons less able to resist injury. The recent challenge is to find ways to raise the adaptive reserve of the brain to overcome such ischemic-associated deficits and support and/or promote neuronal survival. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the association of these genes with risk for Alzheimer's disease will provide the most meaningful targets for therapeutic development to date.

  4. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  5. ISCHEMIC MODEL OF OPTIC NERVE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, George A

    2005-01-01

    Purpose It is proposed that the anterior optic nerve is specifically susceptible to microcirculatory compromise contributing to the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Methods Ischemic optic neuropathy was induced by delivering endothelin-1 (ET-1) to the retrobulbar space in one eye of 12 primates for 6 to 12 months. Regional ganglion cell axonal sizes and densities were compared with the normal, contralateral eyes. Results Without changes of intraocular pressure, mean axonal density was significantly decreased in ET-1 eyes compared to controls (P = .03, paired t test). Two-way matched-pair analysis of variance showed a significant effect of ET-1 on overall axonal density (P < .0001). Among the animals with significant axonal loss, the mean axonal loss was 11.6%, and loss varied from 4% to 21%. Axonal loss was commonly localized within specific quadrants. Five animals were examined for preferential axonal size loss. As a group, there appears to be a tendency toward preferential large axonal loss, but the mean axonal loss of large and small axons did not meet significant differences (P = .1) However, examination of individual animals with significant loss shows significantly greater loss of large axons as compared to the small axons in three of the animals. Conclusions Chronic optic nerve ischemia causes demonstrable and localized damage of the optic nerve, without intraocular pressure elevation. There is preferential loss of large retinal ganglion cell axons in animals with significant axonal loss. Ischemia-induced focal axonal loss is similar to human glaucoma and may represent a differential regional vulnerability. PMID:17057819

  6. Bone Fracture Exacerbates Murine Ischemic Cerebral Injury

    PubMed Central

    Degos, Vincent; Maze, Mervyn; Vacas, Susana; Hirsch, Jan; Guo, Yi; Shen, Fanxia; Jun, Kristine; van Rooijen, Nico; Gressens, Pierre; Young, William L.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone fracture increases alarmins and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood, and provokes macrophage infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the hippocampus. We recently reported that stroke is an independent risk factor after bone surgery for adverse outcome, the impact of bone fracture on stroke outcome is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that bone fracture, shortly after ischemic stroke, enhances stroke-related injuries by augmenting the neuroinflammatory response. Methods Tibia fracture (bone fracture) was induced in mice one day after permanent occlusion of the distal middle cerebral artery (stroke). High-mobility-group box chromosomal protein-1 (HMGB1) was tested to mimic the bone fracture effects. HMGB1 neutralizing antibody and clodrolip (macrophage depletion) were tested to attenuate the bone fracture effects. Neurobehavioral function (n=10), infarct volume, neuronal death, and macrophages/microglia-infiltration (n=6–7) were analyzed three days after. Results We found that mice with both stroke and bone fracture had larger infarct volumes (mean percentage of ipsilateral hemisphere±SD: 30±7% vs. 12±3%, n=6, P<0.001) more severe neurobehavioral dysfunction, and more macrophages/microglia in the peri-infarct region than mice with stroke only. Intraperitoneal injection of HMGB1 mimicked, whereas neutralizing HMGB1 attenuated, the bone fracture effects and the macrophage/microglia infiltration. Depleting macrophages with clodrolip also attenuated the aggravating effects of bone fracture on stroke lesion and behavioral dysfunction. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury via augmented inflammation through HMGB1 and macrophage/microglia infiltration. Interventions to modulate early macrophage/microglia activation could be therapeutic goals to limit the adverse consequences of bone fracture after stroke. PMID:23438676

  7. Morinda citrifolia fruit juice prevents ischemic neuronal damage through suppression of the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinichi; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Kamiya, Kohei; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Satake, Toshiko; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2010-10-01

    Fruit juice of Morinda citrifolia (Noni juice) is a well-known health drink and has various pharmacological properties including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We have hitherto found the protective effect of Noni juice on brain damage caused by ischemic stress in mice. In addition, we also recently reported that regulation of post-ischemic glucose intolerance might be important for good prognosis. Here, we focused on the effect of Noni juice on the development of the post-ischemic glucose intolerance as a cerebral protective mechanism. Noni juice was obtained from the mature fruit grown in Okinawa (about 1.5 L/4 kg of fruit; 100% ONJ). Male ddY mice were given 10% ONJ in drinking water for 7 days. Then, mice were subjected to 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Ingestion of 10% ONJ suppressed the development of neuronal damage after MCAO. Interestingly, glucose intolerance observed on the 1st day after MCAO completely disappeared after 10% ONJ administration. Furthermore, ONJ treatment significantly increased serum insulin levels much further than the control group on the 1st day, while serum adiponectin levels were not affected at all. These results suggest that ONJ could facilitate insulin secretion after ischemic stress and may attenuate the development of glucose intolerance. These mechanisms may contribute to the neuronal protective effect of ONJ against ischemic stress.

  8. Intermittent fasting attenuates inflammasome activity in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Santro, Tomislav; Manzanero, Silvia; Widiapradja, Alexander; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lee, Seung-Yoon; Chunduri, Prasad; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Stranahan, Alexis M; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2014-07-01

    Recent findings have revealed a novel inflammatory mechanism that contributes to tissue injury in cerebral ischemia mediated by multi-protein complexes termed inflammasomes. Intermittent fasting (IF) can decrease the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periphery and brain. Here we investigated the impact of IF (16h of food deprivation daily) for 4months on NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activities following cerebral ischemia. Ischemic stroke was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion (I/R). IF decreased the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, the expression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome proteins, and both IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain tissue. These findings demonstrate that IF can attenuate the inflammatory response and tissue damage following ischemic stroke by a mechanism involving suppression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity.

  9. Depression: links with ischemic heart disease and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Roose, Steven P

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the relationships among depression, ischemic heart disease, and erectile dysfunction. Depression is an independent risk factor for the development of ischemic heart disease, and depression in the post-myocardial infarction patient is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Ischemic heart disease and erectile dysfunction are also frequently comorbid and share many common risk factors including age, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and smoking. Depression and erectile dysfunction often occur together; however, the causal relation may be difficult to determine because erectile dysfunction may be a symptom of depression, social distress accompanying erectile dysfunction may precipitate depressive symptoms, or both conditions may result from a common factor such as vascular disease.

  10. Ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Kaiser Junior, Roberto Luiz; Ruiz, Lilian Piron; Ruiz, Milton Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease. Case report This report presents a case of a 28-year-old female patient with Crohn’s disease and sudden decrease of visual acuity in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal electroretinography confirmed the clinical features of ischemic retinopathy. After systemic corticosteroid treatment, the patient developed epiretinal membrane without significant improvement in visual acuity. Discussion The patient presented with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease with deficiency of central visual acuity. Periodic examination by a retina specialist is recommended for patients being treated for Crohn’s disease. PMID:27524921

  11. Suppression of Acid Sphingomyelinase Protects the Retina from Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Wu, Bill X.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and mediates multiple responses involved in inflammatory and apoptotic signaling. However, the role ASMase plays in ischemic retinal injury has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how reduced ASMase expression impacts retinal ischemic injury. Methods Changes in ceramide levels and ASMase activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis and ASMase activity. Retinal function and morphology were assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and morphometric analyses. Levels of TNF-α were determined by ELISA. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results In wild-type mice, ischemia produced a significant increase in retinal ASMase activity and ceramide levels. These increases were associated with functional deficits as measured by ERG analysis and significant structural degeneration in most retinal layers. In ASMase+/− mice, retinal ischemia did not significantly alter ASMase activity, and the rise in ceramide levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in retinas from wild-type mice. In ASMase+/− mice, functional and morphometric analyses of ischemic eyes revealed significantly less retinal degeneration than in injured retinas from wild-type mice. The ischemia-induced increase in retinal TNF-α levels was suppressed by the administration of the ASMase inhibitor desipramine, or by reducing ASMase expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that reducing ASMase expression provides partial protection from ischemic injury. Hence, the production of ceramide and subsequent mediators plays a role in the development of ischemic retinal injury. Modulating ASMase may present new opportunities for adjunctive therapies when treating retinal ischemic disorders. PMID:27571014

  12. Window Of Opportunity: Estrogen As A Treatment For Ischemic Stroke✰

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ran; Yang, Shao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The neuroprotection research in the last 2 decades has witnessed a growing interest in the functions of estrogens as neuroprotectants against neurodegenerative diseases including stroke. The neuroprotective action of estrogens has been well demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. However, the major conducted clinical trials so far have raised concern for the protective effect of estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. The discrepancy could be partly due to the mistranslation between the experimental stroke research and clinical trials. While predominant experimental studies tested the protective action of estrogens on ischemic stroke using acute treatment paradigm, the clinical trials have mainly focused on the effect of estrogen replacement therapy on the primary and secondary stroke prevention which has not been adequately addressed in the experimental stroke study. Although the major conducted clinical trials have indicated that estrogen replacement therapy has an adverse effect and raise concern for long term estrogen replacement therapy for stroke prevention, these are not appropriate for assessing the potential effects of acute estrogen treatment on stroke protection. The well established action of estrogen in the neurovascular unit and its potential interaction with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) makes it a candidate for the combined therapy with rtPA for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke. On the other hand, the “critical period” and newly emerged “biomarkers window” hypotheses have indicated that many clinical relevant factors have been underestimated in the experimental ischemic stroke research. The development and application of ischemic stroke models that replicate the clinical condition is essential for further evaluation of acute estrogen treatment on ischemic stroke which might provide critical information for future clinical trials. PMID:23340160

  13. Moderate alcohol intake reduces risk of ischemic stroke in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Joo; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kim, Jae Guk; Ko, Youngchai; Hong, Keun-Sik; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Jun; Kim, Joon-Tae; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Jang, Myung Suk; Han, Moon-Ku; Gorelick, Philip B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We undertook a population-based, case-control study to examine a dose-response relationship between alcohol intake and risk of ischemic stroke in Koreans who had different alcoholic beverage type preferences than Western populations and to examine the effect modifications by sex and ischemic stroke subtypes. Methods: Cases (n = 1,848) were recruited from patients aged 20 years or older with first-ever ischemic stroke. Stroke-free controls (n = 3,589) were from the fourth and fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and were matched to the cases by age (±3 years), sex, and education level. All participants completed an interview using a structured questionnaire about alcohol intake. Results: Light to moderate alcohol intake, 3 or 4 drinks (1 drink = 10 g ethanol) per day, was significantly associated with a lower odds of ischemic stroke after adjusting for potential confounders (no drinks: reference; <1 drink: odds ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.32–0.45; 1–2 drinks: 0.45, 0.36–0.57; and 3–4 drinks: 0.54, 0.39–0.74). The threshold of alcohol effect in women was slightly lower than that in men (up to 1–2 drinks in women vs up to 3–4 drinks in men), but this difference was not statistically significant. There was no statistical interaction between alcohol intake and the subtypes of ischemic stroke (p = 0.50). The most frequently used alcoholic beverage was one native to Korea, soju (78% of the cases), a distilled beverage with 20% ethanol by volume. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that light to moderate distilled alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of ischemic stroke in Koreans. PMID:26519539

  14. IL1RN VNTR Polymorphism in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Bradford B.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Brown, W. Mark; Rich, Stephen S.; Arepalli, Sampath; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Duckworth, Jaime; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Meschia, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Genetic factors influence risk for ischemic stroke and likely do so at multiple steps in the pathogenic process. Variants in genes related to inflammation contribute to risk of stroke. The purpose of this study was to confirm our earlier finding of an association between allele 2 of a variable number tandem repeat of the IL-1 receptor antagonist gene (IL1RN) and cerebrovascular disease. Methods An association study of the variable number tandem repeat genotype with ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes was performed on samples from a North American study of affected sibling pairs concordant for ischemic stroke and 2 North American cohorts of prospectively ascertained ischemic stroke cases and unrelated controls. DNA analysis was performed on cases and controls, stratified by race. Results After adjustment for age, sex, and stroke risk factors, the odds ratio for association of allele 2 and ischemic stroke was 2.80 (95% confidence interval, 1.29 to 6.11; P=0.03) for the white participants. The effect of allele 2 of IL1RN on stroke risk most closely fits a recessive genetic model (P=0.009). For the smaller sample of nonwhite participants, the results were not significant. Conclusions Allele 2 of IL1RN, present in nearly one-quarter of stroke patients, may contribute to genetic risk for ischemic stroke and confirm the previously identified association with cerebrovascular disease. These results are driven by the association in the white participants. Further exploration in a larger nonwhite sample is warranted. PMID:17332449

  15. A multicenter, randomized trial on neuroprotection with remote ischemic per-conditioning during acute ischemic stroke: the REmote iSchemic Conditioning in acUtE BRAin INfarction study protocol.

    PubMed

    Pico, Fernando; Rosso, Charlotte; Meseguer, Elena; Chadenat, Marie-Laure; Cattenoy, Amina; Aegerter, Philippe; Deltour, Sandrine; Yeung, Jennifer; Hosseini, Hassan; Lambert, Yves; Smadja, Didier; Samson, Yves; Amarenco, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Rationale Remote ischemic per-conditioning-causing transient limb ischemia to induce ischemic tolerance in other organs-reduces final infarct size in animal stroke models. Aim To evaluate whether remote ischemic per-conditioning during acute ischemic stroke (<6 h) reduces brain infarct size at 24 h. Methods and design This study is being performed in five French hospitals using a prospective randomized open blinded end-point design. Adults with magnetic resonance imaging confirmed ischemic stroke within 6 h of symptom onset and clinical deficit of 5-25 according to National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale will be randomized 1:1 to remote ischemic per-conditioning or control (stratified by center and intravenous fibrinolysis use). Remote ischemic per-conditioning will consist of four cycles of electronic tourniquet inflation (5 min) and deflation (5 min) to a thigh within 6 h of symptom onset. Magnetic resonance imaging is repeated 24 h after stroke onset. Sample size estimates For a difference of 15 cm(3) in brain infarct growth between groups, 200 patients will be included for 5% significance and 80% power. Study outcomes The primary outcome will be the difference in brain infarct growth from baseline to 24 h in the intervention versus control groups (by diffusion-weighted image magnetic resonance imaging). Secondary outcomes include: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score absolute difference between baseline and 24 h, three-month modified Rankin score and daily living activities, mortality, and tolerance and side effects of remote ischemic per-conditioning. Discussion The only remote ischemic per-conditioning trial in humans with stroke did not show remote ischemic per-conditioning to be effective. REmote iSchemic Conditioning in acUtE BRAin INfarction, which has important design differences, should provide more information on the use of this intervention in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  16. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Siegler, James E; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C; Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-10-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke.

  17. Ischemic preconditioning protects against gap junctional uncoupling in cardiac myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sundset, Rune; Cooper, Marie; Mikalsen, Svein-Ole; Ytrehus, Kirsti

    2004-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning increases the heart's tolerance to a subsequent longer ischemic period. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of gap junction communication in simulated preconditioning in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myofibroblasts. Gap junctional intercellular communication was assessed by Lucifer yellow dye transfer. Preconditioning preserved intercellular coupling after prolonged ischemia. An initial reduction in coupling in response to the preconditioning stimulus was also observed. This may protect neighboring cells from damaging substances produced during subsequent regional ischemia in vivo, and may preserve gap junctional communication required for enhanced functional recovery during subsequent reperfusion.

  18. A practical approach to remote ischemic preconditioning and ischemic preconditioning against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; French, Brent A.; Rassaf, Tienush

    2016-01-01

    Although urgently needed in clinical practice, a cardioprotective therapeutic approach against myocardial ischemia/ reperfusion injury remains to be established. Remote ischemic preconditioning (rIPC) and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) represent promising tools comprising three entities: the generation of a protective signal, the transfer of the signal to the target organ, and the response to the transferred signal resulting in cardioprotection. However, in light of recent scientific advances, many controversies arise regarding the efficacy of the underlying signaling. We here show methods for the generation of the signaling cascade by rIPC as well as IPC in a mouse model for in vivo myocardial ischemia/ reperfusion injury using highly reproducible approaches. This is accomplished by taking advantage of easily applicable preconditioning strategies compatible with the clinical setting. We describe methods for using laser Doppler perfusion imaging to monitor the cessation and recovery of perfusion in real time. The effects of preconditioning on cardiac function can also be assessed using ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging approaches. On a cellular level, we confirm how tissue injury can be monitored using histological assessment of infarct size in conjunction with immunohistochemistry to assess both aspects in a single specimen. Finally, we outline, how the rIPC-associated signaling can be transferred to the target cell via conservation of the signal in the humoral (blood) compartment. This compilation of experimental protocols including a conditioning regimen comparable to the clinical setting should proof useful to both beginners and experts in the field of myocardial infarction, supplying information for the detailed procedures as well as troubleshooting guides. PMID:28066791

  19. Phosphoproteomic profiling of human myocardial tissues distinguishes ischemic from non-ischemic end stage heart failure.

    PubMed

    Schechter, Matthew A; Hsieh, Michael K H; Njoroge, Linda W; Thompson, J Will; Soderblom, Erik J; Feger, Bryan J; Troupes, Constantine D; Hershberger, Kathleen A; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Nagel, Whitney L; Landinez, Gina P; Shah, Kishan M; Burns, Virginia A; Santacruz, Lucia; Hirschey, Matthew D; Foster, Matthew W; Milano, Carmelo A; Moseley, M Arthur; Piacentino, Valentino; Bowles, Dawn E

    2014-01-01

    The molecular differences between ischemic (IF) and non-ischemic (NIF) heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins) and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins) from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins) exhibited a ≥ 2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05) when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure.

  20. Phosphoproteomic Profiling of Human Myocardial Tissues Distinguishes Ischemic from Non-Ischemic End Stage Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Linda W.; Thompson, J. Will; Soderblom, Erik J.; Feger, Bryan J.; Troupes, Constantine D.; Hershberger, Kathleen A.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Nagel, Whitney L.; Landinez, Gina P.; Shah, Kishan M.; Burns, Virginia A.; Santacruz, Lucia; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Foster, Matthew W.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Piacentino, Valentino; Bowles, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular differences between ischemic (IF) and non-ischemic (NIF) heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins) and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins) from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins) exhibited a ≥2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05) when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure. PMID:25117565

  1. Factors predicting poor prognosis in ischemic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Añón, Ramón; Boscá, Marta Maia; Sanchiz, Vicente; Tosca, Joan; Almela, Pedro; Amorós, Cirilo; Benages, Adolfo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinical, analytical and endoscopic factors related to ischemic colitis (IC) severity. METHODS: A total of 85 patients were enrolled in a retrospective study from January 1996 to May 2004. There were 53 females and 32 males (age 74.6 ± 9.4 years, range 45-89 years). The patients were diagnosed as IC. The following variables were analyzed including age, sex, period of time from the appearance of symptoms to admission, medical history, medication, stool frequency, clinical symptoms and signs, blood tests (hemogram and basic biochemical profile), and endoscopic findings. Patients were divided in mild IC group and severe IC group (surgery and/or death). Qualitative variables were analyzed using chi-square test and parametric data were analyzed using Student's t test (P < 0.05). RESULTS: The mild IC group was consisted of 69 patients (42 females and 27 males, average age 74.7 ± 12.4 years). The severe IC group was composed of 16 patients (11 females and 5 males, average age of 73.8 ± 12.4 years). One patient died because of failure of medical treatment (no surgery), 15 patients underwent surgery (6 after endoscopic diagnosis and 9 after peroperatory diagnosis). Eight of 85 patients (9.6%) died and the others were followed up as out-patients for 9.6 ± 3.5 mo. Demographic data, medical history, medication and stool frequency were similar in both groups (P > 0.05). Seriously ill patients had less hematochezia than slightly ill patients (37.5% vs 86.9%, P = 0.000). More tachycardia (45.4% vs 10.1%, P = 0.011) and a higher prevalence of peritonism signs (75% vs 5.7%, P = 0.000) were observed in the severe IC group while the presence and intensity of abdominal pain were similar between two groups. Two patients with severe IC had shock when admitted. Regarding analytical data, more seriously ill patients were found to have anemia and hyponatremia than the mildly ill patients (37.5% vs 10.1%, P = 0.014 and 46.6% vs 14.9%, P = 0.012, respectively

  2. Characterization of pericardial and plasma ghrelin levels in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sax, Balazs; Merkely, Béla; Túri, Katalin; Nagy, Andrea; Ahres, Abdelkrim; Hartyánszky, István; Hüttl, Tivadar; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Cseh, Károly; Kékesi, Violetta

    2013-09-10

    Ghrelin is an endocrine regulatory peptide with multiple functions including cardioprotective effects. It is produced in various tissues among others in the myocardium. Pericardial fluid has been proven to be a biologically active compartment of the heart that communicates with the myocardial interstitium. Thus, pericardial level of certain agents may reflect their concentration in the myocardium well. In our study we measured acylated (active) and total (acylated and non-acylated) pericardial and plasma ghrelin levels of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Pericardial fluid and plasma samples were obtained from patients with coronary artery disease (ISCH, n=54) or valvular heart disease (VHD, n=41) undergoing cardiac surgery. Acylated pericardial ghrelin concentrations were found to be significantly higher in patients with ischemic heart disease (ISCH vs. VHD, 32±3 vs. 16±2pg/ml, p<0.01), whereas plasma levels of the peptide showed no difference between patient groups. Pericardial-to-plasma ratio, an index abolishing systemic effects on local ghrelin level was also significantly higher in ISCH group for both acylated and total ghrelin. Plasma total ghrelin showed negative correlation to BMI, plasma insulin and insulin resistance index HOMA-A. Pericardial acylated and total ghrelin concentrations were negatively correlated with posterior wall thickness (R=-0.31, p<0.05 and R=-0.35, p<0.01, respectively). Plasma insulin concentration and HOMA-A showed significant negative correlation with pericardial ghrelin levels. In conclusion, increased pericardial active ghrelin content and higher pericardial-to-plasma ghrelin ratio were found in ischemic heart disease as compared to non-ischemic patients suggesting an increased ghrelin production of the chronically ischemic myocardium. According to our results, pericardial ghrelin content is negatively influenced by left ventricular hypertrophy and insulin resistance.

  3. Remote limb ischemic conditioning enhances motor learning in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Cherry-Allen, Kendra M; Gidday, Jeff M; Lee, Jin-Moo; Hershey, Tamara; Lang, Catherine E

    2015-06-01

    Brief bouts of sublethal ischemia have been shown to protect exposed tissue (ischemic conditioning) and tissues at remote sites (remote ischemic conditioning) against subsequent ischemic challenges. Given that the mechanisms of this protective phenomenon are multifactorial and epigenetic, we postulated that remote limb ischemic conditioning (RLIC) might enhance mechanisms responsible for neural plasticity, and thereby facilitate learning. Specifically, we hypothesized that conditioning of the nervous system with RLIC, achieved through brief repetitive limb ischemia prior to training, would facilitate the neurophysiological processes of learning, thus making training more effective and more long-lasting. Eighteen healthy adults participated in this study; nine were randomly allocated to RLIC and nine to sham conditioning. All subjects underwent seven consecutive weekday sessions and 2-wk and 4-wk follow-up sessions. We found that RLIC resulted in significantly greater motor learning and longer retention of motor performance gains in healthy adults. Changes in motor performance do not appear to be due to a generalized increase in muscle activation or muscle strength and were not associated with changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration. Of note, RLIC did not enhance cognitive learning on a hippocampus-dependent task. While future research is needed to establish optimal conditioning and training parameters, this inexpensive, clinically feasible paradigm might ultimately be implemented to enhance motor learning in individuals undergoing neuromuscular rehabilitation for brain injury and other pathological conditions.

  4. The neuroprotective roles of BDNF in hypoxic ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, AI; XIONG, LI-JING; TONG, YU; MAO, MENG

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (H/I) brain injury results in various degrees of damage to the body, and the immature brain is particularly fragile to oxygen deprivation. Hypothermia and erythropoietin (EPO) have long been known to be neuroprotective in ischemic brain injury. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has recently been recognized as a potent modulator capable of regulating a wide repertoire of neuronal functions. This review was based on studies concerning the involvement of BDNF in the protection of H/I brain injury following a search in PubMed between 1995 and December, 2011. We initially examined the background of BDNF, and then focused on its neuroprotective mechanisms against ischemic brain injury, including its involvement in promoting neural regeneration/cognition/memory rehabilitation, angiogenesis within ischemic penumbra and the inhibition of the inflammatory process, neurotoxicity, epilepsy and apoptosis. We also provided a literature overview of experimental studies, discussing the safety and the potential clinical application of BDNF as a neuroprotective agent in the ischemic brain injury. PMID:24648914

  5. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit.

  6. [Neuroprotective therapy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Naritomi, H

    2001-12-01

    Following cerebral ischemia, various biochemical reactions are provoked in a stepwise manner leading neuronal cells to ischemic death. The prevention of these biochemical reactions may exert neuroprotective actions and consequently reduce the magnitude of ischemic cerebral injury. On the basis of such a view, numerous neuroprotective drugs have been developed during the last decade. Quite a few drugs were found effective in reducing the infarct volume in experimental studies, and more than 15 of them were subjected to clinical phase III trials to see a therapeutic effectiveness. However, the results of phase III trials were disappointing in the majority drugs. Only three drugs, nicaravene, ebselen and edaravone, all radical scavengers, were judged effective by small-sized trials with a wide therapeutic window, 48-72 hours after stroke, in Japan. The fact suggests that a one-point prevention of biochemical reactions by single drug is unable to rescue ischemic neuronal cells. Ischemic insult causes damages of vascular wall including the endothelium which play an important role in the development of hemorrhagic changes or cerebral edema. Vascular protection is considered as important as neuroprotection in treatment of clinical stroke. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective and vascular protective actions and hence may be more effective than neuroprotective drugs for the treatment of stroke. The prevention of fever, which often occurs in severe stroke, may exert the similar effect as hypothermia in neuroprotection. Neuroprotective therapy in the future should proceed toward the simultaneous protections of neurons and vessels using combination of multiple drugs.

  7. Remote limb ischemic conditioning enhances motor learning in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Cherry-Allen, Kendra M.; Gidday, Jeff M.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Hershey, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Brief bouts of sublethal ischemia have been shown to protect exposed tissue (ischemic conditioning) and tissues at remote sites (remote ischemic conditioning) against subsequent ischemic challenges. Given that the mechanisms of this protective phenomenon are multifactorial and epigenetic, we postulated that remote limb ischemic conditioning (RLIC) might enhance mechanisms responsible for neural plasticity, and thereby facilitate learning. Specifically, we hypothesized that conditioning of the nervous system with RLIC, achieved through brief repetitive limb ischemia prior to training, would facilitate the neurophysiological processes of learning, thus making training more effective and more long-lasting. Eighteen healthy adults participated in this study; nine were randomly allocated to RLIC and nine to sham conditioning. All subjects underwent seven consecutive weekday sessions and 2-wk and 4-wk follow-up sessions. We found that RLIC resulted in significantly greater motor learning and longer retention of motor performance gains in healthy adults. Changes in motor performance do not appear to be due to a generalized increase in muscle activation or muscle strength and were not associated with changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration. Of note, RLIC did not enhance cognitive learning on a hippocampus-dependent task. While future research is needed to establish optimal conditioning and training parameters, this inexpensive, clinically feasible paradigm might ultimately be implemented to enhance motor learning in individuals undergoing neuromuscular rehabilitation for brain injury and other pathological conditions. PMID:25867743

  8. Heat shock proteins, end effectors of myocardium ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed Central

    Guisasola, María Concepcion; Desco, Maria del Mar; Gonzalez, Fernanda Silvana; Asensio, Fernando; Dulin, Elena; Suarez, Antonio; Garcia Barreno, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) whether ischemia-reperfusion increased the content of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) transcripts and (2) whether myocardial content of Hsp72 is increased by ischemic preconditioning so that they can be considered as end effectors of preconditioning. Twelve male minipigs (8 protocol, 4 sham) were used, with the following ischemic preconditioning protocol: 3 ischemia and reperfusion 5-minute alternative cycles and last reperfusion cycle of 3 hours. Initial and final transmural biopsies (both in healthy and ischemic areas) were taken in all animals. Heat shock protein 72 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression was measured by a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method using complementary DNA normalized against the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. The identification of heat shock protein 72 was performed by immunoblot. In our “classic” preconditioning model, we found no changes in mRNA hsp72 levels or heat shock protein 72 content in the myocardium after 3 hours of reperfusion. Our experimental model is valid and the experimental techniques are appropriate, but the induction of heat shock proteins 72 as end effectors of cardioprotection in ischemic preconditioning does not occur in the first hours after ischemia, but probably at least 24 hours after it, in the so-called “second protection window.” PMID:17009598

  9. Medications Used in the Treatment of Ischemic Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on medications used in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  10. [Bilateral ischemic optic neuropathy secondary to acute ergotism].

    PubMed

    Sommer, S; Delemazure, B; Wagner, M; Xenard, L; Rozot, P

    1998-02-01

    We report a case of a 31 year-old man who presented a bilateral ischemic optic neuropathy associated with headaches and severe systemic hypertension. This episode appeared after administration of ergotamine tartrate and macrolides. This medication probably led to a vasospasm which occurs in patients with hypertension. The cardiovascular and serum lipid evaluations were normal. A migraine optic neuropathy can be evoked.

  11. NLRP3 deficiency ameliorates neurovascular damage in experimental ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Ziying; Wei, Xinbing; Han, Huirong; Meng, Xianfang; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Weichen; Li, Fengli; Xin, Tao; Pang, Qi; Yi, Fan

    2014-04-01

    Although the innate immune response to induce postischemic inflammation is considered as an essential step in the progression of cerebral ischemia injury, the role of innate immunity mediator NLRP3 in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke is unknown. In this study, focal ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in NLRP3(-/-), NOX2(-/-), or wild-type (WT) mice. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Evans blue permeability, and electron microscopic analyses, we found that NLRP3 deficiency ameliorated cerebral injury in mice after ischemic stroke by reducing infarcts and blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. We further showed that the contribution of NLRP3 to neurovascular damage was associated with an autocrine/paracrine pattern of NLRP3-mediated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release as evidenced by increased brain microvessel endothelial cell permeability and microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. Finally, we found that NOX2 deficiency improved outcomes after ischemic stroke by mediating NLRP3 signaling. This study for the first time shows the contribution of NLRP3 to neurovascular damage and provides direct evidence that NLRP3 as an important target molecule links NOX2-mediated oxidative stress to neurovascular damage in ischemic stroke. Pharmacological targeting of NLRP3-mediated inflammatory response at multiple levels may help design a new approach to develop therapeutic strategies for prevention of deterioration of cerebral function and for the treatment of stroke.

  12. Ambient Air Pollution and the Risk of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wellenius, Gregory A.; Burger, Mary R.; Coull, Brent A.; Schwartz, Joel; Suh, Helen H.; Koutrakis, Petros; Schlaug, Gottfried; Gold, Diane R.; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The link between daily changes in ambient fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is well established. Whether PM2.5 at levels below current US National Ambient Air Quality Standards also increases the risk of ischemic stroke remains uncertain. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 1705 Boston-area patients hospitalized with neurologist-confirmed ischemic stroke and abstracted data on the time of symptom onset and clinical characteristics. PM2.5 concentrations were measured at a central monitoring station. We used the time-stratified case-crossover study design to assess the association between the risk of ischemic stroke onset and PM2.5 levels in the hours and days preceding each event. We examined whether the association with PM2.5 differed by ischemic stroke etiology and patient characteristics. Results The estimated odds ratio of ischemic stroke onset was 1.34 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13, 1.58; p<0.001) following a 24-hour period classified as “moderate” (PM2.5 15–40 μg/m3) by the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Air Quality Index compared to a 24-hour period classified as “good” (≤15 μg/m3). Considering PM2.5 as a continuous variable, the estimated odds ratio of ischemic stroke onset was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.20; p=0.006) per interquartile range increase in PM2.5 (6.4 μg/m3). The increase in risk was greatest within 12–14 hours of exposure to PM2.5 and was most strongly associated with markers of traffic-related pollution. Conclusion These results suggest that exposure to PM2.5 levels considered generally safe by the US EPA increase the risk of ischemic stroke onset within hours of exposure. PMID:22332153

  13. Advances in the Treatment of Ischemic Diseases by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujing; Wang, Xianyun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong; Li, Quanhai

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic diseases are a group of diseases, including ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), and diabetic foot as well as other diseases which are becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to treat a variety of ischemic diseases in animal models and clinical trials. Lots of recent publications demonstrated that MSCs therapy was safe and relieved symptoms in patients of ischemic disease. However, many factors could influence therapeutic efficacy including route of delivery, MSCs' survival and residential rate in vivo, timing of transplantation, particular microenvironment, and patient's clinical condition. In this review, the current status, therapeutic potential, and the detailed factors of MSCs-based therapeutics for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ICM, and diabetic foot are presented and discussed. We think that MSCs transplantation would constitute an ideal option for patients with ischemic diseases. PMID:27293445

  14. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35-54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55-64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  15. Frequency of craniofacial pain in patients with ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Mahin; Rezaei, Rezvan; Baharvand, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background Referred craniofacial pain of cardiac origin might be the only symptom of ischemic heart accidents. This study aimed to determine the frequency of craniofacial pain in patients with ischemic heart disease. Material and Methods This cross-sectional study was accomplished on 296 patients who met the criteria of having ischemic heart disease. Data regarding demographics, medical history and referred craniofacial pain were recorded in data forms. In addition, patients underwent oral examination to preclude any source of dental origin. Chi-square test, Student’s t-test and backward regression model were used to analyze the data by means of SPSS software version 21. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results A total of 296 patients were studied comprising of 211 men (71%) and 85 women (29%) with the mean age of 55.8. Craniofacial pain was experienced by 53 patients out of 296, 35 (66%) of whom were male and 18 (34%) were female. None of the patients experienced craniofacial pain solely. The most common sites of craniofacial pain were occipital and posterior neck (52.8%), head (43.3%), throat and anterior neck (41.5%) respectively. We found no relationship between craniofacial pain of cardiac origin with age, diabetes, hypertension, and family history. On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between hyperlipidemia and smoking with craniofacial pain of cardiac origin. Conclusions Radiating pain to face and head can be expected quite commonly during a cardiac ischemic event. Dental practitioners should be thoroughly aware of this symptomatology to prevent misdirected dental treatment and delay of medical care. Key words:Craniofacial pain, ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, referred pain. PMID:28149470

  16. Disruption of thrombospondin-2 accelerates ischemic fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Miedel, Emily; Dishowitz, Michael I; Myers, Marc H; Dopkin, Derek; Yu, Yan-Yiu; Miclau, Ted S; Marcucio, Ralph; Ahn, Jaimo; Hankenson, Kurt D

    2013-06-01

    Thrombospondin-2 (TSP2) is a matricellular protein that is highly up-regulated during fracture healing. TSP2 negatively regulates vascularity, vascular reperfusion following ischemia, and cutaneous wound healing. As well, TSP2-null mice show increased endocortical bone formation due to an enhanced number of mesenchymal progenitor cells and show increased cortical thickness. Mice deficient in TSP2 (TSP2-null) show an alteration in fracture healing, that is unrelated to their cortical bone phenotype, which is characterized by enhanced vascularization with a shift towards an intramembranous healing phenotype; thus, we hypothesized that there would be enhanced ischemic fracture healing in the absence of TSP2. We investigated whether an absence of TSP2 would enhance ischemic fracture healing utilizing Laser doppler, µCT and histological analysis. Ischemic tibial fractures were created in wildtype (WT) and TSP2-null mice and harvested 10, 20, or 40 days post-fracture. TSP2-null mice show enhanced vascular perfusion following ischemic fracture. At day 10 post-fracture, TSP2-null mice have 115% greater bone volume than WT mice. This is associated with a 122% increase in vessel density, 20% increase in cell proliferation, and 15% decrease in apoptosis compared to WT. At day 20, TSP2-null mice have 34% more bone volume, 51% greater bone volume fraction, and 37% more bone tissue mineral density than WT. By 40 days after fracture the TSP2-null mice have a 24% increase in bone volume fraction, but other parameters show no significant differences. These findings indicate TSP2 is a negative regulator of ischemic fracture healing and that in the absence of TSP2 bone regeneration is enhanced.

  17. Etiologic Ischemic Stroke Phenotypes in the NINDS Stroke Genetics Network

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Robert D.; Chapman, Sherita N.; Cole, John W.; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P.; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Labovitz, Daniel L.; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S.; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose NINDS Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of etiologic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. Methods Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major etiologic groups without weighting towards the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16,954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded re-adjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. Results The distribution of etiologic categories varied by study, age, sex, and race (p<0.001 for each). Overall, only 40% to 54% of cases with a given major ischemic stroke etiology (phenotypic subtype) were classified into the same final causative category with high confidence. There was good agreement for both causative (kappa 0.72, 95%CI:0.69-0.75) and phenotypic classifications (kappa 0.73, 95%CI:0.70-0.75). Conclusions This study demonstrates that etiologic subtypes can be determined with good reliability in studies that include investigators with different expertise and background, institutions with different stroke evaluation protocols and geographic location, and patient populations with different epidemiological characteristics. The discordance between phenotypic and causative stroke subtypes highlights the fact that the presence of an abnormality in a stroke patient does not necessarily mean that it is the cause of stroke. PMID:25378430

  18. The role of HIF in cobalt-induced ischemic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Jones, S M; Novak, A E; Elliott, J P

    2013-11-12

    Understanding the endogenous survival pathways induced by ischemic tolerance may yield targets for neuroprotection from stroke. One well-studied pathway reported to be evoked by preconditioning stimuli is the transcription factor HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor). However, whether HIF induction by ischemic insults is neuroprotective or toxic is still unclear. We examined the ability of three prolyl-hydroxylase inhibitors, which induce HIF, to protect hippocampal cultures from oxygen-glucose deprivation. Hippocampal cultures were exposed to ischemic preconditioning or various concentrations of cobalt chloride, deferoxamine (DFO) or dimethyloxylalyglycine (DMOG), prior to lethal oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Cell survival of neurons and astrocytes was determined with dual-label immunocytochemistry. The induction of HIF targets was assessed in mixed as well as astrocyte-enriched cultures. Ischemic preconditioning, as well as low concentrations of cobalt and DFO, enhanced the survival of neurons following OGD. However, DMOG exacerbates OGD-induced neuronal death. At low concentrations, all three prolyl-hydroxylase (PHD) inhibitors increased the survival of astrocytes. Neuroprotective concentrations of cobalt induced the transcription of the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) in astrocyte cultures. In addition, pretreatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rH-EPO) also protected neurons from OGD. Our data suggest that HIF-induced EPO, released from astrocytes, protects neurons from OGD. However, the three PHD inhibitors each exhibited different neuroprotective profiles at low concentrations, suggesting that not all PHD inhibitors are created equal. The protective effects at low doses is reminiscent of HIF involvement in ischemic tolerance, in which sub-lethal insults induce HIF pathways resulting in neuroprotection, whereas the high-dose toxicity suggests that over-activation of HIF is not always protective. Therefore, the choice of inhibitor and dose may determine

  19. Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults and Preexisting Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yu-Chuan; Bai, Ya-Mei; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Mu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies showed that psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorders, and alcohol misuse are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke. However, the link between psychiatric disorders and stroke in the young population is rarely investigated. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 2063 young adults aged between 18 and 45 years with ischemic stroke and 8252 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in our study between 1998 and 2011. Participants who had preexisting psychiatric disorders were identified. After adjusting for preexisting physical disorders and demographic data, patients with ischemic stroke had an increased risk of having preexisting psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder (odds ratio [OR]: 2.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06∼4.67), unipolar depression (OR: 2.15, 95% CI: 1.62∼2.86), anxiety disorders (OR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.87∼3.69), and alcohol use disorders (OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.79∼4.57). Young ischemic stroke (age ≥30 years) was related to the risk of preexisting unipolar depression (OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.05∼2.11), anxiety disorders (OR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.33∼2.97), and alcohol use disorders (OR: 2.54, 95% CI: 1.55∼4.14); very young stroke (age <30 years) was only associated with the risk of preexisting unipolar depression (OR: 4.15, 95% CI: 1.47∼11.72). Patients who had experienced ischemic stroke at age younger than 45 years had a higher risk of having pre-existing bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety disorders, and alcohol use disorders than those who did not after adjusting for demographic data and stroke-related medical comorbidities. PMID:26402806

  20. Sensitivity to acute cerebral ischemic injury in migraineurs

    PubMed Central

    Mawet, Jerome; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Helenius, Johanna; Daneshmand, Ali; Pearlman, Lea; Avery, Ross; Negro, Andrea; Velioglu, Murat; Arsava, Ethem Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Migraine, particularly with aura, is a risk factor for ischemic stroke. Recent data in migraine mutant mice suggest that cerebral hyperexcitability associated with migraine accelerates recruitment of ischemic penumbra into the core, resulting in faster infarct growth compared with wild type. We hypothesized that individuals with a history of migraine are more likely to exhibit increased recruitment of ischemic tissue into the infarct in acute stroke. Methods: In this retrospective case-control study, we identified participants with reliably documented migraine history, measured lesion volumes on diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted MRI obtained within 72 hours of symptom onset, calculated the proportion of ischemic tissue on perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and compared the proportion of patients with no-mismatch pattern defined as DWI lesion >83% of PWI lesion. Results: Migraineurs (n = 45) were younger, more often female, less likely to have vascular risk factors, and more often had cervical artery dissection, but otherwise did not differ from controls (n = 27). A significantly larger proportion of migraineurs had no-mismatch pattern, indicating that the entire perfusion defect was recruited into the infarct by the time of MRI (22% vs 4% of migraineurs and controls, respectively; p = 0.044). The difference was even more prominent in migraineurs with aura (36% vs 4%, p = 0.019). The association between migraine and no-mismatch pattern persisted after adjustment for time to MRI (p = 0.041). Conclusions: This case-control study supports the hypothesis that a history of migraine, particularly with aura, is associated with a no-mismatch pattern during acute ischemic stroke, consistent with data obtained in migraine mutant mice. PMID:26537055

  1. Use of susceptibility-weighted imaging in assessing ischemic penumbra

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Luo, Song; Wang, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Jun; Bai, Jing; Feng, Jiachun; Zhang, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The ischemic penumbra assessment is essential for the subsequent therapy and prediction of evolution in patients with acute ischemic infraction. Although controversial as a perfect equivalence to penumbra, perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)-diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) mismatch may predict the response to thrombolysis. Due to the reliance of PWI on contrast agents, noninvasive alternatives remain an unmet need. Patient concerns: We reported a 65-year-old man complained of paroxysmal hemiplegia of his right limbs and anepia for 2 days, whereas the symptoms lasted for about 12 hours when he admitted to the hospital. Diagnosis: We diagnosed it as acute ischemic stroke caused by the left middle cerebral artery stenosis. Interventions: Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) work-up which includes conventional MRI sequences (T1WI, T2WI, and FLAIR), DWI, PWI. Outcomes: His DWI-SWI mismatch was comparable to that of DWI-PWI at admission, suggesting that DWI-SWI could predict ischemic penumbra in patient with acute infarction. He refused the digital subtraction angiography examination or stenting, and he was treated with aspirin, atorvastain, and supportive treatment. The patient received a reexamination of the conventional MRI and SWI 11 days later. Expansion of the infarction in the affected MCA territory resulted from the penumbra indicated by the mismatch between DWI-SWI. Lessons: SWI can be used as a noninvasive alternative to evaluate the ischemic penumbra. Besides, SWI can provide perfusion information comparable to PWI and SWI is sufficient to identify occlusive arteries. PMID:28178170

  2. Expression profile based gene clusters for ischemic stroke detection Whole blood gene clusters for ischemic stroke detection

    PubMed Central

    Adamski, Mateusz G; Li, Yan; Wagner, Erin; Yu, Hua; Seales-Bailey, Chloe; Soper, Steven A; Murphy, Michael; Baird, Alison E

    2014-01-01

    In microarray studies alterations in gene expression in circulating leukocytes have shown utility for ischemic stroke diagnosis. We studied forty candidate markers identified in three gene expression profiles to (1) quantitate individual transcript expression, (2) identify transcript clusters and (3) assess the clinical diagnostic utility of the clusters identified for ischemic stroke detection. Using high throughput next generation qPCR 16 of the 40 transcripts were significantly up-regulated in stroke patients relative to control subjects (p<0.05). Six clusters of between 5 and 7 transcripts discriminated between stroke and control (p values between 1.01e-9 and 0.03). A 7 transcript cluster containing PLBD1, PYGL, BST1, DUSP1, FOS, VCAN and FCGR1A showed high accuracy for stroke classification (AUC=0.854). These results validate and improve upon the diagnostic value of transcripts identified in microarray studies for ischemic stroke. The clusters identified show promise for acute ischemic stroke detection. PMID:25135788

  3. Statin Prescription Adhered to Guidelines for Patients Hospitalized due to Acute Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Oh, Mi Sun; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Cho, A-Hyun; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Juneyoung

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Secondary stroke prevention guidelines recommend statins for the management of dyslipidemia in ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). This study assessed the guideline-based statin prescription (GBSP) rate in Korea and the associated physician and patient factors. Methods A survey was conducted to assess Korean neurologists' knowledge of and attitude toward the current dyslipidemia management guidelines. The characteristics and discharge statin prescription for all consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke or TIA treated by participating neurologists during the 6 months prior to the survey were abstracted. Using algorithms to determine GBSP, we assessed the rate and independent factors of GBSP. Results Of the 174 participating neurologists, 79 (45.4%) were categorized as a higher-level knowledge group. For the 4407 patients (mean age, 66.4 years; female, 42.5%; 90.6% with ischemic stroke and 9.4% with TIA) enrolled in this study, the GBSP rate at discharge was 78.6%. The GBSP rate increased significantly with increasing physician knowledge level (test for trend, p<0.0001), and was higher among patients treated by the higher-level knowledge group than for those treated by the lower-level knowledge group (81.6% vs. 74.7%; unadjusted p<0.0001 and adjusted p=0.045). Other independent factors associated with a higher GBSP rate were hypercholesterolemia and higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, while those associated with a lower GBSP rate were cardioembolism, undetermined etiology due to negative or incomplete work-up, other determined etiology, and TIA presentation. Conclusions More than three-quarters of acute ischemic stroke survivors and TIA patients receive a GBSP at discharge, and this proportion would be further improved by improving the knowledge of dyslipidemia management guidelines among neurologists. PMID:24285962

  4. The complexity of atrial fibrillation newly diagnosed after ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack: advances and uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Cerasuolo, Joshua O.; Cipriano, Lauren E.; Sposato, Luciano A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Atrial fibrillation is being increasingly diagnosed after ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). Patient characteristics, frequency and duration of paroxysms, and the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke associated with atrial fibrillation detected after stroke and TIA (AFDAS) may differ from atrial fibrillation already known before stroke occurrence. We aim to summarize major recent advances in the field, in the context of prior evidence, and to identify areas of uncertainty to be addressed in future research. Recent findings Half of all atrial fibrillations in ischemic stroke and TIA patients are AFDAS, and most of them are asymptomatic. Over 50% of AFDAS paroxysms last less than 30 s. The rapid initiation of cardiac monitoring and its duration are crucial for its timely and effective detection. AFDAS comprises a heterogeneous mix of atrial fibrillation, possibly including cardiogenic and neurogenic types, and a mix of both. Over 25 single markers and at least 10 scores have been proposed as predictors of AFDAS. However, there are considerable inconsistencies across studies. The role of AFDAS burden and its associated risk of stroke recurrence have not yet been investigated. Summary AFDAS may differ from atrial fibrillation known before stroke in several clinical dimensions, which are important for optimal patient care strategies. Many questions remain unanswered. Neurogenic and cardiogenic AFDAS need to be characterized, as it may be possible to avoid some neurogenic cases by initiating timely preventive treatments. AFDAS burden may differ in ischemic stroke and TIA patients, with distinctive diagnostic and treatment implications. The prognosis of AFDAS and its risk of recurrent stroke are still unknown; therefore, it is uncertain whether AFDAS patients should be treated with oral anticoagulants. PMID:27984303

  5. Rodent models of ischemic stroke lack translational relevance... are baboon models the answer?

    PubMed

    Kwiecien, Timothy D; Sy, Christopher; Ding, Yuchuan

    2014-05-01

    Rodent models of ischemic stroke are associated with many issues and limitations, which greatly diminish the translational potential of these studies. Recent studies demonstrate that significant differences exist between rodent and human ischemic stroke. These differences include the physical characteristics of the stroke, as well as changes in the subsequent inflammatory and molecular pathways following the acute ischemic insult. Non-human primate (NHP) models of ischemic stroke, however, are much more similar to humans. In addition to evident anatomical similarities, the physiological responses that NHPs experience during ischemic stroke are much more applicable to the human condition and thus make it an attractive model for future research. The baboon ischemic stroke model, in particular, has been studied extensively in comparison to other NHP models. Here we discuss the major shortcomings associated with rodent ischemic stroke models and provide a comparative overview of baboon ischemic stroke models. Studies have shown that baboons, although more difficult to obtain and handle, are more representative of ischemic events in humans and may have greater translational potential that can offset these deficiencies. There remain critical issues within these baboon stroke studies that need to be addressed in future investigations. The most critical issue revolves around the size and the variability of baboon ischemic stroke. Compared to rodent models, however, issues such as these can be addressed in future studies. Importantly, baboon models avoid many drawbacks associated with rodent models including vascular variability and inconsistent inflammatory responses - issues that are inherent to the species and cannot be avoided.

  6. TNFR1 mediates increased neuronal membrane EAAT3 expression after in vivo cerebral ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Pradillo, J M; Hurtado, O; Romera, C; Cárdenas, A; Fernández-Tomé, P; Alonso-Escolano, D; Lorenzo, P; Moro, M A; Lizasoain, I

    2006-01-01

    A short ischemic event (ischemic preconditioning) can result in subsequent resistance to severe ischemic injury (ischemic tolerance). Glutamate is released after ischemia and produces cell death. It has been described that after ischemic preconditioning, the release of glutamate is reduced. We have shown that an in vitro model of ischemic preconditioning produces upregulation of glutamate transporters which mediates brain tolerance. We have now decided to investigate whether ischemic preconditioning-induced glutamate transporter upregulation takes also place in vivo, its cellular localization and the mechanisms by which this upregulation is controlled. A period of 10 min of temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion was used as a model of ischemic preconditioning in rat. EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 glutamate transporters were found in brain from control animals. Ischemic preconditioning produced an up-regulation of EAAT2 and EAAT3 but not of EAAT1 expression. Ischemic preconditioning-induced increase in EAAT3 expression was reduced by the TNF-alpha converting enzyme inhibitor BB1101. Intracerebral administration of either anti-TNF-alpha antibody or of a TNFR1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide also inhibited ischemic preconditioning-induced EAAT3 up-regulation. Immunohistochemical studies suggest that, whereas the expression of EAAT3 is located in both neuronal cytoplasm and plasma membrane, ischemic preconditioning-induced up-regulation of EAAT3 is mainly localized at the plasma membrane level. In summary, these results demonstrate that in vivo ischemic preconditioning increases the expression of EAAT2 and EAAT3 glutamate transporters the upregulation of the latter being at least partly mediated by TNF-alpha converting enzyme/TNF-alpha/TNFR1 pathway.

  7. Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Gonzales, Ernie; Soetikno, Brian; Gong, Enhao; Yan, Ping; Maslov, Konstantin; Lee, Jin-Moo; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    A major obstacle in understanding the mechanism of ischemic stroke is the lack of a tool to noninvasively or minimally invasively monitor cerebral hemodynamics longitudinally. Here, we applied optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) to longitudinally study ischemic stroke induced brain injury in a mouse model with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). OR-PAM showed that, during MCAO, the average hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) values of feeder arteries and draining veins within the stroke core region dropped ~10% and ~34%, respectively. After reperfusion, arterial sO2 recovered back to the baseline; however, the venous sO2 increased above the baseline value by ~7%. Thereafter, venous sO2 values were close to the arterial sO2 values, suggesting eventual brain tissue infarction.

  8. Neuroprotection in acute ischemic stroke – current status

    PubMed Central

    Auriel, E; Bornstein, NM

    2010-01-01

    Abstract With the growing understanding of the mechanism of cell death in ischemia, new approaches for treatment such as neuroprotection have emerged. The basic aim of this strategy is to interfere with the events of the ischemic cascade, blocking the pathological processes and preventing the death of nerve cells in the ischemic penumebra. This concept involves inhibition of the pathological molecular events which eventually leads to the influx of calcium, activation of free radicals and neuronal death. Despite encouraging data from experimental animal models, all clinical trials of neuroprotective therapies have to date been unsuccessful. This article reviews some of the reasons for the failure of neuroprotection in the clinical trials so far. Despite all the negative reports, we believe it would be wrong to give up at this point, since there is still reasonable hope of finding an effective neuroprotection for stroke. PMID:20716132

  9. Spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Della Marca, Giacomo; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Morosetti, Roberta; Caliandro, Pietro; Frisullo, Giovanni

    2014-06-15

    Spontaneous or traumatic bleeding is a common complication of systemic thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We report the case of an 83 y.o. woman with right facio-brachio-crural hemiparesis, left deviation of the head and aphasia who developed, after thrombolytic therapy, a spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma that regressed few days later. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of asymptomatic and spontaneous skeletal muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The occurrence of lateral cervical tuberculosis lymphadenitis ipsilateral to sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma may suggest a causal relationship between local chronic inflammation of active mycobacterial infection and thrombolysis-related extravasation. This case should suggest caution in thrombolytic treatment in patients with chronic immune dysregulation and vascular inflammation such as extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

  10. Mechanisms of gender-linked ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyue; Dziennis, Suzan; Hurn, Patricia D.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2010-01-01

    Biological sex is an important determinant of stroke risk and outcome. Women are protected from cerebrovascular disease relative to men, an observation commonly attributed to the protective effect of female sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone. However, sex differences in brain injury persist well beyond the menopause and can be found in the pediatric population, suggesting that the effects of reproductive steroids may not completely explain sexual dimorphism in stroke. We review recent advances in our understanding of sex steroids (estradiol, progesterone and testosterone) in the context of ischemic cell death and neuroprotection. Understanding the molecular and cell-based mechanisms underlying sex differences in ischemic brain injury will lead to a better understanding of basic mechanisms of brain cell death and is an important step toward designing more effective therapeutic interventions in stroke. PMID:19531872

  11. Blood-brain barrier tight junction permeability and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Karin E; Witt, Ken A

    2008-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is formed by the endothelial cells of cerebral microvessels, providing a dynamic interface between the peripheral circulation and the central nervous system. The tight junctions (TJs) between the endothelial cells serve to restrict blood-borne substances from entering the brain. Under ischemic stroke conditions decreased BBB TJ integrity results in increased paracellular permeability, directly contributing to cerebral vasogenic edema, hemorrhagic transformation, and increased mortality. This loss of TJ integrity occurs in a phasic manner, which is contingent on several interdependent mechanisms (ionic dysregulation, inflammation, oxidative and nitrosative stress, enzymatic activity, and angiogenesis). Understanding the inter-relation of these mechanisms is critical for the development of new therapies. This review focuses on those aspects of ischemic stroke impacting BBB TJ integrity and the principle regulatory pathways, respective to the phases of paracellular permeability.

  12. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): A Progress Report

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Kissela, Brett M.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Beck, Jeanne; Skarp, Alexa N.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genetic factors are associated with ischemic stroke, including multiple recent reports of association with the gene PDE4D, encoding phosphodiesterase 4D, on chromosome 5q12. Genetic studies of stroke are important but can be logistically difficult to perform. This article reviews the design of the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) and discusses problems in performing a sibling-based pedigree study where proband-initiated consent is used to enroll pedigree members. Proband-initiated enrollment optimizes privacy protections for family members, but it is associated with a substantial pedigree non-completion rate such that 3 to 4 probands must be identified to obtain one completed sibling pedigree. This report updates the progress of enrollment in the SWISS protocol, discusses barriers to pedigree completion and describes innovative approaches used by the SWISS investigators to enhance enrollment. PMID:16595789

  13. Trypanosomiasis, cardiomyopathy and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2010-05-01

    American (Chagas disease) and African (sleeping sickness) trypanosomiasis are neglected tropical diseases and are a heavy burden in Latin America and Africa, respectively. Chagas disease is an independent risk factor for stroke. Apical aneurysm, heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias are associated with ischemic stroke in chagasic cardiomyopathy. Not all chagasic patients who suffer an ischemic stroke have a severe cardiomyopathy, and stroke may be the first manifestation of Chagas disease. Cardioembolism affecting the middle cerebral artery is the most common stroke subtype. Risk of recurrence is high and careful evaluation of recurrence risk should be addressed. Repolarization changes, low voltage and prolonged QT interval are common electrocardiography alterations in human African trypanosomiasis, and can be found in more than 70% of patients. Epidemiological studies are needed to asses the risk of stroke in African trypanosomiasis perimyocarditis.

  14. Ischemic Colitis Secondary to Ergotamine Use: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodman, Regina E.; Willson, Thomas D.; Connolly, Mark M.; Podbielski, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman with a history of chronic migraines, initially admitted for inpatient management of intractable migraine headaches, developed new onset abdominal pain, hypotension, and diarrhea on hospital day number ten. In our institution's headache unit, patients are treated by a multidisciplinary approach, including individualized drug therapy based on diagnosis and previous response to therapy. Given the patient's hypotension and clinical appearance, she was transferred to the intensive care unit and treated for septic shock and metabolic acidosis. A bedside colonscopy revealed diffuse ischemic colitis. Final pathology after colon resection showed widespread, transmural necrosis of the colonic wall. We review the pathophysiology of ergotamine use and its potential association with ischemic colitis. PMID:22347148

  15. Renal Hypoxia and Dysoxia After Reperfusion of the Ischemic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Matthieu; Mik, Egbert G; Johannes, Tanja; Payen, Didier; Ince, Can

    2008-01-01

    Ischemia is the most common cause of acute renal failure. Ischemic-induced renal tissue hypoxia is thought to be a major component in the development of acute renal failure in promoting the initial tubular damage. Renal oxygenation originates from a balance between oxygen supply and consumption. Recent investigations have provided new insights into alterations in oxygenation pathways in the ischemic kidney. These findings have identified a central role of microvascular dysfunction related to an imbalance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators, endothelial damage and endothelium–leukocyte interactions, leading to decreased renal oxygen supply. Reduced microcirculatory oxygen supply may be associated with altered cellular oxygen consumption (dysoxia), because of mitochondrial dysfunction and activity of alternative oxygen-consuming pathways. Alterations in oxygen utilization and/or supply might therefore contribute to the occurrence of organ dysfunction. This view places oxygen pathways’ alterations as a potential central player in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury. Both in regulation of oxygen supply and consumption, nitric oxide seems to play a pivotal role. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that, following acute ischemic renal injury, persistent tissue hypoxia contributes to the development of chronic renal dysfunction. Adaptative mechanisms to renal hypoxia may be ineffective in more severe cases and lead to the development of chronic renal failure following ischemia-reperfusion. This paper is aimed at reviewing the current insights into oxygen transport pathways, from oxygen supply to oxygen consumption in the kidney and from the adaptation mechanisms to renal hypoxia. Their role in the development of ischemia-induced renal damage and ischemic acute renal failure are discussed. PMID:18488066

  16. Loss of the Mexican American survival advantage after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Brown, Devin L.; Smith, Melinda A.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Zahuranec, Darin B.; Garcia, Nelda; Kerber, Kevin A.; Skolarus, Lesli E.; Meurer, William J; Burke, James F; Adelman, Eric E.; Baek, Jonggyu; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mexican Americans (MAs) were previously found to have lower mortality following ischemic stroke than non Hispanic Whites (NHWs). We studied mortality trends in a population-based design. Methods Active and passive surveillance were used to find all ischemic stroke cases from January, 2000–December, 2011 in Nueces County, Texas. Deaths were ascertained from the Texas Department of Health through December 31 2012. Cumulative 30-day and 1 year mortality adjusted for covariates was estimated using log-binomial models with a linear term for year of stroke onset used to model time trends. Models used data from the entire study period to estimate adjusted mortality among stroke cases in 2000 and 2011, and to calculate projected ethnic differences. Results There were 1,974 ischemic strokes among NHWs and 2,439 among MAs. Between 2000 and 2011, model estimated mortality declined among NHWs at 30 days (7.6% to 5.6%, p=0.24) and 1 year (20.8% to 15.5%, p=0.02). Among MAs, 30-day model estimated mortality remained stagnant at 5.1% to 5.2% (p=0.92), and a slight decline from 17.4% to 15.3% was observed for 1 year mortality (p=0.26). While ethnic differences in 30-day (p=0.01) and 1 year (p=0.06) mortality were apparent in 2000, they were not so in 2011 (30-day, p=0.63; 1 year p=0.92). Conclusions Overall, mortality following ischemic stroke has declined in the last decade, although significant declines were only observed for NHWs and not MAs at 1 year. The survival advantage previously documented among MAs vanished by 2011. Renewed stroke prevention and treatment efforts for MAs are needed. PMID:25074514

  17. VEGF expression in human brain tissue after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mărgăritescu, Otilia; Pirici, D; Mărgăritescu, Cl

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third most common cause of death in humans, requiring further studies to elucidate its pathophysiological background. One potential mechanism to increase oxygen delivery to the affected tissue is induction of angiogenesis. The most potent proangiogenic factor is VEGF. For this reason, our study investigated immunohistochemically VEGF reactivity in different cellular brain compartments from 15 ischemic stroke patients, as well as from 2 age control cases. By enzymatic immunohistochemistry, we investigate VEGF expression in different brain cell compartments and then we quantified its signal intensity by assessing integrated optical densities (IOD). To establish the exact cellular brain topography of VEGF immunoreactivity we performed double fluorescent immunohistochemistry series (VEGF÷NeuN, GFAP, CD68, CD105). In control samples, VEGF reactivity was observed especially in neurons from the Brodmann cortical layers IV to VI and in protoplasmic astrocytes from the deeper layers of gray matter and in endothelial cells from normal blood vessels because of systemic hypoxia generated after death. In acute ischemic stroke samples, this reactivity was noticed in all brain cellular compartments but with different intensities. The most reactive compartment was the neurons, the intensity of VEGF reaction decreasing with the lesional age from the core infarct toward intact adjacent brain cortex. With a lower intensity, VEGF reaction was noticed in astrocytes compartments, especially in gemistocytic astrocytes adjacent to the liquefaction zone. We also noticed a weak reaction in activated non-phagocytic microglia from the periphery of liquefaction zones, and high VEGF-CD105 colocalization values at the level of microvessels that surround the infarcted brain area. In conclusion, this reactivity could suggest that VEGF might exhibit neuronal and glial protective effects and also a neoangiogenic property in acute ischemic stroke, facts that may have

  18. Classifiers for Ischemic Stroke Lesion Segmentation: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Oskar; Schröder, Christoph; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Martinetz, Thomas; Handels, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Ischemic stroke, triggered by an obstruction in the cerebral blood supply, leads to infarction of the affected brain tissue. An accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation is of high interest, since the lesion volume is an important end-point for clinical trials. However, various factors, such as the high variance in lesion shape, location and appearance, render it a difficult task. Methods In this article, nine classification methods (e.g. Generalized Linear Models, Random Decision Forests and Convolutional Neural Networks) are evaluated and compared with each other using 37 multiparametric MRI datasets of ischemic stroke patients in the sub-acute phase in terms of their accuracy and reliability for ischemic stroke lesion segmentation. Within this context, a multi-spectral classification approach is compared against mono-spectral classification performance using only FLAIR MRI datasets and two sets of expert segmentations are used for inter-observer agreement evaluation. Results and Conclusion The results of this study reveal that high-level machine learning methods lead to significantly better segmentation results compared to the rather simple classification methods, pointing towards a difficult non-linear problem. The overall best segmentation results were achieved by a Random Decision Forest and a Convolutional Neural Networks classification approach, even outperforming all previously published results. However, none of the methods tested in this work are capable of achieving results in the range of the human observer agreement and the automatic ischemic stroke lesion segmentation remains a complicated problem that needs to be explored in more detail to improve the segmentation results. PMID:26672989

  19. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lambrinos, Anna; Schaink, Alexis K; Dhalla, Irfan; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K; Sikich, Nancy; Lum, Cheemun; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kelloway, Linda; Xie, Xuanqian; Hill, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    Although intravenous thrombolysis increases the probability of a good functional outcome in carefully selected patients with acute ischemic stroke, a substantial proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis do not have a good outcome. Several recent trials of mechanical thrombectomy appear to indicate that this treatment may be superior to thrombolysis. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) compared with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. We systematically searched seven databases for randomized controlled trials published between January 2005 and March 2015 comparing stent retrievers or thromboaspiration devices with best medical therapy (with or without intravenous thrombolysis) in adults with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed risk of bias and overall quality of the included trials. We combined the data using a fixed or random effects meta-analysis, where appropriate. We identified 1579 studies; of these, we evaluated 122 full-text papers and included five randomized control trials (n=1287). Compared with patients treated medically, patients who received mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to be functionally independent as measured by a modified Rankin score of 0-2 (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-3.04; I2=0%). This finding was robust to subgroup analysis. Mortality and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different between the two groups. Mechanical thrombectomy significantly improves functional independence in appropriately selected patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  20. Association of serum uric acid with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Khalil, M I; Islam, M J; Ullah, M A; Khan, R K; Munira, S; Haque, M A; Mamun, M A; Islam, M T; Khan, M H

    2013-04-01

    The present study has examined the association between ischemic stroke and hyperuricemia in Bangladeshi population. This age and sex matched case control study was carried out in the Department of Neurology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh during the period of January 2007 to December 2008. A total of 120 subjects were included in this study, among them 60 were cases and another 60 were controls. Data were collected purposively. Multiple logistic regressions were done to identify the risk factors for ischemic stroke. In this study 68.3% were male and 31.7% were female in both the groups. Male and female ratio of stroke patients was 2.16:1. Mean±SD of serum uric acid level of case and control group was 4.94±1.76 and 3.72±1.09 respectively. Among the case group 76.7% had normal and 23.3% had abnormal serum uric acid level. On the other hand, 93.3% respondents of control group had normal and 6.7% had abnormal serum uric acid (SUA) level. Significant differences was found between case and control group in term of SUA level (p<0.05). Since SUA level is a quantitative numerical variable, an increase in 1mg/dl has a 47.0% (95% CI 1.0% to 2.16%) increase in odds ratio (OR) of having ischemic stroke. This 47.0% is obtained by taking OR for uric acid-1. Elevated serum uric acid level is not significant for ischemic stroke among the Bangladeshi population.

  1. High blood pressure in acute ischemic stroke and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuhiro; Kono, Syoichiro; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko

    2009-11-16

    This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of acute phase blood pressure in patients with acute ischemic stroke by determining whether or not it contributes to clinical outcome. We studied 515 consecutive patients admitted within the first 48 hours after the onset of ischemic strokes, employing systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements recorded within 36 hours after admission. High blood pressure was defined when the mean of at least 2 blood pressure measurements was ≥200 mmHg systolic and/or ≥110 mmHg diastolic at 6 to 24 hours after admission or ≥180 mmHg systolic and/or ≥105 mmHg diastolic at 24 to 36 hours after admission. The high blood pressure group was found to include 16% of the patients. Age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, ischemic heart disease, stroke history, carotid artery stenosis, leukoaraiosis, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on admission and mortality were not significantly correlated with either the high blood pressure or non-high blood pressure group. High blood pressure on admission was significantly associated with a past history of hypertension, kidney disease, the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on discharge and the length of stay. On logistic regression analysis, with no previous history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and kidney disease were independent risk factors associated with the presence of high blood pressure [odds ratio (OR), 1.85 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-3.22), 1.89 (95% CI: 1.11-3.22), and 3.31 (95% CI: 1.36-8.04), respectively]. Multi-organ injury may be presented in acute stroke patients with high blood pressure. Patients with high blood pressure had a poor functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

  2. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  3. Ischemic Stroke in the Elderly: Septuagenarians Versus Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    BAŞTAN, Birgül; GÜNAYDIN, Sefer; BALCI, Fatma Belgin; ACAR, Hürtan; MUTLU, Aytül; ÖZER, Feriha; ÇOKAR, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stroke prevalence is known to increase with age. Approximately 50% of acute ischemic stroke patients are aged between 70 and 89 years. Methods In this study, records of 770 ischemic stroke patients who were 70–89 years old were retrospectively examined (407 septuagenarians and 363 octogenarians). The demographics, comorbid conditions, ischemic stroke type, and stroke outcome for the two age groups were analyzed. Results Comorbid hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and HbA1c levels of ≥6.5% more frequently occurred in septuagenarians than in octogenarians (80.6% versus 70.8%, p=0.002; 32.2% versus 21.8%, p=0.001; and 35% versus 23.2%, p=0.003, respectively), whereas atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in octogenarians (49.3% versus 41.5%, p=0.03). Hypercholesterolemia, previous stroke history, and antiaggregant and/or anticoagulant use were not significantly different between the two age groups. Based on the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification, the most common stroke subtype in the septuagenarian group was a lacunar infarction and in the octogenarian group, it was a partial anterior circulation infarct. According to the Modified Ranking Score, the number of patients living independently was higher for septuagenarians (42.8% versus 27.8%, p<0.001). Conclusion The present findings indicate that the clinical characteristics of ischemic stroke differed between septuagenarians and octogenarians. Therefore, elderly stroke patients cannot be accepted as a homogeneous group. Because this is a hospital-based study, our findings need to be tested via additional epidemiological studies. PMID:28360808

  4. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  5. Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Therapy Mitigated Ischemic Stroke Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moldthan, Huong L.; Hirko, Aaron C.; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; Grant, Maria; Li, Zhimin; Peris, Joanna; Lu, Yuanqing; Elshikha, Ahmed; King, Michael A.; Hughes, Jeffrey A.; Song, Sihong

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the only effective therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the thrombolytic agent recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. α1-Antitrypsin, an endogenous inhibitor of serine proteinases and a primary acute phase protein with potent anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antimicrobial and cytoprotective activities, could be beneficial in stroke.. The goal of this study was to test whether α1-antitrypsin could improve ischemic stroke outcome in an established rat model. Middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male rats via intracranial microinjection of endothelin-1. Five to ten minutes following stroke induction rats received either intracranial or intravenous delivery of human α1-antitrypsin. Cylinder and vibrissae tests were used to evaluate sensorimotor function before and 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Infarct volumes were examined via either 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride assay or magnetic resonance imaging 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Despite equivalent initial strokes, at 72 hours the infarct volumes of the human α1-antitrypsin treatment groups (local and systemic injection) were statistically significantly reduced by 83% and 63% (p<0.0001 and p < 0.05 respectively) compared with control rats. Human α1-antitrypsin significantly limited sensory motor systems deficits. Human α1-antitrypsin could be a potential novel therapeutic drug for the protection against neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke, but more studies are needed to investigate the protective mechanisms and efficacy in other animal models. PMID:24582784

  6. Do energy drinks cause epileptic seizure and ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Dikici, Suber; Saritas, Ayhan; Besir, Fahri Halit; Tasci, Ahmet Hakan; Kandis, Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Energy drinks are popular among young individuals and marketed to college students, athletes, and active individuals between the ages of 21 and 35 years. We report a case that had ischemic stroke and epileptic seizure after intake of energy drink with alcohol. To the best of our knowledge, the following case is the first report of ischemic stroke after intake of energy drink. A previously healthy 37-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a witnessed tonic-clonic seizure. According to his wife's testimony, just before loss of consciousness, the patient had been drinking 3 boxes of energy drinks (Redbull, Istanbul, Turkey, 250 mL) with vodka on an empty stomach. He did not have a history of seizures, head trauma, or family history of seizures or another disease. In cranial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, there were hyperintense signal changes in bilateral occipital area (more pronounced in the left occipital lobe), right temporal lobe, frontal lobe, and posterior parietal lobe. All tests associated with possible etiologic causes of ischemic stroke in young patients were negative. Herein, we want to attract attention to adverse effect of energy drink usage.

  7. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  8. Increased hematocrit mitigates ischemic renal damage in the splenectomized dog.

    PubMed

    Bell, R D; Mandal, A K

    1989-03-01

    Splenectomy (SPLX) prevents ischemic acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and peritubular capillary (PTC) congestion. This study attempts to reverse the protective effect of splenectomy in the ischemic model of ATN by increasing hematocrit before inducing ATN. Sham-SPLX, SPLX, and SPLX dogs given packed red cells to elevate hematocrit by 30% (SPLX-high hematocrit) received bilateral renal artery obstruction (RAO) for 120 minutes. Renal function was tested for 6 days post-RAO. Hematocrit in the SPLX-high hematocrit group was greater (p less than .05) than the SPLX-RAO group but did not differ from the non-SPLX group. All groups had different (p less than .05) serum creatinine levels for 48 hours post-RAO, and untreated animals differed from all the others at 144 hours. Serum creatinine was highest in untreated, lowest in SPLX-high hematocrit, and intermediate in noninfused SPLX animals. The same pattern was observed in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine clearance and renal histopathology. Fractional excretion of sodium in the SPLX groups was six times that in the intact animals (p less than .05), irrespective of hematocrit level. We conclude that increased hematocrit is protective in ischemic ATN, and does not promote PTC congestion or ATN in the SPLX animal. In addition, the protective effect of splenectomy may be mediated, in part, by mechanism(s) that alter sodium transport or osmolar excretion.

  9. Asymmetric Dimethyarginine as Marker and Mediator in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shufen; Li, Na; Deb-Chatterji, Milani; Dong, Qiang; Kielstein, Jan T.; Weissenborn, Karin; Worthmann, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, is known as mediator of endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Circulating ADMA levels are correlated with cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia, age and smoking. Accordingly, clinical studies found evidence that increased ADMA levels are associated with a higher risk of cerebrovascular events. After the acute event of ischemic stroke, levels of ADMA and its analog symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) are elevated through augmentation of protein methylation and oxidative stress. Furthermore, cleavage of ADMA through dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAHs) is reduced. This increase of dimethylarginines might be predictive for adverse clinical outcome. However, the definite role of ADMA after acute ischemic stroke still needs to be clarified. On the one hand, ADMA might contribute to brain injury by reduction of cerebral blood flow. On the other hand, ADMA might be involved in NOS-induced oxidative stress and excitotoxic neuronal death. In the present review, we highlight the current knowledge from clinical and experimental studies on ADMA and its role for stroke risk and ischemic brain injury in the hyperacute stage after stroke. Finally, further studies are warranted to unravel the relevance of the close association of dimethylarginines with stroke. PMID:23443106

  10. Xanthine dehydrogenase to xanthine oxidase conversion in ischemic rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    McKelvey, T.G.; Engerson, T.D.; Elmore, C.R.; Jones, H.P. )

    1990-02-26

    The ischemic conversion of the NADH-producing xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) to an oxidase form, that produces both superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, has been proposed as an important step in initiating oxygen radical-mediated ischemia-reperfusion injury. It has also been reported that two forms of converted oxidase are produced in ischemic rat liver; a reversible xanthine oxidase produced through sulfhydryl oxidation, that can be reconverted to XDH by incubation with 10mM dithiothreitol (Dtt) at 37{degrees}C, and a Dtt-irreversible oxidase produced via proteolysis. The authors report that increased oxidase in the ischemic rat intestine results from significant increases in both the Dtt-reversible and Dtt-irreversible forms of xanthine oxidase. Total oxidase activity (Irreversible + Dtt-reversible) was 19% of the total enzyme activity (XDH + XO) in control ileum and distal jejunum, increased to 26% after 1 hour of ischemia at 37{degrees}C, and significantly to 36% after 1.5 hours. After 3 hours 73% of the activity was in the oxidase form. Irreversible oxidase comprised 15% of the total activity in control intestine, significantly increased to 25% after 2 hours, and further to 42% after 3 hours. Dtt-reversible oxidase was 3% of the total activity in controls, increased to 13% after 1.5 hours, and significantly to 29% after 2 hours.

  11. Targeting MMP-2 to treat ischemic heart injury.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Bryan G; Schulz, Richard

    2014-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) are long understood to be involved in remodeling of the extracellular matrix. However, over the past decade, it has become clear that one of the most ubiquitous MMPs, MMP-2, has numerous intracellular targets in cardiac myocytes. Notably, MMP-2 proteolyzes components of the sarcomere, and its intracellular activity contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart. Together with the well documented role played by MMPs in the myocardial remodeling that occurs following myocardial infarction, this has led to great interest in targeting MMPs to treat cardiac ischemic injury. In this review we will describe the expanding understanding of intracellular MMP-2 biology, and how this knowledge may lead to improved treatments for ischemic heart injury. We also critically review the numerous preclinical studies investigating the effects of MMP inhibition in animal models of myocardial infarction and ischemia-reperfusion injury, as well as the recent clinical trials that are part of the effort to translate these results into clinical practice. Acknowledging the disappointing results of past clinical trials of MMP inhibitors for other diseases, we discuss the need for carefully designed preclinical and clinical studies to avoid mistakes that have been previously made. We conclude that inhibition of MMPs, and in particular MMP-2, shows promise as a therapy to prevent the progression from ischemic injury to heart failure. However, it is critical that the full breadth of MMP-2 biology be taken into account as such therapies are developed.

  12. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q < 0.05) between lesions in the right insular, right frontal and right parietal cortex as well as the right amygdala, basal ganglia and thalamus and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  13. Protein methionine oxidation augments reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Blokhin, Ilya O.; Wilson, Katina M.; Dhanesha, Nirav; Doddapattar, Prakash; Grumbach, Isabella M.; Chauhan, Anil K.; Lentz, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Reperfusion injury can exacerbate tissue damage in ischemic stroke, but little is known about the mechanisms linking ROS to stroke severity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that protein methionine oxidation potentiates NF-κB activation and contributes to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. We found that overexpression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme that reverses protein methionine oxidation, attenuated ROS-augmented NF-κB activation in endothelial cells, in part, by protecting against the oxidation of methionine residues in the regulatory domain of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In a murine model, MsrA deficiency resulted in increased NF-κB activation and neutrophil infiltration, larger infarct volumes, and more severe neurological impairment after transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. This phenotype was prevented by inhibition of NF-κB or CaMKII. MsrA-deficient mice also exhibited enhanced leukocyte rolling and upregulation of E-selectin, an endothelial NF-κB–dependent adhesion molecule known to contribute to neurovascular inflammation in ischemic stroke. Finally, bone marrow transplantation experiments demonstrated that the neuroprotective effect was mediated by MsrA expressed in nonhematopoietic cells. These findings suggest that protein methionine oxidation in nonmyeloid cells is a key mechanism of postischemic oxidative injury mediated by NF-κB activation, leading to neutrophil recruitment and neurovascular inflammation in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27294204

  14. Reperfusion Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke. PMID:24646159

  15. Ginsenoside Rd and ischemic stroke; a short review of literatures☆

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Habtemariam, Solomon; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Panax ginseng is a well-known economic medical plant that is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine. This species contains a unique class of natural products—ginsenosides. Recent clinical and experimental studies have presented numerous lines of evidence on the promising role of ginsenosides on different diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and certain types of cancer. Nowadays, most of the attention has focused on ginsenoside Rd as a neuroprotective agent to attenuate ischemic stroke damages. Some of the evidence showed that ginsenoside Rd ameliorates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation. Ginsenoside Rd can prolong neural cells' survival through the upregulation of the endogenous antioxidant system, phosphoinositide-3-kinase/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 pathways, preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential, suppression of the nuclear factor-kappa B, transient receptor potential melastatin, acid sensing ion channels 1a, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, protein tyrosine kinase activation, as well as reduction of cytochrome c-releasing and apoptosis-inducing factor. In the current work, we review the available reports on the promising role of ginsenoside Rd on ischemic stroke. We also discuss its chemistry, source, and the molecular mechanism underlying this effect. PMID:26869821

  16. Reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke: an update.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-11-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke.

  17. Computer simulation of the reentrant cardiac arrhythmias in ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Lin; Jin, Yin-bin; Zhang, Zhen-xi; Huang, Yi-zhuo

    2005-09-30

    Computer simulation was performed to determine how reentrant activity could occur due to the spatial heterogeneity in refractoriness induced by the regional ischemia. Two regional ischemic models were developed by decreasing the intracellular ATP concentration, reducing conductance of the inward Na+ current and increasing the extracellular K+ concentration on the two-dimensional sheet. Operator splitting method was used to integrate the models. The vulnerability to reentry was estimated from the timings of premature stimuli on the constructed models, which could result in unidirectionally propagating action potentials. Two kinds of sustained spiral waves and their Pseudo-Electroscardiograms were observed in numerical simulation. The results showed that the dispersion of refractory period increased with ischemic aggravation, and led to augment of the vulnerable window. A permature stimulation within the vulnerable window could easily induce spiral reentry. The Pseudo-Electrocardiograms of the spiral waves exhibited monomorphic tachycardiac waveforms. Thus, the spatial heterogeneity in refractoriness could be a substrate for reentrant ventricular tachyarrhythmias on the regional ischemic tissue.

  18. Effect of glutathion pretreatment on hypothermic ischemic cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Amano, J; Sunamori, M; Okamura, T; Suzuki, A

    1982-01-01

    Glutathion (GSH) plays an important role in maintenance of the redox state of the myocardium and acts as the membrane stabilizer. Seventeen patients who underwent cardiac surgery were subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and ischemic cardioplegia. The effect of GSH on ischemic myocardium was evaluated by serum lysosomal enzymes (acid phosphatase, beta-glucuronidase), isoenzymes of creatine phosphokinase (MB-CPK) and aspartate aminotransferase (m-GOT). standard CPB was instituted and systemic hypothermia was employed. GSH was administered to 8 patients in a dose of 200 mg/kg i.v. prior to institution of CPB. Mixed venous blood was sampled before administration of GSH, 10 min after institution of CPB and 0, 1, 6, 24 and 48 hr of reperfusion period following cardioplegia. Activity of acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase were significantly suppressed in the GSH-treated group compared to the non-treated group at 24 hours of reperfusion and immediately after aortic unclamping, respectively. Serum MB-CPK levels remained stable during reperfusion, but in the non-treated group, the level increased significantly at 6 hours of reperfusion. Increment of serum m-GOT levels was significantly suppressed at 1, 6 and 24 hours of reperfusion, compared to the non-treated group. These data suggest that pretreatment of GSH can protect the myocardium subjected to CPB from ischemic insult.

  19. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia.

  20. Targeting neutrophils in ischemic stroke: translational insights from experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Jickling, Glen C; Liu, DaZhi; Ander, Bradley P; Stamova, Boryana; Zhan, Xinhua; Sharp, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils have key roles in ischemic brain injury, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. As such, neutrophils are of great interest as targets to treat and prevent ischemic stroke. After stroke, neutrophils respond rapidly promoting blood–brain barrier disruption, cerebral edema, and brain injury. A surge of neutrophil-derived reactive oxygen species, proteases, and cytokines are released as neutrophils interact with cerebral endothelium. Neutrophils also are linked to the major processes that cause ischemic stroke, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. Thrombosis is promoted through interactions with platelets, clotting factors, and release of prothrombotic molecules. In atherosclerosis, neutrophils promote plaque formation and rupture by generating oxidized-low density lipoprotein, enhancing monocyte infiltration, and degrading the fibrous cap. In experimental studies targeting neutrophils can improve stroke. However, early human studies have been met with challenges, and suggest that selective targeting of neutrophils may be required. Several properties of neutrophil are beneficial and thus may important to preserve in patients with stroke including antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, and neuroprotective functions. PMID:25806703

  1. Therapeutic Potential of Non-Psychotropic Cannabidiol in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Mishima, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2010-07-08

    Cannabis contains the psychoactive component delta⁸-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta⁸-THC), and the non-psychoactive components cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol, and cannabigerol. It is well-known that delta⁸-THC and other cannabinoid CB₁ receptor agonists are neuroprotective during global and focal ischemic injury. Additionally, delta⁸-THC also mediates psychological effects through the activation of the CB₁ receptor in the central nervous system. In addition to the CB₁ receptor agonists, cannabis also contains therapeutically active components which are CB₁ receptor independent. Of the CB₁ receptor-independent cannabis, the most important is CBD. In the past five years, an increasing number of publications have focused on the discovery of the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and neuroprotective effects of CBD. In particular, CBD exerts positive pharmacological effects in ischemic stroke and other chronic diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cerebroprotective action of CBD is CB₁ receptor-independent, long-lasting, and has potent anti-oxidant activity. Importantly, CBD use does not lead to tolerance. In this review, we will discuss the therapeutic possibility of CBD as a cerebroprotective agent, highlighting recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms, and therapeutic time window of CBD in ischemic stroke.

  2. Thrombolysis in Chinese Ischemic Stroke Patients with Renal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wai Ting; Cheung, Chi Yuen; Li, Chung Ki; Chau, Ka Foon; Fong, Wing Chi

    2015-01-01

    Background Current data concerning the relationship between renal function and clinical outcome among stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolytic therapy are conflicting. Our aim is to analyze whether the clinical outcome of Chinese ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombolytic therapy is affected by the presence of renal dysfunction. Methods Chinese patients who received intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke were recruited. Renal dysfunction was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <90 ml/min/1.73 m2. The primary outcome was independent function (modified Rankin Scale, mRS, 0-2) at 3 months, while secondary outcomes included early improvement of the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of ≥4 points at 24 h, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) within 36 h of treatment and 30-day mortality. Results A total of 199 patients were recruited, of whom 51.3% had renal dysfunction. There were no significant differences in functional independence at 3 months, NIHSS improvement at 24 h post-thrombolysis and 30-day mortality between patients with or without renal dysfunction. Multivariate analysis showed that eGFR as a continuous variable was not an independent risk factor for symptomatic ICH. Conclusion Chinese ischemic stroke patients with renal dysfunction who received thrombolytic therapy had clinical outcomes similar to those without renal dysfunction. PMID:26019713

  3. The effect of ischemic preconditioning on the recovery of skeletal muscle following tourniquet ischemia.

    PubMed

    Whetzel, T P; Stevenson, T R; Sharman, R B; Carlsen, R C

    1997-12-01

    It has been well documented that ischemic preconditioning limits ischemic-reperfusion injury in cardiac muscle, but the ability of ischemic preconditioning to limit skeletal muscle injury is less clear. Previous reports have emphasized the beneficial effects of ischemic preconditioning on skeletal muscle structure and capillary perfusion but have not evaluated muscle function. We investigated the morphologic and functional consequences of ischemic preconditioning, followed by a 2-hour period of tourniquet ischemia on muscles in the rat hindlimb. The 2-hour ischemia was imposed without preconditioning, or was preceded by three brief (10 minutes on/10 minutes off) preischemic conditioning intervals. We compared muscle morphology, isometric contractile function, and muscle fatigue properties in predominantly fast-twitch, tibialis anterior muscles 3 (n = 8) and 7 (n = 8) days after ischemia-reperfusion. Two hours of ischemia, followed by reperfusion, results in a 20 percent reduction of muscle mass (p < 0.05) and a 33 percent reduction in tetanic tension (p < 0.05) when compared with controls (n = 8) at 3 days. The same protocol, when preceded by ischemic preconditioning, results in similar decreases in muscle mass and contractile function. Neuromuscular transmission was also impaired in both ischemic groups 7 days after ischemia. Nerve-evoked maximum tetanic tension was 69 percent of the tension produced by direct muscle stimulation in the ischemia group and 65 percent of direct tension in the ischemic preconditioning/ischemia group. In summary, ischemic preconditioning, using the same protocol reported to be effective in limiting infarct size in porcine muscle, had no significant benefit in limiting injury or improving recovery in the ischemic rat tibialis anterior. The value of ischemic preconditioning in reducing imposed ischemic-reperfusion-induced functional deficits in skeletal muscle remains to be demonstrated.

  4. Treatment of ischemic leg ulcers with pentoxifylline: a case report and theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Velanovich, V; Fahey, M J

    1990-07-01

    Ischemic ulcers remain difficult to treat. We describe a patient with bilateral ischemic leg ulcers treated preoperatively with pentoxifylline. She had a successful skin graft with no rejection of the graft. The theoretical advantage of treatment with pentoxifylline is discussed, with emphasis not only on its hemorheological properties, but also on its actions on the prostaglandin pathway, platelet aggregation, and thrombosis. We suggest that preoperative pentoxifylline treatment may be a useful adjunct in the closure of ischemic ulcers.

  5. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M.; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.; Southerland, Andrew M.; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). Methods: A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Results: Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits–Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0–2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis of the 5 trials that primarily utilized stent retriever devices (≥70%) in the intervention arm demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy

  6. Ischemic colitis as a manifestation of thrombotic microangiopathy following bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Komeno, Yukiko; Ogawa, Seishi; Ishida, Tateru; Takeuchi, Kengo; Tsujino, Shiho; Kurokawa, Mineo; Aoki, Katsunori; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Chiba, Shigeru; Motokura, Toru; Fukayama, Masashi; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-12-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a microvascular disorder characterized by platelet aggregation and hemolytic anemia. In the setting of bone marrow transplantation (BMT), ischemic colitis due to TMA is difficult to differentiate from acute graft-versus-host disease. We report a 32-year-old man who presented ischemic colitis due to TMA after unrelated BMT for myelodysplastic syndrome. He suffered from treatment-resistant bloody diarrhea, and died of renal failure and Aspergillus pleuritis on day 253 post-BMT. Autopsy revealed endothelial injuries of arterioles and ischemic changes in the intestines and kidneys. Clinical and pathological characteristics of ischemic colitis due to BMT-associated TMA are described.

  7. Effect of Extended CT Perfusion Acquisition Time on Ischemic Core and Penumbra Volume Estimation in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke due to a Large Vessel Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Jordi; Marquering, Henk A.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Riordan, Alan J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been suggested that CT Perfusion acquisition times <60 seconds are too short to capture the complete in and out-wash of contrast in the tissue, resulting in incomplete time attenuation curves. Yet, these short acquisitions times are not uncommon in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of time attenuation curve truncation in 48 seconds CT Perfusion acquisition and to quantify its effect on ischemic core and penumbra estimation in patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a proximal intracranial arterial occlusion of the anterior circulation. Materials and Methods We analyzed CT Perfusion data with 48 seconds and extended acquisition times, assuring full time attenuation curves, of 36 patients. Time attenuation curves were classified as complete or truncated. Ischemic core and penumbra volumes resulting from both data sets were compared by median paired differences and interquartile ranges. Controlled experiments were performed using a digital CT Perfusion phantom to investigate the effect of time attenuation curve truncation on ischemic core and penumbra estimation. Results In 48 seconds acquisition data, truncation was observed in 24 (67%) cases for the time attenuation curves in the ischemic core, in 2 cases for the arterial input function and in 5 cases for the venous output function. Analysis of extended data resulted in smaller ischemic cores and larger penumbras with a median difference of 13.2 (IQR: 4.3–26.0)ml (P<0.001) and; 12.4 (IQR: 4.1–25.7)ml (P<0.001), respectively. The phantom data showed increasing ischemic core overestimation with increasing tissue time attenuation curve truncation. Conclusions Truncation is common in patients with large vessel occlusion and results in repartitioning of the area of hypoperfusion into larger ischemic core and smaller penumbra estimations. Phantom experiments confirmed that truncation results in overestimation of the ischemic core. PMID

  8. Acute ischemic preconditioning of skeletal muscle prior to flap elevation augments muscle-flap survival.

    PubMed

    Carroll, C M; Carroll, S M; Overgoor, M L; Tobin, G; Barker, J H

    1997-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning of the myocardium with repeated brief periods of ischemia and reperfusion prior to prolonged ischemia significantly reduces subsequent myocardial infarction. Following ischemic preconditioning, two "windows of opportunity" (early and late) exist, during which time prolonged ischemia can occur with reduced infarction size. The early window occurs at approximately 4 hours and the late window at 24 hours following ischemic preconditioning of the myocardium. We investigated if ischemic preconditioning of skeletal muscle prior to flap creation improved subsequent flap survival and perfusion immediately or 24 hours following ischemic preconditioning. Currently, no data exist on the utilization of ischemic preconditioning in this fashion. The animal model used was the latissimus dorsi muscle of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were assigned to three groups, and the right or left latissimus dorsi muscle was chosen randomly in each animal. Group 1 (n = 12) was the control group, in which the entire latissimus dorsi muscle was elevated acutely without ischemic preconditioning. Group 2 (n = 8) investigated the effects of ischemic preconditioning in the early window. In this group, the latissimus dorsi muscle was elevated immediately following preconditioning. Group 3 (n = 8) investigated the effects of ischemic preconditioning in the late window, with elevation of the latissimus dorsi muscle 24 hours following ischemic preconditioning. The preconditioning regimen used in groups 2 and 3 was two 30-minute episodes of normothermic global ischemia with intervening 10-minute episodes of reperfusion. Latissimus dorsi muscle ischemia was created by occlusion of the thoracodorsal artery and vein and the intercostal perforators, after isolation of the muscle on these vessels. Muscle perfusion was assessed by a laser-Doppler perfusion imager. One week after flap elevation, muscle necrosis was quantified in all groups by means of computer-assisted digital

  9. Coenzyme Q10 ameliorates oxidative stress and prevents mitochondrial alteration in ischemic retinal injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwook; Kim, Keun-Young; Shim, Myoung Sup; Kim, Sang Yeop; Ellisman, Mark H; Weinreb, Robert N; Ju, Won-Kyu

    2014-04-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species for protecting neuronal cells against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. We tested whether a diet supplemented with CoQ10 ameliorates oxidative stress and mitochondrial alteration, as well as promotes retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in ischemic retina induced by intraocular pressure elevation. A CoQ10 significantly promoted RGC survival at 2 weeks after ischemia. Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression were significantly increased at 12 h after ischemic injury. In contrast, the CoQ10 significantly prevented the upregulation of SOD2 and HO-1 protein expression in ischemic retina. In addition, the CoQ10 significantly blocked activation of astroglial and microglial cells in ischemic retina. Interestingly, the CoQ10 blocked apoptosis by decreasing caspase-3 protein expression in ischemic retina. Bax and phosphorylated Bad (pBad) protein expression were significantly increased in ischemic retina at 12 h. Interestingly, while CoQ10 significantly decreased Bax protein expression in ischemic retina, CoQ10 showed greater increase of pBad protein expression. Of interest, ischemic injury significantly increased mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) protein expression in the retina at 12 h, however, CoQ10 significantly preserved Tfam protein expression in ischemic retina. Interestingly, there were no differences in mitochondrial DNA content among control- or CoQ10-treated groups. Our findings demonstrate that CoQ10 protects RGCs against oxidative stress by modulating the Bax/Bad-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as well as prevents mitochondrial alteration by preserving Tfam protein expression in ischemic retina. Our results suggest that CoQ10 may provide neuroprotection against oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial alterations in ischemic retinal injury.

  10. Melatonin protects against ischemic heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Şehirli, Ahmet Özer; Koyun, Derya; Tetik, Şermin; Özsavcı, Derya; Yiğiner, Ömer; Çetinel, Şule; Tok, Olgu Enis; Kaya, Zehra; Akkiprik, Mustafa; Kılıç, Ertugrul; Şener, Göksel

    2013-09-01

    Ischemic injury, which occurs as a result of sympathetic hyperactivity, plays an important role in heart failure. Melatonin is thought to have antiatherogenic, antioxidant, and vasodilatory effects. In this study, we investigated whether melatonin protects against ischemic heart failure (HF). In Wistar albino rats, HF was induced by left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation and rats were treated with either vehicle or melatonin (10 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. At the end of this period, echocardiographic measurements were recorded and the rats were decapitated to obtain plasma and cardiac tissue samples. Lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lysosomal enzymes (β-D-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, β-D-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, acid phosphatase, and cathepsin-D) were studied in plasma samples, while malondialdehyde and glutathione levels and Na+, K+-ATPase, caspase-3 and myeloperoxidase activities were determined in the cardiac samples. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) and caveolin-3 levels in cardiac tissues were evaluated using Western blot analyses. Furthermore, caveolin-3 levels were also determined by histological analyses. In the vehicle-treated HF group, cardiotoxicity resulted in decreased cardiac Na+, K+-ATPase and SERCA activities, GSH contents and caveolin-3 levels, while plasma LDH, CK, and lysosomal enzyme activities and cardiac MDA and Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were found to be increased. On the other hand, melatonin treatment reversed all the functional and biochemical changes. The present results demonstrate that Mel ameliorates ischemic heart failure in rats. These observations highlight that melatonin is a promising supplement for improving defense mechanisms in the heart against oxidative stress caused by heart failure.

  11. Stem Cells for Ischemic Brain Injury: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Terry C.; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Low, Walter C.

    2014-01-01

    No effective therapy is currently available to promote recovery following ischemic stroke. Stem cells have been proposed as a potential source of new cells to replace those lost due to central nervous system injury, as well as a source of trophic molecules to minimize damage and promote recovery. We undertook a detailed review of data from recent basic science and preclinical studies to investigate the potential application of endogenous and exogenous stem cell therapies for treatment of cerebral ischemia. To date, spontaneous endogenous neurogenesis has been observed in response to ischemic injury, and can be enhanced via infusion of appropriate cytokines. Exogenous stem cells from multiple sources can generate neural cells that survive and form synaptic connections after transplantation in the stroke-injured brain. Stem cells from multiple sources cells also exhibit neuroprotective properties that may ameliorate stroke deficits. In many cases, functional benefits observed are likely independent of neural differentiation, though exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Future studies of neuroregeneration will require the demonstration of function in endogenously born neurons following focal ischemia. Further, methods are currently lacking to definitively demonstrate the therapeutic effect of newly introduced neural cells. Increased plasticity following stroke may facilitate the functional integration of new neurons, but the loss of appropriate guidance cues and supporting architecture in the infarct cavity will likely impede the restoration of lost circuitry. As such careful investigation of the mechanisms underlying trophic benefits will be essential. Evidence to date suggest that continued development of stem cell therapies may ultimately lead to viable treatment options for ischemic brain injury. PMID:19399885

  12. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Shang, Guowei; Chen, Jian; Geng, Xiaokun; Ye, Xin; Xu, Guoxun; Wang, Ju; Zheng, Jiasheng; Li, Hongjun; Akbary, Fauzia; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing; Ling, Feng; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiology in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group: middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood flow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood flow was restored. A reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symptoms of neurological deficits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental findings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the field of brain injury research. PMID:25657726

  13. [EEG and ischemic stroke in full-term newborns].

    PubMed

    Selton, D; André, M; Hascoët, J M

    2003-06-01

    The aims of this study were to describe EEG anomalies in unilateral neonatal ischemic stroke without hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, and to determine possible links between these abnormalities and long-term outcome. In 6 full-term newborns without severe fetal distress ischemic stroke was confirmed by computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty EEGs were recorded during the neonatal period, 5 in acute stage and 15 later. The duration of the follow-up ranged from 3 to 9 years. All newborns developed unilateral clonic seizures, right-sided (5 cases) or left-sided (1 case); seizures began between 14 and 48 h of life. At follow-up, 3 children were normal at 2 and 6 years of age, while the 3 others had sequelae: epilepsy at 9 years of age in one, and unilateral mild cerebral palsy in the 2 others (3 and 4 years of age), with behavioral problems in one of them. Critical EEG discharges, rhythmic sharp waves and/or slow waves were recorded on the injured side. Abnormalities of interictal activity were excess of alpha or theta rhythms, transitory EEG discontinuity or low voltage. The 2 children with cerebral palsy had numerous unilateral post-ictal positive rolandic slow sharp waves (PRSSWs), which were similar to the positive rolandic sharp waves of premature infants; the child with behavioral problems had numerous positive left-sided temporal fast sharp waves. PRSSWs could be associated with contralateral motor sequelae, while positive left temporal fast sharp waves were associated with long term behavioral problems. These findings may be used for future prospective studies aimed at specifying the relation between EEG abnormalities and long-term outcome.

  14. Stroke Code Improves Intravenous Thrombolysis Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with “Stroke Code” (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. Methods The study period was divided into the “pre-SC era” (January 2006 to July 2010) and “SC era” (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. Conclusion The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time. PMID:25111200

  15. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Shang, Guowei; Chen, Jian; Geng, Xiaokun; Ye, Xin; Xu, Guoxun; Wang, Ju; Zheng, Jiasheng; Li, Hongjun; Akbary, Fauzia; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing; Ling, Feng; Ji, Xunming

    2014-12-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiology in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group: middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood flow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood flow was restored. A reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symptoms of neurological deficits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental findings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the field of brain injury research.

  16. Sex Stratified Neuronal Cultures to Study Ischemic Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saurabh; Traystman, Richard J.; Herson, Paco S.

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury and neurodegenerative disease have long been observed, but the signaling mechanisms responsible for those differences remain unclear. Primary disassociated embryonic neuronal culture provides a simplified experimental model with which to investigate the neuronal cell signaling involved in cell death as a result of ischemia or disease; however, most neuronal cultures used in research today are mixed sex. Researchers can and do test the effects of sex steroid treatment in mixed sex neuronal cultures in models of neuronal injury and disease, but accumulating evidence suggests that the female brain responds to androgens, estrogens, and progesterone differently than the male brain. Furthermore, neonate male and female rodents respond differently to ischemic injury, with males experiencing greater injury following cerebral ischemia than females. Thus, mixed sex neuronal cultures might obscure and confound the experimental results; important information might be missed. For this reason, the Herson Lab at the University of Colorado School of Medicine routinely prepares sex-stratified primary disassociated embryonic neuronal cultures from both hippocampus and cortex. Embryos are sexed before harvesting of brain tissue and male and female tissue are disassociated separately, plated separately, and maintained separately. Using this method, the Herson Lab has demonstrated a male-specific role for the ion channel TRPM2 in ischemic cell death. In this manuscript, we share and discuss our protocol for sexing embryonic mice and preparing sex-stratified hippocampal primary disassociated neuron cultures. This method can be adapted to prepare sex-stratified cortical cultures and the method for embryo sexing can be used in conjunction with other protocols for any study in which sex is thought to be an important determinant of outcome. PMID:24378980

  17. Hepcidin Is Involved in Iron Regulation in the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Honglian; Zhao, Ya-Shuo; Chang, Shi-Yang; Yu, Peng; Wu, Wen-Shuang; Zhao, Chen-Yang; Chang, Yan-Zhong; Duan, Xiang-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in neuronal injuries caused by cerebral ischemia. It is well established that free iron increases significantly during ischemia and is responsible for oxidative damage in the brain. However, the mechanism of this ischemia-induced increase in iron is not completely understood. In this report, the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat model was performed and the mechanism of iron accumulation in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion was studied. The expression of L-ferritin was significantly increased in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and striatum on the ischemic side, whereas H-ferritin was reduced in the striatum and increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. The expression level of the iron-export protein ferroportin1 (FPN1) significantly decreased, while the expression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) was increased. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of FPN1 regulation, we studied the expression of the key regulator of FPN1, hepcidin. We observed that the hepcidin level was significantly elevated in the ischemic side of the brain. Knockdown hepcidin repressed the increasing of L-ferritin and decreasing of FPN1 invoked by ischemia-reperfusion. The results indicate that hepcidin is an important contributor to iron overload in cerebral ischemia. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that the levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were significantly higher in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum on the ischemic side; therefore, the HIF-1α-mediated TfR1 expression may be another contributor to the iron overload in the ischemia-reperfusion brain. PMID:21957487

  18. Intracoronary Delivery of Mitochondria to the Ischemic Heart for Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Douglas B.; Yao, Rouan; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Snay, Erin R.; Thedsanamoorthy, Jerusha K.; Zurakowski, David; Ericsson, Maria; Friehs, Ingeborg; Wu, Yaotang; Levitsky, Sidney; del Nido, Pedro J.; Packard, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that transplantation of autologously derived, respiration-competent mitochondria by direct injection into the heart following transient ischemia and reperfusion enhances cell viability and contractile function. To increase the therapeutic potential of this approach, we investigated whether exogenous mitochondria can be effectively delivered through the coronary vasculature to protect the ischemic myocardium and studied the fate of these transplanted organelles in the heart. Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and then reperfused for 10 minutes. Mitochondria were labeled with 18F-rhodamine 6G and iron oxide nanoparticles. The labeled mitochondria were either directly injected into the ischemic region or delivered by vascular perfusion through the coronary arteries at the onset of reperfusion. These hearts were used for positron emission tomography, microcomputed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging with subsequent microscopic analyses of tissue sections to confirm the uptake and distribution of exogenous mitochondria. Injected mitochondria were localized near the site of delivery; while, vascular perfusion of mitochondria resulted in rapid and extensive dispersal throughout the heart. Both injected and perfused mitochondria were observed in interstitial spaces and were associated with blood vessels and cardiomyocytes. To determine the efficacy of vascular perfusion of mitochondria, an additional group of rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of regional ischemia and reperfused for 120 minutes. Immediately following regional ischemia, the hearts received unlabeled, autologous mitochondria delivered through the coronary arteries. Autologous mitochondria perfused through the coronary vasculature significantly decreased infarct size and significantly enhanced post-ischemic myocardial function. In conclusion, the delivery of mitochondria through the coronary arteries resulted in their rapid

  19. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros; Fitzgerald, Jason; Troppmann, Christoph; Michalopoulou, Andromachi

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  20. Transient Ischemic Attacks Presenting with Dizziness or Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Blum, Christina A; Kasner, Scott E

    2015-08-01

    Dizziness with or without associated neurologic symptoms is the most common symptom of posterior circulation transient ischemic attack (TIA) and can be more frequent before posterior circulation strokes. This entity carries a high risk of recurrent events and should be considered as a potential cause of spontaneous episodic vestibular syndrome. Diagnostic evaluation should include intracranial and extracranial imaging of the vertebral arteries and basilar artery. Aggressive medical management with antiplatelet therapy, statin use, and risk factor modification is the mainstay of treatment. This article highlights the importance of diagnosing, evaluating, and treating posterior circulation TIAs manifesting as dizziness or vertigo.

  1. Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao; Jin, Zhu-Qiu

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood-heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC

  2. The Role of Ghrelin in Neuroprotection after Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sarah J.; Miller, Alyson A.; Andrews, Zane B.

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin, a gastrointestinal peptide with a major role in regulating feeding and metabolism, has recently been investigated for its neuroprotective effects. In this review we discuss pre-clinical evidence suggesting ghrelin may be a useful therapeutic in protecting the brain against injury after ischemic stroke. Specifically, we will discuss evidence showing ghrelin administration can improve neuronal cell survival in animal models of focal cerebral ischemia, as well as rescue memory deficits. We will also discuss its proposed mechanisms of action, including anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects, and suggest ghrelin treatment may be a useful intervention after stroke in the clinic. PMID:24961317

  3. Ischemic nephropathy in South Dakota: case reports and review.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Malarvizhi; Larson, Christopher; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-09-01

    Ischemic nephropathy, a relatively new term coined to describe renal insufficiency due to renal artery disease, is neither a new subject for medicine throughout the country, nor a new problem here in South Dakota. It is an important and overlooked cause of renal insufficiency and is almost certainly under-diagnosed. Five case reports and a review of the entity are described to illustrate the diversity of this clinical presentation. Intervention in such cases was thought to preserve, or even improve renal function, delaying the onset of end stage renal disease (ERSD).

  4. [Efficacy of сerebrolysin in acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Petrova, O P; Chuprasov, A V; Matveev, N V

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study the effect of cerebrolysin used in dose 30 ml daily during 10 days on rehabilitation measures in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Material and methods. The 1st group consisited of 23 patients who received standard treatment and cerebrolysin, the 2nd group included 89 patients who received standard treatment only. The severity of neurological deficits (NIHSS) and the level of disability (mRS) were assessed. Results and conclusion. A significantly earlier recovery (p<0,05) and decrease in disability were identified. A more pronounced effect was seen in young patinets and when treatment started early.

  5. [Use of cerebrolysin in the treatment of ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Koppi, S; Barolin, G S

    1998-01-01

    Comparative analysis was performed of results of the treatment of patients with ischemic stroke, including 140 ones treated by means of hemodilution method (control group) and 40 patients treated with cerebrolysin (test group). Barolin's scale of the neurorehabilitation was used for the analysis of the results. Statistically significant results of rehabilitation were better in the test group. Improvement of the parameters characterizing social contacts, working activity and behaviour was more pronounced than an improvement of motor functions. Cerebrolysin had accelerating effect on restoration of damaged functions, by creating more stable basis for rehabilitation.

  6. [Neuroprotective treatment with citicoline (ceraxon) in patients with ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Martynov, M Iu; Boĭko, A N; Kamchatnov, P R; Kabanov, A A; Iasamanova, A N; Shchukin, I A; Kolesnikova, T I; Chubykin, V I; Glukhareva, A P; Gusev, E I

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of neurological symptoms assessed with the Scandinavian stroke scale, the Barthel index and the modified Rankin scale was studied in 89 patients with moderate ischemic stroke who received citicoline (ceraxone) intravenously and orally. The results were compared to a group of 52 age-, sex- and stroke-matched patients who did not receive citicoline. To the date of discharge from the hospital (days 21-24), the full restoration (p<0.05) was noted in patients of the main group. Efficacy of citicoline was significantly (p<0.05) higher in patients younger than 70 years and when the drug was used in the first hours of disease.

  7. Considerations of the ischemic basis and therapy of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Niedermeyer, E

    2007-01-01

    A recently presented concept of Alzheimer disease (AD) is based on a primarily ischemic (rather than degenerative) type of brain disease. Etiologically, this new concept is presumed to be related to the human upright gait along with individual predisposition. The proposed treatment--head-down therapy (HDT) --is the centerpoint of this presentation: a simple and generally accessible type of therapy, with monitoring by neuropsychological questioning, electroencephalography, and transcranial Doppler. As a treatment of AD (limited to stage 1), HDT is expected to be helpful. It is possible, however, that its prophylactic use may be of even greater importance.

  8. Takayasu arteritis presenting as isolated anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guohong; Chen, Qian; Wang, Wenji

    2017-04-07

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology that affects the aorta and its primary branches or large arteries in the proximal upper or lower extremities. Ocular manifestations of TA include microaneurysm formation, small-vessel dilation, arteriovenous anastomosis, retinal ischemia, and neovascular glaucoma. We herein report a case involving a 23-year-old Asian woman who presented with isolated acute anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and was initially misdiagnosed with optic neuritis. The stenosis and occlusion of the aorta and other proximal arteries on angiography confirmed the diagnosis of TA.

  9. Overview: Diagnosis of ischemic heart disease by noninvasive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.H. )

    1991-09-01

    Noninvasive tests have greatly improved in their ability to diagnose coronary artery disease. In addition, new testing modalities have been added to the authors armamentarium. However, no test is clearly superior to all others in every clinical circumstance. Moreover, none have been shown to provide sensitivities and specificities consistently above 90%. Therefore, their use for diagnostic purposes in populations with a lower prevalence of disease is only of moderate value. Conversely, for the assessment of the functional significance of coronary artery disease or prognosis in patients with ischemic heart disease, the addition of noninvasive imaging modalities to exercise testing is of high value.

  10. [Ischemic stroke in childhood. A complication of tonsillectomy].

    PubMed

    Matilla Álvarez, A; García Serrano, E; González de la Huebra Labrador, T; Morales Martín, A C; Yusta Martín, G; Vaquero Roncero, L M

    2016-02-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most frequently performed otorhinolaryngological procedures on children. The postoperative complications are classified into primary or intermediate, which generally appear within 24h, and as secondary or delayed, after 48 h. We present the case of an ischemic stroke after performing a tonsillectomy on a 3 year-old boy, which was diagnosed in the immediate postoperative period. Using brain echo-doppler and angio-CT, an intraluminal clot was observed in the left internal carotid artery, probably as a result of direct vessel injury during arterial ligature for hemostasis.

  11. Myricetin and quercetin attenuate ischemic injury in glial cultures by different mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have demonstrated that polyphenols from cinnamon and green tea reduce cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction in C6 glial cultures following ischemic injury. We tested the protective effects of the flavonoid polyphenols, myricetin and quercetin, on key features of ischemic injury. C6 cultures...

  12. Ionic storm in hypoxic/ischemic stress: Can opioid receptors subside it?

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Dongman; Xia, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are extremely vulnerable to oxygen deprivation and blood supply insufficiency. Indeed, hypoxic/ischemic stress triggers multiple pathophysiological changes in the brain, forming the basis of hypoxic/ischemic encephalopathy. One of the initial and crucial events induced by hypoxia/ischemia is the disruption of ionic homeostasis characterized by enhanced K+ efflux and Na+-, Ca2+- and Cl− influx, which causes neuronal injury or even death. Recent data from our laboratory and those of others have shown that activation of opioid receptors, particularly δ-opioid receptors (DOR), is neuroprotective against hypoxic/ischemic insult. This protective mechanism may be one of the key factors that determine neuronal survival under hypoxic/ischemic condition. An important aspect of the DOR-mediated neuroprotection is its action against hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis. Specially, DOR signal inhibits Na+ influx through the membrane and reduces the increase in intracellular Ca2+, thus decreasing the excessive leakage of intracellular K+. Such protection is dependent on a PKC-dependent and PKA-independent signaling pathway. Furthermore, our novel exploration shows that DOR attenuates hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis through the inhibitory regulation of Na+ channels. In this review, we will first update current information regarding the process and features of hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis and then discuss the opioid-mediated regulation of ionic homeostasis, especially in hypoxic/ischemic condition, and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:20036308

  13. Physical activity in the prevention of ischemic stroke and improvement of outcomes: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Laura E; Corbett, Dale; Brooks, Dina; Sage, Michael D; Macintosh, Bradley J; McIlroy, William E; Black, Sandra E

    2013-02-01

    Physical activity is an integral component of stroke prevention. Although approximately 80% of strokes are due to cerebral ischemia, the mechanisms linking physical activity to the incidence of and recovery from ischemic stroke are not completely understood. This review summarizes evidence from human and animal studies regarding physical activity in the prevention of overt and covert ischemic stroke and associated injury. In cohort studies, people who are physically active have reduced rates of overt ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke mortality. However, few human studies have examined physical activity and the incidence of covert stroke. Evidence from animal models of ischemic stroke indicates that physical activity reduces injury after ischemic stroke by reducing infarct size and apoptotic cell death. Accordingly, physical activity may reduce the magnitude of injury from ischemic stroke so that there are fewer or less severe symptoms. Future research should investigate physical activity and incidence of covert stroke prospectively, ascertain the optimal dose and type of exercise to prevent ischemic injury, and identify the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms.

  14. Phosphodiesterase 4D and 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Crook, Richard; Worrall, Bradford B.; Kissela, Brett; Brown, W. Mark; Rich, Stephen S.; Case, L. Douglas; Evans, E. Whitney; Hague, Stephen; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2006-01-01

    Risk for ischemic stroke is mediated by both environmental and genetic factors. Although several environmental exposures have been implicated, relatively little is known about the genetic basis of predisposition to this disease. Recent studies in Iceland identified risk polymorphisms in two putative candidate genes for ischemic stroke: phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (ALOX5AP). A collection of North American sibling pairs concordant for ischemic stroke and two cohorts of prospectively ascertained North American ischemic stroke cases and control subjects were used for evaluation of PDE4D and ALOX5AP. Although no evidence supported linkage of ischemic stroke with either of the two candidate genes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypic associations were observed between PDE4D and ischemic stroke. There was no evidence of association between variants of ALOX5AP and ischemic stroke. These data suggest that common variants in PDE4D may contribute to the genetic risk for ischemic stroke in multiple populations. PMID:16130105

  15. Remote Limb Ischemic Postconditioning Protects Against Neonatal Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury in Rat Pups by the Opioid Receptor/Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yilin; Fathali, Nancy; Lekic, Tim; Ostrowski, Robert P.; Chen, Chunhua; Martin, Robert D.; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Remote ischemic postconditoning, a phenomenon in which brief ischemic stimuli of 1 organ protect another organ against an ischemic insult, has been demonstrated to protect the myocardium and adult brain in animal models. However, mediators of the protection and underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that remote limb ischemic postconditioning applied immediately after hypoxia provides neuroprotection in a rat model of neonatal hypoxia–ischemia (HI) by mechanisms involving activation of the opioid receptor/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Methods HI was induced in postnatal Day 10 rat pups by unilateral carotid ligation and 2 hours of hypoxia. Limb ischemic postconditioning was induced by 4 conditioning cycles of 10 minutes of ischemia and reperfusion on both hind limbs immediately after HI. The opioid antagonist naloxone, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin, or opioid agonist morphine was administered to determine underlying mechanisms. Infarct volume, brain atrophy, and neurological outcomes after HI were evaluated. Expression of phosphorylated Akt, Bax, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was determined by Western blotting. Results Limb ischemic postconditioning significantly reduced infarct volume at 48 hours and improved functional outcomes at 4 weeks after HI. Naloxone and wortmannin abrogated the postconditioning-mediated infarct-limiting effect. Morphine given immediately after hypoxia also decreased infarct volume. Furthermore, limb ischemic postconditioning recovered Akt activity and decreased Bax expression, whereas no differences in phosphorylated ERK1/2expression were observed. Conclusions Limb ischemic postconditioning protects against neonatal HI brain injury in rats by activating the opioid receptor/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:21183744

  16. EGLN1 Inhibition and Rerouting of α-Ketoglutarate Suffice for Remote Ischemic Protection.

    PubMed

    Olenchock, Benjamin A; Moslehi, Javid; Baik, Alan H; Davidson, Shawn M; Williams, Jeremy; Gibson, William J; Chakraborty, Abhishek A; Pierce, Kerry A; Miller, Christine M; Hanse, Eric A; Kelekar, Ameeta; Sullivan, Lucas B; Wagers, Amy J; Clish, Clary B; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Kaelin, William G

    2016-02-25

    Ischemic preconditioning is the phenomenon whereby brief periods of sublethal ischemia protect against a subsequent, more prolonged, ischemic insult. In remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC), ischemia to one organ protects others organs at a distance. We created mouse models to ask if inhibition of the alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG)-dependent dioxygenase Egln1, which senses oxygen and regulates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factor, could suffice to mediate local and remote ischemic preconditioning. Using somatic gene deletion and a pharmacological inhibitor, we found that inhibiting Egln1 systemically or in skeletal muscles protects mice against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Parabiosis experiments confirmed that RIPC in this latter model was mediated by a secreted factor. Egln1 loss causes accumulation of circulating αKG, which drives hepatic production and secretion of kynurenic acid (KYNA) that is necessary and sufficient to mediate cardiac ischemic protection in this setting.

  17. Inducible pluripotent stem cells for the treatment of ischemic stroke: current status and problems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Wan, Shu; Zhan, Ren-ya

    2012-01-01

    Despite dramatic advancements in medical and surgical care, effective clinical therapies for ischemic stroke are limited. Stem-cell transplantation has emerged as a potential therapeutic approach for cell replacement in ischemic brain injuries. Inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have become an alternative cell source for transplantation. They possess efficient capacities for neural differentiation without ethical and immune-rejection concerns. Substantial function of iPSCs in pre-clinical models of ischemic brain injury has been observed. However, several problems remain regarding the treatment of ischemic stroke with iPSCs: tumorigenicity, poor iPSC derivation methods, and undefined delivery variables. With the development of iPSC research, safer and more effective strategies will be achieved for highly effective and tumor-free cell treatment of ischemic stroke.

  18. Temporal Expression of Apelin/Apelin Receptor in Ischemic Stroke and its Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yili; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Xuan; Cheng, Baohua; Li, Gongying; Bai, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide, and ischemic stroke accounts for approximately 87% of cases. Improving post-stroke recovery is a major challenge in stroke treatment. Accumulated evidence indicates that the apelinergic system, consisting of apelin and apelin receptor (APLNR), is temporally dysregulated in ischemic stroke. Moreover, the apelinergic system plays a pivotal role in post-stroke recovery by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis and facilitating angiogenesis through various molecular pathways. In this review article, we summarize the temporal expression of apelin and APLNR in ischemic stroke and the mechanisms of their dysregulation. In addition, the protective role of the apelinergic system in ischemic stroke and the underlying mechanisms of its protective effects are discussed. Furthermore, critical issues in activating the apelinergic system as a potential therapy will also be discussed. The aim of this review article is to shed light on exploiting the activation of the apelinergic system to treat ischemic stroke. PMID:28167898

  19. Hemorrhagic Transformation after Tissue Plasminogen Activator Reperfusion Therapy for Ischemic Stroke: Mechanisms, Models, and Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Mingchang; Chen, Qianxue; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is well recognized as a common cause of hemorrhage in patients with ischemic stroke. HT after acute ischemic stroke contributes to early mortality and adversely affects functional recovery. The risk of HT is especially high when patients receive thrombolytic reperfusion therapy with tissue plasminogen activator, the only available treatment for ischemic stroke. Although many important publications address preclinical models of ischemic stroke, there are no current recommendations regarding the conduct of research aimed at understanding the mechanisms and prediction of HT. In this review, we discuss the underlying mechanisms for HT after ischemic stroke, provide an overview of the models commonly used for the study of HT, and discuss biomarkers that might be used for the early detection of this challenging clinical problem.

  20. Hemorrhagic Transformation After Tissue Plasminogen Activator Reperfusion Therapy for Ischemic Stroke: Mechanisms, Models, and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Mingchang; Chen, Qianxue; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intracerebral hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is well recognized as a common cause of hemorrhage in patients with ischemic stroke. HT after acute ischemic stroke contributes to early mortality and adversely affects functional recovery. The risk of HT is especially high when patients receive thrombolytic reperfusion therapy with tissue plasminogen activator, the only available treatment for ischemic stroke. Although many important publications address preclinical models of ischemic stroke, there are no current recommendations regarding the conduct of research aimed at understanding the mechanisms and prediction of HT. In this review, we discuss the underlying mechanisms for HT after ischemic stroke, provide an overview of the models commonly used for the study of HT, and discuss biomarkers that might be used for early detection of this challenging clinical problem. PMID:25367883

  1. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Distefano, Giuseppe; Praticò, Andrea D

    2010-09-16

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage.

  2. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage. PMID:20846380

  3. Indole-3-propionic acid attenuates neuronal damage and oxidative stress in the ischemic hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Koo; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Li, Hua; Park, Ok Kyu; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Young-Gil; Lee, Yun Lyul; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kwon, Young-Guen; Won, Moo-Ho

    2009-07-01

    Tryptophan-derived indole compounds have been widely investigated as antioxidants and as free-radical scavengers. Indole-3-propionic acid (IPA), one of these compounds, is a deamination product of tryptophan. In the present study, we used Mongolian gerbils to investigate IPA's neuroprotective effects against ischemic damage and its antioxidative effects in the hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) after 5 min of transient forebrain ischemia. The repeated oral administration of IPA (10 mg/kg) for 15 days before ischemic surgery protected neurons from ischemic damage. In this group, the percentage of cresyl violet-positive neurons in the CA1 was 56.8% compared with that in the sham group. In the vehicle-treated group, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-, S-100-, and vimentin-immunoreactive astrocytes and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1)- and isolectin B4 (IB4)-immunoreactive microglia were activated 4 days after ischemia/reperfusion, whereas in the IPA-treated ischemic group, GFAP, S-100, Iba-1, and IB4, but not vimentin, immunoreactivity was distinctly lower than that in the vehicle-treated ischemic groups. The administration of IPA significantly decreased the level of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, a marker of lipid peroxidation, in ischemic hippocampal homogenates compared with that in the vehicle-treated ischemic groups at various times after ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, immunostaining for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine showed DNA damage in pyramidal neurons in the ischemic CA1 was significantly lower in the IPA-treated ischemic groups than in the vehicle-treated ischemic groups. These results suggest that IPA protects neurons from ischemia-induced neuronal damage by reducing DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

  4. Amelioration of myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury with Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Ray, Diptarka; Mukherjee, Subhendu; Falchi, Mario; Bertelli, Aldo; Das, Dipak K

    2010-12-01

    Calendula officinalis of family Asteraceae, also known as marigold, has been widely used from time immemorial in Indian and Arabic cultures as an anti-inflammatory agent to treat minor skin wound and infections, burns, bee stings, sunburn and cancer. At a relatively high dose, calendula can lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Since inflammatory responses are behind many cardiac diseases, we sought to evaluate if calendula could be cardioprotective against ischemic heart disease Two groups of hearts were used: the treated rat hearts were perfused with calendula solution at 50 mM in KHB buffer (in mM: sodium chloride 118, potassium chloride 4.7, calcium chloride 1.7, sodium bicarbonate 25, potassium biphosphate 0.36, magnesium sulfate 1.2, and glucose 10) for 15 min prior to subjecting the heart to ischemia, while the control group was perfused with the buffer only. Calendula achieved cardioprotection by stimulating left ventricular developed pressure and aortic flow as well as by reducing myocardial infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Cardioprotection appears to be achieved by changing ischemia reperfusion-mediated death signal into a survival signal by modulating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory pathways as evidenced by the activation of Akt and Bcl2 and depression of TNFα. The results further strengthen the concept of using natural products in degeneration diseases like ischemic heart disease.

  5. Histopathological study on myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, M

    1990-06-01

    The mode and causes of myocardial hypertrophy occurring in association with ischemic heart disease were studied. The investigation involved autopsied hearts (15 cases of subendocardial infarction, 27 of transmural infarction, 20 of non-infarcted three vessel disease and 17 controls) and biopsied materials obtained during coronary-aorta bypass graft surgery (23 patients with angina pectoris and 46 with myocardial infarction). The subendocardial infarction group showed most marked myocardial hypertrophy that reflected extensive infarction and fibrosis, dilatation of the left ventricular cavity and the loss of myocytes. Despite a marked decrease in the number of myocyte layers, the residual myocardium of the left ventricle was uniformly hypertrophic, accompanied by an increase in the heart weight. The larger the area of fibrosis, the more marked was myocardial hypertrophy irrespective of the luminal diameter of the responsible coronary artery. These findings indicate that myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease is enhanced by the compensatory mechanisms for a decrease in the contractile myocardium due to fibrosis.

  6. Delay time between onset of ischemic stroke and hospital arrival.

    PubMed

    Biller, J; Patrick, J T; Shepard, A; Adams, H P

    1993-01-01

    Some current experimental protocols for acute ischemic stroke require the initiation of treatment within hours of the onset of stroke symptoms. We prospectively evaluated 30 patients with acute ischemic stroke based on clinical and computed tomography findings. The time between the onset of stroke symptoms and arrival in the emergency room and subsequently on the stroke service was determined. Within 3, 6,12, and 24 h of the onset of stroke symptoms, 16 (53%), 19 (63%), 22 (73%), and 25 (83%) patients had arrived at the emergency room and 0 (0%), 4 (13%), 14 (47%), and 22 (73%) of them on the stroke service, respectively. From the onset of stroke symptoms, the mean arrival time to the emergency room was 24 h (range, 30 min to 144 h) and to the stroke service was 61 h (range, 4-150 h). The mean time between arrival in the emergency room and stroke service was 8.6 h (range, 0-47 h). Even though 53% and 63% of our patients arrived at the emergency room within 3 and 6 h of the onset of stroke symptoms, only 0% and 13% of them arrived on the stroke service within the same time period for the initiation of treatment, respectively. Thus, in order for more patients to qualify for current experimental protocols, they must arrive on the stroke service more quickly or treatment must be initiated in the emergency room.

  7. Bayés syndrome and acute cardioembolic ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Martí, Lucía; Dorison, Sebastien; Sánchez, María José

    2017-01-01

    Bayés syndrome is an under-recognized clinical condition characterized by advanced interatrial block. Bayés syndrome is a subclinical disease that manifests electrocardiographically as a prolonged P wave duration > 120 ms with biphasic morphology ± in the inferior leads. The clinical relevance of Bayés syndrome lies in the fact that is a clear arrhythmological syndrome and has a strong association with supraventricular arrhythmias, particularly atypical atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation. Likewise, Bayés syndrome has been recently identified as a novel risk factor for non-lacunar cardioembolic ischemic stroke and vascular dementia. Advanced interatrial block can be a risk for embolic stroke due to its known sequelae of left atrial dilation, left atrial electromechanical dysfunction or atrial tachyarrhythmia (paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation), conditions predisposing to thromboembolism. Bayés syndrome may be responsible for some of the unexplained ischemic strokes and shall be considered and investigated as a possible cause for cryptogenetic stroke. In summary, Bayés syndrome is a poorly recognized cardiac rhythm disorder with important cardiologic and neurologic implications. PMID:28352633

  8. Pathways to ischemic neuronal cell death: are sex differences relevant?

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Jesse T; McCullough, Louise D

    2008-01-01

    We have known for some time that the epidemiology of human stroke is sexually dimorphic until late in life, well beyond the years of reproductive senescence and menopause. Now, a new concept is emerging: the mechanisms and outcome of cerebral ischemic injury are influenced strongly by biological sex as well as the availability of sex steroids to the brain. The principal mammalian estrogen (17 β estradiol or E2) is neuroprotective in many types of brain injury and has been the major focus of investigation over the past several decades. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that although hormones are a major contributor to sex-specific outcomes, they do not fully account for sex-specific responses to cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent studies in cell culture and animal models that suggest that genetic sex determines experimental stroke outcome and that divergent cell death pathways are activated after an ischemic insult. These sex differences need to be identified if we are to develop efficacious neuroprotective agents for use in stroke patients. PMID:18573200

  9. Coupling of Neurogenesis and Angiogenesis After Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Linhui; Wang, Brian; ZhuGe, Qichuan; Jin, Kunlin

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and severe long-term disability worldwide. Development of effective treatment or new therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke patients is therefore crucial. Ischemic stroke promotes neurogenesis by several growth factors including FGF-2, IGF-1, BDNF, VEGF and chemokines including SDF-1, MCP-1. Stroke-induced angiogenesis is similarly regulated by many factors most notably, eNOS and CSE, VEGF/VEGFR2, and Ang-1/Tie2. Important findings in the last decade have revealed that neurogenesis is not the stand-alone consideration in the fight for full functional recovery from stroke. Angiogenesis has been also shown to be critical in improving post-stroke neurological functional recovery. More than that, recent evidence has shown a highly possible interplay or dependence between stroke-induced neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Moving forward, elucidating the underlying mechanisms of this coupling between stroke-induced neurogenesis and angiogenesis will be of great importance, which will provide the basis for neurorestorative therapy. PMID:25736182

  10. Effect of dexamethasone on brain oedema following acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, A K; Mohammad, Q D; Ullah, M A; Ahsan, M M; Rahman, A; Shakoor, M A

    2011-07-01

    A randomized clinical trial was conducted to asses the effects of dexamethasone on brain oedema following acute ischemic stroke in the departments of Medicine of different hospitals from July, 2003 to December, 2006. A total of 60 patients were included in the study. They were divided into two groups keeping the similarity regarding the age, sex and severity of the stroke between two groups. There were 30 patients in experimental group and 30 in control group. The level of consciousness was compared by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on 3rd, 7th and 10th day of intervention and improvement was found in both the groups, but the improvement of level of consciousness was statistically significant in Dexamethasone treated group. The volume of hypodense area did not differ significantly in two groups in CT scans before and after treatment (p=0.74). The study results demonstrate that Dexamethasone improves the level of consciousness in acute ischemic stroke associated with brain oedema but did not reduce volume of hypodense area.

  11. An acid-sensing ion channel that detects ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    Naves, L A; McCleskey, E W

    2005-11-01

    Ischemic pain occurs when there is insufficient blood flow for the metabolic needs of an organ. The pain of a heart attack is the prototypical example. Multiple compounds released from ischemic muscle likely contribute to this pain by acting on sensory neurons that innervate muscle. One such compound is lactic acid. Here, we show that ASIC3 (acid-sensing ion channel #3) has the appropriate expression pattern and physical properties to be the detector of this lactic acid. In rats, it is expressed only in sensory neurons and then only on a minority (approximately 40%) of these. Nevertheless, it is expressed at extremely high levels on virtually all dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons that innervate the heart. It is extraordinarily sensitive to protons (Hill slope 4, half-activating pH 6.7), allowing it to readily respond to the small changes in extracellular pH (from 7.4 to 7.0) that occur during muscle ischemia. Moreover, both extracellular lactate and extracellular ATP increase the sensitivity of ASIC3 to protons. This final property makes ASIC3 a "coincidence detector" of three molecules that appear during ischemia, thereby allowing it to better detect acidosis caused by ischemia than other forms of systemic acidosis such as hypercapnia.

  12. Cardioprotection of ischemic preconditioning in rats involves upregulating adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Wu, Wenjing; Duan, Jun; Ma, Ming; Kong, Wei; Ke, Yuannan; Li, Gang; Zheng, Jingang

    2017-02-20

    It has been reported that ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and adiponectin (APN) are cardioprotective in many cardiovascular disorders. However, whether APN mediates the effect of IPC on myocardial injury has not been elucidated. This study was conducted to investigate whether IPC affects myocardial ischemic injury by increasing APN expression. Male adult rats with cardiac knockdowns of APN and its receptors via intramyocardial small-interfering RNA injection were subjected to IPC and then myocardial infarction (MI) at 24 h post-IPC. Globular APN (gAd) was injected at 10 min before MI. APN mRNA and protein levels in myocardium as well as the plasma APN concentration were markedly high at 6 and 12 h after IPC. IPC ameliorated myocardial injury as evidenced by improved cardiac functions and a reduced infarct size. Compared with the control MI group, rats in the IPC + MI group had elevated levels of left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening, and a smaller MI size (P<0.05). However, the aforementioned protective effects were ameliorated in the absence of APN and APN receptors, followed by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation, but reversed by gAd treatment in wild-type rats, and AMPK phosphorylation increased (P<0.05). Overall, our results suggest that the cardioprotective effects of IPC are partially due to upregulation of APN, and provide a further insight into IPC-mediated signaling effects.

  13. Nicotinamide restores the reduction of parvalbumin in cerebral ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Koh, Phil-Ok

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study investigated whether nicotinamide affects parvalbumin expression in focal cerebral ischemic injury. Rats were treated with vehicle or nicotinamide (500 mg/kg) 2 hr after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and cerebral cortex tissues were collected 24 hr after MCAO. Nicotinamide significantly decreases the volume of infarct areas in the cerebral cortex. A proteomic approach revealed that MCAO induces decreases of parvalbumin levels, while nicotinamide treatment prevents injury-induced decreases in parvalbumin. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses demonstrated that nicotinamide restores injury-induced decreases in parvalbumin. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining confirmed that the numbers of parvalbumin-positive cells were decreased in vehicle-treated animals with MCAO, and that nicotinamide averted this decrease. In cultured hippocampal cells, nicotinamide treatment prevents the glutamate exposure-induced increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and decrease in parvalbumin expression. These results suggest the fact that the maintenance of parvalbumin expression is mediated to the neuroprotective function of nicotinamide against ischemic brain injury.

  14. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  15. Effects of hypnotic analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    DeBenedittis, G; Panerai, A A; Villamira, M A

    1989-01-01

    Mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia are still poorly understood and conflicting data are reported regarding the underlying neurochemical correlates. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hypnotically induced analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain, taking into account pain and distress tolerance as well as the neurochemical correlates. 11 high hypnotizable Ss and 10 low hypnotizable Ss, as determined by scores on the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (Weitzenhoffer & E. R. Hilgard, 1962), were administered an ischemic pain test in both waking and hypnotic conditions. The following variables were measured: (a) pain and distress tolerance, (b) anxiety levels, and (c) plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Results confirmed significant increases of pain and distress tolerance during hypnosis as compared to the waking state, with positive correlations between pain and distress relief and hypnotizability. Moreover, a hypnotically induced dissociation between the sensory-discriminative and the affective-motivational dimensions of pain experience was found, but only in high hypnotizable Ss. Hypnotic analgesia was unrelated to anxiety reduction and was not mediated either by endorphins or by ACTH.

  16. Minor Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Yakhkind, Aleksandra; McTaggart, Ryan A.; Jayaraman, Mahesh V.; Siket, Matthew S.; Silver, Brian; Yaghi, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    A majority of patients with ischemic stroke present with mild deficits for which aggressive management is not often pursued. Comprehensive work-up and appropriate intervention for minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) point toward better patient outcomes, lower costs, and fewer cases of disability. Imaging is a key modality to guide treatment and predict stroke recurrence. Patients with large vessel occlusions have been found to suffer worse outcomes and could benefit from intervention. Whether intravenous thrombolytic therapy decreases disability in minor stroke patients and whether acute endovascular intervention improves functional outcomes in patients with minor stroke and known large vessel occlusion remain controversial. Studies are ongoing to determine ideal antiplatelet therapy for stroke and TIA, while ongoing statin therapy, surgical management for patients with carotid stenosis, and anticoagulation for patients with atrial fibrillation have all been proven to decrease the rate of stroke recurrence and improve outcomes. This review summarizes the current evidence and discusses the standard of care for patients with minor stroke and TIA. PMID:27375548

  17. Ischemic Gangrene of the Glans following Penile Prosthesis Implantation

    PubMed Central

    García Gómez, Borja; Romero Otero, Javier; Díez Sicilia, Laura; Jiménez Alcaide, Estibaliz; García-Cruz, Eduardo; Rodríguez Antolín, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The development of ischemic gangrene of the penis following implantation of prosthesis is unusual, and very few cases are available in the literature. As a result, no established treatment protocol is available. We report our experience within a case of gangrene of the glans following implantation of a three-component prosthesis. We present a 53-year-old male, smoker with diabetes and hypercholesterolemia, who underwent surgery for the insertion of a penile prosthesis with 3 components to correct his erectile dysfunction and severe Peyronie's disease. The procedure was carried out without incidents. During the postoperative period, the patient began to complain from penile and perineal pain. He developed avascular necrosis of the glans. The necrosed area was excised. Four weeks later, he developed fever and perineal pain arriving to the emergency room with the prosthesis extruding through the glans. He had emergency surgery to remove the prosthesis plus surgical lavage and was prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Four weeks later, the penis was completely revascularized and reepithelialized. Ischemic gangrene following penile prosthesis implantation takes place in patients with poor peripheral vascularisation. Diabetes mellitus has been the common denominator to all of the reported cases. PMID:23956919

  18. The Clinical Status of Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianyun; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Li, Jing; Li, Yaqi; Tan, Zirui; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Li, Quanhai; Yan, Baoyong

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Stem cell-based therapy is emerging as a promising option for treatment of ICM. Several stem cell types including cardiac-derived stem cells (CSCs), bone marrow-derived stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), skeletal myoblasts (SMs), and CD34(+) and CD 133(+) stem cells have been applied in clinical researches. The clinical effect produced by stem cell administration in ICM mainly depends on the transdifferentiation and paracrine effect. One important issue is that low survival and residential rate of transferred stem cells in the infracted myocardium blocks the effective advances in cardiac improvement. Many other factors associated with the efficacy of cell replacement therapy for ICM mainly including the route of delivery, the type and number of stem cell infusion, the timing of injection, patient's physical condition, the particular microenvironment onto which the cells are delivered, and clinical condition remain to be addressed. Here we provide an overview of the pros and cons of these transferred cells and discuss the current state of their therapeutic potential. We believe that stem cell translation will be an ideal option for patients following ischemic heart disease in the future.

  19. Do calcium-dependent ionic currents mediate ischemic ventricular fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Clusin, W T; Bristow, M R; Karagueuzian, H S; Katzung, B G; Schroeder, J S

    1982-02-18

    Calcium ions mediate the adverse effects of myocardial ischemia and have been implicated in the genesis of arrhythmias. Calcium influx blocking drugs protect against early ventricular arrhythmias during experimental coronary occlusion, and recent studies suggest that this effect is at least partly due to inhibition of myocardial cell calcium influx. Most of the pharmacologic maneuvers used to simulate acute ischemic arrhythmias in vivo also produce intracellular calcium overload. Production of calcium overload in small myocardial cell clusters causes fibrillatory electrical and mechanical activity similar to that recorded from fibrillating hearts. Fibrillation in these cell clusters is mediated not by reentrant conduction, but by the same subcellular processes that give rise to depolarizing afterpotentials and abnormal automaticity. Agents favoring calcium influx, such as beta adrenergic agonists, accentuate these processes, while agents that depress calcium influx inhibit them. Although the relation of these experimental models to clinical ischemic arrhythmias has not been fully delineated, calcium influx blocking drugs may prove useful in reducing the incidence of sudden cardiac death.

  20. Cerebral Vascular Disease and Neurovascular Injury in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoming; De Silva, T Michael; Chen, Jun; Faraci, Frank M

    2017-02-03

    The consequences of cerebrovascular disease are among the leading health issues worldwide. Large and small cerebral vessel disease can trigger stroke and contribute to the vascular component of other forms of neurological dysfunction and degeneration. Both forms of vascular disease are driven by diverse risk factors, with hypertension as the leading contributor. Despite the importance of neurovascular disease and subsequent injury after ischemic events, fundamental knowledge in these areas lag behind our current understanding of neuroprotection and vascular biology in general. The goal of this review is to address select key structural and functional changes in the vasculature that promote hypoperfusion and ischemia, while also affecting the extent of injury and effectiveness of therapy. In addition, as damage to the blood-brain barrier is one of the major consequences of ischemia, we discuss cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying ischemia-induced changes in blood-brain barrier integrity and function, including alterations in endothelial cells and the contribution of pericytes, immune cells, and matrix metalloproteinases. Identification of cell types, pathways, and molecules that control vascular changes before and after ischemia may result in novel approaches to slow the progression of cerebrovascular disease and lessen both the frequency and impact of ischemic events.

  1. Update on Inflammatory Biomarkers and Treatments in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Aldo; Liberale, Luca; Vecchié, Alessandra; Casula, Matteo; Carbone, Federico; Dallegri, Franco; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    After an acute ischemic stroke (AIS), inflammatory processes are able to concomitantly induce both beneficial and detrimental effects. In this narrative review, we updated evidence on the inflammatory pathways and mediators that are investigated as promising therapeutic targets. We searched for papers on PubMed and MEDLINE up to August 2016. The terms searched alone or in combination were: ischemic stroke, inflammation, oxidative stress, ischemia reperfusion, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, autoimmunity. Inflammation in AIS is characterized by a storm of cytokines, chemokines, and Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) released by several cells contributing to exacerbate the tissue injury both in the acute and reparative phases. Interestingly, many biomarkers have been studied, but none of these reflected the complexity of systemic immune response. Reperfusion therapies showed a good efficacy in the recovery after an AIS. New therapies appear promising both in pre-clinical and clinical studies, but still need more detailed studies to be translated in the ordinary clinical practice. In spite of clinical progresses, no beneficial long-term interventions targeting inflammation are currently available. Our knowledge about cells, biomarkers, and inflammatory markers is growing and is hoped to better evaluate the impact of new treatments, such as monoclonal antibodies and cell-based therapies. PMID:27898011

  2. Ketogenic diet prevents cardiac arrest-induced cerebral ischemic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Tai, K-K; Nguyen, N; Pham, L; Truong, D D

    2008-07-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for intractable epilepsies. We recently found that KD can prevent seizure and myoclonic jerk in a rat model of post-hypoxic myoclonus. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that KD can prevent the cerebral ischemic neurodegeneration in this animal model. Rats fed a standard diet or KD for 25 days were being subjected to mechanically induced cardiac arrest brain ischemia for 8 min 30 s. Nine days after cardiac arrest, frozen rat brains were sectioned for evaluation of ischemia-induced neurodegeneration using fluoro-jade (FJ) staining. The FJ positive degenerating neurons were counted manually. Cardiac arrest-induced cerebral ischemia in rats fed the standard diet exhibited extensive neurodegeneration in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, the number of FJ positive neurons was 822+/-80 (n=4). They also showed signs of neurodegeneration in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in the thalamic reticular nucleus, the number of FJ positive neurons in the cerebellum was 55+/-27 (n=4), the number of FJ positive neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus was 22+/-5 (n=4). In contrast, rats fed KD showed no evidence of neurodegeneration, the number of FJ positive neurons in these areas were zero. The results demonstrate that KD can prevent cardiac arrest-induced cerebral ischemic neurodegeneration in selected brain regions.

  3. MicroRNA in ischemic stroke etiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Small, noncoding, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key mediators of posttranscriptional gene silencing in both pathogenic and pathological aspects of ischemic stroke biology. In stroke etiology, miRNA have distinct expression patterns that modulate pathogenic processes including atherosclerosis (miR-21, miR-126), hyperlipidemia (miR-33, miR-125a-5p), hypertension (miR-155), and plaque rupture (miR-222, miR-210). Following focal cerebral ischemia, significant changes in the miRNA transcriptome, independent of an effect on expression of miRNA machinery, implicate miRNA in the pathological cascade of events that include blood brain barrier disruption (miR-15a) and caspase mediated cell death signaling (miR-497). Early activation of miR-200 family members improves neural cell survival via prolyl hydroxylase mRNA silencing and subsequent HIF-1α stabilization. Pro- (miR-125b) and anti-inflammatory (miR-26a, -34a, -145, and let-7b) miRNA may also be manipulated to positively influence stroke outcomes. Recent examples of successfully implemented miRNA-therapeutics direct the future of gene therapy and offer new therapeutic strategies by regulating large sets of genes in related pathways of the ischemic stroke cascade. PMID:20841499

  4. Heat shock proteins and protection against ischemic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Dillmann, W H

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins present a complex family of proteins exerting chaperone-like activities that are classified according to their molecular weight. We especially explored protective functions of inducible heat shock protein 70, the mitochondrial heat shock protein 60 and 10, and the small heat shock proteins HSP27 and alphaB-crystallin against ischemic, reoxygenation-mediated injury using transgenic animals and hearts under in vivo conditions and in isolated cardiac myocyte-derived cells using adenoviral vectors. We noted with great interest that differential protective effects are exerted by specific hsps. For example, alpha-B-crystallin and constitutive hsp70 markedly protect microtubular structure in cardiac myocytes from ischemia-induced injury. Inducible hsp70, hsp60 and hsp10 when coexpressed, and hsp27 and alphaB-crystallin have an overall protective effect against ischemic injury as determined by the release of enzymes like creatine kinase and LDH. We did not note inflammatory or immune responses elicited by the expression of hsps in transgenic animals and cardiac myocytes. The specific cell types in which hsps are expressed may contribute to the protective effect of hsps versus their inflammatory and immunogenic effects when expressed in other cell types. PMID:10231010

  5. 25. Ischemic pain in the extremities and Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Devulder, Jacques; van Suijlekom, Hans; van Dongen, Robert; Diwan, Sudhir; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Huygen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Two important groups of disorders result from an insufficient blood supply to the extremities: critical vascular disease and the Raynaud's phenomenon. The latter can be subdivided into a primary and a secondary type. Critical ischemic disease is often caused by arteriosclerosis due to hypertension or diabetes. Primary Raynaud's is idiopathic and will be diagnosed as such if underlying systemic pathology has been excluded. Secondary Raynaud's is often a manifestation of a systemic disease. It is essential to try to establish a diagnosis as soon as possible in order to influence the evolution of the disease. A sympathetic nerve block can be considered in patients with critical ischemic vascular disease after extensive conservative treatment, preferably in the context of a study (2B±). If this has insufficient effect, spinal cord stimulation can be considered in a selected patient group (2B±). In view of the degree of invasiveness and the costs involved, this treatment should preferably be applied in the context of a study and with the use of transcutaneous pO(2) measurements. In case of primary Raynaud's, life style changes are the first step. Sympathectomy can be considered as a treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon (2C+), but only after multidisciplinary evaluation of the patient and in close consultation with the patient's rheumatologist, vascular surgeon or internist.

  6. Infection after Acute Ischemic Stroke: Risk Factors, Biomarkers, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wartenberg, Katja E.; Stoll, Anett; Funk, Andreas; Meyer, Andreas; Schmidt, J. Michael; Berrouschot, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Background. The activation of inflammatory cascades triggered by ischemic stroke may play a key role in the development of infections. Methods. Patients admitted with ischemic stroke within 24 hours were prospectively enrolled. Biomarkers of infection were measured on days 1, 3, and 5. The patients were continuously monitored for predefined infections. Results. Patients with infection were older (OR 1.06 per year, 95% CI 1.01–1.11) and had a higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Score (NIHSS, OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10–1.34), localization in the insula, and higher stroke volumes on diffusion-weighted imaging. The maximum temperature on days 1 and 3, leukocytes, interleukin-6, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein on days 1, 3, and 5, C-reactive protein on days 3 and 5, and procalcitonin on day 5 were higher and HLA-DR-expression on monocytes on days 1, 3, and 5 lower in patients with infection. Age and NIHSS predicted the development of infections. Infection was an independent predictor of poor functional outcome. Conclusions. Severe stroke and increasing age were shown to be early predictors for infections after stroke. PMID:21789273

  7. The Mitochondrial Translocator Protein and Arrhythmogenesis in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders, including ischemic heart disease. Although mitochondria are well recognized for their role in energy production and cell death, mechanisms by which they control excitation-contraction coupling, excitability, and arrhythmias are less clear. The translocator protein (TSPO) is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that is expressed in multiple organ systems. The abundant expression of TSPO in macrophages has been leveraged to image the immune response of the heart to inflammatory processes. More recently, the recognition of TSPO as a regulator of energy-dissipating mitochondrial pathways has extended its utility from a diagnostic marker of inflammation to a therapeutic target influencing diverse pathophysiological processes. Here, we provide an overview of the emerging role of TSPO in ischemic heart disease. We highlight the importance of TSPO in the regenerative process of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced ROS release through its effects on the inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) and the permeability transition pore (PTP). We discuss evidence implicating TSPO in arrhythmogenesis in the settings of acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction. PMID:25918579

  8. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  9. THE METABOLISM OF THE ISCHEMIC KIDNEY : I. THE RESPIRATION AND THE OXIDASE ACTIVITY OF THE ISCHEMIC KIDNEY.

    PubMed

    Raska, S B

    1943-07-01

    The consumption of oxygen by slices of kidney tissue of dogs made hypertensive by the Goldblatt technique was studied manometrically. The respiration of the ischemic kidney tissue was found to be much less than that of the normal kidney. Further, a marked reduction in oxidizing ability, as measured by the oxygen uptake and ammonia formation in the presence of the added amines and amino acids, tyramine, isoamylamine, dl-alanine, and l-aspartic acid, was observed. Extracts of the kidneys were made and tested for amine oxidase, amino acid oxidase, and polyphenol oxidase activity by measuring the increased oxygen consumption and ammonia formation in the presence of the substrates listed above with the addition of l-epinephrine, histamine, and dl- and l-dihydroxyphenylalanine. The preparations from ischemic kidneys of dogs and rabbits showed much lower activity. Animals with varying degrees of constriction of the renal arteries and therefore varying degrees of renal ischemia were prepared and studied. The results with these animals suggested a direct relationship between the degree of renal ischemia and the decrease in oxidizing power of the tissue. The product of the enzymic oxidation of tyramine was identified as p-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde by isolation as the dinitrophenylhydrazone of p-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde.

  10. Thrombin induces ischemic LTP (iLTP): implications for synaptic plasticity in the acute phase of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Efrat Shavit; Itsekson-Hayosh, Zeev; Aronovich, Anna; Reisner, Yair; Bushi, Doron; Pick, Chaim G.; Tanne, David; Chapman, Joab; Vlachos, Andreas; Maggio, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain ischemia modifies synaptic plasticity by inducing ischemic long-term potentiation (iLTP) of synaptic transmission through the activation of N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR). Thrombin, a blood coagulation factor, affects synaptic plasticity in an NMDAR dependent manner. Since its activity and concentration is increased in brain tissue upon acute stroke, we sought to clarify whether thrombin could mediate iLTP through the activation of its receptor Protease-Activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Extracellular recordings were obtained in CA1 region of hippocampal slices from C57BL/6 mice. In vitro ischemia was induced by acute (3 minutes) oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). A specific ex vivo enzymatic assay was employed to assess thrombin activity in hippocampal slices, while OGD-induced changes in prothrombin mRNA levels were assessed by (RT)qPCR. Upon OGD, thrombin activity increased in hippocampal slices. A robust potentiation of excitatory synaptic strength was detected, which occluded the ability to induce further LTP. Inhibition of either thrombin or its receptor PAR1 blocked iLTP and restored the physiological, stimulus induced LTP. Our study provides important insights on the early changes occurring at excitatory synapses after ischemia and indicates the thrombin/PAR1 pathway as a novel target for developing therapeutic strategies to restore synaptic function in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. PMID:25604482

  11. The Time of Maximum Post-Ischemic Hyperperfusion Indicates Infarct Growth Following Transient Experimental Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, Susanne; Artmann, Judith; Luft, Andreas R.; Buxton, Richard B.; Weller, Michael; Wong, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    After recanalization, cerebral blood flow (CBF) can increase above baseline in cerebral ischemia. However, the significance of post-ischemic hyperperfusion for tissue recovery remains unclear. To analyze the course of post-ischemic hyperperfusion and its impact on vascular function, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL) and measured CBF quantitatively during and after a 60 minute transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in adult rats. We added a 5% CO2 - challenge to analyze vasoreactivity in the same animals. Results from MRI were compared to histological correlates of angiogenesis. We found that CBF in the ischemic area recovered within one day and reached values significantly above contralateral thereafter. The extent of hyperperfusion changed over time, which was related to final infarct size: early (day 1) maximal hyperperfusion was associated with smaller lesions, whereas a later (day 4) maximum indicated large lesions. Furthermore, after initial vasoparalysis within the ischemic area, vasoreactivity on day 14 was above baseline in a fraction of animals, along with a higher density of blood vessels in the ischemic border zone. These data provide further evidence that late post-ischemic hyperperfusion is a sequel of ischemic damage in regions that are likely to undergo infarction. However, it is transient and its resolution coincides with re-gaining of vascular structure and function. PMID:23741488

  12. Current knowledge on the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties of citicoline in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Martynov, Mikhail Yu; Gusev, Eugeny I

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of long-lasting disability and death. Two main strategies have been proposed for the treatment of ischemic stroke: restoration of blood flow by thrombolysis or mechanical thrombus extraction during the first few hours of ischemic stroke, which is one of the most effective treatments and leads to a better functional and clinical outcome. The other direction of treatment, which is potentially applicable to most of the patients with ischemic stroke, is neuroprotection. Initially, neuroprotection was mainly targeted at protecting gray matter, but during the past few years there has been a transition from a neuron-oriented approach toward salvaging the whole neurovascular unit using multimodal drugs. Citicoline is a multimodal drug that exhibits neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in a variety of experimental and clinical disorders of the central nervous system, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and global cerebral hypoxia. Citicoline has a prolonged therapeutic window and is active at various temporal and biochemical stages of the ischemic cascade. In acute ischemic stroke, citicoline provides neuroprotection by attenuating glutamate exitotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and blood–brain barrier dysfunction. In the subacute and chronic phases of ischemic stroke, citicoline exhibits neuroregenerative effects and activates neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis and enhances neurotransmitter metabolism. Acute and long-term treatment with citicoline is safe and in most clinical studies is effective and improves functional outcome. PMID:27186142

  13. KUS121, a VCP modulator, attenuates ischemic retinal cell death via suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Masayuki; Ikeda, Hanako O.; Kikkawa, Chinami; Iwai, Sachiko; Muraoka, Yuki; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kakizuka, Akira; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic neural damages cause several devastating diseases, including brain stroke and ischemic retinopathies, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been proposed to be the underlying mechanism of the neuronal cell death of these conditions. We previously synthesized Kyoto University substances (KUSs) as modulators of valosin-containing protein (VCP); KUSs inhibit VCP ATPase activity and protect cells from different cell death-inducing insults. Here, we examined the efficacy of KUS121 in a rat model of retinal ischemic injury. Systemic administration of KUS121 to rats with ischemic retinal injury significantly suppressed inner retinal thinning and death of retinal ganglion and amacrine cells, with a significant functional maintenance of visual functions, as judged by electroretinography. Furthermore, intravitreal injection of KUS121, which is the clinically preferred route of drug administration for retinal diseases, appeared to show an equal or better neuroprotective efficacy in the ischemic retina compared with systemic administration. Indeed, induction of the ER stress marker C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) after the ischemic insult was significantly suppressed by KUS121 administration. Our study suggests VCP modulation by KUS as a promising novel therapeutic strategy for ischemic neuronal diseases. PMID:28317920

  14. Acute extensive ischemic enteritis in a young man diagnosed with wireless capsule endoscopy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Seong; Song, Hyun Joo; Na, Soo Young; Boo, Sun Jin; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jinseok; Choi, Guk Myung

    2013-03-25

    Ischemic enteritis is caused by either the interruption or significant reduction of arterial inflow to the small intestine. Risk factors are old age, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. It is very rare in young patients. We experienced a 21-year-old man with recurrent acute ischemic enteritis who was diagnosed with capsule endoscopy. He had previously taken medications for pulmonary hypertension and obstruction of both carotid arteries, and about 20 months earlier, he had been admitted due to hematochezia. Two sessions of angiography did not reveal the cause of hematochezia. At that time, capsule endoscopy showed mucosal edema and erythema in the terminal ileum, suggesting healed ischemic enteritis. The patient was admitted again due to hematochezia. Abdominal computed tomography showed focal celiac trunk stenosis and diffuse wall thickening of the small intestine, suggesting ischemic enteritis. Capsule endoscopy showed multiple active ulcers and severe hemorrhage with exudate, extending from the proximal jejunum to the terminal ileum. Using capsule endoscopy, the patient was diagnosed with acute extensive ischemic enteritis. Because endoscopic images of ischemic enteritis have rarely been reported, we report a case of a 21-year-old man who was diagnosed acute extensive ischemic enteritis with capsule endoscopy.

  15. Transient ischemic attack may present a target for normobaric hyperoxia treatment.

    PubMed

    Hadjiev, Dimiter I; Mineva, Petya P

    2010-07-01

    According to the new revised tissue-based definition, transient ischemic attack is a transient episode of neurological dysfunction caused by a focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischemia without acute infarction. This review addresses the pathophysiology of transient ischemic attack and the impact of normobaric hyperoxia on the penumbral tissue. Neuroimaging in transient ischemic attack patients and advances in penumbra imaging allow the transient ischemic attack, from pathophysiological viewpoint, to be defined as an ischemic penumbra of varied duration, which could proceed to a cerebral infarction or reduce to a benign oligemia. Persisting perfusion abnormalities are observed, despite resolution of the neurological symptoms. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that the normobaric hyperoxia treatment is associated with improvement of hemodynamic and metabolic disturbances, particularly in the penumbral tissue. Transient ischemic attack, considered an ischemic penumbra, may present an ideal target for early normobaric hyperoxia therapy, administered as soon as possible after the onset of the neurological deficit. Follow-up perfusion imaging could guide and individualize the treatment.

  16. Elevated blood pressure management in acute ischemic stroke remains controversial: could this issue be resolved?

    PubMed

    Hadjiev, Dimiter I; Mineva, Petya P

    2013-01-01

    A transient elevated arterial blood pressure is common in acute ischemic stroke and is often associated with a poor prognosis. The underlying mechanisms of blood pressure elevation are not well understood and its management is still unresolved. This article focuses on pathophysiology and management of elevated blood pressure in acute ischemic stroke. There is evidence that the main causes of a transient blood pressure elevation in acute ischemic stroke are the focal cerebral hypoperfusion and the stress responses with neuroendocrine systems activation. Clinical trials have reported that blood pressure lowering in acute ischemic stroke may have detrimental effect, probably because of impaired cerebral autoregulation. However, quantitative assessment of cerebral perfusion has not been performed during emergency blood pressure reduction in acute ischemic stroke. We suggest that ultrasound carotid artery disease evaluation and cerebral hemodynamics monitoring using bilateral transcranial ultrasonography, during blood pressure management in acute ischemic stroke might contribute to maintaining of an adequate penumbral perfusion and prevent infarct enlargement. Such an approach could individualize the antihypertensive treatment in acute ischemic stroke and improve functional outcome. Prospective studies are needed to confirm such a treatment strategy.

  17. Ischemic Preconditioning and Placebo Intervention Improves Resistance Exercise Performance.

    PubMed

    Marocolo, Moacir; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Marocolo, Isabela C; da Mota, Gustavo Ribeiro; Simão, Roberto; Maior, Alex S

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on resistance exercise performance in the lower limbs. Thirteen men participated in a randomized crossover design that involved 3 separate sessions (IPC, PLACEBO, and control). A 12-repetition maximum (12RM) load for the leg extension exercise was assessed through test and retest sessions before the first experimental session. The IPC session consisted of 4 cycles of 5 minutes of occlusion at 220 mm Hg of pressure alternated with 5 minutes of reperfusion at 0 mm Hg for a total of 40 minutes. The PLACEBO session consisted of 4 cycles of 5 minutes of cuff administration at 20 mm Hg of pressure alternated with 5 minutes of pseudo-reperfusion at 0 mm Hg for a total of 40 minutes. The occlusion and reperfusion phases were conducted alternately between the thighs, with subjects remaining seated. No ischemic pressure was applied during the control (CON) session and subjects sat passively for 40 minutes. Eight minutes after IPC, PLACEBO, or CON, subjects performed 3 repetition maximum sets of the leg extension (2-minute rest between sets) with the predetermined 12RM load. Four minutes after the third set for each condition, blood lactate was assessed. The results showed that for the first set, the number of repetitions significantly increased for both the IPC (13.08 ± 2.11; p = 0.0036) and PLACEBO (13.15 ± 0.88; p = 0.0016) conditions, but not for the CON (11.88 ± 1.07; p > 0.99) condition. In addition, the IPC and PLACEBO conditions resulted insignificantly greater repetitions vs. the CON condition on the first set (p = 0.015; p = 0.007) and second set (p = 0.011; p = 0.019), but not on the third set (p = 0.68; p > 0.99). No difference (p = 0.465) was found in the fatigue index and lactate concentration between conditions. These results indicate that IPC and PLACEBO IPC may have small beneficial effects on repetition performance over a CON condition. Owing to potential for greater discomfort associated

  18. Downregulation of miRNA-134 protects neural cells against ischemic injury in N2A cells and mouse brain with ischemic stroke by targeting HSPA12B.

    PubMed

    Chi, W; Meng, F; Li, Y; Wang, Q; Wang, G; Han, S; Wang, P; Li, J

    2014-09-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a major regulator in neurological diseases, and understanding their molecular mechanism in modulating cerebral ischemic injury may provide potential therapeutic targets for ischemic stroke. However, as one of 19 differentially expressed miRNAs in mouse brain with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), the role of miR-134 in ischemic injury is not well understood. In this study, the miR-134 expression level was manipulated both in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated N2A neuroblastoma cells in vitro and mouse brain with MCAO-induced ischemic stroke in vivo, and its possible targets of heat shock protein A5 (HSPA5) and HSPA12B were determined by bioinformatics analysis and dual luciferase assay. The results showed that overexpression of miR-134 exacerbated cell death and apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, downregulating miR-134 levels reduced cell death and apoptosis. Furthermore, non-expression of miR-134 enhanced HSPA12B protein levels in OGD-treated N2A cells as well as in the ischemic region. It could attenuate brain infarction size and neural cell damage, and improve neurological outcomes in mice with ischemic stroke, whereas upregulation of miR-134 had the opposite effect. In addition, HSPA12B was validated to be a target of miR-134 and its short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) could block miR-134 inhibitor-induced neuroprotection in OGD-treated N2A cells. In conclusion, downregulation of miR-134 could induce neuroprotection against ischemic injury in vitro and in vivo by negatively upregulating HSPA12B protein expression.

  19. Systemic Evaluation of Electrical Stimulation for Ischemic Wound Therapy in a Preclinical In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Graebert, Jennifer K.; Henzel, M. Kristi; Honda, Kord S.; Bogie, Kath M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In a systematic preclinical investigation of ischemic wound healing, we investigated the hypothesis that electrical stimulation (ES) promotes the healing of ischemic wounds. Approach: The effects of varying clinically relevant ES variables were evaluated using our modified version of the Gould F344 rat ischemic wound model. Stimulation was delivered using the novel lightweight integrated, single-channel, current-controlled modular surface stimulation (MSS) device. Stepwise variation allowed the effects of five different stimulation paradigms within an appropriate current density range to be studied. Within each group, 8–10 animals were treated for 28 days or until the ischemic wounds were healed and 5 animals were treated for 12 days. Eight rats received sham devices. A quantitative multivariable outcomes assessment procedure was used to evaluate the effects of ES. Results: Ischemic wounds treated with a decreased interpulse interval (IPI) had the highest rate of complete wound closure at 3 weeks. Wounds treated with decreased pulse amplitude (PA) had a lower proportion of closed wounds than sham ischemic wounds and showed sustained inflammation with a lack of wound contraction. Innovation: Our systematic study of varying ES paradigms using the novel MSS device provides preliminary insight into potential mechanisms of ES in ischemic wound healing. Conclusion: Clinically appropriate ES can more than double the proportion of ischemic wounds closed by 3 weeks in this model. Ninety percent of wounds treated with a decreased IPI healed by 21 days compared with only 29% of ischemic wounds treated with decreased PA, which appears to inhibit healing. PMID:24940557

  20. Hyperglycemia and diabetes have different impacts on outcome of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Snarska, Katarzyna K.; Bachórzewska-Gajewska, Hanna; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Drozdowski, Wiesław; Chorąży, Monika; Kułakowska, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is the second leading cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Diabetes and hyperglycemia may impact the outcome of stroke. We examined the impact of hyperglycemia and diabetes on in-hospital death among ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients. Material and methods Data from 766 consecutive patients with ischemic (83.15%) and hemorrhagic stroke were analyzed. Patients were classified into four groups: ischemic and diabetic; ischemic and non-diabetic; hemorrhagic and diabetic; and hemorrhagic and non-diabetic. Serum glucose was measured on admission at the emergency department together with biochemical and clinical parameters. Results Mean admission glucose in ischemic stroke patients with diabetes was higher than in non-diabetic ones (p < 0.001) and in hemorrhagic stroke patients with diabetes than in those without diabetes (p < 0.05). Mean admission glucose in all patients who died was significantly higher than in patients who survived. In multivariate analysis, the risk factors for outcome in patients with ischemic stroke and without diabetes were age, admission glucose level and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), while in diabetics they were female gender, admission glucose level, and eGFR; in patients with hemorrhagic stroke and without diabetes they were age and admission glucose levels. The cut-off value in predicting death in patients with ischemic stroke and without diabetes was above 113.5 mg/dl, while in diabetics it was above 210.5 mg/dl. Conclusions Hyperglycemia on admission is associated with worsened clinical outcome and increased risk of in-hospital death in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients. Diabetes increased the risk of in-hospital death in hemorrhagic stroke patients, but not in ischemic ones. PMID:28144261

  1. Low ADAMTS13 activity is associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sonneveld, Michelle A H; de Maat, Moniek P M; Portegies, Marileen L P; Kavousi, Maryam; Hofman, Albert; Turecek, Peter L; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Scheiflinger, Fritz; Koudstaal, Peter J; Ikram, M Arfan; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-12-17

    ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin motif repeats 13) has antithrombotic properties because it cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF) in smaller, less active multimers. The aim of our study was to investigate prospectively the association between ADAMTS13 activity and ischemic stroke. We included 5941 individuals ≥55 years without a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) of the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort study. ADAMTS13 activity was measured at inclusion with the FRETS-VWF73 assay and VWF antigen (VWF:Ag) levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We assessed the association among ADAMTS13 activity, VWF:Ag levels, and ischemic stroke by Cox proportional hazard analysis. The added value of ADAMTS13 activity above the traditional risk factors for ischemic stroke risk prediction was examined by the C-statistic and the net reclassification improvement index (NRI). All individuals were followed for incident stroke or TIA. Over a median follow-up time of 10.7 years (56,403 total person-years), 461 participants had a stroke, 306 of which were ischemic. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, individuals with ADAMTS13 activity in the lowest quartile had a higher risk of ischemic stroke (absolute risk, 7.3%) than did those in the reference highest quartile (absolute risk, 3.8%; hazard ratio, 1.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-2.32). Adding ADAMTS13 to the model in prediction of ischemic stroke, increased the C-statistic by 0.013 (P = .003) and provided 0.058 (95% CI, -0.002 to 0.119) NRI. Low ADAMTS13 activity is associated with the risk of ischemic stroke and improves the accuracy of risk predictions for ischemic stroke beyond traditional risk factors.

  2. Peripheral Frequency of CD4+ CD28− Cells in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Casuccio, Alessandra; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Buttà, Carmelo; Clemente, Giuseppe; Corte, Vittoriano della; Guggino, Giuliana; Arnao, Valentina; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Maugeri, Rosario; Squatrito, Rosario; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract CD4+ CD28− T cells also called CD28 null cells have been reported as increased in the clinical setting of acute coronary syndrome. Only 2 studies previously analyzed peripheral frequency of CD28 null cells in subjects with acute ischemic stroke but, to our knowledge, peripheral frequency of CD28 null cells in each TOAST subtype of ischemic stroke has never been evaluated. We hypothesized that CD4+ cells and, in particular, the CD28 null cell subset could show a different degree of peripheral percentage in subjects with acute ischemic stroke in relation to clinical subtype and severity of ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to analyze peripheral frequency of CD28 null cells in subjects with acute ischemic stroke in relation to TOAST diagnostic subtype, and to evaluate their relationship with scores of clinical severity of acute ischemic stroke, and their predictive role in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke and diagnostic subtype We enrolled 98 consecutive subjects admitted to our recruitment wards with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke. As controls we enrolled 66 hospitalized patients without a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Peripheral frequency of CD4+ and CD28 null cells has been evaluated with a FACS Calibur flow cytometer. Subjects with acute ischemic stroke had a significantly higher peripheral frequency of CD4+ cells and CD28 null cells compared to control subjects without acute ischemic stroke. Subjects with cardioembolic stroke had a significantly higher peripheral frequency of CD4+ cells and CD28 null cells compared to subjects with other TOAST subtypes. We observed a significant relationship between CD28 null cells peripheral percentage and Scandinavian Stroke Scale and NIHSS scores. ROC curve analysis showed that CD28 null cell percentage may be useful to differentiate between stroke subtypes. These findings seem suggest a possible role for a T-cell component also in acute ischemic stroke clinical setting showing a different

  3. [NDT-Bobath method used in the rehabilitation of patients with a history of ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Kubsik, Anna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and disability in human. The vitally important problem after ischemic stroke is hemiparesis of the body. The most common methods used in improving the mobility of patients after ischemic stroke is a Bobath-NDT (Neuro-Developmental Treatment - Bobath), which initiated the Berta and Karel Bobath for children with cerebral palsy. It is a method designed to neurophysiological recovery of these vital functions that the patient was lost due to illness, and wants it back.

  4. Assessment of Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Review.

    PubMed

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina Ivette; Mullins, Carola; Solberg, Agnieszka; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. In the last two decades, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has emerged as the primary imaging tool in the detection and prognostic assessment of ischemic heart disease. In a single study, CMRI allows evaluation of not only myocardial wall perfusion, but also the presence, acuity, and extent of myocardial ischemia and infarction complications. Also, rest and stress perfusion imaging can accurately depict inducible ischemia secondary to significant coronary artery stenosis. We present a pictorial review of the assessment of ischemic cardiomyopathy with an emphasis on CMRI features.

  5. Assessment of Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina Ivette; Mullins, Carola; Solberg, Agnieszka; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. In the last two decades, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has emerged as the primary imaging tool in the detection and prognostic assessment of ischemic heart disease. In a single study, CMRI allows evaluation of not only myocardial wall perfusion, but also the presence, acuity, and extent of myocardial ischemia and infarction complications. Also, rest and stress perfusion imaging can accurately depict inducible ischemia secondary to significant coronary artery stenosis. We present a pictorial review of the assessment of ischemic cardiomyopathy with an emphasis on CMRI features. PMID:26085960

  6. Ischemic subglottic damage following a short-time intubation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marta João; Aparício, José; Mota, Teresa; Spratley, Jorge; Ribeiro, Augusto

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to report a case of ischemic subglottic damage after a short-time intubation with a large, overinflated endotracheal tube cuff in a child. The study uses individual case report. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit after a head trauma intubated with a 5.5-mm inner diameter cuffed endotracheal tube overinflated with 16 ml of air that produced a pressure of more than 120 cm H2O. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure produced by inflation was reduced after 4 h. The child presented postextubation stridor with subglottic edema. Inappropriate handling of tracheal intubation without accurate measurement of endotracheal tube size and intracuff pressures of endotracheal tubes, can cause airway trauma and place patients at risk.

  7. Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Vascular Ischemic (Occlusive) Diseases: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is primarily considered to be an autoimmune pathological condition that is also referred to as "Hughes syndrome". It is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and pregnancy pathologies in the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant. APS can occur either as a primary disease or secondary to a connective tissue disorder, most frequently systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Damage to the nervous system is one of the most prominent clinical constellations of sequelae in APS and includes (i) arterial/venous thrombotic events, (ii) psychiatric features and (iii) other non-thrombotic neurological syndromes. In this overview we compare the most important vascular ischemic (occlusive) disturbances (VIOD) with neuro-psychiatric symptomatics, together with complete, updated classifications and hypotheses for the etio-pathogenesis of APS with underlying clinical and laboratory criteria for optimal diagnosis and disease management. PMID:18159581

  8. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and preconditioning for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng-li; Feng, Hua; Xi, Guo-hua

    2016-01-01

    To date, the therapeutic methods for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are still limited. The lack of oxygen supply is critical for brain injury following stroke. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), an approach through a process in which patients breathe in 100% pure oxygen at over 101 kPa, has been shown to facilitate oxygen delivery and increase oxygen supply. Hence, HBO possesses the potentials to produce beneficial effects on stroke. Actually, accumulated basic and clinical evidences have demonstrated that HBO therapy and preconditioning could induce neuroprotective functions via different mechanisms. Nevertheless, the lack of clinical translational study limits the application of HBO. More translational studies and clinical trials are needed in the future to develop effective HBO protocols. PMID:28217297

  9. Synovial fat necrosis associated with ischemic pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Smukler, N M; Schumacher, H R; Pascual, E; Brown, S; Ryan, W E; Sadeghian, M R

    1979-05-01

    A 59-year-old man with ischemic pancreatic disease, polyarthritis, and cutaneous nodules has shown histopathologic findings indicative of disseminated fat necrosis in a percutaneous biopsy specimen from the right knee. The histopathologic findings in the synovium included necrotic fat cells, distorted fat cells and adjacent lymphocytes, lipid laden histiocytes, and giant cells. In prior histopathologic studies of the joint involvement associated with this disorder, fat cell necrosis has been found only in the periarticular tissues, and the synovium has appeared normal or showed nonspecific inflammation. However, the present study shows that the synovial membrane may also be the site of fat necrosis and an associated inflammatory reaction; thus patients with this disorder may manifest arthritis in addition to periarthritis.

  10. [Comparative analysis of efficacy of certain neuroprotectors in ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Skorokhodov, A P; Dudina, A A; Kolesnikova, E A; Koron, A E; Kobantsev, Iu A; Sedova, A A

    2006-01-01

    Cortexin, nootropil and cerebrolysin have been used as neuroprotective medications in the acute period of ischemic stroke (IS). Clinical efficacy of cortexin and nootropil has been compared in 2 therapeutic series in 35 patients and that of cortexin and cerebrolysin--in 45 patients. The efficacy was assessed using several clinical and psychometric scales with statistical processing of the results. The data obtained suggest that in patients with moderate IS the drugs exert a similar and rather marked effect which was stronger comparing to the treatment without these drugs. At the same time, a domestic neuroprotector cortexin has some advantages, especially with regard to the absence of side-effects and "price-dose-therapeutic effect" criterion.

  11. Positive effects of intermittent fasting in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Ng, Gavin Yong Quan; Poh, Luting; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2017-03-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary protocol where energy restriction is induced by alternate periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Prophylactic intermittent fasting has been shown to extend lifespan and attenuate the progress and severity of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular (e.g. stroke and myocardial infarction), neurodegenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) and cancerous diseases in animal models. Stroke is the second leading cause of death, and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and physical inactivity have been associated with elevated risks of stroke in humans. Recent studies have shown that prophylactic IF may mitigate tissue damage and neurological deficit following ischemic stroke by a mechanism(s) involving suppression of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death pathways in animal stroke models. This review summarizes data supporting the potential hormesis mechanisms of prophylactic IF in animal models, and with a focus on findings from animal studies of prophylactic IF in stroke in our laboratory.

  12. Physical exercise training and neurovascular unit in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhang, M; Feng, R; Li, W B; Ren, S Q; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2014-06-20

    Physical exercise could exert a neuroprotective effect in both clinical studies and animal experiments. A series of related studies have indicated that physical exercise could reduce infarct volume, alleviate neurological deficits, decrease blood-brain barrier dysfunction, promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system and increase the survival rate after ischemic stroke. In this review, we summarized the protective effects of physical exercise on neurovascular unit (NVU), including neurons, astrocytes, pericytes and the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that exercise training could decrease the blood-brain barrier dysfunction and promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system. An awareness of the exercise intervention benefits pre- and post stroke may lead more stroke patients and people with high-risk factors to accept exercise therapy for the prevention and treatment of stroke.

  13. Atrial natriuretic factor in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, X; Figueras, J; Salvia, M D; Esque, M T; Delgado, M P; Jimenez, R

    1993-01-01

    The influence of perinatal asphyxia in the secretion of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) during the first 6 days of life, and its renal consequences are discussed. Comparison between 20 healthy term neonates and 19 with first--or second--degree hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is made. Daily controls were performed on clinical and neurological examinations and administration of sodium and fluids. On the first and sixth days of life, 24 hours urine collection, natremia, natriuresis, fractionated excretion of sodium and creatinine clearance were determined. The ANF was performed at 1, 2, 3 and 6 days old, by R.I.A. The full term newborns with HIE showed a peak in ANF values on day two, as does the control group, thereafter maintaining higher levels, with a significant difference on day three and six. No correlation could be found between the ANF levels and the renal variables analyzed.

  14. Reparative resynchronization in ischemic heart failure: an emerging strategy

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Satsuki; Terzic, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac dyssynchrony refers to disparity in cardiac wall motion, a serious consequence of myocardial infarction associated with poor outcome. Infarct-induced scar is refractory to device-based cardiac resynchronization therapy, which relies on viable tissue. Leveraging the prospect of structural and functional regeneration, reparative resynchronization has emerged as a potentially achievable strategy. In proof-of-concept studies, stem-cell therapy eliminates contractile deficit originating from infarcted regions and secures long-term synchronization with tissue repair. Limited clinical experience suggests benefit of cell interventions in acute and chronic ischemic heart disease as adjuvant to standard of care. A regenerative resynchronization option for dyssynchronous heart failure thus merits validation. PMID:24840208

  15. AMPK: energy sensor and survival mechanism in the ischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dake; Young, Lawrence H

    2015-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of cellular metabolism and plays an important role in diabetes, cancer, and vascular disease. In the heart, AMPK activation is an essential component of the adaptive response to cardiomyocyte stress that occurs during myocardial ischemia. During ischemia-reperfusion, AMPK activation modulates glucose and fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial function, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, autophagy, and apoptosis. Pharmacological activation of AMPK prevents myocardial necrosis and contractile dysfunction during ischemia-reperfusion and potentially represents a cardioprotective strategy for the treatment of myocardial infarction. This review discusses novel mechanisms of AMPK activation in the ischemic heart, the role of endogenous AMPK activation during ischemia, and the potential therapeutic applications for AMPK-directed therapy.

  16. Erectile Dysfunction Agents and Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pomeranz, Howard D

    2017-02-01

    Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5I) are used for treatment of erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension and have been implicated as a causative factor for development of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Controversy remains regarding a cause and effect between PDE5I use and NAION because the mechanism by which NAION occurs is still not well understood. Because neuro-ophthalmologists have accepted that there is a potential relationship between ingestion of the PDE5I class of medications and NAION, the neuro-ophthalmologist should inquire about PDE5I use when evaluating a patient with a new diagnosis of NAION, and counsel patients regarding the implication of continued use of PDE5I.

  17. Inhalational Anesthetics as Preconditioning Agents in Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Traystman, Richard J.; Murphy, Stephanie J.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY While many pharmacological agents have been shown to protect the brain from cerebral ischemia in animal models, none have translated successfully to human patients. One potential clinical neuroprotective strategy in humans may involve increasing the brain’s tolerance to ischemia by pre-ischemic conditioning (preconditioning). There are many methods to induce tolerance via preconditioning such as: ischemia itself, pharmacological, hypoxia, endotoxin, and others. Inhalational anesthetic agents have also been shown to result in brain preconditioning. Mechanisms responsible for brain preconditioning are many, complex, and unclear and may involve Akt activation, ATP-sensitive potassium channels, and nitric oxide, amongst many others. Anesthetics, however, may play an important and unique role as preconditioning agents, particularly during the perioperative period. PMID:17962069

  18. Ischemic Stroke Injury Is Mediated by Aberrant Cdk5

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Douglas A.; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I.; Tan, Zhenjun; Tozzi, Alessandro; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; DiNapoli, Vincent; Plattner, Florian; Kansy, Janice W.; Benkovic, Stanley A.; Huber, Jason D.; Miller, Diane B.; Greengard, Paul; Calabresi, Paolo; Rosen, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Treatment options are limited and only a minority of patients receive acute interventions. Understanding the mechanisms that mediate neuronal injury and death may identify targets for neuroprotective treatments. Here we show that the aberrant activity of the protein kinase Cdk5 is a principal cause of neuronal death in rodents during stroke. Ischemia induced either by embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in vivo or by oxygen and glucose deprivation in brain slices caused calpain-dependent conversion of the Cdk5-activating cofactor p35 to p25. Inhibition of aberrant Cdk5 during ischemia protected dopamine neurotransmission, maintained field potentials, and blocked excitotoxicity. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or conditional knock-out (CKO) of Cdk5 prevented neuronal death in response to ischemia. Moreover, Cdk5 CKO dramatically reduced infarctions following MCAO. Thus, targeting aberrant Cdk5 activity may serve as an effective treatment for stroke. PMID:24920629

  19. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration

  20. DNA damage response in nephrotoxic and ischemic kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingjuan; Tang, Chengyuan; Ma, Zhengwei; Huang, Shuang; Dong, Zheng

    2016-10-27

    DNA damage activates specific cell signaling cascades for DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and/or cell death. Recent studies have demonstrated DNA damage response (DDR) in experimental models of acute kidney injury (AKI). In cisplatin-induced AKI or nephrotoxicity, the DDR pathway of ATR/Chk2/p53 is activated and contributes to renal tubular cell apoptosis. In ischemic AKI, DDR seems more complex and involves at least the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family, and p53; however, while ATM may promote DNA repair, p53 may trigger cell death. Targeting DDR for kidney protection in AKI therefore relies on a thorough elucidation of the DDR pathways in various forms of AKI.

  1. Transmembrane potentials during high voltage shocks in ischemic cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Holley, L K; Knisley, S B

    1997-01-01

    Transmembrane, voltage sensitive fluorescent dye (TMF) recording techniques have shown that high voltage shocks (HVS), typically used in defibrillation, produce either hyper- or depolarization of the transmembrane potential (TMP) when delivered in the refractory period of an action potential (AP) in normal cardiac tissue (NT). Further, HVS produce an extension of the AP, which has been hypothesized as a potential mechanism for electrical defibrillation. We examined whether HVS modify TMP of ischemic tissue (IT) in a similar manner. In seven Langendorff rabbit hearts, recordings of APs were obtained in both NT and IT with TMF using di-4-ANEPPS, and diacetylmonoxime (23 microM) to avoid motion artifacts. Local ischemia was produced by occlusion of the LAD, HVS of either biphasic (5 + 5 ms) or (3 + 2 ms) or monophasic shapes (5 ms) were delivered at varying times (20%-90%) of the paced AP. Intracardiac ECG and TMF recordings of the TMP were each amplified, recorded, and digitized at a frequency of 1 kHz. The paced AP in IT was triangular in shape with no obvious phase 3 plateau, typically seen in NT. There was normally a reduced AP amplitude (expressed as fractional fluorescence) in IT (2.6% +/- 1.79%) compared to 3.8% +/- 0.66% in NT, and shortened AP duration (137 +/- 42 vs 171 +/- 11 ms). One hundred-Volt HVS delivered during the refractory period of paced AP in IT in five rabbits, elicited a depolarization response of the TMP with an amplitude up to three times greater than the paced AP. This is in contrast to NT where the 100-V HVS produced hyperpolarization in four hearts, and only a slight depolarization response in one heart. These results suggest that HVS, typically delivered by a defibrillation shock, modify TMPs in a significantly different manner for ischemic cells, which may influence success in defibrillation.

  2. Can anaerobic performance be improved by remote ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed

    Lalonde, François; Curnier, Daniel Y

    2015-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) provides a substantial benefit for heart protection during surgery. Recent literature on RIPC reveals the potential to benefit the enhancement of sports performance as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of RIPC on anaerobic performance. Seventeen healthy participants who practice regular physical activity participated in the project (9 women and 8 men, mean age 28 ± 8 years). The participants were randomly assigned to an RIPC intervention (four 5-minute cycles of ischemia reperfusion, followed by 5 minutes using a pressure cuff) or a SHAM intervention in a crossover design. After the intervention, the participants were tested for alactic anaerobic performance (6 seconds of effort) followed by a Wingate test (lactic system) on an electromagnetic cycle ergometer. The following parameters were evaluated: average power, peak power, the scale of perceived exertion, fatigue index (in watt per second), peak power (in Watt), time to reach peak power (in seconds), minimum power (in Watt), the average power-to-weight ratio (in watt per kilogram), and the maximum power-to-weight ratio (in watt per kilogram). The peak power for the Wingate test is 794 W for RIPC and 777 W for the control group (p = 0.208). The average power is 529 W (RIPC) vs. 520 W for controls (p = 0.079). Perceived effort for RIPC is 9/10 on the Borg scale vs. 10/10 for the control group (p = 0.123). Remote ischemic preconditioning does not offer any significant benefits for anaerobic performance.

  3. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and Diagnosis of Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Brazzelli, Miriam; Chappell, Francesca M; Miranda, Hector; Shuler, Kirsten; Dennis, Martin; Sandercock, Peter A G; Muir, Keith; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is sensitive to small acute ischemic lesions and might help diagnose transient ischemic attack (TIA). Reclassification of patients with TIA and a DWI lesion as “stroke” is under consideration. We assessed DWI positivity in TIA and implications for reclassification as stroke. Methods We searched multiple sources, without language restriction, from January 1995 to July 2012. We used PRISMA guidelines, and included studies that provided data on patients presenting with suspected TIA who underwent MR DWI and reported the proportion with an acute DWI lesion. We performed univariate random effects meta-analysis to determine DWI positive rates and influencing factors. Results We included 47 papers and 9,078 patients (range = 18–1,693). Diagnosis was by a stroke specialist in 26 of 47 studies (55%); all studies excluded TIA mimics. The pooled proportion of TIA patients with an acute DWI lesion was 34.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 30.5–38.4, range = 9–67%; I2 = 89.3%). Larger studies (n > 200) had lower DWI-positive rates (29%; 95% CI = 23.2–34.6) than smaller (n < 50) studies (40.1%; 95% CI = 33.5–46.6%; p = 0.035), but no other testable factors, including clinician speciality and time to scanning, reduced or explained the 7-fold DWI-positive variation. Interpretation The commonest DWI finding in patients with definite TIA is a negative scan. Available data do not explain why ⅔ of patients with definite specialist-confirmed TIA have negative DWI findings. Until these factors are better understood, reclassifying DWI-positive TIAs as strokes is likely to increase variance in estimates of global stroke and TIA burden of disease. ANN NEUROL 2014;75:67–76 PMID:24085376

  4. Early neurological stability predicts adverse outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Hannah J; Battey, Thomas Wk; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Campbell, Bruce Cv; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Sheth, Kevin N; Kimberly, W Taylor

    2016-10-01

    Background Deterioration in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) in the early days after stroke is associated with progressive infarction, brain edema, and/or hemorrhage, leading to worse outcome. Aims We sought to determine whether a stable NIHSS score represents an adverse or favorable course. Methods Brain magnetic resonance images from a research cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. Using NIHSS scores at baseline and follow-up (day 3-5), patients were categorized into early neurological deterioration (ΔNIHSS ≥ 4), early neurological recovery (ΔNIHSS ≤ -4) or early neurological stability (ΔNIHSS between -3 and 3). The association between these categories and volume of infarct growth, volume of swelling, parenchymal hemorrhage, and 3-month modified Rankin Scale score were evaluated. Results Patients with early neurological deterioration or early neurological stability were less likely to be independent (modified Rankin Scale = 0-2) at 3 months compared to those with early neurological recovery ( P < 0.001). Patients with early neurological deterioration or early neurological stability were observed to have significantly greater infarct growth and swelling volumes than those with early neurological recovery ( P = 0.03; P < 0.001, respectively). Brain edema was more common than the other imaging markers investigated and was independently associated with a stable or worsening NIHSS score after adjustment for age, baseline stroke volume, infarct growth volume, presence of parenchymal hemorrhage, and reperfusion ( P < 0.0001). Conclusions Stable NIHSS score in the subacute period after ischemic stroke may not be benign and is associated with tissue injury, including infarct growth and brain edema. Early improvement is considerably more likely to occur in the absence of these factors.

  5. Simulation of human ischemic stroke in realistic 3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Thierry; Duarte, Max; Descombes, Stéphane; Dronne, Marie-Aimée; Massot, Marc; Louvet, Violaine

    2013-06-01

    In silico research in medicine is thought to reduce the need for expensive clinical trials under the condition of reliable mathematical models and accurate and efficient numerical methods. In the present work, we tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling human ischemic stroke. This problem induces peculiar difficulties like potentially large stiffness which stems from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of steep spatial gradients in the reaction fronts, spatially very localized. Furthermore, simulations on realistic 3D geometries are mandatory in order to describe correctly this type of phenomenon. The main goal of this article is to obtain, for the first time, 3D simulations on realistic geometries and to show that the simulation results are consistent with those obtain in experimental studies or observed on MRI images in stroke patients. For this purpose, we introduce a new resolution strategy based mainly on time operator splitting that takes into account complex geometry coupled with a well-conceived parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures. We consider then a high order implicit time integration for the reaction and an explicit one for the diffusion term in order to build a time operator splitting scheme that exploits efficiently the special features of each problem. Thus, we aim at solving complete and realistic models including all time and space scales with conventional computing resources, that is on a reasonably powerful workstation. Consequently and as expected, 2D and also fully 3D numerical simulations of ischemic strokes for a realistic brain geometry, are conducted for the first time and shown to reproduce the dynamics observed on MRI images in stroke patients. Beyond this major step, in order to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of the simulations, we indicate how the present numerical strategy can be coupled with spatial

  6. Nitrates and nitrites in the treatment of ischemic cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Nossaman, Vaughn E; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    The organic nitrite, amyl of nitrite, was initially used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of angina pectoris, but was replaced over a decade later by the organic nitrate, nitroglycerin (NTG), due to the ease of administration and longer duration of action. The administration of organic nitrate esters, such as NTG, continues to be used in the treatment of angina pectoris and heart failure since the birth of modern pharmacology. Their clinical effectiveness is due to vasodilator activity in large veins and arteries through an as yet unidentified method of delivering nitric oxide (NO), or a NO-like compound. The major drawback is the development of tolerance with NTG, and the duration and route of administration with amyl of nitrite. Although the nitrites are no longer used in the treatment of hypertension or ischemic heart disease, the nitrite anion has recently been discovered to possess novel pharmacologic actions, such as modulating hypoxic vasodilation, and providing cytoprotection in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Although the actions of these 2 similar chemical classes (nitrites and organic nitrates) have often been considered to be alike, we still do not understand their mechanism of action. Finally, the nitrite anion, either from sodium nitrite or an intermediate NTG form, may act as a storage form for NO and provide support for investigating the use of these agents in the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular states. We review what is presently known about the use of nitrates and nitrites including the historical, current, and potential uses of these agents, and their mechanisms of action.

  7. Fantasies About Stem Cell Therapy in Chronic Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Seo; Chung, Dan-il; Choi, Hojin; Baek, Wonki; Kim, Hyun Young; Heo, Sung Hyuk; Chang, Dae-Il; Na, Hae Ri; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy (SCT) has been proposed for the treatment of neurological disorders. Although there is insufficient clinical evidence to support its efficacy, unproven SCTs are being performed worldwide. In this study, we investigated the perspectives and expectations of chronic ischemic stroke patients and physicians about SCTs. A total of 250 chronic ischemic stroke patients were interviewed at 4 hospitals. Structured open and closed questions about SCT for chronic stroke were asked by trained interviewers using the conventional in-person method. In addition, 250 stroke-related physicians were randomly interviewed via an e-mail questionnaire. Of the 250 patients (mean 63 years, 70% male), 121 (46%) responded that they wanted to receive SCT in spite of its unknown side effects. Around 60% of the patients anticipated physical, emotional, and psychological improvement after SCT, and 158 (63%) believed that SCT might prevent strokes. However, physicians had much lower expectations about the effectiveness of SCTs, which was not in line with patient expectations. Multivariate analysis revealed that the male gender [odds ratio (OR): 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10–3.64], longer disease duration (OR: 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00–1.02), higher modified Rankin Scale score (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.06–1.60), and familiarity with stem cells (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.10–3.15) were independently associated with wanting SCT. The major source of information about SCT was television (68%), and the most reliable source was physicians (49%). Patients have unfounded expectations that SCT will improve their functioning. Considering our finding that the major source of information on stem cells is media channels, but not the physician, to decrease patients' inappropriate exposure, doctors should make more effort to educate patients using mass media with accurate information. PMID:22784218

  8. The impact of P2Y12 promoter DNA methylation on the recurrence of ischemic events in Chinese patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Gang; Ma, Ning; Wang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Qing; Mei, Sheng-Hui; Zhao, Kun; Wang, Yong-Jun; Li, Wei; Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Sun, Shu-Sen; Miao, Zhong-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The primary mechanism of clopidogrel resistance is still unclear. We aimed to investigate whether the methylation status of the P2Y12 promoter has effects on platelet function and clinical ischemic events. Patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease were enrolled into our study. Venous blood samples were drawn for thrombelastograpy (TEG) and active metabolite assay. Patients were divided into a case- or control-group based on the occurrence of ischemic events during a one year follow-up. Two TEG parameters between the case and control groups were statistically significant [ADP inhibition rate (ADP%): P = 0.018; ADP-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength (MAADP): P = 0.030]. The concentrations of clopidogrel active metabolite had no significant difference (P = 0.281). Sixteen CpG dinucleotides on P2Y12 promoter were tested. Three CpG sites (CpG11 and CpG12 + 13) showed lower methylation status, which correlated with a strong association with increased risk of clinical events. Changes of MAADP and ADP% were also associated with methylation levels of CpG 11 and CpG 12 + 13. Hypomethylation of the P2Y12 promoter is associated with a higher platelet reactivity and increased risk of ischemic events in our patients. Methylation analysis of peripheral blood samples might be a novel molecular marker to help early identification of patients at high risk for clinical ischemic events. PMID:27686864

  9. [Apical hypertrophic myocardiopathy. Report of the first case identified on the American continent].

    PubMed

    Zanoniani, C; Guadalajara, J F; Gil, M; Medrano, G A; Vargas, J; Salazar, E

    1981-01-01

    What appears to be the first case of hypertrophic apical myocardiography described in the western hemisphere is presented in this report. The diagnosis was confirmed by angiocardiography and echocardiography. The electrocardiogram showed the characteristic giant T waves. It is of interest that the coronary radioangiography suggested alterations in the microcirculation which could explain the striking electrocardiographic pattern of subepicardial ischemia seen in these patients.

  10. Developing drug strategies for the neuroprotective treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Arnao, Valentina; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Developing new treatment strategies for acute ischemic stroke in the last twenty years has offered some important successes, but also several failures. Most trials of neuroprotective therapies have been uniformly negative to date. Recent research has reported how excitatory amino acids act as the major excitatory neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, other therapeutic targets such as free radical scavenger strategies and the anti-inflammatory neuroprotective strategy have been evaluated with conflicting data in animal models and human subjects with acute ischemic stroke. Whereas promising combinations of neuroprotection and neurorecovery, such as citicoline, albumin and cerebrolysin have been tested with findings worthy of further evaluation in larger randomized clinical trials. Understanding the complexities of the ischemic cascade is essential to developing pharmacological targets for acute ischemic stroke in neuroprotective or flow restoration therapeutic strategies.

  11. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions. PMID:27672603

  12. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions.

  13. Leukocytes Link Local and Systemic Inflammation in Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease: An Expanded “Cardiovascular Continuum”

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Peter; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K.

    2016-01-01

    We have traditionally viewed ischemic heart disease in a cardiocentric manner: plaques grow in arteries until they block blood flow, causing acute coronary and other ischemic syndromes. Recent research provides new insight into the integrative biology of inflammation as it contributes to ischemic cardiovascular disease. These results have revealed hitherto unsuspected inflammatory signaling networks at work in these disorders that link the brain, autonomic nervous system, bone marrow, and spleen to the atherosclerotic plaque and to the infarcting myocardium. A burgeoning clinical literature indicates that such inflammatory networks—far from a mere laboratory curiosity—operate in our patients and can influence aspects of ischemic cardiovascular disease that determine decisively clinical outcomes. These new findings enlarge the circle of the traditional “cardiovascular continuum” beyond the heart and vessels to include the nervous system, the spleen, and the bone marrow. PMID:26940931

  14. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-01-01

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  15. Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke: The Role of Leukocytes and Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Park, Joohyun; Chang, Ji Young; Kim, Sa-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The immune response after stroke is known to play a major role in ischemic brain pathobiology. The inflammatory signals released by immune mediators activated by brain injury sets off a complex series of biochemical and molecular events which have been increasingly recognized as a key contributor to neuronal cell death. The primary immune mediators involved are glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocyte. After ischemic stroke, activation of glial cells and subsequent release of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals are important for modulating both neuronal cell damage and wound healing. Infiltrated leukocytes release inflammatory mediators into the site of the lesion, thereby exacerbating brain injury. This review describes how the roles of glial cells and circulating leukocytes are a double-edged sword for neuroinflammation by focusing on their detrimental and protective effects in ischemic stroke. Here, we will focus on underlying characterize of glial cells and leukocytes under inflammation after ischemic stroke. PMID:27790058

  16. Unilateral Ischemic Maculopathy Associated with Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Patients with AIDS: Optical Coherence Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, J. Fernando; Garcia, Reinaldo A.; Arevalo, Fernando A.; Fernandez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) characteristics of ischemic maculopathy in two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis developed ischemic maculopathy. Both patients presented with central visual loss and active granular CMV retinitis. The presence of opacification of the superficial retina in the macular area and intraretinal edema suggested the diagnosis. Fluorescein angiography changes were similar in the two cases with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and late staining of juxtafoveal vessels. OCT changes were suggestive of retinal ischemia: Increased reflectivity from the inner retinal layer and decreased backscattering from the retinal photoreceptors due to fluid and retinal edema. Ischemic maculopathy may cause a severe and permanent decrease in vision in AIDS patients. Fluorescein angiography and OCT should be considered in any patient with AIDS and unexplained visual loss. The mechanism of ischemic maculopathy may be multifactorial. PMID:27051496

  17. Papillary fibroelastoma of mitral valve: a rare cause of transient ischemic attack in the young.

    PubMed

    Gölbaşi, Z; Ciçek, D; Aydogdu, S; Can, C

    2000-07-01

    We report the case of a young Turkish man with a transient ischemic attack secondary to a rare cardiac tumor, papillary fibroelastoma. The tumor was diagnosed by 2-dimensional echocardiography and treated surgically.

  18. Endovascular therapy in children with acute ischemic stroke: review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Amlie-Lefond, Catherine; Orbach, Darren B

    2012-09-25

    This review provides a summary of the currently available data pertaining to the interventional management of acute ischemic stroke in children. The literature is scarce and is lacking much-needed prospective trials. No study in the literature on the well-established systemic or local thrombolysis trials has included children. Mechanical thrombectomy trials using clot retriever devices have also excluded patients younger than 18 years. The current review is limited to case series of interventional acute ischemic stroke therapy in children and the potential future of endovascular ischemic stroke therapy in this patient population. Recommendations in this review represent the opinion of the authors, based on review of the limited literature covering endovascular acute ischemic stroke therapy in children.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathies: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina I; Mullins, Carola; Stewart, Kevan; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are defined as either primary or secondary diseases of the myocardium resulting in cardiac dysfunction. While primary cardiomyopathies are confined to the heart and can be genetic or acquired, secondary cardiomyopathies show involvement of the heart as a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease including metabolic, inflammatory, granulomatous, infectious, or autoimmune entities. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are currently classified as hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, or unclassifiable, including left ventricular non-compaction. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) not only has the capability to assess cardiac morphology and function, but also the ability to detect edema, hemorrhage, fibrosis, and intramyocardial deposits, providing a valuable imaging tool in the characterization of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This pictorial essay shows some of the most important non-ischemic cardiomyopathies with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathies: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina I; Mullins, Carola; Stewart, Kevan; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are defined as either primary or secondary diseases of the myocardium resulting in cardiac dysfunction. While primary cardiomyopathies are confined to the heart and can be genetic or acquired, secondary cardiomyopathies show involvement of the heart as a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease including metabolic, inflammatory, granulomatous, infectious, or autoimmune entities. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are currently classified as hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, or unclassifiable, including left ventricular non-compaction. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) not only has the capability to assess cardiac morphology and function, but also the ability to detect edema, hemorrhage, fibrosis, and intramyocardial deposits, providing a valuable imaging tool in the characterization of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This pictorial essay shows some of the most important non-ischemic cardiomyopathies with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features. PMID:26199786

  1. miR-455 inhibits neuronal cell death by targeting TRAF3 in cerebral ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Shengtao; Tang, Bo; Li, Gang; Fan, Ruiming; Cao, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of brain disease, with high morbidity, disability, and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as vital gene regulators in various types of human diseases. Accumulating evidence has suggested that aberrant expression of miRNAs play critical roles in the pathologies of ischemic stroke. Yet, the precise mechanism by which miRNAs control cerebral ischemic stroke remains unclear. In the present study, we explored whether miR-455 suppresses neuronal death by targeting TRAF3 in cerebral ischemic stroke. The expression levels of miR-455 and TRAF3 were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The role of miR-455 in cell death caused by oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) was assessed using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The influence of miR-455 on infarct volume was evaluated in mouse brain after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Bioinformatics softwares and luciferase analysis were used to find and confirm the targets of miR-455. The results showed that the expression levels of miR-455 significantly decreased in primary neuronal cells subjected to OGD and mouse brain subjected to MCAO. In addition, forced expression of miR-455 inhibited neuronal death and weakened ischemic brain infarction in focal ischemia-stroked mice. Furthermore, TRAF3 was proved to be a direct target of miR-455, and miR-455 could negatively suppress TRAF3 expression. Biological function analysis showed that TRAF3 silencing displayed the neuroprotective effect in ischemic stroke and could enhance miR-455-induced positive impact on ischemic injury both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, miR-455 played a vital role in protecting neuronal cells from death by downregulating TRAF3 protein expression. These findings may represent a novel latent therapeutic target for cerebral ischemic stroke. PMID:27980410

  2. Genetic Factors Influencing Coagulation Factor XIII B-Subunit Contribute to Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Traylor, Matthew; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bevan, Stephen; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Seshadri, Sudha; Sudlow, Cathie; Williams, Frances M.K.; Markus, Hugh S.; Lewis, Cathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Abnormal coagulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, but how this association is mediated and whether it differs between ischemic stroke subtypes is unknown. We determined the shared genetic risk between 14 coagulation factors and ischemic stroke and its subtypes. Methods— Using genome-wide association study results for 14 coagulation factors from the population-based TwinsUK sample (N≈2000 for each factor), meta-analysis results from the METASTROKE consortium ischemic stroke genome-wide association study (12 389 cases, 62 004 controls), and genotype data for 9520 individuals from the WTCCC2 ischemic stroke study (3548 cases, 5972 controls—the largest METASTROKE subsample), we explored shared genetic risk for coagulation and stroke. We performed three analyses: (1) a test for excess concordance (or discordance) in single nucleotide polymorphism effect direction across coagulation and stroke, (2) an estimation of the joint effect of multiple coagulation-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in stroke, and (3) an evaluation of common genetic risk between coagulation and stroke. Results— One coagulation factor, factor XIII subunit B (FXIIIB), showed consistent effects in the concordance analysis, the estimation of polygenic risk, and the validation with genotype data, with associations specific to the cardioembolic stroke subtype. Effect directions for FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly discordant with cardioembolic disease (smallest P=5.7×10−04); the joint effect of FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms was significantly predictive of ischemic stroke (smallest P=1.8×10−04) and the cardioembolic subtype (smallest P=1.7×10−04). We found substantial negative genetic covariation between FXIIIB and ischemic stroke (rG=−0.71, P=0.01) and the cardioembolic subtype (rG=−0.80, P=0.03). Conclusions— Genetic markers associated with low FXIIIB levels

  3. Ethnic Differences in Ambient Air Pollution and Risk of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Jeffrey J.; Adar, Sara D.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Smith, Melinda A.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between short-term changes in ambient pollution (particulate matter < 2.5μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3)) and the risk of ischemic stroke among individuals living in a bi-ethnic community and whether this association is modified by ethnicity. Methods We identified incident ischemic stroke cases from the population-based Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project between 2000 and 2012. Associations between PM2.5 (mean 24-hour) and O3 (maximal 8-hour) levels, measured on the same-day and lags of 1-3 days, and odds of ischemic stroke were assessed using a time-stratified case-crossover design and modeled using conditional logistic regression. We explored race/ethnicity (Mexican American versus non-Hispanic white) as a modifier by including interaction terms in the models. Results There were 2,948 ischemic strokes with median age 71 years (IQR: 59-80). We observed no overall associations between the air pollutants and odds of ischemic stroke at any lag. When stratified by ethnicity, higher O3 was consistently associated with greater odds of ischemic stroke for non-Hispanic whites, but not for Mexican Americans. Higher PM2.5 was generally associated with lower odds of ischemic stroke for non-Hispanic whites but modestly greater odds for Mexican Americans. Conclusion Ethnic differences in the associations between ischemic stroke and short-term exposures to O3 and PM2.5 were suggested indicating that further study in diverse populations may be warranted. PMID:26451880

  4. Nrf2 in ischemic neurons promotes retinal vascular regeneration through regulation of semaphorin 6A

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yanhong; Gong, Junsong; Xu, Zhenhua; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K.; Mitchell, Katherine L.; Welsbie, Derek S.; Biswal, Shyam; Duh, Elia J.

    2015-01-01

    Delayed revascularization of ischemic neural tissue is a major impediment to preservation of function in central nervous system (CNS) diseases including stroke and ischemic retinopathies. Therapeutic strategies allowing rapid revascularization are greatly needed to reduce ischemia-induced cellular damage and suppress harmful pathologic neovascularization. However, key mechanisms governing vascular recovery in ischemic CNS, including regulatory molecules governing the transition from tissue injury to tissue repair, are largely unknown. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a major stress-response transcription factor well known for its cell-intrinsic cytoprotective function. However, its role in cell–cell crosstalk is less appreciated. Here we report that Nrf2 is highly activated in ischemic retina and promotes revascularization by modulating neurons in their paracrine regulation of endothelial cells. Global Nrf2 deficiency strongly suppresses retinal revascularization and increases pathologic neovascularization in a mouse model of ischemic retinopathy. Conditional knockout studies demonstrate a major role for neuronal Nrf2 in vascular regrowth into avascular retina. Deletion of neuronal Nrf2 results in semaphorin 6A (Sema6A) induction in hypoxic/ischemic retinal ganglion cells in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α)-dependent fashion. Sema6A expression increases in avascular inner retina and colocalizes with Nrf2 in human fetal eyes. Extracellular Sema6A leads to dose-dependent suppression of the migratory phenotype of endothelial cells through activation of Notch signaling. Lentiviral-mediated delivery of Sema6A small hairpin RNA (shRNA) abrogates the defective retinal revascularization in Nrf2-deficient mice. Importantly, pharmacologic Nrf2 activation promotes reparative angiogenesis and suppresses pathologic neovascularization. Our findings reveal a unique function of Nrf2 in reprogramming ischemic tissue toward neurovascular repair via Sema6A regulation

  5. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy in patients treated with dabigatran with acute ischemic stroke: Expert opinion.

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Bernstein, R; Butcher, K; Campbell, B; Cloud, G; Davalos, A; Davis, S; Ferro, J M; Grond, M; Krieger, D; Ntaios, G; Slowik, A; Touzé, E

    2017-01-01

    Systemic thrombolysis with rt-PA is contraindicated in patients with acute ischemic stroke anticoagulated with dabigatran. This expert opinion provides guidance on the use of the specific reversal agent idarucizumab followed by rt-PA and/or thrombectomy in patients with ischemic stroke pre-treated with dabigatran. The use of idarucizumab followed by rt-PA is covered by the label of both drugs.

  6. Surgical Management of Stuttering Ischemic Priapism: A Case Report and Concise Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Raslan, M.; Hiew, K.; Hoyle, A.; Ross, D.G.; Betts, C.D.; Maddineni, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    Stuttering priapism is an extremely rare and poorly understood entity. We present a rare case of a 47-year-old Afro-Caribbean gentleman who required proximal shunt procedure to treat his ischemic stuttering priapism after he had failed medical management. We provided a concise review of the literature on the surgical management of ischemic priapism. This case highlighted the importance of prompt surgical intervention in prolonged stuttering priapism to avoid serious psychological and functional complications. PMID:26977408

  7. Application of Spatially Distributed Field of Electric Impulses for Correction of Angiogenesis in Ischemic Muscular Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kublanov, V.S.; Danilova, I.G.; Goette, I.F.; Brykina, I.A.; Shalyagin, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Influence of spatially distributed field of electric impulses in a projection to cervical ganglions of the sympathetic nervous system on angiogenesis in ischemic muscular tissue of a rat’s shin has been studied. It is revealed that blood supply of animals, influenced by the field, is restored through increase in quantity of capillaries in ischemic tissues, and number of products of endogenous intoxication is reduced. PMID:23675207

  8. Marine Compound Xyloketal B Reduces Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ai-Jiao; Chen, Wenliang; Xu, Baofeng; Liu, Rui; Turlova, Ekaterina; Barszczyk, Andrew; Sun, Christopher Lf; Liu, Ling; Deurloo, Marielle; Wang, Guan-Lei; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy causes neurodegeneration and brain injury, leading to sensorimotor dysfunction. Xyloketal B is a novel marine compound isolated from a mangrove fungus Xylaria species (no. 2508) with unique antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanism of xyloketal B on oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neuronal cell death in mouse primary cortical culture and on hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal mice in vivo. We found that xyloketal B reduced anoxia-induced neuronal cell death in vitro, as well as infarct volume in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury model in vivo. Furthermore, xyloketal B improved functional behavioral recovery of the animals following hypoxic-ischemic insult. In addition, xyloketal B significantly decreased calcium entry, reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells, reduced the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax proteins, and increased the level of Bcl-2 protein after the hypoxic-ischemic injury. Our findings indicate that xyloketal B is effective in models of hypoxia-ischemia and thus has potential as a treatment for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:25546517

  9. PACAP38/PAC1 Signaling Induces Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Homing to Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Huan; Chiu, Lian; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chiang, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shih-Ping; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Hsu, Chung Y; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Shyu, Woei-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding stem cell homing, which is governed by environmental signals from the surrounding niche, is important for developing effective stem cell-based repair strategies. The molecular mechanism by which the brain under ischemic stress recruits bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) to the vascular niche remains poorly characterized. Here we report that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation upregulates pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide 38 (PACAP38), which in turn activates PACAP type 1 receptor (PAC1) under hypoxia in vitro and cerebral ischemia in vivo. BMDCs homing to endothelial cells in the ischemic brain are mediated by HIF-1α activation of the PACAP38-PAC1 signaling cascade followed by upregulation of cellular prion protein and α6-integrin to enhance the ability of BMDCs to bind laminin in the vascular niche. Exogenous PACAP38 confers a similar effect in facilitating BMDCs homing into the ischemic brain, resulting in reduction of ischemic brain injury. These findings suggest a novel HIF-1α-activated PACAP38-PAC1 signaling process in initiating BMDCs homing into the ischemic brain for reducing brain injury and enhancing functional recovery after ischemic stroke. Stem Cells 2015;33:1153–1172 PMID:25523790

  10. SIMPLE MACHINE PERFUSION SIGNIFICANTLY ENHANCES HEPATOCYTE YIELDS OF ISCHEMIC AND FRESH RAT LIVERS.

    PubMed

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Calhoun, Candice; Uygun, Basak E; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Price, Gavrielle; Luitje, Martha; Saeidi, Nima; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Korkut

    2013-01-01

    The scarcity of viable hepatocytes is a significant bottleneck in cell transplantation, drug discovery, toxicology, tissue engineering, and bioartificial assist devices, where trillions of high-functioning hepatocytes are needed annually. We took the novel approach of using machine perfusion to maximize cell recovery, specifically from uncontrolled cardiac death donors, the largest source of disqualified donor organs. In a rat model, we developed a simple 3 hour room temperature (20±2°C) machine perfusion protocol to treat non-premedicated livers exposed to 1 hour of warm (34°C) ischemia. Treated ischemic livers were compared to fresh, fresh-treated and untreated ischemic livers using viable hepatocyte yields and in vitro performance as quantitative endpoints. Perfusion treatment resulted in both a 25-fold increase in viable hepatocytes from ischemic livers, and a 40% increase from fresh livers. While cell morphology and function in suspension and plate cultures of untreated warm ischemic cells was significantly impaired, treated warm ischemic cells were indistinguishable from fresh hepatocytes. Further, a strong linear correlation between tissue ATP and cell yield enabled accurate evaluation of the extent of perfusion recovery. Maximal recovery of warm ischemic liver ATP content appears to be correlated with optimal flow through the microvasculature. These data demonstrate that the inclusion of a simple perfusion-preconditioning step can significantly increase the efficiency of functional hepatocyte yields and the number of donor livers that can be gainfully utilized.

  11. Carnosine protects the brain of rats and Mongolian gerbils against ischemic injury: after-stroke-effect.

    PubMed

    Dobrota, Dusan; Fedorova, Tatiana; Stvolinsky, Sergey; Babusikova, Eva; Likavcanova, Katarina; Drgova, Anna; Strapkova, Adriana; Boldyrev, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    Carnosine, a specific constituent of excitable tissues of vertebrates, exhibits a significant antioxidant protecting effect on the brain damaged by ischemic-reperfusion injury when it was administered to the animals before ischemic episode. In this study, the therapeutic effect of carnosine was estimated on animals when this drug was administered intraperitoneally (100 mg/kg body weight) after ischemic episode induced by experimental global brain ischemia. Treatment of the animals with carnosine after ischemic episode under long-term (7-14 days) reperfusion demonstrated its pronounced protective effect on neurological symptoms and animal mortality. Carnosine also prevented higher lipid peroxidation of brain membrane structures and increased a resistance of neuronal membranes to the in vitro induced oxidation. Measurements of malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) in brain homogenates showed its increase in the after brain stroke animals and decreased MDA level in the after brain stroke animals treated with carnosine. We concluded that carnosine compensates deficit in antioxidant defense system of brain damaged by ischemic injury. The data presented demonstrate that carnosine is effective in protecting the brain in the post-ischemic period.

  12. Influence of sulfation on anti-myocardial ischemic activity of Ophiopogon japonicus polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qin; Feng, Yi; Xu, De-Sheng; Lin, Xiao; Chen, Yan-Zuo

    2009-01-01

    Ophiopogon japonicus polysaccharide (FOJ-5) from Radix ophiopogonis has shown anti-myocardial ischemic action in vitro and in vivo in our previous studies. In order to clarify the influence of chemical modifications on the action, a series of sulfated FOJ-5 (FOJ-5-S) with different substitution degrees were prepared and the anti-myocardial ischemic action of the natural FOJ-5 and the FOJ-5-S were studied in vitro and in vivo. Langendorff isolated rat hearts and acute myocardial ischemic rats induced by isoprenaline were employed as myocardial ischemic models in our experiments. The amplitude and frequency of cardiac contraction, coronary blood flow at different time points after ischemia/reperfusion were measured in vitro. The ST segment shift in electrocardiogram and lactate dehydrogenase level in blood plasma were observed on the in vivo model. The results indicated that FOJ-5 and FOJ-5-S had the anti-myocardial ischemic action compared with non-treated vehicle groups. Furthermore, it was found that FOJ-5-S had significant action on the in vivo model compared with FOJ-5 (P < 0.05). And the obtained results from the further study also indicated that only when the degree of substitution was in a certain range, the FOJ-5-S had excellent anti-myocardial ischemic activity.

  13. Simple Machine Perfusion Significantly Enhances Hepatocyte Yields of Ischemic and Fresh Rat Livers

    PubMed Central

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Calhoun, Candice; Uygun, Basak E.; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Price, Gavrielle; Luitje, Martha; Saeidi, Nima; Yarmush, Martin L.; Uygun, Korkut

    2013-01-01

    The scarcity of viable hepatocytes is a significant bottleneck in cell transplantation, drug discovery, toxicology, tissue engineering, and bioartificial assist devices, where trillions of high-functioning hepatocytes are needed annually. We took the novel approach of using machine perfusion to maximize cell recovery, specifically from uncontrolled cardiac death donors, the largest source of disqualified donor organs. In a rat model, we developed a simple 3-h room temperature (20 ± 2°C) machine perfusion protocol to treat nonpremedicated livers exposed to 1 h of warm (34°C) ischemia. Treated ischemic livers were compared to fresh, fresh-treated, and untreated ischemic livers using viable hepatocyte yields and in vitro performance as quantitative endpoints. Perfusion treatment resulted in both a 25-fold increase in viable hepatocytes from ischemic livers and a 40% increase from fresh livers. While cell morphology and function in suspension and plate cultures of untreated warm ischemic cells was significantly impaired, treated warm ischemic cells were indistinguishable from fresh hepatocytes. Furthermore, a strong linear correlation between tissue ATP and cell yield enabled accurate evaluation of the extent of perfusion recovery. Maximal recovery of warm ischemic liver ATP content appears to be correlated with optimal flow through the microvasculature. These data demonstrate that the inclusion of a simple perfusion-preconditioning step can significantly increase the efficiency of functional hepatocyte yields and the number of donor livers that can be gainfully utilized. PMID:25431743

  14. Activation of NR2A receptors induces ischemic tolerance through CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Yasukazu; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Yagita, Yoshiki; Okazaki, Shuhei; Sugiyama, Yukio; Oyama, Naoki; Omura-Matsuoka, Emi; Sakoda, Saburo; Kitagawa, Kazuo

    2010-08-01

    Previous exposure to a nonlethal ischemic insult protects the brain against subsequent harmful ischemia. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are a highly studied target of neuroprotection after ischemia. Recently, NMDA receptor subtypes were implicated in neuronal survival and death. We focused on the contribution of NR2A and cyclic-AMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) signaling to ischemic tolerance using primary cortical neurons. Ischemia in vitro was modeled by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Ischemic tolerance was induced by applying 45-mins OGD 24 h before 180-mins OGD. Sublethal OGD also induced cross-tolerance against lethal glutamate and hydrogen peroxide. After sublethal OGD, expression of phosphorylated CREB and CRE transcriptional activity were significantly increased. When CRE activity was inhibited by CREB-S133A, a mutant CREB, ischemic tolerance was abolished. Inhibiting NR2A using NVP-AAM077 attenuated preconditioning-induced neuroprotection and correlated with decreased CRE activity levels. Activating NR2A using bicuculline and 4-aminopiridine induced resistance to lethal ischemia accompanied by elevated CRE activity levels, and this effect was abolished by NVP-AAM077. Elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transcriptional activities were observed after sublethal OGD and administration of bicuculline and 4-aminopiridine. NR2A-containing NMDA receptors and CREB signaling have important functions in the induction of ischemic tolerance. This may provide potential novel therapeutic strategies to treat ischemic stroke.

  15. Inhibition of TRPC6 degradation suppresses ischemic brain damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wanlu; Huang, Junbo; Yao, Hailan; Zhou, Kechun; Duan, Bo; Wang, Yizheng

    2010-01-01

    Brain injury after focal cerebral ischemia, the most common cause of stroke, develops from a series of pathological processes, including excitotoxicity, inflammation, and apoptosis. While NMDA receptors have been implicated in excitotoxicity, attempts to prevent ischemic brain damage by blocking NMDA receptors have been disappointing. Disruption of neuroprotective pathways may be another avenue responsible for ischemic damage, and thus preservation of neuronal survival may be important for prevention of ischemic brain injury. Here, we report that suppression of proteolytic degradation of transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) prevented ischemic neuronal cell death in a rat model of stroke. The TRPC6 protein level in neurons was greatly reduced in ischemia via NMDA receptor–dependent calpain proteolysis of the N-terminal domain of TRPC6 at Lys16. This downregulation was specific for TRPC6 and preceded neuronal death. In a rat model of ischemia, activating TRPC6 prevented neuronal death, while blocking TRPC6 increased sensitivity to ischemia. A fusion peptide derived from the calpain cleavage site in TRPC6 inhibited degradation of TRPC6, reduced infarct size, and improved behavioral performance measures via the cAMP response element–binding protein (CREB) signaling pathway. Thus, TRPC6 proteolysis contributed to ischemic neuronal cell death, and suppression of its degradation preserved neuronal survival and prevented ischemic brain damage. PMID:20811149

  16. Effect of β-adrenergic antagonists on in-hospital mortality after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Christopher; Alaigh, Vivek; Fortunato, Gil; Staff, Ilene; Sansing, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke accounts for 85–90% of all strokes and currently has very limited therapeutic options. Recent studies of β-adrenergic antagonists suggest they may have neuroprotective effects that lead to improved functional outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke, however there is limited data in patients. We aimed to determine whether there was an improvement in mortality rates among patients who were taking β-blockers during the acute phase of their ischemic stroke. Methods A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database of ischemic stroke patients was performed. Patients who were on β-adrenergic antagonists both at home and during the first three days of hospitalization were compared to patients who were not on β-adrenergic antagonists to determine the association with patient mortality rates. Results The study included a patient population of 2804 patients. In univariate analysis, use of β-adrenergic antagonists was associated with older age, atrial fibrillation, hypertension and more severe initial stroke presentation. Despite this, multivariable analysis revealed a reduction in in-hospital mortality among patients who were treated with β-adrenergic antagonists (odds ratio 0.657; 95% confidence interval 0.655–0.658). Conclusions The continuation of home β-adrenergic antagonist medication during the first three days of hospitalization after an ischemic stroke is associated with a decrease in patient mortality. This supports the work done in rodent models suggesting neuroprotective effects of β-blockers after ischemic stroke. PMID:26163891

  17. Comparative risk of ischemic stroke among users of clopidogrel together with individual proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bilker, Warren B.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Flockhart, David A.; Freeman, Cristin P.; Kasner, Scott E.; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Hennessy, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is controversy and little information concerning whether individual proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) differentially alter the effectiveness of clopidogrel in reducing ischemic stroke risk. We therefore aimed to elucidate the risk of ischemic stroke among concomitant users of clopidogrel and individual PPIs. Methods We conducted a propensity score-adjusted cohort study of adult new users of clopidogrel, using 1999–2009 Medicaid claims from 5 large states. Exposures were defined by prescriptions for esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole—with pantoprazole serving as the referent. The endpoint was hospitalization for acute ischemic stroke, defined by International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision Clinical Modification codes in the principal position on inpatient claims, within 180 days of concomitant therapy initiation. Results Among 325,559 concomitant users of clopidogrel and a PPI, we identified 1,667 ischemic strokes for an annual incidence of 2.4% (95% confidence interval: 2.3–2.5). Adjusted hazard ratios for ischemic stroke vs. pantoprazole were: 0.98 (0.82–1.17) for esomeprazole; 1.06 (0.92–1.21) for lansoprazole; 0.98 (0.85–1.15) for omeprazole; and 0.85 (0.63–1.13) for rabeprazole. Conclusions PPIs of interest did not increase the rate of ischemic stroke among clopidogrel users when compared to pantoprazole, a PPI thought to be devoid of the potential to interact with clopidogrel. PMID:25657176

  18. Delayed treatment with ADAMTS13 ameliorates cerebral ischemic injury without hemorrhagic complication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takafumi; Irie, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Sano, Kazunori; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Yuta; Satho, Tomomitsu; Fujioka, Masayuki; Muroi, Carl; Matsuo, Koichi; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Futagami, Kojiro; Mishima, Kenichi

    2015-10-22

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke. However, delayed tPA treatment increases the risk of cerebral hemorrhage and can result in exacerbation of nerve injury. ADAMTS13, a von Willebrand factor (VWF) cleaving protease, has a protective effect against ischemic brain injury and may reduce bleeding risk by cleaving VWF. We examined whether ADAMTS13 has a longer therapeutic time window in ischemic stroke than tPA in mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). ADAMTS13 (0.1mg/kg) or tPA (10mg/kg) was administered i.v., immediately after reperfusion of after 2-h or 4-h MCAO for comparison of the therapeutic time windows in ischemic stroke. Infarct volume, hemorrhagic volume, plasma high-mobility group box1 (HMGB1) levels and cerebral blood flow were measured 24h after MCAO. Both ADAMTS13 and tPA improved the infarct volume without hemorrhagic complications in 2-h MCAO mice. On the other hand, ADAMTS13 reduced the infarct volume and plasma HMGB1 levels, and improved cerebral blood flow without hemorrhagic complications in 4-h MCAO mice, but tPA was not effective and these animals showed massive intracerebral hemorrhage. These results indicated that ADAMTS13 has a longer therapeutic time window in ischemic stroke than tPA, and ADAMTS13 may be useful as a new therapeutic agent for ischemic stroke.

  19. Role of histidine/histamine in carnosine-induced neuroprotection during ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Majid, Arshad

    2013-08-21

    Urgent need exists for new therapeutic options in ischemic stroke. We recently demonstrated that carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide consisting of alanine and histidine, is robustly neuroprotective in ischemic brain injury and has a wide clinically relevant therapeutic time window. The precise mechanistic pathways that mediate this neuroprotective effect are not known. Following in vivo administration, carnosine is hydrolyzed into histidine, a precursor of histamine. It has been hypothesized that carnosine may exert its neuroprotective activities through the histidine/histamine pathway. Herein, we investigated whether the neuroprotective effect of carnosine is mediated by the histidine/histamine pathway using in vitro primary astrocytes and cortical neurons, and an in vivo rat model of ischemic stroke. In primary astrocytes, carnosine significantly reduced ischemic cell death after oxygen-glucose deprivation, and this effect was abolished by histamine receptor type I antagonist. However, histidine or histamine did not exhibit a protective effect on ischemic astrocytic cell death. In primary neuronal cultures, carnosine was found to be neuroprotective but histamine receptor antagonists had no effect on the extent of neuroprotection. The in vivo effect of histidine and carnosine was compared using a rat model of ischemic stroke; only carnosine exhibited neuroprotection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that although the protective effects of carnosine may be partially mediated by activity at the histamine type 1 receptor on astrocytes, the histidine/histamine pathway does not appear to play a critical role in carnosine induced neuroprotection.

  20. Association between matrix metalloproteinase gene polymorphisms and development of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yunhua; Tian, Shihong; Sun, Min; Zhu, Yuanjian; Nie, Zhiyu; Yang, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association between MMP2 rs243865, MMP3 rs3025058 and MMP9 rs3918242 polymorphisms and development of ischemic stroke in a Chinese population. Between January 2012 and May 2014, a total of 317 patients with ischemic stroke and 317 health control subjects were enrolled into our study. The MMP2 rs243865, MMP3 rs3025058 and MMP9 rs3918242 polymorphisms were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). By multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found that individuals carrying with the CC genotype and the TC+CC genotype of MMP9 rs3918242 were associated with a significantly increased risk of ischemic stroke when compared with the TT genotype, and the ORs (95% CI) was 5.47 (2.64-12.38) and 1.55 (1.08-2.24), respectively. The TC+CC genotype of MMP9 rs3918242 was associated with an elevated risk of ischemic stroke in tobacco smokers, and the OR (95% CI) was 2.03 (1.11-3.74). In conclusion, our study suggests that MMP9 rs3918242 polymorphism is correlated with an elevated risk of ischemic stroke, and this gene polymorphism has interaction with tobacco smoking in the risk of ischemic stroke.

  1. Behavior outcome after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, with similar brain damage, in rats.

    PubMed

    Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Saur, Lisiani; Boisserand, Lígia Simões Braga; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Xavier, Léder Leal; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    Stroke causes disability and mortality worldwide and is divided into ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes. Although clinical trials suggest distinct recovery profiles for ischemic and hemorrhagic events, this is not conclusive due to stroke heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to produce similar brain damage, using experimental models of ischemic (IS) and hemorrhagic (HS) stroke and evaluate the motor spontaneous recovery profile. We used 31 Wistar rats divided into the following groups: Sham (n=7), ischemic (IS) (n=12) or hemorrhagic (HS) (n=12). Brain ischemia or hemorrhage was induced by endotelin-1 (ET-1) and collagenase type IV-S (collagenase) microinjections, respectively. All groups were evaluated in the open field, cylinder and ladder walk behavioral tests at distinct time points as from baseline to 30 days post-surgery (30 PS). Histological and morphometric analyses were used to assess the volume of lost tissue and lesion length. Present results reveal that both forms of experimental stroke had a comparable long-term pattern of damage, since no differences were found in volume of tissue lost or lesion size 30 days after surgery. However, behavioral data showed that hemorrhagic rats were less impaired at skilled walking than ischemic ones at 15 and 30 days post-surgery. We suggest that experimentally comparable stroke design is useful because it reduces heterogeneity and facilitates the assessment of neurobiological differences related to stroke subtypes; and that spontaneous skilled walking recovery differs between experimental ischemic and hemorrhagic insults.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen suppresses hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Lu, Mengru; Li, Qing-Jie; Zhang, Zhuo; Wu, Zheng-Zheng; Li, Jie; Qian, Lai; Xu, Yun; Wang, Zhong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The optimal therapeutic time-window and protective mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of hyperbaric oxygen. Following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage modeling in neonatal rats, hyperbaric oxygen was administered at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours and 1 week after hypoxia, respectively, once daily for 1 week. Fourteen days after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, cell density and apoptosis rate, number of Fas-L+, caspase-8+, and caspase-3+ neuronal cells, levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase in hippocampus were examined. Morris water maze test was conducted 28 days after insult. Significant improvements were found in cell density, rate of apoptosis, oxidative stress markers, FasL, and caspases in rats treated with hyperbaric oxygen within 72 hours compared to hypoxic-ischemic injury. Similarly, time-dependent behavioral amelioration was observed in pups treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Our findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by inhibiting oxidative stress and FasL-induced apoptosis, and optimal therapeutic time window is within 72 hours after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  3. Color Doppler sonography in the study of chronic ischemic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Meola, M; Petrucci, I

    2008-06-01

    In western countries, the risk of cardiovascular disease has increased considerably in recent decades. This trend has been paralleled by an increase in cases of atherosclerotic renal disease, which is related to the improved prognosis of cardiovascular diseases, aging, and the increasing mean age of the general population. It is reasonable to expect that in the near future, there will be a sharp increase in the number of elderly patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease in chronic dialysis programs. The result will be a dramatic rise in the social and economic costs of dialysis that could constitute a true clinical emergency. In this epidemiologic scenario, one of the most important targets of 21st century nephrology will be the early diagnosis of chronic ischemic nephropathy and the development of new and more effective strategies for its treatment.Color Doppler (CD) ultrasonography has displayed high sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values in the diagnosis of this disease in selected population, making it an ideal tool for use in screening programs. Eligibility for screening should be based on clinical criteria. For the most part, it will be aimed at adults (especially those who are elderly) with atherosclerotic vascular disease involving multiple districts and chronic kidney disease (CKD), stage 2-3, in the absence of a documented history of renal disease. In these patients, hypertension may be a secondary manifestation or a symptom of the ischemic nephropathy itself. The objectives of sonographic screening should be (1) to identify subjects in the population at risk who are affected by stenosis of the main renal artery (RAS); (2) to identify and characterize patients without RAS who have chronic ischemic nephropathy caused by nephroangiosclerosis and/or atheroembolic disease. The former group will require second-level diagnostic studies or angioplasty with stenting; the latter can be managed conservatively. The most important

  4. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets’ tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight

  5. Serum Hepcidin Levels in Childhood-Onset Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Seham F.; Akeel, Nagwa E.; Abdalhady, Mohamed A.; Elhewala, Ahmed A.; Ali, Al Shymaa A.; Amin, Ezzat K.; Sarhan, Dina T.; Almalky, Mohamed A.A.; Elhindawy, Eman M.; Salam, Mohamed M.A.; Soliman, Attia A.; Abdellatif, Sawsan H.; Ismail, Sanaa M.; Elsamad, Nahla A.; Hashem, Mustafa I.A.; Aziz, Khalid A.; Elazouni, Osama M.A.; Arafat, Manal S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recently, hepcidin, an antimicrobial-like peptide hormone, has evolved as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. Despite the growing evidence of iron imbalance in childhood-onset ischemic stroke, serum hepcidin level in those patients has not yet been researched. In this study, we aimed to estimate serum (hepcidin) level in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients and to investigate whether subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium, which is a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) derivative, could modulate serum hepcidin level in those patients. This was a case–control study included 60 (AIS) cases, and 100 healthy children with comparable age and gender as control group. For all subjects’ serum hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble transferrin receptor [sTfR]) levels were assessed by (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] method). Iron parameters including (serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, and total iron binding capacity [TIBC]) were also measured. The patients were subdivided according to treatment with an LMWH derivative into 2 groups and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and 1 week after stroke onset for all cases. We found that AIS cases had higher serum iron, ferritin, and IL6 levels compared to the control group (all P < 0.01). Serum hepcidin was significantly higher in AIS cases (median, 36[15–73]ng/mL) compared to the control group (median, 24[10–41]ng/mL; P < 0.01). On the 1st day of AIS diagnosis, serum hepcidin levels were similar in both stroke subgroups (P > 0.05). However, on the 7th day of diagnosis serum hepcidin level decreased significantly in AIS cases treated with LMWH (group 1) (median, 36 vs 21 ng/mL; P < 0.01, respectively). Meanwhile, no significant change was observed in serum hepcidin level in AIS cases not treated with LMWH (group 2) (P > 0.05). Serum hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with serum iron, transferrin saturation, ferritin, and IL6 (r = 0.375, P < 0

  6. Cerebral ischemic events in patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bonnerot, Mathieu; Humbertjean, Lisa; Mione, Gioia; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Derelle, Anne-Laure; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Riou-Comte, Nolwenn; Richard, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is a dramatic complication of pancreatic cancer with mechanisms related to oncological disease. A better description of the characteristics of cerebrovascular events would help better understand the pathogeny and protect vulnerable patients. We thus conducted a descriptive analysis of clinical, biological, and radiological features of patients from our centers and literature. We reviewed consecutive cases of patients who presented cerebrovascular events and pancreatic cancer in 4 stroke units in Lorrain (France) between January 1, 2009 and March 31, 2015, and all reported cases of literature. We identified 17 cases in our centers and 18 reported cases. Fifty-seven per cent of patients were male. Median age was 63 ± 14 years and ranged from 23 to 81 years. All cerebral events were ischemic. At the onset of stroke, pancreatic cancer had already been diagnosed in 59% of the patients in our centers for a mean time of 5.4 months. Five of them (29%) were being treated with gemcitabine and 2 (12%) with folfirinox. Adenocarcinoma at metastatic stage was reported in 82% of cases overall. Brain imaging revealed disseminated infarctions in 64%. High median levels of D-dimer (7600 ± 5 × 107 μg/L), C-reactive protein (63 ± 43 mg/L), and elevated prothrombin time (19 ± 6 seconds) were found. Thirty-six per cent of patients explored with echocardiography were diagnosed with nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis. Ten of our patients received anticoagulant therapy as secondary stroke prevention without any documented recurrence. Nevertheless, outcome was poor with a median survival time of 28 ± 14 days after stroke onset. Cerebral ischemic events occur at advanced stages of pancreatic cancer, most likely by a thromboembolic mechanism. Disseminated infarctions and high D-dimer, C-reactive protein levels, and a high prothrombin time are the most constant characteristics found in this context. All patients should be screened for

  7. Traditional Chinese Patent Medicine for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Xue-Ting; Kang, De-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to conduct an overview of systematic reviews (SRs) to provide a contemporary review of the evidence for delivery of Traditional Chinese Patent Medicine (TCPMs) for patients with acute ischemic stroke. SRs were assessed for quality using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool and the Oxman-Guyatt Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire (OQAQ). We assessed the quality of the evidence of high methodological quality (an AMSTAR score ≥9 or an OQAQ score ≥7) for reported outcomes using the GRADE (the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. (1) Dan Shen agents: tiny trends toward the improvement in different neurological outcomes (RR = 1.16, 1.10, 1.23, 1.08, 1.12); (2) Mailuoning: a tiny trend toward improvement in the neurological outcome (RR = 1.18); (3) Ginkgo biloba: tiny trends toward improvement in the neurological outcome (RR = 1.18, MD = 0.81); (4) Dengzhanhua: a tiny trend toward an improvement in neurological (RR = 1.23); (5) Acanthopanax: a small positive (RR = 1.17, 1.31) result on neurological improvement reported; (6) Chuanxiong-type preparations: neurological functional improved (MD = 2.90);(7) Puerarin: no better effect on the rate of death or disability (OR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.35–1.87); (8) Milk vetch: no better effect on the rate of death (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.11–2.83);(9) Qingkailing: rate of death reduced (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.11–2.83). Limitations in the methodological quality of the RCTs, inconsistency and imprecision led to downgrading of the quality of the evidence, which varied by review and by outcome. Consequently, there are currently only weak evidences to support those TCPMs. The 9 TCPMs may be effective in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, as the GRADE approach indicated a weak recommendation for those TCPMs’ usage. PMID:27015174

  8. Hypophosphatemic effect of niacin extended release in ischemic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Yasmeen, Ghazala; Dawani, Manohar Lal; Mahboob, Tabassum

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic nephropathy is an emerging cause of end stage renal disease, associated with many co-morbidities especially cardiovascular disease risk and derangement in calcium-phosphorus homeostasis resulting in hyperphosphatemia, influencing bones, a characteristic of advancing chronic kidney disease. The management of elevated serum phosphorus has been a challenge in this patient population with compromised kidney performance, as available phosphorus lowering agents possess many undesirable hazardous secondary effects and/or are very expensive. While niacin in different formulation is known to not only correct dyslipidemia but also reduce phosphorus level, but its clinical use restricted owing to side effects. The objective of present study is to evaluate such effect of niacin extended release (NER) in ischemic nephropathy. The chronic kidney disease patients fulfilling the pre-defined criteria were randomly categorized into two groups of equal size (n=60) and prescribed either atorvastatin 20 mg/day or NER 500 mg/day with the same dose of statin for four months. A control of 50 healthy characters matched was also incorporated for local reference range. Baseline and follow up phosphorus concentration was measured and means were compared using t-test at SPSS version 17 with 0.05 chosen alpha. There was no difference in the baseline levels in both groups while significant (p<0.001) hyperphosphatemia was observed in both units as compared with healthy controls. The administration of atorvastatin alone for four weeks showed an insignificant decrease in phosphorus, whereas, NER significantly reduced phosphorus (p<0.001). The mean percent change from baseline to follow up further endorsed the finding as statin alone brought -13.8 % reduction in phosphorus and NER -47 % from baseline. NER, at its lowest prescribed dose once a day was well tolerated by most of the patients and demonstrated significant goal achievement of phosphorus reduction. It is concluded that NER even at

  9. Management of Hypertension in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Agbor-Etang, Brian B; Setaro, John F

    2015-12-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) affects about 16 million adults in the USA. Many more individuals likely harbor subclinical coronary disease. Hypertension (HTN) continues to be a potent and widespread risk factor for IHD. Among other Framingham risk factors of tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and left ventricular hypertrophy, HTN plays an independent role in augmenting IHD risk, as well as a multiplicative role with respect to adverse outcomes when HTN is present concurrently with the other major IHD risk factors listed above. Over the past two decades, numerous studies and guideline reports have been presented with the aims of (a) elucidating the pathophysiology of IHD, (b) delineating an ideal blood pressure (BP) threshold at which to institute pharmacotherapy, and (c) defining the optimal pharmacologic elements of a therapeutic regimen. While there are active debates surrounding the existence and relevance of the J curve in IHD patients who have HTN, as well as the numerical level of the BP cutoff justifying drug therapy in the general population, there is a general consensus that the BP target in IHD patients should be lower than 140/90 mmHg. The most appropriate class (or classes) of medication recommended will depend on the comorbid conditions associated with each individual patient. Overall, however, there is no major evidence underscoring a significant difference between drug classes, provided the target BP is achieved, although it should be pointed out that the most recent (2015) American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Society of Hypertension (ASH) guideline statement now elevates beta-blockers (BB) to the same level of recommendation as other classes of hypertension drugs in the treatment of patients who have hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Although most agents that reduce blood pressure will correspondingly lower myocardial workload, BB may exhibit a special advantage in IHD patients because BB

  10. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika; Asp, Julia; Synnergren, Jane; Johansson, Cecilia Thalen; Palmqvist, Lars; Jeppsson, Anders; Hulten, Lillemor Mattsson

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 in the ischemic heart. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incubation of human muscle cells in hypoxia showed a 22-fold upregulation of ALOX15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed increased levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggesting a link between ischemia and inflammation in ischemic heart biopsies. -- Abstract: A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield

  11. Neuronal Interleukin-4 as a Modulator of Microglial Pathways and Ischemic Brain Damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiurong; Wang, Huan; Sun, Guanghua; Zhang, Jie; Edwards, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    After ischemic stroke, various damage-associated molecules are released from the ischemic core and diffuse to the ischemic penumbra, activating microglia and promoting proinflammatory responses that may cause damage to the local tissue. Here we demonstrate using in vivo and in vitro models that, during sublethal ischemia, local neurons rapidly produce interleukin-4 (IL-4), a cytokine with potent anti-inflammatory properties. One such anti-inflammatory property includes its ability to polarize macrophages away from a proinflammatory M1 phenotype to a “healing” M2 phenotype. Using an IL-4 reporter mouse, we demonstrated that IL-4 expression was induced preferentially in neurons in the ischemic penumbra but not in the ischemic core or in brain regions that were spared from ischemia. When added to cultured microglia, IL-4 was able to induce expression of genes typifying the M2 phenotype and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation. IL-4 also enhanced expression of the IL-4 receptor on microglia, facilitating a “feedforward” increase in (1) their expression of trophic factors and (2) PPARγ-dependent phagocytosis of apoptotic neurons. Parenteral administration of IL-4 resulted in augmented brain expression of M2- and PPARγ-related genes. Furthermore, IL-4 and PPARγ agonist administration improved functional recovery in a clinically relevant mouse stroke model, even if administered 24 h after the onset of ischemia. We propose that IL-4 is secreted by ischemic neurons as an endogenous defense mechanism, playing a vital role in the regulation of brain cleanup and repair after stroke. Modulation of IL-4 and its associated pathways could represent a potential target for ischemic stroke treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Depending on the activation signal, microglia/macrophages (MΦ) can behave as “healing” (M2) or “harmful” (M1). In response to ischemia, damaged/necrotic brain cells discharge factors that polarize MΦ to a M1-like

  12. Peripapillary Pachychoroid in Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagia, Lina; Huisingh, Carrie; Johnstone, John; Kline, Lanning B.; Clark, Mark; Girard, Michael J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Girkin, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the peripapillary choroidal thickness (PCT) in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) in comparison to contralateral eyes and normal eyes. Methods We used enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to image the optic nerve head of 20 NAION, 10 contralateral eyes, and 102 normal eyes. Following compensation, the scans were manually delineated to identify relevant surfaces including Bruch's membrane opening (BMO), Bruch's membrane, and anterior sclera. The PCT was defined as the measurement between Bruch's membrane and the anterior sclera and was measured at increasing distance from BMO. Models adjusted for age, BMO area, and axial length were used to compare the mean PCT between NAION and normal eyes, and contralateral eyes and normal eyes. Paired t-tests were used to compare the PCT between NAION and contralateral eyes. Results The mean PCT was thicker in NAION and contralateral eyes when compared with normal eyes at all distances from BMO (P < 0.001). The PCT was not significantly thicker in contralateral eyes when compared with affected NAION eyes. Choroidal thickness was thinnest in the inferior quadrant in all eyes regardless of the group. Conclusions Increased peripapillary choroidal thickness was noted in both NAION and contralateral eyes. The thicker choroid may be an associated feature or a result of the disorder. Although further longitudinal study is required to determine causation, these findings may suggest that a thickened peripapillary choroid may be a component of the disk-at-risk clinical phenotype. PMID:27583829

  13. Acute ischemic colitis secondary to air embolism after diving

    PubMed Central

    Payor, Austin Daniel; Tucci, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic colitis (IC) secondary to air embolism from decompression sickness or barotrauma during diving is an extremely rare condition. After extensive review of the available literature, we found that there has been only one reported case of IC secondary to air embolism from diving. Although air embolization from diving and the various medical complications that follow have been well documented, the clinical manifestation of IC from an air embolism during diving is very rare and thus far unstudied. Common symptoms of IC include abdominal pain, bloody or non-bloody diarrhea or nausea or vomiting or any combination. Emergency physicians and Critical Care specialists should consider IC as a potential diagnosis for a patient with the above-mentioned symptoms and a history of recent diving. We report a case of IC from air embolism after a routine dive to 75 feet below sea level in a 53-year-old White female who presented to a community Emergency Department complaining of a 2-day history of diffuse abdominal pain and nausea. She was diagnosed by colonoscopy with biopsies and treated conservatively with antibiotics, bowel rest, and a slow advancement in diet. PMID:22096777

  14. Emergency EC-IC bypass for symptomatic atherosclerotic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Nitta, Junpei; Ishizaka, Shigetoshi; Kanaya, Kohei; Yanagawa, Takao; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery has no preventive effect on subsequent ipsilateral ischemic stroke in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic internal carotid occlusion and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. A few studies have assessed whether an urgent EC-IC bypass surgery is an effective treatment for main trunk stenosis or occlusion in acute stage. The authors retrospectively reviewed 58 consecutive patients who underwent urgent EC-IC bypass for symptomatic internal carotid artery or the middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion between January 2003 and December 2011. Clinical characteristics and neuroimagings were evaluated and analyzed. Based on preoperative angiogram, responsible lesions were the internal carotid artery in 19 (32.8%) patients and the middle cerebral artery in 39 (67.2%). No hemorrhagic complication occurred. Sixty-nine percent of patients showed improvement of neurological function after surgery, and 74.1% of patients had favorable outcome. Unfavorable outcome was associated with insufficient collateral flow and new infarction after bypass surgery.

  15. Sirtuin 3 mediates neuroprotection of ketones against ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yin, Junxiang; Han, Pengcheng; Tang, Zhiwei; Liu, Qingwei; Shi, Jiong

    2015-11-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death. Growing evidence indicates that ketone bodies have beneficial effects in treating stroke, but their underlying mechanism remains unclear. Our previous study showed ketone bodies reduced reactive oxygen species by using NADH as an electron donor, thus increasing the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. In this study, we investigated whether mitochondrial NAD(+)-dependent Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) could mediate the neuroprotective effects of ketone bodies after ischemic stroke. We injected mice with either normal saline or ketones (beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) at 30 minutes after ischemia induced by transient middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. We found that ketone treatment enhanced mitochondria function, reduced oxidative stress, and therefore reduced infarct volume. This led to improved neurologic function after ischemia, including the neurologic score and the performance in Rotarod and open field tests. We further showed that ketones' effects were achieved by upregulating NAD(+)-dependent SIRT3 and its downstream substrates forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the penumbra region since knocking down SIRT3 in vitro diminished ketones' beneficial effects. These results provide us a foundation to develop novel therapeutics targeting this SIRT3-FoxO3a-SOD2 pathway.

  16. beta-Hydroxy fatty acid production by ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, K H; Koen, A E; Hull, F E

    1982-01-01

    beta-Hydroxymyristate, -palmitate, and -stearate were produced by and accumulated in isolated rabbit heart when perfused ischemically for 2-10 min by the nonrecirculating langendorff technique with 0.75 mM palmitate and 0.16 mM albumin. Tissue fractionation into mitochondria and cytosol showed that by 2 min of ischemia 44% of beta-hydroxypalmitate and 38% beta-hydroxystearate was located in the cytosol; this percentage increased to greater than 50% by 5 min of ischemia. Lipid fractionation studies showed that by 10 min these two beta-hydroxy fatty acids were distributed approximately as 60% acylcarnitine, 20% acyl-coenzyme A (CoA), and 20% free fatty acids. All three chemical forms of beta-hydroxypalmitate were found in both the mitochondria and the cytosol. After 10 min of ischemia beta-hydroxypalmitoyl-CoA and beta-hydroxystearoyl-CoA constituted at least 16% of the incremental long-chain acyl-CoA, whereas beta-hydroxypalmitoylcarnitine and b-hydroxystearoylcarnitine constituted 8% of the incremental long-chain acylcarnitine. These data suggests that myocardial beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA oxidation is limited during ischemia. Substrate accumulates and is transferred to the cytosol where it accumulates primarily as beta-hydroxyacylcarnitine. PMID:6799549

  17. Experimental models of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, R C

    1993-01-01

    Animal research has provided important information on the pathogenesis of and neuropathologic responses to perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. In experimental animals, structural brain damage from hypoxia-ischemia has been produced in immature rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep and monkeys (18, 20, 24, 25, 38). Of the several available animal models, the fetal and newborn rhesus monkey and immature rat have been studied most extensively because of their similarities to humans in respect to the physiology of reproduction and their neuroanatomy at or shortly following birth. Given the frequency of occurrence of human perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and the multiple, often severe neurologic handicaps which ensue in infants and children, it is not surprising that the above described animal models have been developed. These models have provided the basis for investigations to clarify not only physiologic and biochemical mechanisms of tissue injury but also the efficacy of specific management strategies. Hopefully, such animal research will continue to provide important information regarding how best to prevent or minimize the devastating consequences of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

  18. Nicotinamide reduces hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yangzheng; Paul, Ian A; LeBlanc, Michael H

    2006-03-31

    Nicotinamide reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. Can similar brain protection be seen in newborn animals? Seven-day-old rat pups had the right carotid artery permanently ligated followed by 2.5 h of 8% oxygen. Nicotinamide 250 or 500 mg/kg was administered i.p. 5 min after reoxygenation, with a second dose given at 6 h after the first. Brain damage was evaluated by weight deficit of the right hemisphere at 22 days following hypoxia. Nicotinamide 500 mg/kg reduced brain weight loss from 24.6 +/- 3.6% in vehicle pups (n = 28) to 11.9 +/- 2.6% in the treated pups (n = 29, P < 0.01), but treatment with 250 mg/kg did not affect brain weight. Nicotinamide 500 mg/kg also improved behavior in rotarod performance. Levels of 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha measured in the cortex by enzyme immune assay 16 h after reoxygenation was 115 +/- 7 pg/g in the shams (n = 6), 175 +/- 17 pg/g in the 500 mg/kg nicotinamide treated (n = 7), and 320 +/- 79 pg/g in the vehicle treated pups (n = 7, P < 0.05 versus sham, P < 0.05 versus nicotinamide). Nicotinamide reduced the increase in caspase-3 activity caused by hypoxic ischemia (P < 0.01). Nicotinamide reduces brain injury in the neonatal rat, possibly by reducing oxidative stress and caspase-3 activity.

  19. Thrombolysis and Thrombectomy for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Strengths and Synergies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce C V

    2017-03-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is responsible for around 80% of all strokes and is a leading cause of disability and death globally. There are two potential treatment strategies: restoring blood flow (reperfusion) and preventing cellular injury (neuroprotection). As yet, all the successful trials have involved reperfusion with numerous failures of neuroprotectants. There are two proven reperfusion strategies. Intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase was first demonstrated to reduce disability with publication of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke tissue plasminogen activator trial in 1995. Since that time further trials have solidified the evidence base and demonstrated benefit when alteplase is administered within 4.5 hours of stroke onset. Exploration of potentially more effective thrombolytics is still underway with tenecteplase but others, such as desmoteplase, have been unsuccessful in clinical trials. The second proven reperfusion strategy is endovascular clot retrieval. This has been practiced for several years but came of age with the publication of five strongly positive trials in 2015. This review discusses the evidence for intravenous and intra-arterial reperfusion strategies and the advantages, disadvantages, and synergies of the two approaches.

  20. Ischemic spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Jessica R.; Golomb, Meredith R.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord infarction in children is a rare condition which is becoming more widely recognized. There are few reports in the pediatric literature characterizing etiology, diagnosis, treament and prognosis. The risk factors for pediatric ischemic spinal cord infarction include obstruction of blood flow associated with cardiovascular compromise or malformation, iatrogenic or traumatic vascular inujury, cerebellar herniation, thrombotic or embolic disease, infection, and vasculitis. In many children the cause of spinal cord ischemia in the absence of vertebral fracture is unknown. Imaging diagnosis of spinal cord ischemia is often difficult due to the small transverse area of the cord, cerebrospinal fluid artifact and inadequate resolution of MRI. Physical therapy is the most important treatment option. The prognosis is dependent on the level of spinal cord damage, early identification and reversal of ischemia, and follow-up with intensive physical therapy and medical support. In addition to summarizing the literature regarding spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture, this review article adds two cases to the literature which highlight the difficulties and controversies in the management of this condition. PMID:17437902

  1. Tetramethylpyrazine nitrone, a multifunctional neuroprotective agent for ischemic stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zaijun; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Sun, Yewei; Szeto, Samuel S W; Law, Henry C H; Quan, Quan; Li, Guohui; Yu, Pei; Sho, Eiketsu; Siu, Michael K W; Lee, Simon M Y; Chu, Ivan K; Wang, Yuqiang

    2016-11-14

    TBN, a novel tetramethylpyrazine derivative armed with a powerful free radical-scavenging nitrone moiety, has been reported to reduce cerebral infarction in rats through multi-functional mechanisms of action. Here we study the therapeutic effects of TBN on non-human primate model of stroke. Thirty male Cynomolgus macaques were subjected to stroke with 4 hours ischemia and then reperfusion. TBN were injected intravenously at 3 or 6 hours after the onset of ischemia. Cerebral infarction was examined by magnetic resonance imaging at 1 and 4 weeks post ischemia. Neurological severity scores were evaluated during 4 weeks observation. At the end of experiment, protein markers associated with the stroke injury and TBN treatment were screened by quantitative proteomics. We found that TBN readily penetrated the blood brain barrier and reached effective therapeutic concentration after intravenous administration. It significantly reduced brain infarction and modestly preserved the neurological function of stroke-affected arm. TBN suppressed over-expression of neuroinflammatory marker vimentin and decreased the numbers of GFAP-positive cells, while reversed down-regulation of myelination-associated protein 2', 3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase and increased the numbers of NeuN-positive cells in the ipsilateral peri-infarct area. TBN may serve as a promising new clinical candidate for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates ischemic acute kidney injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Bragança, Ana Carolina; Volpini, Rildo A; Canale, Daniele; Gonçalves, Janaína G; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa M; Sanches, Talita R; Seguro, Antonio C; Andrade, Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) increases the risk of death in hospitalized patients. Renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) induces acute kidney injury (AKI), which activates cell cycle inhibitors, including p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and genomic target of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which is in turn a potent immunomodulator with antiproliferative effects. In this study, we assess the impact of VDD in renal IRI. Wistar rats were divided into groups, each evaluated for 30 days: control (receiving a standard diet); VDD (receiving a vitamin D-free diet); IRI (receiving a standard diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28); and VDD + IRI (receiving a vitamin D-free diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28). At 48 h after IRI, animals were euthanized; blood, urine, and kidney tissue samples were collected. Compared with IRI rats, VDD + IRI rats showed a more severe decrease in glomerular filtration rate, greater urinary protein excretion, a higher kidney/body weight ratio and lower renal aquaporin 2 expression, as well as greater morphological damage, characterized by increased interstitial area and tubular necrosis. Our results suggest that the severity of tubular damage in IRI may be associated with downregulation of vitamin D receptors and p21. VDD increases renal inflammation, cell proliferation and cell injury in ischemic AKI. PMID:25780095

  3. Impedance spectroscopy for monitoring ischemic injury in the intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    González, César A; Villanueva, Cleva; Othman, Salah; Narváez, Raúl; Sacristán, Emilio

    2003-05-01

    This work evaluates the feasibility of monitoring ischemic injury in the gastrointestinal mucosa by impedance spectroscopy, using a minimally invasive intestinal catheter. The disruption of the intestinal mucosa plays a key role in the evolution of shock and is the 'motor of multiple organ failure'. Different technologies have been developed to monitor mucosal perfusion, oxygenation and/or ischemia, but no practical method exists to assess tissue damage, which may be crucial for preventing multiple organ failure. The experimental protocol of this study relied on an isobaric model of hypovolemic shock in 16 anaesthetized rabbits assigned to three groups: sham (n = 6), ischemia (n = 5) and ischemia + reperfusion (n = 5). Complex impedance spectra were recorded in the range of 0.05 to 300 kHz, with simultaneous measurements of tonometric pHi in the ileum every 30 min for 4 h. Impedance spectra were reproducible, and those of tissue under prolonged ischemia were clearly differentiable from those of normally perfused tissue. The dynamic changes in impedance did not correlate directly with either tissue perfusion or pHi, but instead correlated well with the duration of ischemia. It is concluded that impedance spectroscopy does indeed measure changes in tissue injury, and could be a very useful tool to guide therapy of patients in shock.

  4. Nicotinamide reduces hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the newborn rat

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yangzheng; Paul, Ian A.; LeBlanc, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. Can similar brain protection be seen in newborn animals? Seven-day-old rat pups had the right carotid artery permanently ligated followed by 2.5 h of 8% oxygen. Nicotinamide 250 or 500 mg/kg was administered i.p. 5 min after reoxygenation, with a second dose given at 6 h after the first. Brain damage was evaluated by weight deficit of the right hemisphere at 22 days following hypoxia. Nicotinamide 500 mg/kg reduced brain weight loss from 24.6 ± 3.6% in vehicle pups (n = 28) to 11.9 ± 2.6% in the treated pups (n = 29, P < 0.01), but treatment with 250 mg/kg did not affect brain weight. Nicotinamide 500 mg/kg also improved behavior in rotarod performance. Levels of 8-isoprostaglandin F2α measured in the cortex by enzyme immune assay 16 h after reoxygenation was 115 ± 7 pg/g in the shams (n = 6), 175 ± 17 pg/g in the 500 mg/kg nicotinamide treated (n = 7), and 320 ± 79 pg/g in the vehicle treated pups (n = 7, P < 0.05 versus sham, P < 0.05 versus nicotinamide). Nicotinamide reduced the increase in caspase-3 activity caused by hypoxic ischemia (P < 0.01). Nicotinamide reduces brain injury in the neonatal rat, possibly by reducing oxidative stress and caspase-3 activity. PMID:16533659

  5. Low-frequency and common genetic variation in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rainer; Traylor, Matthew; Pulit, Sara L.; Bevan, Steve; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Zhao, Wei; Abrantes, Patricia; Amouyel, Philippe; Attia, John R.; Battey, Thomas W.K.; Berger, Klaus; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Chauhan, Ganesh; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Clarke, Robert; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Debette, Stephanie; Falcone, Guido J.; Ferro, Jose M.; Gamble, Dale M.; Ilinca, Andreea; Kittner, Steven J.; Kourkoulis, Christina E.; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Christopher R.; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Arne; Liu, Jingmin; Meschia, James F.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Oliveira, Sofia A.; Pera, Joana; Reiner, Alex P.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie L.M.; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Thijs, Vincent; Vicente, Astrid M.; Woo, Daniel; Seshadri, Sudha; Saleheen, Danish; Rosand, Jonathan; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of common and low-frequency genetic variants on the risk of ischemic stroke (all IS) and etiologic stroke subtypes. Methods: We meta-analyzed 12 individual genome-wide association studies comprising 10,307 cases and 19,326 controls imputed to the 1000 Genomes (1 KG) phase I reference panel. We selected variants showing the highest degree of association (p < 1E-5) in the discovery phase for replication in Caucasian (13,435 cases and 29,269 controls) and South Asian (2,385 cases and 5,193 controls) samples followed by a transethnic meta-analysis. We further investigated the p value distribution for different bins of allele frequencies for all IS and stroke subtypes. Results: We showed genome-wide significance for 4 loci: ABO for all IS, HDAC9 for large vessel disease (LVD), and both PITX2 and ZFHX3 for cardioembolic stroke (CE). We further refined the association peaks for ABO and PITX2. Analyzing different allele frequency bins, we showed significant enrichment in low-frequency variants (allele frequency <5%) for both LVD and small vessel disease, and an enrichment of higher frequency variants (allele frequency 10% and 30%) for CE (all p < 1E-5). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the missing heritability in IS subtypes can in part be attributed to low-frequency and rare variants. Larger sample sizes are needed to identify the variants associated with all IS and stroke subtypes. PMID:26935894

  6. [Metabolic support of the ischemic heart during cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Luna Ortiz, Pastor; Serrano Valdés, Xenia; Rojas Pérez, Eduardo; de Micheli, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    We examine [IBM1] the basic principles and clinical results of the metabolic intervention with glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) solutions in the field of cardiovascular surgery. On the basis of many international publications concerning this subject, and the experience obtained in the operating room of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia "Ignacio Chávez", we conclude that the metabolic support wit GIK is a powerful system that provides very useful energy to protect the myocardium during cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. The most recent publications indicate their effects in reducing low output syndromes, due to interventions on the coronary arteries, as well as producing a significant reduction of circulating fatty acids. These effects are produced also in the field of interventional cardiology, where GIK solutions protect the myocardium against damage due to impaired microcirculation. It is evident that these solutions must be utilized in higher concentrations that the initial ones, equal to those employed in laboratory animals. On the other side, it is worthy to remember that it has been always underlined that this treatment represents only a protection for the myocardium. Therefore, its association with other drugs or treatments favoring a good myocardial performance is not contraindicated--on the contrary, it yields better results. The present review presents pharmacological approaches, such as the use of glutamato, aspartate, piruvato, trimetazidina ranolazine and taurine to optimize cardiac energy metabolism, for the management of ischemic heart disease.

  7. PHLPP1 gene deletion protects the brain from ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Van Winkle, Jessica A; Lyden, Patrick D; Brown, Joan H; Purcell, Nicole H

    2013-01-01

    A recently discovered protein phosphatase PHLPP (PH domain Leucine-rich repeat Protein Phosphatase) has been shown to dephosphorylate Akt on its hydrophobic motif (Ser473) thereby decreasing Akt kinase activity. We generated PHLPP1 knockout (KO) mice and used them to explore the ability of enhanced in vivo Akt signaling to protect the brain against ischemic insult. Brains from KO mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 hours showed significantly greater increases in Akt activity and less neurovascular damage after reperfusion than wild-type (WT) mice. Remarkably, infarct volume in the PHLPP1 KO was significantly reduced compared with WT (12.7±2.7% versus 22.9±3.1%) and this was prevented by Akt inhibition. Astrocytes from KO mice and neurons in which PHLPP1 was downregulated showed enhanced Akt activation and diminished cell death in response to oxygen-glucose deprivation. Thus, deletion of PHLPP1 can enhance Akt activation in neurons and astrocytes, and can significantly increase cell survival and diminish infarct size after MCAO. Inhibition of PHLPP could be a therapeutic approach to minimize damage after focal ischemia. PMID:23072745

  8. Ischemic stroke assessment with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiguo; Li, Pengcheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Hu, Bo

    1999-09-01

    Many authors have elucidated the theory about oxygenated hemoglobin, deoxygenated hemoglobin absorption in near-infrared spectrum. And the theory has opened a window to measure the hemodynamic changes caused by stroke. However, no proper animal model still has established to confirm the theory. The aim of this study was to validate near-infrared cerebral topography (NCT) as a practical tool and to try to trace the focal hemodynamic changes of ischemic stroke. In the present study, middle cerebral artery occlusion model and the photosensitizer induced intracranial infarct model had been established. NCT and functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) were obtained during pre- and post-operation. The geometric shape and infarct area of NCT image was compared with the fMRI images and anatomical samples of each rat. The results of two occlusion models in different intervene factors showed the NCT for infarct focus matched well with fMRI and anatomic sample of each rats. The instrument might become a practical tool for short-term prediction of stroke and predicting the rehabilitation after stroke in real time.

  9. Visible spectroscopic imaging studies of normal and ischemic dermal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuzak, Karel J.; Schaeberle, Michael D.; Lewis, E. Neil; Levin, Ira W.

    2000-05-01

    We describe a non-invasive, in vivo hyperspectral imaging method for visualizing the spatial distribution of dermal tissue oxygenation. Real-time images of the dermis are acquired both at multiple, contiguous wavelengths and at relatively narrow spectral bandwidths to generate a data cube consisting of one spectral and two spatial dimensions. For data collection, the sample area is illuminated by radiation, which is delivered by liquid light guides from a quartz tungsten halogen source. Reflected light from the sample is first passed through a liquid crystal tunable filter and then imaged onto a silicon charged coupled device detector. The subsequently digitized data are presented in terms of spectral images reflecting multivariate least squares analyses based upon linear combinations of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin reference spectra. The generated gray scale images directly represent the varying spatial distributions of dermal tissue oxygenation. As an example, imaging data are obtained from normal tissue and induced ischemic tissue for which both the venous and arterial blood flow was artificially occluded.

  10. Effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemic preservation injury

    PubMed Central

    Aslaner, Arif; Gunal, Omer; Turgut, Hamdi Taner; Celik, Erdal; Yildirim, Umran; Demirci, Rojbin Karakoyun; Gunduz, Umut Riza; Calis, Hasan; Dogan, Sami

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a potent free radical scavenger of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and a well-known antioxidant secreted from pineal gland. This hormone has been reported to protect tissue from oxidative damage. In this study, we aim to investigate the effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemia time when added to preservation solution. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided equally into three groups; Ringer Lactate (RL) solution, University of Wisconsin (UW) solution with and without melatonin. The serum Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activities of the preservation solutions at 2nd, 24th, 36th, and 48th hours were determined. Tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also measured and a histological examination was performed at 48th hour. Melatonin that added to preservation solution prevented enzyme elevation and decreased lipid peroxidation in preservation solution when compared to the control group (p<0.05). The histological examination revealed that UW solution containing melatonin significantly prevented the kidney from pathological injury (p<0.05). Melatonin added to preservation solutions such as UW solution seemed to protect the tissue preserved effectively from cold ischemic injury for up to 48 hour. PMID:24179573

  11. Lasers in the treatment of ischemic heart disease in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongzhen; Chen, Mingzhe

    2000-10-01

    Myocardial revascularization by laser is a new treatment modality for chronic, severe, refractory angina in the patients with coronary heart disease that is not amenable to angioplasty (PTCA) or bypass surgery (CABG). Transmyocardial revascularization (TMR), typically requiring open thoracotomy, uses laser to create channels that would directly carry blood from left ventricular cavity into the ischemic myocardium. Current data indicate that TMR may provide these patients with improvement in angina severity, quality of life, and myocardial perfusion. The greatest potential future use of TMR is as an adjunct to CABG in patients with disease that prevents bypass grafting due to lack of distal targets or a conduit. Recently, as percutaneous (catheter-based) myocardial revascularization (PMR) has been developed with laser technology that permits the creation of channels from the endocardial surface of the left ventricle. The early results with PMR seem encouraging. Randomized clinical trial has demonstrated symptomatic improvement and increased exercise capacity. The risk: benefit ratio for PMR appears to be much more favorable than that for TMR. The mechanisms of action of them have not yet been clearly elucidated, and several theories have been proposed, including channel patency, angiogenesis, denervation, and placebo effect. The challenge of TMR/PMR is related to improvement of perioperative outcomes and long-term survival without worsening of left ventricular function. In future, it may be feasible to combine TMR/PMR with intramyocardial delivery of angiogenic growth factors to induce further new blood vessel formation.

  12. NMDA receptors and the differential ischemic vulnerability of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christine E; Benquet, Pascal; Raineteau, Olivier; Rietschin, Lotty; Kirbach, Sebastian W; Gerber, Urs

    2006-05-01

    Transient cerebral ischemia causes an inhomogeneous pattern of cell death in the brain. We investigated mechanisms, which may underlie the greater susceptibility of hippocampal CA1 vs. CA3 pyramidal cells to ischemic insult. Using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of ischemia, we found that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were enhanced in the more susceptible CA1 pyramidal cells and transiently depressed in the resistant CA3 pyramidal cells. The long-lasting potentiation of NMDA responses in CA1 cells was associated with delayed cell death and was prevented by blocking tyrosine kinase-dependent up-regulation of NMDA receptor function. In CA3 cells, the energy deprivation-induced transient depression of NMDA responses was converted to potentiation by blocking protein phosphatase signalling. These results suggest that energy deprivation differentially shifts the intracellular equilibrium between the tyrosine kinase and phosphatase activities that modulate NMDA responses in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells. Therapeutic modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation may thus prove beneficial in mitigating ischemia-induced neuronal death in vulnerable brain areas.

  13. The role of endoglin in post-ischemic revascularization.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gómez, Elena; Pericacho, Miguel; Ollauri-Ibáñez, Claudia; Bernabéu, Carmelo; López-Novoa, José M

    2017-02-01

    Following arterial occlusion, blood vessels respond by forming a new network of functional capillaries (angiogenesis), by reorganizing preexisting capillaries through the recruitment of smooth muscle cells to generate new arteries (arteriogenesis) and by growing and remodeling preexisting collateral arterioles into physiologically relevant arteries (collateral development). All these processes result in the recovery of organ perfusion. The importance of endoglin in post-occlusion reperfusion is sustained by several observations: (1) endoglin expression is increased in vessels showing active angiogenesis/remodeling; (2) genetic endoglin haploinsufficiency in humans causes deficient angiogenesis; and (3) the reduction of endoglin expression by gene disruption or the administration of endoglin-neutralizing antibodies reduces angiogenesis and revascularization. However, the precise role of endoglin in the several processes associated with revascularization has not been completely elucidated and, in some cases, the function ascribed to endoglin by different authors is controversial. The purpose of this review is to organize in a critical way the information available for the role of endoglin in several phenomena (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis and collateral development) associated with post-ischemic revascularization.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fatal ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burstyn, I.; Kromhout, H.; Partanen, T.; Svane, O.; Langard, S.; Ahrens, W.; Kauppinen, T.; Stucker, I.; Shaham, J.; Heederik, D.; Ferro, G.; Heikkila, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Johansen, C.; Randem, B.G.; Boffetta, P.

    2005-11-01

    Several toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have produced evidence that occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, a clear exposure-response relation has not been demonstrated. We studied a relation between exposure to PAH and mortality from IHD (418 cases) in a cohort of 12,367 male asphalt workers from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands and Norway. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene were assessed quantitatively using measurement-driven exposure models. Exposure to coal tar was assessed in a semiquantitative manner on the basis of information supplied by company representatives. We carried out sensitivity analyses to assess potential confounding by tobacco smoking. Both cumulative and average exposure indices for benzo(a)pyrene were positively associated with mortality from IHD. The highest relative risk for fatal IHD was observed for average benzo(a)pyrene exposures of 273 ng/m{sup 3} or higher, for which the relative risk was 1.64(95% confidence interval = 1.13-2.38). Similar results were obtained for coal tar exposure. Sensitivity analysis indicated that even in a realistic scenario of confounding by smoking, we would observe approximately 20% to 40% excess risk in IHD in the highest PAH-exposure categories. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that occupational PAH exposure causes fatal IHD and demonstrate a consistent exposure-response relation for this association.

  15. Discovery of Metabolite Biomarkers for Acute Ischemic Stroke Progression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peifang; Li, Ruiting; Antonov, Anton A; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wei; Hua, Yunfei; Guo, Huimin; Wang, Lijuan; Liu, Peijia; Chen, Lixia; Tian, Yuan; Xu, Fengguo; Zhang, Zunjian; Zhu, Yulan; Huang, Yin

    2017-02-03

    Stroke remains a major public health problem worldwide; it causes severe disability and is associated with high mortality rates. However, early diagnosis of stroke is difficult, and no reliable biomarkers are currently established. In this study, mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics was utilized to characterize the metabolic features of the serum of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) to identify novel sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis and progression. First, global metabolic profiling was performed on a training set of 80 human serum samples (40 cases and 40 controls). The metabolic profiling identified significant alterations in a series of 26 metabolites with related metabolic pathways involving amino acid, fatty acid, phospholipid, and choline metabolism. Subsequently, multiple algorithms were run on a test set consisting of 49 serum samples (26 cases and 23 controls) to develop different classifiers for verifying and evaluating potential biomarkers. Finally, a panel of five differential metabolites, including serine, isoleucine, betaine, PC(5:0/5:0), and LysoPE(18:2), exhibited potential to differentiate AIS samples from healthy control samples, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.988 and 0.971 in the training and test sets, respectively. These findings provided insights for the development of new diagnostic tests and therapeutic approaches for AIS.

  16. Tetramethylpyrazine nitrone, a multifunctional neuroprotective agent for ischemic stroke therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zaijun; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Sun, Yewei; Szeto, Samuel S. W.; Law, Henry C. H.; Quan, Quan; Li, Guohui; Yu, Pei; Sho, Eiketsu; Siu, Michael K. W.; Lee, Simon M. Y.; Chu, Ivan K.; Wang, Yuqiang

    2016-01-01

    TBN, a novel tetramethylpyrazine derivative armed with a powerful free radical-scavenging nitrone moiety, has been reported to reduce cerebral infarction in rats through multi-functional mechanisms of action. Here we study the therapeutic effects of TBN on non-human primate model of stroke. Thirty male Cynomolgus macaques were subjected to stroke with 4 hours ischemia and then reperfusion. TBN were injected intravenously at 3 or 6 hours after the onset of ischemia. Cerebral infarction was examined by magnetic resonance imaging at 1 and 4 weeks post ischemia. Neurological severity scores were evaluated during 4 weeks observation. At the end of experiment, protein markers associated with the stroke injury and TBN treatment were screened by quantitative proteomics. We found that TBN readily penetrated the blood brain barrier and reached effective therapeutic concentration after intravenous administration. It significantly reduced brain infarction and modestly preserved the neurological function of stroke-affected arm. TBN suppressed over-expression of neuroinflammatory marker vimentin and decreased the numbers of GFAP-positive cells, while reversed down-regulation of myelination-associated protein 2′, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase and increased the numbers of NeuN-positive cells in the ipsilateral peri-infarct area. TBN may serve as a promising new clinical candidate for the treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:27841332

  17. Language in Children with Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Chenia; Carneiro, Luciana; Vernier, Luíza; Cesa, Carla; Guardiola, Ana; Vidor, Deisi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (NHIE) is a common neurologic injury, and it may compromise the child's language and cognition. Understanding the process of language acquisition becomes possible with concise knowledge about children's global development. Objective The aim of this study was to observe if language acquisition and development are impaired in children with NHIE. Methods Seventy children with NHIE from 1 to 24 months old were analyzed in a Pediatric Neurology Service of Hospital of Porto Alegre, South of Brazil using the Brunet-Lezine Scale. Statistical analysis used SPSS 13.0 software. Results Twenty-four (60%) of the subjects were boys, with mean gestational age of 35.8 weeks (standard deviation of 4.6) and mean Apgar score of 6.0 at 1 minute and 7.1 at 5 minutes. The variables age versus language showed significant inverse correlation (r =  − 0.566; p = 0.028). As the subjects aged, language tasks became more specific and dependent on the subject's direct action, rather than the subjective interpretation of their guardian. This correlation seems to be closely associated with scale configuration and with consequences of neurologic disorder, evincing the delays in language development. Conclusion This study achieved the goals proposed and highlights the necessity of greater attention by professionals to language skills during the initial period of child development. PMID:25992102

  18. Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease Affects Health Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Goreishi, Abolfazl; Shajari, Zahra; Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases endanger not only physical health but also psychological and social health of patient. Thus, evaluation of such patients for psychological treatment decisions is very important. Method This is a descriptive study that was performed with 50 chronic patients (ischemic heart disease) selected from Valiasr and Mousavi at cardiac wards in Zanjan Province. They were given three types of questionnaire: demographic, WHOQOL, and Zung depression and anxiety index. The information was statically analyzed by frequency chart, central indexes, dispersion, Chi-Square and t tests, Pearson’s correlation index (P < 0.05). Results The average of quality of life in all patients were calculated as was respectively 12.19, 11.98, 12.08, and 12.4 in physical, psychological, social and environmental domains respectively, 68 percent of total number of the patients had various degrees of anxiety and 78 percent of them had various degrees of depression. There was a significant relationship between the life quality average in all domains and anxiety intensity and depression intensity (P < 0.05) and there was a significant relationship between life quality average in all domains and income (P < 0.05). Conclusion As the level of depression and anxiety goes up, quality of life decreases pointing out that they have a reverse relationship. Depression and anxiety are one of the most significant factors of quality of life among other variables. Regarding specific conditions of the treatment, it is necessary to pay special attention to psychological aspects.

  19. Limb apraxia in acute ischemic stroke: a neglected clinical challenge?

    PubMed

    Schell, Caroline; Suchan, Julia; Himmelbach, Marc; Haarmeier, Thomas; Borchers, Svenja

    2014-04-01

    Symptoms of limb apraxia and executive dysfunctions are currently not explicitly considered by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and, thus, not routinely tested by clinicians in the acute care of patients with suspected stroke. Neuropsychological testing, clinical examination, MRI, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were performed in a right-handed patient with acute onset of left-sided sensorimotor hemiparesis due to a right hemisphere ischemic stroke. Deficits in the execution of meaningless and meaningful gestures were not detected properly on initial clinical examination but were revealed later on through neuropsychological testing. Instead, the patient's inability to respond to specific instructions in the acute care setting was mistaken to reflect severe deficits in auditory comprehension. fMRI revealed right-hemispheric localization of language in the right-handed patient. We suggest including a bedside test for limb apraxia symptoms in acute clinical care of stroke patients. The distinction between deficits in limb praxis and impairments of language can be complicated owing to the common hemispheric co-localization of the two functions.

  20. Evolution of endovascular mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Przybylowski, Colin J; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Durst, Christopher R; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a common medical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. A small proportion of AIS patients meet eligibility criteria for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, and its efficacy for large vessel occlusion is poor. Therefore, an increasing number of patients with AIS are being treated with endovascular mechanical thrombectomy when IVT is ineffective or contraindicated. Rapid advancement in catheter-based and endovascular device technology has led to significant improvements in rates of cerebral reperfusion with these devices. Stentrievers and modern aspiration catheters have now surpassed earlier generation devices in the degree and rapidity of revascularization. This progress has been achieved with no concurrent increase in risk of major complications or mortality, both when used alone or in combination with IVT. The initial randomized controlled trials comparing endovascular therapy to IVT for AIS failed to show superior outcomes with endovascular treatment, but key limitations of each trial may limit the significance of these results to current practice. While endovascular devices and operator experience continue to evolve, we are optimistic that this will be accompanied by improvements in patient outcomes. This review highlights the major endovascular devices used in current practice and the trials which have investigated their efficacy. PMID:25405185

  1. Evolution of endovascular mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Przybylowski, Colin J; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Durst, Christopher R; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C

    2014-11-16

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a common medical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. A small proportion of AIS patients meet eligibility criteria for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, and its efficacy for large vessel occlusion is poor. Therefore, an increasing number of patients with AIS are being treated with endovascular mechanical thrombectomy when IVT is ineffective or contraindicated. Rapid advancement in catheter-based and endovascular device technology has led to significant improvements in rates of cerebral reperfusion with these devices. Stentrievers and modern aspiration catheters have now surpassed earlier generation devices in the degree and rapidity of revascularization. This progress has been achieved with no concurrent increase in risk of major complications or mortality, both when used alone or in combination with IVT. The initial randomized controlled trials comparing endovascular therapy to IVT for AIS failed to show superior outcomes with endovascular treatment, but key limitations of each trial may limit the significance of these results to current practice. While endovascular devices and operator experience continue to evolve, we are optimistic that this will be accompanied by improvements in patient outcomes. This review highlights the major endovascular devices used in current practice and the trials which have investigated their efficacy.

  2. Nitroxyl exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury and oxidative neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Choe, Chi-un; Lewerenz, Jan; Fischer, Gerry; Uliasz, Tracy F; Espey, Michael Graham; Hummel, Friedhelm C; King, Stephen Bruce; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Böger, Rainer H; Gerloff, Christian; Hewett, Sandra J; Magnus, Tim; Donzelli, Sonia

    2009-09-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO) donor compounds function as potent vasorelaxants, improve myocardial contractility and reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury in the cardiovascular system. With respect to the nervous system, HNO donors have been shown to attenuate NMDA receptor activity and neuronal injury, suggesting that its production may be protective against cerebral ischemic damage. Hence, we studied the effect of the classical HNO-donor, Angeli's salt (AS), on a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in a mouse model of experimental stroke and on related in vitro paradigms of neurotoxicity. I.p. injection of AS (40 mumol/kg) in mice prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion exacerbated cortical infarct size and worsened the persistent neurological deficit. AS not only decreased systolic blood pressure, but also induced systemic oxidative stress in vivo indicated by increased isoprostane levels in urine and serum. In vitro, neuronal damage induced by oxygen-glucose-deprivation of mature neuronal cultures was exacerbated by AS, although there was no direct effect on glutamate excitotoxicity. Finally, AS exacerbated oxidative glutamate toxicity - that is, cell death propagated via oxidative stress in immature neurons devoid of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Taken together, our data indicate that HNO might worsen cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury by increasing oxidative stress and decreasing brain perfusion at concentrations shown to be cardioprotective in vivo.

  3. Ischemic Preconditioning Enhances Muscle Endurance during Sustained Isometric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, D; Suga, T; Tanaka, T; Kido, K; Honjo, T; Fujita, S; Hamaoka, T; Isaka, T

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) enhances whole-body exercise endurance. However, it is poorly understood whether the beneficial effects originate from systemic (e. g., cardiovascular system) or peripheral (e. g., skeletal muscle) adaptations. The present study examined the effects of IPC on local muscle endurance during fatiguing isometric exercise. 12 male subjects performed sustained isometric unilateral knee-extension exercise at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction until failure. Prior to the exercise, subjects completed IPC or control (CON) treatments. During exercise trial, electromyography activity and near-infrared spectroscopy-derived deoxygenation in skeletal muscle were continuously recorded. Endurance time to task failure was significantly longer in IPC than in CON (mean±SE; 233±9 vs. 198±9 s, P<0.001). Quadriceps electromyography activity was not significantly different between IPC and CON. In contrast, deoxygenation dynamics in the quadriceps vastus lateralis muscle was significantly faster in IPC than in CON (27.1±3.4 vs. 35.0±3.6 s, P<0.01). The present study found that IPC can enhance muscular endurance during fatiguing isometric exercise. Moreover, IPC accelerated muscle deoxygenation dynamics during the exercise. Therefore, we suggest that the origin of beneficial effects of IPC on exercise performance may be the enhanced mitochondrial metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  4. Stenting in the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Samaniego, Edgar A.; Dabus, Guilherme; Linfante, Italo

    2011-01-01

    Recanalization of acute large artery occlusions is a strong predictor of good outcome. The development of thrombectomy devices resulted in a significant improvement in recanalization rates compared to thrombolytics alone. However, clinical trials and registries with these thrombectomy devices in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) have shown recanalization rates in the range of 40–81%. The last decade has seen the development of nickel titanium self-expandable stents (SES). These stents, in contrast to balloon-mounted stents, allow better navigability and deployment in tortuous vessels and therefore are optimal for the cerebral circulation. SES were initially used for stent-assisted coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms and for treatment of intracranial stenosis. However, a few authors have recently reported feasibility of deployment of SES in AIS. The use of these devices yielded higher recanalization rates compared to traditional thrombectomy devices. Encouraged by these results, retrievable SES systems have been recently used in AIS. These devices offer the advantage of resheathing and retrieving of the stent even after full deployment. Some of these stents can also be detached in case permanent stent placement is needed. Retrievable SES are being used in Europe and currently tested in clinical trials in the United States. We review the recent literature in the use of stents for the treatment of AIS secondary to large vessel occlusion. PMID:22163225

  5. Tissue pertechnetate and iodinated contrast material ischemic stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.C.; Coss, D.T.; Jacobson, R.L.; Meyer, M.W.

    1980-11-01

    Isotope uptake during static radionuclide scanning and contrast enhancement during CT scanning, which may result from similar pathophysiologic mechanisms after ischemic infarction, were investigated in an animal model. Infarction was produced by transorbital occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in cats killed one, 2, 4, 8, or 16 days later. Sodium pertechnetate containing technetium-99m and 30% methylglucamine iothalamate labeled with I-125 were administered intravenously 60 and 15 min respectively prior to sacrifice. A coronal section through the infarct was parceled into 30 portions which were assayed for concentration of each isotope. Adjacent brain was prepared for histopathologic correlation. Concentrations of the 2 materials were highest in infarcted brain at 4 and 8 days. Strong positive correlation was found between tissue concentrations of the 2 materials in all brain samples. Elevated tissue levels correlated with necrosis, macrophage infiltration, and vascular hyperplasia. The results support the probability that radionuclide scan positivity and CT contrast enhancement reflect the same pathophysiologic development, probably extravasation of the respective labels, after schemic stroke.

  6. 18F-Fluoride and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography After Transient Ischemic Attack or Minor Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, William S. A.; Irkle, Agnese; Moss, Alastair; Sng, Greg; Forsythe, Rachael O.; Clark, Tim; Roberts, Gemma; Fletcher, Alison; Lucatelli, Christophe; Rudd, James H. F.; Davenport, Anthony P.; Mills, Nicholas L.; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Dennis, Martin; Whiteley, William N.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Dweck, Marc R.; Newby, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Background— Combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) can assess both anatomy and biology of carotid atherosclerosis. We sought to assess whether 18F-fluoride or 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose can identify culprit and high-risk carotid plaque. Methods and Results— We performed 18F-fluoride and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in 26 patients after recent transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke: 18 patients with culprit carotid stenosis awaiting carotid endarterectomy and 8 controls without culprit carotid atheroma. We compared standardized uptake values in the clinically adjudicated culprit to the contralateral asymptomatic artery, and assessed the relationship between radiotracer uptake and plaque phenotype or predicted cardiovascular risk (ASSIGN score [Assessing Cardiovascular Risk Using SIGN Guidelines to Assign Preventive Treatment]). We also performed micro PET/CT and histological analysis of excised plaque. On histological and micro PET/CT analysis, 18F-fluoride selectively highlighted microcalcification. Carotid 18F-fluoride uptake was increased in clinically adjudicated culprit plaques compared with asymptomatic contralateral plaques (log10standardized uptake valuemean 0.29±0.10 versus 0.23±0.11, P=0.001) and compared with control patients (log10standardized uptake valuemean 0.29±0.10 versus 0.12±0.11, P=0.001). 18F-Fluoride uptake correlated with high-risk plaque features (remodeling index [r=0.53, P=0.003], plaque burden [r=0.51, P=0.004]), and predicted cardiovascular risk [r=0.65, P=0.002]). Carotid 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake appeared to be increased in 7 of 16 culprit plaques, but no overall differences in uptake were observed in culprit versus contralateral plaques or control patients. However, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose did correlate with predicted cardiovascular risk (r=0.53, P=0.019), but not with plaque phenotype. Conclusions— 18F-Fluoride PET/CT highlights culprit and phenotypically high-risk carotid plaque

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus presented as non-inflammatory necrotizing vasculopathy-induced ischemic glomerulopathy and small vessels-related ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, J M; Hsu, S C; Chen, F F; Huang, J J

    2002-01-01

    The clinical significance of lupus non-inflammatory necrotizing vasculopathy (NINV) is not well established. For example, since lupus renal NINV is usually reported to coexist with proliferative and active glomerulonephritis, it is difficult to demonstrate the role of NINV on renal pathophysiology. Here we report a 16-year-old SLE boy with renal NINV presenting as ischemic glomerulopathy and small vessels-related ischemic heart failure. The renal biopsy demonstrated mild proliferative glomerulonephritis and NINV initially, and one month later repeated renal biopsy showed NINV with ischemic glomerulopathy. These findings established that NINV, but not proliferative glomerulonephritis, was responsive for his acute renal failure (ARF). Another interesting question is about the pathophysiology of his myocardial dysfunction. This patient presented typical angina and congestive heart failure (CHF). Echocardiograms and ventriculography revealed dilatation of four chambers and low ejection fraction. Serial electrocardiograms demonstrated evolutionary ischemic changes. Coronary angiography revealed no abnormality of large vessels. These findings suggested small vascular lesions-induced myocardial ischemia was the underlying mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy. As myocardial biopsy was not done in our case, we could only speculate, but not prove, that the NINV observed in renal biopsy may also involve in cardiac microvascular beds. Nevertheless, this interesting case emphasized the role of obliterative small vascular lesions in the pathophysiology of ARF and myocardial dysfunction. The patient was treated with high-dose corticosteroid, plasma infusion and hemodialysis. His cardiac function improved gradually, however the renal function did not recover.

  8. Association of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism with ischemic stroke in the Eastern Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Lv, Q-Q; Lu, J; Sun, H; Zhang, J-S

    2015-04-27

    The association between the MTHFR genetic polymorphism and ischemic stroke has been reported by a number of investigators. However, the results have been controversial and conflicting. The aim of this study was to explore the association between the MTHFR variants C677T and A1298C and the risk of ischemic stroke in an Eastern Chinese Han population. A total of 199 patients with ischemic stroke and 241 controls were recruited. Genotyping of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms was carried out using the Taqman 7900HT Sequence Detection System. The overall estimates (odds ratio: OR) for the allele (C) and genotype (AC+CC) of the A1298C polymorphism were 1.57 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.16-2.10], and 2.36 (95%CI = 1.39-4.00), respectively, establishing significant association of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with ischemic stroke. In contrast, there were no statistically significant differences compared to controls between MTHFR C677T polymorphic variants in the association ischemic stroke risk. Furthermore, haplotype-based analysis demonstrated that compared with the C-677-A-1298 haplotype, the C-677-C-1298 and T-677-C-1298 haplotypes showed significant increased risk of ischemic stroke (OR = 1.56; 95%CI = 1.07- 2.2; P = 0.02; OR = 1.76; 95%CI = 1.17-2.65; P < 0.01, respectively). We concluded that the A1298C polymorphism and the haplotypes C-677-C-1298 and T-677-C-1298 in MTHFR might modulate the risk of ischemic stroke in the Eastern Chinese Han population.

  9. Polymorphism of Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Affects the Clinical Phenotypes of Ischemic Stroke in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Don; Yun, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hee-Sang; Kim, Su Kang; Kim, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Je, Goun; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Chung, Seung Joon; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2293054 [Ile734Ile], rs1047735 [His902His], rs2293044 [Val1353Val], rs2682826 (3'UTR) of nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are associated with the development and clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke. Methods We enrolled 120 ischemic stroke patients and 314 control subjects. Ischemic stroke patients were divided into subgroups according to the scores of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Survey (NIHSS, <6 and ≥6) and Modified Barthel Index (MBI, <60 and ≥60). SNPStats, SNPAnalyzer, and HelixTree programs were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and p-values. Multiple logistic regression models were performed to analyze genetic data. Results No SNPs of the NOS1 gene were found to be associated with ischemic stroke. However, in an analysis of clinical phenotypes, we found that rs2293054 was associated with the NIHSS scores of ischemic stroke patients in codominant (p=0.019), dominant (p=0.007), overdominant (p=0.033), and log-additive (p=0.0048) models. Also, rs2682826 revealed a significant association in the recessive model (p=0.034). In allele frequency analysis, we also found that the T alleles of rs2293054 were associated with lower NIHSS scores (p=0.007). Respectively, rs2293054 had a significant association in the MBI scores of ischemic stroke in codominant (p=0.038), dominant (p=0.031), overdominant (p=0.045), and log-additive (p=0.04) models. Conclusion These results suggest that NOS1 may be related to the clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke in Korean population. PMID:26949676

  10. Ischemic stroke subtype and presence of sleep-disordered breathing: the BASIC Sleep Apnea Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; Mowla, Ashkan; McDermott, Mollie; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Hegeman, Garnett; Smith, Melinda A.; Garcia, Nelda M.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2014-01-01

    Goal Little is known about the prevalence of sleep apnea (SA) across ischemic stroke subtypes. Given the important implications for SA screening, we tested the association between SA and ischemic stroke subtype in a population-based study. Methods Within the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project, ischemic stroke patients were offered SA screening with the ApneaLink Plus™ (n=355). A neurologist assigned TOAST subtype (with an additional category for nonlacunar infarctions of unknown etiology) using hospital records. Unadjusted and adjusted (demographics, BMI, NIHSS, diabetes, history of stroke/TIA) logistic and linear regression models were used to test the association between subtype and SA or apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Findings Median age was 65 and 55% were male; 59% were Mexican American. Median time from stroke onset to SA screen was 13 days (IQR: 6, 21). Overall, 215 (61%) had SA (AHI ≥ 10). Median AHI was 13 (IQR: 6, 27). Prevalence of SA by subtype was: cardioembolism, 66%; large artery atherosclerosis, 57%; small vessel occlusion, 68%; other determined, 50%; undetermined etiology, 58%; and nonlacunar stroke of unknown etiology, 63%. Ischemic stroke subtype was not associated with SA in unadjusted (p=0.72) or adjusted models (p=0.91) models. Ischemic stroke subtype was not associated with AHI in unadjusted (p=0.41) or adjusted models (p=0.62). Conclusion In this population-based stroke surveillance study, ischemic stroke subtype was not associated with the presence or severity of SA. Sleep apnea is likely to be present after ischemic stroke, and the subtype should not influence decisions about SA screening. PMID:25497720

  11. Polyhydroxylated fullerene nanoparticles attenuate brain infarction and oxidative stress in rat model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vani, Javad Rasouli; Mohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Foroshani, Mahsa Sarami; Jafari, Mahvash

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the common underlying mechanism of damage in ischemic stroke. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the possible protective effects of polyhydroxylated fullerene derivatives on brain infarction and oxidative/nitrosative stress in a rat model of ischemic stroke. The experiment was performed by four groups of rats (each; n=12); Sham, Control ischemia, and ischemic treatment groups (Pretreatment and Posttreatment). Brain ischemia was induced by 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 24 hours reperfusion. Rats received fullerene nanoparticles at dose of 1 mg/kg 30 min before MCAO and immediately after beginning of reperfusion. Infarct volume, contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and nitrate as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were assessed 24 hours after termination of MCAO. Brain infarct volume was 310 ± 21 mm3 in control group. Administration of fullerene nanoparticles before and after MCAO significantly decreased the infarct volume by 53 % (145 ± 45 mm3) and 81 % (59 ± 13 mm3), respectively. Ischemia also enhanced MDA and nitrate contents of ischemic hemispheres by 45 % and 25 % , respectively. Fullerene nanoparticles considerably reduced the MDA and nitrate contents of ischemic hemispheres before MCAO by 58 % and 17 % , respectively, and after MCAO by 38 % and 21 % , respectively. Induction of MCAO significantly decreased GSH content (19 % ) and SOD activity (52 % ) of ischemic hemispheres, whereas fullerene nanoparticles increased the GSH content and SOD activity of ischemic hemispheres by 19 % and 52 % before MCAO, respectively, and 21 % and 55 % after MCAO, respectively. Our findings indicate that fullerene nanoparticles, as a potent scavenger of free radicals, protect the brain cells against ischemia/reperfusion injury and inhibit brain oxidative/nitrosative damage. PMID:27540350

  12. Gut dysbiosis is associated with metabolism and systemic inflammation in patients with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Urabe, Takao; Ueno, Yuji; Yamashiro, Yuichiro; Nomoto, Koji; Takahashi, Takuya; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Asahara, Takashi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    The role of metabolic diseases in ischemic stroke has become a primary concern in both research and clinical practice. Increasing evidence suggests that dysbiosis is associated with metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the gut microbiota, as well as concentrations of organic acids, the major products of dietary fiber fermentation by the gut microbiota, are altered in patients with ischemic stroke, and to examine the association between these changes and host metabolism and inflammation. We analyzed the composition of the fecal gut microbiota and the concentrations of fecal organic acids in 41 ischemic stroke patients and 40 control subjects via 16S and 23S rRNA-targeted quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses, respectively. Multivariable linear regression analysis was subsequently performed to evaluate the relationships between ischemic stroke and bacterial counts and organic acid concentrations. Correlations between bioclinical markers and bacterial counts and organic acids concentrations were also evaluated. Although only the bacterial counts of Lactobacillus ruminis were significantly higher in stroke patients compared to controls, multivariable analysis showed that ischemic stroke was independently associated with increased bacterial counts of Atopobium cluster and Lactobacillus ruminis, and decreased numbers of Lactobacillus sakei subgroup, independent of age, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. Changes in the prevalence of Lactobacillus ruminis were positively correlated with serum interleukin-6 levels. In addition, ischemic stroke was associated with decreased and increased concentrations of acetic acid and valeric acid, respectively. Meanwhile, changes in acetic acid concentrations were negatively correlated with the levels of glycated hemoglobin and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, whereas changes in valeric acid concentrations were positively correlated with the

  13. A modified collagen gel dressing promotes angiogenesis in a preclinical swine model of chronic ischemic wounds.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Ganesh, Kasturi; Dickerson, Jennifer; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Ghatak, Piya Das; Dixit, Sriteja; Bergdall, Valerie; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2014-01-01

    We recently performed proteomic characterization of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing and reported promising effects of the gel in healing full-thickness excisional wounds. In this work, we test the translational relevance of our aforesaid findings by testing the dressing in a swine model of chronic ischemic wounds recently reported by our laboratory. Full-thickness excisional wounds were established in the center of bipedicle ischemic skin flaps on the backs of animals. Ischemia was verified by laser Doppler imaging, and MCG was applied to the test group of wounds. Seven days post wounding, macrophage recruitment to the wound was significantly higher in MCG-treated ischemic wounds. In vitro, MCG up-regulated expression of Mrc-1 (a reparative M2 macrophage marker) and induced the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and of fibroblast growth factor-basic (β-FGF). An increased expression of CCR2, an M2 macrophage marker, was noted in the macrophages from MCG treated wounds. Furthermore, analyses of wound tissues 7 days post wounding showed up-regulation of transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, von Willebrand's factor, and collagen type I expression in MCG-treated ischemic wounds. At 21 days post wounding, MCG-treated ischemic wounds displayed higher abundance of proliferating endothelial cells that formed mature vascular structures and increased blood flow to the wound. Fibroblast count was markedly higher in MCG-treated ischemic wound-edge tissue. In addition, MCG-treated wound-edge tissues displayed higher abundance of mature collagen with increased collagen type I : III deposition. Taken together, MCG helped mount a more robust inflammatory response that resolved in a timely manner, followed by an enhanced proliferative phase, angiogenic outcome, and postwound tissue remodeling. Findings of the current study warrant clinical testing of MCG in a setting of ischemic chronic wounds.

  14. Intake of antioxidants and B vitamins is inversely associated with ischemic stroke and cerebral atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hansaem; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Yun, Jin A; Kim, Ji-Myung; Song, Tae-Jin; Chang, Namsoo; Kim, Yong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study was conducted to examine relationships between dietary habits and intakes of antioxidants and B vitamins and the risk of ischemic stroke, and to compare dietary factors according to the presence of cerebral artery atherosclerosis and stroke subtypes. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 147 patients and 144 control subjects were recruited consecutively in the metropolitan area of Seoul, Korea. Sixty participants each in the case and control groups were included in analyses after 1:1 frequency matching. In addition, 117 acute ischemic stroke patients were classified into subtypes according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) guidelines. Dietary intake was measured using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire composed of 111 food items and plasma lipid and homocysteine levels were analyzed. RESULTS When compared with control subjects, stroke patients had unfavorable dietary behaviors and lower intakes of fruits (73.1 ± 83.2 g vs. 230.9 ± 202.1 g, P < 0.001), vegetables (221.1 ± 209.0 g vs. 561.7 ± 306.6 g, P < 0.001), and antioxidants, including vitamins C, E, B6, β-carotene, and folate. The intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamin C, and folate were inversely associated with the risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for confounding factors. Intakes of vegetables, vitamins C, B6, B12, and folate per 1,000 kcal were lower in ischemic stroke with cerebral atherosclerosis than in those without. Overall vitamin B12 intake per 1,000 kcal differed according to the TOAST classification (P = 0.004), but no differences among groups existed based on the post-hoc test. CONCLUSIONS When compared with control subjects, ischemic stroke patients, particularly those with cerebral atherosclerosis, had unfavorable dietary intake, which may have contributed to the development of ischemic stroke. These results indicate that proper dietary recommendations are important for the prevention of ischemic stroke. PMID:27698959

  15. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; de Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Methods Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes. PMID:25004417

  16. Hyperpolarized 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging of a rat model of transient Ischemic Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walvick, Ronn P.; Bastan, Birgul; Reno, Austin; Mansour, Joey; Sun, Yanping; Zhou, Xin; Mazzani, Mary; Fisher, Marc; Sotak, Christopher H.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2009-02-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for nearly 80% of all stroke cases. Although proton diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the gold standards in ischemic stroke diagnostics, the use of hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI has a potential role to contribute to the diagnostic picture. The highly lipophilic hyperpolarized 129Xe can be non-invasively delivered via inhalation into the lungs where it is dissolved into the blood and delivered to other organs such as the brain. As such, we expect hyperpolarized 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer which will result in a signal deficit in areas of blood deprived tissue. In this work, we present imaging results from an animal model of transient ischemic stroke characterized through 129Xe MRI. In this model, a suture is used to occlude the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in the rat brain, thus causing an ischemic event. After a period of MCA occlusion, the suture can then be removed to reperfuse the ischemic area. During the ischemic phase of the stroke, a signal void was observed in the MCA territory; which was subsequently restored by normal 129Xe MRI signal once perfusion was reinstated. Further, a higher resolution one-dimensional chemical shift image shows a sharp signal drop in the area of ischemia. Validation of ischemic damage was shown through both proton diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazoliumchloride (TTC) staining. The results show the potential of 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer; information that may add to the diagnostic and prognostic utility of the clinical picture of stroke.

  17. Reversible ischemic colitis in young women. Association with oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Deana, D G; Dean, P J

    1995-04-01

    Ischemic colitis, a condition of middle-aged to elderly patients, occurs uncommonly in younger persons. In this study, we describe the clinical and pathological features of 18 young adults (mean age, 29 years; age range, 17-39 years) with spontaneous ischemic colitis, 17 of whom were women. All presented with abrupt onset of severe, cramping abdominal pain followed by hematochezia. Colonoscopic visualization of the mucosa showed segmental hyperemia, friability, and erosion affecting the distal transverse colon (three cases), splenic flexure (three cases), descending colon (five cases), and sigmoid (seven cases). Mucosal biopsy documented superficial ischemic necrosis in seven patients; 11 patients had full-thickness mucosal necrosis with regeneration. Colonic mucosa proximal and distal to the ischemic segment was endoscopically normal in all patients and histologically normal in the eight patients in whom biopsies were obtained. All patients recovered with supportive care. Median duration of illness was 2.1 days (range, 1-4 days). Ten women (59%) were using low-dose estrogenic oral contraceptive agents, compared with the 1988 national average of 18.5% oral contraceptive users among females aged 15 to 44 years. The calculated odds ratio yielded a greater than sixfold relative risk for the occurrence of ischemic colitis among oral contraceptive users. In addition, four women not currently on hormonal contraceptive therapy had a past history of oral contraceptive use; the three remaining women were taking estrogen as replacement therapy after oophorectomy. In one patient, documented reversible ischemic colitis recurred on resumption of oral contraceptive use; four women reported symptoms and signs of recurrent ischemia but did not seek further medical evaluation. Our data indicate that transient colonic ischemia represents a form of acute segmental colitis in young adults; before the 5th decade of life, spontaneous ischemic colitis is a disorder found almost

  18. [An evaluation of ischemic stroke using dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Igarashi, H; Katayama, Y; Terashi, A

    1998-04-01

    Thrombolytic therapy during the hyperacute stage is important for salvaging dying cerebral tissue. To date, however, accurate non-invasive assessment of an ischemic lesion during the hyperacute stage has not been possible. Perfusion MRI may be the key to the quick diagnosis of ischemic lesions. To assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI, echo planar imaging was performed in 10 patients with ischemic stroke. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean transit time (MTT), and relative cerebral blood flow(rCBF) were measured based on moment analysis and the gamma variate method. These measurements, however, are not suitable for the detection of cerebral ischemia during the hyperacute stage. Therefore, we additionally studied the changes in a concentration curve (time-delta R* curve) of Gd-DTPA, injected into the median vein of the forearm. From the curve the SUM (delta R*) time to peak and the delta R* peak, which may be calculated quickly, were determined and were compared to rCBV, MTT, and rCBF, respectively. The rCBV and the rCBF in the ischemic regions were less than those in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), and the MTT in the ischemic regions was longer than that in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05). Additionally, SUM (delta R*) and the delta R* peak in the ischemic regions were less, and the time to peak in the ischemic regions was longer than the value in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), correlating well to the rCBV, rCBF, and MTT measurements. Also, images of these parameters, depicting the ischemic lesion earlier than conventional T2 weighted images, can be easily made by using an MRI console. These results suggest that the SUM (delta R*), time to peak and the delta R* peak images calculated with dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI may be one of the best techniques for the detection of cerebral ischemic lesions during the hyperacute stage.

  19. Preventive mechanisms of agmatine against ischemic acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Takahiro; Kobuchi, Shuhei; Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Takaoka, Masanori; Fujii, Toshihide; Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2009-01-28

    The excitation of renal sympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the development of ischemic acute kidney injury in rats. Recently, we found that agmatine, an adrenaline alpha(2)/imidazoline I(1)-receptor agonist, has preventive effects on ischemic acute kidney injury by suppressing the enhanced renal sympathetic nerve activity during renal ischemia and by decreasing the renal venous norepinephrine overflow after reperfusion. In the present study, we investigated preventive mechanisms of agmatine against ischemic acute kidney injury in rats. Ischemic acute kidney injury was induced by clamping the left renal artery and vein for 45 min followed by reperfusion, 2 weeks after the contralateral nephrectomy. Pretreatment with efaroxan (30 mumol/kg, i.v.), an alpha(2)/I(1)-receptor antagonist, abolished the suppressive effects of agmatine on the enhanced renal sympathetic nerve activity during renal ischemia and on the elevated norepinephrine overflow after reperfusion, and eliminated the preventing effects of agmatine on the ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal dysfunction and histological damage. On the other hand, pretreatment with yohimbine (6 mumol/kg, i.v.), an alpha(2)-receptor antagonist, eliminated the preventing effects of agmatine on the ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal injury and norepinephrine overflow, without affecting the lowering effect of agmatine on renal sympathetic nerve activity. These results indicate that agmatine prevents the ischemic renal injury by sympathoinhibitory effect probably via I(1) receptors in central nervous system and by suppressing the norepinephrine overflow through alpha(2) or I(1) receptors on sympathetic nerve endings.

  20. Astrocyte morphology after ischemic and hemorrhagic experimental stroke has no influence on the different recovery patterns.

    PubMed

    Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca; Saur, Lisiani; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Vaz, Sabrina Pereira; Ferreira, Kelly; Machado, Susane Alves; Xavier, Léder Leal; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2015-02-01

    Stroke, broadly subdivided into ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes, is a serious health-care problem worldwide. Previous studies have suggested ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke could present different functional recovery patterns. However, little attention has been given to this neurobiological finding. Coincidently, astrocyte morphology could be related to improved sensorimotor recovery after skilled reaching training and modulated by physical exercise and environmental enrichment. Therefore, it is possible that astrocyte morphology might be linked to differential recovery patterns between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Thus, we decided to compare long-term GFAP-positive astrocyte morphology after ischemic (IS, n=5), hemorrhagic (HS, n=5) and sham (S, n=5) stroke groups (induced by endothelin-1, collagenase type IV-S and salina, respectively). Our results showed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes induced similar long-term GFAP-positive astrocyte plasticity (P>0.05) for all evaluated measures (regional and cellular optical density; astrocytic primary processes ramification and length; density of GFAP positive astrocytes) in perilesional sensorimotor cortex and striatum. These interesting negative results discourage similar studies focused on long-term plasticity of GFAP-positive astrocyte morphology and recovery comparison of stroke subtypes.

  1. Non-Coding RNAs as Potential Neuroprotectants against Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prameet; Liu, Fujia; Tan, Jun Rong; Lim, Kai Ying; Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2013-03-20

    Over the past decade, scientific discoveries have highlighted new roles for a unique class of non-coding RNAs. Transcribed from the genome, these non-coding RNAs have been implicated in determining the biological complexity seen in mammals by acting as transcriptional and translational regulators. Non-coding RNAs, which can be sub-classified into long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs and several others, are widely expressed in the nervous system with roles in neurogenesis, development and maintenance of the neuronal phenotype. Perturbations of these non-coding transcripts have been observed in ischemic preconditioning as well as ischemic brain injury with characterization of the mechanisms by which they confer toxicity. Their dysregulation may also confer pathogenic conditions in neurovascular diseases. A better understanding of their expression patterns and functions has uncovered the potential use of these riboregulators as neuroprotectants to antagonize the detrimental molecular events taking place upon ischemic-reperfusion injury. In this review, we discuss the various roles of non-coding RNAs in brain development and their mechanisms of gene regulation in relation to ischemic brain injury. We will also address the future directions and open questions for identifying promising non-coding RNAs that could eventually serve as potential neuroprotectants against ischemic brain injury.

  2. Effects of passive smoking on ischemic heart disease mortality of nonsmokers. A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, C.; Barrett-Connor, E.; Suarez, L.; Criqui, M.H.; Wingard, D.L.

    1985-05-01

    The mortality attributable to ischemic heart disease as a result of cigarette smoking is greater of a community of older adults in southern California, the authors tested the hypothesis that nonsmoking women exposed to their husband's cigarette smoke would have an elevated risk of fatal ischemic heart disease. Married women aged 50-79 years who had never smoked cigarettes (n = 695) were classified according to the husband's self-reported smoking status at entry into the study: never, former, or current smoker. After 10 years, nonsmoking wives of current or former cigarette smokers had a higher total (p less than or equal to 0.05) and age-adjusted (p less than or equal to 0.10) death rate from ischemic heart disease than women whose husbands never smoked. After adjustment for differences in risk factors for heart disease, the relative risk for death from ischemic heart disease in nonsmoking women married to current or former cigarette smokers was 14.9 (p less than or equal to 0.10). These data are compatible with the hypothesis that passive cigarette smoking carries an excess risk of fatal ischemic heart disease.

  3. Association between TNFRSF11B gene polymorphisms and history of ischemic stroke in Italian diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Biscetti, Federico; Straface, Giuseppe; Giovannini, Silvia; Santoliquido, Angelo; Angelini, Flavia; Santoro, Luca; Porreca, Carlo Filippo; Pecorini, Giovanni; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Flex, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secretory glycoprotein that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor family and plays a role in atherosclerosis. The present study aimed to evaluate whether OPG gene (TNFRSF11B) polymorphisms are involved in ischemic stroke in an Italian population with diabetes. Participants in a retrospective case-control study included 364 diabetic patients (180 males, 184 females) with history of ischemic stroke and 492 diabetic subjects without history of ischemic stroke (252 males, 240 females). The T245G, T950C, and G1181C polymorphisms of the OPG gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. We found that the T245G, T950C, and G1181C gene polymorphisms of the OPG gene were significantly (34.1 vs. 9.5 %, P < 0.0001; 30.8 vs. 6.3 %, P < 0.0001 and 26.4 vs. 11.6 % P < 0.0001, respectively) and independently (adjusted OR 5.15 [3.46-7.68], OR 6.63 [4.26-10.31], and OR 3.03 [2.04-4.50], respectively) associated with history of ischemic stroke. We also found that these three polymorphisms act synergistically in patients with stroke history. The TNFRSF11B gene polymorphisms studied are associated with history of ischemic stroke and synergistic effects between these genotypes might be potential markers for cerebrovascular disorders.

  4. A3 adenosine receptor agonist reduces brain ischemic injury and inhibits inflammatory cell migration in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, In-Young; Lee, Jae-Chul; Ju, Chung; Hwang, Sunyoung; Cho, Geum-Sil; Lee, Hyuk Woo; Choi, Won Jun; Jeong, Lak Shin; Kim, Won-Ki

    2011-10-01

    A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is recognized as a novel therapeutic target for ischemic injury; however, the mechanism underlying anti-ischemic protection by the A3AR agonist remains unclear. Here, we report that 2-chloro-N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-5'-N-methylcarbamoyl-4'-thioadenosine (LJ529), a selective A3AR agonist, reduces inflammatory responses that may contribute to ischemic cerebral injury. Postischemic treatment with LJ529 markedly reduced cerebral ischemic injury caused by 1.5-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by 24-hour reperfusion in rats. This effect was abolished by the simultaneous administration of the A3AR antagonist MRS1523, but not the A2AAR antagonist SCH58261. LJ529 prevented the infiltration/migration of microglia and monocytes occurring after middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion, and also after injection of lipopolysaccharides into the corpus callosum. The reduced migration of microglia by LJ529 could be related with direct inhibition of chemotaxis and down-regulation of spatiotemporal expression of Rho GTPases (including Rac, Cdc42, and Rho), rather than by biologically relevant inhibition of inflammatory cytokine/chemokine release (eg, IL-1β, TNF-α, and MCP-1) or by direct inhibition of excitotoxicity/oxidative stress (not affected by LJ529). The present findings indicate that postischemic activation of A3AR and the resultant reduction of inflammatory response should provide a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  5. Angiogenesis in Ischemic Stroke and Angiogenic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Sai-Wang; Chang, Dennis; Jenkins, Anita; Bensoussan, Alan; Kiat, Hosen

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and adult disability worldwide. The underlying pathophysiology of stroke is highly complicated, consisting of impairments of multiple signalling pathways, and numerous pathological processes such as acidosis, glutamate excitotoxicity, calcium overload, cerebral inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The current treatment for ischemic stroke is limited to thromolytics such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). tPA has a very narrow therapeutic window, making it suitable to only a minority of stroke patients. Hence, there is great urgency to develop new therapies that can protect brain tissue from ischemic damage. Recent studies have shown that new vessel formation after stroke not only replenishes blood flow to the ischemic area of the brain, but also promotes neurogenesis and improves neurological functions in both animal models and patients. Therefore, drugs that can promote angiogenesis after ischemic stroke can provide therapeutic benefits in stroke management. In this regard, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has a long history in treating stroke and the associated diseases. A number of studies have demonstrated the pro-angiogenic effects of various Chinese herbs and herbal formulations in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on angiogenesis in the context of ischemic stroke and discuss the potential use of CHM in stroke management through modulation of angiogenesis. PMID:27275837

  6. Repair or observe moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation during coronary artery bypass grafting? Prospective randomized multicenter data

    PubMed Central

    Gulack, Brian C.; Englum, Brian R.; Castleberry, Anthony W.; Daneshmand, Mani A.; Perrault, Louis P.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common occurrence following myocardial infarction and its presence is associated with poor outcomes. The optimal treatment of ischemic MR is a matter of debate, especially for patients with moderate MR severity. Some authors advocate for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for patients with moderate MR, maintaining that reverse ventricular remodeling will reduce MR grade and its associated mortality risk, while others argue that a concomitant mitral valve repair (MVR) or replacement is superior. The Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network (CTSN) recently published the 1-year results of the Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation study, a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial investigating the impact of MVR in addition to CABG compared to CABG alone in the treatment of moderate ischemic MR. Here, we have reviewed previous observational and prospective studies investigating moderate ischemic MR treatment as well as the results of the current CTSN randomized trial. Furthermore, we have summarized the current state of the available evidence and preview potential new information that will become available with planned subgroup analyses and further follow-up of enrolled patients in the recently completed CTSN trial. PMID:26309829

  7. Central Role of Maladapted Astrocytic Plasticity in Ischemic Brain Edema Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema formation and the ensuing brain damages are the major cause of high mortality and long term disability following the occurrence of ischemic stroke. In this process, oxygen and glucose deprivation and the resulting reperfusion injury play primary roles. In response to the ischemic insult, the neurovascular unit experiences both intracellular and extracellular edemas, associated with maladapted astrocytic plasticity. The astrocytic plasticity includes both morphological and functional plasticity. The former involves a reactive gliosis and the subsequent glial retraction. It relates to the capacity of astrocytes to buffer changes in extracellular chemical levels, particularly K+ and glutamate, as well as the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter involves the expression and activity of a series of ion and water transport proteins. These molecules are grouped together around glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and water channel protein aquaporin 4 (AQP4) to form functional networks, regulate hydromineral balance across cell membranes and maintain the integrity of the BBB. Intense ischemic challenges can disrupt these capacities of astrocytes and result in their maladaptation. The maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke cannot only disrupt the hydromineral homeostasis across astrocyte membrane and the BBB, but also leads to disorders of the whole neurovascular unit. This review focuses on how the maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke plays the central role in the brain edema formation. PMID:27242440

  8. Association of Serum Calcium Levels with Infarct Size in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Observations from Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Meghna; Dhar, Sriparna; Gogoi, Dipankar Mall; Ruram, Alice Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Background: Calcium is known to be major mediator in ischemic neuronal cell death. Recent studies have shown that elevated serum calcium levels at admission in patients with stroke have been associated with less severe clinical deficits and with better outcomes. Aim: The aim of this to determine the correlation between serum calcium (total, corrected, and ionized) and infarct size (IS) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from 61 patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke from May 2015 to April 2016 at a tertiary care institute in Northeast India. Only patients aged ≥40 years and diagnosed as having acute ischemic cerebrovascular stroke with clinical examination and confirmed by a computed tomography scan were included in the study. Serum calcium levels (total, albumin corrected, and ionized) were collapsed into quartiles, and these quartile versions were used for calculating correlation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for comparing calcium levels with IS. Results: Total calcium, albumin-corrected calcium, and ionized calcium had a statistically significant negative correlation with IS with r = −0.578, −0.5396, and −0.5335, respectively. Total and ionized calcium showed a significant negative correlation with IS across all four quartiles. Albumin-corrected calcium levels showed a significant negative correlation with IS only across the lowest and highest quartiles. Conclusion: The findings in our study suggest that serum calcium can be used as a prognostic indicator in ischemic stroke as its levels directly correlates with the IS. PMID:28163502

  9. Peripheral administration of fetuin-A attenuates early cerebral ischemic injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Li, Wei; Zhu, Shu; Li, Jianhua; D'Amore, Jason; Ward, Mary F; Yang, Huan; Wu, Rongqian; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Tracey, Kevin J; Wang, Ping; Sama, Andrew E

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia-elicited inflammatory responses are driven by inflammatory mediators produced both by central (e.g., neurons and microglia) and infiltrating peripheral immune cells (e.g., macrophage/monocyte), and contribute to the evolution of tissue injury. A ubiquitous molecule, spermine, is released from injured cells, and counter-regulates release of various proinflammatory cytokines. However, the spermine-mediated anti-inflammatory activities are dependent on the availability of fetuin-A, a liver-derived negative acute-phase protein. Using an animal model of focal cerebral ischemia (i.e., permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, MCAo), we found that levels of fetuin-A in the ischemic brain tissue were elevated in a time-dependent manner, starting between 2 and 6 h, peaking around 24 to 48 h, and returning to baseline 72 h after MCAo. When administered peripherally, exogenous fetuin-A gained entry across the BBB into the ischemic brain tissue, and dose dependently reduced brain infarct volume at 24 h after MCAo. Meanwhile, fetuin-A effectively attenuated (i) ischemia-induced HMGB1 depletion from the ischemic core; (ii) activation of centrally (e.g., microglia) and peripherally derived immune cells (e.g., macrophage/monocytes); and (iii) TNF production in ischemic brain tissue. Taken together, these experimental data suggest that fetuin-A protects against early cerebral ischemic injury partly by attenuating the brain inflammatory response. PMID:19953099

  10. Global profiling of influence of intra-ischemic brain temperature on gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Megumi Sugahara; Asai, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Koichi; Nishida, Yayoi; Nagata, Toshihito; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2008-06-01

    Mild to moderate differences in brain temperature are known to greatly affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. The impact of brain temperature on ischemic disorders has been mainly evaluated through pathological analysis. However, no comprehensive analyses have been conducted at the gene expression level. Using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray, we screened 24000 genes in the hippocampus under hypothermic (32 degrees C), normothermic (37 degrees C), and hyperthermic (39 degrees C) conditions in a rat ischemia-reperfusion model. When the ischemic group at each intra-ischemic brain temperature was compared to a sham-operated control group, genes whose expression levels changed more than three-fold with statistical significance could be detected. In our screening condition, thirty-three genes (some of them novel) were obtained after screening, and extensive functional surveys and literature reviews were subsequently performed. In the hypothermic condition, many neuroprotective factor genes were obtained, whereas cell death- and cell damage-associated genes were detected as the brain temperature increased. At all intra-ischemic brain temperatures, multiple molecular chaperone genes were obtained. The finding that intra-ischemic brain temperature affects the expression level of many genes related to neuroprotection or neurotoxicity coincides with the different pathological outcomes at different brain temperatures, demonstrating the utility of the genetic approach.

  11. Uptake of iodinated contrast material by the ischemically damaged myocardial cell.

    PubMed

    Newell, J D; Higgins, C B; Abraham, J L

    1982-01-01

    Computerized transmission tomography has shown differential contrast enhancement of the area of ischemic damage after intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. The current study performed in normal dogs and dogs with two-day-old and 30-day-old myocardial infarctions was intended to determine if the iodine accumulation is intracellular. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis detected iodine peaks associated with the cells in areas of ischemic damage, while iodine peaks were not detected in normal myocardium. Energy spectra in the area of ischemic damage showed a significant increase in the Na+ -K+ ratio compared to normal myocardium, consistent with the loss of cellular membrane integrity in this region. Results were similar for both two- and 30-day-old infarcts. These results indicate that iodinated contrast material attaches to the membrane of enters the ischemically damaged cell, but is virtually excluded from the normal myocardial cell. It may serve as a marker of myocardial cells which have lost cellular membrane integrity after an ischemic insult.

  12. The Prognostic Values of Leukocyte Rho Kinase Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng-I.; Lin, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Tzu-Hsien; Lin, Hung-Sheng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Yuen, Chun-Man; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2014-01-01

    Objective. It has been reported that leukocyte ROCK activity is elevated in patients after ischemic stroke, but it is unclear whether leukocyte ROCK activity is associated with clinical outcomes following acute stroke events. The objective of this study is to investigate if leukocyte ROCK activity can predict the outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 110 patients of acute ischemic stroke and measured the leukocyte ROCK activity and plasma level of inflammatory cytokines to correlate the clinical outcomes of these patients. Results. The leukocyte ROCK activity at 48 hours after admission in acute ischemic stroke patients was higher as compared to a risk-matched population. The leukocyte ROCK activity significantly correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) difference between admission and 90 days after stroke event. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates showed lower stroke-free survival during follow-up period in patients with high leukocyte ROCK activity or plasma hsCRP level. Leukocyte ROCK activity independently predicted the recurrent stroke in patients with atherosclerotic stroke. Conclusions. This study shows elevated leukocyte ROCK activity in patients with ischemic stroke as compared to risk-matched subjects and is an independent predictor for recurrent stroke. PMID:24716192

  13. Isolation and Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells from the Ischemic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Weise, Gesa

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke initiates a robust inflammatory response that starts in the intravascular compartment and involves rapid activation of brain resident cells. A key mechanism of this inflammatory response is the migration of circulating immune cells to the ischemic brain facilitated by chemokine release and increased endothelial adhesion molecule expression. Brain-invading leukocytes are well-known contributing to early-stage secondary ischemic injury, but their significance for the termination of inflammation and later brain repair has only recently been noticed. Here, a simple protocol for the efficient isolation of immune cells from the ischemic mouse brain is provided. After transcardial perfusion, brain hemispheres are dissected and mechanically dissociated. Enzymatic digestion with Liberase is followed by density gradient (such as Percoll) centrifugation to remove myelin and cell debris. One major advantage of this protocol is the single-layer density gradient procedure which does not require time-consuming preparation of gradients and can be reliably performed. The approach yields highly reproducible cell counts per brain hemisphere and allows for measuring several flow cytometry panels in one biological replicate. Phenotypic characterization and quantification of brain-invading leukocytes after experimental stroke may contribute to a better understanding of their multifaceted roles in ischemic injury and repair. PMID:26967380

  14. Is cirrhosis associated with lower odds of ischemic stroke: A nationwide analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Abhinav; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Shah, Nishi; Singh, Shailender

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association between cirrhosis and ischemic stroke in a large nationally representative sample. METHODS A retrospective cross-sectional study of all hospitalized patients during 2012 and 2013 in the United States was performed using the National Inpatient Sample database. Hospitalizations with acute stroke, cirrhosis and other risk factors were identified using ICD-9-CM codes. RESULTS There were a total of 72082638 hospitalizations in the United States during the years 2012 and 2013. After excluding hospitalizations with missing demographic variables, that there were a total of 1175210 (1.6%) out of these were for acute ischemic stroke. Cirrhosis was present among 5605 (0.4%) cases of ischemic stroke. Mean age among the cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic groups with ischemic stroke were 66.4 and 70.5 years, respectively. Prevalence of risk factors among the two groups was also calculated. After adjusting for various known risk factors the odds of having an ischemic stroke (OR = 0.28, P < 0.001) were 72% lower in cirrhotics compared to non-cirrhotics. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that in a large, nationally representative sample of the United States population, cirrhosis is associated with a lower likelihood of stroke. PMID:28050237

  15. Proteinuria is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke among diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mondol, G; Rahman, K M; Uddin, M J; Bhattacharjee, M; Dey, S K; Israil, A; Miah, A H; Sarkar, U K; Islam, S S; Rahman, M M; Hossain, F; Bhuiya, M M; Bhowmik, R; Chowdhury, A H; Kabir, M S; Uddin, M S

    2012-07-01

    This study was done to assess the relationship between proteinuria and ischemic stroke in subjects with diabetes mellitus, and to determine whether proteinuria is an independent risk factor for stroke. This comparative study was conducted in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to June 2010. It was done to establish the relationship between proteinuria (Microalbuminuria) and ischemic stroke among diabetic patients. Other risk factors were also assessed. Patients were divided in Group A - diabetic patients with ischemic stroke (n=50) and Group B diabetic patients without stroke (n=50). Mean age of the Group A & B were 60.16±8.33 and 57.19±7.73 years (p=0.068). Mean Blood sugar (2 hours after Break Fast) was 14.68±4.32mmol/L in Group A and 14.75±4.02mmol/L in Group B (p>0.05). Albumin Creatinine ratio was abnormal in 84.0% in Group A and 22.0% in Group A (p=0.001) [Odds ratio (95%CI) = 18.61 (6.78-51.09)]. Logistic regression analysis has also shown that microalbuminuria (ACR) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke (p=0.001), [Odds ratio (95%CI) = 19.811(5.915-66.348)]. In diabetic patients increased urinary protein is a risk factor for stroke. Estimation of urinary protein (Microalbuminuria) may be used as a predictor for ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes.

  16. Edaravone-Encapsulated Agonistic Micelles Rescue Ischemic Brain Tissue by Tuning Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qu; Cai, Yu; Li, Sihan; Liu, Haoran; Zhou, Xingyu; Lu, Chunqiang; Gao, Xihui; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Shenghong; Li, Cong

    2017-01-01

    Thrombolysis has been a standard treatment for ischemic stroke. However, only 2-7% patients benefit from it because the thrombolytic agent has to be injected within 4.5 h after the onset of symptoms to avoid the increasing risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. As the only clinically approved neuroprotective drug, edaravone (EDV) rescues ischemic brain tissues by eradicating over-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) without the limitation of therapeutic time-window. However, EDV's short circulation half-life and inadequate cerebral uptake attenuate its therapeutic efficacy. Here we developed an EDV-encapsulated agonistic micelle (EDV-AM) to specifically deliver EDV into brain ischemia by actively tuning blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. The EDV-AM actively up-regulated endothelial monolayer permeability in vitro. HPLC studies showed that EDV-AM delivered more EDV into brain ischemia than free EDV after intravenous injection. Magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that EDV-AM more rapidly salvaged ischemic tissue than free EDV. Diffusion tensor imaging indicated the highest efficiency of EDV-AM in accelerating axonal remodeling in the ipsilesional white matter and improving functional behaviors of ischemic stroke models. The agonistic micelle holds promise to improve the therapeutic efficiency of ischemic stroke patients who miss the thrombolytic treatment. PMID:28382161

  17. Complex Roles of Microglial Cells in Ischemic Stroke Pathobiology: New Insights and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Guruswamy, Revathy; ElAli, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke constitutes the major cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. The interest in microglia arose from the evidence outlining the role of neuroinflammation in ischemic stroke pathobiology. Microglia constitute the powerhouse of innate immunity in the brain. Microglial cells are highly ramified, and use these ramifications as sentinels to detect changes in brain homeostasis. Once a danger signal is recognized, cells become activated and mount specialized responses that range from eliminating cell debris to secreting inflammatory signals and trophic factors. Originally, it was suggested that microglia play essentially a detrimental role in ischemic stroke. However, recent reports are providing evidence that the role of these cells is more complex than what was originally thought. Although these cells play detrimental role in the acute phase, they are required for tissue regeneration in the post-acute phases. This complex role of microglia in ischemic stroke pathobiology constitutes a major challenge for the development of efficient immunomodulatory therapies. This review aims at providing an overview regarding the role of resident microglia and peripherally recruited macrophages in ischemic pathobiology. Furthermore, the review will highlight future directions towards the development of novel fine-tuning immunomodulatory therapeutic interventions. PMID:28245599

  18. Modulation of mitochondrial function and autophagy mediates carnosine neuroprotection against ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeong-A; Akram, Muhammad; Shin, Young-Jun; Kim, Eun-Sun; Yu, Seong Woon; Majid, Arshad; Bae, Ok-Nam

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite the rapidly increasing global burden of ischemic stroke, no therapeutic options for neuroprotection against stroke currently exist. Recent studies have shown that autophagy plays a key role in ischemic neuronal death and treatments that target autophagy may represent a novel strategy in neuroprotection. We investigated whether autophagy is regulated by carnosine, an endogenous pleiotropic dipeptide which has robust neuroprotective activity against ischemic brain damage. Methods We examined the effect of carnosine on mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic processes in rat focal ischemia and in neuronal cultures. Results Autophagic pathways such as reduction of phosphorylated mTOR/p70S6K and the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II were enhanced in the ischemic brain. However, treatment with carnosine significantly attenuated autophagic signaling in the ischemic brain, with improvement of brain mitochondrial function and mitophagy signaling. The protective effect of carnosine against autophagy was also confirmed in primary cortical neurons. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of carnosine is at least partially mediated by mitochondrial protection, and attenuation of deleterious autophagic processes. Our findings shed new light on the mechanistic pathways that this exciting neuroprotective agent influences. PMID:24938837

  19. Intraperitoneal administration of thioredoxin decreases brain damage from ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Tian, Shilai; Wang, Jiayi; Han, Feng; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Rencong; Ning, Weidong; Chen, Wei; Qu, Yan

    2015-07-30

    Recent studies demonstrate that Thioredixin (Trx) possesses a neuronal protective effect and closely relates to oxidative stress and apoptosis of cerebral ischemia injury. The present study was conducted to validate the neuroprotective effect of recombinant human Trx-1 (rhTrx-1) and its potential mechanisms against ischemia injury at middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice. rhTrx-1 was administrated intraperitoneally at a dose of 5, 10 and 20mg/kg 30 min before MCAO in mice, and its neuronal protective effect was evaluated by neurological deficit score, brain dry-wet weight, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. The protein carbonyl content and HO-1 were detected to investigate its potential anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory property, and the anti-apoptotic ability of rhTrx-1 was assessed by casepase-3 and TUNEL staining. The results demonstrated that rhTrx-1 significantly improved neurological functions and reduced cerebral infarction and apoptotic cell death at 24h after MCAO. Moreover, rhTrx-1 resulted in a significant decrease in carbonyl contents and HO-1 against oxidative stress, which turned to be fast reduction during the first 24h and tended to be stable from 24h to 72h after MCAO. The study shows that rhTrx-1 exerts an neuroprotective effect in cerebral ischemia injury. The anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties of rhTrx-1 are more likely to succeed as a therapeutic approach to diminish oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptotic cell death in acute ischemic stroke.

  20. Effects of systemic erythropoietin on ischemic wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Arslantaş, Mustafa Kemal; Arslantaş, Reyhan; Tozan, Emine Nur

    2015-03-01

    Results of in vivo studies have shown erythropoietin (EPO) is associated with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and cell protective effects on wound healing. These effects are dose-dependent. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the duration of EPO treatment affects the healing process in the ischemic wound. Forty-two (42) Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, wounded with H-shaped flaps, and randomized to 2 groups; Group 1 received 400 u/kg/day EPO and Group 2 received a saline solution, both via intraperitoneal injection following the wounding. All substances were administered once daily at the same time for up to 10 days after surgery. At days 3, 5, and 10, 7 rats from each group were sacrificed. Skin samples were stained with hematoxylin/eosin, viewed under an optical microscope at 10X and 40X magnification, and analyzed by blinded investigators for re-epithelialization, neovascularization amount and maturation of granulation tissue, inflammatory cells, and ulcer healing using an evaluation scale where 0 = none; 1 = partial; 2 = complete, but immature/thin: and 4 = complete and mature. Blood hemoglobin and hematocrit levels also were measured. Data were analyzed using ANOVA one-way test (P <0.05). Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels rose while subsequent doses of EPO were administered over time, accompanied by a transient surge in healing on day 5, when differences in healing scores were significant. Flap necrosis, ulceration, and abscess were noted on post-wounding day 10 near the pedicle. The study showed EPO therapy can improve wound healing early in the post-wounding period but can reduce wound healing after post-injury treatment day 5. Further research is necessary, particularly to establish how EPO influences the microcirculation and rheology.

  1. Sex differences in neuroinflammation and neuroprotection in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Spychala, Monica S; Honarpisheh, Pedram; McCullough, Louise D

    2017-01-02

    Stroke is not only a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide it also disproportionally affects women. There are currently over 500,000 more women stroke survivors in the US than men, and elderly women bear the brunt of stroke-related disability. Stroke has dropped to the fifth leading cause of death in men, but remains the third in women. This review discusses sex differences in common stroke risk factors, the efficacy of stroke prevention therapies, acute treatment responses, and post-stroke recovery in clinical populations. Women have an increased lifetime risk of stroke compared to men, largely due to a steep increase in stroke incidence in older postmenopausal women, yet most basic science studies continue to only evaluate young male animals. Women also have an increased lifetime prevalence of many common stroke risk factors, including hypertension and atrial fibrillation, as well as abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome. None of these age-related risk factors have been well modeled in the laboratory. Evidence from the bench has implicated genetic and epigenetic factors, differential activation of cell-death programs, cell-cell signaling pathways, and systemic immune responses as contributors to sex differences in ischemic stroke. The most recent basic scientific findings have been summarized in this review, with an emphasis on factors that differ between males and females that are pertinent to stroke outcomes. Identification and understanding of the underlying biological factors that contribute to sex differences will be critical to the development of translational targets to improve the treatment of women after stroke. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cardioprotective effects of grape seed proanthocyanidin against ischemic reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Maulik, G; Ray, P S; Bagchi, D; Das, D K

    1999-06-01

    There is increasing evidence to indicate cardioprotective effects of red wine consumption. Such cardioprotective properties of wine have been attributed to certain polyphenolic constituents of grapes. The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether proanthocyanidins derived from grape seeds possess cardioprotective properties. Rats were randomly divided into two groups: grape-seed proanthocyanidin was administered orally to one group of rats (100 mg/kg/day) for 3 weeks while the other group served as control. After 3 weeks, rats were killed, hearts excised, mounted on the perfusion apparatus and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate (KHB) buffer. After stabilization hearts were perfused in the working mode for baseline measurements of contractile functions. Hearts were then subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Coronary perfusates were collected to monitor malonaldehyde formation, a presumptive marker for oxidative stress development. At the end of each experiment, the heart was processed for infarct size determination. Peroxyl radical scavenging activity of proanthocyanidin was determined by examining its ability to remove peroxyl radical generated by 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride while hydroxyl radical scavenging activity was tested with its ability to reduce 7-OH.-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid. The results of our study demonstrated that proanthocyanidin-fed animals were resistant to myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury as evidenced by improved recovery of post-ischemic contractile functions. The proanthocyanidin-fed group revealed reduced extent of myocardial infarction compared to the control group. Fluorimetric study demonstrated the antioxidant property of proanthocyanidin as judged by its ability to directly scavenge peroxyl radicals. Taken together, the results of this study showed that grape seed-proanthocyanidins possess a cardioprotective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. Such

  3. Trans-system mechanisms against ischemic myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu Q; Ma, Xin-Liang; Qin, Gangjian; Liu, Qingping; Li, Yan-Chun; Wu, Yu H

    2015-01-01

    A mammalian organism possesses a hierarchy of naturally evolved protective mechanisms against ischemic myocardial injury at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. These mechanisms comprise regional protective processes, including upregulation and secretion of paracrine cell-survival factors, inflammation, angiogenesis, fibrosis, and resident stem cell-based cardiomyocyte regeneration. There are also interactive protective processes between the injured heart, circulation, and selected remote organs, defined as trans-system protective mechanisms, including upregulation and secretion of endocrine cell-survival factors from the liver and adipose tissue as well as mobilization of bone marrow, splenic, and hepatic cells to the injury site to mediate myocardial protection and repair. The injured heart and activated remote organs exploit molecular and cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, mobilization, and/or extracellular matrix production, to establish protective mechanisms. Both regional and trans-system cardioprotective mechanisms are mediated by paracrine and endocrine messengers and act in coordination and synergy to maximize the protective effect, minimize myocardial infarction, and improve myocardial function, ensuring the survival and timely repair of the injured heart. The concept of the trans-system protective mechanisms may be generalized to other organ systems-injury in one organ may initiate regional as well as trans-system protective responses, thereby minimizing injury and ensuring the survival of the entire organism. Selected trans-system processes may serve as core protective mechanisms that can be exploited by selected organs in injury. These naturally evolved protective mechanisms are the foundation for developing protective strategies for myocardial infarction and injury-induced disorders in other organ systems.

  4. Erythrocyte Antioxidant Defenses Against Cigarette Smoking in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Basalingappa, Doddamani R; Uppala, Satyanarayana; Mitta, Geeta

    2015-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoke promotes atherogenesis by producing oxygen-derived free radicals. Aim The present study was conducted to determine the effect of cigarette smoking on lipid peroxidation and erythrocyte antioxidant status in ischemic heart disease (IHD). Materials and Methods A total of 327 male subjects were enrolled for this study, divided into two groups consisting of 200 patients, who were consecutively admitted for IHD in the intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) of a Government Hospital and 127 age matched male healthy subjects. Both the groups were subsequently categorised into smokers and non smokers sub groups depending upon the smoking history {>/= 20 pack years of smoking; (20 cigarettes per day for one year constitutes one pack year)}. All 327 subjects were investigated for lipid profile, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Statistical Analysis The differences in the parameters between the groups were tested for significance by one way ANOVA using the SPSS software version 19. A p-value of < 0.001 was considered to be significant statistically. Multiple comparisons were made between all the four groups by Post Hoc Tukey test. Results There was highly significant difference (p<0.001) observed in GPX activity, in comparison to CAT and SOD (p=0.032, p=0.009) between smokers vs non smokers in control group as well as patient group. The plasma MDA levels were found to be increased significantly (p<0.001) in IHD patients, who smoked as compared to those who did not. Conclusion Chronic smoking enhances erythrocyte lipid peroxidation in IHD patients with concomitant failure of both plasma and erythrocyte antioxidant defense mechanisms. Along with conventional lipid markers and plasma MDA levels, the erythrocyte GPX activity was observed to be a better marker of oxidative stress, in chronic smokers, who are at risk of developing IHD. PMID:26266112

  5. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Mi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines. PMID:27482251

  6. Intravenous Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Review of 97 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan; Buddaraju, Kiran; Majeed, Anas; Sharma, Suryanarayana; Javali, Mahendra; Acharya, Purushottam; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) has now become a standard treatment in eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) who present within 4.5 h of symptom onset. Objective: To determine the usefulness of IVT and the subset of patients who will benefit from IVT in AIS within 4.5 h. Materials and Methods: Patients with AIS within 4.5 h of symptom onset who underwent IVT were studied prospectively. The study period was from October 2011 to October 2015. Results: A total of 97 patients were thrombolysed intravenously. The mean onset to needle time in all patients was 177.2 ± 62 min (range: 60–360). At 3 months follow-up, favorable outcome was seen in 65 patients (67.1%) and poor outcome including death in the remaining 32 patients (32.9%). Factors predicting favorable outcome was age <65 years (P = 0.02), the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) <15 (P < 0.001), small vessel occlusion (P = 0.006), cardioembolism (P = 0.006), and random blood sugar (RBS) <250 mg/dl (P < 0.001). Factors predicting poor outcome was diabetes mellitus (P = 0.01), dyslipidemia (P = 0.01), NIHSS at admission >15 (P = 0.03), RBS >250 mg/dl (P = 0.01), Dense cerebral artery sign, age, glucose level on admission, onset-to-treatment time, NIHSS on admission score >5 (P = 0.03), and occlusion of large artery (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Milder baseline stroke severity, blood glucose <250 mg/dL, younger patients (<65 years), cardioembolic stroke, and small vessel occlusion benefit from recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. PMID:28149079

  7. Occupational Noise and Ischemic Heart Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Dzhambov, Angel M; Dimitrova, Donka D

    2016-01-01

    Noise exposure might be a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). Unlike residential exposure, however, evidence for occupational noise is limited. Given that high-quality quantitative synthesis of existing data is highly warranted for occupational safety and policy, we aimed at conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of the risks of IHD morbidity and mortality because of occupational noise exposure. We carried out a systematic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and on the Internet since April 2, 2015, in English, Spanish, Russian, and Bulgarian. A quality-scoring checklist was developed a priori to assess different sources of methodological bias. A qualitative data synthesis was performed. Conservative assumptions were applied when appropriate. A meta-analysis was not feasible because of unresolvable methodological discrepancies between the studies. On the basis of five studies, there was some evidence to suggest higher risk of IHD among workers exposed to objectively assessed noise >75–80 dB for <20 years (supported by one high, one moderate, and one low quality study, opposed by one high and one moderate quality study). Three moderate and two low quality studies out of six found self-rated exposure to be associated with higher risk of IHD, and only one moderate quality study found no effect. Out of four studies, a higher mortality risk was suggested by one moderate quality study relying on self-rated exposure and one of high-quality study using objective exposure. Sensitivity analyses showed that at higher exposures and in some vulnerable subgroups, such as women, the adverse effects were considerably stronger. Despite methodological discrepancies and limitations of the included studies, occupational noise appeared to be a risk factor for IHD morbidity. Results suggested higher risk for IHD mortality only among vulnerable subgroups. Workers exposed to high occupational noise should be considered at higher overall risk of IHD. PMID:27569404

  8. Vitamin D ameliorates hepatic ischemic/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Seif, Ansam Aly; Abdelwahed, Doaa Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    Vitamin D, most commonly associated with the growth and remodeling of bone, has been shown to ameliorate ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) in some tissues, yet its underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the protective effect of vitamin D, if any, against hepatic IRI in rats and the underlying mechanism involved. Adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, sham-operated (sham), ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and ischemic-reperfused vitamin D-treated (vit D) groups. Rats in the I/R and vit D groups were subjected to partial (70%) hepatic ischemia for 45 min, followed by 1 h of reperfusion. Vitamin D was given to rats orally in a dose of 500 IU/kg daily for 2 weeks before being subjected to I/R. Markers of liver damage, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis were evaluated. Hepatic morphology was also examined. Vit D-treated rats had significantly lower serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and γ glutamyl transferase compared to rats in the I/R group. Also, vit D-treated rats showed a significant decrease in malondialdehyde, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor κB, B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2-associated X protein, cytochrome c, and caspase-3 levels, with higher levels of glutathione peroxidase and B cell lymphoma 2 protein levels in liver tissues compared to I/R rats. Histological examination showed less damaged liver tissues with amelioration of apoptotic signs in the vit D group compared to the I/R group. In conclusion, vitamin D supplementation ameliorates hepatic IRI mostly by alleviating the inflammatory-apoptotic response mediated by the oxidative reperfusion injury insult.

  9. A new characterization for nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aipeng; Li, Lin; Li, Miyang; Shi, Xiaoru

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Totally 133 patients (156 eyes) were included in this study. At the first visit and follow-up visits, the patients were subjected to the ophthalmic evaluations, including the fundus photography, visual field (VF) test, fluorescein fundus angiography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The visual acuity (VA) of 156 eyes and the VF of 148 eyes were evaluated. For the VA assessment, 59 (38%), 67 (43%), and 30 (19%) cases presented with an initial VA ≥ 20/40, between 20/40 and 20/400, and ≤ 20/400, respectively. VA was improved in 44% and deteriorated in 8% of the patients with VA < 20/20 after NAION onset. Inferior or superior altitudinal defects, constricted fields, and nasal steps were the most common VF defects. In the eyes with VF defects, 32 cases (22%) were improved, and 25 cases (17%) were worsened. In the 61 cases (39%) with VA ≤ 20/200 at NAION onset, neuroepithelial detachment in the fovea was found in 37 eyes (61%). For the optic disc assessment, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickening was the most common symptom of NAION. Out of the 36 eyes with ONA or DR, 72% showed VA improvement after the NAION occurrence in the contralateral eye. Poor microcirculation perfusion in the bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) might be the underlying mechanism for NAION, which could be relieved by compromising the blood supply to the one side. PMID:26770482

  10. Results of neurolysis in established upper limb Volkmann's ischemic contracture

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Dinesh K; Thalanki, Srikiran; Patni, Poornima; Meena, Ram Khiladi; Bairawa, Dinesh; Bhatia, Chirag

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of established cases of Volkmann's ischemic contracture (VIC) of upper limb is very tedious. Since the period of Volkmann, various experimental works are being performed for its treatment, but none are effective. Disabilities from nerve palsy and hand muscle paralysis are more problematic than any other deformity in VIC. To solve these problems, we conducted a study to see the result of neurolysis of median and ulnar nerve and their subcutaneous placement in established cases of VIC. Materials and Methods: Twelve cases of established VIC operated between July 2007 and August 2010 with complete records and followup were included in the study. VIC of lower limb and contracture of nonischemic etiology were excluded from the study. Their evaluation was done by the British Medical Research Council grading system for sensory and motor recovery. Followup was done for an average period of 24.3 months (range 15-30 months) (the average age was 8.3 years). Results: To study the results, we divided the cases into two series. One group consisted of cases which were operated within 6 months from onset of VIC. The second group consisted of cases which were operated after 6 months from onset of VIC. Our results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups operated, though both had significant improvement in motor and sensory recovery in both median and ulnar nerve distribution. Conclusions: Neurolysis of the nerves definitely improved the outcome for motor and sensory components of median and ulnar nerves but the timing of the surgery did not play a role in the outcome contrary to the clinical assumption. This study can serve as a template and further such studies could help us find the answer to a long standing issue. PMID:27904214

  11. Electrical remodeling in a canine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Sheng; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Mei; Tang, Daniel; Clemo, Henry F; Higgins, Robert S D; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2007-01-01

    The nature of electrical remodeling in a canine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM; induced by repetitive intracoronary microembolizations) that exhibits spontaneous ventricular tachycardia is not entirely clear. We used the patch-clamp technique to record action potentials and ionic currents of left ventricular myocytes isolated from the region affected by microembolizations. We also used the immunoblot technique to examine channel subunit expression in adjacent affected tissue. Ventricular myocytes and tissue isolated from the corresponding region of normal hearts served as control. ICM myocytes had prolonged action potential duration (APD) and more pronounced APD dispersion. Slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks)) was reduced at voltages positive to 0 mV, along with a negative shift in its voltage dependence of activation. Immunoblots showed that there was no change in KCNQ1.1 (I(Ks) pore-forming or alpha-subunit), but KCNE1 (I(Ks) auxiliary or beta-subunit) was reduced, and KCNQ1.2 (a truncated KCNQ1 splice variant with a dominant-negative effect on I(Ks)) was increased. Transient outward current (I(to)) was reduced, along with an acceleration of the slow phase of recovery from inactivation. Immunoblots showed that there was no change in Kv4.3 (alpha-subunit of fast-recovering I(to) component), but KChIP2 (beta-subunit of fast-recovering component) and Kv1.4 (alpha-subunit of slow-recovering component) were reduced. Inward rectifier current was reduced. L-type Ca current was unaltered. The immunoblot data provide mechanistic insights into the observed changes in current amplitude and gating kinetics of I(Ks) and I(to). We suggest that these changes, along with the decrease in inward rectifier current, contribute to APD prolongation in ICM hearts.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene polymorphisms are associated with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Kang; Kang, Sung Wook; Kim, Dong Hwan; Yun, Dong Hwan; Chung, Joo-Ho; Ban, Ju Yeon

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is a heterogeneous disease caused by different pathogenic mechanisms. Several candidate genes for stroke have been proposed, but few have been replicated. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are expressed following stroke. We investigated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the MMP3 gene with stroke in the Korean population. This study included 186 stroke patients [116 ischemic stroke (IS) and 70 intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)] and 668 age-matched control subjects (267 for IS and 401 for ICH). Three SNPs [rs520540 (Ala362Ala), rs602128 (Asp96Asp), and rs679620 (Lys45Glu)] in the coding region of MMP3 were selected and genotyped by direct sequencing. HelixTree, SNPAnalyzer, SNPStats, and Haploview version 4.2 were used to analyze genetic data. Multiple logistic regression models (codominant, dominant, and recessive models) were conducted to evaluate odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, and P value. Three SNPs in the MMP3 gene were significantly associated with IS (P<0.05). The genotype distribution of 3 SNPs differed between the IS and control subjects. However, there was no association of the SNPs between the ICH and control. In analysis of gender, 3 SNPs were also associated with IS in female group (P<0.05). These SNPs remained significantly associated with IS after the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (P(c)<0.05). Haplotype analysis revealed that no haplotypes were associated with IS or ICH. Overall, the results of our study demonstrate an association of the MMP3 gene with development of IS, and no association of MMP3 with ICH.

  13. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  14. Alcohol consumption, Lewis phenotypes, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, H.O.; Suadicani, P.; Gyntelberg, F. . Epidemiological Research Unit); Sorenson, H. . Dept. of Chemical Immunology); Hein, H.O. . Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1993-02-13

    The authors have previously found an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in men with the Lewis phenotype Le(a[minus]b[minus]) and suggested that the Lewis blood group has a close genetic relation with insulin resistance. The authors have investigated whether any conventional risk factors explain the increased risk in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men. 3,383 men aged 53-75 years were examined in 1985-86, and morbidity and mortality during the next 4 years were recorded. At baseline, the authors excluded 343 men with a history of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, intermittent claudication, or stroke. The potential risk factors examined were alcohol consumption, physical activity, tobacco smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, body-mass index, blood pressure, prevalence of hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and social class. In 280 (9.6%) men with Le(a[minus]b[minus]), alcohol was the only risk factor significantly associated with risk of IHD. There was a significant inverse dose-effect relation between alcohol consumption and risk; trend tests, with adjustment for age, were significant for fatal IHD (p=0.02), all IHD (p=0.03), and all causes of death (p=0.02). In 2649 (90.4%) men with other phenotypes, there was a limited negative association with alcohol consumption. In Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men, a group genetically at high risk of IHD, alcohol consumption seems to be especially protective. The authors suggest that alcohol consumption may modify insulin resistance in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men.

  15. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and its experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L.; Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) can be divided into nonarteritic (NAION) and arteritic (AAION) forms. NAION makes up ~85% of all cases of AION, and until recently was poorly understood. There is no treatment for NAION, and its initiating causes are poorly understood, in part because NAION is not lethal, making it difficult to obtain fresh, newly affected tissue for study. In-vivo electrophysiology and post-mortem studies reveal specific responses that are associated with NAION. New models of NAION have been developed which enable insights into the pathophysiological events surrounding this disease. These models include both rodent and primate species, and the power of a `vertically integrated' multi-species approach can help in understanding the common cellular mechanisms and physiological responses to clinical NAION, and to identify potential approaches to treatment. The models utilize laser light to activate intravascular photoactive dye to induce capillary vascular thrombosis, while sparing the larger vessels. The observable optic nerve changes associated with rodent models of AION (rAION) and primate NAION (pNAION) are indistinguishable from that seen in clinical disease, including sectoral axonal involvement, and in-vivo electrophysiological data from these models are consistent with clinical data. Early post-infarct events reveal an unexpected inflammatory response, and changes in intraretinal gene expression for both stress response, while sparing outer retinal function, which occurs in AAION models. Histologically, the NAION models reveal an isolated loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. There are changes detectable by immunohistochemistry suggesting that other retinal cells mount a brisk response to retinal ganglion cell distress without themselves dying. The optic nerve ultimately shows axonal loss and scarring. Inflammation is a prominent early histological feature. This suggests that clinically, specific modulation of inflammation may

  16. Ischemic stroke selectively inhibits REM sleep of rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Samreen; Meng, He; Liu, Tiecheng; Sutton, Blair C; Opp, Mark R; Borjigin, Jimo; Wang, Michael M

    2011-12-01

    Sleep disorders are important risk factors for stroke; conversely, stroke patients suffer from sleep disturbances including disruptions of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and a decrease in total sleep. This study was performed to characterize the effect of stroke on sleep architecture of rats using continuous electroencephalography (EEG) and activity monitoring. Rats were implanted with transmitters which enabled continuous real time recording of EEG, electromyography (EMG), and locomotor activity. Baseline recordings were performed prior to induction of either transient middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion or sham surgery. Sleep recordings were obtained for 60 h after surgery to identify periods of wakefulness, NREM, and REM sleep before and after stroke. Spectral analysis was performed to assess the effects of stroke on state-dependent EEG. Finally, we quantified the time in wake, NREM, and REM sleep before and after stroke. Delta power, a measure of NREM sleep depth, was increased the day following stroke. At the same time, there was a significant shift in theta rhythms to a lower frequency during REM and wake periods. The awake EEG slowed after stroke over both hemispheres. The EEG of the ischemic hemisphere demonstrated diminished theta power specific to REM in excess of the slowing seen over the contralateral hemisphere. In contrast to rats exposed to sham surgery which had slightly increased total sleep, rats undergoing stroke experienced decreased total sleep. The decrease in total sleep after stroke was the result of dramatic reduction in the amount of REM sleep after ischemia. The suppression of REM after stroke was due to a decrease in the number of REM bouts; the length of the average REM bout did not change. We conclude that after stroke in this experimental model, REM sleep of rats is specifically and profoundly suppressed. Further experiments using this experimental model should be performed to investigate the

  17. Forebrain neurogenesis after focal Ischemic and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kernie, Steven G; Parent, Jack M

    2010-02-01

    Neural stem cells persist in the adult mammalian forebrain and are a potential source of neurons for repair after brain injury. The two main areas of persistent neurogenesis, the subventricular zone (SVZ)-olfactory bulb pathway and hippocampal dentate gyrus, are stimulated by brain insults such as stroke or trauma. Here we focus on the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on SVZ neural progenitor cells in experimental stroke, and the influence of mechanical injury on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Stroke potently stimulates forebrain SVZ cell proliferation and neurogenesis. SVZ neuroblasts are induced to migrate to the injured striatum, and to a lesser extent to the peri-infarct cortex. Controversy exists as to the types of neurons that are generated in the injured striatum, and whether adult-born neurons contribute to functional restoration remains uncertain. Advances in understanding the regulation of SVZ neurogenesis in general, and stroke-induced neurogenesis in particular, may lead to improved integration and survival of adult-born neurons at sites of injury. Dentate gyrus cell proliferation and neurogenesis similarly increase after experimental TBI. However, pre-existing neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus are vulnerable to traumatic insults, which appear to stimulate neural stem cells in the SGZ to proliferate and replace them, leading to increased numbers of new granule cells. Interventions that stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis appear to improve cognitive recovery after experimental TBI. Transgenic methods to conditionally label or ablate neural stem cells are beginning to further address critical questions regarding underlying mechanisms and functional significance of neurogenesis after stroke or TBI. Future therapies should be aimed at directing appropriate neuronal replacement after ischemic or traumatic injury while suppressing aberrant integration that may contribute to co-morbidities such as epilepsy or

  18. Neurogenic pathways in remote ischemic preconditioning induced cardioprotection: Evidences and possible mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aulakh, Amritpal Singh; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Singh, Nirmal

    2017-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is an intrinsic phenomenon whereby 3~4 consecutive ischemia-reperfusion cycles to a remote tissue (noncardiac) increases the tolerance of the myocardium to sustained ischemiareperfusion induced injury. Remote ischemic preconditioning induces the local release of chemical mediators which activate the sensory nerve endings to convey signals to the brain. The latter consequently stimulates the efferent nerve endings innervating the myocardium to induce cardioprotection. Indeed, RIPC-induced cardioprotective effects are reliant on the presence of intact neuronal pathways, which has been confirmed using nerve resection of nerves including femoral nerve, vagus nerve, and sciatic nerve. The involvement of neurogenic signaling has been further substantiated using various pharmacological modulators including hexamethonium and trimetaphan. The present review focuses on the potential involvement of neurogenic pathways in mediating remote ischemic preconditioning-induced cardioprotection. PMID:28280407

  19. Deep vein thrombosis after ischemic stroke: rationale for a therapeutic trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, N.M.; Norris, J.W.

    1988-11-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the legs occurs in 23% to 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke, and pulmonary embolism accounts for about 5% of deaths. New heparinoid substances, lacking the hazards of more established anticoagulants, raise the question of DVT prophylaxis for these patients. Two hundred fifty consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients were evaluated for the presence of DVT of the legs in a feasibility study for a trial of low-molecular-weight heparin prophylaxis. Forty-nine patients were found suitable for the study, of whom 11 (22.5%) developed DVT. All patients underwent clinical examination, I-125 fibrinogen leg scanning, and impedance plethysmography. Five patients were sufficiently alert and without serious neurologic deficits to justify DVT prophylaxis. Recent advances in noninvasive diagnostic techniques to detect DVT early and the development of relatively safe heparinoid compounds increase the need for a prophylactic study in patients with ischemic stroke.

  20. The potential for nanotechnology to improve delivery of therapy to the acute ischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Evans, Cameron W; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Hool, Livia C

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acute cardiac ischemia remains an area in which there are opportunities for therapeutic improvement. Despite significant advances, many patients still progress to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Timely reperfusion is critical in rescuing vulnerable ischemic tissue and is directly related to patient outcome, but reperfusion of the ischemic myocardium also contributes to damage. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species, initiation of an inflammatory response and deregulation of calcium homeostasis all contribute to injury, and difficulties in delivering a sufficient quantity of drug to the affected tissue in a controlled manner is a limitation of current therapies. Nanotechnology may offer significant improvements in this respect. Here, we review recent examples of how nanoparticles can be used to improve delivery to the ischemic myocardium, and suggest some approaches that may lead to improved therapies for acute cardiac ischemia.

  1. [The effect of cerebrolysin in dosage 50 ml on the volume of lesion in ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Shamalov, N A; Stakhovskaia, L V; Burenchev, D V; Kichuk, I V; Tvorogova, T V; Botsina, A Iu; Smychkov, A S; Kerbikov, O B; Moessler, H; Novak, P; Skvortsova, V I

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to assess safety and efficacy of cerebrolysin used in dosage 50 ml in acute ischemic stroke. Forty-seven patients with ischemic stroke, aged 45-85 years, who were admitted to a clinical unit within the first 12 h after stroke onset were included in the study. A quantitative time-related MRI analysis of the dynamics of neurological deficit revealed the more rapid decrease of stroke volume to the 28th day in the group treated with cerebrolysin (45.4% versus 43.6% in the placebo-group (p < 0.05)). No side-effects of treatment with cerebrolysin was found. The results of this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study suggest the positive effect of cerebrolysin on the dynamics of volume lesion in patients with ischemic stroke.

  2. [Comparative aspects of using neuroprotectors in the management of patients with ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Ershov, V I

    2011-01-01

    Comparative efficacy of neuroprotective preparations: actovegin, cerebrolysin and ceraxon was studied in 73 patients in the most acute phase of ischemic stroke. A control group included 33 patients in the most acute phase of ischemic stroke who received only basic treatment without neuroprotectors. Patient's state was assessed with the NIHSS, the original scale of E.I. Gusev and V.I. Skvortsova and the Barthel index. Ceraxon in daily dosage 2 g and cerebrolysin in daily dosage 10 ml during 10 days after the development of ischemic stroke led to the significantly better regression of neurological symptoms to the 21st day of disease compared to the control group. Barthel index scores did not differ in the groups studied.

  3. Selectivity of voluntary finger flexion during ischemic nerve block of the hand

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Karen T.; Schieber, Marc H.; McNulty, Penelope A.

    2009-01-01

    During ischemic nerve block of an extremity, the cortical representations of muscles proximal to the block are known to expand, increasing the overlap of different muscle representations. Such reorganization mimics that seen in actual amputees. We investigated whether such changes degrade voluntary control of muscles proximal to the block. Nine subjects produced brief, isometric flexion force selectively with each fingertip before, during, and after ischemic block at the wrist. We recorded the isometric force exerted at the distal phalanx of each digit, along with electromyographic (EMG) activity from intrinsic and extrinsic finger muscles. Despite paralysis of the intrinsic hand muscles, and associated decrements in the flexion forces exerted by the thumb, index, and little fingers, the selectivity of voluntary finger flexion forces and of EMG activity in the extrinsic finger muscles that generated these forces remained unchanged. Our observations indicate that during ischemic nerve block, reorganization does not eliminate or degrade motor representations of the temporarily deafferented and paralyzed fingers. PMID:18431564

  4. Colonic mucormycosis presented with ischemic colitis in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Do, Gi Won; Jung, Seok Won; Jun, Jae-Bum; Seo, Jae Hee; Nah, Yang Won

    2013-06-14

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon opportunistic fungal infection with high mortality in liver transplant recipients. Mucormycosis of the gastrointestinal tract can manifest with features similar to ischemic colitis. Typically signs and symptoms of non-gangrenous ischemic colitis resolve spontaneously within 24-48 h. On the other hand, the clinical course of the mucormycosis is commonly fulminant. We encountered a case of invasive fungal colitis presenting with abdominal pain and hematochezia in a liver transplant recipient. Endoscopic examination showed multiple shallow ulcerations and edema with mucosal friabilities on the sigmoid and distal descending colon, which was consistent with ischemic colitis. However, the histological examination obtained from endoscopic biopsies showed fungal hyphae with surrounding inflammatory cells and mucosal necrosis. The patient was successfully managed with antifungal agent without surgical treatment. Thus, early diagnosis and treatment is essential for improving the prognosis of invasive fungal infection after liver transplantation.

  5. Growth factor- and cytokine-stimulated endothelial progenitor cells in post-ischemic cerebral neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Peplow, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells are resident in the bone marrow blood sinusoids and circulate in the peripheral circulation. They mobilize from the bone marrow after vascular injury and home to the site of injury where they differentiate into endothelial cells. Activation and mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells from the bone marrow is induced via the production and release of endothelial progenitor cell-activating factors and includes specific growth factors and cytokines in response to peripheral tissue hypoxia such as after acute ischemic stroke or trauma. Endothelial progenitor cells migrate and home to specific sites following ischemic stroke via growth factor/cytokine gradients. Some growth factors are less stable under acidic conditions of tissue ischemia, and synthetic analogues that are stable at low pH may provide a more effective therapeutic approach for inducing endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and promoting cerebral neovascularization following ischemic stroke. PMID:25317152

  6. Cost - effectiveness analysis of the antiplatelet treatment administered on ischemic stroke patients using goal programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Rasvini; Zainuddin, Zaitul Marlizawati; Idris, Badrisyah

    2014-09-01

    There are numerous ways to prevent or treat ischemic stroke and each of these competing alternatives is associated with a different effectiveness and a cost. In circumstances where health funds are budgeted and thus fixed, cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) can provide information on how to comprehend the largest health gains with that limited fund as CEA is used to compare different strategies for preventing or treating a single disease. The most common medications for ischemic stroke are the anti-platelet drugs. While some drugs are more effective than others, they are also more expensive. This paper will thus assess the CEA of anti-platelet drug available for ischemic stroke patients using goal programming (GP) approach subject to in-patients days and patients' quality-of-life. GP presents a way of striving towards several objectives simultaneously whereby in this case we will consider minimizing the cost and maximizing the effectiveness.

  7. Efficacy of telemedicine for thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yun-kai; Zhu, Wei-jun; Hou, Hong-li; Sun, Dong-xu; Zhao, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of telemedicine in the delivery of thrombolytic therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke. We performed a meta-analysis using combinations of the following terms: telestroke, telemedicine, tissue plasminogen activator/t-PA, and acute ischemic stroke. The primary outcome was favorable outcome based on the modified Rankin score. Secondary outcomes were incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and overall mortality. We found no significant difference in favorable outcome between the telemedicine and control groups, and no significant difference was found between these groups in the rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or overall mortality. Patients with acute ischemic stroke who were treated with intravenous thrombolysis had similar outcomes regardless of whether telemedicine was used or they were treated in-person at a medical facility. Telemedicine can be used to support hospitals with limited experience in administering thrombolytic therapy for stroke.

  8. Acute ischemic stroke after cardiac catheterization: the protamine low-dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator pathway.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Carlos; Quijada, Alonso; Rosas, Carolina; Bulatova, Katya; Lara, Hugo; Nieto, Elena; Morales, Marcelo

    2016-05-20

    Intravenous thrombolysis is the preferred treatment for acute ischemic stroke; however, it remains unestablished in the area of cardiac catheterization. We report three patients with acute ischemic stroke after cardiac catheterization. After reversing the anticoagulant effect of unfractionated heparin with protamine, all of the patients were successfully off-label thrombolyzed with reduced doses of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (0.6 mg/kg). This dose was preferred to reduce the risk of symptomatic cerebral or systemic bleeding. The sequential pathway of protamine recombinant tissue plasminogen activator at reduced doses may be safer for reducing intracranial or systemic bleeding events, whereas remaining efficacious for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke after cardiac catheterization.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and its effects on renal tubular cells apoptosis in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Guo, Min; Jiang, Wei; Dong, Hui; Han, Yafei; An, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Jisheng

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia is the most frequent cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), which is characterized by apoptosis of renal tubular cell. A common result of ischemia in AKI is dysfunction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which causes the protein-folding capacity to lag behind the protein-folding load. The abundance of misfolded proteins stressed the ER and results in induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). While the UPR is an adaptive response, over time it can result in apoptosis when cells are unable to recover quickly. Recent research suggests that ER stress is a major factor in renal tubular cell apoptosis resulting from ischemic AKI. Thus, ER stress may be an important new progression factor in the pathology of ischemic AKI. In this article, we review UPR signaling, describe pathology and pathophysiology mechanisms of ischemic AKI, and highlight the dual function of ER stress on renal tubular cell apoptosis.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and short-term neurological outcomes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Biyang; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Keting; Fan, Wenping; Zhang, Yumeng; Xie, Xia; Dai, Minhui; Cao, Liping; Bai, Wen; Du, Juan; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Shuyu; Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Wusheng; Ma, Minmin; Liu, Wenhua; Liu, Xinfeng; Xu, Gelin

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and long-term disability worldwide. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a potential contributor for the sex differences of ischemic stroke heritability. Although mtDNA haplogroups were associated with stroke onset, their impacts on stroke outcomes remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the impacts of mtDNA haplogroups on short-term outcomes of neurological functions in patients with ischemic stroke. A total of 303 patients were included, and their clinical data and mtDNA sequences were analyzed. Based on the changes between baseline and 14-day follow-up stroke severity, our results showed that haplogroup N9 was an independent protective factor against neurological worsening in acute ischemic stroke patients. These findings supported that mtDNA variants play a role in post-stroke neurological recovery, thus providing evidences for future pharmacological intervention in mitochondrial function. PMID:25993529

  11. New objective criterion for determining, noninvasively, the healing potential of an ischemic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.E.; Stewart, C.A.; Wagner, W.; Sakimura, I.

    1981-02-01

    Peripheral vascular perfusion studies using intravenously administered thallium-201 were performed on 13 patients suffering from ischemic ulcer of the lower extermities. Scintillation camera views and point counting over the lesion and adjacent region were utilized to define qualitatively and quantitatively the relative hyperemia of the lesion. The preliminary findings demonstrate that when the relative hyperemia was equal to or greater than 1.5, 100% (seven of seven) went on to heal their ulcer with conservative management. Of those without this degree of hyperemia, 83% (five of six) will require amputation. Based on this limited series, noninvasive assessment of the relative hyperemia of an ischemic ulcer using thallium-201 is a new, useful, and objective indicator of the healing potential of a so-called ischemic ulcer.

  12. Acute Stress Decreases but Chronic Stress Increases Myocardial Sensitivity to Ischemic Injury in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Eric D.; Rorabaugh, Boyd R.; Zoladz, Phillip R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the largest cause of mortality worldwide, and stress is a significant contributor to the development of CVD. The relationship between acute and chronic stress and CVD is well evidenced. Acute stress can lead to arrhythmias and ischemic injury. However, recent evidence in rodent models suggests that acute stress can decrease sensitivity to myocardial ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). Conversely, chronic stress is arrhythmogenic and increases sensitivity to myocardial IRI. Few studies have examined the impact of validated animal models of stress-related psychological disorders on the ischemic heart. This review examines the work that has been completed using rat models to study the effects of stress on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury. Utilization of animal models of stress-related psychological disorders is critical in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders in patients experiencing stress-related psychiatric conditions. PMID:27199778

  13. Current recommendations for endovascular interventions in the treatment of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Appelboom, Geoffrey; Strozyk, Dorothea; Meyers, Philip M; Higashida, Randall T

    2010-07-01

    Ischemic stroke remains one of the leading cause of adult death and disability in the United States. Reperfusion of the occluded vessel is the standard of care in the setting of acute ischemic stroke according to established guidelines. Since the introduction of intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in the late 1990s, significant advances have been made in methods to deliver thrombolytic agents and in devices for mechanical recanalization of occluded vessels. Furthermore, improvements in patient selection contribute to achievement of good clinical outcomes after endovascular therapy. This article summarizes findings from recent clinical trials and presents evidence-based guidelines for endovascular interventions in the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  14. Forced Arterial Suction Thrombectomy Using Distal Access Catheter in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Cheol; Kang, Dong-Hun; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Historical innovations in mechanical thrombectomy devices and strategies for ischemic stroke have resulted in improved angiographic outcomes and better clinical outcomes. Various devices have been used, but the two most common approaches are aspiration thrombectomy and stent-retrieval thrombectomy. Aspiration thrombectomy has advanced from the traditional Penumbra system to forced arterial suction thrombectomy and a direct aspiration first-pass technique. Newer generation aspiration catheters with flexible distal tips and a larger bore have demonstrated faster and better recanalization relative to older devices. Recently, several species of distal access catheters have similar structural characteristics to the Penumbra reperfusion catheter. Therefore, we used the distal access catheter for forced arterial suction thrombectomy in three patients with acute ischemic stroke. In each case, we achieved fast and complete recanalization without significant complications. Forced arterial suction thrombectomy using a distal access catheter might provide another option for mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:28316869

  15. In Vivo Bioimpedance Spectroscopy Characterization of Healthy, Hemorrhagic and Ischemic Rabbit Brain within 10 Hz-1 MHz.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Liu, Wenbo; Chen, Rongqing; Zhang, Ge; Li, Weichen; Fu, Feng; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2017-04-07

    Acute stroke is a serious cerebrovascular disease and has been the second leading cause of death worldwide. Conventional diagnostic modalities for stroke, such as CT and MRI, may not be available in emergency settings. Hence, it is imperative to develop a portable tool to diagnose stroke in a timely manner. Since there are differences in impedance spectra between normal, hemorrhagic and ischemic brain tissues, multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography (MFEIT) shows great promise in detecting stroke. Measuring the impedance spectra of healthy, hemorrhagic and ischemic brain in vivo is crucial to the success of MFEIT. To our knowledge, no research has established hemorrhagic and ischemic brain models in the same animal and comprehensively measured the in vivo impedance spectra of healthy, hemorrhagic and ischemic brain within 10 Hz-1 MHz. In this study, the intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic models were established in rabbits, and then the impedance spectra of healthy, hemorrhagic and ischemic brain were measured in vivo and compared. The results demonstrated that the impedance spectra differed significantly between healthy and stroke-affected brain (i.e., hemorrhagic or ischemic brain). Moreover, the rate of change in brain impedance following hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke with regard to frequency was distinct. These findings further validate the feasibility of using MFEIT to detect stroke and differentiate stroke types, and provide data supporting for future research.

  16. Reduction of deformability of erythrocytes of ischemic rats under the action of semax: examination by the method of laser diffractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugovtsov, A. E.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Fadukova, O. E.; Koshelev, V. B.

    2006-08-01

    Reduced ability of erythrocytes of ischemic rats to change their shape in shear flow and semax effect on the deformability of erythrocytes are studied with laser diffractometry technique. It is shown that both in vivo and in vitro applied semax positively influences the impaired deformability properties of erythrocytes of ischemic rats.

  17. The iron-regulatory peptide hepcidin is upregulated in the ischemic and in the remote myocardium after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Simonis, Gregor; Mueller, Katrin; Schwarz, Peggy; Wiedemann, Stephan; Adler, Guido; Strasser, Ruth H; Kulaksiz, Hasan

    2010-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that iron metabolism contributes to the ischemic damage after myocardial infarction. Hepcidin, a recently discovered peptide hormone, regulates iron uptake and metabolism, protecting the body from iron overload. In this study we analyzed the regulation of hepcidin in the heart and blood of rats after myocardial infarction. To induce a myocardial infarction in the rats, left anterior descending coronary artery ligation was performed. After 1-24h, biopsies from the ischemic and the non-ischemic myocardium were taken. In these biopsies, the mRNA levels and the protein expression of hepcidin were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis, respectively. In parallel, the serum levels of prohepcidin were measured by ELISA. Six hours after myocardial infarction, the hepcidin mRNA expression was temporally upregulated in the ischemic and in the non-ischemic myocardium. The upregulation was specific for hepcidin, since other iron-related genes (hemojuvelin, IREG-1) remained unchanged. Furthermore, the alteration of the hepcidin protein expression in the ischemic area was connected to the level of hepcidin in the serum of the infarcted rats, where hepcidin also raised up. Angiotensin receptor blockade with candesartan did not influence the mRNA regulation of hepcidin. Together, these data show a particular upregulation of the iron-regulatory peptide hepcidin in the ischemic and the non-ischemic myocardium after myocardial infarction. It is speculated that upregulation of hepcidin may reduce iron toxicity and thus infarct size expansion in an infarcted heart.

  18. Ameliorating effect of hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor against impaired glucose metabolism after cerebral ischemic stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinichi; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, has potent neuroprotective effects against brain injury. We recently reported that glucose intolerance/hyperglycemia could be induced by ischemic stress (i.e., post-ischemic glucose intolerance) following ischemic neuronal damage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of BDNF on the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and ischemic neuronal damage. Male ddY mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 h. On day 1, the expression levels of BDNF were significantly decreased in the cortex, hypothalamus, liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas. The expression levels of tyrosine kinase B receptor, a BDNF receptor, decreased in the hypothalamus and liver and increased in the skeletal muscle and pancreas, but remained unchanged in the cortex. Intrahypothalamic administration of BDNF (50 ng/mouse) suppressed the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance on day 1 and neuronal damage on day 3 after MCAO. In the liver and skeletal muscle, the expression levels of insulin receptors decreased, while gluconeogenic enzyme levels increased on day 1 after MCAO. These changes completely recovered to normal levels in the presence of BDNF. These results indicate that regulation of post-ischemic glucose intolerance by BDNF may suppress ischemic neuronal damage.

  19. Effect of arginine vasopressin on the cortex edema in the ischemic stroke of Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Yan; Wu, Chun-Fang; Yang, Jun; Gao, Yang; Sun, Fang-Jie; Wang, Da-Xin; Wang, Chang-Hong; Lin, Bao-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Brain edema formation is one of the most important mechanisms of ischemia-evoked cerebral edema. It has been demonstrated that arginine vasopressin (AVP) receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain damage after focal cerebral ischemia. In a well-characterized animal model of ischemic stroke of Mongolian gerbils, the present study was undertaken to clear the effect of AVP on cortex edema in cerebral ischemia. The results showed that (1) occluding the left carotid artery of Mongolian gerbils not only decreased the cortex specific gravity (cortex edema) but also increased AVP levels in the ipsilateral cortex (ischemic area) including left prefrontal lobe, left parietal lobe, left temporal lobe, left occipital lobe and left hippocampus for the first 6 hours, and did not change of the cortex specific gravity and AVP concentration in the right cortex (non-ischemic area); (2) there were many negative relationships between the specific gravity and AVP levels in the ischemic cortex; (3) intranasal AVP (50 ng or 200 ng), which could pass through the blood-brain barrier to the brain, aggravated the focal cortex edema, whereas intranasal AVP receptor antagonist-D(CH2)5Tyr(ET)DAVP (2 µg) mitigated the cortex edema in the ischemic area after occluding the left carotid artery of Mongolian gerbils; and (4) either intranasal AVP or AVP receptor antagonist did not evoke that edema in the non-ischemic cortex. The data indicated that AVP participated in the process of ischemia-evoked cortex edema, and the cerebral AVP receptor might serve as an important therapeutic target for the ischemia-evoked cortex edema.

  20. Inducible Glutamate Oxaloacetate Transaminase as a Therapeutic Target Against Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Savita; Briggs, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Glutamate serves multi-faceted (patho)physiological functions in the central nervous system as the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter and under pathological conditions as a potent neurotoxin. Regarding the latter, elevated extracellular glutamate is known to play a central role in ischemic stroke brain injury. Recent Advances: Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) has emerged as a new therapeutic target in protecting against ischemic stroke injury. Oxygen-sensitive induction of GOT expression and activity during ischemic stroke lowers glutamate levels at the stroke site while sustaining adenosine triphosphate levels in brain. The energy demands of the brain are among the highest of all organs underscoring the need to quickly mobilize alternative carbon skeletons for metabolism in the absence of glucose during ischemic stroke. Recent work builds on the important observation of Hans Krebs that GOT-mediated metabolism of glutamate generates tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates in brain tissue. Taken together, outcomes suggest GOT may enable the transformative switch of otherwise excitotoxic glutamate into life-sustaining TCA cycle intermediates during ischemic stroke. Critical Issues: Neuroprotective strategies that focus solely on blocking mechanisms of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity have historically failed in clinical trials. That GOT can enable glutamate to assume the role of a survival factor represents a paradigm shift necessary to develop the overall significance of glutamate in stroke biology. Future Directions: Ongoing efforts are focused to develop the therapeutic significance of GOT in stroke-affected brain. Small molecules that target induction of GOT expression and activity in the ischemic penumbra are the focus of ongoing studies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 175–186. PMID:25343301

  1. Phosphodiesterase 4D polymorphisms associate with the short-term outcome in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yan-li; Wang, Chun-juan; Wu, Yi-ping; Lin, Jie; Wang, Peng-lian; Du, Wan-liang; Liu, Li; Lin, Jin-xi; Wang, Yi-long; Wang, Yong-jun; Liu, Gai-fen

    2017-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) genetic polymorphism is associated with ischemic stroke. However, the association between PDE4D gene and prognosis after ischemic stroke remains unknown. We consecutively enrolled ischemic stroke patients admitted to Beijing Tiantan Hospital from October 2009 to December 2013. Clinical, laboratory and imaging data upon admission were collected. All patients were followed up 3 months after stroke onset. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the associations of genetic polymorphisms with 3-month outcome after ischemic stroke and different subtypes, under various genetic models. A total of 1447 patients were enrolled, and 3-month follow-up data were obtained from 1388 (95.92%). Multivariate regression analysis showed that SNP87 of PDE4D gene was associated with increased risk of unfavorable outcome after total ischemic stroke (OR = 1.47, 95%CI 1.12–1.93), as well as stroke due to large-artery atherosclerosis (OR = 1.49, 95%CI 1.04–2.11) and small-artery occlusion (OR = 1.76, 95%CI 1.05–2.96) under a recessive model. No association between SNP83 genotype and poor outcome was found. Overall, this study demonstrated that the TT genotype of SNP87 in PDE4D was associated with increased risk of poor outcome after total ischemic stroke, large-artery atherosclerosis and small-artery occlusion, in a Chinese population. PMID:28225001

  2. Early afterdepolarizations promote transmural reentry in ischemic human ventricles with reduced repolarization reserve

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sara; Mincholé, Ana; Zacur, Ernesto; Quinn, T. Alexander; Taggart, Peter; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Aims Acute ischemia is a major cause of sudden arrhythmic death, further promoted by potassium current blockers. Macro-reentry around the ischemic region and early afterdepolarizations (EADs) caused by electrotonic current have been suggested as potential mechanisms in animal and isolated cell studies. However, ventricular and human-specific arrhythmia mechanisms and their modulation by repolarization reserve remain unclear. The goal of this paper is to unravel multiscale mechanisms underlying the modulation of arrhythmic risk by potassium current (IKr) block in human ventricles with acute regional ischemia. Methods and results A human ventricular biophysically-detailed model, with acute regional ischemia is constructed by integrating experimental knowledge on the electrophysiological ionic alterations caused by coronary occlusion. Arrhythmic risk is evaluated by determining the vulnerable window (VW) for reentry following ectopy at the ischemic border zone. Macro-reentry around the ischemic region is the main reentrant mechanism in the ischemic human ventricle with increased repolarization reserve due to the ATP-sensitive potassium current (IK(ATP)) activation. Prolongation of refractoriness by 4% caused by 30% IKr reduction counteracts the establishment of macro-reentry and reduces the VW for reentry (by 23.5%). However, a further decrease in repolarization reserve (50% IKr reduction) is less anti-arrhythmic despite further prolongation of refractoriness. This is due to the establishment of transmural reentry enabled by electrotonically-triggered EADs in the ischemic border zone. EADs are produced by L-type calcium current (ICaL) reactivation due to prolonged low amplitude electrotonic current injected during the repolarization phase. Conclusions Electrotonically-triggered EADs are identified as a potential mechanism facilitating intramural reentry in a regionally-ischemic human ventricles model with reduced repolarization reserve. PMID:26850675

  3. Acute BMP2 upregulation following induction of ischemic osteonecrosis in immature femoral head.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Shafer, Sasha; Oxendine, Ila; Mortlock, Douglas P; Chandler, Ronald L; Oxburgh, Leif; Kim, Harry K W

    2013-03-01

    Juvenile ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (IOFH) is one of the most serious hip conditions causing the femoral head deformity. Little is known about BMP signaling following ischemic osteonecrosis. In this study, we found acute BMP2 upregulation in the femoral head cartilage 24h after ischemic induction using our immature pig IOFH model. Similarly, in our ischemic osteonecrosis mouse model, BMP2 expression and BMP signaling were enhanced in the articular cartilage surrounding the necrotic bone. BMP2 was increased in cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes under hypoxia (1% O(2)) compared with normoxia (21% O(2)). Addition of the hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1) activator DFO significantly increased BMP2 while HIF1 silencing (siHIF1) only partially reduced BMP2, suggesting other mechanisms of BMP2 upregulation being present. Hypoxia is known to induce the production of free oxygen radicals, which are converted to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) by superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). As an alternative mechanism, we investigated the effect of H(2)O(2)/SOD2 production on BMP2 upregulation. Chondrocytes produced more H(2)O(2) under hypoxia than normoxia. H(2)O(2) addition to the chondrocyte culture also significantly increased BMP2 expression. SOD2 was also dramatically increased in the ischemic pig cartilage at 24h following surgery and in primary chondrocytes/cartilage explants culture under hypoxia. SOD2 protein addition to the chondrocyte culture significantly increased BMP2. Moreover, DFO significantly increased SOD2 while HIF1 silencing only partially reduced SOD2. These results suggest that the acute BMP2 response of chondrocytes to ischemic osteonecrosis is more dominantly through the H(2)O(2) production and only partly through the HIF1 pathway.

  4. Rational modulation of the innate immune system for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amantea, Diana; Micieli, Giuseppe; Tassorelli, Cristina; Cuartero, María I.; Ballesteros, Iván; Certo, Michelangelo; Moro, María A.; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system plays a dualistic role in the evolution of ischemic brain damage and has also been implicated in ischemic tolerance produced by different conditioning stimuli. Early after ischemia, perivascular astrocytes release cytokines and activate metalloproteases (MMPs) that contribute to blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption and vasogenic oedema; whereas at later stages, they provide extracellular glutamate uptake, BBB regeneration and neurotrophic factors release. Similarly, early activation of microglia contributes to ischemic brain injury via the production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-1, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and proteases. Nevertheless, microglia also contributes to the resolution of inflammation, by releasing IL-10 and tumor growth factor (TGF)-β, and to the late reparative processes by phagocytic activity and growth factors production. Indeed, after ischemia, microglia/macrophages differentiate toward several phenotypes: the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype is classically activated via toll-like receptors or interferon-γ, whereas M2 phenotypes are alternatively activated by regulatory mediators, such as ILs 4, 10, 13, or TGF-β. Thus, immune cells exert a dualistic role on the evolution of ischemic brain damage, since the classic phenotypes promote injury, whereas alternatively activated M2 macrophages or N2 neutrophils prompt tissue remodeling and repair. Moreover, a subdued activation of the immune system has been involved in ischemic tolerance, since different preconditioning stimuli act via modulation of inflammatory mediators, including toll-like receptors and cytokine signaling pathways. This further underscores that the immuno-modulatory approach for the treatment of ischemic stroke should be aimed at blocking the detrimental effects, while promoting the beneficial responses of the immune reaction. PMID:25972779

  5. Ischemic damage and subsequent proliferation of oligodendrocytes in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mandai, K; Matsumoto, M; Kitagawa, K; Matsushita, K; Ohtsuki, T; Mabuchi, T; Colman, D R; Kamada, T; Yanagihara, T

    1997-04-01

    In order to achieve a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ischemic white matter lesions, oligodendrocytic degeneration and subsequent proliferation were examined in the mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. In situ hybridization histochemistry for proteolipid protein messenger RNA was employed as a sensitive and specific marker of oligodendrocytes, and immunohistochemistry for myelin basic protein was used as a compact myelin marker. Immunohistochemistry for microtubule-associated protein 2 and albumin was employed to monitor neuronal degeneration and the breakdown of the blood brain barrier, respectively. In the ischemic core of the caudoputamen, the immunoreactivity for microtubule-associated protein 2 disappeared and massive albumin extravasation occurred several hours after vessel occlusion, while proteolipid protein messenger RNA signals remained relatively strong at this time. The messenger RNA signals began to attenuate 12 h after ischemia and were hardly detectable 24 h after ischemia in the whole ischemic lesion. In situ end-labeling of fragmented DNA showed some cells with proteolipid protein messenger RNAs to have DNA fragmentation at this period. In contrast to proteolipid protein messenger RNA signals, the immunoreactivity for myelin basic protein was detected as long as five days after ischemia. An apparent increase in the cells possessing strong proteolipid protein messenger RNA signals was found five days after ischemia, mainly in the corpus callosum and the cortex bordering the infarcted areas. A double simultaneous procedure with in situ hybridization for proteolipid protein messenger RNA and immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acid protein or lectin histochemistry for macrophages/microglia showed proliferating oligodendrocytes to be co-localized with reactive astrocytes and macrophages/microglia. These findings show that oligodendrocytic damage occurred following ischemic neuronal damage and the breakdown of the blood

  6. Pathophysiology, treatment, and animal and cellular models of human ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Trent M; Thundyil, John; Tang, Sung-Chun; Sobey, Christopher G; Taylor, Stephen M; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2011-01-25

    Stroke is the world's second leading cause of mortality, with a high incidence of severe morbidity in surviving victims. There are currently relatively few treatment options available to minimize tissue death following a stroke. As such, there is a pressing need to explore, at a molecular, cellular, tissue, and whole body level, the mechanisms leading to damage and death of CNS tissue following an ischemic brain event. This review explores the etiology and pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and provides a general model of such. The pathophysiology of cerebral ischemic injury is explained, and experimental animal models of global and focal ischemic stroke, and in vitro cellular stroke models, are described in detail along with experimental strategies to analyze the injuries. In particular, the technical aspects of these stroke models are assessed and critically evaluated, along with detailed descriptions of the current best-practice murine models of ischemic stroke. Finally, we review preclinical studies using different strategies in experimental models, followed by an evaluation of results of recent, and failed attempts of neuroprotection in human clinical trials. We also explore new and emerging approaches for the prevention and treatment of stroke. In this regard, we note that single-target drug therapies for stroke therapy, have thus far universally failed in clinical trials. The need to investigate new targets for stroke treatments, which have pleiotropic therapeutic effects in the brain, is explored as an alternate strategy, and some such possible targets are elaborated. Developing therapeutic treatments for ischemic stroke is an intrinsically difficult endeavour. The heterogeneity of the causes, the anatomical complexity of the brain, and the practicalities of the victim receiving both timely and effective treatment, conspire against developing effective drug therapies. This should in no way be a disincentive to research, but instead, a clarion call to

  7. Adjuvant Chinese Herbal Products for Preventing Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Muo, Chih-Hsin; Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Liu, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chinese herbal products (CHPs) are widely used for atrial fibrillation (AF) in Taiwan. We investigated the effect of adjuvant CHPs in preventing ischemic stroke in patients with AF. Methods Taiwanese patients in the Health Insurance Database newly diagnosed with AF during 2000–2011 were enrolled. Medication treatment with/without CHPs was administered within 7 days after the AF diagnosis. The clinical endpoint was an ischemic stroke. The Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Student t test were used to examine differences between the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and non-TCM cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess the risk for ischemic stroke between two cohorts. Results Three hundred and eleven patients underwent TCM treatment and 1715 patients did not. Compared to non-TCM users, TCM users had a lower incidence of stroke (12.59% vs. 1.93%, respectively) and lower risk of stroke [CHA2DS2-VASc score = 0–2 (hazard ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval = 0.06–0.65)]. Compared to non-TCM users, the stroke risk was significantly lower in TCM users with AF who were female or younger than 65 years, but not in males, people more than 65 years old, or people with comorbidities. Compared to TCM users, non-TCM users who received conventional treatment had a higher ischemic stroke risk. The risk for AF-related hospitalization was significantly lower in TCM users (0.64%) than in non-TCM users (38.1%). Conclusions Users of TCM with AF have a lower risk of new-onset ischemic stroke. Therefore, adjuvant CHP therapy may have a protective effect and may be used in AF patients to prevent ischemic stroke. PMID:27428543

  8. Engineering triiodothyronine (T3) nanoparticle for use in ischemic brain stroke.

    PubMed

    Mdzinarishvili, Alexander; Sutariya, Vijaykumar; Talasila, Phani K; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Sadana, Prabodh

    2013-08-01

    A potential means of pharmacological management of ischemic stroke is rapid intervention using potent neuroprotective agents. Thyroid hormone (T3) has been shown to protect against ischemic damage in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of ischemic brain stroke. While thyroid hormone is permeable across the blood-brain barrier, we hypothesized that efficacy of thyroid hormone in ischemic brain stroke can be enhanced by encapsulation in nanoparticulate delivery vehicles. We tested our hypothesis by generating poly-(lactide-co-glycolide)-polyethyleneglycol (PLGA-b-PEG) nanoparticles that are either coated with glutathione or are not coated. We have previously reported that glutathione coating of PLGA-PEG nanoparticles is an efficient means of brain targeted drug delivery. Encapsulation of T3 in PLGA-PEG delivery vehicle resulted in particles that were in the nano range and exhibited a zeta potential of -6.51 mV (uncoated) or -1.70 mV (coated). We observed that both glutathione-coated and uncoated nanoparticles are taken up in cells wherein they stimulated the expression of thyroid hormone response element driven reporter robustly. In MCAO model of ischemic stroke, significant benefit of administering T3 in nanoparticulate form was observed over injection of a T3 solution. A 34 % decrease in tissue infarction and a 59 % decrease in brain edema were seen upon administration of T3 solution in MCAO stroke model. Corresponding measurements for uncoated T3 nanoparticles were 51 % and 68 %, whereas for the glutathione coated were 58 % and 75 %. Our study demonstrates that using nanoparticle formulations can significantly improve the efficacy of neuroprotective drugs in ischemic brain stroke.

  9. Acute ischemic stroke in a child with cyanotic congenital heart disease due to non-compliance of anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Misbahuddin; James, Anish F.; Qureshi, Raheel S.; Saraf, Sapan; Ahluwalia, Tina; Mukherji, Joy Dev; Kole, Tamorish

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a common presentation in geriatric patients in emergency department but rarely seen in pediatric patients. In case of acute ischemic stroke in pediatric age group, management is different from that of adult ischemic stroke where thrombolysis is a good op. METHODS: We report a case of a 17-year-old male child presenting in emergency with an episode of acute ischemic stroke causing left hemiparesis with left facial weakness and asymmetry. The patient suffered from cyanotic congenital heart disease for which he had undergone Fontan operation previously. He had a history of missing his daily dose of warfarin for last 3 days prior to the stroke. RESULTS: The patient recovered from acute ischemic stroke without being thrombolyzed. CONCLUSION: In pediatric patients, acute ischemic stroke usually is evolving and may not require thrombolysis. PMID:25215056

  10. Uptake of iodinated contrast material in ischemic myocardium as an indicator of loss of cellular membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J L; Higgins, C B; Newell, J D

    1980-11-01

    Differential uptake of iodine containing radiographic contrast medium (I) in myocardial infarcts compared with normal mycardium has been detected by computerized transmission tomography (CTT). In this study the histologic and cellular distribution of I in ischemically damaged canine myocardium after intravenous administration of contrast material was examined by the use of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of fresh frozen cryosections. Analysis of individual cells in 6-mu thick sections mounted on carbon substrates showed that I was detectable in the ischemically damaged but not the normal myocardial cells. A decline in the potassium-to-sodium ratio confirmed the loss of membrane integrity in the ischemically damaged cells that accumulated I. These results indicate that I enters ischemically damaged but not normal myocardial cells suggesting that CTT scans after intravenous administration of contrast material may be capable of defining the area of the myocardium in which cells have lost membrane integrity after an ischemic injury.

  11. Ischemic stroke as a rare manifestation of aluminum phosphide poisoning: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Mahmoud; Fatehi, Farzad; Tabrizi, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a solid fumigant which is widely used for a suicide attempt in Iran. Although neurologic symptoms are commonly reported, cerebrovascular stenosis is rare in AlP poisoning. We described ischemic stroke as a delayed complication of AlP intoxication. A 30-year-old man was admitted because of sudden onset left side hemiplegia, 11 days after intentional ingestion of three rice tablets. Investigations revealed in situ thrombosis in right middle cerebral artery (MCA) while other causes of stroke in young adults were excluded. Ischemic stroke should be considered as a delayed complication of AlP intoxication even after the acute phase of intoxication.

  12. Ischemic Necrosis of Upper Lip, and All Fingers and Toes After Norepinephrine Use.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin Yong; Roh, Si-Gyun; Lee, Nae-Ho; Yang, Kyung-Moo

    2016-03-01

    A 68-year-old woman with necrosis of total finger, toe, and upper lip was requested by department of internal medicine. She was diagnosed with septic shock and treated with norepinephrine 10 days ago. Norepinephrine is an often-used medicine for normalizing blood pressure in septic shock patients. Norepinephrine stimulates adrenergic receptors, causing vasoconstriction and the rise of blood pressure. These peripheral vasoconstrictions sometimes lead to ischemic changes in end organs. In this case report, the authors describe ischemic necrosis of the upper lip and all fingers and toes after norepinephrine use in a patient in the intensive care unit.

  13. Association of TOMM40 and SLC22A4 polymorphisms with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    YAMASE, YUICHIRO; HORIBE, HIDEKI; UEYAMA, CHIKARA; FUJIMAKI, TETSUO; OGURI, MITSUTOSHI; KATO, KIMIHIKO; ARAI, MASAZUMI; WATANABE, SACHIRO; YAMADA, YOSHIJI

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and their meta-analyses have identified various genes and loci underlying the predisposition to ischemic stroke or coronary artery disease in Caucasian populations. Given that ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease may have a shared genetic architecture, certain polymorphisms may confer genetic susceptibility to these two diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible association of ischemic stroke with 29 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously identified by the meta-analyses of GWASs as susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease. The study population comprised 3,187 Japanese individuals, including 894 subjects with ischemic stroke and 2,293 controls. The genotypes for the 29 SNPs of the 28 genes were determined by a method that combines the polymerase chain reaction and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes with suspension array technology. Comparisons of the allele frequencies by the χ2 test between subjects with ischemic stroke and controls revealed that rs9319428 (G→A) of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 gene (P=0.0471), rs2075650 (G→A) of the translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog gene (TOMM40, P=0.0102) and rs273909 (T→C) of the solute carrier family 22, member 4 gene (SLC22A4, P=0.0097) were significantly (P<0.05) associated with the prevalence of ischemic stroke. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, smoking status and the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia revealed that rs2075650 of TOMM40 (P=0.0443; recessive model; odds ratio=0.50) and rs273909 of SLC22A4 (P=0.0123; dominant model; odds ratio=0.45) were significantly associated with ischemic stroke with the minor G and C allele, respectively, being protective against this condition. TOMM40 and SLC22A4 may thus be susceptibility loci for ischemic stroke in Japanese individuals. PMID:26171154

  14. [Clinical and pathogenetical peculiarities and treatment policy in ischemic stroke of elderly and old age].

    PubMed

    Gafurov, B G; Alikulova, N A

    2004-01-01

    The data on randomized study of 2 groups of patients with ischemic brain hemisphere stroke of elderly and old (over 70 years) as well as middle (under 60 years) age are presented. In elderly and old age, stroke develops on the basis of common affection of major vessels, with a great role of the "steal syndrome" in its pathogenesis. In authors' opinion, in treatment of ischemic stroke of elderly and old age attention should be paid to metabolic therapy, in particular to using high dosages of Cerebrolysin. Basing on clinical and paraclinical study, efficacy of this medication is revealed.

  15. Ischemic stroke subtypes among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites: the BASIC Project.

    PubMed

    Uchino, K; Risser, J M H; Smith, M A; Moyé, L A; Morgenstern, L B

    2004-08-10

    Ischemic stroke subtype distribution was compared between Mexican Americans (MAs) and non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) in a community-based stroke surveillance study in Nueces County, TX. There was no difference in the distribution of stroke subtype by ethnicity (p = 0.19). There was a similar proportion of small-vessel and large-artery strokes between the two ethnic groups (p = 0.32). Differences in stroke rates among MAs and NHWs are not explained by the distribution of ischemic stroke subtypes.

  16. A critical velocity of squeezing a droplet through a circular constriction: implications on ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Drapaca, Corina

    2016-11-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for about 87 percent of all stroke cases. In these cases, models of squeezing a droplet through a smaller constriction channel can help better understand the pathology and capillary restoring after a Stroke. In the present research, we analytical expressed the minimum impulse of squeezing a droplet through a circular channel as well as its critical velocity. By comparison with a previously defined critical velocity, we find the difference between these two. Applications of this research in the understanding of ischemic stroke are also discussed. Zhifeng Zhang thanks the support of Robert A. Sebrosky Graduate Fellowship in Engineering Science and Mechanics, the Pennsylvania State University.

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor: an attractive target in the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui; Zhou, Hui; Lu, Jie; Qu, Yi; Yu, Dan; Tong, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia or ischemia results in cell death and cerebral edema, as well as other cellular reactions such as angiogenesis and the reestablishment of functional microvasculature to promote recovery from brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor is expressed in the central nervous system after hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and is involved in the process of brain repair via the regulation of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, and cerebral edema, which all require vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. In this review, we focus on the role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the response to hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and discuss potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26981109

  18. Painless legs and moving toes as an initial presentation of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Mi; Yoon, Won Tae; Kim, Ji Youn; Shin, Hee-Young; Lee, Won Yong

    2009-05-01

    Painless legs and moving toes is an unusual syndrome, which has not previously been reported as an initial presentation of ischemic stroke. We encountered a 78-year-old woman who developed dysarthria and involuntary movement of her left toes that was clinically regarded as painless legs and moving toes. These symptoms appeared abruptly and simultaneously as the initial symptoms of stroke, and improved gradually with conservative management by intravenous hydration for a month. We suggest that, in our case, a cortical brain lesion caused by ischemic stroke might be associated with the development of painless legs and moving toes.

  19. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  20. CTS Trials Network: A paradigm shift in the surgical treatment of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation?

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiothoracic Surgery Trials Network has reported results of the one-year follow up of their randomized trial "Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation". They studied 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with or without mitral repair with the primary end-point of change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) at one year and multiple clinical and echocardiographic secondary endpoints. Although their results were against repairing the mitral valve, the debate on surgical management of moderate IMR remains unsettled.

  1. CTS Trials Network: A paradigm shift in the surgical treatment of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation?

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiothoracic Surgery Trials Network has reported results of the one-year follow up of their randomized trial “Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation”. They studied 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with or without mitral repair with the primary end-point of change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) at one year and multiple clinical and echocardiographic secondary endpoints. Although their results were against repairing the mitral valve, the debate on surgical management of moderate IMR remains unsettled. PMID:26779511

  2. Cranial anatomy and detection of ischemic stroke in the cat by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Buonanno, F.S.; Pykett, I.L.; Kistler, J.P.; Vielma, J.; Brady, T.J.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Goldman, M.R.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-04-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of cat heads were obtained using a small, experimental imaging system. As a prelude to the study of experimental ischemic brain infarction, the normal cat head was imaged for identification of anatomical features. Images of one cat which had undergone ligation of the middle cerebral artery three weeks previously showed brain changes associated with chronic ischemic stroke and compared favorably with findings on computed tomography (CT). The NMR images have millimetric spatial resolution. NMR parameters inherent in the tissues provide intensity variations and are sufficiently sensitive to yield contrast resolution surpassing that of CT.

  3. Gender differences in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Corea, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Alberti, Andrea; Lanari, Alessia; Micheli, Sara; Bertolani, Luca; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Billeci, Antonia M R; Comi, Giancarlo; Previdi, Paolo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women than men owing to the fact that women have more stroke events and are less likely to recover. Age-specific stroke rates are higher in men; however, because of women's longer life expectancy and the much higher incidence of stroke at older ages, women have more stroke events than men overall. The aims of this prospective study in consecutive patients were to assess whether there are gender differences in stroke risk factors, treatment or outcome. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were included in this prospective study at four study centers. Disability was assessed using a modified Rankin Scale score (>or=3 indicating disabling stroke) in both genders at 90 days. Outcomes and risk factors in both genders were compared using the chi(2) test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify any independent predictors of outcome. A total of 1136 patients were included in this study; of these, 494 (46%) were female. Women were statistically older compared with men: 76.02 (+/- 12.93) and 72.68 (+/- 13.27) median years of age, respectively. At admission, females had higher NIH Stroke Scale scores compared with males (9.4 [+/- 6.94] vs 7.6 [+/- 6.28] for men; p = 0.0018). Furthermore, females tended to have more cardioembolic strokes (153 [30%] vs 147 [23%] for men; p = 0.004). Males had lacunar and atherosclerotic strokes more often (146 [29%] vs 249 [39%] for men; p = 0.002, and 68 [13%] vs 123 [19%] for men; p = 0.01, respectively). The mean modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months was also significantly different between genders, at 2.5 (+/- 2.05) for women and 2.1 (+/- 2.02) for men (p = 0.003). However, at multivariate analysis, female gender was not an indicator for negative outcome. It was concluded that female gender was not an independent factor for negative outcome. In addition, both genders demonstrated different stroke pathophysiologies. These findings should be taken into account when diagnostic workup and

  4. Shared genetic contribution to ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Adib‐Samii, Poneh; Harold, Denise; Dichgans, Martin; Williams, Julie; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Fornage, Myriam; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sharma, Pankaj; Bis, Joshua C; Psaty, Bruce M; Seshadri, Sudha; Nalls, Mike A; Devan, William J; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Malik, Rainer; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Ikram, M Arfan; Clarke, Robert; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Kilarski, Laura L; Walters, Matthew; Thijs, Vincent; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lambert, Jean‐Charles; Ibrahim‐Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier‐Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton‐Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao‐Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie‐Thçrèse; Choi, Seung‐Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiçvet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger‐Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George‐Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez‐Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Del Zompo, Maria; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton‐Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li‐San; Dartigues, Jean‐François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak‐Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increasing evidence suggests epidemiological and pathological links between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated the evidence that shared genetic factors underpin the two diseases. Methods Using genome‐wide association study (GWAS) data from METASTROKE + (15,916 IS cases and 68,826 controls) and the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP; 17,008 AD cases and 37,154 controls), we evaluated known associations with AD and IS. On the subset of data for which we could obtain compatible genotype‐level data (4,610 IS cases, 1,281 AD cases, and 14,320 controls), we estimated the genome‐wide genetic correlation (rG) between AD and IS, and the three subtypes (cardioembolic, small vessel, and large vessel), using genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. We then performed a meta‐analysis and pathway analysis in the combined AD and small vessel stroke data sets to identify the SNPs and molecular pathways through which disease risk may be conferred. Results We found evidence of a shared genetic contribution between AD and small vessel stroke (rG [standard error] = 0.37 [0.17]; p = 0.011). Conversely, there was no evidence to support shared genetic factors in AD and IS overall or with the other stroke subtypes. Of the known GWAS associations with IS or AD, none reached significance for association with the other trait (or stroke subtypes). A meta‐analysis of AD IGAP and METASTROKE + small vessel stroke GWAS data highlighted a region (ATP5H/KCTD2/ICT1) associated with both diseases (p = 1.8 × 10−8). A pathway analysis identified four associated pathways involving cholesterol transport and immune response. Interpretation Our findings indicate shared genetic susceptibility to AD and small vessel stroke and highlight potential causal pathways and loci. Ann Neurol 2016;79:739–747 PMID:26913989

  5. Machine Perfusion Enhances Hepatocyte Isolation Yields From Ischemic Livers

    PubMed Central

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Perk, Sinem; Calhoun, Candice; Uygun, Korkut; Yarmush, Martin L.; Berthiaume, François

    2015-01-01

    Background High-quality human hepatocytes form the basis of drug safety and efficacy tests, cell-based therapies, and bridge-to-transplantation devices. Presently the only supply of cells derives from an inadequate pool of suboptimal disqualified donor livers. Here we evaluated whether machine perfusion could ameliorate ischemic injury that many of these livers experience prior to hepatocyte isolation. Methods Non-heparinized female Lewis rat livers were exposed to an hour of warm ischemia (34°C) and then perfused for 3 hours. Five different perfusion conditions that utilized the cell isolation apparatus were investigated, namely: (1) modified Williams Medium E and (2) Lifor, both with active oxygenation (95%O2/5%CO2), as well as (3) Lifor passively oxygenated with ambient air (21%O2/0.04%CO2), all at ambient temperatures (20±2°C). At hypothermic temperatures (5±1°C) and under passive oxygenation were (4) University of Wisconsin solution (UW) and (5) Vasosol. Negative and positive control groups comprised livers that had ischemia (WI) and livers that did not (Fresh) prior to cell isolation, respectively. Results Fresh livers yielded 32±9 million cells/g liver while an hour of ischemia reduced the cell yield to 1.6±0.6 million cells/g liver. Oxygenated Williams medium E and Lifor recovered yields of 39±11 and 31±2.3 million cells/g liver, respectively. The passively oxygenated groups produced 15±7 (Lifor), 13±7 (Vasosol), and 10±6 (UW) million cells/g liver. Oxygenated Williams Medium E was most effective at sustaining pH values, avoiding the accumulation of lactate, minimizing edematous weight gain and producing bile during perfusion. Conclusions Machine perfusion results in a dramatic increase in cell yields from livers that have had up to an hour of warm ischemia, but perfusate choice significantly impacts the extent of recovery. Oxygenated Williams Medium E at room temperature is superior to Lifor, UW and Vasosol, largely facilitated by its high

  6. Effects of Momordica charantia (Bitter Melon) on Ischemic Diabetic Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Czompa, Attila; Gyongyosi, Alexandra; Szoke, Kitti; Bak, Istvan; Csepanyi, Evelin; Haines, David D; Tosaki, Arpad; Lekli, Istvan

    2017-03-20

    and ZO BM-treated, versus Lean rats of total cholesterol (high density lipoprotein HDL-c + low density lipoprotein LDL-c), with an inferred increase in HDL-c/LDL-c ratio-an outcome associated with decreased risk of atherosclerotic disease. Conclusions: BM extract failed to positively affect T2DM- and cardiovascular-related outcomes at a level suggesting use as a standalone treatment. Nevertheless, the encouraging effects of BM in enhancement of cardiac function, suppression of post-ischemic/reperfused infarct size extent and capacity to modulate serum cholesterol, will likely make it useful as an adjuvant therapy for the management of T2DM and related cardiovascular diseases.

  7. IV thrombolysis in very severe and severe ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Kennedy R.; Collas, David; Rand, Viiu-Marika; Mikulik, Robert; Toni, Danilo; Wahlgren, Nils; Ahmed, Niaz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the safety of off-label IV thrombolysis in patients with very severe stroke (NIH Stroke Scale [NIHSS] scores >25) compared with severe stroke (NIHSS scores 15–25), where treatment is within European regulations. Methods: Data were analyzed from 57,247 patients with acute ischemic stroke receiving IV tissue plasminogen activator in 793 hospitals participating in the Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke (SITS) International Stroke Thrombolysis Registry (2002–2013). Eight hundred sixty-eight patients (1.5%) had NIHSS scores >25 and 19,995 (34.9%) had NIHSS scores 15–25. Outcome measures were parenchymal hemorrhage, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, mortality, and functional outcome. Results: Parenchymal hemorrhage occurred in 10.7% vs 11.0% (p = 0.79), symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage per SITS-MOST (SITS–Monitoring Study) in 1.4% vs 2.5% (p = 0.052), death at 3 months in 50.4% vs 26.9% (p < 0.001), and functional independence at 3 months in 14.0% vs 29.0% (p < 0.001) of patients with NIHSS scores >25 and NIHSS scores 15–25, respectively. Multivariate adjustment did not change findings from univariate comparisons. Posterior circulation stroke was more common in patients with NIHSS scores >25 (36.2% vs 7.4%, p < 0.001), who were also more often obtunded or comatose on presentation (58.4% vs 7.1%, p < 0.001). Of patients with NIHSS scores >25, 26.2% were treated >3 hours from symptom onset vs 14.5% with NIHSS scores of 15–25. Conclusions: Our data show no excess risk of cerebral hemorrhage in patients with NIHSS score >25 compared to score 15–25, suggesting that the European contraindication to IV tissue plasminogen activator treatment at NIHSS levels >25 may be unwarranted. Increased mortality and lower rates of functional independence in patients with NIHSS score >25 are explained by higher stroke severity, impaired consciousness on presentation due to posterior circulation ischemia, and longer treatment delays. PMID

  8. Ischemic Colitis after Cardiac Surgery: Can We Foresee the Threat?

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Rawa; Farag, Mina; Zaradzki, Marcin; Reissfelder, Christoph; Pianka, Frank; Bruckner, Thomas; Kremer, Jamila; Franz, Maximilian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Szabo, Gabor; Beller, Carsten J.; Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ischemic colitis (IC) remains a great threat after cardiac surgery with use of extracorporeal circulation. We aimed to identify predictive risk factors and influence of early catecholamine therapy for this disease. Methods We prospectively collected and analyzed data of 224 patients, who underwent laparotomy due to IC after initial cardiac surgery with use of extracorporeal circulation during 2002 and 2014. For further comparability 58 patients were identified, who underwent bypass surgery, aortic valve replacement or combination of both. Age ±5 years, sex, BMI ± 5, left ventricular function, peripheral arterial disease, diabetes and urgency status were used for match-pair analysis (1:1) to compare outcome and detect predictive risk factors. Highest catecholamine doses during 1 POD were compared for possible predictive potential. Results Patients’ baseline characteristics showed no significant differences. In-hospital mortality of the IC group with a mean age of 71 years (14% female) was significantly higher than the control group with a mean age of 70 (14% female) (67% vs. 16%, p<0.001). Despite significantly longer bypass time in the IC group (133 ± 68 vs. 101 ± 42, p = 0.003), cross-clamp time remained comparable (64 ± 33 vs. 56 ± 25 p = 0.150). The majority of the IC group suffered low-output syndrome (71% vs. 14%, p<0.001) leading to significant higher lactate values within first 24h after operation (55 ± 46 mg/dl vs. 31 ± 30 mg/dl, p = 0.002). Logistic regression revealed elevated lactate values to be significant predictor for colectomy during the postoperative course (HR 1.008, CI 95% 1.003–1.014, p = 0.003). However, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve calculates a cut-off value for lactate of 22.5 mg/dl (sensitivity 73% and specificity 57%). Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed low-output syndrome (HR 4.301, CI 95% 2.108–8.776, p<0.001) and vasopressin therapy (HR 1.108, CI 95% 1.012–1.213, p = 0.027) significantly

  9. Incide