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Sample records for islet damage induced

  1. Reg3α Overexpression Protects Pancreatic β Cells from Cytokine-Induced Damage and Improves Islet Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Xu, Yuemei; Shuai, Xuanyu; Shi, Xuhui; Chen, Xiang; Huang, Wenbin; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Zhang, Zhihong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    The process of islet transplantation for treating type 1 diabetes has been limited by the high level of graft failure. This may be overcome by locally delivering trophic factors to enhance engraftment. Regenerating islet-derived protein 3α (Reg3α) is a pancreatic secretory protein which functions as an antimicrobial peptide in control of inflammation and cell proliferation. In this study, to investigate whether Reg3α could improve islet engraftment, a marginal mass of syngeneic islets pretransduced with adenoviruses expressing Reg3α or control EGFP were transplanted under the renal capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Mice receiving islets with elevated Reg3α production exhibited significantly lower blood glucose levels (9.057 ± 0.59 mmol/L versus 13.48 ± 0.35 mmol/L, P < 0.05) and improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (1.80 ± 0.17 ng/mL versus 1.16 ± 0.16 ng/mL, P < 0.05) compared with the control group. The decline of apoptotic events (0.57% ± 0.15% versus 1.06% ± 0.07%, P < 0.05) and increased β-cell proliferation (0.70% ± 0.10% versus 0.36% ± 0.14%, P < 0.05) were confirmed in islet grafts overexpressing Reg3α by morphometric analysis. Further experiments showed that Reg3α production dramatically protected cultured islets and pancreatic β cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis and the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Moreover, exposure to cytokines led to the activation of MAPKs in pancreatic β cells, which was reversed by Reg3α overexpression in contrast to control group. These results strongly suggest that Reg3α could enhance islet engraftments through its cytoprotective effect and advance the therapeutic efficacy of islet transplantation. PMID:25826674

  2. Mechanism of Inhibition of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide-Induced Membrane Damage by a Small Organic Fluorogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxu; Wan, Mingwei; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-02-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is believed to be responsible for the death of insulin-producing β-cells. However, the mechanism of membrane damage at the molecular level has not been fully elucidated. In this article, we employ coarse- grained dissipative particle dynamics simulations to study the interactions between a lipid bilayer membrane composed of 70% zwitterionic lipids and 30% anionic lipids and hIAPPs with α-helical structures. We demonstrated that the key factor controlling pore formation is the combination of peptide charge-induced electroporation and peptide hydrophobicity-induced lipid disordering and membrane thinning. According to these mechanisms, we suggest that a water-miscible tetraphenylethene BSPOTPE is a potent inhibitor to rescue hIAPP-induced cytotoxicity. Our simulations predict that BSPOTPE molecules can bind directly to the helical regions of hIAPP and form oligomers with separated hydrophobic cores and hydrophilic shells. The micelle-like hIAPP-BSPOTPE clusters tend to be retained in the water/membrane interface and aggregate therein rather than penetrate into the membrane. Electrostatic attraction between BSPOTPE and hIAPP also reduces the extent of hIAPP binding to the anionic lipid bilayer. These two modes work together and efficiently prevent membrane poration.

  3. Possible involvement of iNOS and TNF-α in nutritional intervention against nicotine-induced pancreatic islet cell damage.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ankita; Prasad, Shilpi Kumari; Pal, Swagata; Maji, Bithin; Banerjee, Arnab; Das, Debasmita; Bose, Ananya; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Mukherjee, Sandip

    2016-12-01

    Nicotine is the more abundant and most significant components of cigarette smoke. Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests an association between cigarette smoking and pancreatic injury. Although effects of smoking on endocrine pancreas are still controversial Here, we examined the impact and underlying mechanisms of action of folic acid and vitamin B12 on nicotine induced damage in pancreatic islets of rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with nicotine (3mg/kg body weight/day, intraperitonealy) with or without folic acid (36μg/kg body weight/day, orally) and vitamin B12 (0.63μg/kg body weight/day, orally) for 21days. Supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B12 suppressed the nicotine induced changes in HbA1c, insulin, TNF-α, IL-6, generation of reactive oxygen species, and attenuated the changes in markers of oxidative stress. Moreover, folic acid and vitamin B12 also counteracted the increased expression of protein and mRNA contents of TNF-α and iNOS produced by nicotine. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination limits the nicotine induced changes in cell cycle and excessive apoptosis of the pancreatic β-cells and also successfully blunted the nicotine induced alteration in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, data demonstrate that folic acid and vitamin B12 may be possible nutritional intervention against cellular oxidative stress, which is a critical step in nicotine-mediated islet injury, and improves islet cell functional status by scavenging free radicals and by inhibiting the generation of pro-inflammatory mediators.

  4. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

    PubMed

    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer.

  5. TCF2 attenuates FFA-induced damage in islet β-cells by regulating production of insulin and ROS.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yingna; Liang, Chunlian

    2014-07-30

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are cytotoxic to pancreatic islet β-cells and play a crucial role in the diabetes disease process. A recent study revealed a down-regulation of transcription factor 2 (TCF2) levels during FFA-mediated cytotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells. However, its function during this process and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, treatment with palmitic acid (PA) at high levels (400 and 800 μM) decreased β-cell viability and TCF2 protein expression, along with the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Western and RT-PCR analysis confirmed the positive regulatory effect of TCF2 on GSIS through promotion of the key regulators pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) in β-cells. In addition, both PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK showed decreased expression in PA (800 μM)-treated β-cells. Overexpression of TCF2 could effectively restore the inhibitory effect of PA on the activation of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK as well as β-cell viability, simultaneously, inhibited PA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. After blocking the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK signals with their specific inhibitor, the effect of overexpressed TCF2 on β-cell viability and ROS production was obviously attenuated. Furthermore, a protective effect of TCF2 on GSIS by positive modulation of JNK-PDX1/GLUT2 signaling was also confirmed. Accordingly, our study has confirmed that TCF2 positively modulates insulin secretion and further inhibits ROS generation via the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Our work may provide a new therapeutic target to achieve prevention and treatment of diabetes.

  6. Leptin- or troglitazone-induced lipopenia protects islets from interleukin 1beta cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Shimabukuro, M; Koyama, K; Lee, Y; Unger, R H

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta)-induced beta cell cytotoxicity has been implicated in the autoimmune cytotoxicity of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. These cytotoxic effects may be mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Since long-chain fatty acids (FFA), like IL-1beta, upregulate inducible nitric oxide synthase and enhance NO generation in islets, it seemed possible that islets might be protected from IL-1beta-induced damage by lowering their lipid content. We found that IL-1beta-induced NO production varied directly and islet cell viability inversely with islet triglyceride (TG) content. Fat-laden islets of obese rats were most vulnerable to IL-1beta, while moderately fat-depleted islets of food-restricted normal rats were less vulnerable than those of free-feeding normal rats. Severely lipopenic islets of rats made chronically hyperleptinemic by adenoviral leptin gene transfer resisted IL-1beta cytotoxicity even at 300 pg/ml, the maximal concentration. Troglitazone lowered islet TG in cultured islets from both normal rats and obese, leptin-resistant rats and reduced NO production and enhanced cell survival. We conclude that measures that lower islet TG content protect against IL-1beta-induced NO production and cytotoxicity. Leptin or troglitazone could provide in vivo protection against insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:9312173

  7. Expression of Innate Immunity Genes and Damage of Primary Human Pancreatic Islets by Epidemic Strains of Echovirus: Implication for Post-Virus Islet Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiento, Luis; Frisk, Gun; Anagandula, Mahesh; Cabrera-Rode, Eduardo; Roivainen, Merja; Cilio, Corrado M.

    2013-01-01

    Three large-scale Echovirus (E) epidemics (E4,E16,E30), each differently associated to the acute development of diabetes related autoantibodies, have been documented in Cuba. The prevalence of islet cell autoantibodies was moderate during the E4 epidemic but high in the E16 and E30 epidemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of epidemic strains of echovirus on beta-cell lysis, beta-cell function and innate immunity gene expression in primary human pancreatic islets. Human islets from non-diabetic donors (n = 7) were infected with the virus strains E4, E16 and E30, all isolated from patients with aseptic meningitis who seroconverted to islet cell antibody positivity. Viral replication, degree of cytolysis, insulin release in response to high glucose as well as mRNA expression of innate immunity genes (IFN-b, RANTES, RIG-I, MDA5, TLR3 and OAS) were measured. The strains of E16 and E30 did replicate well in all islets examined, resulting in marked cytotoxic effects. E4 did not cause any effects on cell lysis, however it was able to replicate in 2 out of 7 islet donors. Beta-cell function was hampered in all infected islets (P<0.05); however the effect of E16 and E30 on insulin secretion appeared to be higher than the strain of E4. TLR3 and IFN-beta mRNA expression increased significantly following infection with E16 and E30 (P<0.033 and P<0.039 respectively). In contrast, the expression of none of the innate immunity genes studied was altered in E4-infected islets. These findings suggest that the extent of the epidemic-associated islet autoimmunity may depend on the ability of the viral strains to damage islet cells and induce pro-inflammatory innate immune responses within the infected islets. PMID:24223733

  8. Pancreatic islet-specific overexpression of Reg3β protein induced the expression of pro-islet genes and protected the mice against streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoquan; Wang, Xiao; Li, Bing; Chowdhury, Subrata; Lu, Yarong; Srikant, Coimbatore B; Ning, Guang; Liu, Jun-Li

    2011-04-01

    Reg family proteins have been implicated in islet β-cell proliferation, survival, and regeneration. The expression of Reg3β (pancreatitis-associated protein) is highly induced in experimental diabetes and acute pancreatitis, but its precise role has not been established. Through knockout studies, this protein was shown to be mitogenic, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory in the liver and pancreatic acinars. To test whether it can promote islet cell growth or survival against experimental damage, we developed β-cell-specific overexpression using rat insulin I promoter, evaluated the changes in normal islet function, gene expression profile, and the response to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Significant and specific overexpression of Reg3β was achieved in the pancreatic islets of RIP-I/Reg3β mice, which exhibited normal islet histology, β-cell mass, and in vivo and in vitro insulin secretion in response to high glucose yet were slightly hyperglycemic and low in islet GLUT2 level. Upon streptozotocin treatment, in contrast to wild-type littermates that became hyperglycemic in 3 days and lost 15% of their weight, RIP-I/Reg3β mice were significantly protected from hyperglycemia and weight loss. To identify specific targets affected by Reg3β overexpression, a whole genome DNA microarray on islet RNA isolated from the transgenic mice revealed more than 45 genes significantly either up- or downregulated. Among them, islet-protective osteopontin/SPP1 and acute responsive nuclear protein p8/NUPR1 were significantly induced, a result further confirmed by real-time PCR, Western blots, and immunohistochemistry. Our results suggest that Reg3β is unlikely an islet growth factor but a putative protector that prevents streptozotocin-induced damage by inducing the expression of specific genes.

  9. Assessment of benzene induced oxidative impairment in rat isolated pancreatic islets and effect on insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Benzene (C6H6) is an organic compound used in petrochemicals and numerous other industries. It is abundantly released to our environment as a chemical pollutant causing widespread human exposure. This study mainly focused on benzene induced toxicity on rat pancreatic islets with respect to oxidative damage, insulin secretion and glucokinase (GK) activity. Benzene was dissolved in corn oil and administered orally at doses 200, 400 and 800mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. In rats, benzene significantly raised the concentration of plasma insulin. Also the effect of benzene on the release of glucose-induced insulin was pronounced in isolated islets. Benzene caused oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, and also reduced the cell viability and total thiols groups, in the islets of exposed rats. In conclusion, the current study revealed that pancreatic glucose metabolism is susceptible to benzene toxicity and the resultant oxidative stress could lead to functional abnormalities in the pancreas.

  10. The effects of oral carvacrol treatment against H2O2 induced injury on isolated pancreas islet cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Dagli Gul, Asli San; Fadillioglu, Ersin; Karabulut, Ismail; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is an alternative treatment of insulin replacement therapy in diabetes mellitus, but the islets are exposed to many chemical, mechanical damages, and oxidative stress before transplantation. Carvacrol is a well-known essential oil for its antioxidant, antimicrobial, antifungal and antiinflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of carvacrol against H 2O 2 induced cellular injury on isolated pancreas islets. After carvacrol (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg/day) treatment, the pancreas islets were isolated by enzyme digestion. The isolated islets were incubated within 0, 150 and 300 µM H 2O 2 containing medium at +4°C for 15 min. Then, the islets were examined with fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide mixture stains for viability. A number of islets were stored for lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA fragmentation analysis. The cell viability ratio of Carvacrol 20 mg/kg/day group was increased in comparison to control and vehicle (DMSO) groups. Additionally, carvacrol application protected the cells from lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation induced by H 2O 2. H 2O 2 caused tissue injury and DNA fragmentation. There was only one DNA fragmentation band from islet cells of 20 mg/kg/day carvacrol treated group, however there were more than one bands from control and DMSO groups. In conclusion, carvacrol treatment ameliorates islet cell injury induced by H 2O 2. However, the dose of carvacrol is important and our results suggest that 20 mg/kg/day dose is more effective than doses of 40 or 80 mg/kg/day.

  11. Vitexin alleviates lipopolysaccharide-induced islet cell injury by inhibiting HMGB1 release

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feifei; Yin, Jiajing; Ma, Yujin; Jiang, Hongwei; Li, Yanbo

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disease, where the predominant pathogenesis is pancreatic β-cells dysfunction or injury. It has been well established that inflammation leads to a gradual exhaustion of pancreatic β-cell function with decreased β-cell mass likely resulting from pancreatic β-cells apoptosis or death. Vitexin, a major bioactive flavonoid compound in plants has numerous pharmacological properties, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimyeloperoxidase. Whether vitexin can protect pancreatic β-cells against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and apoptosis has received little attention. The present study investigated the potential effects of vitexin on LPS-induced pancreatic β-cell injury and apoptosis. It was revealed that apoptosis and damage induced by LPS in islet tissue of rats and INS-1 cells was significantly decreased in response to vitexin treatment. In addition, pretreatment with vitexin decreased the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in LPS-induced rats. Further experiments demonstrated that vitexin pretreatment suppressed the activation of P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in LPS-induced INS-1 cells. In conclusion, the results indicated that vitexin prevented LPS-induced islet tissue damage in rats, and INS-1 cells injury and apoptosis by inhibiting HMGB1 release. Therefore, the present study provided clear evidence indicating that vitexin may be a viable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DM. PMID:28098903

  12. The Spleen Is an Ideal Site for Inducing Transplanted Islet Graft Expansion in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Shohta

    2017-01-01

    Alternative islet transplantation sites have the potential to reduce the marginal number of islets required to ameliorate hyperglycemia in recipients with diabetes. Previously, we reported that T cell leukemia homeobox 1 (Tlx1)+ stem cells in the spleen effectively regenerated into insulin-producing cells in the pancreas of non-obese diabetic mice with end-stage disease. Thus, we investigated the spleen as a potential alternative islet transplantation site. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice received syngeneic islets into the portal vein (PV), beneath the kidney capsule (KC), or into the spleen (SP). The marginal number of islets by PV, KC, or SP was 200, 100, and 50, respectively. Some plasma inflammatory cytokine levels in the SP group were significantly lower than those of the PV group after receiving a marginal number of islets, indicating reduced inflammation in the SP group. Insulin contents were increased 280 days after islet transplantation compared with those immediately following transplantation (p<0.05). Additionally, Tlx1-related genes, including Rrm2b and Pla2g2d, were up-regulated, which indicates that islet grafts expanded in the spleen. The spleen is an ideal candidate for an alternative islet transplantation site because of the resulting reduced inflammation and expansion of the islet graft. PMID:28135283

  13. Pregnancy restores insulin secretion from pancreatic islets in cafeteria diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Vanzela, E C; Ribeiro, R A; de Oliveira, C A Machado; Rodrigues, F B; Bonfleur, M L; Carneiro, E M; Souza, K L A; Boschero, A C

    2010-02-01

    Insulin resistance during pregnancy is counteracted by enhanced insulin secretion. This condition is aggravated by obesity, which increases the risk of gestational diabetes. Therefore, pancreatic islet functionality was investigated in control nonpregnant (C) and pregnant (CP), and cafeteria diet-fed nonpregnant (Caf), and pregnant (CafP) obese rats. Isolated islets were used for measurements of insulin secretion (RIA), NAD(P)H production (MTS), glucose oxidation ((14)CO(2) production), intracellular Ca(2+) levels (fura-2 AM), and gene expression (real-time PCR). Impaired glucose tolerance was clearly established in Caf and CafP rats at the 14th wk on a diet. Insulin secretion induced by direct depolarizing agents such as KCl and tolbutamide and increasing concentrations of glucose was significantly reduced in Caf, compared with C islets. This reduction was not observed in islets from CP and CafP rats. Accordingly, the glucose oxidation and production of reduced equivalents were increased in CafP islets. The glucose-induced Ca(2+) increase was significantly lower in Caf and higher in CafP, compared with all other groups. CP and CafP islets demonstrated an increased Ca(2+) oscillation frequency, compared with both C and Caf islets, and the amplitude of oscillations was augmented in CafP, compared with Caf islets. In addition, Ca(v)alpha1.2 and SERCA2a mRNA levels were reduced in Caf islets. Ca(v)alpha1.2, but not SERCA2a, mRNA was normalized in CafP islets. In conclusion, cafeteria diet-induced obesity impairs insulin secretion. This alteration is related to the impairment of Ca(2+) handling in pancreatic islets, in especial Ca(2+) influx, a defect that is reversed during pregnancy allowing normalization of insulin secretion.

  14. Virus-induced alterations in insulin release in hamster islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Rayfield, E J; Seto, Y; Walsh, S; McEvoy, R C

    1981-11-01

    After the inoculation of Golden Syrian hamsters with the TC-83 vaccine strain of Venezuelan encephalitis (VE) virus, a sustained diminution in glucose-stimulated insulin release and glucose intolerance of shorter duration develops. To understand better the mechanism of this defect in insulin release, we examined insulin secretion in response to several test agents in isolated perifused islets from control and 24-d post-VE virus-infected hamsters. 50 islets were used in all perifusion experiments, and data were expressed as total insulin released as well as peak response for each test agent during a 30-min perifusion period from control and VE-infected islets. After perifusion with 20 mM glucose, a 45% diminution of insulin release was noted in VE-infected islets in comparison with control islets, which in turn was similar to in vivo findings. However, following 1-mM tolbutamide stimulation, insulin release was similar in control and VE-infected islets. In separate studies, 1 mM tolbutamide, 10 mM theophilline, 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic (c)AMP, and 1 mM 8-bromo-cAMP resulted in statistically similar insulin-release curves in control and VE-infected islets. Additional experiments assessing [5-3H]glucose use in control and infected islets after 20 min of perifusion with 20 mM glucose revealed virtually identical values (239 +/- 30-control; and 222 +/- 27-VE-infected islets). Morphological and morphometric evaluation of VE-infected islets (21 d following virus inoculation) showed no changes in islet volume density, beta cell density, and beta cell granulation. Thus, VE virus induces a defect in glucose-stimulated insulin release from hamster beta cells that can be corrected by cAMP analogues and does not alter islet glucose use.

  15. Beneficial effect of 17{beta}-estradiol on hyperglycemia and islet {beta}-cell functions in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Zhu Baoting

    2010-11-15

    The modulating effect of estrogen on glucose homeostasis remains a controversial issue at present. In this study, we sought to determine the beneficial effect of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) on hyperglycemia and islet {beta}-cell functions in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.p. with STZ to induce a relatively mild diabetic condition. The rats were then treated with E{sub 2} orally at 500 {mu}g/kg body weight/day for 15 days to evaluate the modulating effect on hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, and islet {beta}-cell proliferation. E{sub 2} administration for 10 days significantly lowered plasma glucose levels, increased plasma insulin levels, and improved glucose tolerance by attenuating insulin response to oral glucose loading. These beneficial effects of E{sub 2} were accompanied by increases in islet number and volume, rate of islet cell proliferation, and the amount of insulin secreted. The growth-stimulatory effect of E{sub 2} on islet cells was linked to the functions of the estrogen receptor {alpha}. Notably, these protective effects of E{sub 2} on diabetic conditions were basically not observed when the STZ-treated rats had a more severe degree of islet damage and hyperglycemia. Taken together, we conclude that E{sub 2} can promote the regeneration of damaged pancreatic islets by stimulating {beta}-cell proliferation in diabetic rats, and this effect is accompanied by improvements in glucose tolerance and a decrease in plasma glucose levels. These findings suggest that oral administration of E{sub 2} may be beneficial in diabetic patients with an accelerated loss of islet {beta}-cells.

  16. Inhibition of instant blood-mediated inflammatory responses by co-immobilization of sCR1 and heparin on islets.

    PubMed

    Luan, Nguyen Minh; Iwata, Hiroo

    2013-07-01

    Intraportal transplantation of islets of Langerhans is followed by marked islet loss, mainly caused by instant blood-mediated inflammatory responses (IBMIR). We previously developed a method of co-immobilizing sCR1 and heparin on islets. Here we examined whether this process could reduce islet loss following intraportal islet transplantation in a syngeneic mouse model. sCR1-heparin islets or unmodified islet controls were transplanted into the livers of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Transplantation of 100 and 125 sCR1-heparin islets normalized blood glucose levels in 8 of 9 (88.9%) and 9 of 9 diabetic mice (100%), respectively, whereas transplantation of 100 and 125 non-treated islets induced normoglycemia in 0 of 9 and 2 of 9 diabetic mice, respectively. Fibrin staining and plasma insulin measurements indicated that, compared to non-treated islets, sCR1-heparin islet transplantation was associated with fewer blood clots around islets, and significantly less insulin leakage from damaged islets at 1 h post-transplantation. Long-term follow-up of the sCR1-heparin islet group showed islet cells in the livers and insulin expression. In conclusion, co-immobilization of sCR1 and heparin on islets could effectively reduce islet damage by IBMIR, and might be useful to enable transplantation with only one donor and one recipient.

  17. Inhibition of TLR4 protects rat islets against lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ge, Qin Min; Bian, Fan; Dong, Yan; Huang, Chun Mei

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress leads to dysfunction in pancreatic cells, causing a reduction in insulin secretion following exposure to glucose. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) may be activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stress. TLR4 may mediate the initiation of inflammatory and immune defense responses; however, the importance of the LPS/TLR4 interaction in apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in pancreatic β cells remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the importance of TLR4 during LPS‑induced oxidative stress, apoptosis and dysfunction of insulin secretion in isolated islets of rats. LPS‑induced stimulation of TLR4 increased the production of reactive oxygen species and promoted apoptosis by upregulating the expression levels of caspase‑3, poly ADP ribose polymerase and altering the expression ratio of B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2)/Bcl‑2 associated X protein. Additionally, the insulin secretion of islets cells was reduced. Anti‑TLR4 antibody and a knockdown of TLR4 by TLR4‑short hairpin RNA were used to inhibit TLR4 activity, which may reverse LPS‑induced events. The present study determined that in islets exposed to LPS oxidative stress, dysfunction may be partly mediated via the TLR4 pathway. Inhibition of TLR4 may prevent dysfunction of rat islets due to oxidative stress. The present study revealed that targeting the LPS/TLR4 signaling pathway and antioxidant therapy may be a novel treatment for the severely septic patients with hyperglycemia stress.

  18. Par-4/NF-κB Mediates the Apoptosis of Islet β Cells Induced by Glucolipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    QiNan, Wu; XiaGuang, Gan; XiaoTian, Lei; WuQuan, Deng; Ling, Zhang; Bing, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis of islet β cells is a primary pathogenic feature of type 2 diabetes, and ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play important roles in this process. Previous research has shown that prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4)/NF-κB induces cancer cell apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the mechanism by which Par-4/NF-κB induces islet β cell apoptosis remains unknown. We used a high glucose/palmitate intervention to mimic type 2 diabetes in vitro. We demonstrated that the high glucose/palmitate intervention induced the expression and secretion of Par-4. It also causes increased expression and activation of NF-κB, which induced NIT-1 cell apoptosis and dysfunction. Overexpression of Par-4 potentiates these effects, whereas downregulation of Par-4 attenuates them. Inhibition of NF-κB inhibited the Par-4-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, these effects occurred through the ER stress cell membrane and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Our findings reveal a novel role for Par-4/NF-κB in islet β cell apoptosis and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27340675

  19. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  20. The TrxG Complex Mediates Cytokine Induced De Novo Enhancer Formation in Islets

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Peter; Dhillon, Jasmine; Gill, Amol; Whiting, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    To better understand how β-cells respond to proinflammatory cytokines we mapped the locations of histone 3 lysine 4 monomethylation (H3K4me1), a post-translational histone modification enriched at active and poised cis-regulatory regions, in IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα treated pancreatic islets. We identified 96,721 putative cis-regulatory loci, of which 3,590 were generated de novo, 3,204 had increased H3K4me1, and 5,354 had decreased H3K4me1 in IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα exposed islets. Roughly 10% of the de novo and increased regions were enriched for the repressive histone modification histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in untreated cells, and these were frequently associated with chemokine genes. We show that IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα exposure overcomes this repression and induces chemokine gene activation in as little as three hours, and that this expression persists for days in absence of continued IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα exposure. We implicate trithorax group (TrxG) complexes as likely players in the conversion of these repressed loci to an active state. To block the activity of these complexes, we suppressed Wdr5, a core component of the TrxG complexes, and used the H3K27me3 demethylase inhibitor GSK-J4. We show that GSK-J4 is particularly effective in blunting IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα-induced chemokine gene expression in β-cells; however, it induced significant islet-cell apoptosis and β-cell dysfunction. Wdr5 suppression also reduced IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα induced chemokine gene expression in β-cells without affecting islet-cell survival or β-cell function after 48hrs, but did begin to increase islet-cell apoptosis and β-cell dysfunction after four days of treatment. Taken together these data suggest that the TrxG complex is potentially a viable target for preventing cytokine induced chemokine gene expression in β-cells. PMID:26505193

  1. Proteasome Dysfunction Mediates High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Rodent Beta Cells and Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Broca, Christophe; Varin, Elodie; Armanet, Mathieu; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Bosco, Domenico; Dalle, Stéphane; Wojtusciszyn, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS), a major cellular protein degradation machinery, plays key roles in the regulation of many cell functions. Glucotoxicity mediated by chronic hyperglycaemia is detrimental to the function and survival of pancreatic beta cells. The aim of our study was to determine whether proteasome dysfunction could be involved in beta cell apoptosis in glucotoxic conditions, and to evaluate whether such a dysfunction might be pharmacologically corrected. Therefore, UPS activity was measured in GK rats islets, INS-1E beta cells or human islets after high glucose and/or UPS inhibitor exposure. Immunoblotting was used to quantify polyubiquitinated proteins, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through CHOP expression, and apoptosis through the cleavage of PARP and caspase-3, whereas total cell death was detected through histone-associated DNA fragments measurement. In vitro, we found that chronic exposure of INS-1E cells to high glucose concentrations significantly decreases the three proteasome activities by 20% and leads to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. We showed that pharmacological blockade of UPS activity by 20% leads to apoptosis in a same way. Indeed, ER stress was involved in both conditions. These results were confirmed in human islets, and proteasome activities were also decreased in hyperglycemic GK rats islets. Moreover, we observed that a high glucose treatment hypersensitized beta cells to the apoptotic effect of proteasome inhibitors. Noteworthily, the decreased proteasome activity can be corrected with Exendin-4, which also protected against glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings reveal an important role of proteasome activity in high glucose-induced beta cell apoptosis, potentially linking ER stress and glucotoxicity. These proteasome dysfunctions can be reversed by a GLP-1 analog. Thus, UPS may be a potent target to treat deleterious metabolic conditions leading to type 2 diabetes. PMID:24642635

  2. Pancreatic Islets Engineered with SA-FasL Protein Establish Robust Localized Tolerance by Inducing T Regulatory Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yolcu, Esma S; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Lacelle, Chantale; Woodward, Kyle B; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic islet transplantation is an important therapeutic approach for the treatment of T1D. Clinical application of this approach, however, is severely curtailed by allograft rejection primarily initiated by pathogenic T effector cells regardless of chronic use of immunosuppression. Given the role of Fas-mediated signaling in regulating T effector cell responses, we tested if pancreatic islets can be engineered ex vivo to display on their surface an apoptotic form of FasL protein chimeric with streptavidin (SA-FasL), and whether such engineered islets induce tolerance in allogeneic hosts. Islets were modified with biotin following efficient engineering with SA-FasL protein that persisted on the surface of islets for over a week in vitro. SA-FasL-engineered islet grafts established euglycemia in chemically diabetic syngeneic mice indefinitely, demonstrating functionality and lack of acute toxicity. Most importantly, the transplantation of SA-FasL-engineered BALB/c islet grafts in conjunction with a short course of rapamycin treatment resulted in robust localized tolerance in 100% C57BL/6 recipients. Tolerance was initiated and maintained by CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells as their depletion early during tolerance induction or late after established tolerance resulted in prompt graft rejection. Furthermore, Treg cells sorted from graft-draining lymph nodes, but not spleen, of long-term graft recipients prevented the rejection of unmodified allogeneic islets in an adoptive transfer model, further confirming the Treg role in established tolerance. Engineering islets ex vivo in a rapid and efficient manner to display on their surface immunomodulatory proteins represents a novel, safe, and clinically applicable approach with important implications for the treatment of T1D. PMID:22068235

  3. Pancreatic islets engineered with SA-FasL protein establish robust localized tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Esma S; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Lacelle, Chantale; Woodward, Kyle B; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2011-12-01

    Allogeneic islet transplantation is an important therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Clinical application of this approach, however, is severely curtailed by allograft rejection primarily initiated by pathogenic effector T cells regardless of chronic use of immunosuppression. Given the role of Fas-mediated signaling in regulating effector T cell responses, we tested if pancreatic islets can be engineered ex vivo to display on their surface an apoptotic form of Fas ligand protein chimeric with streptavidin (SA-FasL) and whether such engineered islets induce tolerance in allogeneic hosts. Islets were modified with biotin following efficient engineering with SA-FasL protein that persisted on the surface of islets for >1 wk in vitro. SA-FasL-engineered islet grafts established euglycemia in chemically diabetic syngeneic mice indefinitely, demonstrating functionality and lack of acute toxicity. Most importantly, the transplantation of SA-FasL-engineered BALB/c islet grafts in conjunction with a short course of rapamycin treatment resulted in robust localized tolerance in 100% of C57BL/6 recipients. Tolerance was initiated and maintained by CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, as their depletion early during tolerance induction or late after established tolerance resulted in prompt graft rejection. Furthermore, Treg cells sorted from graft-draining lymph nodes, but not spleen, of long-term graft recipients prevented the rejection of unmodified allogeneic islets in an adoptive transfer model, further confirming the Treg role in established tolerance. Engineering islets ex vivo in a rapid and efficient manner to display on their surface immunomodulatory proteins represents a novel, safe, and clinically applicable approach with important implications for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

  4. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanak, Mazhar A.; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Levy, Marlon F.

    2014-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation. PMID:24883060

  5. Nigella sativa seed extracts enhance glucose-induced insulin release from rat-isolated Langerhans islets.

    PubMed

    Rchid, Halima; Chevassus, Hugues; Nmila, Rachid; Guiral, Carine; Petit, Pierre; Chokaïri, Mustapha; Sauvaire, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Nigella sativa L. 'Black cumin' (Ranunculaceae) is one of the plants commonly used in Moroccan folk medicine for treatment of various ailments including diabetes mellitus. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of different N. sativa seed extracts on insulin secretion. Different fractions of the seed were prepared: the defatted fraction (HR II), which was divided into two subfractions: the first (HR III) containing acidic and neutral compounds and the second (HR IV) containing basic compounds. The insulin secretory effects of these extracts were evaluated individually at different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/mL), in vitro in isolated rat pancreatic islets in the presence of 8.3 mmol/L glucose. The results show that addition of the defatted whole extract or of the basic subfraction of the seed in the incubation medium significantly increased glucose-induced insulin release from the islets. In the case of the acidic and neutral subfraction, the stimulatory effect was observed only for the higher concentration (5 mg/mL). However, a clear concentration-dependent increase in insulin release from isolated pancreatic islets was observed for the basic subfraction. Our data show that the antidiabetic properties of N. sativa seeds may be, at least partly, mediated by stimulated insulin release, and that the basic subfraction largely contributes to this stimulatory effect. Further phytochemical studies are underway in order to isolate the pharmacological compound(s) responsible for the insulinotropic effect of N. sativa seeds.

  6. Viral infection induces cytokine release by beta islet cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Baroni, M G; Toto, A; Gearing, A J; Forsey, T; Andreani, D; Thorpe, R; Pozzilli, P

    1992-01-01

    Viral infection has been suggested to play a triggering role in the pancreatic beta cell destruction which occurs in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM). However, the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon is unknown. In this study a human insulinoma cell line has been infected with measles, mumps and rubella viruses since a temporal association is reported between the clinical onset of IDDM and diseases caused by these viruses. The infection with measles and mumps viruses induced the release of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by the cell line as assessed by a bioassay and up-regulated the expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II antigens as evaluated by cytofluorimetric analysis. Stimulation with rubella virus induced the release of IL-6 only and had no effect on HLA antigen expression. These data show for the first time that IL-1 and IL-6 secretion by an insulinoma cell line may occur after viral infection and suggest that cytokine release and increased expression of HLA molecules by beta cells may act to induce the immune response towards beta cells in IDDM. PMID:1592439

  7. Nardostachys jatamansi extract protects against cytokine-induced β-cell damage and streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mi-Young; Bae, Ui-Jin; Lee, Bong-Hee; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Seo, Eun-A; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Min-Sun; Song, Ho-Joon; Kwon, Keun-Sang; Park, Jin-Woo; Ryu, Do-Gon; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-diabetogenic mechanism of Nardostachys jatamansi extract (NJE). METHODS: Mice were injected with streptozotocin via a tail vein to induce diabetes. Rat insulinoma RINm5F cells and isolated rat islets were treated with interleukin-1β and interferon-γ to induce cytotoxicity. RESULTS: Treatment of mice with streptozotocin resulted in hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining of the islets. The diabetogenic effects of streptozotocin were completely abolished when mice were pretreated with NJE. Inhibition of streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia by NJE was mediated by suppression of nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. In addition, NJE protected against cytokine-mediated cytotoxicity. Incubation of RINm5F cells and islets with NJE resulted in a significant reduction in cytokine-induced NF-κB activation and downstream events, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production. The protective effect of NJE was further demonstrated by the normal insulin secretion of cytokine-treated islets in response to glucose. CONCLUSION: NJE provided resistance to pancreatic β-cell damage from cytokine or streptozotocin treatment. The β-cell protective effect of NJE is mediated by suppressing NF-κB activation. PMID:20614480

  8. Adverse effect on syngeneic islet transplantation by transgenic coexpression of decoy receptor 3 and heme oxygenase-1 in the islet of NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, S-H; Lin, G-J; Chien, M-W; Chu, C-H; Yu, J-C; Chen, T-W; Hueng, D-Y; Liu, Y-L; Sytwu, H-K

    2013-03-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) blocks both Fas ligand- and LIGHT-induced pancreatic β-cell damage in autoimmune diabetes. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) possesses antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative effects that protect cells against various forms of attack by the immune system. Previously, we have demonstrated that transgenic islets overexpressing DcR3 or murine HO-1 (mHO-1) exhibit longer survival times than nontransgenic islets in syngeneic islet transplantation. In this study, we evaluated whether DcR3 and mHO-1 double-transgenic islets of NOD mice could provide better protective effects and achieve longer islet graft survival than DcR3 or mHO-1 single-transgenic islets after islet transplantation. We generated DcR3 and mHO-1 double-transgenic NOD mice that specifically overexpress DcR3 and HO-1 in islets. Seven hundred islets isolated from double-transgenic, single-transgenic, or nontransgenic NOD mice were syngeneically transplanted into the kidney capsules of newly diabetic female recipients. Unexpectedly, there was no significant difference in the survival time between double-transgenic or nontransgenic NOD islet grafts, and the survival times of double-transgenic NOD islet grafts were even shorter than those of DcR3 or mHO-1 single-transgenic islets. Our data indicate that transplantation of double-transgenic islets that coexpress HO-1 and DcR3 did not result in a better outcome. On the contrary, this strategy even caused an adverse effect in syngeneic islet transplantation.

  9. Whole organ and islet of Langerhans dosimetry for calculation of absorbed doses resulting from imaging with radiolabeled exendin

    PubMed Central

    van der Kroon, Inge; Woliner-van der Weg, Wietske; Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; Visser, Eric P.; Gotthardt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Radiolabeled exendin is used for non-invasive quantification of beta cells in the islets of Langerhans in vivo. High accumulation of radiolabeled exendin in the islets raised concerns about possible radiation-induced damage to these islets in man. In this work, islet absorbed doses resulting from exendin-imaging were calculated by combining whole organ dosimetry with small scale dosimetry for the islets. Our model contains the tissues with high accumulation of radiolabeled exendin: kidneys, pancreas and islets. As input for the model, data from a clinical study (radiolabeled exendin distribution in the human body) and from a preclinical study with Biobreeding Diabetes Prone (BBDP) rats (islet-to-exocrine uptake ratio, beta cell mass) were used. We simulated 111In-exendin and 68Ga-exendin absorbed doses in patients with differences in gender, islet size, beta cell mass and radiopharmaceutical uptake in the kidneys. In all simulated cases the islet absorbed dose was small, maximum 1.38 mGy for 68Ga and 66.0 mGy for 111In. The two sources mainly contributing to the islet absorbed dose are the kidneys (33–61%) and the islet self-dose (7.5–57%). In conclusion, all islet absorbed doses are low (<70 mGy), so even repeated imaging will hardly increase the risk on diabetes. PMID:28067253

  10. Changes induced by sucrose administration on glucose metabolism in pancreatic islets in normal hamsters.

    PubMed

    Massa, M L; Borelli, M I; Del Zotto, H; Gagliardino, J J

    2001-12-01

    We correlated the changes in glucose-induced insulin secretion with those observed in glucose metabolism and hexokinase/glucokinase activity in islets from normal sucrose-fed hamsters. Blood glucose and insulin levels were measured in normal male hamsters fed with (S5) or without (C5) 10% sucrose in the drinking water for 5 weeks. Isolated islets (collagenase digestion) from both groups of animals were used to study insulin secretion, (14)CO(2) and (3)H(2)O production from D-[U-(14)C]-glucose and D-[5-(3)H]-glucose respectively, with 3.3 or 16.7 mM glucose in the medium, and hexokinase/glucokinase activity (fluorometric assay) in islet homogenates. Whereas S5 and C5 animals had comparable normal blood glucose levels, S5 showed higher insulin levels than C5 hamsters (2.3+/-0.1 vs 0.6+/-0.03 ng/ml, P<0.001). Islets from S5 hamsters released significantly more insulin than C5 islets in the presence of low and high glucose (3.3 mM glucose: 0.77+/-0.04 vs 0.20+/-0.06 pg/ng DNA/min, P<0.001; 16.7 mM glucose: 2.77+/-0.12 vs 0.85+/-0.06 pg/ng DNA/min, P<0.001) and produced significantly higher amounts of (14)CO(2) and (3)H(2)O at both glucose concentrations ((14)CO(2): 3.3 mM glucose: 0.27+/-0.01 vs 0.18+/-0.01, P<0.001; 16.7 mM glucose: 1.44+/-0.15 vs 0.96+/-0.08, P<0.02; (3)H(2)O: 3.3 mM glucose: 0.31+/-0.02 vs 0.15+/-0.01, P<0.001; 16.7 mM glucose: 1.46+/-0.20 vs 0.76+/-0.05 pmol glucose/ng DNA/min, P<0.005). The hexokinase K(m) and V(max) values from S5 animals were significantly higher than those from C5 ones (K(m): 100.14+/-7.01 vs 59.90+/- 3.95 microM, P<0.001; V(max): 0.010+/-0.0005 vs 0.008+/- 0.0006 pmol glucose/ng DNA/min, P<0.02). Conversely, the glucokinase K(m) value from S5 animals was significantly lower than in C5 animals (K(m): 15.31+/-2.64 vs 35.01+/-1.65 mM, P<0.001), whereas V(max) figures were within a comparable range in both groups (V(max): 0.048+/-0.009 vs 0.094+/-0.035 pmol glucose/ng DNA/min, not significant). The glucose phosphorylation ratio

  11. Cooling dissociates glucose-induced insulin release from electrical activity and cation fluxes in rodent pancreatic islets.

    PubMed Central

    Atwater, I; Goncalves, A; Herchuelz, A; Lebrun, P; Malaisse, W J; Rojas, E; Scott, A

    1984-01-01

    Insulin release and beta-cell membrane potentials in response to glucose at 37 and 27 degrees C have been measured simultaneously in single, micro-dissected, perifused islets of Langerhans from normal mice. Insulin release and 45Ca outflow in response to glucose at 37 and 27 degrees C have been measured simultaneously from perfused islets isolated by collagenase digestion from normal rats. The effect of cooling on beta-cell membrane potassium permeability was assessed by changes in measured membrane potential and input resistance (in the mouse) and by changes in 86Rb outflow (in the rat). Resting and active beta-cell membrane parameters (i.e. membrane potential, spike frequency, input resistance, 45Ca outflow and 86Rb outflow), in both mouse and rat islets, were affected only slightly by cooling to 27 degrees C, with temperature coefficients of 2 or lower. At 27 degrees C glucose-stimulated insulin release was inhibited completely in mouse islets and almost completely in rat islets. The temperature coefficients in both preparations were greater than 5. It is concluded that beta-cell electrical activity and changes in membrane permeability induced by glucose are not consequences of insulin release. PMID:6371219

  12. Fibroblast populated collagen matrix promotes islet survival and reduces the number of islets required for diabetes reversal.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Reza B; Moeen Rezakhanlou, Alireza; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Ao, Ziliang; Warnock, Garth L; Ghahary, Aziz

    2011-07-01

    Islet transplantation represents a viable treatment for type 1 diabetes. However, due to loss of substantial mass of islets early after transplantation, islets from two or more donors are required to achieve insulin independence. Islet-extracellular matrix disengagement, which occurs during islet isolation process, leads to subsequent islet cell apoptosis and is an important contributing factor to early islet loss. In this study, we developed a fibroblast populated collagen matrix (FPCM) as a novel scaffold to improve islet cell viability and function post-transplantation. FPCM was developed by embedding fibroblasts within type-I collagen and used as scaffold for islet grafts. Viability and insulin secretory function of islets embedded within FPCM was evaluated in vitro and in a syngeneic murine islet transplantation model. Islets embedded within acellular matrix or naked islets were used as control. Islet cell survival and function was markedly improved particularly after embedding within FPCM. The composite scaffold significantly promoted islet isograft survival and reduced the critical islet mass required for diabetes reversal by half (from 200 to 100 islets per recipient). Fibroblast embedded within FPCM produced fibronectin and growth factors and induced islet cell proliferation. No evidence of fibroblast over-growth within composite grafts was noticed. These results confirm that FPCM significantly promotes islet viability and functionality, enhances engraftment of islet grafts and decreases the critical islet mass needed to reverse hyperglycemia. This promising finding offers a new approach to reducing the number of islet donors per recipient and improving islet transplant outcome.

  13. α-1 Antitrypsin Enhances Islet Engraftment by Suppression of Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Sun, Zhen; Gou, Wenyu; Adams, David B; Cui, Wanxing; Morgan, Katherine A; Strange, Charlie; Wang, Hongjun

    2017-04-01

    Islet cell transplantation has limited effectiveness because of an instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) that occurs immediately after cell infusion and leads to dramatic β-cell death. In intraportal islet transplantation models using mouse and human islets, we demonstrated that α-1 antitrypsin (AAT; Prolastin-C), a serine protease inhibitor used for the treatment of AAT deficiency, inhibits IBMIR and cytokine-induced inflammation in islets. In mice, more diabetic recipients reached normoglycemia after intraportal islet transplantation when they were treated with AAT compared with mice treated with saline. AAT suppressed blood-mediated coagulation pathways by diminishing tissue factor production, reducing plasma thrombin-antithrombin complex levels and fibrinogen deposition on islet grafts, which correlated with less graft damage and apoptosis. AAT-treated mice showed reduced serum tumor necrosis factor-α levels, decreased lymphocytic infiltration, and decreased nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation compared with controls. The potent anti-inflammatory effect of AAT is possibly mediated by suppression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Blocking JNK activation failed to further reduce cytokine-induced apoptosis in β-cells. Taken together, AAT significantly improves islet graft survival after intraportal islet transplantation by mitigation of coagulation in IBMIR and suppression of cytokine-induced JNK and NF-κB activation. AAT-based therapy has the potential to improve graft survival in human islet transplantation and other cellular therapies on the horizon.

  14. Successful β cells islet regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic baboons using ultrasound-targeted microbubble gene therapy with cyclinD2/CDK4/GLP1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyuan; Bastarrachea, Raul A; Roberts, Brad J; Voruganti, V Saroja; Frost, Patrice A; Nava-Gonzalez, Edna J; Arriaga-Cazares, Hector E; Chen, Jiaxi; Huang, Pintong; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Grayburn, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Both major forms of diabetes mellitus (DM) involve β-cell destruction and dysfunction. New treatment strategies have focused on replenishing the deficiency of β-cell mass common to both major forms of diabetes by islet transplantation or β-cell regeneration. The pancreas, not the liver, is the ideal organ for islet regeneration, because it is the natural milieu for islets. Since islet mass is known to increase during obesity and pregnancy, the concept of stimulating pancreatic islet regeneration in vivo is both rational and physiologic. This paper proposes a novel approach in which non-viral gene therapy is targeted to pancreatic islets using ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) in a non-human primate model (NHP), the baboon. Treated baboons received a gene cocktail comprised of cyclinD2, CDK, and GLP1, which in rats results in robust and durable islet regeneration with normalization of blood glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels. We were able to generate important preliminary data indicating that gene therapy by UTMD can achieve in vivo normalization of the intravenous (IV) glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) curves in STZ hyperglycemic-induced conscious tethered baboons. Immunohistochemistry clearly demonstrated evidence of islet regeneration and restoration of β-cell mass.

  15. Long-term in vivo polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure induces oxidative stress and alters proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; dos Anjos, Fabyana Maria; Shimada, Ana Lúcia; Cruz, Wesley Soares; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra Helena

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a risk factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We investigated this hypothesis using long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure to rats addressing metabolic, cellular and proteomic parameters. Male Wistar rats were exposed to PCB126 (0.1, 1 or 10 μg/kg of body weight/day; for 15 days) or vehicle by intranasal instillation. Systemic alterations were quantified by body weight, insulin and glucose tolerance, and blood biochemical profile. Pancreatic toxicity was measured by inflammatory parameters, cell viability and cycle, free radical generation, and proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans. In vivo PCB126 exposure enhanced the body weight gain, impaired insulin sensitivity, reduced adipose tissue deposit, and elevated serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin levels. Inflammatory parameters in the pancreas and cell morphology, viability and cycle were not altered in islets of Langerhans. Nevertheless, in vivo PCB126 exposure increased free radical generation and modified the expression of proteins related to oxidative stress on islets of Langerhans, which are indicative of early β-cell failure. Data herein obtained show that long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure through intranasal route induced alterations on islets of Langerhans related to early end points of DM2. PMID:27292372

  16. Long-term in vivo polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure induces oxidative stress and alters proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Dos Anjos, Fabyana Maria; Shimada, Ana Lúcia; Cruz, Wesley Soares; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra Helena

    2016-06-01

    It has been recently proposed that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a risk factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We investigated this hypothesis using long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure to rats addressing metabolic, cellular and proteomic parameters. Male Wistar rats were exposed to PCB126 (0.1, 1 or 10 μg/kg of body weight/day; for 15 days) or vehicle by intranasal instillation. Systemic alterations were quantified by body weight, insulin and glucose tolerance, and blood biochemical profile. Pancreatic toxicity was measured by inflammatory parameters, cell viability and cycle, free radical generation, and proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans. In vivo PCB126 exposure enhanced the body weight gain, impaired insulin sensitivity, reduced adipose tissue deposit, and elevated serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin levels. Inflammatory parameters in the pancreas and cell morphology, viability and cycle were not altered in islets of Langerhans. Nevertheless, in vivo PCB126 exposure increased free radical generation and modified the expression of proteins related to oxidative stress on islets of Langerhans, which are indicative of early β-cell failure. Data herein obtained show that long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure through intranasal route induced alterations on islets of Langerhans related to early end points of DM2.

  17. Evaluation of low doses BPA-induced perturbation of glycemia by toxicogenomics points to a primary role of pancreatic islets and to the mechanism of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Carchia, E; Porreca, I; Almeida, P J; D'Angelo, F; Cuomo, D; Ceccarelli, M; De Felice, M; Mallardo, M; Ambrosino, C

    2015-10-29

    Epidemiologic and experimental studies have associated changes of blood glucose homeostasis to Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure. We took a toxicogenomic approach to investigate the mechanisms of low-dose (1 × 10(-9 )M) BPA toxicity in ex vivo cultures of primary murine pancreatic islets and hepatocytes. Twenty-nine inhibited genes were identified in islets and none in exposed hepatocytes. Although their expression was slightly altered, their impaired cellular level, as a whole, resulted in specific phenotypic changes. Damage of mitochondrial function and metabolism, as predicted by bioinformatics analyses, was observed: BPA exposure led to a time-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, to an increase of ROS cellular levels and, finally, to an induction of apoptosis, attributable to the bigger Bax/Bcl-2 ratio owing to activation of NF-κB pathway. Our data suggest a multifactorial mechanism for BPA toxicity in pancreatic islets with emphasis to mitochondria dysfunction and NF-κB activation. Finally, we assessed in vitro the viability of BPA-treated islets in stressing condition, as exposure to high glucose, evidencing a reduced ability of the exposed islets to respond to further damages. The result was confirmed in vivo evaluating the reduction of glycemia in hyperglycemic mice transplanted with control and BPA-treated pancreatic islets. The reported findings identify the pancreatic islet as the main target of BPA toxicity in impairing the glycemia. They suggest that the BPA exposure can weaken the response of the pancreatic islets to damages. The last observation could represent a broader concept whose consideration should lead to the development of experimental plans better reproducing the multiple exposure conditions.

  18. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C.

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  19. Membrane Curvature-sensing and Curvature-inducing Activity of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide and Its Implications for Membrane Disruption*♦

    PubMed Central

    Kegulian, Natalie C.; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Apostolidou, Melania; Jayasinghe, Sajith A.; Malmstadt, Noah; Butler, Peter C.; Langen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is a 37-amino acid amyloid protein intimately associated with pancreatic islet β-cell dysfunction and death in type II diabetes. In this study, we combine spectroscopic methods and microscopy to investigate α-helical IAPP-membrane interactions. Using light scattering and fluorescence microscopy, we observe that larger vesicles become smaller upon treatment with human or rat IAPP. Electron microscopy shows the formation of various highly curved structures such as tubules or smaller vesicles in a membrane-remodeling process, and spectrofluorometric detection of vesicle leakage shows disruption of membrane integrity. This effect is stronger for human IAPP than for the less toxic rat IAPP. From CD spectra in the presence of different-sized vesicles, we also uncover the membrane curvature-sensing ability of IAPP and find that it transitions from inducing to sensing membrane curvature when lipid negative charge is decreased. Our in vivo EM images of immunogold-labeled rat IAPP and human IAPP show both forms to localize to mitochondrial cristae, which contain not only locally curved membranes but also phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin, lipids with high spontaneous negative curvature. Disruption of membrane integrity by induction of membrane curvature could apply more broadly to other amyloid proteins and be responsible for membrane damage observed in other amyloid diseases as well. PMID:26283787

  20. Glucose-induced β cell production of IL-1β contributes to glucotoxicity in human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Maedler, Kathrin; Sergeev, Pavel; Ris, Frédéric; Oberholzer, José; Joller-Jemelka, Helen I.; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Kaiser, Nurit; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia is suggested to be detrimental to pancreatic β cells, causing impaired insulin secretion. IL-1β is a proinflammatory cytokine acting during the autoimmune process of type 1 diabetes. IL-1β inhibits β cell function and promotes Fas-triggered apoptosis in part by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Recently, we have shown that increased glucose concentrations also induce Fas expression and β cell apoptosis in human islets. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that IL-1β may mediate the deleterious effects of high glucose on human β cells. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels resulted in increased production and release of IL-1β, followed by NF-κB activation, Fas upregulation, DNA fragmentation, and impaired β cell function. The IL-1 receptor antagonist protected cultured human islets from these deleterious effects. β cells themselves were identified as the islet cellular source of glucose-induced IL-1β. In vivo, IL-1β–producing β cells were observed in pancreatic sections of type 2 diabetic patients but not in nondiabetic control subjects. Similarly, IL-1β was induced in β cells of the gerbil Psammomys obesus during development of diabetes. Treatment of the animals with phlorizin normalized plasma glucose and prevented β cell expression of IL-1β. These findings implicate an inflammatory process in the pathogenesis of glucotoxicity in type 2 diabetes and identify the IL-1β/NF-κB pathway as a target to preserve β cell mass and function in this condition. PMID:12235117

  1. Effect of polishing induced subsurface damages on laser induced damage in fused silica optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang; Zhao, Heng; Huang, Ying; Cai, Chao; Hu, JiangChuan; Ma, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Conventional used ceria polishing would induce both of Ce contaminants and subsurface damages, which mainly restricts the laser induced damage resistance of fused silica optics. To control the near surface defects, nanometer sized colloidal silica are used to polish fused silica optics after the normal ceria polishing process. Then the contaminant elements and subsurface damages of the polished samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry and Nomarski microscopy. It reveals that ceria polishing would introduce lots of subsurface damages whereas colloidal silica polishing induces much fewer subsurface damages especially no fracture induced severe subsurface damages. The laser damage tests reveal that subsequent colloidal silica polishing of the ceria pre-polished samples could gradually eliminate the ceria polishing induced subsurface damages and lower the laser induced damage density accordingly with the increased polishing time. But unlike the damage density, only the severe subsurface damages are totally eliminated could the damage threshold be substantially improved. These results incline to indicate that the subsurface damages have great influence on the laser induced damage density and the fracture related severe subsurface damages will greatly restrict the damage threshold in polished optics.

  2. Diazoxide, a K(ATP) channel opener, prevents ischemia-reperfusion injury in rodent pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Shusen; Harvat, Tricia; Kinzer, Katie; Zhang, Lisa; Feng, Feng; Qi, Meirigeng; Oberholzer, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Diazoxide (DZ) is a pharmacological opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels that has been used for mimicking ischemic preconditioning and shows protection against ischemic damage. Here we investigated whether diazoxide supplementation to University of Wisconsin (UW) solution has cellular protection during islet isolation and improves in vivo islet transplant outcomes in a rodent ischemia model. C57/B6 mice pancreata were flushed with UW or UW + DZ solution and cold preserved for 6 or 10 h prior to islet isolation. Islet yield, in vitro and in vivo function, mitochondrial morphology, and apoptosis were evaluated. Significantly higher islet yields were observed in the UW + DZ group than in the UW group (237.5 ± 25.6 vs. 108.7 ± 49.3, p < 0.01). The islets from the UW + DZ group displayed a significantly higher glucose-induced insulin secretion (0.97 ng/ml ± 0.15 vs. 0.758 ng/ml ± 0.21, p = 0.009) and insulin content (60.96 ng/islet ± 13.94 vs. 42.09 ng/islet ± 8.15, p = 0.002). The DZ-treated islets had well-preserved mitochondrial morphology with superior responses of mitochondrial potentials, and calcium influx responded to glucose. A higher number of living cells and less late apoptotic cells were observed in the UW + DZ group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the islets from the UW + DZ group had a significantly higher cure rate and improved glucose tolerance. This study is the first to report mitoprotective effects of DZ for pancreas preservation and islet isolation. In the future, it will be necessary to further understand the underlying mechanism for the mitoprotection and to test this promising approach for pancreas preservation and the islet isolation process in nonhuman primates and ultimately humans.

  3. Diazoxide, a KATP Channel Opener, Prevents Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rodent Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Shusen; Harvat, Tricia; Kinzer, Katie; Zhang, Lisa; Feng, Feng; Qi, Meirigeng; Oberholzer, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diazoxide (DZ) is a pharmacological opener of ATP-sensitive K+ channels and has been used for mimicking ischemic preconditioning and shows protection against ischemic damage. Here, we investigated whether Diazoxide supplementation to University of Wisconsin (UW) solution has cellular protection during islet isolation and improves in vivo islet transplant outcomes in rodent ischemia model. Research Design and Methods C57/B6 mice pancreata were flushed with UW or UW+DZ solution and cold preserved for 6 or 10 hrs prior to islet isolation. Islet yield, in vitro and in vivo function, mitochondrial morphology, and apoptosis were evaluated. Results Significantly higher islet yields were observed in the UW+DZ group than in the UW group (237.5 ± 25.6 vs. 108.7 ± 49.3, p < 0.01). The islets from the UW+DZ group displayed a significantly higher glucose-induced insulin secretion (0.97 ng/ml ± 0.15 vs. 0.758 ng/ml ± 0.21, p = 0.009) and insulin content (6095.6 ng/islet ± 1394.5 vs. 4209.2 ng/islet ± 815.1, p = 0.002). The DZ-treated islets had well-preserved mitochondrial morphology with superior responses of mitochondrial potentials and calcium influx responded to glucose. Higher living cells and less late apoptotic cells were observed in the UW+DZ group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the transplanted islets from the UW+DZ group had a significantly higher cure rate and improved glucose tolerance. Conclusion This study is the first to report mitoprotective effects of DZ for pancreas preservation and islet isolation. It remains to be tested whether these findings can be replicated in human islet isolation and transplantation. PMID:24070013

  4. Transplantation models to characterize the mechanisms of stem cell-induced islet regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Seneviratne, Ayesh K; Nasri, Grace N; Hess, David A

    2013-09-20

    This unit describes our current knowledge regarding the isolation human bone marrow-derived progenitor cells for the paracrine stimulation of islet regeneration after transplantation into immunodeficient mouse models of diabetes. By using high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH(hi) ) activity, a conserved function in multiple stem cell lineages, a mixed population of hematopoietic, endothelial, and mesenchymal progenitor cells can be efficiently purified using flow cytometry. We describe in vitro approaches to characterize and expand these distinct cell types. Importantly, these cell types can be transplanted into immunodeficient mice rendered beta-cell deficient by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment, in order monitor functional recovery from hyperglycemia and to characterize endogenous islet regeneration via paracrine mechanisms. Herein, we provide detailed protocols for: (1) isolation and characterization of ALDH(hi) cells for the establishment of hematopoietic and multipotent-stromal progenitor lineages; (2) intravenous and intrapancreatic transplantation of human stem cell subtypes for the quantification of glycemic recovery in STZ-treated immunodeficient mice; and (3) immunohistochemical characterization of islet recovery via the stimulation of islet neogenic, beta-cell proliferative, and islet revascularization programs. Collectively, these systems can be used to support the pre-clinical development of human progenitor cell-based therapies to treat diabetes via islet regeneration.

  5. Pancreatic β-Cell Membrane Fluidity and Toxicity Induced by Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Species

    PubMed Central

    Pilkington, Emily H.; Gurzov, Esteban N.; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Litwak, Sara A.; Stanley, William J.; Davis, Thomas P.; Ke, Pu Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) into fibrils and plaques is associated with pancreatic β-cell loss in type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, due to the rapidness of hIAPP conversion in aqueous phase, exactly which hIAPP species is responsible for the observed toxicity and through what mechanisms remains ambiguous. In light of the importance of understanding hIAPP toxicity for T2D here we show a biophysical scheme based on the use of a lipophilic Laurdan dye for examining MIN6 cell membranes upon exposure to fresh and oligomeric hIAPP as well as mature amyloid. It has been found that all three hIAPP species, especially fresh hIAPP, enhanced membrane fluidity and caused losses in cell viability. The cell generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, was the most pronounced with mature amyloid hIAPP. The correlation between changes in membrane fluidity and cell viability and their lack of correlation with ROS production suggest hIAPP toxicity is elicited through both physical and biochemical means. This study offers a new insight into β-cell toxicity induced by controlled hIAPP species, as well as new biophysical methodologies that may prove beneficial for the studies of T2D as well as neurological disorders. PMID:26880502

  6. Pancreatic β-Cell Membrane Fluidity and Toxicity Induced by Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, Emily H.; Gurzov, Esteban N.; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Litwak, Sara A.; Stanley, William J.; Davis, Thomas P.; Ke, Pu Chun

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) into fibrils and plaques is associated with pancreatic β-cell loss in type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, due to the rapidness of hIAPP conversion in aqueous phase, exactly which hIAPP species is responsible for the observed toxicity and through what mechanisms remains ambiguous. In light of the importance of understanding hIAPP toxicity for T2D here we show a biophysical scheme based on the use of a lipophilic Laurdan dye for examining MIN6 cell membranes upon exposure to fresh and oligomeric hIAPP as well as mature amyloid. It has been found that all three hIAPP species, especially fresh hIAPP, enhanced membrane fluidity and caused losses in cell viability. The cell generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, was the most pronounced with mature amyloid hIAPP. The correlation between changes in membrane fluidity and cell viability and their lack of correlation with ROS production suggest hIAPP toxicity is elicited through both physical and biochemical means. This study offers a new insight into β-cell toxicity induced by controlled hIAPP species, as well as new biophysical methodologies that may prove beneficial for the studies of T2D as well as neurological disorders.

  7. PD-L1-driven tolerance protects neurogenin3-induced islet neogenesis to reverse established type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongying; Lee, Jeongkyung; Kim, Mi-sun; Liu, Victoria; Moulik, Mousumi; Li, Haiyan; Yi, Qing; Xie, Aini; Chen, Wenhao; Yang, Lina; Li, Yimin; Tsai, Tsung Huang; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Yechoor, Vijay

    2015-02-01

    A breakdown in self-tolerance underlies autoimmune destruction of β-cells and type 1 diabetes. A cure by restoring β-cell mass is limited by the availability of transplantable β-cells and the need for chronic immunosuppression. Evidence indicates that inhibiting costimulation through the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is central to immune tolerance. We therefore tested whether induction of islet neogenesis in the liver, protected by PD-L1-driven tolerance, reverses diabetes in NOD mice. We demonstrated a robust induction of neo-islets in the liver of diabetic NOD mice by gene transfer of Neurogenin3, the islet-defining factor, along with betacellulin, an islet growth factor. These neo-islets expressed all the major pancreatic hormones and transcription factors. However, an enduring restoration of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and euglycemia occurs only when tolerance is also induced by the targeted overexpression of PD-L1 in the neo-islets, which results in inhibition of proliferation and increased apoptosis of infiltrating CD4(+) T cells. Further analysis revealed an inhibition of cytokine production from lymphocytes isolated from the liver but not from the spleen of treated mice, indicating that treatment did not result in generalized immunosuppression. This treatment strategy leads to persistence of functional neo-islets that resist autoimmune destruction and consequently an enduring reversal of diabetes in NOD mice.

  8. Impact of islet size on pancreatic islet transplantation and potential interventions to improve outcome.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Daria; Phan, Tammy; Sequi, Marco; Lin, Yong; Freeman, Daniel H; Cicalese, Luca; Rastellini, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Better results have been recently reported in clinical pancreatic islet transplantation (ITX) due mostly to improved isolation techniques and immunosuppression; however, some limitations still exist. It is known that following transplantation, 30% to 60% of the islets are lost. In our study, we have investigated 1) the role of size as a factor affecting islet engraftment and 2) potential procedural manipulations to increase the number of smaller functional islets that can be transplanted. C57/BL10 mice were used as donors and recipients in a syngeneic islet transplant model. Isolated islets were divided by size (large, >300 μm; medium 150-300 μm; small, <150 μm). Each size was transplanted in chemically induced diabetic mice as full (600 IEQ), suboptimal (400 IEQ), and marginal mass (200 IEQ). Control animals received all size islets. Engraftment was defined as reversal of diabetes by day 7 posttransplantation. When the superiority of smaller islets was observed, strategies of overdigestion and fragmentation were adopted during islet isolation in the attempt to reduce islet size and improve engraftment. Smaller islets were significantly superior in engraftment compared to medium, large, and control (all sizes) groups. This was more evident when marginal mass data were compared. In all masses, success decreased as islet size increased. Once islets were engrafted, functionality was not affected by size. When larger islets were fragmented, a significant decrease in islet functionality was observed. On the contrary, if pancreata were slightly overdigested, although not as successful as small naive islets, an increase in engraftment was observed when compared to the control group. In conclusion, smaller islets are superior in engraftment following islet transplantation. Fragmentation has a deleterious effect on islet engraftment. Islet isolations can be performed by reducing islet size with slight overdigestion, and it can be safely adopted to improve clinical

  9. [Structural alterations in pancreatic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with of bioactive additive on the basis of Gymnema sylvestre].

    PubMed

    Snigur, G L; Samokhina, M P; Pisarev, V B; Spasov, A A; Bulanov, A E

    2008-01-01

    The structural alterations in pancreatic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were studied after the administration of Gymnema sylvestre extract or its composition. Diabetes mellitus was modeled by daily injection of streptozotocin (20 mg/kg for 5 days) and single injection of 0.2 ml of complete Freund's adjuvant, Only the animals with the blood glucose level exceeding 15 mmol/l were included in the experiment. B- and A-endocrinocytes were demonstrated using immunocytochemistry. The proportions of the area of the pancreatic islets, occupied by B- and A-endocrinocytes, as well as the volume fraction of the pancreatic islets within the pancreas, were determined. In the model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, the part of the total islet area occupied by B-endocrinocytes, was diminished in the pancreatic islets located in all the zones of the gland. Prophylactic administration of Gymnema sylvestre extract or its composition tended to restore the area occupied by B-endocrinocytes in the pancreatic islets. These results indicate the equal potency of the composition and extract of Gymnema sylvestre to induce the regeneration of B-endocrinocytes.

  10. The Islet Estrogen Receptor-α Is Induced by Hyperglycemia and Protects Against Oxidative Stress-Induced Insulin-Deficient Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Gamze; Alvarez-Mercado, Ana I.; Zarrouki, Bader; Opland, Darren; Liew, Chong Wee; Alonso, Laura C.; Myers, Martin G.; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Poitout, Vincent; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The female steroid, 17β-estradiol (E2), is important for pancreatic β-cell function and acts via at least three estrogen receptors (ER), ERα, ERβ, and the G-protein coupled ER (GPER). Using a pancreas-specific ERα knockout mouse generated using the Cre-lox-P system and a Pdx1-Cre transgenic line (PERαKO−/−), we previously reported that islet ERα suppresses islet glucolipotoxicity and prevents β-cell dysfunction induced by high fat feeding. We also showed that E2 acts via ERα to prevent β-cell apoptosis in vivo. However, the contribution of the islet ERα to β-cell survival in vivo, without the contribution of ERα in other tissues is still unclear. Using the PERαKO−/− mouse, we show that ERα mRNA expression is only decreased by 20% in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, without a parallel decrease in the VMH, making it a reliable model of pancreas-specific ERα elimination. Following exposure to alloxan-induced oxidative stress in vivo, female and male PERαKO−/− mice exhibited a predisposition to β-cell destruction and insulin deficient diabetes. In male PERαKO−/− mice, exposure to E2 partially prevented alloxan-induced β-cell destruction and diabetes. ERα mRNA expression was induced by hyperglycemia in vivo in islets from young mice as well as in cultured rat islets. The induction of ERα mRNA by hyperglycemia was retained in insulin receptor-deficient β-cells, demonstrating independence from direct insulin regulation. These findings suggest that induction of ERα expression acts to naturally protect β-cells against oxidative injury. PMID:24498408

  11. Monomethylated-adenines potentiate glucose-induced insulin production and secretion via inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity in rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Boland, Brandon B; Alarcón, Cristina; Ali, Almas; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Monomethyladenines have effects on DNA repair, G-protein-coupled receptor antagonism and autophagy. In islet ß-cells, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) has been implicated in DNA-repair and autophagy, but its mechanism of action is unclear. Here, the effect of monomethylated adenines was examined in rat islets. 3-MA, N6-methyladenine (N6-MA) and 9-methyladenine (9-MA), but not 1- or 7-monomethylated adenines, specifically potentiated glucose-induced insulin secretion (3-4 fold; p ≤ 0.05) and proinsulin biosynthesis (∼2-fold; p ≤ 0.05). Using 3-MA as a 'model' monomethyladenine, it was found that 3-MA augmented [cAMP]i accumulation (2-3 fold; p ≤ 0.05) in islets within 5 minutes. The 3-, N6- and 9-MA also enhanced glucose-induced phosphorylation of the cAMP/protein kinase-A (PKA) substrate cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Treatment of islets with pertussis or cholera toxin indicated 3-MA mediated elevation of [cAMP]i was not mediated via G-protein-coupled receptors. Also, 3-MA did not compete with 9-cyclopentyladenine (9-CPA) for adenylate cyclase inhibition, but did for the pan-inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Competitive inhibition experiments with PDE-isoform specific inhibitors suggested 3-MA to have a preference for PDE4 in islet ß-cells, but this was likely reflective of PDE4 being the most abundant PDE isoform in ß-cells. In vitro enzyme assays indicated that 3-, N6- and 9-MA were capable of inhibiting most PDE isoforms found in ß-cells. Thus, in addition to known inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3'K)/m Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, 3-MA also acts as a pan-phosphodiesterase inhibitor in pancreatic ß-cells to elevate [cAMP]i and then potentiate glucose-induced insulin secretion and production in parallel.

  12. Oxygen free-radical scavengers and immune destruction of murine islets in allograft rejection and multiple low-dose streptozocin-induced insulitis.

    PubMed

    Mendola, J; Wright, J R; Lacy, P E

    1989-03-01

    We examined the effects of desferrioxamine (DFX), a potent inhibitor of the formation of oxygen-derived hydroxyl radicals, and nicotinamide (NIC), a poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase inhibitor and a weak free-radical scavenger, on two models of immune destruction of murine islets [i.e., allograft rejection and multiple low-dose streptozocin (STZ)-induced insulitis]. Freshly isolated or low-temperature-cultured BALB/cJ islets were transplanted beneath the kidney capsules of C57BL/6J recipients. The recipients were treated with NIC alone (500 mg.kg-1.day-1), DFX alone (4.2 mg/day x 14 days), or NIC + DFX. Only recipients treated with NIC + DFX, receiving cultured islets, showed a mean graft survival time significantly longer than control mice receiving freshly isolated or cultured islets. Control CD-1 mice treated with multiple low doses of STZ developed insulitis and diabetes. Treatment with NIC alone, DFX alone, or NIC + DFX decreased the severity of hyperglycemia relative to the controls. Treatment with DFX alone was more effective than NIC alone or NIC + DFX. Only the group treated with DFX alone had a lower incidence of diabetes (mean plasma glucose level greater than 200 mg/dl) than the controls after 4 wk. Histologically, islets from control mice showed severe insulitis, islet destruction, and absence of stainable insulin, whereas islets from DFX-treated mice showed only mild peri-insulitis and a relative preservation of beta-cell granulation. Our study showed that NIC and DFX partially protect islets from immune destruction in allograft rejection and in low-dose STZ-induced insulitis. Apparently, hydroxyl radicals play important roles in both of these models.

  13. Glutathione Ethyl Ester Supplementation during Pancreatic Islet Isolation Improves Viability and Transplant Outcomes in a Murine Marginal Islet Mass Model

    PubMed Central

    Raposo do Amaral, Alexandre S.; Pawlick, Rena L.; Rodrigues, Erika; Costal, Flavia; Pepper, Andrew; Ferreira Galvão, Flávio H.; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lucia; Shapiro, A. M.James

    2013-01-01

    Background The success of pancreatic islet transplantation still faces many challenges, mainly related to cell damage during islet isolation and early post-transplant. The increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during islet isolation and the consumption of antioxidant defenses appear to be an important pathway related to islet damage. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we evaluated whether supplementation of glutathione-ethyl-ester (GEE) during islet isolation could improve islet viability and transplant outcomes in a murine marginal islet mass model. We also cultured human islets for 24 hours in standard CMRL media with or without GEE supplementation. Supplementation of GEE decreased the content of ROS in isolated islets, leading to a decrease in apoptosis and maintenance of islet viability. A higher percentage of mice transplanted with a marginal mass of GEE treated islets became euglycemic after transplant. The supplementation of 20 mM GEE in cultured human islets significantly reduced the apoptosis rate in comparison to untreated islets. Conclusions/Significance GEE supplementation was able to decrease the apoptosis rate and intracellular content of ROS in isolated islets and might be considered a potential intervention to improve islet viability during the isolation process and maintenance in culture before islet transplantation. PMID:23424628

  14. Glucose- and Hormone-Induced cAMP Oscillations in α- and β-Cells Within Intact Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Sandler, Stellan; Gylfe, Erik; Tengholm, Anders

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE cAMP is a critical messenger for insulin and glucagon secretion from pancreatic β- and α-cells, respectively. Dispersed β-cells show cAMP oscillations, but the signaling kinetics in cells within intact islets of Langerhans is unknown. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The subplasma-membrane cAMP concentration ([cAMP]pm) was recorded in α- and β-cells in the mantle of intact mouse pancreatic islets using total internal reflection microscopy and a fluorescent translocation biosensor. Cell identification was based on the opposite effects of adrenaline on cAMP in α- and β-cells. RESULTS In islets exposed to 3 mmol/L glucose, [cAMP]pm was low and stable. Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide (GLP-1) induced dose-dependent elevation of [cAMP]pm, often with oscillations synchronized among β-cells. Whereas glucagon also induced [cAMP]pm oscillations in most α-cells, <20% of the α-cells responded to GLP-1. Elevation of the glucose concentration to 11–30 mmol/L in the absence of hormones induced slow [cAMP]pm oscillations in both α- and β-cells. These cAMP oscillations were coordinated with those of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the β-cells but not caused by the changes in [Ca2+]i. The transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (AC) inhibitor 2′5′-dideoxyadenosine suppressed the glucose- and hormone-induced [cAMP]pm elevations, whereas the preferential inhibitors of soluble AC, KH7, and 1,3,5(10)-estratrien-2,3,17-β-triol perturbed cell metabolism and lacked effect, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Oscillatory [cAMP]pm signaling in secretagogue-stimulated β-cells is maintained within intact islets and depends on transmembrane AC activity. The discovery of glucose- and glucagon-induced [cAMP]pm oscillations in α-cells indicates the involvement of cAMP in the regulation of pulsatile glucagon secretion. PMID:21444924

  15. Quantifying pulsed laser induced damage to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Marc; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Bezares, Francisco J.; Robinson, Jeremy; Anderson, Travis; Chun, Hayden; Tadjer, Marko

    2011-11-21

    As an emerging optical material, graphene's ultrafast dynamics are often probed using pulsed lasers yet the region in which optical damage takes place is largely uncharted. Here, femtosecond laser pulses induced localized damage in single-layer graphene on sapphire. Raman spatial mapping, SEM, and AFM microscopy quantified the damage. The resulting size of the damaged area has a linear correlation with the optical fluence. These results demonstrate local modification of sp{sup 2}-carbon bonding structures with optical pulse fluences as low as 14 mJ/cm{sup 2}, an order-of-magnitude lower than measured and theoretical ablation thresholds.

  16. Blood-Induced Joint Damage

    PubMed Central

    Roosendaal, Goris; Jansen, Nathalie W.D.; Lafeber, Floris P.J.G.; Mastbergen, Simon C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Four days of blood exposure leads to irreversible cartilage damage in vitro. In contrast, intermittent intra-articular blood injections twice a week during 4 weeks (mimicking micro-bleeds) in a canine model resulted in transient damage only. In this study, it was evaluated whether acute joint bleeds are more harmful than micro-bleeds in a canine model of knee arthropathy. Design. Seven dogs received 4 sequential daily intra-articular blood injections twice in 2 weeks (mimicking 2 acute 4-day joint bleeds). Seven other dogs received the same blood load but in a total of 8 injections intermittently over the 4-week period with at least 1 day in between (mimicking micro-bleeds over the same timespan). Contralateral knees served as controls. Ten weeks after the last injection cartilage matrix turnover and synovial inflammation were evaluated. Results. Only after the acute joint bleeds the release of newly formed and total (resident) cartilage matrix glycosaminoglycans were increased (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01, respectively). Furthermore, in animals with the acute joint bleeds cartilage glycosaminoglycan content was decreased (P = 0.01) and not in animals with micro-bleeds. Mild synovial inflammation was observed in both groups (both P < 0.0001) but was not different between groups. Conclusions. In contrast to micro-bleeds, 2 acute joint bleeds lead to prolonged cartilage damage independent of the level of synovial inflammation. This model suggests that micro-bleeds are less devastating than acute joint bleeds with respect to joint damage, which might be of relevance to treatment of joint bleeds in clinical practice. PMID:26069675

  17. Consumption of a glucose diet enhances the sensitivity of pancreatic islets from adrenalectomized genetically obese (ob/ob) mice to glucose-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Mistry, A M; Chen, N G; Lee, Y S; Romsos, D R

    1995-03-01

    Consumption of a glucose diet for 4 d markedly elevates plasma insulin concentrations in adrenalectomized ob/ob mice. The present study examined regulation of insulin secretion from perifused pancreatic islets of female adrenalectomized genetically obese (ob/ob) and lean mice fed a glucose diet for 4 d. These mice were fed a high carbohydrate commercial diet for 21 d, or the high carbohydrate commercial diet for 17 d and a purified high glucose diet for the last 4 d of the 21-d feeding period. Adrenalectomy equalized plasma insulin concentrations, pancreatic islet size, rates of insulin secretion in response to 20 mmol/L glucose and insulin mRNA relative abundance in ob/ob and lean mice fed the commercial diet, but the threshold for glucose-induced insulin secretion determined by a linear glucose gradient remained lower in islets from adrenalectomized ob/ob mice than in those from lean mice (3.8 +/- 0.1 vs. 4.9 +/- 0.2 mmol/L glucose), and addition of acetylcholine to the perifusate lowered the threshold to only 2.0 +/- 0.1 mmol/L glucose in islets from ob/ob mice vs. 3.3 +/- 0.1 mmol/L glucose in lean mice. Switching from the commercial diet to the glucose diet for 4 d increased plasma insulin concentrations -10-fold in islets from adrenalectomized ob/ob mice without affecting islet size, 20 mmol/L glucose-induced insulin secretion or insulin mRNA abundance. Consumption of the glucose diet did, however, markedly lower the threshold for glucose-induced insulin secretion in islets from adrenalectomized ob/ob mice to approximate the abnormally low glucose thresholds in intact ob/ob mice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Human interleukin-1 beta induced stimulation of insulin release from rat pancreatic islets is accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial oxidative events.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, D L; Sandler, S

    1989-11-01

    Acute exposure of pancreatic islets to interleukin-1 beta results in an increase in insulin release, while an extension of the exposure time induces a functional suppression and eventually, destruction of the B-cells. We have recently suggested that the interleukin-1 beta induced inhibition of islet function is mediated through an impairment in oxidative metabolism. The aim of the current study was to investigate if the acute, stimulatory effects of interleukin-1 beta on islet function could also be related to changes in the substrate metabolism. For this purpose, rat islets were exposed for 90-120 min to 30 pmol/l human recombinant interleukin-1 beta (biological activity of 2.5 U/ml) and their function and metabolism characterized during this period. The cytokine did not increase insulin release in the presence of 1.7 or 5.5 mmol/l glucose but in both the presence of 16.7 mmol/l glucose or 10 mmol/l leucine + 2 mmol/l glutamine there was a 50% increase in insulin release. Interleukin-1 beta exposure increased the oxidation of D-[U-14C]glucose at 5.5 mmol/l glucose by 25% and at 16.7 mmol/l glucose by 60%. Carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism were further examined in the presence of D-[5-3H]glucose, D-[6-14C]glucose, [1-14C]pyruvate, L-[U-14C]glutamine, L-[U-14C]leucine and L-[1-14C]leucine. There was no difference between control islets and interleukin-1 beta exposed islets in terms of D-[5-3H]glucose utilization or [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation, but the oxidation of D-[6-14C]glucose was increased by 64% in the interleukin-1 beta exposed islets.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage. PMID:26325327

  20. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-03-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage.

  1. In vitro reconstitution of pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The lack of transplantable pancreatic islets is a serious problem that affects the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Beta cells can be induced from various sources of stem or progenitor cells, including induced pluripotent stem cells in the near future; however, the reconstitution of islets from β cells in culture dishes is challenging. The generation of highly functional islets may require three-dimensional spherical cultures that resemble intact islets. This review discusses recent advances in the reconstitution of islets. Several factors affect the reconstitution of pseudoislets with higher functions, such as architectural similarity, cell-to-cell contact, and the production method. The actual transplantation of naked or encapsulated pseudoislets and islet-like cell clusters from various stem cell sources is also discussed. Advancing our understanding of the methods used to reconstitute pseudoislets should expand the range of potential strategies available for developing de novo islets for therapeutic applications.

  2. β Cell–specific increased expression of calpastatin prevents diabetes induced by islet amyloid polypeptide toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gurlo, Tatyana; Costes, Safia; Hoang, Jonathan D.; Rivera, Jacqueline F.; Butler, Alexandra E.; Butler, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    The islet in type 2 diabetes (T2D) shares many features of the brain in protein misfolding diseases. There is a deficit of β cells with islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), a protein coexpressed with insulin. Small intracellular membrane-permeant oligomers, the most toxic form of IAPP, are more frequent in β cells of patients with T2D and rodents expressing human IAPP. β Cells in T2D, and affected cells in neurodegenerative diseases, share a comparable pattern of molecular pathology, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, attenuation of autophagy, and calpain hyperactivation. While this adverse functional cascade in response to toxic oligomers is well described, the sequence of events and how best to intervene is unknown. We hypothesized that calpain hyperactivation is a proximal event and tested this in vivo by β cell–specific suppression of calpain hyperactivation with calpastatin overexpression in human IAPP transgenic mice. β Cell–specific calpastatin overexpression was remarkably protective against β cell dysfunction and loss and diabetes onset. The critical autophagy/lysosomal pathway for β cell viability was protected with calpain suppression, consistent with findings in models of neurodegenerative diseases. We conclude that suppression of calpain hyperactivation is a potentially beneficial disease-modifying strategy for protein misfolding diseases, including T2D. PMID:27812546

  3. Resveratrol supplementation restores high-fat diet-induced insulin secretion dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial function in islet

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wen; Zheng, Juan; Zhang, Hao-hao; Hu, Xiang; Zeng, Tian-shu; Hu, Di

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), a natural compound, is known for its effects on energy homeostasis. Here we investigated the effects of RSV and possible mechanism in insulin secretion of high-fat diet rats. Rats were randomly divided into three groups as follows: NC group (animals were fed ad libitum with normal chow for 8 weeks), HF group (animals were fed ad libitum with high-fat diet for 8 weeks), and HFR group (animals were treated with high-fat diet and administered with RSV for 8 weeks). Insulin secretion ability of rats was assessed by hyperglycemic clamp. Mitochondrial biogenesis genes, mitochondrial respiratory chain activities, reactive oxidative species (ROS), and several mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme activities were evaluated in islet. We found that HF group rats clearly showed low insulin secretion and mitochondrial complex dysfunction. Expression of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog- 1 (SIRT1) and related mitochondrial biogenesis were significantly decreased. However, RSV administration group (HFR) showed a marked potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This effect was associated with elevated SIRT1 protein expression and antioxidant enzyme activities, resulting in increased mitochondrial respiratory chain activities and decreased ROS level. This study suggests that RSV may increase islet mitochondrial complex activities and antioxidant function to restore insulin secretion dysfunction induced by high-fat diet. PMID:25228148

  4. Islet Endothelial Cells Induce Glycosylation and Increase Cell-surface Expression of Integrin β1 in β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Spelios, Michael G.; Olsen, John A.; Kenna, Lauren A.; Akirav, Eitan M.

    2015-01-01

    The co-culturing of insulinoma and islet-derived endothelial cell (iEC) lines results in the spontaneous formation of free-floating pseudoislets (PIs). We previously showed that iEC-induced PIs display improved insulin expression and secretion in response to glucose stimulation. This improvement was associated with a de novo deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by iECs in and around the PIs. Here, iEC-induced PIs were used to study the expression and posttranslational modification of the ECM receptor integrin β1. A wide array of integrin β subunits was detected in βTC3 and NIT-1 insulinomas as well as in primary islets, with integrin β1 mRNA and protein detected in all three cell types. Interestingly, the formation of iEC-induced PIs altered the glycosylation patterns of integrin β1, resulting in a higher molecular weight form of the receptor. This form was found in native pancreas but was completely absent in monolayer β-cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of monolayers and PIs revealed a higher expression of integrin β1 in PIs. Antibody-mediated blocking of integrin β1 led to alterations in β-cell morphology, reduced insulin gene expression, and enhanced glucose secretion under baseline conditions. These results suggest that iEC-induced PI formation may alter integrin β1 expression and posttranslational modification by enhancing glycosylation, thereby providing a more physiological culture system for studying integrin-ECM interactions in β cells. PMID:25911095

  5. Transient overexpression of cyclin D2/CDK4/GLP1 genes induces proliferation and differentiation of adult pancreatic progenitors and mediates islet regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyuan; Shimoda, Masayuki; Chen, Jiaxi; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Grayburn, Paul A

    2012-02-15

    The molecular mechanism of β-cell regeneration remains poorly understood. Cyclin D2/CDK4 expresses in normal β cells and maintains adult β-cell growth. We hypothesized that gene therapy with cyclin D2/CDK4/GLP-1 plasmids targeted to the pancreas of STZ-treated rats by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) would force cell cycle re-entry of residual G(0)-phase islet cells into G(1)/S phase to regenerate β cells. A single UTMD treatment induced β-cell regeneration with reversal of diabetes for 6 mo without evidence of toxicity. We observed that this β-cell regeneration was not mediated by self-replication of pre-existing β cells. Instead, cyclin D2/CDK4/GLP-1 initiated robust proliferation of adult pancreatic progenitor cells that exist within islets and terminally differentiate to mature islets with β cells and α cells.

  6. Metformin Ameliorates Dysfunctional Traits of Glibenclamide- and Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion by Suppression of Imposed Overactivity of the Islet Nitric Oxide Synthase-NO System.

    PubMed

    Lundquist, Ingmar; Mohammed Al-Amily, Israa; Meidute Abaraviciene, Sandra; Salehi, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Metformin lowers diabetic blood glucose primarily by reducing hepatic gluconeogenesis and increasing peripheral glucose uptake. However, possible effects by metformin on beta-cell function are incompletely understood. We speculated that metformin might positively influence insulin secretion through impacting the beta-cell nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-NO system, a negative modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release. In short-time incubations with isolated murine islets either glibenclamide or high glucose augmented insulin release associated with increased NO production from both neural and inducible NOS. Metformin addition suppressed the augmented NO generation coinciding with amplified insulin release. Islet culturing with glibenclamide or high glucose revealed pronounced fluorescence of inducible NOS in the beta-cells being abolished by metformin co-culturing. These findings were reflected in medium nitrite-nitrate levels. A glucose challenge following islet culturing with glibenclamide or high glucose revealed markedly impaired insulin response. Metformin co-culturing restored this response. Culturing murine islets and human islets from controls and type 2 diabetics with high glucose or high glucose + glibenclamide induced a pronounced decrease of cell viability being remarkably restored by metformin co-culturing. We show here, that imposed overactivity of the beta-cell NOS-NO system by glibenclamide or high glucose leads to insulin secretory dysfunction and reduced cell viability and also, importantly, that these effects are relieved by metformin inhibiting beta-cell NO overproduction from both neural and inducible NOS thus ameliorating a concealed negative influence by NO induced by sulfonylurea treatment and/or high glucose levels. This double-edged effect of glibenclamide on the beta-cellsuggests sulfonylurea monotherapy in type 2 diabetes being avoided.

  7. Metformin Ameliorates Dysfunctional Traits of Glibenclamide- and Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion by Suppression of Imposed Overactivity of the Islet Nitric Oxide Synthase-NO System

    PubMed Central

    Lundquist, Ingmar; Mohammed Al-Amily, Israa; Meidute Abaraviciene, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Metformin lowers diabetic blood glucose primarily by reducing hepatic gluconeogenesis and increasing peripheral glucose uptake. However, possible effects by metformin on beta-cell function are incompletely understood. We speculated that metformin might positively influence insulin secretion through impacting the beta-cell nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-NO system, a negative modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release. In short-time incubations with isolated murine islets either glibenclamide or high glucose augmented insulin release associated with increased NO production from both neural and inducible NOS. Metformin addition suppressed the augmented NO generation coinciding with amplified insulin release. Islet culturing with glibenclamide or high glucose revealed pronounced fluorescence of inducible NOS in the beta-cells being abolished by metformin co-culturing. These findings were reflected in medium nitrite-nitrate levels. A glucose challenge following islet culturing with glibenclamide or high glucose revealed markedly impaired insulin response. Metformin co-culturing restored this response. Culturing murine islets and human islets from controls and type 2 diabetics with high glucose or high glucose + glibenclamide induced a pronounced decrease of cell viability being remarkably restored by metformin co-culturing. We show here, that imposed overactivity of the beta-cell NOS-NO system by glibenclamide or high glucose leads to insulin secretory dysfunction and reduced cell viability and also, importantly, that these effects are relieved by metformin inhibiting beta-cell NO overproduction from both neural and inducible NOS thus ameliorating a concealed negative influence by NO induced by sulfonylurea treatment and/or high glucose levels. This double-edged effect of glibenclamide on the beta-cellsuggests sulfonylurea monotherapy in type 2 diabetes being avoided. PMID:27820841

  8. Continuous Quadrupole Magnetic Separation of Islets during Digestion Improves Purified Porcine Islet Viability

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Sajja, Venkata Sunil; Rizzari, Michael D.; Scott III, William E.; Kitzmann, Jennifer P.; Kennedy, David J.; Todd, Paul W.; Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Hering, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Islet transplantation (ITx) is an emerging and promising therapy for patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. The islet isolation and purification processes require exposure to extended cold ischemia, warm-enzymatic digestion, mechanical agitation, and use of damaging chemicals for density gradient separation (DG), all of which reduce viable islet yield. In this paper, we describe initial proof-of-concept studies exploring quadrupole magnetic separation (QMS) of islets as an alternative to DG to reduce exposure to these harsh conditions. Three porcine pancreata were split into two parts, the splenic lobe (SPL) and the combined connecting/duodenal lobes (CDL), for paired digestions and purifications. Islets in the SPL were preferentially labeled using magnetic microparticles (MMPs) that lodge within the islet microvasculature when infused into the pancreas and were continuously separated from the exocrine tissue by QMS during the collection phase of the digestion process. Unlabeled islets from the CDL were purified by conventional DG. Islets purified by QMS exhibited significantly improved viability (measured by oxygen consumption rate per DNA, p < 0.03) and better morphology relative to control islets. Islet purification by QMS can reduce the detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to toxic enzymes and density gradient solutions and substantially improve islet viability after isolation. PMID:27843954

  9. Continuous Quadrupole Magnetic Separation of Islets during Digestion Improves Purified Porcine Islet Viability.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Bradley P; Kumar Sajja, Venkata Sunil; Suszynski, Thomas M; Rizzari, Michael D; Scott Iii, William E; Kitzmann, Jennifer P; Mueller, Kate R; Hanley, Thomas R; Kennedy, David J; Todd, Paul W; Balamurugan, Appakalai N; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2016-01-01

    Islet transplantation (ITx) is an emerging and promising therapy for patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. The islet isolation and purification processes require exposure to extended cold ischemia, warm-enzymatic digestion, mechanical agitation, and use of damaging chemicals for density gradient separation (DG), all of which reduce viable islet yield. In this paper, we describe initial proof-of-concept studies exploring quadrupole magnetic separation (QMS) of islets as an alternative to DG to reduce exposure to these harsh conditions. Three porcine pancreata were split into two parts, the splenic lobe (SPL) and the combined connecting/duodenal lobes (CDL), for paired digestions and purifications. Islets in the SPL were preferentially labeled using magnetic microparticles (MMPs) that lodge within the islet microvasculature when infused into the pancreas and were continuously separated from the exocrine tissue by QMS during the collection phase of the digestion process. Unlabeled islets from the CDL were purified by conventional DG. Islets purified by QMS exhibited significantly improved viability (measured by oxygen consumption rate per DNA, p < 0.03) and better morphology relative to control islets. Islet purification by QMS can reduce the detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to toxic enzymes and density gradient solutions and substantially improve islet viability after isolation.

  10. Delayed apoptosis allows islet β-cells to implement an autophagic mechanism to promote cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Heather L.; Peterson, Brett S.; Haldeman, Jonathan M.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Hohmeier, Hans E.

    2017-01-01

    Increased β-cell death coupled with the inability to replicate existing β-cells drives the decline in β-cell mass observed in the progression of both major forms of diabetes. Understanding endogenous mechanisms of islet cell survival could have considerable value for the development of novel strategies to limit β-cell loss and thereby promote β-cell recovery. Insulinoma cells have provided useful insight into β-cell death pathways but observations made in cell lines sometimes fail to translate to primary islets. Here, we report dramatic differences in the temporal regulation and engagement of the apoptotic program in primary rodent islets relative to the INS-1 derived 832/13 cell line. As expected, 832/13 cells rapidly induced cell stress markers in response to ER stress or DNA damage and were fully committed to apoptosis, resulting in >80% cell death within 24 h. In contrast, primary rat islets were largely refractory to cell death in response to ER stress and DNA damage, despite rapid induction of stress markers, such as XBP-1(s), CHOP, and PUMA. Gene expression profiling revealed a general suppression of pro-apoptotic machinery, such as Apaf-1 and caspase 3, and sustained levels of pro-survival factors, such as cIAP-1, cIAP-2, and XIAP, in rat islets. Furthermore, we observed sustained induction of autophagy following chronic ER stress and found that inhibition of autophagy rendered islet β-cells highly vulnerable to ER stress-induced cell death. We propose that islet β-cells dampen the apoptotic response to delay the onset of cell death, providing a temporal window in which autophagy can be activated to limit cellular damage and promote survival. PMID:28212395

  11. Anaplerotic input is sufficient to induce time-dependent potentiation of insulin release in rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C; Liu, Yi-Jia; Macdonald, Michael J; Straub, Susanne G; Sharp, Geoffrey W G

    2004-11-01

    Nutrients that induce biphasic insulin release, such as glucose and leucine, provide acetyl-CoA and anaplerotic input in the beta-cell. The first phase of release requires increased ATP production leading to increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). The second phase requires increased [Ca(2+)](i) and anaplerosis. There is strong evidence to indicate that the second phase is due to augmentation of Ca(2+)-stimulated release via the K(ATP) channel-independent pathway. To test whether the phenomenon of time-dependent potentiation (TDP) has similar properties to the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel-independent pathway, we monitored the ability of different agents that provide acetyl-CoA and anaplerotic input or both of these inputs to induce TDP. The results show that anaplerotic input is sufficient to induce TDP. Interestingly, among the agents tested, the nonsecretagogue glutamine, the nonhydrolyzable analog of leucine aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid, and succinic acid methyl ester all induced TDP, and all significantly increased alpha-ketoglutarate levels in the islets. In conclusion, anaplerosis that enhances the supply and utilization of alpha-ketoglutarate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle appears to play an essential role in the generation of TDP.

  12. Hyposmolar medium and ethanol in isosmotic solution induce the release of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) by isolated rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Benický, J; Greer, M A; Strbák, V

    1997-01-01

    Cell swelling induced by hypotonic medium or small isotonic permeant molecules results in an immediate secretory response in various types of cells. We have expanded exploration of this phenomenon by examining the effect of either isotonic ethanol or hyposmotic medium on the release of TRH by freshly isolated islets of Langerhans in static incubation and perifusion. Ethanol (40, 80 or 160 mM in isotonic solution) dose-dependently evoked the release of TRH by statically incubated islets. The dynamics of TRH release induced by 80 mM isotonic ethanol or 30% hypotonic medium were similar to those induced by 50 mM KCl, with the highest secretion rate during the first 5 min of incubation irrespective of the duration of stimulation. Ca2+ depletion of the incubation medium abolished the response to 50 mM KCl but did not diminish the response to 80 mM isotonic ethanol. We conclude that osmotic stimuli known to induce cell swelling also induce release of TRH by isolated pancreatic islets.

  13. Effect of polyethylene glycol grafted onto islet capsules on prevention of splenocyte and cytokine attacks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Yun; Nam, Jong Hee; Byun, Youngro

    2004-01-01

    In the graft rejection of transplanted islets, the host's immune cells recognize the islets as antigens, which then stimulate the immune cells to begin the cytokine secretion and also the proliferation of immune cells. To prevent the recognition of islets by the immune cells, we grafted biocompatible polyethylene glycol (PEG) onto the collagen capsule of islets without incurring any changes in the morphology and function of islets. To evaluate the efficiency of PEG grafting, PEG-grafted islets were cultured with splenocytes consisting mainly of lymphocytes and macrophages. A splenocyte proliferation assessment using a BrdU incorporation assay showed that the PEG-grafted islets did not stimulate the splenocytes. In addition, the viability and microorganisms in islet cells of co-cultured PEG-grafted islets were not altered. However, in the co-culture of free islets (control) splenocytes were stimulated; they mainly secreted TNF-alpha and strongly affected the viability and structure of free islets. Furthermore, when islets were treated with the rat recombinant TNF-alpha for 7 days, the viabilities of PEG-grafted and free islets were significantly damaged, although the viability of PEG-grafted islets was higher than that of free islets by nearly three times. These results demonstrate that PEG grafted on the surface of islets could prevent the recognition of islets by splenocytes, but could not completely protect islets from cytokines.

  14. Preservation of pancreatic islets in cold UW solution before transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Show; Saito, Takuro; Ise, Kazuya; Yamashita, Michitoshi; Sato, Yoshihiro; Saito, Takaharu; Tsukada, Manabu; Oshibe, Ikuro; Kenjo, Akira; Kimura, Takashi; Anazawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Shigeya; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2012-01-01

    Culture of islets prior to transplantation needs to be revisited for maintaining functional islet capacity. This study was conducted to compare cold UW (University of Wisconsin) preservation with conventional culture based on insulin secretory capacity in vitro and in vivo. Islets isolated from Wistar rats were either cultured for 24 h at 37°C in RPMI1640 medium or DMEM containing various concentrations of glucose or preserved for the same period in UW solution or in DMEM solution at 4°C. The islet yield in UW group, but not in other groups, was maintained as comparable with that of fresh islets. Insulin secretory capacity in response to glucose was maintained only in the islets of UW group, but not in other groups. SCID mice given 300 IEQ islets of UW group showed gradual restoration of normoglycemia as found in the mice given freshly isolated islets. Meanwhile, those mice given cultured islets for 24 h at 37°C in RPMI1640 medium showed rapid decrease of blood glucose levels on day 1 followed by relatively elevated levels on day 2, suggesting unstable insulin secretory capacity of islets.   Morphological staining with anti-HMGB1 (high mobility group B1) antibody revealed central damage of islets in all culture groups regardless of glucose concentration and in islets of cold DMEM group, whereas those in the UW group were quite intact. These results suggest that cold preservation in UW solution is simple and beneficial in protecting islets morphologically and functionally before transplantation.

  15. Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Espana, A.; Joly, A.G.; Hess, W.P.; Dickinson, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    As advances continue to be made in laser technology there is an increasing demand for materials that have high thresholds for laser-induced damage. Laser damage occurs when light is absorbed, creating defects in the crystal lattice. These defects can lead to the emission of atoms, ions and molecules from the sample. One specific field where laser damage is of serious concern is semiconductor lithography, which is beginning to use light at a wavelength of 157 nm. CaF2 is a candidate material for use in this new generation of lithography. In order to prevent unnecessary damage of optical components, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for laser damage and the factors that serve to enhance it. In this research, we study various aspects of laser interactions with CaF2, including impurity absorbance and various forms of damage caused by incident laser light. Ultraviolet (UV) laser light at 266 nm with both femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) pulse widths is used to induce ion and neutral particle emission from cleaved samples of CaF2. The resulting mass spectra show significant differences suggesting that different mechanisms for desorption occur following excitation using the different pulse durations. Following irradiation by ns pulses at 266 nm, multiple single-photon absorption from defect states is likely responsible for ion emission whereas the fs case is driven by a multi-photon absorption process. This idea is further supported by the measurements made of the transmission and reflection of fs laser pulses at 266 nm, the results of which reveal a non-linear absorption process in effect at high incident intensities. In addition, the kinetic energy profiles of desorbed Ca and K contaminant atoms are different indicating that a different mechanism is responsible for their emission as well. Overall, these results show that purity plays a key role in the desorption of atoms from CaF2 when using ns pulses. On the other hand, once the irradiance reaches high

  16. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Apoptosis in Pancreatic Islet Endothelial Cells via NF-κB-Activated Cyclooxygenase-2/Prostaglandin E2 Up-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Kuo-Cheng; Chiu, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Chia-Wei; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Huang, Kuo-Tong; Tsai, Keh-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular complications eventually affect nearly all patients with diabetes. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) resulting from hyperglycemia are a complex and heterogeneous group of compounds that accumulate in the plasma and tissues in diabetic patients. They are responsible for both endothelial dysfunction and diabetic vasculopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of AGEs on pancreatic islet microvascular endothelial cells. The mechanism underlying the apoptotic effect of AGEs in pancreatic islet endothelial cell line MS1 was explored. The results showed that AGEs significantly decreased MS1 cell viability and induced MS1 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. AGEs dose-dependently increased the expressions of cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in MS1 cells. Treatment of MS1 cells with AGEs also resulted in increased nuclear factor (NF)-κB-p65 phosphorylation and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression. However, AGEs did not affect the expressions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related molecules in MS1 cells. Pretreatment with NS398 (a COX-2 inhibitor) to inhibit prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production reversed the induction of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, and MS1 cell viability. Moreover, AGEs significantly increased the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) protein expression in MS1 cells, which could be reversed by RAGE neutralizing antibody. RAGE Neutralizing antibody could also reverse the induction of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP and decreased cell viability induced by AGEs. These results implicate the involvement of NF-κB-activated COX-2/PGE2 up-regulation in AGEs/RAGE-induced islet endothelial cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity. These findings may provide insight into the pathological processes within the pancreatic islet microvasculature induced by AGEs accumulation. PMID:25898207

  17. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  18. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21) Protects against High Fat Diet Induced Inflammation and Islet Hyperplasia in Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Garima; Fisher, ffolliott Martin; Chee, Melissa J.; Tan, Tze Guan; El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Adams, Andrew C.; Najarian, Robert; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Benoist, Christophe; Flier, Jeffrey S.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an important endocrine metabolic regulator expressed in multiple tissues including liver and adipose tissue. Although highest levels of expression are in pancreas, little is known about the function of FGF21 in this tissue. In order to understand the physiology of FGF21 in the pancreas, we analyzed its expression and regulation in both acinar and islet tissues. We found that acinar tissue express 20-fold higher levels than that observed in islets. We also observed that pancreatic FGF21 is nutritionally regulated; a marked reduction in FGF21 expression was noted with fasting while obesity is associated with 3–4 fold higher expression. Acinar and islet cells are targets of FGF21, which when systemically administered, leads to phosphorylation of the downstream target ERK 1/2 in about half of acinar cells and a small subset of islet cells. Chronic, systemic FGF21 infusion down-regulates its own expression in the pancreas. Mice lacking FGF21 develop significant islet hyperplasia and periductal lymphocytic inflammation when fed with a high fat obesogenic diet. Inflammatory infiltrates consist of TCRb+ Thy1+ T lymphocytes with increased levels of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Increased levels of inflammatory cells were coupled with elevated expression of cytokines such as TNFα, IFNγ and IL1β. We conclude that FGF21 acts to limit islet hyperplasia and may also prevent pancreatic inflammation. PMID:26872145

  19. St. John's wort extract and hyperforin protect rat and human pancreatic islets against cytokine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Michela; Beffy, Pascale; Menegazzi, Marta; De Tata, Vincenzo; Martino, Luisa; Sgarbossa, Anna; Porozov, Svetlana; Pippa, Anna; Masini, Matilde; Marchetti, Piero; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2014-02-01

    The extract of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort, SJW) and its component hyperforin (HPF) were previously shown to inhibit cytokine-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 and nuclear factor κB and prevent apoptosis in a cultured β-cell line. Objective of this study was to assess the protection exerted by SJW and HPF on isolated rat and human islets exposed to cytokines in vitro. Functional, ultrastructural, biomolecular and cell death evaluation studies were performed. In both rat and human islets, SJW and HPF counteracted cytokine-induced functional impairment and down-regulated mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory target genes, such as iNOS, CXCL9, CXCL10, COX2. Cytokine-induced NO production from cultured islets, evaluated by nitrites measurement in the medium, was significantly reduced in the presence of the vegetal compounds. Noteworthy, the increase in apoptosis and necrosis following 48-h exposure to cytokines was fully prevented by SJW and partially by HPF. Ultrastructural morphometric analysis in human islets exposed to cytokines for 20 h showed that SJW or HPF avoided early β-cell damage (e.g., mitochondrial alterations and loss of insulin granules). In conclusion, SJW compounds protect rat and human islets against cytokine effects by counteracting key mechanisms of cytokine-mediated β-cell injury and represent promising pharmacological tools for prevention or limitation of β-cell dysfunction and loss in type 1 diabetes.

  20. Insulin hypersecretion in islets from diet-induced hyperinsulinemic obese female mice is associated with several functional adaptations in individual β-cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Merino, Beatriz; Marroquí, Laura; Ñeco, Patricia; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Caballero-Garrido, Ernesto; Vieira, Elaine; Soriano, Sergi; Gomis, Ramon; Nadal, Angel; Quesada, Ivan

    2013-10-01

    Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are generally associated with obesity. Obese nondiabetic individuals develop a compensatory β-cell response to adjust insulin levels to the increased demand, maintaining euglycemia. Although several studies indicate that this compensation relies on structural changes, the existence of β-cell functional adaptations is incompletely understood. Here, we fed female mice with a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. These animals became obese, hyperinsulinemic, insulin-resistant, and mildly glucose-intolerant while fed, and fasting glycemia was comparable in HFD and control mice. Islets from HFD animals exhibited increased β-cell mass and hypertrophy. Additionally, they had enhanced insulin gene expression and content and augmented glucose-induced insulin secretion. Electrophysiological examination of β-cells from both groups showed no differences in KATP channel open probability and conductance. However, action potentials elicited by glucose had larger amplitude in obese mice. Glucose-induced Ca²⁺ signals in intact islets, in isolated β-cells, and individual β-cells within islets were also increased in HFD mice. Additionally, a higher proportion of glucose-responsive cells was present in obese mice. In contrast, whole-cell Ca²⁺ current densities were similar in both groups. Capacitance measurements showed that depolarization-evoked exocytosis was enhanced in HFD β-cells compared with controls. Although this augment was not significant when capacitance increases of the whole β-cell population were normalized to cell size, the exocytotic output varied significantly when β-cells were distributed by size ranges. All these findings indicate that β-cell functional adaptations are present in the islet compensatory response to obesity.

  1. Compensatory hyperinsulinemia in high-fat diet-induced obese mice is associated with enhanced insulin translation in islets

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Ayumi; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Masuda, Katsuhisa; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Kimura-Koyanagi, Maki; Seino, Susumu; Ogawa, Wataru; Kido, Yoshiaki

    2015-03-13

    A high-fat diet (HF) is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia. Animal studies have shown compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells after high fat load, such as increased pancreatic β-cell mass, enhanced insulin secretion, and exocytosis. However, the effects of high fat intake on insulin synthesis are obscure. Here, we investigated whether insulin synthesis was altered in correlation with an HF diet, for the purpose of obtaining further understanding of the compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells. Mice fed an HF diet are obese, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic, and glucose intolerant. In islets of mice fed an HF diet, more storage of insulin was identified. We analyzed insulin translation in mouse islets, as well as in INS-1 cells, using non-radioisotope chemicals. We found that insulin translational levels were significantly increased in islets of mice fed an HF diet to meet systemic demand, without altering its transcriptional levels. Our data showed that not only increased pancreatic β-cell mass and insulin secretion but also elevated insulin translation is the major compensatory mechanism of pancreatic β-cells. - Highlights: • More stored insulin was recognized in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was not enhanced by fatty acids, but by insulin demand. • Insulin transcription was not altered in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was markedly enhanced in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Non-radioisotope chemicals were used to measure insulin translation in mouse islets.

  2. Correlation of polishing-induced shallow subsurface damages with laser-induced gray haze damages in fused silica optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang; Zhao, Heng; Wang, Gang; Zhou, Peifan; Ma, Ping

    2016-08-01

    Laser-induced damage in fused silica optics greatly restricts the performances of laser facilities. Gray haze damage, which is always initiated on ceria polished optics, is one of the most important damage morphologies in fused silica optics. In this paper, the laser-induced gray haze damages of four fused silica samples polished with CeO2, Al2O3, ZrO2, and colloidal silica slurries are investigated. Four samples all present gray haze damages with much different damage densities. Then, the polishing-induced contaminant and subsurface damages in four samples are analyzed. The results reveal that the gray haze damages could be initiated on the samples without Ce contaminant and are inclined to show a tight correlation with the shallow subsurface damages.

  3. Transplantation of allogeneic islets of Langerhans in the rat liver: effects of macrophage depletion on graft survival and microenvironment activation.

    PubMed

    Bottino, R; Fernandez, L A; Ricordi, C; Lehmann, R; Tsan, M F; Oliver, R; Inverardi, L

    1998-03-01

    Early impairment of islet function and graft loss limit the success of allogeneic islet transplantation. Nonspecific inflammatory events occurring at the transplant site immediately after grafting, involving the production of cytokines and free radicals and sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) activation, may contribute to islet cell damage. To evaluate whether Kupffer cell inactivation would result in prolonged allograft survival in a model system of intrahepatic islet transplantation in rats, we systemically administered either gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) or dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP) to assess the effects of macrophage inactivation on rejection and on the release of proinflammatory molecules, as well as to assess the functional profile of SEC. The results obtained were compared with those observed in untreated, sham-injected animals and in rats receiving intraportal infusions of microbeads. Transient macrophage inhibition, particularly in hepatic Kupffer cells, is associated with significant prolongation of graft survival after intraportal islet allotransplantation (ITx) in rats: 7.2 days in the control group versus 11.9 days in the GdCl3 group (P < 0.01) and 15.6 days in the Cl2MDP group (P < 0.0006), respectively. Although systemic release of inflammatory mediators was observed only when islet transplantations were performed and it could be inhibited by macrophage-targeting treatments, perturbation of the functional profile of endothelial cells was also observed when microembolization was induced by the use of microbeads and could not be prevented by macrophage inhibition. These experiments provide evidence to support the concept that macrophages play a key role in early inflammatory events known to adversely affect islet engraftment and suggest that manipulation of nonspecific immune activation by inhibition of macrophage function may facilitate hepatic engraftment of islet allografts. The mechanisms mediating this effect are likely to include

  4. Suppression of ROS Production by Exendin-4 in PSC Attenuates the High Glucose-Induced Islet Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Won; Park, Shin-Young; You, Young-Hye; Ham, Dong-Sik; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yang, Hae Kyung; Jeong, In-Kyung; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a major role to fibrotic islet destruction observed in diabetic patients and animal model of diabetes. Exendin-4 (Ex-4) is a potent insulinotropic agent and has been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, there have been no reports demonstrating the effects of Ex-4 on pancreatic islet fibrosis. In this study, Ex-4 treatment clearly attenuated fibrotic islet destruction and improved glucose tolerance and islet survival. GLP-1 receptor expression was upregulated during activation and proliferation of PSCs by hyperglycemia. The activation of PKA pathway by Ex-4 plays a role in ROS production and angiotensin II (Ang II) production. Exposure to high glucose stimulated ERK activation and Ang II-TGF- β1 production in PSCs. Interestingly, Ex-4 significantly reduced Ang II and TGF-β1 production by inhibition of ROS production but not ERK phosphorylation. Ex-4 may be useful not only as an anti-diabetic agent but also as an anti-fibrotic agent in type 2 diabetes due to its ability to inhibit PSC activation and proliferation and improve islet fibrosis in OLETF rats. PMID:27977690

  5. Palmitic acid-rich diet suppresses glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreatic islets in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takumi; Kawai, Toshihide; Hirose, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kumiko; Kurosawa, Hideaki; Fujii, Chikako; Fujita, Haruhisa; Seto, Yoshiko; Matsumoto, Hideo; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to clarify whether dietary palmitic acid supplementation affects glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway in pancreatic islets in mice. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into three treatment diet groups: control diet, palmitic acid-supplemented diet (PAL) and oleic acid-supplemented diet (OLE). After 2 weeks of treatment, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test were performed. GSIS was assessed by pancreatic perfusion in situ with basal (100 mg/dL) glucose followed by a high (300 mg/dL) glucose concentration. We measured mRNA levels of ER stress markers such as C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (BIP) and X-box binding protein (XBP)-1 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses in isolated islets. Immunohistochemical staining was also performed. Mice fed PAL showed significantly decreased glucose tolerance (p < 0.05). In the perfusion study, GSIS was significantly suppressed in the PAL group (p < 0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed that islet CHOP, BIP, and XBP-1 mRNA expression were significantly increased in the PAL group (p < 0.05). TUNEL-positive β-cells were not detected in all groups. Dietary palmitic acid-supplementation for 2 weeks might suppress GSIS and induce ER stress in pancreatic islets in mice, in the early stage of lipotoxicity.

  6. Factors controlling pancreatic islet neogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, A.; Pittenger, G.; Rafaeloff, R.; Rosenberg, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have established a model in which cellophane wrapping induces reiteration of the normal ontogeny of beta-cell differentiation from ductal tissue. The secretion of insulin is physiologic and coordinated to the needs of the animal. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in hamsters can be "cured" at least half the time. There appears to be activation of growth factor(s) within the pancreas, acting in an autocrine, paracrine, or juxtacrine manner to induce ductal cell proliferation and differentiation into functioning beta cells. Given the results of our studies to date, it does not seem premature to envisage new approaches to the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Identification of the factor(s) regulating islet-cell proliferation and differentiation in our model may permit islets to be grown in culture. This concept could be extended to induce endocrine cell differentiation in vitro as well. Furthermore, islet-cell growth factors could be used to provide "trophic support" to islet transplants as a means of maintaining graft viability. There may also be greater scope for gene therapy when the growth factor(s) have been isolated, purified, sequenced, and cloned. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 9 PMID:1364089

  7. UCP2 mRNA expression is dependent on glucose metabolism in pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA levels are decreased in islets of Langerhans from glucokinase deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA up-regulation by glucose is dependent on glucokinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of UCP2 increases GSIS of glucokinase heterozygous pancreatic islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This may protect glucokinase deficient mice from hyperglycemic damages. -- Abstract: Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) is expressed in the pancreatic {beta}-cell, where it partially uncouples the mitochondrial proton gradient, decreasing both ATP-production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Increased glucose levels up-regulate UCP2 mRNA and protein levels, but the mechanism for UCP2 up-regulation in response to increased glucose is unknown. The aim was to examine the effects of glucokinase (GK) deficiency on UCP2 mRNA levels and to characterize the interaction between UCP2 and GK with regard to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. UCP2 mRNA expression was reduced in GK+/- islets and GK heterozygosity prevented glucose-induced up-regulation of islet UCP2 mRNA. In contrast to UCP2 protein function UCP2 mRNA regulation was not dependent on superoxide generation, but rather on products of glucose metabolism, because MnTBAP, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, did not prevent the glucose-induced up-regulation of UCP2. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was increased in UCP2-/- and GK+/- islets compared with GK+/- islets and UCP2 deficiency improved glucose tolerance of GK+/- mice. Accordingly, UCP2 deficiency increased ATP-levels of GK+/- mice. Thus, the compensatory down-regulation of UCP2 is involved in preserving the insulin secretory capacity of GK mutant mice and might also be implicated in limiting disease progression in MODY2 patients.

  8. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  9. Macroporous Three Dimensional PDMS Scaffolds for Extrahepatic Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Eileen; Brady, Ann-Christina; Fraker, Christopher A.; Molano, R. Damaris; Sukert, Steven; Berman, Dora M.; Kenyon, Norma S.; Pileggi, Antonello; Ricordi, Camillo; Stabler, Cherie L.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation has demonstrated success in treating type 1 diabetes. A current limitation is the intrahepatic portal vein transplant site, which is prone to mechanical stress and inflammation. Transplantation of pancreatic islets into alternative sites is preferable, but challenging, as it may require a three-dimensional vehicle to confer mechanical protection and to confine islets to a well-defined, retrievable space where islet neovascularization can occur. We have fabricated biostable, macroporous scaffolds from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and investigated islet retention and distribution, metabolic function, and glucose-dependent insulin secretion within these materials. Islets from multiple sources, including rodents, non-human primates, and humans, were tested in vitro. We observed high islet retention and distribution within PDMS scaffolds, with retention of small islets (< 100 µm) improved through the post-loading addition of fibrin gel. Islets loaded within PDMS scaffolds exhibited viability and function comparable to standard culture conditions when incubated under normal oxygen tensions, but displayed improved viability compared to standard two-dimensional culture controls under low oxygen tensions. In vivo efficacy of scaffolds to support islet grafts was evaluated after transplantation in the omental pouch of chemically-induced diabetic syngeneic rats, which promptly achieved normoglycemia. Collectively, these results are promising in that they indicate the potential for transplanting islets into a clinically relevant, extrahepatic site that provides spatial distribution of islets, as well as intra-device vascularization. PMID:23031502

  10. Glucose cycling in islets from healthy and diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.; Chandramouli, V.; Ostenson, C.G.; Loew, H.L.; Landau, B.R.; Efendic, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Pancreatic islets from healthy (control) and neonatally streptozocin-induced diabetic (STZ-D) rats, a model for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, were incubated with {sup 3}H{sub 2}O and 5.5 or 16.7 mM glucose. At 5.5 mM glucose, no detectable ({sup 3}H)glucose was formed. At 16.7 mM, 2.2 patom.islet-1.h-1 of {sup 3}H was incorporated into glucose by the control islets and 5.4 patom.islet-1.h-1 by STZ-D islets. About 75% of the {sup 3}H was bound to carbon-2 of the glucose. Glucose utilization was 35.3 pmol.islet-1.h-1 by the control and 19.0 pmol.islet-1.h-1 by the STZ-D islets. Therefore, 4.5% of the glucose-6-phosphate formed by the control islets and 15.7% by the STZ-D islets was dephosphorylated. This presumably occurred in the beta-cells of the islets catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphatase. An increased glucose cycling, i.e., glucose----glucose-6-phosphate----glucose, in islets of STZ-D rats may contribute to the decreased insulin secretion found in these animals.

  11. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live. Transplanted islet cells, however, can take over the work of the destroyed cells. The beta cells in these islets will begin to make and release insulin. Researchers hope islet transplantation will help people with ...

  12. Copper deficiency potentiates ethanol induced liver damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zidenberg-Cherr, S.; Han, B.; Graham, T.W.; Keen, C.L. )

    1992-02-26

    Copper sufficient (+Cu) and deficient ({minus}Cu) rats were fed liquid diets with EtOH or dextrose at 36% of kcals for 2 mo. Consumption of either the {minus}Cu diet or EtOH resulted in lower liver CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were lowest in EtOH/{minus}Cu rats; being 20% and 50% of control values, respectively. Ethanol resulted in higher MnSOD activity in +Cu and {minus}Cu rats. Low Cu intake as well as EtOH resulted in lower mitochondrial (Mit) TBARS relative to controls. TBARS were lowest in Mit from EtOH/{minus}Cu rats. Microsomal (Micro) TBARS were lower in {minus}Cu and EtOH-fed rats than in controls. The peroxidizability index (PI) was calculated as an index of substrate availability for lipid peroxidation. Ethanol feeding resulted in lower PI's in Mit and Micro than measured in non-EtOH rats. There was a positive correlation between Micro PI's and TBARS. These results show that despite reductions in components of antioxidant defense, compensatory mechanism arise resulting in reduction in peroxidation targets and/or an increase in alternate free radical quenching factors. Histological examination demonstrated increased portal and intralobular connective tissue and cell necrosis in EtOH/{minus}Cu rats, suggesting that Cu may be a critical modulator of EtOH induced tissue damage.

  13. Acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2006-10-01

    Chronic administration of acrylonitrile results in a dose-related increase in astrocytomas in rat brain, but the mechanism of acrylonitrile carcinogenicity is not fully understood. The potential of acrylonitrile or its metabolites to induce direct DNA damage as a mechanism for acrylonitrile carcinogenicity has been questioned, and recent studies indicate that the mechanism involves the induction of oxidative stress in rat brain. The present study examined the ability of acrylonitrile to induce DNA damage in the DI TNC1 rat astrocyte cell line using the alkaline Comet assay. Oxidized DNA damage also was evaluated using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase treatment in the modified Comet assay. No increase in direct DNA damage was seen in astrocytes exposed to sublethal concentrations of acrylonitrile (0-1.0 mM) for 24 hr. However, acrylonitrile treatment resulted in a concentration-related increase in oxidative DNA damage after 24 hr. Antioxidant supplementation in the culture media (alpha-tocopherol, (-)-epigallocathechin-3 gallate, or trolox) reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage. Depletion of glutathione using 0.1 mM DL-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine increased acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (22-46%), while cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 2.5 mM L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, a precursor for glutathione biosynthesis, significantly reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (7-47%). Cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 0.5 mM 1-aminobenzotriazole, a suicidal inhibitor of cytochrome P450, prevented the oxidative DNA damage produced by acrylonitrile. Cyanide (0.1-0.5 mM) increased oxidative DNA damage (44-160%) in astrocytes. These studies demonstrate that while acrylonitrile does not directly damage astrocyte DNA, it does increase oxidative DNA damage. The oxidative DNA damage following acrylonitrile exposure appears to arise mainly through the P450 metabolic pathway; moreover, glutathione depletion may contribute to the

  14. Impact of Size in Pancreatic Islet Transplantation and Potential Interventions to Improve Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Daria; Phan, Tammy; Sequi, Marco; Lin, Yong; Freeman, Daniel H.; Cicalese, Luca; Rastellini, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Better results have been recently reported in clinical pancreatic islet transplantation (ITX) due mostly to improved isolation techniques and immunosuppression; however, some limitations still exist. It is known that following transplantation from 30 to 60% of the islets is lost. In our study, we have investigated: 1) the role of size as a factor affecting islet engraftment and, 2) potential procedural manipulations to increase the number of smaller functional islets that can be transplanted. C57/BL10 mice were used as donors and recipients in a syngeneic islet transplant model. Isolated islets were divided by size (large, >300 µm; medium 150–300 µm; small, ρ50 µm). Each size was transplanted in chemically induced diabetic mice as full (600 IEq), suboptimal (400 IEq), and marginal mass (200 IEq). Control animals received all size islets. Engraftment was defined as reversal of diabetes by day 7 post-transplantation. When the superiority of smaller islets was observed, strategies of over-digestion and fragmentation were adopted during islet isolation in the attempt to reduce islet size and improve engraftment. Smaller islets were significantly superior in engraftment as compared to medium, large, and control (all sizes) groups. This was more evident when marginal mass data were compared. In all masses, success decreased as islet sizes increased. Once islets were engrafted, functionality was not affected by size. When larger islets were fragmented, a significant decrease in islet functionality was observed. On the contrary, if pancreata were slightly over-digested, although not as successful as small naive islets, an increase in engraftment was observed when compared to the control group. In conclusion, smaller islets are superior in engraftment following islet transplantation. Fragmentation has a deleterious effect on islet engraftment. Islet isolations can be performed reducing islet size with slight over-digestion and it can be safely adopted to improve

  15. The transcription factor HNF1α induces expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in pancreatic islets from evolutionarily conserved promoter motifs.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kim Brint; Chhabra, Kavaljit H; Nguyen, Van K; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has previously been shown to be critical for maintaining glycemia and β-cell function. Efforts to maintain or increase ACE2 expression in pancreatic β-cells might therefore have therapeutic potential for treating diabetes. In our study, we investigated the transcriptional role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) in induction of ACE2 expression in insulin-secreting cells. A deficient allele of HNF1α or HNF1β causes maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) types 3 and 5, respectively, in humans. We found that ACE2 is primarily transcribed from the proximal part of the ACE2 promoter in the pancreas. In the proximal part of the human ACE2 promoter, we further identified three functional HNF1 binding sites, as they have binding affinity for HNF1α and HNF1β and are required for induction of promoter activity by HNF1β in insulinoma cells. These three sites are well-conserved among mammalian species. Both HNF1α and HNF1β induce expression of ACE2 mRNA and lead to elevated levels of ACE2 protein and ACE2 enzymatic activity in insulinoma cells. Furthermore, HNF1α dose-dependently increases ACE2 expression in primary pancreatic islet cells. We conclude that HNF1α can induce the expression of ACE2 in pancreatic islet cells via evolutionarily conserved HNF1 binding sites in the ACE2 promoter. Potential therapeutics aimed at counteracting functional HNF1α depletion in diabetes and MODY3 will thus have ACE2 induction in pancreatic islets as a likely beneficial effect.

  16. Heat induced damage detection in composite materials by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzieński, Maciej; Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2015-03-01

    In recent years electromagnetic Terahertz (THz) radiation or T-ray has been increasingly used for nondestructive evaluation of various materials such as polymer composites and porous foam tiles in which ultrasonic waves cannot penetrate but T-ray can. Most of these investigations have been limited to mechanical damage detection like inclusions, cracks, delaminations etc. So far only a few investigations have been reported on heat induced damage detection. Unlike mechanical damage the heat induced damage does not have a clear interface between the damaged part and the surrounding intact material from which electromagnetic waves can be reflected back. Difficulties associated with the heat induced damage detection in composite materials using T-ray are discussed in detail in this paper. T-ray measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure of composite specimens.

  17. Changes in histochemically detectable calcium and zinc during tolbutamide-induced degranulation and subsequent regranulation of rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Wolters, G H; Pasma, A; Wiegman, J B; Konijnendijk, W

    1983-01-01

    Secretory granules of pancreatic B-cells contain high concentrations of zinc and calcium. The effect of gradual degranulation (induced by tolbutamide over a period of 3 days) and the subsequent regranulation (over a period of 4 days) on the histochemically detectable zinc (Zn) and calcium (Ca) content of B-cells was investigated. Zn was stained by dithizone, Ca by glyoxal-bis-(2-hydroxyanil), (GBHA), and B-granules by aldehyde fuchsin (AF). The staining intensities were determined cytophotometrically. A decrease of the granulation by 50% causes a comparable decrease of the Zn content. Almost complete degranulations, however, hardly further diminished the Zn content. Regranulation restores the Zn content parallel to the granulation. The presence of 40% of the initial Zn content in degranulated B-cells suggests the existence of a non-granular Zn fraction. The Zn content of B-cells may be partly involved in the storage of insulin as a Zn-insulin complex in the secretory vesicles. A-cells, however, contain even more (+ 30%) Zn than B-cells. Degranulation of B-cells is accompanied by a moderate decrease of the zinc content of the A-cells. The function of Zn in A-cells is completely unknown. Degranulation of B-cells causes the GBHA-Ca content to decrease to a very low level parallel to the AF-positive granulation. During regranulation the GBHA-Ca content restores parallel to the granulation and reaches after complete regranulation a slightly higher level than in untreated control rats. Almost complete disappearance of CBHA-Ca in the B-cells is accompanied by a decrease of the total islet calcium content of 33%. The results indicate that GBHA stains a Ca fraction which is mainly localized to the secretory granules. The stainability of granular Ca by GBHA is probably based on: a) the high Ca concentration in the granules, b) the presence of ionized Ca in the granules, due to the low intragranular pH, and c) on the properties of GBHA, which stains, under conditions used

  18. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jamaludin; Nazratun Nafizah, A. H.; Zariyantey, A. H.; Budin, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease that occurs in both developed and developing countries. This metabolic disease affects all systems in the body, including the liver. Hyperglycaemia, mainly caused by insulin resistance, affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can further progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and, finally, hepatocellular carcinomas. The underlying mechanism of diabetes that contributes to liver damage is the combination of increased oxidative stress and an aberrant inflammatory response; this activates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes and damages hepatocytes. Significant involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α—exacerbates the accumulation of oxidative damage products in the liver, such as malondialdehyde, fluorescent pigments and conjugated dienes. This review summarises the biochemical, histological and macromolecular changes that contribute to oxidative liver damage among diabetic individuals. PMID:27226903

  19. Relationship of gonadal activity and chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Crawford, J.D.

    1988-04-08

    The authors tested the hypothesis that chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage is proportional to the degree of gonadal activity during treatment. Thirty studies that evaluated gonadal function after cyclophosphamide therapy for renal disease or combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease or acute lymphocytic leukemia provided data for analysis. Data were stratified according to sex, illness, chemotherapeutic regimen and dose, and pubertal stage at the time of treatment. Chemotherapy-induced damage was more likely to occur in patients who were treated when sexually mature compared with those who were treated when prepubertal. Males were significantly more frequently affected than females when treated for renal disease of Hodgkin's disease. Chemotherapy-induced damage was also more likely to occur when patients were treated with large doses of alkylating agents. These data suggest that chemotherapy-induced damage is proportional to gonadal activity. Further efforts are needed to test whether induced gonadal quiescence during chemotherapy will reduce the strikingly high incidence of gonadal failure following chemotherapy.

  20. Pancreatic islet regeneration and some liver biochemical parameters of leaf extracts of Vitex doniana in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Oche, Okpe; Sani, Ibrahim; Chilaka, Njoku Godwin; Samuel, Ndidi Uche; Samuel, Atabo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test two water soluble extracts (aqueous and ethanolic) obtained from the leaves of Vitex doniana in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats for their effects on pancreatic endocrine tissues and serum marker enzymes for a period of 21 d. Methods A total of 55 rats divided into 11 groups of 5 rats each were assigned into diabetic and non-diabetic groups and followed by a daily administration of ethanolic and aqueous extracts for 21 d. Group 1 was the normal control while group 7 was treated with standard drug. Results The histopathological studies of the diabetic rats indicated increase in the volume density of islets, percent of β-cells and size of islet in the groups that received the plant extracts, which suggested regeneration of β-cells along with β-cells repairs, as compared with the non-treated diabetic control which showed complete degeneration of the islet cells. There was significant reduction (P<0.05) in the serum activities of marker enzymes, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase in diabetes treated rats, whereas an insignificant increase (P>0.01) in the serum activities of marker enzymes was observed for non-diabetic treated rats. Results of total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and unconjugated bilirubin showed that diabetic control group was significantly higher (P<0.05) in total bilirubin and unconjugated bilirubin compared with treated groups while non-diabetic treated groups showed no significant increase (P>0.01) in total bilirubin and direct bilirubin compared with the normal control. Conclusion This herbal therapy appears to bring about repair/regeneration of the endocrine pancreas and hepatic cells protection in the diabetic rat. PMID:25182283

  1. Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F.

    1993-06-01

    The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

  2. An inducible long noncoding RNA amplifies DNA damage signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Adam M.; Garcia, Julia T.; Hung, Tiffany; Flynn, Ryan A.; Shen, Ying; Qu, Kun; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Broz, Daniela Kenzelmann; Baum, Rachel; Guo, Shuling; Chen, James K.; Attardi, Laura D.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalent genes with frequently exquisite regulation but mostly unknown functions. Here we demonstrate a role of lncRNAs in guiding organismal DNA damage response. DNA damage activates transcription of DINO (Damage Induced NOncoding) via p53. DINO is required for p53-dependent gene expression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, and DINO expression suffice to activate damage signaling and cell cycle arrest in the absence of DNA damage. DINO binds to and promotes p53 protein stabilization, mediating a p53 auto-amplification loop. Dino knockout or promoter inactivation in mice dampens p53 signaling and ameliorates acute radiation syndrome in vivo. Thus, inducible lncRNA can create a feedback loop with its cognate transcription factor to amplify cellular signaling networks. PMID:27668660

  3. Antibody Response to Serpin B13 Induces Adaptive Changes in Mouse Pancreatic Islets and Slows Down the Decline in the Residual Beta Cell Function in Children with Recent Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kryvalap, Yury; Lo, Chi-Wen; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Baldzizhar, Raman; Jospe, Nicholas; Czyzyk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is characterized by a heightened antibody (Ab) response to pancreatic islet self-antigens, which is a biomarker of progressive islet pathology. We recently identified a novel antibody to clade B serpin that reduces islet-associated T cell accumulation and is linked to the delayed onset of T1D. As natural immunity to clade B arises early in life, we hypothesized that it may influence islet development during that time. To test this possibility healthy young Balb/c male mice were injected with serpin B13 mAb or IgG control and examined for the number and cellularity of pancreatic islets by immunofluorescence and FACS. Beta cell proliferation was assessed by measuring nucleotide analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-EdU) incorporation into the DNA and islet Reg gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Human studies involved measuring anti-serpin B13 autoantibodies by Luminex. We found that injecting anti-serpin B13 monoclonal Ab enhanced beta cell proliferation and Reg gene expression, induced the generation of ∼80 pancreatic islets per animal, and ultimately led to increase in the beta cell mass. These findings are relevant to human T1D because our analysis of subjects just diagnosed with T1D revealed an association between baseline anti-serpin activity and slower residual beta cell function decline in the first year after the onset of diabetes. Our findings reveal a new role for the anti-serpin immunological response in promoting adaptive changes in the endocrine pancreas and suggests that enhancement of this response could potentially help impede the progression of T1D in humans.

  4. Antibody Response to Serpin B13 Induces Adaptive Changes in Mouse Pancreatic Islets and Slows Down the Decline in the Residual Beta Cell Function in Children with Recent Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus*

    PubMed Central

    Kryvalap, Yury; Lo, Chi-Wen; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Baldzizhar, Raman; Jospe, Nicholas; Czyzyk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is characterized by a heightened antibody (Ab) response to pancreatic islet self-antigens, which is a biomarker of progressive islet pathology. We recently identified a novel antibody to clade B serpin that reduces islet-associated T cell accumulation and is linked to the delayed onset of T1D. As natural immunity to clade B arises early in life, we hypothesized that it may influence islet development during that time. To test this possibility healthy young Balb/c male mice were injected with serpin B13 mAb or IgG control and examined for the number and cellularity of pancreatic islets by immunofluorescence and FACS. Beta cell proliferation was assessed by measuring nucleotide analog 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (5-EdU) incorporation into the DNA and islet Reg gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Human studies involved measuring anti-serpin B13 autoantibodies by Luminex. We found that injecting anti-serpin B13 monoclonal Ab enhanced beta cell proliferation and Reg gene expression, induced the generation of ∼80 pancreatic islets per animal, and ultimately led to increase in the beta cell mass. These findings are relevant to human T1D because our analysis of subjects just diagnosed with T1D revealed an association between baseline anti-serpin activity and slower residual beta cell function decline in the first year after the onset of diabetes. Our findings reveal a new role for the anti-serpin immunological response in promoting adaptive changes in the endocrine pancreas and suggests that enhancement of this response could potentially help impede the progression of T1D in humans. PMID:26578518

  5. Justifying clinical trials for porcine islet xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Cara E; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Edmonton Protocol encouraged a great deal of optimism that a cell-based cure for type I diabetes could be achieved. However, donor organ shortages prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread solution as the supply cannot possibly equal the demand. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has the potential to address these shortages, and recent preclinical and clinical trials show promising scientific support. Consequently, it is important to consider whether the current science meets the ethical requirements for moving toward clinical trials. Despite the potential risks and the scientific unknowns that remain to be investigated, there is optimism regarding the xenotransplantation of some types of tissue, and enough evidence has been gathered to ethically justify clinical trials for the most safe and advanced area of research, porcine islet transplantation. Researchers must make a concerted effort to maintain a positive image for xenotransplantation, as a few well-publicized failed trials could irrevocably damage public perception of xenotransplantation. Because all of society carries the burden of risk, it is important that the public be involved in the decision to proceed. As new information from preclinical and clinical trials develops, policy decisions should be frequently updated. If at any point evidence shows that islet xenotransplantation is unsafe, then clinical trials will no longer be justified and they should be halted. However, as of now, the expected benefit of an unlimited supply of islets, combined with adequate informed consent, justifies clinical trials for islet xenotransplantation.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA damage by bleomycin induces AML cell death.

    PubMed

    Yeung, ManTek; Hurren, Rose; Nemr, Carine; Wang, Xiaoming; Hershenfeld, Samantha; Gronda, Marcela; Liyanage, Sanduni; Wu, Yan; Augustine, Jeevan; Lee, Eric A; Spagnuolo, Paul A; Southall, Noel; Chen, Catherine; Zheng, Wei; Jeyaraju, Danny V; Minden, Mark D; Laposa, Rebecca; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own 16.6 kb circular genome. To explore the impact of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage on mitochondrial (mt) function and viability of AML cells, we screened a panel of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic agents to identify drugs that could damage mtDNA. We identified bleomycin as an agent that damaged mtDNA in AML cells at concentrations that induced cell death. Bleomycin also induced mtDNA damage in primary AML samples. Consistent with the observed mtDNA damage, bleomycin reduced mt mass and basal oxygen consumption in AML cells. We also demonstrated that the observed mtDNA damage was functionally important for bleomycin-induced cell death. Finally, bleomycin delayed tumor growth in xenograft mouse models of AML and anti-leukemic concentrations of the drug induced mtDNA damage in AML cells preferentially over normal lung tissue. Taken together, mtDNA-targeted therapy may be an effective strategy to target AML cells and bleomycin could be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  7. Preventing Ultraviolet Light-Induced Damage: The Benefits of Antioxidants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Cheng-Wai

    2007-01-01

    Extracts of fruit peels contain antioxidants that protect the bacterium "Escherichia coli" against damage induced by ultraviolet light. Antioxidants neutralise free radicals, thus preventing oxidative damage to cells and deoxyribonucleic acid. A high survival rate of UV-exposed cells was observed when grapefruit or grape peel extract was…

  8. Mechanisms of Microwave Induced Damage in Biologic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Activities and Microwave Exposures Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), an enzyme involved in the production of the polyamines putrescine and spermidine, has...f 0 0 Mechanisms of Microwave Induced N Damage in Biologic Materials I ,<DTIC .. E LECTEI I Annual Report S FEB08 1990 U January, 1989 m D EFFECTS OF...Clasufication) (U) Mechanisms of Microwave Induced Damage in Biologic Materials I 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) .3a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14

  9. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  10. Photoexcited riboflavin induces oxidative damage to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Yoshioka, Takuto

    2015-08-01

    Photoexcited riboflavin induced damage of human serum albumin (HSA), a water soluble protein, resulting in the diminishment of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue. Because riboflavin hardly photosensitized singlet oxygen generation and sodium azide, a singlet oxygen quencher, did not inhibit protein damage, electron transfer-mediated oxidation of HSA was speculated. Fluorescence lifetime of riboflavin was not affected by HSA, suggesting that the excited triplet state of riboflavin is responsible for protein damage through electron transfer. In addition, the preventive effect of xanthone derivatives, triplet quenchers, on photosensitized protein damage could be evaluated using this photosensitized reaction system of riboflavin and HSA.

  11. PWR fuel features to preclude externally induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shallenberger, J.M.; Wilson, J.F.; Knott, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past several years there have been instances of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel damage attributed to factors external to the fuel. These externally induced causes include debris in the reactor coolant and baffle jetting. These causes of PWR fuel damage account for --50% of the total number of damaged rods. This paper discusses two features that significantly reduce the potential for fuel damage due to debris and baffle jetting. These two features are the debris filter bottom nozzle (DFBN) and the antivibration clip.

  12. Experimental studies on islets isolation, purification and function in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xinlu; Xue, Wujun; Feng, Xinshun; Tian, Xiaohui; Teng, Yan; Ding, Xiaoming; Pan, Xiaoming; Guo, Qi; He, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    To develop a simple and effective method of islet isolation and purification in rats. Collagenase P was injected into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath to digest the pancreas and isolate islet, then discontinuous gravity gradient purification was used to purify the islet. The purified islets were identified by dithizone staining. The viability of islets was assessed by fluorescence staining of acridine orange (AO) and propidium iodide (PI). The function of purified islets was determined by glucose-stimulated insulin release test and transplantation of rat with streptozocin-induced diabetes. 738±193 islets were recovered after purification. The average purity was 77±13%, the viability of islets was more than 95%. When inspected by glucose stimulation, the secreted insulin concentration was 24.31±5.47 mIU/L when stimulated by low concentration glucose and 37.62±4.29 mIU/L by high concentration glucose. There was significant difference between the two phases (P<0.05). The blood sugar concentration recovered to normal level after two days in the animals with islet transplantation. In conclusion, islets can be procured with good function and shape by using the method of injecting collagenase into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath and purification using discontinuous gravity gradient.

  13. JANEX-1, a JAK3 inhibitor, protects pancreatic islets from cytokine toxicity through downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activation and the JAK/STAT pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Na; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Song, Mi-Young; Choi, Ha-Na; Moon, Woo Sung; Park, Sung-Joo; Park, Jin-Woo; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2009-07-15

    JANEX-1/WHI-P131, a selective Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) inhibitor, has been shown to delay the onset of diabetes in the NOD mouse model. However, the molecular mechanism by which JANEX-1 protects pancreatic {beta}-cells is unknown. In the current study, we investigated the role of JANEX-1 on interleukin (IL)-1{beta} and interferon (IFN)-{gamma}-induced {beta}-cell damage using isolated islets. JANEX-1-pretreated islets showed resistance to cytokine toxicity, namely suppressed nitric oxide (NO) production, reduced inducible form of NO synthase (iNOS) expression, and decreased islet destruction. The molecular mechanism by which JANEX-1 inhibits iNOS expression was mediated through suppression of the nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways. Islets treated with the cytokines downregulated the protein levels of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and SOCS-3, but pretreatment with JANEX-1 attenuated these decreases. Additionally, islets from JAK3{sup -/-} mice were more resistant to cytokine toxicity than islets from control mice. These results demonstrate that JANEX-1 protects {beta}-cells from cytokine toxicity through suppression of the NF-{kappa}B and JAK/STAT pathways and upregulation of SOCS proteins, suggesting that JANEX-1 may be used to preserve functional {beta}-cell mass.

  14. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  15. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  16. Chemically Induced Damage to the Hippocampal Formation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    31-42. Siesj0, B K (1981): Cell damage in the brain: A speculative synthe i, J Cereb Blood Flow Metabol 1, 155-85. Stefanis, C (1964): Hippocampal... serotonin effects on central neurons, Advanc Pharmacol 6A, 414-18. Storm-Mathisen, J (1972): Glutamate decarboxylase in the rat hippo- campal region...and chro- nic toluene inhalation on behavior and [ H]- serotonin binding in rat, Life Sciences 30, 1997-2002. Zimmer, L, Woolley, D and Chang, L (1985

  17. A Method for Performing Islet Transplantation Using Tissue-Engineered Sheets of Islets and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirabaru, Masataka; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kitasato, Amane; Ono, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Takayuki; Matsushima, Hajime; Sakai, Yusuke; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Okano, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have a protective effect on islet cells. Cell sheets developed using tissue engineering help maintain the function of the cells themselves. This study describes a tissue engineering approach using islets with MSC sheets to improve the therapeutic effect of islet transplantation. MSCs were obtained from Fischer 344 rats and engineered into cell sheets using temperature-responsive culture dishes. The islets obtained from Fischer 344 rats were seeded onto MSC sheets, and the islets with MSC sheets were harvested by low-temperature treatment after coculture. The functional activity of the islets with MSC sheets was confirmed by a histological examination, insulin secretion assay, and quantification of the levels of cytokines. The therapeutic effects of the islets with MSC sheets were investigated by transplanting the sheets at subcutaneous sites in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Improvement of islet function and viability was shown in situ on the MSC sheet, and the histological examination showed that the MSC sheet maintained adhesion factor on the surface. In the recipient mice, normoglycemia was maintained for at least 84 days after transplantation, and neovascularization was observed. These results demonstrated that islet transplantation in a subcutaneous site would be possible by using the MSC sheet as a scaffold for islets. PMID:26066973

  18. Growth factor protection against cytokine-induced apoptosis in neonatal rat islets of Langerhans: role of Fas.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M; Dunger, A M; Berg, S; Mabley, J; John, N; Green, M H; Green, I C

    1998-09-18

    Treatment of neonatal rat islets of Langerhans with combined cytokines (interleukin-1beta 10(-10) M, tumour necrosis factor-alpha 10(-10) M, interferon-gamma 5 U/ml) led to extensive cell death, which was potentiated by Fas activation with the anti-Fas cytolytic antibody JO2. Pre-treatment with insulin (25 ng/ml) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (10(-8)M) gave only partial protection against cell killing, but prevented the Fas-mediated component. In the absence of cytokine treatment, Fas-mediated killing was not observed.

  19. Molecular Structure, Membrane Interactions, and Toxicity of the Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Caillon, Lucie; Hoffmann, Anais R. F.; Botz, Alexandra; Khemtemourian, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major component of the amyloid deposits found in the pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Mature hIAPP, a 37-aa peptide, is natively unfolded in its monomeric state but forms islet amyloid in T2DM. In common with other misfolded and aggregated proteins, amyloid formation involves aggregation of monomers of hIAPP into oligomers, fibrils, and ultimately mature amyloid deposits. hIAPP is coproduced and stored with insulin by the pancreatic islet β-cells and is released in response to the stimuli that lead to insulin secretion. Accumulating evidence suggests that hIAPP amyloid deposits that accompany T2DM are not just an insignificant phenomenon derived from the disease progression but that hIAPP aggregation induces processes that impair the functionality and the viability of β-cells. In this review, we particularly focus on hIAPP structure, hIAPP aggregation, and hIAPP-membrane interactions. We will also discuss recent findings on the mechanism of hIAPP-membrane damage and on hIAPP-induced cell death. Finally, the development of successful antiamyloidogenic agents that prevent hIAPP fibril formation will be examined. PMID:26636105

  20. Distinct differences in the responses of the human pancreatic β-cell line EndoC-βH1 and human islets to proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Bryndon J; McGraw, Jennifer A; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Annamalai, Mani; Chen, Jing; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Davis, Dawn B; Corbett, John A; Mathews, Clayton E

    2015-09-01

    While insulinoma cells have been developed and proven to be extremely useful in studies focused on mechanisms controlling β-cell function and viability, translating findings to human β-cells has proven difficult because of the limited access to human islets and the absence of suitable insulinoma cell lines of human origin. Recently, a human β-cell line, EndoC-βH1, has been derived from human fetal pancreatic buds. The purpose of this study was to determine whether human EndoC-βH1 cells respond to cytokines in a fashion comparable to human islets. Unlike most rodent-derived insulinoma cell lines that respond to cytokines in a manner consistent with rodent islets, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to a combination of cytokines (IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF) in a manner consistent with human islets. Nitric oxide, produced following inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, is a major mediator of cytokine-induced human islet cell damage. We show that EndoC-βH1 cells fail to express iNOS or produce nitric oxide in response to this combination of cytokines. Inhibitors of iNOS prevent cytokine-induced loss of human islet cell viability; however, they do not prevent cytokine-induced EndoC-βH1 cell death. Stressed human islets or human islets expressing heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) are resistant to cytokines, and, much like stressed human islets, EndoC-βH1 cells express HSP70 under basal conditions. Elevated basal expression of HSP70 in EndoC-βH1 cells is consistent with the lack of iNOS expression in response to cytokine treatment. While expressing HSP70, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress activators, such as thapsigargin. These findings indicate that EndoC-βH1 cells do not faithfully recapitulate the response of human islets to cytokines. Therefore, caution should be exercised when making conclusions regarding the actions of cytokines on human islets when using this human-derived insulinoma cell line.

  1. Vitamin D3 restores altered cholinergic and insulin receptor expression in the cerebral cortex and muscarinic M3 receptor expression in pancreatic islets of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Peeyush T; Antony, Sherin; Nandhu, Mohan S; Sadanandan, Jayanarayanan; Naijil, George; Paulose, Chiramadathikudiyil S

    2011-05-01

    Nutritional therapy is a challenging but necessary dimension in the management of diabetes and neurodegenerative changes associated with it. The study evaluates the effect of vitamin D(3) in preventing the altered function of cholinergic, insulin receptors and GLUT3 in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. Muscarinic M3 acetylcholine receptors in pancreas control insulin secretion. Vitamin D(3) treatment in M3 receptor regulation in the pancreatic islets was also studied. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex of male Wistar rats. Immunocytochemistry of muscarinic M3 receptor was studied in the pancreatic islets using specific antibodies. Y-maze was used to evaluate the exploratory and spatial memory. Diabetes induced a decrease in muscarinic M1, insulin and vitamin D receptor expression and an increase in muscarinic M3, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, acetylcholine esterase and GLUT3 expression. Vitamin D(3) and insulin treatment reversed diabetes-induced alterations to near control. Diabetic rats showed a decreased Y-maze performance while vitamin D(3) supplementation improved the behavioural deficit. In conclusion, vitamin D(3) shows a potential therapeutic effect in normalizing diabetes-induced alterations in cholinergic, insulin and vitamin D receptor and maintains a normal glucose transport and utilisation in the cortex. In addition vitamin D(3) modulated muscarinic M3 receptors activity in pancreas and plays a pivotal role in controlling insulin secretion. Hence our findings proved, vitamin D(3) supplementation as a potential nutritional therapy in ameliorating diabetes mediated cortical dysfunctions and suggest an interaction between vitamin D(3) and muscarinic M3 receptors in regulating insulin secretion from pancreas.

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of the Pancreatic Islet: Implications for Islet Function

    PubMed Central

    Stitzel, Michael L.; Kycia, Ina; Kursawe, Romy; Ucar, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans contain multiple hormone-producing endocrine cells controlling glucose homeostasis. Transcription establishes and maintains islet cellular fates and identities. Genetic and environmental disruption of islet transcription triggers cellular dysfunction and disease. Early transcriptional regulation studies of specific islet genes, including insulin (INS) and the transcription factor PDX1, identified the first cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors governing islet function. Here, we review how human islet “omics” studies are reshaping our understanding of transcriptional regulation in islet (dys)function and diabetes. First, we highlight the expansion of islet transcript number, form, and function and of DNA transcriptional regulatory elements controlling their production. Next, we cover islet transcriptional effects of genetic and environmental perturbation. Finally, we discuss how these studies’ emerging insights should empower our diabetes research community to build mechanistic understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to equip clinicians with tailored, precision medicine options to prevent and treat islet dysfunction and diabetes. PMID:26272056

  3. New Treatment Strategies for Alcohol-Induced Heart Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Solà, Joaquim; Planavila Porta, Ana

    2016-01-01

    High-dose alcohol misuse induces multiple noxious cardiac effects, including myocyte hypertrophy and necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, decreased ventricular contraction and ventricle enlargement. These effects produce diastolic and systolic ventricular dysfunction leading to congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and an increased death rate. There are multiple, dose-dependent, synchronic and synergistic mechanisms of alcohol-induced cardiac damage. Ethanol alters membrane permeability and composition, interferes with receptors and intracellular transients, induces oxidative, metabolic and energy damage, decreases protein synthesis, excitation-contraction coupling and increases cell apoptosis. In addition, ethanol decreases myocyte protective and repair mechanisms and their regeneration. Although there are diverse different strategies to directly target alcohol-induced heart damage, they are partially effective, and can only be used as support medication in a multidisciplinary approach. Alcohol abstinence is the preferred goal, but control drinking is useful in alcohol-addicted subjects not able to abstain. Correction of nutrition, ionic and vitamin deficiencies and control of alcohol-related systemic organ damage are compulsory. Recently, several growth factors (myostatin, IGF-1, leptin, ghrelin, miRNA, and ROCK inhibitors) and new cardiomyokines such as FGF21 have been described to regulate cardiac plasticity and decrease cardiac damage, improving cardiac repair mechanisms, and they are promising agents in this field. New potential therapeutic targets aim to control oxidative damage, myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and persistent apoptosis In addition, stem-cell therapy may improve myocyte regeneration. However, these strategies are not yet approved for clinical use. PMID:27690014

  4. Physics associated with cavitation induced material damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, F. B.

    1974-01-01

    The role of cavitation in mechanical failure is discussed. Some of the most common types of material damage associated with the presence of cavitation are surface material removal, delamination and structural vibration. This occurs in external flows such as on propellers, hydrofoils, and high speed non-lifting surfaces. In internal flows, pipe bends, inlets, constructions, pumps and turbines are typical. Nominally nonflowing liquids are also susceptible in, for example, strong acoustic fields and high energy particle detectors. For flowing systems, Bernoulli's equation shows how a local pressure is reduced as the fluid's velocity is increased. At sufficiently high velocities, a tension can actually develop and this has, in fact, been demonstrated experimentally. Once the pressure is reduced below the fluid vapor pressure a vapor cavity can be nucleated. Various aspects of this process are simply shown by considering the flow over a lifting surface.

  5. Hydroxyl radical Thymine adduct induced DNA damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schyman, Patric; Eriksson, Leif A.; Zhang, Ru bo; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2008-06-01

    DNA damages caused by a 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine-6-yl radical (5-OHT-6yl) abstracting a C2‧ hydrogen from a neighboring sugar (inter-H abstraction) have been theoretically investigated using hybrid DFT in gas phase and in water solution. The inter-H abstraction was here shown to be comparable in energy (24 kcal mol-1) with the intra-H abstraction in which the 5-OHT-6yl abstracts a C2‧ hydrogen from its own sugar. The effect of a neutrally or a negatively charged phosphate group was also studied and the results show no significant impact on the activation energy of the hydrogen abstraction whereas base release and strand break reactions are affected.

  6. Facet-Dependent Interactions of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide with Gold Nanoparticles: Implications for Fibril Formation and Peptide-Induced Lipid Membrane Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between proteins or peptides and nanomaterials is crucial for the development of nanomaterial-based diagnostics and therapeutics. In this work, we systematically explored the interactions between citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), a 37-amino acid peptide hormone co-secreted with insulin from the pancreatic islet. We utilized diffusion-ordered spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to systematically elucidate the underlying mechanism of the IAPP–AuNP interactions. Because of the presence of a metal-binding sequence motif in the hydrophilic peptide domain, IAPP strongly interacts with the Au surface in both the monomeric and fibrillar states. Circular dichroism showed that AuNPs triggered the IAPP conformational transition from random coil to ordered structures (α-helix and β-sheet), and TEM imaging suggested the acceleration of IAPP fibrillation in the presence of AuNPs. MD simulations revealed that the IAPP–AuNP interactions were initiated by the N-terminal domain (IAPP residues 1–19), which subsequently induced a facet-dependent conformational change in IAPP. On a Au(111) surface, IAPP was unfolded and adsorbed directly onto the Au surface, while for the Au(100) surface, it interacted predominantly with the citrate adlayer and retained some helical conformation. The observed affinity of AuNPs for IAPP was further applied to reduce the level of peptide-induced lipid membrane disruption. PMID:28260837

  7. BACE2 suppression promotes β-cell survival and function in a model of type 2 diabetes induced by human islet amyloid polypeptide overexpression.

    PubMed

    Alcarraz-Vizán, Gema; Castaño, Carlos; Visa, Montse; Montane, Joel; Servitja, Joan-Marc; Novials, Anna

    2017-03-23

    BACE2 (β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 2) is a protease expressed in the brain, but also in the pancreas, where it seems to play a physiological role. Amyloidogenic diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes (T2D), share the accumulation of abnormally folded and insoluble proteins that interfere with cell function. In T2D, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) deposits have been shown to be a pathogenic key feature of the disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of BACE2 modulation on β-cell alterations in a mouse model of T2D induced by IAPP overexpression. Heterozygous mice carrying the human transcript of IAPP (hIAPP-Tg) were used as a model to study the deleterious effects of IAPP upon β-cell function. These animals showed glucose intolerance and impaired insulin secretion. When crossed with BACE2-deficient mice, the animals presented a significant improvement in glucose tolerance accompanied with an enhanced insulin secretion, as compared to hIAPP-Tg mice. BACE2 deficiency also partially reverted gene expression changes observed in islets from hIAPP-Tg mice, including a set of genes related to inflammation. Moreover, homozygous hIAPP mice presented a severe hyperglycemia and a high lethality rate from 8 weeks onwards due to a massive destruction of β-cell mass. This process was significantly reduced when crossed with the BACE2-KO model, improving the survival rate of the animals. Altogether, the absence of BACE2 ameliorates glucose tolerance defects induced by IAPP overexpression in the β-cell and promotes β-cell survival. Thus, targeting BACE2 may represent a promising therapeutic strategy to improve β-cell function in T2D.

  8. Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Syzygium cumini Leaf Dually Improves Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity and Pancreatic Islet Function in Monosodium L-Glutamate-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Jonas R.; França, Lucas M.; Chagas, Vinicyus T.; Gaspar, Renato S.; dos Santos, Kayque A.; Gonçalves, Luciana M.; Sloboda, Deborah M.; Holloway, Alison C.; Dutra, Richard P.; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Cappelli, Ana Paula G.; Paes, Antonio Marcus de A.

    2016-01-01

    Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae) has been traditionally used to treat a number of illnesses. Ethnopharmacological studies have particularly addressed antidiabetic and metabolic-related effects of extracts prepared from its different parts, especially seed, and pulp-fruit, however. there is a lack of studies on phytochemical profile and biological properties of its leaf. As there is considerable interest in bioactive compounds to treat metabolic syndrome and its clustered risk factors, we sought to characterize the metabolic effects of hydroethanolic extract of S. cumini leaf (HESc) on lean and monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obese rats. HPLC-MS/MS characterization of the HESc polyphenolic profile, at 254 nm, identified 15 compounds pertaining to hydrolysable tannin and flavanol subclasses. At 60 days of age, both groups were randomly assigned to receive HESc (500 mg/kg) or vehicle for 30 days. At the end of treatment, obese+HESc exhibited significantly lower body weight gain, body mass index, and white adipose tissue mass, compared to obese rats receiving vehicle. Obese rats treated with HESc showed a twofold increase in lipolytic activity in the periepididymal fat pad, as well as, brought triglyceride levels in serum, liver and skeletal muscle back to levels close those found in lean animals. Furthermore, HESc also improved hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in obese+HESc rats, which resulted in partial reversal of glucose intolerance, as compared to obese rats. HESc had no effect in lean rats. Assessment of ex vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion showed HESc potentiated pancreatic function in islets isolated from both lean and obese rats treated with HESc. In addition, HESc (10–1000 μg/mL) increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion from both isolated rat islets and INS-1E β-cells. These data demonstrate that S. cumini leaf improved peripheral insulin sensitivity via stimulating/modulating β-cell insulin release, which was associated

  9. Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Syzygium cumini Leaf Dually Improves Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity and Pancreatic Islet Function in Monosodium L-Glutamate-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Jonas R; França, Lucas M; Chagas, Vinicyus T; Gaspar, Renato S; Dos Santos, Kayque A; Gonçalves, Luciana M; Sloboda, Deborah M; Holloway, Alison C; Dutra, Richard P; Carneiro, Everardo M; Cappelli, Ana Paula G; Paes, Antonio Marcus de A

    2016-01-01

    Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae) has been traditionally used to treat a number of illnesses. Ethnopharmacological studies have particularly addressed antidiabetic and metabolic-related effects of extracts prepared from its different parts, especially seed, and pulp-fruit, however. there is a lack of studies on phytochemical profile and biological properties of its leaf. As there is considerable interest in bioactive compounds to treat metabolic syndrome and its clustered risk factors, we sought to characterize the metabolic effects of hydroethanolic extract of S. cumini leaf (HESc) on lean and monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obese rats. HPLC-MS/MS characterization of the HESc polyphenolic profile, at 254 nm, identified 15 compounds pertaining to hydrolysable tannin and flavanol subclasses. At 60 days of age, both groups were randomly assigned to receive HESc (500 mg/kg) or vehicle for 30 days. At the end of treatment, obese+HESc exhibited significantly lower body weight gain, body mass index, and white adipose tissue mass, compared to obese rats receiving vehicle. Obese rats treated with HESc showed a twofold increase in lipolytic activity in the periepididymal fat pad, as well as, brought triglyceride levels in serum, liver and skeletal muscle back to levels close those found in lean animals. Furthermore, HESc also improved hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in obese+HESc rats, which resulted in partial reversal of glucose intolerance, as compared to obese rats. HESc had no effect in lean rats. Assessment of ex vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion showed HESc potentiated pancreatic function in islets isolated from both lean and obese rats treated with HESc. In addition, HESc (10-1000 μg/mL) increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion from both isolated rat islets and INS-1E β-cells. These data demonstrate that S. cumini leaf improved peripheral insulin sensitivity via stimulating/modulating β-cell insulin release, which was associated

  10. NK T cell-induced protection against diabetes in V alpha 14-J alpha 281 transgenic nonobese diabetic mice is associated with a Th2 shift circumscribed regionally to the islets and functionally to islet autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Laloux, V; Beaudoin, L; Jeske, D; Carnaud, C; Lehuen, A

    2001-03-15

    The onset of autoimmune diabetes is related to defective immune regulation. Recent studies have shown that NK T cells are deficient in number and function in both diabetic patients and nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. NK T cells, which are CD1d restricted, express a TCR with an invariant V alpha 14-J alpha 281 chain and rapidly produce large amounts of cytokines. V alpha 14-J alpha 281 transgenic NOD mice have increased numbers of NK T cells and are protected against diabetes onset. In this study we analyzed where and how NK T cells interfere with the development of the anti-islet autoimmune response. NK T cells, which are usually rare in lymph nodes, are abundant in pancreatic lymph nodes and are also present in islets. IL-4 mRNA levels are increased and IFN-gamma mRNA levels decreased in islets from diabetes-free V alpha 14-J alpha 281 transgenic NOD mice; the IgG1/IgG2c ratio of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase is also increased in these mice. Treatment with IL-12 (a pro-Th1 cytokine) or anti-IL-4 Ab abolishes the diabetes protection in V alpha 14-J alpha 281 NOD mice. The protection from diabetes conferred by NK T cells is thus associated with a Th2 shift within islets directed against autoantigen such as glutamic acid decarboxylase. Our findings also demonstrate the key role of IL-4.

  11. Heavy ion induced permanent damage in MNOS gate insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickel, J. C.; Blandford, J. T., Jr.; Waskiewicz, A. E.; Strahan, V. H., Jr.

    1985-12-01

    Heavy-ion-induced permanent damage in MNOS gate insulators has been investigated using a Cf252 fission source. The electric field and ion LET thresholds for onset of the damage has been characterized. The results are consistent with a thermal runaway mechanism in the silicon nitride layer initiated by a single heavy ion and leading to a permanent high conductivity path through the dielectric layers.

  12. Sulforaphane protects against cytokine- and streptozotocin-induced {beta}-cell damage by suppressing the NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Woo-Sung; Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil; Kwon, Kang-Beom Park, Byung-Hyun

    2009-02-15

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an indirect antioxidant that protects animal tissues from chemical or biological insults by stimulating the expression of several NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)-regulated phase 2 enzymes. Treatment of RINm5F insulinoma cells with SFN increases Nrf2 nuclear translocation and expression of phase 2 enzymes. In this study, we investigated whether the activation of Nrf2 by SFN treatment or ectopic overexpression of Nrf2 inhibited cytokine-induced {beta}-cell damage. Treatment of RIN cells with IL-1{beta} and IFN-{gamma} induced {beta}-cell damage through a NF-{kappa}B-dependent signaling pathway. Activation of Nrf2 by treatment with SFN and induction of Nrf2 overexpression by transfection with Nrf2 prevented cytokine toxicity. The mechanism by which Nrf2 activation inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent cell death signals appeared to involve the reduction of oxidative stress, as demonstrated by the inhibition of cytokine-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. The protective effect of SFN was further demonstrated by the restoration of normal insulin secreting responses to glucose in cytokine-treated rat pancreatic islets. Furthermore, pretreatment with SFN blocked the development of type 1 diabetes in streptozotocin-treated mice.

  13. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  14. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  15. Modulation of irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage by theanine.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry

    2012-05-01

    The possible chemoprotective activity of theanine against irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage towards mouse bone marrow cells was investigated. Chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, micronuclei formation and mitotic activity were studied in the current study as markers of genomic damage. Oxidative DNA stress markers such as 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione levels were assessed as a possible mechanism underlying this amelioration. Theanine was neither genotoxic nor cytotoxic in mice at doses equivalent to 30 or 60 mg/kg for 12 days. Pretreatment of mice with theanine significantly reduced irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells and these effects were dose dependent. Irinotecan induced marked biochemical alterations characteristic of oxidative DNA stress, including increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, enhanced lipid peroxidation and reduction in the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. Prior administration of theanine ahead of irinotecan challenge ameliorated these oxidative DNA stress markers. Overall, this study provides for the first time that theanine has a protective role in the abatement of irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells of mice that resides, at least in part, on its ability to modulate the cellular antioxidant levels and consequently protect bone marrow from irinotecan genotoxicity.

  16. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin.

  17. Islet transplantation: immunological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Inverardi, Luca; Kenyon, Norma S; Ricordi, Camillo

    2003-10-01

    Clinical trials of islet transplantation are showing remarkable success, but they require administration of chronic immunosuppression, and are underscoring the large gap that exists between the number of human donors available and the number of patients that could benefit from the procedure. Recent progress has been made in the definition of key immunological mechanisms that are involved in determining islet transplant outcome. Clinical and preclinical studies, and studies in small animal model systems, will all eventually contribute to the definition of efficient and safe protocols for islet transplantation. If the use of xenografts is successful, it might represent a solution to the shortage of human organs.

  18. Blasting-induced damage in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kabongo, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    The paper is drawn from a project intended to explore a technique of prediction, control and optimization of fracture in coal induced by blasting. It evaluates the fines generated in coal submitted to dynamic loading stresses in an impact stamp mortar. The aim is to analyze a complex phenomenon of coal response to blast-generated stresses from a series of discrete simulations of shock and gas actions in controllable processes. It is learned that despite the nucleation of primary crushing and fractures to originate from the point of impact energy in coal, a secondary crushing appears to depart from within the burden progressing towards the free boundaries. The extension of the secondary crushing zone appears to be influenced by the magnitude of the breaking stresses generated and the coal burden distance. A strong dependence of fines on the coal`s innate discontinuities (strength) and the energy input is highlighted.

  19. Transesophageal Echocardiography and Radiation-induced Damages

    PubMed Central

    Cottini, Marzia; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Buffa, Vitaliano; Musumeci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The long-term sequelae of mantle therapy include, especially lung and cardiac disease but also involve the vessels and the organs in the neck and thorax (such as thyroid, aorta, and esophagus). We presented the case of 66-year-old female admitted for congestive heart failure in radiation-induced heart disease. The patient had undergone to massive radiotherapy 42 years ago for Hodgkin's disease (type 1A). Transesophageal echocardiography was performed unsuccessfully with difficulty because of the rigidity and impedance of esophageal walls. Our case is an extraordinary report of radiotherapy's latency effect as a result of dramatic changes in the structure of mediastinum, in particular in the esophagus, causing unavailability of a transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:27867461

  20. Automated digital image analysis of islet cell mass using Nikon's inverted eclipse Ti microscope and software to improve engraftment may help to advance the therapeutic efficacy and accessibility of islet transplantation across centers.

    PubMed

    Gmyr, Valery; Bonner, Caroline; Lukowiak, Bruno; Pawlowski, Valerie; Dellaleau, Nathalie; Belaich, Sandrine; Aluka, Isanga; Moermann, Ericka; Thevenet, Julien; Ezzouaoui, Rimed; Queniat, Gurvan; Pattou, Francois; Kerr-Conte, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Reliable assessment of islet viability, mass, and purity must be met prior to transplanting an islet preparation into patients with type 1 diabetes. The standard method for quantifying human islet preparations is by direct microscopic analysis of dithizone-stained islet samples, but this technique may be susceptible to inter-/intraobserver variability, which may induce false positive/negative islet counts. Here we describe a simple, reliable, automated digital image analysis (ADIA) technique for accurately quantifying islets into total islet number, islet equivalent number (IEQ), and islet purity before islet transplantation. Islets were isolated and purified from n = 42 human pancreata according to the automated method of Ricordi et al. For each preparation, three islet samples were stained with dithizone and expressed as IEQ number. Islets were analyzed manually by microscopy or automatically quantified using Nikon's inverted Eclipse Ti microscope with built-in NIS-Elements Advanced Research (AR) software. The AIDA method significantly enhanced the number of islet preparations eligible for engraftment compared to the standard manual method (p < 0.001). Comparisons of individual methods showed good correlations between mean values of IEQ number (r(2) = 0.91) and total islet number (r(2) = 0.88) and thus increased to r(2) = 0.93 when islet surface area was estimated comparatively with IEQ number. The ADIA method showed very high intraobserver reproducibility compared to the standard manual method (p < 0.001). However, islet purity was routinely estimated as significantly higher with the manual method versus the ADIA method (p < 0.001). The ADIA method also detected small islets between 10 and 50 µm in size. Automated digital image analysis utilizing the Nikon Instruments software is an unbiased, simple, and reliable teaching tool to comprehensively assess the individual size of each islet cell preparation prior to transplantation. Implementation of this

  1. Alpha1-antitrypsin monotherapy prolongs islet allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Eli C; Shapiro, Leland; Bowers, Owen J; Dinarello, Charles A

    2005-08-23

    Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetic patients shows promising results with the use of nondiabetogenic immunosuppressive therapy. However, in addition to compromising the immune system of transplant recipients, long-term studies demonstrate that islet viability is impaired. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of immunosuppressive agents, monotherapy with clinical-grade human alpha1-antitrypsin (hAAT), the major serum serine-protease inhibitor, prolongs islet graft survival and normoglycemia in transplanted allogeneic diabetic mice, lasting until the development of anti-hAAT antibodies. Compared to untreated or albumin-control-treated graft recipients, which rejected islets at day 10, AAT-treated mice displayed diminished cellular infiltrates and intact intragraft insulin production throughout treatment. Using peritoneal infiltration models, we demonstrate that AAT decreases allogeneic fibroblast-elicited natural-killer-cell influx by 89%, CD3-positive cell influx by 44%, and thioglycolate-elicited neutrophil emigration by 66%. ATT also extended islet viability in mice after streptozotocin-induced beta cell toxicity. In vitro, several islet responses to IL-1beta/IFNgamma stimulation were examined. In the presence of AAT, islets displayed enhanced viability and inducible insulin secretion. Islets also released 36% less nitric oxide and 82% less macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and expressed 63% fewer surface MHC class II molecules. TNFalpha release from IL-1beta/IFNgamma-stimulated islet cells was reduced by 99%, accompanied by an 8-fold increase in the accumulation of membrane TNFalpha on CD45-positive islet cells. In light of the established safety record and the nondiabetogenic potential of AAT, these data suggest that AAT may be beneficial as adjunctive therapy in patients undergoing islet transplantation.

  2. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of stomach acid. Tumors that arise from islet ... try and shrink the tumors. If the abnormal production of hormones is causing symptoms, you may receive ...

  3. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  4. Hardening measures for bipolar transistors against microwave-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Chang-Chun; Ma, Zhen-Yang; Ren, Xing-Rong; Yang, Yin-Tang; Zhao, Ying-Bo; Yu, Xin-Hai

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper we study the influences of the bias voltage and the external components on the damage progress of a bipolar transistor induced by high-power microwaves. The mechanism is presented by analyzing the variation in the internal distribution of the temperature in the device. The findings show that the device becomes less vulnerable to damage with an increase in bias voltage. Both the series diode at the base and the relatively low series resistance at the emitter, Re, can obviously prolong the burnout time of the device. However, Re will aid damage to the device when the value is sufficiently high due to the fact that the highest hot spot shifts from the base-emitter junction to the base region. Moreover, the series resistance at the base Rb will weaken the capability of the device to withstand microwave damage.

  5. Selective therapeutic effect of cornus officinalis fruits on the damage of different organs in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunkyung; Jung, Hyo Won; Park, Yong-Ki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the selective therapeutic effects of Corni Fructus (Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc.) on different organs in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes in rats was induced by intraperitonal injection with STZ at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight (bw) for 3 days (once per a day). STZ-induced diabetic rats were orally administrated Corni Fructus (CF) extract at 300 mg/kg or metformin at 250 mg/kg daily for 4 weeks. Blood glucose and triglyceride (TG) in sera and urine total volume were measured. Histopathological changes of different organs, pancreas, liver, kidney, and lung tissues were observed by H&E staining. The expression of insulin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was investigated in pancreas, and kidney by immunohistochemistry, respectively. The results revealed that CF extract significantly decreased the serum levels of blood glucose, and TG, and also urine total volume in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The histological examinations revealed amelioration of diabetes-induced pancreas injury including pathological changes of the Langerhans's islet and glomerular with their loss after the administration of CF extraction. Moreover, the administration of CF extract increased the numbers of insulin releasing beta cells in pancreas and also inhibited the expression of α-SMA in kidney of STZ-induced diabetic rats. On the other hand, CF extract showed no effect on the pathological damages of liver and lung in STZ-induced diabetic rats. These results demonstrated that CF extract may have a selective therapeutic potential through the control of hyperglycemia, and the protection of pancreas and kidney against diabetic damage.

  6. Heat Induced Damage Detection by Terahertz (THz) Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Wu, Ziran; Xin, Hao

    2011-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) and sub-terahertz imaging and spectroscopy are becoming increasingly popular nondestructive evaluation techniques for damage detection and characterization of materials. THz radiation is being used for inspecting ceramic foam tiles used in TPS (Thermal Protection System), thick polymer composites and polymer tiles that are not good conductors of ultrasonic waves. Capability of THz electromagnetic waves in detecting heat induced damage in porous materials is investigated in this paper. Porous pumice stone blocks are subjected to long time heat exposures to produce heat induced damage in the block. The dielectric properties extracted from THz TDS (Time Domain Spectroscopy) measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure. Experimental results show noticeable and consistent change in dielectric properties with increasing levels of heat exposure, well before its melting point.

  7. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  8. Shock-induced damage in rocks: Application to impact cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Huirong

    Shock-induced damage beneath impact craters is studied in this work. Two representative terrestrial rocks, San Marcos granite and Bedford limestone, are chosen as test target. Impacts into the rock targets with different combinations of projectile material, size, impact angle, and impact velocity are carried out at cm scale in the laboratory. Shock-induced damage and fracturing would cause large-scale compressional wave velocity reduction in the recovered target beneath the impact crater. The shock-induced damage is measured by mapping the compressional wave velocity reduction in the recovered target. A cm scale nondestructive tomography technique is developed for this purpose. This technique is proved to be effective in mapping the damage in San Marcos granite, and the inverted velocity profile is in very good agreement with the result from dicing method and cut open directly. Both compressional velocity and attenuation are measured in three orthogonal directions on cubes prepared from one granite target impacted by a lead bullet at 1200 m/s. Anisotropy is observed from both results, but the attenuation seems to be a more useful parameter than acoustic velocity in studying orientation of cracks. Our experiments indicate that the shock-induced damage is a function of impact conditions including projectile type and size, impact velocity, and target properties. Combined with other crater phenomena such as crater diameter, depth, ejecta, etc., shock-induced damage would be used as an important yet not well recognized constraint for impact history. The shock-induced damage is also calculated numerically to be compared with the experiments for a few representative shots. The Johnson-Holmquist strength and failure model, initially developed for ceramics, is applied to geological materials. Strength is a complicated function of pressure, strain, strain rate, and damage. The JH model, coupled with a crack softening model, is used to describe both the inelastic response of

  9. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  10. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    PubMed

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  11. Autophagy Induced by Calcium Phosphate Precipitates Targets Damaged Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Khambu, Bilon; Zhang, Hao; Gao, Wentao; Li, Min; Chen, Xiaoyun; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate precipitates (CPPs) form complexes with DNA, which enter cells via endocytosis. Under this condition CPPs induce autophagy via the canonic autophagy machinery. Here we showed that CPP-induced autophagy was also dependent on endocytosis as the process was significantly inhibited by methyl-β-cyclodextrin and dynasore, which suppress clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Consistently, CPP treatment triggered the formation of filipin-positive intracellular vesicles whose membranes are rich in cholesterol. Unexpectedly, these vesicles were also positive for galectin 3, suggesting that they were damaged and the membrane glycans became accessible to galectins to bind. Endosome damage was caused by endocytosis of CPPs and was reversed by calcium chelators or by endocytosis inhibitors. Notably, CPP-induced LC3-positive autophagosomes were colocalized with galectin 3, ubiquitin, and p62/SQSTM1. Inhibition of galectin 3 reduced p62 puncta and autophagosome formation. Knockdown of p62 additionally inhibited the colocalization of autophagosomes with galectins. Furthermore, most of the galectin 3-positive vesicles were colocalized with Rab7 or LAMP1. Agents that affect endosome/lysosome maturation and function, such as bafilomycin A1, also significantly affected CPP-induced tubulovesicular autophagosome formation. These findings thus indicate that endocytosed CPPs caused endosome damage and recruitment of galectins, particularly at the later endosome stage, which led to the interaction of the autophagosomal membranes with the damaged endosome in the presence of p62. PMID:24619419

  12. NBQX and TCP prevent soman-induced hippocampal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lallement, G.; Carpentier, P.; Pernot-Marino, I.; Baubichon, D.; Blanchet, G.

    1993-05-13

    In a previous investigation we demonstrated that the measurement of w3 (peripheral-type benzodiazepine) binding site densities could be of widespread applicability in the localization and quantification of soman-induced damage in the central nervous system. We thus used this marker to assess, in mouse hippocampus, the neuroprotective activity against soman-induced brain damage of NBQX and TCP which are respective antagonists of non-NMDA and NMDA glutamatergic receptors. Injection of NBQX at 20 or 40 mg/kg 5 min prior to soman totally prevented the neuronal damage. Comparatively, TCP had neuroprotective efficacy when administered at l mg/kg 5 min prior to soman followed by a reinjection 1 hour after. These results demonstrate that both NBQX and TCP afford a satisfactory neuroprotection against soman-induced brain damage. Since it is known that the neuropathology due to soman is closely seizure-related, it is likely that the neuroprotective activities of NBQX and TCP are related to the respective roles of non-NMDA and NMDA receptors in the onset and maintenance of soman-induced seizures.

  13. Enhancement of in vitro and in vivo function of agarose-encapsulated porcine islets by changes in the islet microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Holdcraft, Robert W; Gazda, Lawrence S; Circle, Lisa; Adkins, Hollie; Harbeck, Steven G; Meyer, Eric D; Bautista, Melissa A; Martis, Prithy C; Laramore, Melissa A; Vinerean, Horatiu V; Hall, Richard D; Smith, Barry H

    2014-01-01

    The transplantation of porcine islets of Langerhans to treat type 1 diabetes may provide a solution to the demand for insulin-producing cells. Porcine islets encapsulated in agarose-agarose macrobeads have been shown to function in nonimmunosuppressed xenogeneic models of both streptozotocin-induced and autoimmune type 1 diabetes. One advantage of agarose encapsulation is the ability to culture macrobeads for extended periods, permitting microbiological and functional assessment. Herein we describe optimization of the agarose matrix that results in improved islet function. Porcine islets (500 IEQs) from retired breeding sows were encapsulated in 1.5% SeaKem Gold (SG), 0.8% SG, or 0.8% Litex (Li) agarose, followed by an outer capsule of 5% SG agarose. Insulin production by the encapsulated islets exhibited an agarose-specific effect with 20% (0.8% SG) to 50% (0.8% Li) higher initial insulin production relative to 1.5% SG macrobeads. Insulin production was further increased by 40-50% from week 2 to week 12 in both agarose types at the 0.8% concentration, whereas islets encapsulated in 1.5% SG agarose increased insulin production by approximately 20%. Correspondingly, fewer macrobeads were required to restore normoglycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female CD(SD) rats that received 0.8% Li (15 macrobeads) or 0.8% SG (17 macrobeads) as compared to 1.5% SG (19 macrobeads). Islet cell proliferation was also observed during the first 2 months postencapsulation, peaking at 4 weeks, where approximately 50% of islets contained proliferative cells, including β-cells, regardless of agarose type. These results illustrate the importance of optimizing the microenvironment of encapsulated islets to improve islet performance and advance the potential of islet xenotransplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

  14. Induction of Protective Genes Leads to Islet Survival and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjun; Ferran, Christiane; Attanasio, Chiara; Calise, Fulvio; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2011-01-01

    Islet transplantation is the most valid approach to the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, the function of transplanted islets is often compromised since a large number of β cells undergo apoptosis induced by stress and the immune rejection response elicited by the recipient after transplantation. Conventional treatment for islet transplantation is to administer immunosuppressive drugs to the recipient to suppress the immune rejection response mounted against transplanted islets. Induction of protective genes in the recipient (e.g., heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), A20/tumor necrosis factor alpha inducible protein3 (tnfaip3), biliverdin reductase (BVR), Bcl2, and others) or administration of one or more of the products of HO-1 to the donor, the islets themselves, and/or the recipient offers an alternative or synergistic approach to improve islet graft survival and function. In this perspective, we summarize studies describing the protective effects of these genes on islet survival and function in rodent allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation models and the prevention of onset of diabetes, with emphasis on HO-1, A20, and BVR. Such approaches are also appealing to islet autotransplantation in patients with chronic pancreatitis after total pancreatectomy, a procedure that currently only leads to 1/3 of transplanted patients being diabetes-free. PMID:22220267

  15. Protective effects of honokiol against methylglyoxal-induced osteoblast damage.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kwang Sik; Chon, Suk; Choi, Eun Mi

    2016-01-25

    Honokiol is an active compound isolated from Magnolia officinalis that has been used without notable side effects in traditional medicine. We investigated the effects of honokiol against methylglyoxal (MG)-induced cytotoxicity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells and the possible molecular mechanism(s) involved. The results showed that honokiol alleviated MG-induced cell death and the production of intracellular ROS, mitochondrial superoxide, cardiolipin peroxidation, and inflammatory cytokines. MG induction of the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end product (AGE) was reduced by pretreatment with honokiol. Furthermore, honokiol increased the levels of Nrf2 and increased the levels of glutathione and the activity of glyoxalase I. Pretreatment with honokiol prior to MG exposure reduced MG-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and alleviated MG-induced reduction of nitric oxide and PGC1α levels, suggesting that honokiol may induce mitochondrial biogenesis. It was concluded that honokiol could be useful in the attenuation of MG-induced cell damage.

  16. Avermectin induced inflammation damage in king pigeon brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Qu, Jian Ping; Xu, Shiwen; Li, Shu

    2013-11-01

    To determine the effect of Avermectin (AVM) on inflammation damage in king pigeon brain, eighty two-month-old American king pigeons were randomly divided into four groups, and were fed with either commercial diet or AVM-supplemented diet containing 20 mg kg(-1)diet, 40 mg kg(-1)diet, and 60 mg kg(-1)diet AVM for 30, 60 and 90 d, respectively. Then, the expression level of inflammatory factors (iNOS, PTGEs, NF-κB), histological damage, and ultra-structural damage were examined. It showed that AVM caused higher expressions (P<0.05) of iNOS, PTGEs, NF-κB with disorganized histological and ultra-structural structures in cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. Meanwhile, inflammatory and histopathological damage were induced by AVM in king pigeon brains. In addition, the main targeted organelle in nervous system was mitochondria, which indicated that mitochondria may be relevant to the process of inflammation induced by AVM. To our best knowledge, this is the first report to study the toxic effect of AVM on inflammatory damage in king pigeon. Thus, the information presented in this study is believed to be helpful in supplementing data for further AVM toxicity study.

  17. Overloaded training increases exercise-induced oxidative stress and damage.

    PubMed

    Palazzetti, Stephane; Richard, Marie-Jeanne; Favier, Alain; Margaritis, Irene

    2003-08-01

    We hypothesized that overloaded training (OT) in triathlon would induce oxidative stress and damage on muscle and DNA. Nine male triathletes and 6 male sedentary subjects participated in this study. Before and after a 4-week OT, triathletes exercised for a duathlon. Blood ratio of reduced vs. oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), leukocyte DNA damage, creatine kinase (CK), and CK-MB mass in plasma, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, erythrocyte and plasma glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and plasma total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured before and after OT in pre- and postexercise situations. Triathletes were overloaded in response to OT. In rest conditions, OT induced plasma GSH-Px activity increase and plasma TAS decrease (both p < 0.05). In exercise conditions, OT resulted in higher exercise-induced variations of blood GSH/GSSG ratio, TBARS level (both p < 0.05), and CK-MB mass (p < 0.01) in plasma; and decreased TAS response (p < 0.05). OT could compromise the antioxidant defense mechanism with respect to exercise-induced response. The resulting increased exercise-induced oxidative stress and further cellular susceptibility to damage needs more study.

  18. A quantitative study of sodium tungstate protective effect on pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Hamidreza; Moudi, Bita

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem. Development of new therapies that are able to improve glycemia management, cure diabetes, and can even protect from it, are of great interest. This study investigated the protective effect of sodium tungstate against STZ-induced beta-cell damages by means of stereological methods. Sixty rats were divided into six groups: control (C), tungstate-treated control (TC), STZ-induced diabetic (D), STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated by sodium tungstate from 1 week before STZ injection (TDB), food-restricted diabetic (FRD), and diabetic rats treated with sodium tungstate 1 week after STZ administration (TDA). Stereological estimation of pancreas volume, islets volume density, volume-weighted mean islets volume and mass of beta cells, islets, and pancreas and total number of islets were done. Islets volume density, volume-weighted mean islets volume, and mass of beta cells, islets, and pancreas of TDB group was significantly higher than D, FRD and TDA groups (P<0.001) and was comparable to controls (C and TC groups). Total number of islets, pancreas wet weight and volume did not show any significant changes between these groups (P>0.05). Results suggested that sodium tungstate preserves pancreatic beta cells from STZ-induced damages and diabetes induction in rats.

  19. Stimulus-secretion coupling of arginine-induced insulin release. Uptake of metabolized and nonmetabolized cationic amino acids by pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Blachier, F.; Mourtada, A.; Sener, A.; Malaisse, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to assess the possible role of L-arginine accumulation in islet cells as a determinant of its insulinotropic action, the uptake of L-arginine and other cationic amino acids (L-ornithine, L-homoarginine, D,L-alpha-methylornithine, D,L-alpha-difluoromethylornithine) by rat pancreatic islets was compared to the ionic and secretory responses of the islets to the same amino acids. A tight correlation was found between the net uptake of these amino acids and their capacity to stimulate 86Rb efflux, 45Ca uptake and efflux, and insulin release. In the latter respect, there was little difference between metabolized and nonmetabolized amino acids. Thus, although L-homoarginine and 4-amino-1-guanylpiperidine-4-carboxylic acid failed to act as a substrate for either arginase or amino acid aminotransferase in islet homogenates, they both stimulated 86Rb efflux, 45Ca uptake and efflux, and insulin secretion in intact islets. These findings are compatible with the view that the accumulation of these positively charged amino acids in islet cells represents an essential determinant of their secretory action. Hence, the release of insulin evoked by these amino acids could be due to depolarization of the plasma membrane with subsequent gating of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels and/or to some other biophysical effect, as suggested by the persistence of a sizeable secretory response to L-arginine or L-ornithine in islets perifused at a high concentrations of extracellular K+ (50 mM).

  20. Zebrafish fin regeneration after cryoinjury-induced tissue damage

    PubMed Central

    Chassot, Bérénice; Pury, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although fin regeneration following an amputation procedure has been well characterized, little is known about the impact of prolonged tissue damage on the execution of the regenerative programme in the zebrafish appendages. To induce histolytic processes in the caudal fin, we developed a new cryolesion model that combines the detrimental effects of freezing/thawing and ischemia. In contrast to the common transection model, the damaged part of the fin was spontaneously shed within two days after cryoinjury. The remaining stump contained a distorted margin with a mixture of dead material and healthy cells that concomitantly induced two opposing processes of tissue debris degradation and cellular proliferation, respectively. Between two and seven days after cryoinjury, this reparative/proliferative phase was morphologically featured by displaced fragments of broken bones. A blastemal marker msxB was induced in the intact mesenchyme below the damaged stump margin. Live imaging of epithelial and osteoblastic transgenic reporter lines revealed that the tissue-specific regenerative programmes were initiated after the clearance of damaged material. Despite histolytic perturbation during the first week after cryoinjury, the fin regeneration resumed and was completed without further alteration in comparison to the simple amputation model. This model reveals the powerful ability of the zebrafish to restore the original appendage architecture after the extended histolysis of the stump. PMID:27215324

  1. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV–HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells. PMID:23868060

  2. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-07-18

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV-HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells.

  3. Computational modeling of process induced damage during plasma clean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, S.; Haggag, A.; Moosa, M.; Ventzek, P. L. G.

    2006-07-01

    When partially completed circuits come in contact with plasmas during integrated circuit fabrication, current from the plasma can potentially damage active devices on the wafer. A suite of computational models is used in this article to investigate damage to ultrathin (1.0-5.5nm) transistor gate dielectric (SiO2) during Ar /O2 based plasma cleaning in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor. This modeling infrastructure includes a two-dimensional plasma equipment model for relating process control parameters to ion and electron currents, a three-dimensional model for flux density calculation within a circular via, an electrostatic model for computing potential across the gate dielectric, and a percolation model to investigate dielectric damage characteristics. Computational results show that when the plasma current comes in contact with the gate dielectric, the gate dielectric rapidly charges up and the potential difference across the dielectric saturates at the level necessary to support the plasma induced current. The steady-state voltage across the dielectric determines the propensity of irreversible damage that can occur under this electrical stress. Gate dielectric damage was found to be most sensitively linked to dielectric thickness. As thin dielectrics (<2.0nm) are leaky, direct tunneling current flow ensures that the potential drop across the gate dielectric remains small. As a consequence, the dielectric is able to withstand the plasma current and the probability of damage is small. However, for thicker dielectrics where Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is dominant, a large voltage builds up across the gate dielectric due to the plasma induced current. The probability of thicker dielectrics getting damaged during the plasma process is therefore high. For given plasma conditions and gate dielectric thickness, current collection area (i.e., antenna size) determines the voltage buildup across the gate dielectric. Damage probability increases with the size of the

  4. Gene transfer of manganese superoxide dismutase extends islet graft function in a mouse model of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bertera, Suzanne; Crawford, Megan L; Alexander, Angela M; Papworth, Glenn D; Watkins, Simon C; Robbins, Paul D; Trucco, Massimo

    2003-02-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising cure for diabetes. However, inflammation, allorejection, and recurrent autoimmune damage all may contribute to early graft loss. Pancreatic islets express lower levels of antioxidant genes than most other tissues of the body, and beta-cells in particular are sensitive to oxidative damage. Therefore, damage from oxidative stress may pose a major obstacle to islet replacement therapy in that both the islet isolation and transplantation processes generate oxygen radicals. To determine whether antioxidant gene overexpression in isolated pancreatic islets can prevent oxidative damage and prolong islet function after transplantation, we used the NOD mouse model to study oxidative stress encountered during both transplantation and autoimmune attack. We transferred an antioxidant gene, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), by adenoviral infection into isolated islets that were transplanted into streptozotocin-treated NODscid recipient mice. Functioning islet grafts were subsequently exposed to diabetogenic spleen cells and monitored until graft failure. The results show that islet grafts overexpressing MnSOD functioned approximately 50% longer than control grafts. This significant prolongation of graft function suggests that the antioxidant activity of MnSOD is beneficial to transplanted islet survival and may be used in combination with other strategies aimed at islet graft protection.

  5. Protective Effects of the Mushroom Lactarius deterrimus Extract on Systemic Oxidative Stress and Pancreatic Islets in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mihailović, Mirjana; Arambašić Јovanović, Jelena; Uskoković, Aleksandra; Grdović, Nevena; Dinić, Svetlana; Vidović, Senka; Poznanović, Goran; Mujić, Ibrahim; Vidaković, Melita

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the in vivo effects of the extract of the medicinal mushroom, Lactarius deterrimus, when administered (60 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for four weeks to streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats treated with the L. deterrimus extract displayed several improved biochemical parameters in the circulation: reduced hyperglycemia, lower triglyceride concentration and reduced glycated hemoglobin, glycated serum protein, and advanced glycation end product (AGE) levels. This treatment also adjusted the diabetes-induced redox imbalance. Thus, higher activities of the antioxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase, and catalase in the circulation were accompanied by increased levels of free intracellular thiols and glutathionylated proteins after treatment with the L. deterrimus extract. In addition to a systemic antioxidant effect, the administration of the extract to diabetic rats also had a positive localized effect on pancreatic islets where it decreased AGE formation, and increased the expression of chemokine CXCL12 protein that mediates the restoration of β-cell population through the activation of the serine/threonine-specific Akt protein kinase prosurvival pathway. As a result, the numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen- (PCNA-) and insulin-positive β-cells were increased. These results show that the ability of the L. deterrimus extract to alleviate oxidative stress and increase β-cell mass represents a therapeutic potential for diabetes management. PMID:26221612

  6. Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

    1980-01-01

    Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

  7. Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 Overexpression Induces β-Cell Dysfunction and Increases Beta-cell Susceptibility to Damage*

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, Alba; Mallol, Cristina; Salavert, Ariana; Jimenez, Veronica; Garcia, Miquel; Agudo, Judith; Obach, Mercè; Haurigot, Virginia; Vilà, Laia; Molas, Maria; Lage, Ricardo; Morró, Meritxell; Casana, Estefania; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    The human insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and insulin genes are located within the same genomic region. Although human genomic studies have demonstrated associations between diabetes and the insulin/IGF2 locus or the IGF2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2), the role of IGF2 in diabetes pathogenesis is not fully understood. We previously described that transgenic mice overexpressing IGF2 specifically in β-cells (Tg-IGF2) develop a pre-diabetic state. Here, we characterized the effects of IGF2 on β-cell functionality. Overexpression of IGF2 led to β-cell dedifferentiation and endoplasmic reticulum stress causing islet dysfunction in vivo. Both adenovirus-mediated overexpression of IGF2 and treatment of adult wild-type islets with recombinant IGF2 in vitro further confirmed the direct implication of IGF2 on β-cell dysfunction. Treatment of Tg-IGF2 mice with subdiabetogenic doses of streptozotocin or crossing these mice with a transgenic model of islet lymphocytic infiltration promoted the development of overt diabetes, suggesting that IGF2 makes islets more susceptible to β-cell damage and immune attack. These results indicate that increased local levels of IGF2 in pancreatic islets may predispose to the onset of diabetes. This study unravels an unprecedented role of IGF2 on β-cells function. PMID:25971976

  8. Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 Overexpression Induces β-Cell Dysfunction and Increases Beta-cell Susceptibility to Damage.

    PubMed

    Casellas, Alba; Mallol, Cristina; Salavert, Ariana; Jimenez, Veronica; Garcia, Miquel; Agudo, Judith; Obach, Mercè; Haurigot, Virginia; Vilà, Laia; Molas, Maria; Lage, Ricardo; Morró, Meritxell; Casana, Estefania; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-07-03

    The human insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and insulin genes are located within the same genomic region. Although human genomic studies have demonstrated associations between diabetes and the insulin/IGF2 locus or the IGF2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2), the role of IGF2 in diabetes pathogenesis is not fully understood. We previously described that transgenic mice overexpressing IGF2 specifically in β-cells (Tg-IGF2) develop a pre-diabetic state. Here, we characterized the effects of IGF2 on β-cell functionality. Overexpression of IGF2 led to β-cell dedifferentiation and endoplasmic reticulum stress causing islet dysfunction in vivo. Both adenovirus-mediated overexpression of IGF2 and treatment of adult wild-type islets with recombinant IGF2 in vitro further confirmed the direct implication of IGF2 on β-cell dysfunction. Treatment of Tg-IGF2 mice with subdiabetogenic doses of streptozotocin or crossing these mice with a transgenic model of islet lymphocytic infiltration promoted the development of overt diabetes, suggesting that IGF2 makes islets more susceptible to β-cell damage and immune attack. These results indicate that increased local levels of IGF2 in pancreatic islets may predispose to the onset of diabetes. This study unravels an unprecedented role of IGF2 on β-cells function.

  9. Multiomic Analysis of the UV-Induced DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Boeing, Stefan; Williamson, Laura; Encheva, Vesela; Gori, Ilaria; Saunders, Rebecca E; Instrell, Rachael; Aygün, Ozan; Rodriguez-Martinez, Marta; Weems, Juston C; Kelly, Gavin P; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Stewart, Aengus; Howell, Michael; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2016-05-11

    In order to facilitate the identification of factors and pathways in the cellular response to UV-induced DNA damage, several descriptive proteomic screens and a functional genomics screen were performed in parallel. Numerous factors could be identified with high confidence when the screen results were superimposed and interpreted together, incorporating biological knowledge. A searchable database, bioLOGIC, which provides access to relevant information about a protein or process of interest, was established to host the results and facilitate data mining. Besides uncovering roles in the DNA damage response for numerous proteins and complexes, including Integrator, Cohesin, PHF3, ASC-1, SCAF4, SCAF8, and SCAF11, we uncovered a role for the poorly studied, melanoma-associated serine/threonine kinase 19 (STK19). Besides effectively uncovering relevant factors, the multiomic approach also provides a systems-wide overview of the diverse cellular processes connected to the transcription-related DNA damage response.

  10. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  11. Investigation of the laser-induced damage of dispersive coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, Ivan B.; von Conta, Aaron; Trushin, Sergei A.; Major, Zsuzsanna; Karsch, Stefan; Krausz, Ferenc; Pervak, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    Different dispersive coatings were tested in terms of laser-induced damage threshold by using a Ti:Sapphire laser yielding 1 mJ, 30 fs pulses at 500 Hz repetition rate at 790 nm central wavelength. The beam was focused down to 140 μm. Single layer coatings of Au, Ag, Nb2O5, SiO2, Ta2O5 and mixtures of Ta2O5 and silica were examined as well as different dispersive coatings. We observed a direct dependence of the damage threshold on the band gap of the materials used to produce the different samples. The damage threshold values for the dispersive coatings employing the same high index material lay within a range of 30% of each other.

  12. Size-based separation and collection of mouse pancreatic islets for functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Yong, Wang; Harvat, Tricia; Adewola, Adeola; Wang, Shesun; Oberholzer, Jose; Eddington, David T

    2010-10-01

    Islet size has recently been demonstrated to be an important factor in determining human islet transplantation outcomes. In this study, a multi-layered microfluidic device was developed and quantified for size-based separation of a heterogeneous population of mouse islets. The device was fabricated using standard soft lithography and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Size-based separation was first demonstrated via injection of a heterogeneous population of glass beads between 50-300 microm in diameter which were separated into five sub-populations based on their diameter. Next, a heterogeneous population of mouse pancreatic islets, between 50-250 microm in diameter was separated into four sub-populations. Throughout this process the islets remained intact without any signs of damage, as indicated by cell viability staining. Islet glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of each sub-population of islets was also evaluated demonstrating that islets smaller than 150 microm have superior stimulation indexes (SI) compared to islets larger than 150 microm. In this study, we found that islets between 100 microm and 150 microm in diameter had the greatest SI value in a heterogeneous population of islets.

  13. Automated separation of merged Langerhans islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švihlík, Jan; Kybic, Jan; Habart, David

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with separation of merged Langerhans islets in segmentations in order to evaluate correct histogram of islet diameters. A distribution of islet diameters is useful for determining the feasibility of islet transplantation in diabetes. First, the merged islets at training segmentations are manually separated by medical experts. Based on the single islets, the merged islets are identified and the SVM classifier is trained on both classes (merged/single islets). The testing segmentations were over-segmented using watershed transform and the most probable back merging of islets were found using trained SVM classifier. Finally, the optimized segmentation is compared with ground truth segmentation (correctly separated islets).

  14. Statistical analysis of vibration-induced bone and joint damages.

    PubMed

    Schenk, T

    1995-01-01

    Vibration-induced damages to bones and joints are still occupational diseases with insufficient knowledge about causing and moderating factors and resulting damages. For a better understanding of these relationships also retrospective analyses of already acknowledged occupational diseases may be used. Already recorded detailed data for 203 in 1970 to 1979 acknowledged occupational diseases in the building industry and the building material industry of the GDR are the basis for the here described investigations. The data were gathered from the original documents of the occupational diseases and scaled in cooperation of an industrial engineer and an industrial physician. For the purposes of this investigations the data are to distinguish between data which describe the conditions of the work place (e.g. material, tools and posture), the exposure parameters (e.g. beginning of exposure and latency period) and the disease (e.g. anamnestical and radiological data). These data are treated for the use with sophisticated computerized statistical methods. The following analyses were carried out. Investigation of the connections between the several characteristics, which describe the occupational disease (health damages), including the comparison of the severity of the damages at the individual joints. Investigation of the side dependence of the damages. Investigation of the influence of the age at the beginning of the exposure and the age at the acknowledgement of the occupational disease and herewith of the exposure duration. Investigation of the effect of different occupational and exposure conditions.

  15. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-03

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  16. Reformulated meat products protect against ischemia-induced cardiac damage.

    PubMed

    Asensio-Lopez, M C; Lax, A; Sanchez-Mas, J; Avellaneda, A; Planes, J; Pascual-Figal, D A

    2016-02-01

    The protective effects of the antioxidants present in food are of great relevance for cardiovascular health. This study evaluates whether the extracts from reformulated meat products with a reduction in fat and/or sodium content exert a cardioprotective effect against ischemia-induced oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes, compared with non-meat foods. Ischemic damage caused loss of cell viability, increased reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation and decreased the antioxidant activity. Pretreatment for 24 h with digested or non-digested extracts from reformulated meat products led to protection against ischemia-induced oxidative damage: increased cell viability, reduced oxidative stress and restored the antioxidant activity. Similar results were obtained using extracts from tuna fish, but not with the extracts of green peas, salad or white beans. These results suggest that reformulated meat products have a beneficial impact in protecting cardiac cells against ischemia, and they may represent a source of natural antioxidants with benefits for cardiovascular health.

  17. Prediction of marginal mass required for successful islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Papas, Klearchos K; Colton, Clark K; Qipo, Andi; Wu, Haiyan; Nelson, Rebecca A; Hering, Bernhard J; Weir, Gordon C; Koulmanda, Maria

    2010-02-01

    Islet quality assessment methods for predicting diabetes reversal (DR) following transplantation are needed. We investigated two islet parameters, oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and OCR per DNA content, to predict transplantation outcome and explored the impact of islet quality on marginal islet mass for DR. Outcomes in immunosuppressed diabetic mice were evaluated by transplanting mixtures of healthy and purposely damaged rat islets for systematic variation of OCR/DNA over a wide range. The probability of DR increased with increasing transplanted OCR and OCR/DNA. On coordinates of OCR versus OCR/DNA, data fell into regions in which DR occurred in all, some, or none of the animals with a sharp threshold of around 150-nmol/min mg DNA. A model incorporating both parameters predicted transplantation outcome with sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 94%, respectively. Marginal mass was not constant, depended on OCR/DNA, and increased from 2,800 to over 100,000 islet equivalents/kg body weight as OCR/DNA decreased. We conclude that measurements of OCR and OCR/DNA are useful for predicting transplantation outcome in this model system, and OCR/DNA can be used to estimate the marginal mass required for reversing diabetes. Because human clinical islet preparations in a previous study had OCR/DNA.

  18. Inflammation-Induced Cell Proliferation Potentiates DNA Damage-Induced Mutations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Olipitz, Werner; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are a critical driver of cancer initiation. While extensive studies have focused on exposure-induced mutations, few studies have explored the importance of tissue physiology as a modulator of mutation susceptibility in vivo. Of particular interest is inflammation, a known cancer risk factor relevant to chronic inflammatory diseases and pathogen-induced inflammation. Here, we used the fluorescent yellow direct repeat (FYDR) mice that harbor a reporter to detect misalignments during homologous recombination (HR), an important class of mutations. FYDR mice were exposed to cerulein, a potent inducer of pancreatic inflammation. We show that inflammation induces DSBs (γH2AX foci) and that several days later there is an increase in cell proliferation. While isolated bouts of inflammation did not induce HR, overlap between inflammation-induced DNA damage and inflammation-induced cell proliferation induced HR significantly. To study exogenously-induced DNA damage, animals were exposed to methylnitrosourea, a model alkylating agent that creates DNA lesions relevant to both environmental exposures and cancer chemotherapy. We found that exposure to alkylation damage induces HR, and importantly, that inflammation-induced cell proliferation and alkylation induce HR in a synergistic fashion. Taken together, these results show that, during an acute bout of inflammation, there is a kinetic barrier separating DNA damage from cell proliferation that protects against mutations, and that inflammation-induced cell proliferation greatly potentiates exposure-induced mutations. These studies demonstrate a fundamental mechanism by which inflammation can act synergistically with DNA damage to induce mutations that drive cancer and cancer recurrence. PMID:25647331

  19. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors induce DNA damage through nucleoside depletion

    PubMed Central

    Juvekar, Ashish; Hu, Hai; Yadegarynia, Sina; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Ullas, Soumya; Lien, Evan C.; Bellinger, Gary; Son, Jaekyoung; Hok, Rosanna C.; Seth, Pankaj; Daly, Michele B.; Kim, Baek; Scully, Ralph; Asara, John M.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wulf, Gerburg M.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that combining a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor with a poly-ADP Rib polymerase (PARP)-inhibitor enhanced DNA damage and cell death in breast cancers that have genetic aberrations in BRCA1 and TP53. Here, we show that enhanced DNA damage induced by PI3K inhibitors in this mutational background is a consequence of impaired production of nucleotides needed for DNA synthesis and DNA repair. Inhibition of PI3K causes a reduction in all four nucleotide triphosphates, whereas inhibition of the protein kinase AKT is less effective than inhibition of PI3K in suppressing nucleotide synthesis and inducing DNA damage. Carbon flux studies reveal that PI3K inhibition disproportionately affects the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway that delivers Rib-5-phosphate required for base ribosylation. In vivo in a mouse model of BRCA1-linked triple-negative breast cancer (K14-Cre BRCA1f/fp53f/f), the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 led to a precipitous drop in DNA synthesis within 8 h of drug treatment, whereas DNA synthesis in normal tissues was less affected. In this mouse model, combined PI3K and PARP inhibition was superior to either agent alone to induce durable remissions of established tumors. PMID:27402769

  20. Stochastics of diffusion induced damage in intercalation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, Pallab; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2016-10-01

    Fundamental understanding of the underlying diffusion-mechanics interplay in the intercalation electrode materials is critical toward improved life and performance of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles. Especially, diffusion induced microcrack formation in brittle, intercalation active materials, with emphasis on the grain/grain-boundary (GB) level implications, has been fundamentally investigated based on a stochastic modeling approach. Quasistatic damage evolution has been analyzed under lithium concentration gradient induced stress. Scaling of total amount of microcrack formation shows a power law variation with respect to the system size. Difference between the global and local roughness exponent indicates the existence of anomalous scaling. The deterioration of stiffness with respect to microcrack density displays two distinct regions of damage propagation; namely, diffused damage evolution and stress concentration driven localized crack propagation. Polycrystalline material microstructures with different grain sizes have been considered to study the diffusion-induced fracture in grain and GB regions. Intergranular crack paths are observed within microstructures containing softer GB region, whereas, transgranular crack paths have been observed in microstructures with relatively strong GB region. Increased tortuosity of the spanning crack has been attributed as the reason behind attaining increased fracture strength in polycrystalline materials with smaller grain sizes.

  1. The effect of insulin treatment and of islet transplantation on the resistance artery function in the STZ-induced diabetic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heygate, K. M.; Davies, J.; Holmes, M.; James, R. F.; Thurston, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. This study was designed to investigate the influence of insulin treatment and islet transplantation on the smooth muscle contractility and endothelium-dependent and independent relaxation of resistance arteries in the chemically induced streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rat after 6-8 weeks, and 12-14 weeks of diabetes, compared to non-diabetic age-matched controls. 2. The morphology, and contractile responses to high potassium physiological salt solution (KPSS), KPSS containing 10(-5) M noradrenaline (NAK), and concentration-response curves to noradrenaline (NA) of mesenteric resistance arteries were recorded, along with the endothelium-dependent relaxation responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and bradykinin (BK), and endothelium-independent relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Concentration-response curves were then repeated in the presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG). 3. Insulin-treated diabetic rats in the 12 week study demonstrated enhanced vascular contractility to KPSS, NAK and NA, compared to age-matched non-diabetic controls. 4. Incubation with L-NOARG resulted in both a significant increase in maximum contractile response, and sensitivity (pD2) to NA in the untreated diabetic group (6 weeks). A significant shift in sensitivity was also seen in the insulin-treated diabetic group. In the 12 week study, incubation with L-NOARG resulted in an increased maximum contractile response and sensitivity to NA in the insulin-treated diabetics. An increase in sensitivity was also observed in the untreated diabetic group. 5. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh was significantly augmented in the untreated diabetics (6-weeks), compared to the control group. In the 12-week study, relaxation to both ACh and BK was not significantly different in any of the experimental groups when compared to the sham-operated non-diabetic controls. 6. Incubation with L-NOARG resulted in a significant attenuation of the maximum relaxation response

  2. Glucose- and GTP-dependent stimulation of the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in rodent and human pancreatic islets and pure beta cells. Evidence for an essential role of GTP-binding proteins in nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, A; Seavey, S E; Li, G; Sorenson, R L; Weinhaus, A J; Nesher, R; Rabaglia, M E; Vadakekalam, J; Metz, S A

    1996-01-01

    Several GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins) undergo post-translational modifications (isoprenylation and carboxyl methylation) in pancreatic beta cells. Herein, two of these were identified as CDC42 and rap 1, using Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Confocal microscopic data indicated that CDC42 is localized only in islet endocrine cells but not in acinar cells of the pancreas. CDC42 undergoes a guanine nucleotide-specific membrane association and carboxyl methylation in normal rat islets, human islets, and pure beta (HIT or INS-1) cells. GTPgammaS-dependent carboxyl methylation of a 23-kD protein was also demonstrable in secretory granule fractions from normal islets or beta cells. AFC (a specific inhibitor of prenyl-cysteine carboxyl methyl transferases) blocked the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in five types of insulin-secreting cells, without blocking GTPgammaS-induced translocation, implying that methylation is a consequence (not a cause) of transfer to membrane sites. High glucose (but not a depolarizing concentration of K+) induced the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in intact cells, as assessed after specific immunoprecipitation. This effect was abrogated by GTP depletion using mycophenolic acid and was restored upon GTP repletion by coprovision of guanosine. In contrast, although rap 1 was also carboxyl methylated, it was not translocated to the particulate fraction by GTPgammaS; furthermore, its methylation was also stimulated by 40 mM K+ (suggesting a role which is not specific to nutrient stimulation). AFC also impeded nutrient-induced (but not K+-induced) insulin secretion from islets and beta cells under static or perifusion conditions, whereas an inactive structural analogue of AFC failed to inhibit insulin release. These effects were reproduced not only by S-adenosylhomocysteine (another methylation inhibitor), but also by GTP depletion. Thus, the glucose- and GTP-dependent carboxyl methylation of G-proteins such as CDC42 is an obligate step in

  3. Enhancement of ultrasonically induced cell damage by phthalocyanines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Gabryelak, Teresa

    2008-12-01

    In this work, erythrocytes from carp were used as a nucleated cell model to test the hypothesis that the phthalocyanines (zinc--ZnPc and chloroaluminium -AlClPc) enhance ultrasonically induced damage in vitro. In order to confirm and complete our earlier investigation, the influence of ultrasound (US) and phthalocyanines (Pcs) on unresearched cellular components, was studied. Red blood cells were exposed to 1 MHz continuous ultrasound wave (0.61 and/or 2.44 W/cm(2)) in the presence or absence of phthalocyanines (3 microM). To identify target cell damage, we studied hemolysis, membrane fluidity and morphology of erythrocytes. To demonstrate the changes in the fluidity of plasma membrane we used the spectrofluorimetric methods using two fluorescence probes: 1-[4-(trimethylamino)phenyl]-6-phenyl-1,3,5,-hexatriene (TMA-DPH) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). The effect of US and Pcs on nucleated erythrocytes morphology was estimated on the basis of microscopic observation. The enhancement of ultrasonically induced membrane damage by both phthalocyanines was observed in case of hemolysis, and membrane surface fluidity, in comparison to ultrasound. The authors also observed changes in the morphology of erythrocytes. The obtained results support the hypothesis that the Pcs enhance ultrasonically induced cell damage in vitro. Furthermore, the influence of ultrasound on phthalocyanines (Pcs) in medium and in cells was tested. The authors observed changes in the phthalocyanines absorption spectra in the medium and the increase in the intensity of phthalocyanines fluorescence in the cells. These data can suggest changes in the structure of phthalocyanines after ultrasound action.

  4. Prevention of downhill walking-induced muscle damage by non-damaging downhill walking

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Mountain trekking involves level, uphill, and downhill walking (DW). Prolonged DW induces damage to leg muscles, reducing force generating ability and muscle coordination. These increase risks for more serious injuries and accidents in mountain trekking, thus a strategy to minimize muscle damage is warranted. It has been shown that low-intensity eccentric contractions confer protective effect on muscle damage induced by high-intensity eccentric contractions. This study tested the hypothesis that 5-min non-damaging DW would attenuate muscle damage induced by 40-min DW, but 5-min level walking (LW) would not. Methods Untrained young men were allocated (n = 12/group) to either a control or one of the two preconditioning groups (PRE-DW or PRE-LW). The PRE-DW and PRE-LW groups performed 5-min DW (-28%) and 5-min LW, respectively, at 5 km/h with a load of 10% body mass, 1 week before 40-min DW (-28%, 5 km/h, 10% load). The control group performed 40-min DW only. Maximal knee extension strength, plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity, and muscle soreness (0–100 mm visual analogue scale) were measured before and 24 h after 5-min DW and 5-min LW, and before and 24, 48, and 72 h after 40-min DW. Results No significant changes in any variables were evident after 5-min DW and 5-min LW. After 40-min DW, the control and PRE-LW groups showed significant (P<0.05) changes in the variables without significant differences between groups (control vs. PRE-LW; peak strength reduction: -19.2 ± 6.9% vs. -18.7 ± 11.0%, peak CK: 635.5 ± 306.0 vs. 639.6 ± 405.4 U/L, peak soreness: 81.4 ± 14.8 vs. 72.0 ± 29.2 mm). These changes were significantly (P<0.05) attenuated (47–64%) for the PRE-DW group (-9.9 ± 9.6%, 339.3 ± 148.4 U/L, 27.8 ± 16.8 mm). Conclusions The results supported the hypothesis and suggest that performing small volume of downhill walking is crucial in preparation for trekking. PMID:28288187

  5. Mechanism of site-specific DNA damage induced by ozone.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiko; Inoue, Sumiko; Hiraku, Yusuke; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2005-08-01

    Ozone has been shown to induce lung tumors in mice. The reactivity of ozone with DNA in an aqueous solution was investigated by a DNA sequencing technique using 32P-labeled DNA fragments. Ozone induced cleavages in the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of double-stranded DNA, which were reduced by hydroxyl radical scavengers, suggesting the participation of hydroxyl radicals in the cleavages. The ozone-induced DNA cleavages were enhanced with piperidine treatment, which induces cleavages at sites of base modification, but the inhibitory effect of hydroxyl radical scavengers on the piperidine-induced cleavages was limited. Main piperidine-labile sites were guanine and thymine residues. Cleavages at some guanine and thymine residues after piperidine treatment became more predominant with denatured single-stranded DNA. Exposure of calf thymus DNA to ozone resulted in a dose-dependent increase of the 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine formation, which was partially inhibited by hydroxyl radical scavengers. ESR studies using 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) showed that aqueous ozone produced the hydroxyl radical adduct of DMPO. In addition, the fluorescein-dependent chemiluminescence was detected during the decomposition of ozone in a buffer solution and the enhancing effect of D2O was observed, suggesting the formation of singlet oxygen. However, no or little enhancing effect of D2O on the ozone-induced DNA damage was observed. These results suggest that DNA backbone cleavages were caused by ozone via the production of hydroxyl radicals, while DNA base modifications were mainly caused by ozone itself and the participation of hydroxyl radicals and/or singlet oxygen in base modifications is small, if any. A possible link of ozone-induced DNA damage to inflammation-associated carcinogenesis as well as air pollution-related carcinogenesis is discussed.

  6. Oxidant-induced DNA damage of target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstätter, I; Hyslop, P A; Jackson, J H; Cochrane, C G

    1988-01-01

    In this study we examined the leukocytic oxidant species that induce oxidant damage of DNA in whole cells. H2O2 added extracellularly in micromolar concentrations (10-100 microM) induced DNA strand breaks in various target cells. The sensitivity of a specific target cell was inversely correlated to its catalase content and the rate of removal of H2O2 by the target cell. Oxidant species produced by xanthine oxidase/purine or phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated monocytes induced DNA breakage of target cells in proportion to the amount of H2O2 generated. These DNA strand breaks were prevented by extracellular catalase, but not by superoxide dismutase. Cytotoxic doses of HOCl, added to target cells, did not induce DNA strand breakage, and myeloperoxidase added extracellularly in the presence of an H2O2-generating system, prevented the formation of DNA strand breaks in proportion to its H2O2 degrading capacity. The studies also indicated that H2O2 formed hydroxyl radical (.OH) intracellularly, which appeared to be the most likely free radical responsible for DNA damage: .OH was detected in cells exposed to H2O2; the DNA base, deoxyguanosine, was hydroxylated in cells exposed to H2O2; and intracellular iron was essential for induction of DNA strand breaks. PMID:2843565

  7. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, J.; Korfer, M.; Wanke, H. , Mainz ); Schroeder, A.N.F. ); Figes, D.; Dragovitsch, P. ); Englert, P.A.J. ); Starr, R.; Trombka, J.I. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Taylor, I. ); Drake, D.M.; Shunk, E.R. )

    1991-04-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10{sub 8} protons cm{sup {minus}2} (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific as well as engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage the detectors were stepwise annealed at temperatures T {le} 110{degrees}C while staying specially designed cryostats. This paper shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged particles environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  8. Sunscreens promote repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced dermal damage.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H; Akin, F J; Kligman, A M

    1983-08-01

    Chronic UV irradiation profoundly damages the dermis of human and animal skin. These alterations were thought to be irreversible. Recently, we showed that substantial repair occurred in hairless mice after stopping UV exposure. A band of new connective tissue was laid down subepidermally. The present study focussed on whether repair would occur if animals were protected by sunscreens after dermal damage was induced and irradiation was continued. Albino hairless mice were exposed to Westinghouse FS20 sunlamps thrice weekly for 30 weeks. The daily dose of UV (UVB + UVA) was 0.17 J/cm2. Sunscreens of sun protection factors (SPF) 6 and 15 were applied after 10 and 20 weeks of irradiation. Biopsies were taken at 10, 20, 30, and 45 weeks of the experiment. With both sunscreens, especially SPF-15, previously damaged dermis was repaired during continued irradiation. Repair occurred in situ and, in severely damaged skin, in the novel form of subepidermal reconstruction zones of new connective tissue with parallel collagen bundles and a network of fine elastic fibers.

  9. Radiation-induced thymine base damage in replicating chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Warters, R.L.; Childers, T.J.

    1982-06-01

    The efficiency of radiation-induced production of 5',6'-dihydroxydihydrothymine (t/sup ..gamma../)-type damage was determined in nascent and mature chromatin DNA for the dose range of 50 to 150 krad. These large doses affected neither the total fraction of nuclear DNA in chromatin subunits nor the nucleosome subunit repeat length. The DNA in nascent chromatin, however, was found to be 3.3 times more sensitive than mature chromatin DNA to ..gamma..-ray (/sup 137/Cs)-induced t/sup ..gamma../-type damage, while thymine damage of this type was uniformly distributed in the nucleosomal DNA of mature chromatin (i.e., in the nucleosome core and spacer DNA). The half-time for the transition of nascent DNA sensitivity to mature chromatin DNA sensitivity levels was the same as the half-time at 37/sup 0/C for the maturation of nascent into mature chromatin structure. The rate at which nascent chromatin matured was unaffected by radiation doses as large as 150 krad. The most logical explanation for the greater sensitivity of nascent DNA to radiation is the decreased concentration of histone chromosomal proteins in nascent chromatin.

  10. Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Running Economy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Cláudio de Oliveira; Lima, Leonardo Coelho Rabello; Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Greco, Camila Coelho; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2013-01-01

    Running economy (RE), defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running, has been identified as a critical factor of overall distance running performance. Plyometric and resistance trainings, performed during a relatively short period of time (~15–30 days), have been successfully used to improve RE in trained athletes. However, these exercise types, particularly when they are unaccustomed activities for the individuals, may cause delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, and reduced muscle strength. Some studies have demonstrated that exercise-induced muscle damage has a negative impact on endurance running performance. Specifically, the muscular damage induced by an acute bout of downhill running has been shown to reduce RE during subsequent moderate and high-intensity exercise (>65% VO2max). However, strength exercise (i.e., jumps, isoinertial and isokinetic eccentric exercises) seems to impair RE only for subsequent high-intensity exercise (~90% VO2max). Finally, a single session of resistance exercise or downhill running (i.e., repeated bout effect) attenuates changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and blunts changes in RE. PMID:23431253

  11. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Williams, Vonetta; Filippova, Maria; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer. PMID:25340830

  12. Mitochondrial injury and dysfunction in hypertension-induced cardiac damage

    PubMed Central

    Eirin, Alfonso; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension remains an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Deciphering the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension is critical, as its prevalence continues increasing worldwide. Mitochondria, the primary cellular energy producers, are numerous in parenchymal cells of the heart, kidney, and brain, major target organs in hypertension. These membrane-bound organelles not only maintain cellular respiration but also modulate several functions of the cell including proliferation, apoptosis, generation of reactive oxygen species, and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Therefore, mitochondrial damage and dysfunction compromise overall cell functioning. In recent years, significant advances increased our understanding of mitochondrial morphology, bioenergetics, and homeostasis, and in turn of their role in several diseases, so that mitochondrial abnormalities and dysfunction have been identified in experimental models of hypertension. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the contribution of dysfunctional mitochondria to the pathophysiology of hypertension-induced cardiac damage, as well as available evidence of mitochondrial injury-induced damage in other organs. Finally, we discuss the capability of antihypertensive therapy to ameliorate hypertensive mitochondrial injury, and the potential position of mitochondria as therapeutic targets in patients with hypertension. PMID:25385092

  13. Laser pointer induced macular damage: case report and mini review.

    PubMed

    Turaka, Kiran; Bryan, J Shepard; Gordon, Alan J; Reddy, Rahul; Kwong, Henry M; Sell, Clive H

    2012-06-01

    To report laser pointer induced damage to retina and choroid and briefly review literature. A case report of a 13-year old Caucasian boy developed blurry central vision and central scotoma in right eye (OD). He was exposed for one minute to class IIIA green laser pointer of 650 nm wavelength and 5 mW power. Clinical examination showed a grayish lesion in foveal region. Ancillary testing revealed disruption of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) layer in foveal region and indocyanine green angiography demonstrated evidence of choroidal hypofluorescence suggestive of choroidal infarction in OD. Visual acuity improved from 20/100 to 20/60 in one day and he was treated with tapering doses of oral prednisolone (40 mg) for 3 weeks. Laser pointer with a power of >5 mW caused damage to RPE in the macula. Children should not be given laser pointers as toys especially those with label of danger instructions.

  14. Dietary strategies to recover from exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Mónica; Teixeira, Vítor H; Soares, José

    2014-03-01

    Exhaustive or unaccustomed intense exercise can cause exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and its undesirable consequences may decrease the ability to exercise and to adhere to a training programme. This review briefly summarises the muscle damage process, focusing predominantly on oxidative stress and inflammation as contributing factors, and describes how nutrition may be positively used to recover from EIMD. The combined intake of carbohydrates and proteins and the use of antioxidants and/or anti-inflammatory nutrients within physiological ranges are interventions that may assist the recovery process. Although the works studying food instead of nutritional supplements are very scarce, their results seem to indicate that food might be a favourable option as a recovery strategy. To date, the only tested foods were milk, cherries, blueberries and pomegranate with promising results. Other potential solutions are foods rich in protein, carbohydrates, antioxidants and/or anti-inflammatory nutrients.

  15. Vascularized tissue-engineered chambers promote survival and function of transplanted islets and improve glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Knight, K R; Uda, Y; Findlay, M W; Brown, D L; Cronin, K J; Jamieson, E; Tai, T; Keramidaris, E; Penington, A J; Rophael, J; Harrison, L C; Morrison, W A

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a chamber model of islet engraftment that optimizes islet survival by rapidly restoring islet-extracellular matrix relationships and vascularization. Our aim was to assess the ability of syngeneic adult islets seeded into blood vessel-containing chambers to correct streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Approximately 350 syngeneic islets suspended in Matrigel extracellular matrix were inserted into chambers based on either the splenic or groin (epigastric) vascular beds, or, in the standard approach, injected under the renal capsule. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for 7 weeks, and an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test performed at 6 weeks in the presence of the islet grafts. Relative to untreated diabetic animals, glycemic control significantly improved in all islet transplant groups, strongly correlating with islet counts in the graft (P<0.01), and with best results in the splenic chamber group. Glycemic control deteriorated after chambers were surgically removed at week 8. Immunohistochemistry revealed islets with abundant insulin content in grafts from all groups, but with significantly more islets in splenic chamber grafts than the other treatment groups (P<0.05). It is concluded that hyperglycemia in experimental type 1 diabetes can be effectively treated by islets seeded into a vascularized chamber functioning as a "pancreatic organoid."

  16. Human BM stem cells initiate angiogenesis in human islets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Luo, J Z Q; Xiong, F; Al-Homsi, A S; Roy, T; Luo, L G

    2011-08-01

    BM stem cells may have regenerative effects on islet function through angiogenesis. Human islets (100islet equivalent/mL) were cultured alone (control) or co-cultured (experimental group) with whole human BM (1 × 10(6) cells/mL) for 210 days. A protein array measuring angiogenesis factors found upregulated (experimental vs control, day 210) proteins levels of VEGF-a (535 vs 2 pg/mL), PDGF (280.79 vs 0 pg/mL), KGF (939 vs 8 pg/mL), TIMP-1 (4592 vs 4332 pg/mL) and angiogenin (506 vs 97 pg/mL). Lower protein levels of angiopoietin-2 (5 vs 709 pg/mL) were observed. Depletion of pro-angiogenesis factors in co-culture decreased the effects of BM-induced islet vascularization. Depletion of VEGF-a, eKGF and PDGF significantly reduced islet vascularization but individual depletion of KGF and PDGF had less effects overall on vessel formation. BM-induced vascularization showed significant endothelial cell distribution. Islet vascularization was linked to islet growth. A decrease in islet size indicated poor vascularization. Insulin release was evident in the tissues generated from human islet-BM co-culture throughout the entire culture period. Significant increase in insulin (28.66-fold vs control) and glucagon (24.4-fold vs control) gene expression suggest BM can induce endocrine cell regeneration. In conclusion, BM promotes human islet tissue regeneration via regulation of angiogenesis factors.

  17. Revision of laser-induced damage threshold evaluation from damage probability data

    SciTech Connect

    Bataviciute, Gintare; Grigas, Povilas; Smalakys, Linas; Melninkaitis, Andrius

    2013-04-15

    In this study, the applicability of commonly used Damage Frequency Method (DFM) is addressed in the context of Laser-Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) testing with pulsed lasers. A simplified computer model representing the statistical interaction between laser irradiation and randomly distributed damage precursors is applied for Monte Carlo experiments. The reproducibility of LIDT predicted from DFM is examined under both idealized and realistic laser irradiation conditions by performing numerical 1-on-1 tests. A widely accepted linear fitting resulted in systematic errors when estimating LIDT and its error bars. For the same purpose, a Bayesian approach was proposed. A novel concept of parametric regression based on varying kernel and maximum likelihood fitting technique is introduced and studied. Such approach exhibited clear advantages over conventional linear fitting and led to more reproducible LIDT evaluation. Furthermore, LIDT error bars are obtained as a natural outcome of parametric fitting which exhibit realistic values. The proposed technique has been validated on two conventionally polished fused silica samples (355 nm, 5.7 ns).

  18. Characterizing the Mechanistic Pathways of the Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction in Xenogeneic Neonatal Islet Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Liuwantara, David; Chew, Yi Vee; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.; Hawkes, Joanne M.; Burns, Heather L.; O'Connell, Philip J.; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) causes major loss of islets after transplantation and consequently represents the initial barrier to survival of porcine neonatal islet cell clusters (NICC) after xenotransplantation. Methods This study used novel assays designed to characterize the various immunologic components responsible for xenogeneic IBMIR to identify initiators and investigate processes of IBMIR-associated coagulation, complement activation and neutrophil infiltration. The IBMIR was induced in vitro by exposing NICC to platelet-poor or platelet-rich human plasma or isolated neutrophils. Results We found that xenogeneic IBMIR was characterized by rapid, platelet-independent thrombin generation, with addition of platelets both accelerating and exacerbating this response. Platelet-independent complement activation was observed as early as 30 minutes after NICC exposure to plasma. However, membrane attack complex formation was not observed in NICC histopathology sections until after 60 minutes. We demonstrated for the first time that NICC-mediated complement activation was necessary for neutrophil activation in the xenogeneic IBMIR setting. Finally, using the Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer, we identified substantial loss of islet function (up to 40%) after IBMIR with surviving NICC showing evidence of mitochondrial damage. Conclusions This study used novel assays to describe multiple key pathways by which xenogeneic IBMIR causes islet destruction, allowing further refinement of future interventions aimed at resolving the issue of IBMIR in xenotransplantation. PMID:27500267

  19. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Nancy D.; Braby, Leslie A.; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  20. Role of neutrophils in acrylonitrile-induced gastric mucosal damage.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Nadia M; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Alghamdi, Hassan A; Tolba, Mai F; Esmat, Ahmed; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2012-01-25

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used intermediate in the manufacture of plastics, acrylic fibers, synthetic rubbers and resins that are used in a variety of products including food containers and medical devices. ACN is a possible human carcinogen and a documented animal carcinogen, with the stomach being an important target of its toxicity. ACN has been previously reported to require metabolic activation to reactive intermediates and finally to cyanide (CN⁻). The current study aimed at exploring the potential role of neutrophils in ACN-induced gastric damage in rats. Experimental neutropenia was attained by injecting rats with methotrexate. This significantly ameliorated gastric mucosal injury induced by ACN. This is evidenced by protection against the increase in gastric ulcer index, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and CN⁻ level. Also, neutropenia guarded against the decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), induction of oxidative stress and reduction of total nitrites and alleviated histopathological alterations in rat stomachs. These data indicate that neutrophil infiltration is, at least partly, involved in ACN-induced gastric damage in rats.

  1. Silica radical-induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, X; Mao, Y; Daniel, L N; Saffiotti, U; Dalal, N S; Vallyathan, V

    1994-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the mechanism of disease induction caused by the surface properties of minerals. In this respect, specific research needs to be focused on the biologic interactions of oxygen radicals generated by mineral particles resulting in cell injury and DNA damage leading to fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis. In this investigation, we used electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping to study oxygen radical generation from aqueous suspensions of freshly fractured crystalline silica. Hydroxyl radical (.OH), superoxide radical (O2.-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) were all detected. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) partially inhibited .OH yield, whereas catalase abolished .OH generation. H2O2 enhanced .OH generation while deferoxamine inhibited it, indicating that .OH is generated via a Haber-Weiss type reaction. These spin trapping measurements provide the first evidence that aqueous suspensions of silica particles generate O2.- and 1O2. Oxygen consumption measurements indicate that freshly fractured silica uses molecular oxygen to generate O2.- and 1O2. Electrophoretic assays of in vitro DNA strand breakages showed that freshly fractured silica induced DNA strand breakage, which was inhibited by catalase and enhanced by H2O2. In an argon atmosphere, DNA damage was suppressed, showing that molecular oxygen is required for the silica-induced DNA damage. Incubation of freshly fractured silica with linoleic acid generated linoleic acid-derived free radicals and caused dose-dependent lipid peroxidation as measured by ESR spin trapping and malondialdehyde formation. SOD, catalase, and sodium benzoate inhibited lipid peroxidation by 49, 52, and 75%, respectively, again showing the role of oxygen radicals in silica-induced lipid peroxidation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 7. PMID:7705289

  2. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  3. Identification of T cell subsets and class I and class II antigen expression in islet grafts and pancreatic islets of diabetic BioBreeding/Worcester rats.

    PubMed Central

    Weringer, E. J.; Like, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    The BioBreeding/Worcester (BB/Wor) rat develops a spontaneous disorder that closely resembles human insulin-dependent (Type I) diabetes mellitus. The syndrome is preceded by lymphocytic insulitis that destroys pancreatic beta cells. The morphologic features of the spontaneous insulitis lesions are also observed within islets transplanted beneath the renal capsule of diabetes-prone and diabetic animals. This study reports the results of experiments in which immunohistochemical techniques were used to characterize the phenotype of the infiltrating mononuclear cells and detect the expression of class I and class II MHC antigens in native islets and islet transplants in diabetic and diabetes-prone BB/Wor rats. The infiltrates within native pancreatic islets and islet grafts were comprised predominantly of Ia+ cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) CD4+ cells (helper/inducer lymphocytes and macrophages), CD5+ (pan-T) cells and smaller numbers of CD8+ (cytotoxic/suppressor and NK) cells. Pancreatic and graft insulitis were accompanied by markedly enhanced class I antigen expression on islet and exocrine cells. Class II (Ia) antigens were not detected on normal islet cells, islets undergoing insulitis or on islet transplants subjected to immune attack. In islet grafts stained with polymorphic MAbs that distinguish Ia antigens of donor and host origin, Ia antigen expression was limited to infiltrating dendritic cells and macrophages of host origin. It is concluded that the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells that comprise the insulitis lesion in spontaneous BB/Wor diabetes, and the inflammatory attack on islets transplanted into diabetic BB/Wor rats are the same, that pancreatic islet and graft insulitis occur in the presence of enhanced class I antigen expression but in the absence of class II antigen expression, and that infiltrating Ia+ cells within islet grafts are exclusively of recipient (BB/Wor) origin and may explain the initiation of immune insulitis

  4. Gender differences in alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and brain damage.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Loeches, Silvia; Pascual, María; Guerri, Consuelo

    2013-09-06

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated that women are more vulnerable than men to the toxic effects of alcohol, although the results as to whether gender differences exist in ethanol-induced brain damage are contradictory. We have reported that ethanol, by activating the neuroimmune system and Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4), can cause neuroinflammation and brain injury. However, whether there are gender differences in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation and brain injury are currently controversial. Using the brains of TLR4(+/+) and TLR4(-/-) (TLR4-KO) mice, we report that chronic ethanol treatment induces inflammatory mediators (iNOS and COX-2), cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α), gliosis processes, caspase-3 activation and neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex of both female and male mice. Conversely, the levels of these parameters tend to be higher in female than in male mice. Using an in vivo imaging technique, our results further evidence that ethanol treatment triggers higher GFAP levels and lower MAP-2 levels in female than in male mice, suggesting a greater effect of ethanol-induced astrogliosis and less MAP-2(+) neurons in female than in male mice. Our results further confirm the pivotal role of TLR4 in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation and brain damage since the elimination of TLR4 protects the brain of males and females against the deleterious effects of ethanol. In short, the present findings demonstrate that, during the same period of ethanol treatment, females are more vulnerable than males to the neurotoxic/neuroinflammatory effects of ethanol, thus supporting the view that women are more susceptible than men to the medical consequences of alcohol abuse.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in subdermal islet transplant sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-03-01

    Exogenous insulin administration is the mainstay treatment therapy for patients with Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, for select patients, clinical islet transplantation is an alternative therapeutic treatment. In this procedure, islets are transplanted into the hepatic portal vein, and despite improved success within the last decade, obstacles are still associated with this approach. It has been discovered that the subcutaneous space may be an effective alternative site for islet transplantation, and may provide advantages of easy access and potential for simple monitoring. The ability to monitor islet viability and the transplant microenvironment may be key to future success in islet transplantation. A subcutaneous device-less technique has been developed to facilitate angiogenesis in the islet transplant site, however, a method for monitoring the potential engraftment site have yet to be explored fully. Here we demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis in mice with 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks post-catheter implant on both sides of the abdomen using a FujiFilm VisualSonics Vevo-LAZR system. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities exhibited gradual vessel growth successfully induced by catheter implantation. Our study demonstrates the ability of employing photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound imaging to track angiogenesis around the catheter site prior to islet transplantation.

  6. Heavy metals, islet function and diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya Wen; Yang, Ching Yao; Huang, Chun Fa; Hung, Dong Zong; Leung, Yuk Man; Liu, Shing Hwa

    2009-01-01

    It has long been believed that heavy metals possess many adverse health effects. Uncontrolled industrialization has released heavy metal pollution in the world. Heavy metal pollutants damage organ functions and disrupt physiological homeostasis. Diabetes mellitus is growing in prevalence worldwide. Several studies have indicated that the deficiency and efficiency of some essential trace metals may play a role in the islet function and development of diabetes mellitus. Some toxic metals have also been shown to be elevated in biological samples of diabetes mellitus patients. In the present work, we review the important roles of heavy metals in islet function and diabetes development in which the in vitro, in vivo or human evidences are associated with exposure to zinc, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and nickel. Through this work, we summarize the evidence which suggests that some heavy metals may play an important role in diabetes mellitus as environmental risk factors.

  7. Simulation of ion induced radiation damage in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, W.; Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H. G.; Ottolenghi, A.; Ballarini, F.; Dingfelder, M.

    The biophysical simulation code PARTRAC has been used in several studies of DNA damage induced by various radiation qualities including photons electrons protons alphas and ions heavier than alpha particles Ion-electron interaction cross sections are taken from isotachic protons scaled by Z eff 2 with the effective charge calculated according to the Barkas formula Recently ion type dependent angular distributions were introduced for intermediate secondary electron energies taking into account the different kinematic scaling of the constituents of the electron spectra Calculated stopping powers radial dose distributions and secondary electron spectra were found in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical results Radiation damage to DNA is determined in PARTRAC by superposition of the calculated track structures with a DNA target model taking into account direct effects from coincidences of ionisations and atoms within the DNA helix as well as indirect effects due to interactions of OH radicals produced in water surrounding the DNA For a simulation of radiation effects in human cells this target model comprises several genomic structure levels from the DNA double-helix up to chromosomes Calculated DNA damage due to irradiation of human fibroblast cells by ions of boron nitrogen and neon was compared to corresponding experimental data The calculated total yield of DSB per dose showed saturation behaviour with an RBE of about 2 whereas experimental data had a decreasing tendency with increasing LET to RBE values

  8. Bee products prevent agrichemical-induced oxidative damage in fish.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daiane; Rocha, Helio Carlos; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Loro, Vania Lucia; Marqueze, Alessandra; Koakoski, Gessi; da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; Gusso, Darlan; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2013-01-01

    In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g) were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™) and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L(-1) of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50). We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ), honey (H), bee pollen (BP) and propolis (P), reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) are increased.

  9. Quercetin protection against ciprofloxacin induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Taslidere, E; Dogan, Z; Elbe, H; Vardi, N; Cetin, A; Turkoz, Y

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a common, broad spectrum antibacterial agent; however, evidence is accumulating that ciprofloxacin may cause liver damage. Quercetin is a free radical scavenger and antioxidant. We investigated histological changes in hepatic tissue of rats caused by ciprofloxacin and the effects of quercetin on these changes using histochemical and biochemical methods. We divided 28 adult female Wistar albino rats into four equal groups: control, quercetin treated, ciprofloxacin treated, and ciprofloxacin + quercetin treated. At the end of the experiment, liver samples were processed for light microscopic examination and biochemical measurements. Sections were prepared and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and a histopathologic damage score was calculated. The sections from the control group appeared normal. Hemorrhage, inflammatory cell infiltration and intracellular vacuolization were observed in the ciprofloxacin group. The histopathological findings were reduced in the group treated with quercetin. Significant differences were found between the control and ciprofloxacin groups, and between the ciprofloxacin and ciprofloxacin + quercetin groups. Quercetin administration reduced liver injury caused by ciprofloxacin in rats. We suggest that quercetin may be useful for preventing ciprofloxacin induced liver damage.

  10. Bee Products Prevent Agrichemical-Induced Oxidative Damage in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Daiane; Rocha, Helio Carlos; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Loro, Vania Lucia; Marqueze, Alessandra; Koakoski, Gessi; Santos da Rosa, João Gabriel; Gusso, Darlan; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2013-01-01

    In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g) were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™) and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L−1 of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50). We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ), honey (H), bee pollen (BP) and propolis (P), reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) are increased. PMID:24098336

  11. Photodynamic therapy induced vascular damage: an overview of experimental PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Moriyama, L. T.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2013-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as one of the most important therapeutic options in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. By resorting to the photosensitizer and light, which convert oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), PDT will induce vascular damage and direct tumor cell killing. Another consequence of PDT is the microvascular stasis, which results in hypoxia and further produces tumor regression. To improve the treatment with PDT, three promising strategies are currently attracting much interest: (1) the combination of PDT and anti-angiogenesis agents, which more effectively prevent the proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels; (2) the nanoparticle-assisted delivery of photosensitizer, which makes the photosensitizer more localized in tumor sites and thus renders minimal damage to the normal tissues; (3) the application of intravascular PDT, which can avoid the loss of energy during the transmission and expose the target area directly. Here we aim to review the important findings on vascular damage by PDT on mice. The combination of PDT with other approaches as well as its effect on cancer photomedicine are also reviewed.

  12. Renal tissue damage induced by focused shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioritani, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Kambe, K.; Taguchi, K.; Saitoh, T.; Shirai, S.; Orikasa, S.; Takayama, K.; Lush, P. A.

    1990-07-01

    Biological evidence of renal arterial wall damage induced by the microjet due to shock wave-cavitation bubble interaction was demonstrated in living dog kidneys. We also intended to clarify the mechanism of renal tissue damage and the effects of different conditions of shock wave exposure (peak pressure of focused area, number of shots, exposure rate) on the renal tissue damage in comparison to stone disintegration. Disruption of arterial wall was the most remarkable histological change in the focused area of the kidneys. This lesion appeared as if the wall had been punctured by a needle. Large hematoma formation in the renal parenchym, and interstitial hemorrhage seemed to be the results of the arterial lesion. This arterial disorder also led to ischemic necrosis of the tubules surrounding the hematoma. Micro-angiographic examination of extracted kidneys also proved such arterial puncture lesions and ischemic lesions. The number of shots required for model stone disintegration was not inversely proportional to peak pressure. It decreased markedly when peak pressure was above 700 bar. Similarly thenumber of shots for hematoma formation was not inversely proportional to peak pressure, however, this decreased markedly above 500 bar. These results suggested that a hematoma could be formed under a lower peak pressure than that required for stone disintegration.

  13. Differential sensitivity to beta-cell secretagogues in cultured rat pancreatic islets exposed to human interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, D L; Sandler, S; Hallberg, A; Bendtzen, K; Sener, A; Malaisse, W J

    1989-08-01

    The early stages of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are characterized by a selective inability to secrete insulin in response to glucose, coupled to a better response to nonnutrient secretagogues. The deficient glucose response may be a result of the autoimmune process directed toward the beta-cells. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been suggested to be one possible mediator of immunological damage of the beta-cells. In the present study we characterized the sensitivity of beta-cells to different secretagogues after human recombinant IL-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) exposure. Furthermore, experiments were performed to clarify the biochemical mechanisms behind the defective insulin response observed in these islets. Rat pancreatic islets were isolated and kept in tissue culture (medium RPMI-1640 plus 10% calf serum) for 5 days. The islets were subsequently exposed to 60 pM human recombinant IL-1 beta during 48 h in the same culture conditions as above and examined immediately after IL-1 exposure. The rIL-1 beta-treated islets showed a marked reduction of glucose-stimulated insulin release. Stimulation with arginine plus different glucose concentrations, and leucine plus glutamine partially counteracted the rIL-1 beta-induced reduction of insulin release. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase, glucokinase, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were similar in control and IL-1-exposed islets. Treatment with IL-1 also did not impair the activities of NADH+- and NADPH+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-aspartate transaminase, glutamate-alanine transaminase, citrate synthase, and NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase. The oxidation of D-[6-14C]glucose and L-[U-14C]leucine were decreased by 50% in IL-1-treated islets. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the ratios of [2-14C]pyruvate oxidation/[1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation and L-[U-14C]leucine oxidation/L-[1-14C]leucine decarboxylation, indicating that IL-1 decreases the proportion of

  14. Solvent effect induced solute damage in an organic inner salt.

    PubMed

    Shui, Min; Jin, Xiao; Li, Zhongguo; Yang, Junyi; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Xueru; Wang, Yuxiao; Yang, Kun; Wei, Tai-huei; Song, Yinglin

    2010-12-20

    Nonlinear absorption of a newly synthesized organic inner salt Ge-150 dissolved in four different solvents (DMF, DMSO, acetonitrile and acetone) is investigated by the Z-scan technique with both nanosecond and picosecond pulses. When pulse energy surpasses a threshold and pulse-to-pulse separation is shorter than a characteristic time, all the four solutions show absorption weakening induced by cross-pulse effects in the picosecond regime. However, only two of them (Ge-150 dissolved in DMF and DMSO) show this weakening in the nanosecond regime. By conducting a simple verification experiment, we verify this absorption weakening is induced by solute damage related to solvent effect rather than solute migration. A simple theoretical model is proposed to interpret the experimental phenomenon.

  15. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface.

  16. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  17. Scaling Relations for Intercalation Induced Damage in Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien-Fan; Barai, Pallab; Smith, Kandler; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2016-04-02

    Mechanical degradation, owing to intercalation induced stress and microcrack formation, is a key contributor to the electrode performance decay in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The stress generation and formation of microcracks are caused by the solid state diffusion of lithium in the active particles. Here in this work, scaling relations are constructed for diffusion induced damage in intercalation electrodes based on an extensive set of numerical experiments with a particle-level description of microcrack formation under disparate operating and cycling conditions, such as temperature, particle size, C-rate, and drive cycle. The microcrack formation and evolution in active particles is simulated based on a stochastic methodology. A reduced order scaling law is constructed based on an extensive set of data from the numerical experiments. The scaling relations include combinatorial constructs of concentration gradient, cumulative strain energy, and microcrack formation. Lastly, the reduced order relations are further employed to study the influence of mechanical degradation on cell performance and validated against the high order model for the case of damage evolution during variable current vehicle drive cycle profiles.

  18. Scaling Relations for Intercalation Induced Damage in Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien-Fan; Barai, Pallab; Smith, Kandler; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical degradation, owing to intercalation induced stress and microcrack formation, is a key contributor to the electrode performance decay in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The stress generation and formation of microcracks are caused by the solid state diffusion of lithium in the active particles. In this work, scaling relations are constructed for diffusion induced damage in intercalation electrodes based on an extensive set of numerical experiments with a particle-level description of microcrack formation under disparate operating and cycling conditions, such as temperature, particle size, C-rate, and drive cycle. The microcrack formation and evolution in active particles is simulated based on a stochastic methodology. A reduced order scaling law is constructed based on an extensive set of data from the numerical experiments. The scaling relations include combinatorial constructs of concentration gradient, cumulative strain energy, and microcrack formation. The reduced order relations are further employed to study the influence of mechanical degradation on cell performance and validated against the high order model for the case of damage evolution during variable current vehicle drive cycle profiles.

  19. Scaling Relations for Intercalation Induced Damage in Electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Chien-Fan; Barai, Pallab; Smith, Kandler; ...

    2016-04-02

    Mechanical degradation, owing to intercalation induced stress and microcrack formation, is a key contributor to the electrode performance decay in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The stress generation and formation of microcracks are caused by the solid state diffusion of lithium in the active particles. Here in this work, scaling relations are constructed for diffusion induced damage in intercalation electrodes based on an extensive set of numerical experiments with a particle-level description of microcrack formation under disparate operating and cycling conditions, such as temperature, particle size, C-rate, and drive cycle. The microcrack formation and evolution in active particles is simulated based onmore » a stochastic methodology. A reduced order scaling law is constructed based on an extensive set of data from the numerical experiments. The scaling relations include combinatorial constructs of concentration gradient, cumulative strain energy, and microcrack formation. Lastly, the reduced order relations are further employed to study the influence of mechanical degradation on cell performance and validated against the high order model for the case of damage evolution during variable current vehicle drive cycle profiles.« less

  20. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  1. The Study of Non-Viral Nanoscale Delivery Systems for Islet Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Diana

    Due to safety concerns associated with using viral systems clinically to expand islet cells and make them available to many more patients, significant emphasis has been placed on producing a safe and effective non-viral delivery system for biological research and gene therapy. To obtain this goal, we propose the use of an innovative technology that utilizes gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a non-viral method of delivery. Our laboratory was one of the first to describe the use of AuNPs in human islets and observe AuNPs can penetrate into the core of islets to deliver a gene to the vast majority of the cells, without damaging the cell. Gold nanoparticles proved to be a biocompatible delivery system both in vitro and in vivo. Thus far, gene therapy and molecular biology have focused primarily on delivering DNA of a specific gene into cells. The risk of this approach is that the DNA can be permanently incorporated into the genome and lead to damages in the cell that could result in overexpression of cancerous tumor cells. This risk does not exist with the use of mRNA. Many researchers believe mRNA is too unstable to be used as a molecular tool to overexpress specific proteins. With advances in nanotechnology, and better understanding of the translation process, methods have been developed that allow for expression of specific proteins by intracellular delivery of protein-encoding mRNA. We used AuNPs conjugated to mCherry mRNA to establish a proof of concept of the feasibility of using AuNP-mRNA to achieve increased expression of a specific protein within cells. To do this, we conjugated mCherry mRNA to AuNPs and tested the feasibility for increasing delivery efficacy and preserve functionality of human pancreatic islets. We believe that with this novel technology we can create AuNPs that allow specific mRNA to enter islets and lead to the production of a specific protein within the cell, with the aim to induce beta cell proliferation. In a previous experiment with single

  2. Earthquake-induced Landslidingand Ground Damage In New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancox, G. T.; Perrin, N. D.; Dellow, G. D.

    A study of landsliding caused by 22 historical earthquakes in New Zealand was completed at the end of 1997 (Hancox et al., 1997). The main aims of that study were to determine: (a) the nature and extent of landsliding and other ground damage (sand boils, subsidence and lateral spreading due to soil liquefaction) caused by historical earthquakes; (b) relationships between landsliding and earthquake magnitude, epicentre, faulting, geology and topography; (c) improved environmental criteria and ground classes for assigning MM intensities and seismic hazard assessments in N.Z. The data and results of the 1997 study have recently been summarised and expanded (Hancox et al., in press), and are described in this paper. Relationships developed from these studies indicate that the minimum magnitude for earthquake-induced landsliding (EIL) in N.Z. is about M 5, with significant landsliding occurring at M 6 or greater. The minimum MM intensity for landsliding is MM6, while the most common intensities for significant landsliding are MM7-8. The intensity threshold for soil liquefaction in New Zealand was found to be MM7 for sand boils, and MM8 for lateral spreading, although such effects may also occur at one intensity level lower in highly susceptible materials. The minimum magnitude for liquefaction phenomena in N.Z. is about M 6, compared to M 5 overseas where highly susceptible soils are probably more widespread. Revised environmental response criteria (landsliding, subsidence, liquefaction-induced sand boils and lateral spreading) have also been established for the New Zealand MM Intensity Scale, and provisional landslide susceptibility Ground Classes developed for assigning MM intensities in areas where there are few buildings. Other new data presented include a size/frequency distribution model for earthquake-induced landslides over the last 150 years and a preliminary EIL Opportunity model for N.Z. The application of EIL data and relationships for seismic hazard

  3. Imatinib prevents beta cell death in vitro but does not improve islet transplantation outcome

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Lisa A.; Persaud, Shanta J.; Jones, Peter M.; Howell, Simon L.; Welsh, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Improving islet transplantation outcome could not only bring benefits to individual patients but also widen the patient pool to which this life-changing treatment is available. Imatinib has previously been shown to protect beta cells from apoptosis in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. The aim of this study was to investigate whether imatinib could be used to improve islet transplantation outcome. Methods Islets were isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and pre-cultured with imatinib prior to exposure to streptozotocin and cytokines in vitro. Cell viability and glucose-induced insulin secretion were measured. For transplantation experiments, islets were pre-cultured with imatinib for either 72 h or 24 h prior to transplantation into streptozotocin-diabetic C57Bl/6 mice. In one experimental series mice were also administered imatinib after islet transplantation. Results Imatinib partially protected islets from beta cell death in vitro. However, pre-culturing islets in imatinib or administering the drug to the mice in the days following islet transplantation did not improve blood glucose concentrations more than control-cultured islets. Conclusion Although imatinib protected against beta cell death from cytokines and streptozotocin in vitro, it did not significantly improve syngeneic islet transplantation outcome. PMID:26953716

  4. A novel fluorescence imaging approach for comparative measurements of pancreatic islet function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Kathryn L; Hall, Thomas E; Haile, Ruth; Nunemaker, Craig S

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic islet dysfunction is a key element in the development of type 2 diabetes. Determining possible early warning signs of dysfunction is thus important to determining the underlying causes of diabetes. We describe an improved fluorescent imaging approach to detect potential islet dysfunction. Using Cell Tracker Red (CTR, a mildly thiol-reactive fluorescent probe) to positively label particular islets, we measured intracellular free calcium with fura-2 AM in both CTR-labeled and unlabeled sets of pancreatic islets simultaneously in vitro. This approach enhances sensitivity by controlling for differences in background fluorescence, temperature, and perifusion dynamics. We confirmed that 200 nM CTR produced no spectral overlap with fura-2 and no significant physiological effects in selective tests of islet function. To demonstrate the utility of dual-labeling, we compared untreated islets with islets pretreated with low-dose pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 + IL-1B) to induce mild dysfunction. We alternated CTR-labeling between control and test islets and identified consistent reductions in the amplitude and trajectory of glucose-stimulated calcium responses (GSCa) among cytokine-treated islets that were independent of labeling. Observations were verified using a MATLAB program specifically designed to identify key features in the GSCa. Our findings thus demonstrate the utility of CTR-labeling in identifying islet dysfunction and propose that this technique can be adapted for other cells and tissues.

  5. Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection against Oxidant-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Suntres, Zacharias E.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical, can be formed as normal products of aerobic metabolism and can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Overproduction and/or insufficient removal of ROS result in significant damage to cell structure and functions. In vitro studies showed that antioxidants, when applied directly and at relatively high concentrations to cellular systems, are effective in conferring protection against the damaging actions of ROS, but results from animal and human studies showed that several antioxidants provide only modest benefit and even possible harm. Antioxidants have yet to be rendered into reliable and safe therapies because of their poor solubility, inability to cross membrane barriers, extensive first-pass metabolism, and rapid clearance from cells. There is considerable interest towards the development of drug-delivery systems that would result in the selective delivery of antioxidants to tissues in sufficient concentrations to ameliorate oxidant-induced tissue injuries. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic artificial phospholipid vesicles that offer the possibility of carrying hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. This paper focus on the use of liposomes for the delivery of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress. PMID:21876690

  6. Prevention of chloride-induced corrosion damage to bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Virmani, Y.P. | Butler, J.T.; Nelson, F.J. | Thompson, N.G.

    2002-01-01

    The annual direct cost of bridge infrastructure corrosion to the U.S. economy is estimated at $8.3 billion, with indirect costs approximately 10 times higher. Of the approximately 600000 bridges in the U.S., between 15% and 20% are listed as ?structurally deficient,? frequently due to corrosion damage. Five technologies are presented for reducing the cost of chloride-induced corrosion damage: (1) conductive coating anodes for cathodic protection of existing reinforce concrete bridges, (2) epoxy-coated rebar (ECR), (3) stainless steel rebar, and (4) high-performance concrete for extending the service life of new structures, and (5) metalizing to provide economical, long-term corrosion protection of steel bridges. Conductive coating anodes and stainless steel rebar represent ongoing work by the Oregon Department of Transportation with final verdicts not expected for years. The ECR and metalizing technology have longer track records and are better established in the bridge construction and protection industry. Application of these technologies is guided by a thorough understanding of their performance, of characteristics of the bridge and its environment, and of the results that are sought.

  7. Laser induced damage and fracture in fused silica vacuum windows

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Hurst, P.A.; Heggins, D.D.; Steele, W.A.; Bumpas, S.E.

    1996-11-01

    Laser-induced damage, that initiates catastrophic fracture, has been observed in large ({le}61 cm dia) fused silica lenses that also serve as vacuum barriers in Nova and Beamlet lasers. If the elastic stored energy in the lens is high enough, the lens will fracture into many pieces (implosion). Three parameters control the degree of fracture in the vacuum barrier window: elastic stored energy (tensile stress), ratio of window thickness to flaw depth, and secondary crack propagation. Fracture experiments were conducted on 15-cm dia fused silica windows that contain surface flaws caused by laser damage. Results, combined with window failure data on Beamlet and Nova, were used to develop design criteria for a ``fail-safe`` lens (that may catastrophically fracture but not implode). Specifically, the window must be made thick enough so that the peak tensile stress is less than 500 psi (3.4 MPa) and the thickness/critical flaw size is less than 6. The air leak through the window fracture and into the vacuum must be rapid enough to reduce the load on the window before secondary crack growth occurs. Finite element stress calculations of a window before and immediately following fracture into two pieces show that the elastic stored energy is redistributed if the fragments ``lock`` in place and thereby bridge the opening. In such cases, the peak stresses at the flaw site can increase, leading to further (i.e. secondary) crack growth.

  8. Oxidatively induced DNA damage and its repair in cancer.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2015-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by endogenous and exogenous reactive species. DNA lesions resulting from this type of damage are mutagenic and cytotoxic and, if not repaired, can cause genetic instability that may lead to disease processes including carcinogenesis. Living organisms possess DNA repair mechanisms that include a variety of pathways to repair multiple DNA lesions. Mutations and polymorphisms also occur in DNA repair genes adversely affecting DNA repair systems. Cancer tissues overexpress DNA repair proteins and thus develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions before they become toxic is a major mechanism for development of resistance to therapy, affecting patient survival. Accumulated evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker for patient response to therapy. Thus, knowledge of DNA protein expressions in normal and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. DNA repair proteins constitute targets for inhibitors to overcome the resistance of tumors to therapy. Inhibitors of DNA repair for combination therapy or as single agents for monotherapy may help selectively kill tumors, potentially leading to personalized therapy. Numerous inhibitors have been developed and are being tested in clinical trials. The efficacy of some inhibitors in therapy has been demonstrated in patients. Further development of inhibitors of DNA repair proteins is globally underway to help eradicate cancer.

  9. Knee proprioception after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Torres, R; Vasques, J; Duarte, J A; Cabri, J M H

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether exercise-induced quadriceps muscle damage affects knee proprioception such as joint position sense (JPS), force sense and the threshold to detect passive movement (TTDPM). Fourteen young men performed sets of eccentric quadriceps contractions at a target of 60% of the maximal concentric peak torque until exhaustion; the exercise was interrupted whenever the subject could not complete two sets. Muscle soreness, JPS, the TTDPM and force sense were examined before the exercise as well as one, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after exercise. The results were compared using one-way repeated-measure ANOVA. Plasma CK activity, collected at the same times, was analyzed by the Friedman's test to discriminate differences between baseline values and each of the other assessment moments (p<0.05). Relative to the proprioception assessment, JPS at 30 and 70 degrees of knee flexion and force sense were significantly decreased up to 48 h, whereas TTDPM decreased significantly at only one hour and 24 h after exercise, at 30 and 70 degrees of the knee flexion, respectively. The results allow the conclusion that eccentric exercise leading to muscle damage alters joint proprioception, suggesting that there might be impairment in the intrafusal fibres of spindle muscles and in the tendon organs.

  10. Tamoxifen inhibits mitochondrial oxidative stress damage induced by copper orthophenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Correa, Francisco; Díaz-Ruiz, Jorge Luis; Chávez, Edmundo

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of tamoxifen and cyclosporin A on mitochondrial permeability transition caused by addition of the thiol-oxidizing pair Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline. The findings indicate that tamoxifen and cyclosporin A circumvent the oxidative membrane damage manifested by matrix Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial swelling, and transmembrane electrical gradient collapse. Furthermore, it was found that tamoxifen and cyclosporin A prevent the generation of TBARs promoted by Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline, as well as the inactivation of the mitochondrial enzyme aconitase and disruption of mDNA. Electrophoretic analysis was unable to demonstrate a cross-linking reaction between membrane proteins. Yet, it was found that Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline induced the generation of reactive oxygen species. It is thus plausible that membrane leakiness is due to an oxidative stress injury.

  11. Sonic-boom-induced building structure responses including damage.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarkson, B. L.; Mayes, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Concepts of sonic-boom pressure loading of building structures and the associated responses are reviewed, and results of pertinent theoretical and experimental research programs are summarized. The significance of sonic-boom load time histories, including waveshape effects, are illustrated with the aid of simple structural elements such as beams and plates. Also included are discussions of the significance of such other phenomena as three-dimensional loading effects, air cavity coupling, multimodal responses, and structural nonlinearities. Measured deflection, acceleration, and strain data from laboratory models and full-scale building tests are summarized, and these data are compared, where possible, with predicted values. Damage complaint and claim experience due both to controlled and uncontrolled supersonic flights over communities are summarized with particular reference to residential, commercial, and historic buildings. Sonic-boom-induced building responses are compared with those from other impulsive loadings due to natural and cultural events and from laboratory simulation tests.

  12. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) induces the differentiation of an adult human pancreatic ductal cell line into insulin-expressing cells through stepwise activation of key transcription factors for embryonic beta cell development.

    PubMed

    Assouline-Thomas, Béatrice; Ellis, Daniel; Petropavlovskaia, Maria; Makhlin, Julia; Ding, Jieping; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of β-cells in diabetic patients is an important goal of diabetes research. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) was discovered in the partially duct-obstructed hamster pancreas. Its bioactive fragment, pentadecapeptide 104-118 (INGAP-P), has been shown to reverse diabetes in animal models and to improve glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes in clinical trials. Further development of INGAP as a therapy for diabetes requires identification of target cells in the pancreas and characterization of the mechanisms of action. We hypothesized that adult human pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and can be induced by INGAP to undergo endocrine differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we treated the normal human pancreatic ductal cell line (HPDE) with either INGAP-P or full-length recombinant protein (rINGAP) for short-term periods. Our data show that this single drug treatment induces both proliferation and transdifferentiation of HPDE cells, the latter being characterized by the rapid sequential activation of endocrine developmental transcription factors Pdx-1, Ngn3, NeuroD, IA-1, and MafA and subsequently the expression of insulin at both the mRNA and the protein levels. After 7 days, C-peptide was detected in the supernatant of INGAP-treated cells, reflecting their ability to secrete insulin. The magnitude of differentiation was enhanced by embedding the cells in Matrigel, which led to islet-like cluster formation. The islet-like clusters cells stained positive for nuclear Pdx-1 and Glut 2 proteins, and were expressing Insulin mRNA. These new data suggest that human adult pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and demonstrate that a short exposure to INGAP triggers their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells in vitro. In the context of the urgent search for a regenerative and/or cellular therapy for diabetes, these results make INGAP a promising therapeutic candidate.

  13. Pyrosequencing: Applicability for Studying DNA Damage-induced Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Minko, Irina G.; Earley, Lauriel F.; Larlee, Kimberly E.; Lin, Ying-Chih; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Site-specifically modified DNAs are routinely used in the study of DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. These analyses involve the creation of DNA vectors containing a lesion at a predetermined position, DNA replication, and detection of mutations at the target site. The final step has previously required the isolation of individual DNA clones, hybridization with radioactively-labeled probes, and verification of mutations by Sanger sequencing. In search for an alternative procedure that would allow direct quantification of sequence variants in a mixed population of DNA molecules, we evaluated the applicability of pyrosequencing to site-specific mutagenesis assays. The progeny DNAs were analyzed that originated from replication of N6-(deoxy-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-2,6-diamino-3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-5-N-methylformamidopyrimidine (MeFapy-dG)-containing vectors in primate cells, with the lesion being positioned in the 5′-GCNGG-3′ sequence context. Pyrosequencing detected ~8% G to T transversions and ~3.5% G to A transitions, a result that was in excellent agreement with frequencies previously measured by the standard procedure [Earley et al., 2013]. However, ~3.5% G to C transversions and ~2.0% deletions could not be detected by pyrosequencing. Consistent with these observations, the sensitivity of pyrosequencing for measuring the single deoxynucleotide variants differed depending on the deoxynucleotide identity, and in the given sequence contexts, was determined to be ~1-2% for A and T and ~5% for C. Pyrosequencing of other DNA isolates that were obtained following replication of MeFapy-dG-containing vectors in primate cells or Escherichia coli, identified several additional limitations. Collectively, our data demonstrated that pyrosequencing can be used for studying DNA damage-induced mutagenesis as an effective complementary experimental approach to current protocols. PMID:24962778

  14. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  15. That which does not kill us makes us stronger--does Nietzsche's quote apply to islets? A re-evaluation of the passenger leukocyte theory, free radicals, and glucose toxicity in islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wright, J R; Xu, B-Y

    2014-07-01

    In clinical islet transplantation, isolated islets are embolized into the liver via the portal vein (PV); however, up to 70% of the islets are lost in the first few days after transplantation (i.e., too quickly to be mediated by the adaptive immune system). Part of early loss is due to instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction, an immune/thrombotic process caused by islets interacting with complement. We have shown that glucose toxicity (GT) also plays a critical role based upon the observation that islets embolized into the PVs of diabetic athymic mice are rapidly lost but, if recipients are not diabetic, the islet grafts persist. Using donor islets resistant to the β-cell toxin streptozotocin, we have shown that intraportal islets engrafted in non-diabetic athymic mice for as little as 3 days will maintain normoglycemia when streptozotocin is administered destroying the recipient's native pancreas β-cells. What is the mechanism of GT in β-cells? Chronic exposure to hyperglycemia over-exerts β-cells and their electron transport chains leak superoxide radicals during aerobic metabolism. Here we reinterpret old data and present some compelling new data supporting a new model of early intraportal islet graft loss. We hypothesize that diabetes stimulates overproduction of superoxide in both the β-cells of the islet grafts and the endothelial cells lining the intraportal microvasculature adjacent to where the embolized islets become lodged. This double dose of oxidant damage stresses both the islets, which are highly susceptible to free radicals because of inherent low levels of scavenging enzymes, and the adjacent hepatic endothelial cells. This, superimposed upon localized endothelial damage caused by embolization, precipitates inflammation and coagulation which further damages islet grafts. Based upon this model, we predict that pre-exposing islets to sub-lethal hyperoxia should up-regulate islet free radical scavenging enzyme levels and promote initial

  16. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-01-01

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  17. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Interfering RNA Nanodelivery to Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Moore, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising therapeutic approach for type 1 diabetes.However, recent advances in islet transplantation are limited by significant graft loss after transplantation. Multiple immunological and nonimmunological factors contribute to this loss. Novel therapies that could target the core reasons for the islet graft loss are desperately needed. Small interfering RNA can be used to inhibit the expression of virtually any gene with single-nucleotide specificity including genes responsible for islet damage. Applying adequate delivery of siRNA molecules to pancreatic islets prior to transplantation holds a great potential for improving the survival of islet grafts. Noninvasive imaging provides means for monitoring the survival of transplanted islets in real time. Here, we summarize the approach that has been developed to deliver siRNA to pancreatic islets in conjunction with tracking of the graft outcome by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We synthesize a nano-sized theranostic agent consisting of magnetic nanoparticles (MN), a reporter for MRI, labeled with Cy5.5 dye for near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, and conjugated to siRNA molecule targeting genes that are harmful to islet grafts. Pre-labeling of islets by MN-Cy5.5-siRNA allowed us to monitor the survival of transplanted islet grafts by MRI and NIRF imaging and resulted in efficient silencing of the target genes in vivo. This novel approach combines a therapeutic effect provided by RNA interference technology with in vivo MR imaging and is expected to significantly improve the outcome of islet transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  18. Can pancreatic duct-derived progenitors be a source of islet regeneration?

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Bing; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Yi, Ran; Yang, Baofeng

    2009-06-12

    The regenerative process of the pancreas is of interest because the main pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus is an inadequate number of insulin-producing {beta}-cells. The functional mass of {beta}-cells is decreased in type 1 diabetes, so replacing missing {beta}-cells or triggering their regeneration may allow for improved type 1 diabetes treatment. Therefore, expansion of the {beta}-cell mass from endogenous sources, either in vivo or in vitro, represents an area of increasing interest. The mechanism of islet regeneration remains poorly understood, but the identification of islet progenitor sources is critical for understanding {beta}-cell regeneration. One potential source is the islet proper, via the dedifferentiation, proliferation, and redifferentiation of facultative progenitors residing within the islet. Neogenesis, or that the new pancreatic islets can derive from progenitor cells present within the ducts has been reported, but the existence and identity of the progenitor cells have been debated. In this review, we focus on pancreatic ductal cells, which are islet progenitors capable of differentiating into islet {beta}-cells. Islet neogenesis, seen as budding of hormone-positive cells from the ductal epithelium, is considered to be one mechanism for normal islet growth after birth and in regeneration, and has suggested the presence of pancreatic stem cells. Numerous results support the neogenesis hypothesis, the evidence for the hypothesis in the adult comes primarily from morphological studies that have in common the production of damage to all or part of the pancreas, with consequent inflammation and repair. Although numerous studies support a ductal origin for new islets after birth, lineage-tracing experiments are considered the 'gold standard' of proof. Lineage-tracing experiments show that pancreatic duct cells act as progenitors, giving rise to new islets after birth and after injury. The identification of differentiated pancreatic ductal cells as

  19. Important role of heparan sulfate in postnatal islet growth and insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Iwao; Noguchi, Naoya; Nata, Koji; Yamada, Shuhei; Kaneiwa, Tomoyuki; Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikeda, Takayuki; Sugihara, Kazushi; Asano, Masahide; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Yamauchi, Akiyo; Shervani, Nausheen Jamal; Uruno, Akira; Kato, Ichiro; Unno, Michiaki; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Takasawa, Shin; and others

    2009-05-22

    Heparan sulfate (HS) binds with several signaling molecules and regulates ligand-receptor interactions, playing an essential role in embryonic development. Here we showed that HS was intensively expressed in pancreatic islet {beta}-cells after 1 week of age in mice. The enzymatic removal of HS in isolated islets resulted in attenuated glucose-induced insulin secretion with a concomitant reduction in gene expression of several key components in the insulin secretion machinery. We further depleted islet HS by inactivating the exostosin tumor-like 3 gene specifically in {beta}-cells. These mice exhibited abnormal islet morphology with reduced {beta}-cell proliferation after 1 week of age and glucose intolerance due to defective insulin secretion. These results demonstrate that islet HS is involved in the regulation of postnatal islet maturation and required to ensure normal insulin secretion.

  20. Infection of peripancreatic lymph nodes but not islets precedes Kilham rat virus-induced diabetes in BB/Wor rats.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D W; Welsh, R M; Like, A A

    1993-01-01

    A parvovirus serologically identified as Kilham rat virus (KRV) reproducibly induces acute type I diabetes in diabetes-resistant BB/Wor rats. The tissue tropism of KRV was investigated by in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labelled plasmid DNA probe containing approximately 1.6 kb of the genome of the UMass isolate of KRV. Partial sequencing of the KRV probe revealed high levels of homology to the sequence of minute virus of mice (89%) and to the sequence of H1 (99%), a parvovirus capable of infecting rats and humans. Of the 444 bases sequenced, 440 were shared by H1. KRV mRNA and DNA were readily detected in lymphoid tissues 5 days postinfection but were seldom seen in the pancreas. High levels of viral nucleic acids were observed in the thymus, spleen, and peripancreatic and cervical lymph nodes. The low levels of infection observed in the pancreas involved essentially only endothelial and interstitial cells. Beta cells of the pancreas were not infected with KRV. These findings suggest that widespread infection of peripancreatic and other lymphoid tissues but not pancreatic beta cells by KRV triggers autoimmune diabetes by perturbing the immune system of genetically predisposed BB/Wor rats. Images PMID:8371347

  1. Topical Application of Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection Against CEES Induced Skin Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    keratinocytes. Task 2: Similar to HD, CEES induces oxidative stress in the skin cells resulting in ROS generation, DNA damaging, protein and lipid oxidation...W81XWH-05-2-0034 TITLE: Topical Application of Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection Against CEES Induced Skin Damage PRINCIPAL...NUMBER Topical Application of Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection Against CEES Induced Skin Damage 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-2-0034 5c. PROGRAM

  2. New insights in photoaging, UVA induced damage and skin types.

    PubMed

    Battie, Claire; Jitsukawa, Setsuko; Bernerd, Françoise; Del Bino, Sandra; Marionnet, Claire; Verschoore, Michèle

    2014-10-01

    UVA radiation is the most prevalent component of solar UV radiation; it deeply penetrates into the skin and induces profound alterations of the dermal connective tissue. In recent years, the detrimental effects of UVA radiation were more precisely demonstrated at cellular and molecular levels, using adequate methods to identify biological targets of UVA radiation and the resulting cascade impairment of cell functions and tissue degradation. In particular gene expression studies recently revealed that UVA radiation induces modulation of several genes confirming the high sensitivity of dermal fibroblasts to UVA radiation. The major visible damaging effects of UVA radiation only appear after years of exposure: it has been clearly evidenced that they are responsible for more or less early signs of photoageing and photocarcinogenesis. UVA radiation appears to play a key role in pigmented changes occurring with age, the major sign of skin photoaging in Asians. Skin susceptibility to photoaging alterations also depends on constitutive pigmentation. The skin sensitivity to UV light has been demonstrated to be linked to skin color type.

  3. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  4. A preclinical evaluation of alternative site for islet allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    He, Sirong; Yuan, Yujia; Han, Pengfei; Wang, Dan; Chen, Younan; Liu, Jingping; Tian, Bole; Yang, Guang; Yi, Shounan; Gao, Fabao; Zhong, Zhihui; Li, Hongxia; Cheng, Jingqiu; Lu, Yanrong

    2017-01-01

    The bone marrow cavity (BMC) has recently been identified as an alternative site to the liver for islet transplantation. This study aimed to compare the BMC with the liver as an islet allotransplantation site in diabetic monkeys. Diabetes was induced in Rhesus monkeys using streptozocin, and the monkeys were then divided into the following three groups: Group1 (islets transplanted in the liver with immunosuppressant), Group 2 (islets transplanted in the tibial BMC), and Group 3 (islets transplanted in the tibial BMC with immunosuppressant). The C-peptide and blood glucose levels were preoperatively measured. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was conducted to assess graft function, and complete blood cell counts were performed to assess cell population changes. Cytokine expression was measured using an enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) and MILLIPLEX. Five monkeys in Group 3 exhibited a significantly increased insulin-independent time compared with the other groups (Group 1: 78.2 ± 19.0 days; Group 2: 58.8 ± 17.0 days; Group 3: 189.6 ± 26.2 days) and demonstrated increases in plasma C-peptide 4 months after transplantation. The infusion procedure was not associated with adverse effects. Functional islets in the BMC were observed 225 days after transplantation using the dithizone (DTZ) and insulin/glucagon stains. Our results showed that allogeneic islets transplanted in the BMC of diabetic Rhesus monkeys remained alive and functional for a longer time than those transplanted in the liver. This study was the first successful demonstration of allogeneic islet engraftment in the BMC of non-human primates (NHPs). PMID:28358858

  5. Repair and misrepair of heavy-ion-induced chromosomal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, E.; Blakely, E.; Ivery, G.; Tobias, C.

    The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to investigate chromosomal damage, repair, and misrepair in the G1 phase of a human/hamster hybrid cell line that contains a single human chromosome. Plateau-phase cell cultures were exposed to either x-rays or a 425 MeV/u beam of neon ions near the Bragg peak where the LET is 183 keV/μm. An in situ hybridization technique coupled to fluorescent staining of PCC spreads confirmed the linearity of the dose response for initial chromatin breakage in the human chromosome to high doses (1600 cGy x-ray or 1062 cGy Ne). On Giemsa-stained slides, initial chromatin breakage in the total genome and the rejoining kinetics of these breaks were determined. As a measure of chromosomal misrepair, ring PCC aberrations were also scored. Ne ions were about 1.5 x more effective per unit dose compared to x-rays at producing the initially measured chromatin breakage. 90% of the x-ray-induced breaks rejoined in cells incubated at 37°C after exposure. In contrast, only 50% of Ne-ion-induced breaks rejoined. In the irradiated G1 cells, ring PCC aberrations increased with time apparently by first order kinetics after either x-ray or Ne exposures. However, far fewer rings formed in Ne-irradiated cells after a dose giving a comparable initial number of chromatin breaks. Following x-ray exposures, the yield of rings formed after long repair times (6 to 9 hrs) fit a quadratic dose-response curve. These results indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the chromosomal lesions induced by low- and high-LET radiations.

  6. Zinc protects HepG2 cells against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Hao, Junran; Shen, Xiao Li; Yang, Xuan; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun

    2013-04-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are the most studied mechanisms by which ochratoxin A (OTA) induces its toxic effects, which include nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Zinc, which is an essential trace element, is considered a potential antioxidant. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplement could inhibit OTA-induced oxidative damage and DNA damage in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of inhibition. The results indicated that that exposure of OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration; zinc supplement significantly reduced the OTA-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity but did not affect the OTA-induced decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}). Meanwhile, the addition of the zinc chelator N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) strongly aggravated the OTA-induced oxidative damage. This study also demonstrated that zinc helped to maintain the integrity of DNA through the reduction of OTA-induced DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation and DNA hypomethylation. OTA increased the mRNA expression of metallothionein1-A (MT1A), metallothionein2-A (MT2A) and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Zinc supplement further enhanced the mRNA expression of MT1A and MT2A, but it had no effect on the mRNA expression of SOD1 and catalase (CAT). Zinc was for the first time proven to reduce the cytotoxicity of OTA through inhibiting the oxidative damage and DNA damage, and regulating the expression of zinc-associated genes. Thus, the addition of zinc can potentially be used to reduce the OTA toxicity of contaminated feeds. - Highlights: ► OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration. ► OTA induced the formation of 8-OHdG in HepG2 cells. ► It was testified for the first time that OTA induced DNA hypomethylation. ► Zinc protects against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by

  7. Paternal high-fat diet consumption induces common changes in the transcriptomes of retroperitoneal adipose and pancreatic islet tissues in female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sheau-Fang; Lin, Ruby C Y; Maloney, Christopher A; Youngson, Neil A; Owens, Julie A; Morris, Margaret J

    2014-04-01

    We previously showed that paternal high-fat diet (HFD) consumption programs β-cell dysfunction in female rat offspring, together with transcriptome alterations in islets. Here we investigated the retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RpWAT) transcriptome using gene and pathway enrichment and pathway analysis to determine whether commonly affected network topologies exist between these two metabolically related tissues. In RpWAT, 5108 genes were differentially expressed due to a paternal HFD; the top 5 significantly enriched networks identified by pathway analysis in offspring of HFD fathers compared with those of fathers fed control diet were: mitochondrial and cellular response to stress, telomerase signaling, cell death and survival, cell cycle, cellular growth and proliferation, and cancer. A total of 187 adipose olfactory receptor genes were down-regulated. Interrogation against the islet transcriptome identified specific gene networks and pathways, including olfactory receptor genes that were similarly affected in both tissues (411 common genes, P<0.05). In particular, we highlight a common molecular network, cell cycle and cancer, with the same hub gene, Myc, suggesting early onset developmental changes that persist, shared responses to programmed systemic factors, or crosstalk between tissues. Thus, paternal HFD consumption triggers unique gene signatures, consistent with premature aging and chronic degenerative disorders, in both RpWAT and pancreatic islets of daughters.

  8. The effects of pre-exercise vibration stimulation on the exercise-induced muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Yun; Kang, Da-Haeng; Lee, Joon-Hee; O, Se-Min; Jeon, Jae-Keun

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation on the pressure-pain threshold and muscle-fatigue-related metabolites of exercise-induced muscle damage. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy, adult male subjects were randomly assigned to the pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation group, post-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation group, or control group (n=10 per group). To investigate the effects of pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation, changes in the pressure-pain threshold (lb), creatine kinase level (U/L), and lactate dehydrogenase level (U/L) were measured and analyzed at baseline and at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds and concentrations of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase varied significantly in each group and during each measurement period. There were interactions between the measurement periods and groups, and results of the post-hoc test showed that the pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation group had the highest efficacy among the groups. [Conclusion] Pre-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation is more effective than post-induced muscle damage vibration stimulation for preventing muscle damage. PMID:28210056

  9. Deficiency in the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 renders pancreatic β-cells vulnerable to arsenic-induced cell damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bei; Fu, Jingqi; Zheng, Hongzhi; Xue, Peng; Yarborough, Kathy; Woods, Courtney G.; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2012-11-01

    Chronic human exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs), a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes, where impairment of pancreatic β-cell function is a key pathogenic factor. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. However, persistent activation of Nrf2 in response to chronic oxidative stress, including inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) exposure, blunts glucose-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling and impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In the current study, we found that MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with stable knockdown of Nrf2 (Nrf2-KD) by lentiviral shRNA and pancreatic islets isolated from Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2−/−) mice exhibited reduced expression of several antioxidant and detoxification enzymes in response to acute iAs{sup 3+} exposure. As a result, Nrf2-KD MIN6 cells and Nrf2−/− islets were more susceptible to iAs{sup 3+} and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup 3+})-induced cell damage, as measured by decreased cell viability, augmented apoptosis and morphological change. Pretreatment of MIN6 cells with Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone protected the cells from iAs{sup 3+}-induced cell damage in an Nrf2-dependent fashion. In contrast, antioxidant N‐acetyl cysteine protected Nrf2-KD MIN6 cells against acute cytotoxicity of iAs{sup 3+}. The present study demonstrates that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response is critical in the pancreatic β-cell defense mechanism against acute cytotoxicity by arsenic. The findings here, combined with our previous results on the inhibitory effect of antioxidants on ROS signaling and GSIS, suggest that Nrf2 plays paradoxical roles in pancreatic β-cell dysfunction induced by environmental arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Lack of Nrf2 reduced expression of antioxidant genes induced by iAs{sup 3+} in β-cells. ► Deficiency of Nrf2 in

  10. Methylphenidate and Amphetamine Do Not Induce Cytogenetic Damage in Lymphocytes of Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Kristine L.; Shelby, Michael D.; Itchon-Ramos, Nilda; Faircloth, Melissa; Kissling, Grace E.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Ravi, Hima; Murli, Hemalatha; Mattison, Donald R.; Kollins, Scott H.

    2008-01-01

    The inducement of chromosomal damage in lymphocytes among children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder receiving treatment with methylphenidate- or amphetamine-based drugs is investigated. Findings did not reveal significant increases in cytogenetic damage related to the treatment. The risk for cytogenetic damage posed by such products…

  11. The Pancreatic Islet Regulome Browser

    PubMed Central

    Mularoni, Loris; Ramos-Rodríguez, Mireia; Pasquali, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The pancreatic islet is a highly specialized tissue embedded in the exocrine pancreas whose primary function is that of controlling glucose homeostasis. Thus, understanding the transcriptional control of islet-cell may help to puzzle out the pathogenesis of glucose metabolism disorders. Integrative computational analyses of transcriptomic and epigenomic data allows predicting genomic coordinates of putative regulatory elements across the genome and, decipher tissue-specific functions of the non-coding genome. We herein present the Islet Regulome Browser, a tool that allows fast access and exploration of pancreatic islet epigenomic and transcriptomic data produced by different labs worldwide. The Islet Regulome Browser is now accessible on the internet or may be installed locally. It allows uploading custom tracks as well as providing interactive access to a wealth of information including Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) variants, different classes of regulatory elements, together with enhancer clusters, stretch-enhancers and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic progenitors and adult human pancreatic islets. Integration and visualization of such data may allow a deeper understanding of the regulatory networks driving tissue-specific transcription and guide the identification of regulatory variants. We believe that such tool will facilitate the access to pancreatic islet public genomic datasets providing a major boost to functional genomics studies in glucose metabolism related traits including diabetes. PMID:28261261

  12. Intracellular glutathione production, but not protein glycation, underlies the protective effects of captopril against 2-deoxy-D-ribose-induced β-cell damage.

    PubMed

    Koh, Gwanpyo; Yang, Eun-Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Hyun, Jonghoon; Yoo, Soyeon; Lee, Sang Ah

    2015-10-01

    Our previous study reported that both oxidative stress and protein glycation were the principal mechanisms underlying 2‑deoxy‑D‑ribose (dRib)‑induced pancreatic β‑cell damage. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of captopril on dRib‑induced damage in pancreatic β‑cells, as well as to determine the mechanisms underlying these effects. Treatment with dRib increased the levels of cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and intracellular reactive oxygen species in Syrian hamster insulinoma HIT‑T15 cells; however, pretreatment with captopril significantly inhibited the effects of dRib. The intracellular levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione were depleted following treatment with dRib; however, these levels were restored following HIT‑T15 cell treatment with captopril. In rat islets, dRib stimulation suppressed the mRNA expression levels of insulin, and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1, as well as insulin content; however, these effects were dose‑dependently reversed by treatment with captopril. Treatment with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of intracellular glutathione biosynthesis, inhibited the protective effects of captopril on dRib‑mediated glutathione depletion and cytotoxicity in HIT‑T15 cells. Following incubation with albumin, dRib increased the formation of dicarbonyl and advanced glycation end products. Treatment with captopril did not inhibit the dRib‑induced increase in production of dicarbonyl and advanced glycation end products. In conclusion, treatment with captopril reversed dRib‑induced oxidative damage and suppression of insulin expression in β‑cells. The mechanism underlying the protective effects of captopril may involve increased intracellular glutathione production, rather than protein glycation.

  13. Subsurface defects of fused silica optics and laser induced damage at 351 nm.

    PubMed

    Hongjie, Liu; Jin, Huang; Fengrui, Wang; Xinda, Zhou; Xin, Ye; Xiaoyan, Zhou; Laixi, Sun; Xiaodong, Jiang; Zhan, Sui; Wanguo, Zheng

    2013-05-20

    Many kinds of subsurface defects are always present together in the subsurface of fused silica optics. It is imperfect that only one kind of defects is isolated to investigate its impact on laser damage. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the impact of subsurface defects on laser induced damage of fused silica optics with a comprehensive vision. In this work, we choose the fused silica samples manufactured by different vendors to characterize subsurface defects and measure laser induced damage. Contamination defects, subsurface damage (SSD), optical-thermal absorption and hardness of fused silica surface are characterized with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), fluorescence microscopy, photo-thermal common-path interferometer and fully automatic micro-hardness tester respectively. Laser induced damage threshold and damage density are measured by 351 nm nanosecond pulse laser. The correlations existing between defects and laser induced damage are analyzed. The results show that Cerium element and SSD both have a good correlation with laser-induced damage thresholds and damage density. Research results evaluate process technology of fused silica optics in China at present. Furthermore, the results can provide technique support for improving laser induced damage performance of fused silica.

  14. Examination of naturally occurring polyacetylenes and alpha-terthienyl for their ability to induce cytogenetic damage.

    PubMed

    MacRae, W D; Chan, G F; Wat, C K; Towers, G H; Lam, J

    1980-09-15

    alpha-Terthienyl and 5 polyacetylenes were examined for chromosome damaging activity using Syrian hamster cells. None of these naturally occurring compounds induced sister chromatid exchanges and neither alpha-terthienyl nor phenylheptatriyne induced chromosome aberrations.

  15. Non-Problematic Risks from Low-Dose Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage clusters have been proposed and are usually considered to pose the threat of serious biological damage. This has been attributed to DNA repair debilitation or cessation arising from the complexity of cluster damage. It will be shown here, contrary to both previous suggestions and perceived wisdom, that radiation induced damage clusters contribute to non-problematic risks in the low-dose, low-LET regime. The very complexity of cluster damage which inhibits and/or compromises DNA repair will ultimately be responsible for the elimination and/or diminution of precancer-ous and cancerous cells. PMID:18648573

  16. Assessment of islet quality following international shipping of more than 10,000 km.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Itoh, Takeshi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Tamura, Yoshiko; Jackson, Andrew M; Shimoda, Masayuki; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Onaca, Nicholas; Yasunami, Yohichi; Levy, Marlon F

    2010-01-01

    Islet transplantation is an attractive therapy for type 1 diabetes, although some issues remain. One of them is the severe donor shortage in some countries. In this study, we investigated the possibility of international islet shipping beyond 10,000 km to supply islets to countries with donor shortages. Human islets were isolated from six cadaver donors and cultured until shipment. Islets were packed in either gas-permeable bags or in non-gas-permeable bags and shipped from Baylor Research Institute (Dallas, TX, USA) to Fukuoka University (Fukuoka, Japan). Pre- and postshipment islet number, purity, viability, and stimulation index (by glucose stimulation test) were assessed. Shipped 1,500 IE islets were transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic nude mice for in vivo assay. The distance of our shipment was 11,148.4 km, and the mean duration of the shipments was 48.2 ± 8.2 h. The islet number recovery rate (postshipment/preshipment) was significantly higher in gas-permeable bags (56.4 ± 10.1% vs. 20.5 ± 20.6%, p < 0.01). Islet purity was significantly reduced during shipment in non-gas-permeable bags (from 47.7 ± 18.6% to 40.2 ± 28.2 in gas-permeable bags vs. from 50.4 ± 6.4% to 25.9 ± 15.6% in non-gas-permeable bags, p < 0.05). Islet viability and stimulation index did not change significantly between pre- and postshipping, in either gas-permeable bags or in non-gas-permeable bags. One of three diabetic nude mice (33.3%) converted to normoglycemia. It is feasible to ship human islet cells internationally in gas-permeable bags. This strategy would promote basic and preclinical research for countries with donor shortages, even though the research centers are remote (over 10,000 km from the islet isolation center).

  17. An 'alpha-beta' of pancreatic islet microribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Eliasson, Lena

    2017-01-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are cellular, short, non-coding ribonucleotides acting as endogenous posttranscriptional repressors following incorporation in the RNA-induced silencing complex. Despite being chemically and mechanistically very similar, miRNAs exert a multitude of different cellular effects by acting on mRNA species, whose gene-products partake in a wide array of processes. Here, the aim was to review the knowledge of miRNA expression and action in the islet of Langerhans. We have focused on: 1) physiological consequences of islet or beta cell specific inhibition of miRNA processing, 2) mechanisms regulating processing of miRNAs in islet cells, 3) presence and function of miRNAs in alpha versus beta cells - the two main cell types of islets, and 4) miRNA mediators of beta cell decompensation. It is clear that miRNAs regulate pancreatic islet development, maturation, and function in vivo. Moreover, processing of miRNAs appears to be altered by obesity, diabetes, and aging. A number of miRNAs (such as miR-7, miR-21, miR-29, miR-34a, miR-212/miR-132, miR-184, miR-200 and miR-375) are involved in mediating beta cell dysfunction and/or compensation induced by hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, cytotoxic cytokines, and in rodent models of fetal metabolic programming prediabetes and overt diabetes. Studies of human type 2 diabetic islets underline that these miRNA families could have important roles also in human type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, there is a genuine gap of knowledge regarding miRNA expression and function in pancreatic alpha cells. Progress in this area would be enhanced by improved in vitro alpha cell models and better tools for islet cell sorting.

  18. Engineering of microscale three-dimensional pancreatic islet models in vitro and their biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Wang, Lin; Han, Shuang; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes now is the most common chronic disease in the world inducing heavy burden for the people's health. Based on this, diabetes research such as islet function has become a hot topic in medical institutes of the world. Today, in medical institutes, the conventional experiment platform in vitro is monolayer cell culture. However, with the development of micro- and nano-technologies, several microengineering methods have been developed to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) islet models in vitro which can better mimic the islet of pancreases in vivo. These in vitro islet models have shown better cell function than monolayer cells, indicating their great potential as better experimental platforms to elucidate islet behaviors under both physiological and pathological conditions, such as the molecular mechanisms of diabetes and clinical islet transplantation. In this review, we present the state-of-the-art advances in the microengineering methods for fabricating microscale islet models in vitro. We hope this will help researchers to better understand the progress in the engineering 3D islet models and their biomedical applications such as drug screening and islet transplantation.

  19. Calculation of radiation damage induced by neutrons in compound materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunéville, L.; Simeone, D.; Jouanne, C.

    2006-07-01

    Many years have been devoted to study the behaviour of solids submitted to impinging particles like ions or neutrons. The nuclear evaluations describe more and more accurately the various neutron-atom interactions. Anisotropic neutron-atom cross-sections are now available for many elements. Moreover, clear mathematical formalism now allows to calculate the number of displacements per atom in polyatomic targets in a realistic way using the binary collision approximation (BCA) framework. Even if these calculations do not take into account relaxation processes at the end of the displacement spike, they can be used to compare damages induced by different facilities like pressurized water reactors (PWR), fast breeder reactors (FBR), high temperature reactors (HTR) and fusion facilities like the European Spallation Source (ESS) and the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) on a defined material. In this paper, a formalism is presented to describe the neutron-atom cross-section and primary recoil spectra taking into account the anisotropy of nuclear reactions extracted from nuclear evaluations. Such a formalism permitted to compute displacement per atom production rate, primary and weighted recoil spectra within the BCA. The multigroup approximation has been used to calculate displacement per atom production rate and recoil spectra for a define nuclear reactor. All these informations are useful to compare recoil spectra and displacement per atom production rate produced by particle accelerator and nuclear reactor.

  20. Chemical modification of normal tissue damage induced by photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Sigdestad, C. P.; Fingar, V. H.; Wieman, T. J.; Lindberg, R. D.

    1996-01-01

    One of the limitations of successful use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) employing porphyrins is the acute and long-term cutaneous photosensitivity. This paper describes results of experiments designed to test the effects of two radiation protective agents (WR-2721, 500 mg kg-1 or WR-3689, 700 mg kg-1) on murine skin damage induced by PDT. C3H mice were shaved and depilated three days prior to injection with the photosensitiser, Photofrin (5 or 10 mg kg-1). Twenty-four hours later, the mice were injected intraperitoneally with a protector 30 min prior to Argon dye laser (630 nm) exposure. The skin response was followed for two weeks post irradiation using an arbitrary response scale. A light dose response as well as a drug dose response was obtained. The results indicate that both protectors reduced the skin response to PDT, however WR-2721 was demonstrated to be the most effective. The effect of the protectors on vascular stasis after PDT was determined using a fluorescein dye exclusion assay. In mice treated with Photofrin (5 mg kg-1), and 630 nm light (180 J cm-2) pretreatment with either WR-2721 or WR-3689 resulted in significant protection of the vascular effects of PDT. These studies document the ability of the phosphorothioate class of radiation protective agents to reduce the effects of light on photosensitized skin. They do so in a drug dose-dependent fashion with maximum protection at the highest drug doses. PMID:8763855

  1. Retinal Damage Induced by Internal Limiting Membrane Removal

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rachel; Stevenson, William; Prospero Ponce, Claudia; Agarwal, Daniel; Christoforidis, John Byron

    2015-01-01

    The internal limiting membrane (ILM), the basement membrane of the Müller cells, serves as the interface between the vitreous body and the retinal nerve fiber layer. It has a fundamental role in the development, structure, and function of the retina, although it also is a pathologic component in the various vitreoretinal disorders, most notably in macular holes. It was not until understanding of the evolution of idiopathic macular holes and the advent of idiopathic macular hole surgery that the idea of adjuvant ILM peeling in the treatment of tractional maculopathies was explored. Today intentional ILM peeling is a commonly applied surgical technique among vitreoretinal surgeons as it has been found to increase the rate of successful macular hole closure and improve surgical outcomes in other vitreoretinal diseases. Though ILM peeling has refined surgery for tractional maculopathies, like all surgical procedures it is not immune to perioperative risk. The essential role of the ILM to the integrity of the retina and risk of trauma to retinal tissue spurs suspicion with regard to its routine removal. Several authors have investigated the retinal damage induced by ILM peeling and these complications have been manifested across many different diagnostic studies. PMID:26425355

  2. SHI induced damage in electrical properties of silicon NPN BJTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. Vinay; Kumar, Santhosh; Yashoda, T.; Krishnaveni, S.

    2016-05-01

    The investigation of radiation damage in Si microelectronic circuitry and devices are being carried out by various research groups globally. In particular the Si Bipolar junction transistors are very sensitive to high energetic radiation. In the present study, radiation response of NPN Bipolar junction transistor (2N3773) has been examined for 60 MeV B4+ ion. Key electrical properties like Gummel, dc current gain and capacitance - voltage (C-V) characteristics of 60 MeV B4+ ion irradiated transistor were studied before and after irradiation. Ion irradiation and subsequent electrical characterizations were performed at room temperature. Current voltage (I-V) measurements showed the increase in collector current for VBE ≤ 0.4 V as a function of fluence, which is due to B4+ ion induced surface leakage currents. Base current is observed to be more sensitive than collector current and gain appears to be degraded with ion fluence. Also, C-V measurements shows that both built in potential and doping concentration increased significantly after irradiation.

  3. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in astronauts' lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testard, I; Ricoul, M; Hoffschir, F; Flury-Herard, A; Dutrillaux, B; Fedorenko, B; Gerasimenko, V; Sabatier, L

    1996-10-01

    The increased number of manned space missions has made it important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. As they are exposed to cosmic rays, especially ions with high linear energy transfer (LET), it is necessary to estimate the doses they receive. The most sensitive biological dosimetry used is based on the quantification of radiation-induced chromosome damage to human lymphocytes. After the space missions ANTARES (1992) and ALTAIR (1993), we performed cytogenetic analysis of blood samples from seven astronauts who had spent from 2 weeks to 6 months in space. After 2 or 3 weeks, the X-ray equivalent dose was found to be below the cytogenetic detection level of 20 mGy. After 6 months, the biological dose greatly varied among the astronauts, from 95 to 455 mGy equivalent dose. These doses are in the same range as those estimated by physical dosimetry (90 mGy absorbed dose and 180 mSv equivalent dose). Some blood cells exhibited the same cytogenetic pattern as the 'rogue cells' occasionally observed in controls, but with a higher frequency. We suggest that rogue cells might result from irradiation with high-LET particles of cosmic origin. However, the responsibility of such cells for the long-term effects of cosmic irradiation remains unknown and must be investigated.

  4. Feeding NOD mice with pig splenocytes induces transferable mechanisms that modulate cellular and humoral xenogeneic reactions against pig spleen or islet cells

    PubMed Central

    YOU, S; GOUIN, E; SAÏ, P

    2002-01-01

    We have reported previously that oral administration of pig cells to NOD mice modified xenogeneic cellular response against pig islet cells (PICs), and hypothesized that it may have induced active suppression. This preliminary report evaluated only the effect of feeding pig cells by ‘primary’ proliferation, i.e. when splenocytes from fed mice are confronted with pig cells in vitro. The present study also considered ‘secondary’ proliferation and cytokine production after feeding and subsequent in vivo graft of pig cells. Additionally, serum IgM and IgG isotypes were quantified by ELISA using pig target cells. Induction of active mechanism by feeding was hypothetical, which led us here to transfer splenocytes from mice fed pig spleen cells (PSC) and evaluate ‘primary’ (after transfer) and ‘secondary’ (after transfer and subsequent graft of pig cells) proliferations and cytokine secretions in recipient mice. We also determined whether the effects of feeding pig cells persisted after depression of suppressor mechanisms by cyclophosphamide. Mice fed with PSC displayed increased ‘primary’ splenocyte proliferation to PSC or PIC (P < 0·0001), while ‘secondary’ responses were decreased (P < 0·03) in those fed PSC and subsequently grafted with PSC. The increased ‘primary’ and decreased ‘secondary’ proliferations were reduced (P < 0·04) by pretreatment with cyclophosphamide. The IL-10/ and IL-4/IFNγ ratios produced in response to PSC increased (P < 0·04) in mice fed and grafted with PSC compared to those grafted only with PSC. IgM and IgG levels against pig cells were, respectively, increased (P < 0·04) and decreased (P < 0·04) in mice fed and grafted with PSC. IgG2a and IgG2b, but not IgG1, levels were lower (P < 0·01). These effects of feeding PSC on ‘secondary’ proliferation, cytokine and antibody productions, were not detected when mice were fed PSC only after graft with PSC. Transfer with splenocytes from mice fed PSC increased

  5. Novel DNA damage checkpoint in mitosis: Mitotic DNA damage induces re-replication without cell division in various cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Rosen, Eliot M; Jang, Young-Joo

    2012-07-06

    DNA damage induces multiple checkpoint pathways to arrest cell cycle progression until damage is repaired. In our previous reports, when DNA damage occurred in prometaphase, cells were accumulated in 4 N-DNA G1 phase, and mitosis-specific kinases were inactivated in dependent on ATM/Chk1 after a short incubation for repair. We investigated whether or not mitotic DNA damage causes cells to skip-over late mitotic periods under prolonged incubation in a time-lapse study. 4 N-DNA-damaged cells re-replicated without cell division and accumulated in 8 N-DNA content, and the activities of apoptotic factors were increased. The inhibition of DNA replication reduced the 8 N-DNA cell population dramatically. Induction of replication without cell division was not observed upon depletion of Chk1 or ATM. Finally, mitotic DNA damage induces mitotic slippage and that cells enter G1 phase with 4 N-DNA content and then DNA replication is occurred to 8 N-DNA content before completion of mitosis in the ATM/Chk1-dependent manner, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis during long-term repair.

  6. The Evaluation of Islet Purification Methods That Use Large Bottles to Create a Continuous Density Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Miyagi-Shiohira, Chika; Kobayashi, Naoya; Saitoh, Issei; Watanabe, Masami; Noguchi, Yasufumi; Matsushita, Masayuki; Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Islet purification is one of the most important steps of islet isolation for pancreatic islet transplantation. The most common method of islet purification is density gradient centrifugation using a COBE 2991 cell processor. However, this method can damage islets mechanically through its high shearing force. We recently reported that a new purification method using large plastic bottles effectively achieves a high yield of islets from the porcine pancreas. In the present study, we evaluated the methods of making a continuous density gradient. The gradient was produced with a gradient maker and two types of candy cane-shaped stainless steel pipes. One method was to use a “bent-tipped” stainless steel pipe and to load from a high-density solution to a low-density solution, uploading the stainless steel pipe. The other method was to use a regular stainless steel pipe and to load from a low-density solution to a high-density solution, leaving the stainless steel pipe in place. There were no significant differences between the two solutions in terms of the islet yield, rate of viability or purity, score, or the stimulation index after purification. Furthermore, there were no differences in the attainability or suitability of posttransplantation normoglycemia. Our study shows the equivalency of these two methods of islet purification. PMID:28174674

  7. Local opioid-sensitive afferent sensory neurones in the modulation of gastric damage induced by Paf.

    PubMed Central

    Esplugues, J. V.; Whittle, B. J.; Moncada, S.

    1989-01-01

    1. The role of local sensory neurones in modulating the extent of gastric mucosal damage induced by close-arterial infusion of platelet-activating factor (Paf 50 ng kg-1 min-1 for 10 min) has been investigated in the anaesthetized rat. 2. Local intra-arterial infusion of the neurotoxin, tetrodotoxin (TTX), substantially augmented the mucosal damage induced by Paf, as assessed by both macroscopic and histological techniques. 3. In rats pretreated with capsaicin 2 weeks prior to study, to induce a functional ablation of primary afferent neurones, gastric damage induced by Paf was significantly augmented. 4. Administration of morphine (0.75-3 mg kg-1 i.v.) or its peripherally acting quaternary analogue, N-methyl morphine (15 mg kg-1 i.v.), also significantly enhanced the gastric damage induced by Paf. 5. The potentiation by morphine of Paf-induced gastric damage was inhibited by administration of the opioid antagonists, naloxone (1 mg kg-1 i.v.) or the peripherally acting N-methyl nalorphine (3 mg kg-1 i.v.). 6. Administration of TTX or morphine alone, or pretreatment with capsaicin did not induce any detectable mucosal damage, suggesting that interference with local sensory neuronal activity itself does not directly induce mucosal disruption. 7. These results indicate that peripheral opiate-sensitive afferent sensory neurones play a physiological defensive role in the mucosa, attenuating the extent of gastric damage induced by Paf. PMID:2758231

  8. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future.

  9. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  10. Cosmic ray induced permanent damage in MNOS EAROMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, J. T., Jr.; Pickel, J. C.; Waskiewicz, A. E.

    1984-12-01

    Permanent damage to the memory cells in Metal Nitride Oxide Semiconductor (MNOS) Electrically Alterable Read Only Memories (EAROM) has been observed after exposure to a heavy ion beam from a cyclotron under high field (Erase/Write Mode) conditions. The probability of permanent damage depends on the system application.

  11. Cosmic ray induced permanent damage in MNOS EAROMs

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, J.T.; Pickel, J.C.; Waskiewicz, A.E.

    1984-12-01

    Permanent damage to the memory cells in Metal Nitride Oxide Semiconductor (MNOS) Electrically Alterable Read Only Memories (EAROM) has been observed after exposure to a heavy ion beam from a cyclotron under high field (Erase/Write Mode) conditions. The probability, of permanent damage depends on the system application.

  12. DNA damage induced by red food dyes orally administered to pregnant and male mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Murakami, M; Matsusaka, N; Kano, K; Taniguchi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2001-05-01

    We determined the genotoxicity of synthetic red tar dyes currently used as food color additives in many countries, including JAPAN: For the preliminary assessment, we treated groups of 4 pregnant mice (gestational day 11) once orally at the limit dose (2000 mg/kg) of amaranth (food red No. 2), allura red (food red No. 40), or acid red (food red No. 106), and we sampled brain, lung, liver, kidney, glandular stomach, colon, urinary bladder, and embryo 3, 6, and 24 h after treatment. We used the comet (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis) assay to measure DNA damage. The assay was positive in the colon 3 h after the administration of amaranth and allura red and weakly positive in the lung 6 h after the administration of amaranth. Acid red did not induce DNA damage in any sample at any sampling time. None of the dyes damaged DNA in other organs or the embryo. We then tested male mice with amaranth, allura red, and a related color additive, new coccine (food red No. 18). The 3 dyes induced DNA damage in the colon starting at 10 mg/kg. Twenty ml/kg of soaking liquid from commercial red ginger pickles, which contained 6.5 mg/10 ml of new coccine, induced DNA damage in colon, glandular stomach, and bladder. The potencies were compared to those of other rodent carcinogens. The rodent hepatocarcinogen p-dimethylaminoazobenzene induced colon DNA damage at 1 mg/kg, whereas it damaged liver DNA only at 500 mg/kg. Although 1 mg/kg of N-nitrosodimethylamine induced DNA damage in liver and bladder, it did not induce colon DNA damage. N-nitrosodiethylamine at 14 mg/kg did not induce DNA damage in any organs examined. Because the 3 azo additives we examined induced colon DNA damage at a very low dose, more extensive assessment of azo additives is warranted.

  13. Molecular responses of radiation-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Ainiwaer, Aimudula; Wang, Yunlian; Wu, Ge; Mao, Rui; Yang, Ying; Bao, Yongxing

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular responses involved in radiation‑induced liver damage (RILD). Sprague‑Dawley rats (6‑weeks‑old) were irradiated once at a dose of 20 Gy to the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. The rats were then sacrificed 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after irradiation and rats, which were not exposed to irradiation were used as controls. Weight measurements and blood was obtained from the rats and liver tissues were collected for histological and apoptotic analysis. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) and western blot analysis were performed to measure the expression levels of mRNAs and proteins, respectively. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were increased significantly in the RILD rats. Histological investigation revealed the proliferation of collagen and the formation of fibrotic tissue 12 weeks after irradiation. Apoptotic cells were observed predominantly 2 and 4 weeks after irradiation. The immunohistochemistry, RT‑qPCR and western blot analysis all revealed the same pattern of changes in the expression levels of the molecules assessed. The expression levels of transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1), nuclear factor (NF)‑κB65, mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (Smad3) and Smad7 and connective tissue growth factor were increased during the recovery period following irradiation up to 12 weeks. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α, Smad7 and Smad4 were only increased during the early phase (first 4 weeks) of recovery following irradiation. In the RILD rat model, the molecular responses indicated that the TGF‑β1/Smads and NF‑κB65 signaling pathways are involved in the mechanism of RILD recovery.

  14. Angiopoetin-2 Signals Do Not Mediate the Hypervascularization of Islets in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal; Lueschen, Navina; Ardestani, Amin; Oberholzer, Jose; Olerud, Johan; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Maedler, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Changes in the islet vasculature have been implicated in the regulation of β-cell survival and function during the progression to type 2 diabetes (T2D). Failure of the β-cell to compensate for the increased insulin demand in obesity eventually leads to diabetes; as a result of the complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors (e.g. ongoing inflammation within the islets) and impaired vascular function. The Angiopoietin/Tie (Ang/Tie) angiogenic system maintains vasculature and is closely related to organ inflammation and angiogenesis. In this study we aimed to identify whether the vessel area within the islets changes in diabetes and whether such changes would be triggered by the Tie-antagonist Ang-2. Methods Immunohistochemical and qPCR analyses to follow islet vascularization and Ang/Tie levels were performed in human pancreatic autopsies and isolated human and mouse islets. The effect of Ang-2 was assessed in β-cell-specific Ang-2 overexpressing mice during high fat diet (HFD) feeding. Results Islet vessel area was increased in autopsy pancreases from patients with T2D. The vessel markers Tie-1, Tie-2 and CD31 were upregulated in mouse islets upon HFD feeding from 8 to 24 weeks. Ang-2 was transiently upregulated in mouse islets at 8 weeks of HFD and under glucolipotoxic conditions (22.2 mM glucose/ 0.5 mM palmitate) in vitro in human and mouse islets, in contrast to its downregulation by cytokines (IL-1β, IFN-ɣ and TNF-α). Ang-1 on the other hand was oppositely regulated, with a significant loss under glucolipotoxic condition, a trend to reduce in islets from patients with T2D and an upregulation by cytokines. Modulation of such changes in Ang-2 by its overexpression or the inhibition of its receptor Tie-2 impaired β-cell function at basal conditions but protected islets from cytokine induced apoptosis. In vivo, β-cell-specific Ang-2 overexpression in mice induced hypervascularization under normal diet but contrastingly led to

  15. [Attenuation of chronic stress-induced hippocampal damages following physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Liu, Hong-Tao; Chao, Fu-Huan

    2002-10-25

    The long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the plasma glucocorticoids level were observed in rats to study the effects of physical exercise on chronic stress-induced hippocampal damages. Eight-week spontaneous wheel running exercise could attenuate the suppression of LTP induced by 21-day restraint stress, and maintain the normal plasma glucocorticoids levels. It is suggested that long-term physical exercise may protect the hippocampus from stress-induced damages.

  16. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  17. Helium vs. Proton Induced Displacement Damage in Electronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringo, Sawnese; Barghouty, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the specific effects of displacement damage due to the passage of protons and helium nuclei on some typical electronic materials will be evaluated and contrasted. As the electronic material absorbs the energetic proton and helium momentum, degradation of performance occurs, eventually leading to overall failure. Helium nuclei traveling at the same speed as protons are expected to impart more to the material displacement damage; due to the larger mass, and thus momentum, of helium nuclei compared to protons. Damage due to displacement of atoms in their crystalline structure can change the physical properties and hence performance of the electronic materials.

  18. Short and longer-term effects of creatine supplementation on exercise induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Rosene, John; Matthews, Tracey; Ryan, Christine; Belmore, Keith; Bergsten, Alisa; Blaisdell, Jill; Gaylord, James; Love, Rebecca; Marrone, Michael; Ward, Kristine; Wilson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if creatine supplementation assisted with reducing the amount of exercise induced muscle damage and if creatine supplementation aided in recovery from exercise induced muscle damage. Two groups of subjects (group 1 = creatine; group 2 = placebo) participated in an eccentric exercise protocol following 7 and 30 days of creatine or placebo supplementation (20 g.d(-1) for 7 d followed by 6g.d(-1) for 23 d = 30 d). Prior to the supplementation period, measurements were obtained for maximal dynamic strength, maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Following 7 days of creatine supplementation, on day 8, subjects began consuming 6 g.d(-1) of creatine for 23 days. Additionally on days 8 and 31, subjects performed an eccentric exercise protocol using the knee extensors to induce muscle damage. Indirect markers of muscle damage, including maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of CK and LDH, were collected at 12, 24, and 48 hours following each exercise bout. The results indicated that acute bouts of creatine have no effect on indirect markers of muscle damage for the acute (7 days) bout. However, maximal isometric force was greater for the creatine group versus placebo for the chronic (30 days) bout. This suggests that the ergogenic effect of creatine following 30 days of supplementation may have a positive impact on exercise induced muscle damage. Key pointsEccentric muscle actions highly associated with exercise induced muscle damage.Creatine supplementation has ergogenic effect to increase protein synthesis.Creatine supplementation does not attenuate exercise induced muscle damage with short term supplementation (7 days).Increased maximal isometric force seen with creatine supplementation after 30 days following exercise induced muscle damage.Ergogenic effect of creatine

  19. Short and longer-term effects of creatine supplementation on exercise induced muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Rosene, John; Matthews, Tracey; Ryan, Christine; Belmore, Keith; Bergsten, Alisa; Blaisdell, Jill; Gaylord, James; Love, Rebecca; Marrone, Michael; Ward, Kristine; Wilson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if creatine supplementation assisted with reducing the amount of exercise induced muscle damage and if creatine supplementation aided in recovery from exercise induced muscle damage. Two groups of subjects (group 1 = creatine; group 2 = placebo) participated in an eccentric exercise protocol following 7 and 30 days of creatine or placebo supplementation (20 g.d-1 for 7 d followed by 6g.d-1 for 23 d = 30 d). Prior to the supplementation period, measurements were obtained for maximal dynamic strength, maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Following 7 days of creatine supplementation, on day 8, subjects began consuming 6 g.d-1 of creatine for 23 days. Additionally on days 8 and 31, subjects performed an eccentric exercise protocol using the knee extensors to induce muscle damage. Indirect markers of muscle damage, including maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of CK and LDH, were collected at 12, 24, and 48 hours following each exercise bout. The results indicated that acute bouts of creatine have no effect on indirect markers of muscle damage for the acute (7 days) bout. However, maximal isometric force was greater for the creatine group versus placebo for the chronic (30 days) bout. This suggests that the ergogenic effect of creatine following 30 days of supplementation may have a positive impact on exercise induced muscle damage. Key points Eccentric muscle actions highly associated with exercise induced muscle damage. Creatine supplementation has ergogenic effect to increase protein synthesis. Creatine supplementation does not attenuate exercise induced muscle damage with short term supplementation (7 days). Increased maximal isometric force seen with creatine supplementation after 30 days following exercise induced muscle damage. Ergogenic effect of creatine

  20. Laser-induced damage on fused silica with photo-acoustic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Muyu; Ke, Kai; Zhao, Jianjun; Yuan, Xiao; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-11-01

    The surface damage processes of fused silica are studied by a new photo-acoustic probe with Anti-Emi (Electron-Magnetic Interference), easy-adjusted and non-damage for the samples, and the damage thresholds is detected according to the rapid increase of the acoustic signals. Experimental results show that the damage threshold of fused silica samples is 13.86 J/cm2 at the wavelength of 1064 nm and the pulse width of 10 ns. This work may provide an effective technical support for the laser-induced damage detection.

  1. Electron-Induced Displacement Damage Effects in CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Elliott, Tom; Alexander, James W.

    2006-01-01

    We compare differences in parametric degradation for CCDs irradiated to the same displacement damage dose with 10-MeV and 50-MeV electrons. Charge transfer efficiency degradation was observed to not scale with NIEL for small signals.

  2. Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, Darcie D; Cerreta, Ellen K; Gray, Ill, George T

    2009-01-01

    Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

  3. Influence of Subsurface Cracks on Laser Induced Surface Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2003-11-07

    Cracks can affect laser damage susceptibility in three ways. These are field intensification due to interference, enhanced absorption due to trapped material in the cracks, and increased mechanical weakness. Enhanced absorption is the most important effect.

  4. Transplanted human bone marrow progenitor subtypes stimulate endogenous islet regeneration and revascularization.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Broughton, Heather C; Levac, Krysta D; Allan, David A; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Hess, David A

    2012-01-01

    Transplanted murine bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells recruit to the injured pancreas and induce endogenous beta cell proliferation to improve islet function. To enrich for analogous human progenitor cell types that stimulate islet regeneration, we purified human BM based on high-aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(hi)), an enzymatic function conserved in hematopoietic, endothelial, and mesenchymal progenitor lineages. We investigated the contributions of ALDH(hi) mixed progenitor cells or culture-expanded, ALDH-purified multipotent stromal cell (MSC) subsets to activate endogenous programs for islet regeneration after transplantation into streptozotocin-treated NOD/SCID mice. Intravenous injection of uncultured BM ALDH(hi) cells improved systemic hyperglycemia and augmented insulin secretion by increasing islet size and vascularization, without increasing total islet number. Augmented proliferation within regenerated endogenous islets and associated vascular endothelium indicated the induction of islet-specific proliferative and pro-angiogenic programs. Although cultured MSC from independent human BM samples showed variable capacity to improve islet function, and prolonged expansion diminished hyperglycemic recovery, transplantation of ALDH-purified regenerative MSC reduced hyperglycemia and augmented total beta cell mass by stimulating the formation of small beta cell clusters associated with the ductal epithelium, without evidence of increased islet vascularization or Ngn3(+) endocrine precursor activation. Thus, endogenous islet recovery after progenitor cell transplantation can occur via distinct regenerative mechanisms modulated by subtypes of progenitor cells administered. Further, understanding of how these islet regenerative and pro-angiogenic programs are activated by specific progenitor subsets may provide new approaches for combination cellular therapies to combat diabetes.

  5. Isles within islets: The lattice origin of small-world networks in pancreatic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, Amlan K.; Goel, Pranay

    2016-02-01

    The traditional computational model of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans is a lattice of β-cells connected with gap junctions. Numerous studies have investigated the behavior of networks of coupled β-cells and have shown that gap junctions synchronize bursting strongly. This simplistic architecture of islets, however, seems increasingly untenable at the face of recent experimental advances. In a microfluidics experiment on isolated islets, Rocheleau et al. (2004) showed a failure of penetration of excitation when one end received high glucose and other end was not excited sufficiently; this suggested that gap junctions may not be efficient at inducing synchrony throughout the islet. Recently, Stozer et al. (2013) have argued that the functional networks of β-cells in an islet are small world. Their results implicate the existence of a few long-range connections among cells in the network. The physiological reason underlying this claim is not well understood. These studies cast doubt on the original lattice model that largely predict an all-or-none synchrony among the cells. Here we have attempted to reconcile these observations in a unified framework. We assume that cells in the islet are coupled randomly to their nearest neighbors with some probability, p. We simulated detailed β-cell bursting in such islets. By varying p systematically we were led to network parameters similar to those obtained by Stozer et al. (2013). We find that the networks within islets break up into components giving rise to smaller isles within the super structure-isles-within-islets, as it were. This structure can also account for the partial excitation seen by Rocheleau et al. (2004). Our updated view of islet architecture thus explains the paradox how islets can have strongly synchronizing gap junctions, and be weakly coordinated at the same time.

  6. Repair Machinery for Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    significant defect in the repair of certain DNA damages, but of which damages needs to be determined. We have selected Chinese Hamster Ovary ( CHO ) as...chromosome (BAC) genomic fragment, which we isolated from a CHO BAC library, revealed that APE1 exists as a single copy gene in AA8 (see Appendix, Figure... cells , we first determined the APE1 gene copy number in the CHO AA8 cell line. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with an APE1 bacterial artificial

  7. Investigation of Friction-induced Damage to the Pig Cornea.

    PubMed

    Barros, Raquel C; Van Kooten, Theo G; Veeregowda, Deepak Halenahally

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical friction causes damage to the cornea. A friction measurement device with minimal intervention with the pig cornea tear film revealed a low friction coefficient of 0.011 in glycerine solution. Glycerine molecules presumably bind to water, mucins, and epithelial cells and therewith improve both squeeze film and boundary lubrication. Using confocal microscopy, we determined that glycerine solution reduced damage to epithelial cells by 50% compared with the phosphate buffer saline.

  8. Is Allelopathic Activity of Ipomoea murucoides Induced by Xylophage Damage?

    PubMed

    Flores-Palacios, Alejandro; Corona-López, Angélica María; Rios, María Yolanda; Aguilar-Guadarrama, Berenice; Toledo-Hernández, Víctor Hugo; Rodríguez-López, Verónica; Valencia-Díaz, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory activates the synthesis of allelochemicals that can mediate plant-plant interactions. There is an inverse relationship between the activity of xylophages and the abundance of epiphytes on Ipomoea murucoides. Xylophagy may modify the branch chemical constitution, which also affects the liberation of allelochemicals with defense and allelopathic properties. We evaluated the bark chemical content and the effect of extracts from branches subjected to treatments of exclusion, mechanical damage and the presence/absence of epiphytes, on the seed germination of the epiphyte Tillandsia recurvata. Principal component analysis showed that branches without any treatment separate from branches subjected to treatments; damaged and excluded branches had similar chemical content but we found no evidence to relate intentional damage with allelopathy; however 1-hexadecanol, a defense volatile compound correlated positively with principal component (PC) 1. The chemical constitution of branches subject to exclusion plus damage or plus epiphytes was similar among them. PC2 indicated that palmitic acid (allelopathic compound) and squalene, a triterpene that attracts herbivore enemies, correlated positively with the inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata. Inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata was mainly correlated with the increment of palmitic acid and this compound reached higher concentrations in excluded branches treatments. Then, it is likely that the allelopathic response of I. murucoides would increase to the damage (shade, load) that may be caused by a high load of epiphytes than to damage caused by the xylophages.

  9. Is Allelopathic Activity of Ipomoea murucoides Induced by Xylophage Damage?

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Palacios, Alejandro; Corona-López, Angélica María; Rios, María Yolanda; Aguilar-Guadarrama, Berenice; Toledo-Hernández, Víctor Hugo; Rodríguez-López, Verónica; Valencia-Díaz, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory activates the synthesis of allelochemicals that can mediate plant-plant interactions. There is an inverse relationship between the activity of xylophages and the abundance of epiphytes on Ipomoea murucoides. Xylophagy may modify the branch chemical constitution, which also affects the liberation of allelochemicals with defense and allelopathic properties. We evaluated the bark chemical content and the effect of extracts from branches subjected to treatments of exclusion, mechanical damage and the presence/absence of epiphytes, on the seed germination of the epiphyte Tillandsia recurvata. Principal component analysis showed that branches without any treatment separate from branches subjected to treatments; damaged and excluded branches had similar chemical content but we found no evidence to relate intentional damage with allelopathy; however 1-hexadecanol, a defense volatile compound correlated positively with principal component (PC) 1. The chemical constitution of branches subject to exclusion plus damage or plus epiphytes was similar among them. PC2 indicated that palmitic acid (allelopathic compound) and squalene, a triterpene that attracts herbivore enemies, correlated positively with the inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata. Inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata was mainly correlated with the increment of palmitic acid and this compound reached higher concentrations in excluded branches treatments. Then, it is likely that the allelopathic response of I. murucoides would increase to the damage (shade, load) that may be caused by a high load of epiphytes than to damage caused by the xylophages. PMID:26625350

  10. NAD(+) administration decreases doxorubicin-induced liver damage of mice by enhancing antioxidation capacity and decreasing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ban; Ma, Yingxin; Kong, Xiaoni; Ding, Xianting; Gu, Hongchen; Chu, Tianqing; Ying, Weihai

    2014-04-05

    One of the major obstacles for cancer treatment is the toxic side effects of anti-cancer drugs. Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs, which produces significant toxic side effects on the heart and such organs as the liver. Because NAD(+) can decrease cellular or tissue damage under multiple conditions, we hypothesized that NAD(+) administration may decrease DOX-induced hepatotoxicity. In this study we tested this hypothesis by using a mouse model, showing that NAD(+) administration can significantly attenuate DOX-induced increase in serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase activity and decrease in liver weight. The NAD(+) administration also attenuated the DOX-induced increases in the levels of double-strand DNA (dsDNA) damage, TUNEL signals, and active caspase-3. Furthermore, our data has suggested that the NAD(+) administration could produce protective effects at least partially by restoring the antioxidation capacity of the liver, because NAD(+) administration can attenuate the decreases in both the GSH levels and the glutathione reductase activity of the DOX-treated liver, which could play a significant role in the DOX-induced hepatotoxicity. This finding has provided the first evidence indicating that NAD(+) is capable of increasing the antioxidation capacity of tissues. Collectively, our study has found that NAD(+) can significantly decrease DOX-induced liver damage at least partially by enhancing antioxidation capacity and decreasing dsDNA damage. Because it can also selectively decrease tumor cell survival, NAD(+) may have significant merits over antioxidants for applying jointly with DOX to decrease the toxic side effects of DOX.

  11. Oxygenation of the Intraportally Transplanted Pancreatic Islet

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intraportal islet transplantation (IT) is not widely utilized as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. Oxygenation of the intraportally transplanted islet has not been studied extensively. We present a diffusion-reaction model that predicts the presence of an anoxic core and a larger partly functional core within intraportally transplanted islets. Four variables were studied: islet diameter, islet fractional viability, external oxygen partial pressure (P) (in surrounding portal blood), and presence or absence of a thrombus on the islet surface. Results indicate that an islet with average size and fractional viability exhibits an anoxic volume fraction (AVF) of 14% and a function loss of 72% at a low external P. Thrombus formation increased AVF to 30% and function loss to 92%, suggesting that the effect of thrombosis may be substantial. External P and islet diameter accounted for the greatest overall impact on AVF and loss of function. At our institutions, large human alloislets (>200 μm diameter) account for ~20% of total islet number but ~70% of total islet volume; since most of the total transplanted islet volume is accounted for by large islets, most of the intraportal islet cells are likely to be anoxic and not fully functional. PMID:27872862

  12. Genetic and Functional Studies of Genes that Regulate DNA-Damage-Induced Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0145 TITLE: Genetic and Functional Studies of Genes that Regulate DNA-damage-induced Cell Death PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...and Functional Studies of Genes that Regulate DAMD17-01-1-0145 DNA-damage-induced Cell Death 6. A UTHOR(S) Zhou Songyang, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZA...mechanisms of genes that regulate DNA damage induced cell death are much less well studied. We have proposed to establish a genetic system to screen for

  13. Lightning Strike Induced Damage Mechanisms of Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hirohide

    Composite materials have a wide application in aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries, because of the superior structural and weight performances. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites possess a much lower electrical conductivity as compared to traditional metallic materials utilized for aircraft structures, serious concern about damage resistance/tolerance against lightning has been rising. Main task of this study is to clarify the lightning damage mechanism of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy polymer composites to help further development of lightning strike protection. The research on lightning damage to carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites is quite challenging, and there has been little study available until now. In order to tackle this issue, building block approach was employed. The research was started with the development of supporting technologies such as a current impulse generator to simulate a lightning strike in a laboratory. Then, fundamental electrical properties and fracture behavior of CFRPs exposed to high and low level current impulse were investigated using simple coupon specimens, followed by extensive parametric investigations in terms of different prepreg materials frequently used in aerospace industry, various stacking sequences, different lightning intensity, and lightning current waveforms. It revealed that the thermal resistance capability of polymer matrix was one of the most influential parameters on lightning damage resistance of CFRPs. Based on the experimental findings, the semi-empirical analysis model for predicting the extent of lightning damage was established. The model was fitted through experimental data to determine empirical parameters and, then, showed a good capability to provide reliable predictions for other test conditions and materials. Finally, structural element level lightning tests were performed to explore more practical situations. Specifically, filled-hole CFRP plates and patch

  14. Protective effects of curcumin on amyloid-β-induced neuronal oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Chang; Chang, Ping; Dai, Xue-Ling; Jiang, Zhao-Feng

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the protective effects of curcumin against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced neuronal damage. Primary rat cortical neurons were cultured with different treatments of Aβ and curcumin. Neuronal morphologies, viability and damage were assessed. Neuronal oxidative stress was assessed, including extracellular hydrogen peroxide and intracellular reactive oxygen species. The abilities of curcumin to scavenge free radicals and to inhibit Aβ aggregation and β-sheeted formation are further assessed and discussed. Curcumin preserves cell viability, which is decreased by Aβ. The results of changed morphology, released Lactate dehydrogenases and cell viability assays indicate that curcumin protects Aβ-induced neuronal damage. Curcumin depresses Aβ-induced up-regulation of neuronal oxidative stress. The treatment sequence impacts the protective effect of curcumin on Aβ-induced neuronal damage. Curcumin shows a more protective effect on neuronal oxidative damage when curcumin was added into cultured neurons not later than Aβ, especially prior to Aβ. The abilities of curcumin to scavenge free radicals and to inhibit the formation of β-sheeted aggregation are both beneficial to depress Aβ-induced oxidative damage. Curcumin prevents neurons from Aβ-induced oxidative damage, implying the therapeutic usage for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients.

  15. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  16. Modelling blast induced damage from a fully coupled explosive charge

    PubMed Central

    Onederra, Italo A.; Furtney, Jason K.; Sellers, Ewan; Iverson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents one of the latest developments in the blasting engineering modelling field—the Hybrid Stress Blasting Model (HSBM). HSBM includes a rock breakage engine to model detonation, wave propagation, rock fragmentation, and muck pile formation. Results from two controlled blasting experiments were used to evaluate the code’s ability to predict the extent of damage. Results indicate that the code is capable of adequately predicting both the extent and shape of the damage zone associated with the influence of point-of-initiation and free-face boundary conditions. Radial fractures extending towards a free face are apparent in the modelling output and matched those mapped after the experiment. In the stage 2 validation experiment, the maximum extent of visible damage was of the order of 1.45 m for the fully coupled 38-mm emulsion charge. Peak radial velocities were predicted within a relative difference of only 1.59% at the nearest history point at 0.3 m from the explosive charge. Discrepancies were larger further away from the charge, with relative differences of −22.4% and −42.9% at distances of 0.46 m and 0.61 m, respectively, meaning that the model overestimated particle velocities at these distances. This attenuation deficiency in the modelling produced an overestimation of the damage zone at the corner of the block due to excessive stress reflections. The extent of visible damage in the immediate vicinity of the blasthole adequately matched the measurements. PMID:26412978

  17. Stress-induced DNA Damage biomarkers: Applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism’s endogenous processes like replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damages play a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g. X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e. single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition to such DNA damage products, we suggest possible gene inductions that can be used to characterize responses to different types of stresses i.e. radiation, oxidative and replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and stringent meta-analysis of literature data.

  18. Novobiocin Inhibits the Antimicrobial Resistance Acquired through DNA Damage-Induced Mutagenesis in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Luis M.; Pérez-Varela, María; Corral, Jordi; Arch, Marta; Cortés, Pilar; Bou, Germán; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a worldwide emerging nosocomial pathogen, acquires antimicrobial resistances in response to DNA-damaging agents, which increase the expression of multiple error-prone DNA polymerase components. Here we show that the aminocoumarin novobiocin, which inhibits the DNA damage response in Gram-positive bacteria, also inhibits the expression of error-prone DNA polymerases in this Gram-negative multidrug-resistant pathogen and, consequently, its potential acquisition of antimicrobial resistance through DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. PMID:26503651

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans-induced macrophage lysosome damage crucially contributes to fungal virulence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael J; Eastman, Alison J; Qiu, Yafeng; Gregorka, Brian; Kozel, Thomas R; Osterholzer, John J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Swanson, Joel A; Olszewski, Michal A

    2015-03-01

    Upon ingestion by macrophages, Cryptococcus neoformans can survive and replicate intracellularly unless the macrophages become classically activated. The mechanism enabling intracellular replication is not fully understood; neither are the mechanisms that allow classical activation to counteract replication. C. neoformans-induced lysosome damage was observed in infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, increased with time, and required yeast viability. To demonstrate lysosome damage in the infected host, we developed a novel flow cytometric method for measuring lysosome damage. Increased lysosome damage was found in C. neoformans-containing lung cells compared with C. neoformans-free cells. Among C. neoformans-containing myeloid cells, recently recruited cells displayed lower damage than resident cells, consistent with the protective role of recruited macrophages. The magnitude of lysosome damage correlated with increased C. neoformans replication. Experimental induction of lysosome damage increased C. neoformans replication. Activation of macrophages with IFN-γ abolished macrophage lysosome damage and enabled increased killing of C. neoformans. We conclude that induction of lysosome damage is an important C. neoformans survival strategy and that classical activation of host macrophages counters replication by preventing damage. Thus, therapeutic strategies that decrease lysosomal damage, or increase resistance to such damage, could be valuable in treating cryptococcal infections.

  20. Gastric mucosal damage induced by nonsalicylate nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in rats is mediated systemically.

    PubMed

    Skeljo, M V; Giraud, A S; Yeomans, N D

    1993-11-01

    The gastric toxicities of an enteric-coated formulation and conventional indomethacin were compared in rats. Both formulations were equally damaging to the mucosa, suggesting that topical damage was not the major route of injury. The importance of systemically mediated damage was further determined by gastrotoxicity dose-response curves and pyloric ligation experiments in which indomethacin was administered either orally or parenterally, or into stomach or duodenum with the pylorus occluded. Gastric damage was significantly higher in those groups that had received the drug parenterally or intraduodenally. The extent of deeper mucosal damage, assessed histologically, was greater in parenterally dosed rats. In further experiments, oral and parenteral routes of administration of two other nonsalicylate NSAIDs, naproxen and sodium diclofenac, were found to be equally damaging to the mucosa. Our results show that indomethacin-induced gastric damage, unlike aspirin injury, is mediated mainly systemically. Enteric-coating may not be a useful strategy in reducing gastric injury by nonsalicylate, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

  1. Hybrid molecular dynamics simulation for plasma induced damage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable further device size reduction (also known as Moore's law) and improved power performance, the semiconductor industry is introducing new materials and device structures into the semiconductor fabrication process. Materials now include III-V compounds, germanium, cobalt, ruthenium, hafnium, and others. The device structure in both memory and logic has been evolving from planar to three dimensional (3D). One such device is the FinFET, where the transistor gate is a vertical fin made either of silicon, silicon-germanium or germanium. These changes have brought renewed interests in the structural damages caused by energetic ion bombardment of the fin sidewalls which are exposed to the ion flux from the plasma during the fin-strip off step. Better control of the physical damage of the 3D devices requires a better understanding of the damage formation mechanisms on such new materials and structures. In this study, the damage formation processes by ion bombardment have been simulated for Si and Ge substrate by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid simulations and compared to the results from the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In our QM/MM simulations, the highly reactive region in which the structural damage is created is simulated with the Density Functional based Tight Binding (DFTB) method and the region remote from the primary region is simulated using classical MD with the Stillinger-Weber and Moliere potentials. The learn on the fly method is also used to reduce the computational load. Hence our QM/MM simulation is much faster than the full QC-MD simulations and the original QM/MM simulations. The amorphous layers profile simulated with QM/MM have obvious differences in their thickness for silicon and germanium substrate. The profile of damaged structure in the germanium substrate is characterized by a deeper tail then in silicon. These traits are also observed in the results from the mass selected ion beam

  2. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo.

  3. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo. PMID:26788916

  4. Explosive-induced shock damage in copper and recompression of the damaged region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, W. D.; Stevens, G. D.; Hixson, R. S.; Cerreta, E. K.; Daykin, E. P.; Graeve, O. A.; La Lone, B. M.; Novitskaya, E.; Perez, C.; Rigg, P. A.; Veeser, L. R.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the dynamic spall process for copper samples in contact with detonating low-performance explosives. When a triangular shaped shock wave from detonation moves through a sample and reflects from the free surface, tension develops immediately, one or more damaged layers can form, and a spall scab can separate from the sample and move ahead of the remaining target material. For dynamic experiments, we used time-resolved velocimetry and x-ray radiography. Soft-recovered samples were analyzed using optical imaging and microscopy. Computer simulations were used to guide experiment design. We observe that for some target thicknesses the spall scab continues to run ahead of the rest of the sample, but for thinner samples, the detonation product gases accelerate the sample enough for it to impact the spall scab several microseconds or more after the initial damage formation. Our data also show signatures in the form of a late-time reshock in the time-resolved data, which support this computational prediction. A primary goal of this research was to study the wave interactions and damage processes for explosives-loaded copper and to look for evidence of this postulated recompression event. We found both experimentally and computationally that we could tailor the magnitude of the initial and recompression shocks by varying the explosive drive and the copper sample thickness; thin samples had a large recompression after spall, whereas thick samples did not recompress at all. Samples that did not recompress had spall scabs that completely separated from the sample, whereas samples with recompression remained intact. This suggests that the hypothesized recompression process closes voids in the damage layer or otherwise halts the spall formation process. This is a somewhat surprising and, in some ways controversial, result, and the one that warrants further research in the shock compression community.

  5. The Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Eric S.; Gunn, Bridget; Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the effects of oral creatine (Cr) supplementation on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage following high-force eccentric exercise in men randomly administered Cr or placebo. Results indicated that 5 days of Cr supplementation did not reduce indirect makers of muscle damage or enhance recovery from high-force eccentric exercise.…

  6. Catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Frank R. Natoli, Jean-Yves; Akhouayri, Hassan; Commandré, Mireille; Duchateau, Guillaume

    2014-06-28

    Due to its high effective nonlinearity and the possibility to produce periodically poled crystals, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}, KTP) is still one of the economically important nonlinear optical materials. In this overview article, we present a large study on catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in this material and the very similar RbTiOPO{sub 4} (RTP). Several different systematic studies are included: multiple pulse laser damage, multi-wavelength laser damage in KTP, damage resistance anisotropy, and variations of the laser damage thresholds for RTP crystals of different qualities. All measurements were carried out in comparable experimental conditions using a 1064 nm Q-switched laser and some were repeated at 532 nm. After summarizing the experimental results, we detail the proposed model for laser damage in this material and discuss the experimental results in this context. According to the model, nanosecond laser damage is caused by light-induced generation of transient laser-damage precursors which subsequently provide free electrons that are heated by the same nanosecond pulse. We also present a stimulated Raman scattering measurement and confront slightly different models to the experimental data. Finally, the physical nature of the transient damage precursors is discussed and similarities and differences to laser damage in other crystals are pointed out.

  7. RNase H enables efficient repair of R-loop induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Amon, Jeremy D; Koshland, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    R-loops, three-stranded structures that form when transcripts hybridize to chromosomal DNA, are potent agents of genome instability. This instability has been explained by the ability of R-loops to induce DNA damage. Here, we show that persistent R-loops also compromise DNA repair. Depleting endogenous RNase H activity impairs R-loop removal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causing DNA damage that occurs preferentially in the repetitive ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA). We analyzed the repair kinetics of this damage and identified mutants that modulate repair. We present a model that the persistence of R-loops at sites of DNA damage induces repair by break-induced replication (BIR). This R-loop induced BIR is particularly susceptible to the formation of lethal repair intermediates at the rDNA because of a barrier imposed by RNA polymerase I. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20533.001 PMID:27938663

  8. Antecedent glycemic control reduces severe hypoglycemia-induced neuronal damage in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Tanoli, Tariq; Bree, Adam; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Cui, Chen; Maloney, Susan E; Wozniak, David F; Fisher, Simon J

    2013-06-15

    Brain damage due to severe hypoglycemia occurs in insulin-treated people with diabetes. This study tests the hypothesis that chronic insulin therapy that normalizes elevated blood glucose in diabetic rats would be neuroprotective against brain damage induced by an acute episode of severe hypoglycemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were split into three groups: 1) control, non-diabetic; 2) STZ-diabetic; and 3) insulin-treated STZ-diabetic. After 3 wk of chronic treatment, unrestrained awake rats underwent acute hyperinsulinemic severe hypoglycemic (10-15 mg/dl) clamps for 1 h. Rats were subsequently analyzed for brain damage and cognitive function. Severe hypoglycemia induced 15-fold more neuronal damage in STZ-diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic rats. Chronic insulin treatment of diabetic rats, which nearly normalized glucose levels, markedly reduced neuronal damage induced by severe hypoglycemia. Fortunately, no cognitive defects associated with the hypoglycemia-induced brain damage were observed in any group. In conclusion, antecedent blood glucose control represents a major modifiable therapeutic intervention that can afford diabetic subjects neuroprotection against severe hypoglycemia-induced brain damage.

  9. Effect of Creatine Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Repair Following Eccentrically-Induced Damage to the Elbow Flexor Muscles

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Neal B.; Graham, Mitchell T.; Tiidus, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated effects of creatine (Cr) supplementation (CrS) on exercise-induced muscle damage. Untrained males and females (N = 27) ages 18-25, with no CrS history in the past 4 months, were randomly assigned to CrS (creatine and carbohydrate) (n = 9), placebo (P) (carbohydrate only) (n = 9), or control (C) (no supplements) groups (n = 9). Participants followed a 5-day Cr loading protocol of 40 g·day-1, divided for 5 days prior to exercise, reduced to 10 g g·day-1 for 5 days following exercise. Testing consisted of 5 maximal isometric contractions at 90 arm flexion with the preferred arm on a CYBEX NORM dynamometer, assessed prior to, immediately following, and 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post muscle-damaging procedures. Damage was induced to the elbow flexor muscles using 6 sets of 10 eccentric contractions at 75 °/sec, 90 °/sec and 120 °/sec. Participants were asked to rate their muscle soreness on a scale of 1-10. Data was analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA, with an alpha of 0.05. No significant differences were found between muscle force loss and rate of recovery or muscle soreness between groups over the 96 hr recovery period (p > 0.05). Across all 3 experimental groups an initial decrease in force was observed, followed by a gradual recovery. Significant differences were found between baseline and all others times (p = 0.031,0 .022, 0.012, 0.001 respectively), and between the 48 hour and 96 hour time periods (p = 0.034). A weak negative correlation between subjectively rated muscle soreness and mean peak isometric force loss (R2 = 0.0374 at 96 hours), suggested that muscle soreness and muscle force loss may not be directly related. In conclusion, 5 days of Cr loading, followed by a Cr maintenance protocol did not reduce indices of muscle damage or speed recovery of upper body muscles following eccentrically induced muscle damage. Key points Creatine supplementation has been suggested as a means to diminish exercise induced muscle damage and speed

  10. Early mechanisms in radiation-induced biological damage

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    An introduction to the mechanisms of radiation action in biological systems is presented. Several questions about the nature of the radiation damage process are discussed, including recognition of the oxygen effects, dose-response relationships, and the importance of the hydroxyl radical. (ACR)

  11. Residual force enhancement following eccentric induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Power, Geoffrey A; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2012-06-26

    During lengthening of an activated skeletal muscle, the force maintained following the stretch is greater than the isometric force at the same muscle length. This is termed residual force enhancement (RFE), but it is unknown how muscle damage following repeated eccentric contractions affects RFE. Using the dorsiflexors, we hypothesised muscle damage will impair the force generating sarcomeric structures leading to a reduction in RFE. Following reference maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) in 8 young men (26.5±2.8y) a stretch was performed at 30°/s over a 30° ankle excursion ending at the same muscle length as the reference MVCs (30° plantar flexion). Surface electromyography (EMG) of the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles was recorded during all tasks. The damage protocol involved 4 sets of 25 isokinetic (30°/s) lengthening contractions. The same measures were collected at baseline and immediately post lengthening contractions, and for up to 10min recovery. Following the lengthening contraction task, there was a 30.3±6.4% decrease in eccentric torque (P<0.05) and 36.2±9.7% decrease in MVC (P<0.05) compared to baseline. Voluntary activation using twitch interpolation and RMS EMG amplitude of the tibialis anterior remained near maximal without increased coactivation for MVC. Contrary to our hypothesis, RFE increased (∼100-250%) following muscle damage (P<0.05). It appears stretch provided a mechanical strategy for enhanced muscle function compared to isometric actions succeeding damage. Thus, active force of cross-bridges is decreased because of impaired excitation-contraction coupling but force generated during stretch remains intact because force contribution from stretched sarcomeric structures is less impaired.

  12. Relationship between recurrent liquefaction-induced damage and subsurface conditions in Midorigaoka, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, Kazue; Yoshida, Nozomu

    2008-07-08

    Midorigaoka, Kushiro City, northeast Japan, suffered liquefaction-induced ground failures during four successive earthquakes in the past thirty years. This paper presents the ground failures and their effects to structures observed in Midorigaoka during the earthquakes, and examines the relationships between recurrent liquefaction-induced damage and subsurface conditions. As a result, thick liquefiable fill, slope of the ground surface, and subsurface water conditions, which resulted primarily from filling a marshy valley, are found to be responsible on the damage.

  13. Acrylonitrile-Induced Oxidative Stress and Oxidative DNA Damage in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kamendulis, Lisa M.; Klaunig, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the induction of oxidative stress may be involved in brain tumor induction in rats by acrylonitrile. The present study examined whether acrylonitrile induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in rats and whether blood can serve as a valid surrogate for the biomonitoring of oxidative stress induced by acrylonitrile in the exposed population. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 0, 3, 30, 100, and 200 ppm acrylonitrile in drinking water for 28 days. One group of rats were also coadministered N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) (0.3% in diet) with acrylonitrile (200 ppm in drinking water) to examine whether antioxidant supplementation was protective against acrylonitrile-induced oxidative stress. Direct DNA strand breakage in white blood cells (WBC) and brain was measured using the alkaline comet assay. Oxidative DNA damage in WBC and brain was evaluated using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (fpg)-modified comet assay and with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. No significant increase in direct DNA strand breaks was observed in brain and WBC from acrylonitrile-treated rats. However, oxidative DNA damage (fpg comet and 8′hydroxyl-2-deoxyguanosine) in brain and WBC was increased in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, plasma levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in rats administered acrylonitrile. Dietary supplementation with NAC prevented acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage in brain and WBC. A slight, but significant, decrease in the GSH:GSSG ratio was seen in brain at acrylonitrile doses > 30 ppm. These results provide additional support that the mode of action for acrylonitrile-induced astrocytomas involves the induction of oxidative stress and damage. Significant associations were seen between oxidative DNA damage in WBC and brain, ROS formation in plasma, and the reported tumor incidences. Since oxidative DNA damage in brain correlated with oxidative damage in WBC, these results suggest

  14. Laser-matter coupling mechanisms governing particulate-induced damage on optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, M. J.; Feigenbaum, E.; Demos, S. G.; Raman, R. N.; Qiu, S. R.; Shen, N.; Harris, C.; Negres, R. A.; Norton, M.; Cross, D.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive study of laser-induced damage associated with particulate damage on optical surfaces is presented. Contaminant-driven damage on silica windows and multilayer dielectrics is observed to range from shallow pitting to more classical fracture-type damage, depending on particle-substrate material combination, as well as laser pulse characteristics. Ejection dynamics is studied in terms of plasma emission spectroscopy and pump-probe shadowgraphy. Our data is used to assess the momentum coupling between incident energy and the ejected plasma, which dominates the laser-particle-substrate interaction. Beam propagation analysis is also presented to characterize the impact of contaminant-driven surface pitting on optical performance.

  15. Ghrelin Attenuates cAMP-PKA Signaling to Evoke Insulinostatic Cascade in Islet β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dezaki, Katsuya; Damdindorj, Boldbaatar; Sone, Hideyuki; Dyachok, Oleg; Tengholm, Anders; Gylfe, Erik; Kurashina, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Masashi; Kakei, Masafumi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ghrelin reportedly restricts insulin release in islet β-cells via the Gαi2 subtype of G-proteins and thereby regulates glucose homeostasis. This study explored whether ghrelin regulates cAMP signaling and whether this regulation induces insulinostatic cascade in islet β-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Insulin release was measured in rat perfused pancreas and isolated islets and cAMP production in isolated islets. Cytosolic cAMP concentrations ([cAMP]i) were monitored in mouse MIN6 cells using evanescent-wave fluorescence imaging. In rat single β-cells, cytosolic protein kinase-A activity ([PKA]i) and Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were measured by DR-II and fura-2 microfluorometry, respectively, and whole cell currents by patch-clamp technique. RESULTS Ghrelin suppressed glucose (8.3 mmol/L)-induced insulin release in rat perfused pancreas and isolated islets, and these effects of ghrelin were blunted in the presence of cAMP analogs or adenylate cyclase inhibitor. Glucose-induced cAMP production in isolated islets was attenuated by ghrelin and enhanced by ghrelin receptor antagonist and anti-ghrelin antiserum, which counteract endogenous islet-derived ghrelin. Ghrelin inhibited the glucose-induced [cAMP]i elevation and [PKA]i activation in MIN6 and rat β-cells, respectively. Furthermore, ghrelin potentiated voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channel currents without altering Ca2+ channel currents and attenuated glucose-induced [Ca2+]i increases in rat β-cells in a PKA-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS Ghrelin directly interacts with islet β-cells to attenuate glucose-induced cAMP production and PKA activation, which lead to activation of Kv channels and suppression of glucose-induced [Ca2+]i increase and insulin release. PMID:21788571

  16. Damage mechanisms for ultrasound-induced cavitation in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M.; Vlaisavljevich, E.; Xu, Z.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-03-01

    In a variety of biomedical applications, cavitation occurs in soft tissue. Although significant amounts of research have been performed on cavitation in water, bubble dynamics, and related bioeffects remain poorly understood. We use numerical simulations of spherical bubble dynamics in soft tissue to assess the extent to which viscoelasticity affects "known" and introduces "new" damage mechanisms. We find that deviatoric stresses - although not an important damage mechanism in water - are significantly enhanced and could be an important bioeffect mechanism in tissue. Both the viscoelastic properties and the nonlinear, large-collapse radius contribute to stress amplification in the surroundings. In addition, temperatures in the surrounding medium increase more in the Zener tissue than in water, due to viscous heating.

  17. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  18. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  19. Evaluating thermal damage induced by pulsed light with multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Xie, Shusen; Huang, Yimei

    2009-02-01

    Nonablative skin remodeling is a new light treatment approach for photodamaged skin. Compared to ablative CO2 or Er:YAG laser resurfacing, dermabrasion, and chemical peels, the clinical objective of nonablative skin remodeling is to maximize thermal damage to upper dermis while minimizing injury to the epidermis and surrounding tissue, consequently decreasing potential complications and shortening long recuperation periods. Histological analysis of preoperative and postoperative biopsies using H&E or special stains has indicated the dermal thermal injury, which resulting in collagen denaturation, is the most important mechanism of nonablative skin remodeling for improving skin situation. And the extent of improvement of skin situation corresponded to the formation of a new band of dense, compact collagen bundles in the papillary dermis. The diversity of individual skin condition influences the choice of pulsed light treatment parameters, and further influences the degree of dermal thermal damage, thus the efficacy of nonablative skin remodeling remains unstable. Recently, multiphoton microscopy has show a promising application for monitoring skin thermal damage, because collagen could produce strong second harmonic generation (SHG). And SHG intensity is presumably proportional to the percentage of collagen in dermis. In this paper, the auto-fluorescence (AF) intensity and SHG intensity of mice skin irradiated by pulsed Nd:YAG laser were measured and imaged with multiphoton microscope, and the results show the ratio of SHG to AF decreases with the increase of irradiation exposure dose, and could be a quantitative technique to assess dermal thermal damage, and could further benefit the choice of light treatment parameters.

  20. Botanical Extracts as Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    seed extract supplements and Labrador tea whole leaf extracts as potential radioprotectants. Three different commercial grape seed extracts were... supplements and Labrador tea whole leaf extracts as potential radioprotectants. A novel assay was used to compare DNA damage in cellular and...concentrations of commercial grape seed extract supplements and Labrador tea. In addition, this work has identified and validated a set of procedures to use

  1. Induction and repair of HZE induced cytogenetic damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Bao, S.; Rithidech, K.; Chrisler, W. B.; Couch, L. A.; Braby, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to high-mass, high energy (HZE) 56Fe particles (1000 GeV/AMU) using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The animals were sacrificed at 1-5 hours or after a 30-day recovery period. The frequency of micronuclei in the tracheal and the deep lung epithelial cells were evaluated. The relative effectiveness of 56Fe, for the induction of initial chromosome damage in the form of micronuclei, was compared to damage produced in the same biological system exposed to other types of high and low-LET radiation. It was demonstrated that for animals sacrificed at short times after exposure, the tracheal and lung epithelial cells, the 56Fe particles were 3.3 and 1.3 times as effective as 60Co in production of micronuclei, respectively. The effectiveness was also compared to that for exposure to inhaled radon. With this comparison, the 56Fe exposure of the tracheal epithelial cells and the lung epithelial cells were only 0.18 and 0.20 times as effective as radon in the production of the initial cytogenetic damage. It was suggested that the low relative effectiveness was related to potential for 'wasted energy' from the core of the 56Fe particles. When the animals were sacrificed after 30 days, the slopes of the dose-response relationships, which reflect the remaining level of damage, decreased by a factor of 10 for both the tracheal and lung epithelial cells. In both cases, the slope of the dose-response lines were no longer significantly different from zero, and the r2 values were very high. Lung epithelial cells, isolated from the animals sacrificed hours after exposure, were maintained in culture, and the micronuclei frequency evaluated after 4 and 6 subcultures. These cells were harvested at 24 and 36 days after the exposure. There was no dose-response detected in these cultures and no signs of genomic instability at either sample time.

  2. Ultraviolet induced DNA damage and hereditary skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Francis, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Clearly, cells from normal individuals possess the ability to repair a variety of damage to DNA. Numerous studies indicate that defects in DNA repair may increase an individual's susceptibility to cancer. It is hoped that continued studies of the exact structural changes produced in the DNA by environmental insults, and the correlation of specific DNA changes with particulr cellular events, such as DNA repair, will lead to a better understanding of cell-killing, mutagenesis and carbinogenesis. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  3. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  4. Few-cycle pulse laser-induced damage of thin films in air and vacuum ambience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Kyle R. P.; Talisa, Noah; Tempea, Gabriel; Austin, Drake R.; Neacsu, Catalin; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced damage mechanisms were investigated for an ultra-broadband chirped mirror, as part of a systematic study of few-cycle pulse laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of widely-used ultra-broadband optics, in vacuum and in air, for single and multi-pulse regimes (S-on-1). Microscopic analysis of damage morphology suggests that three different damage mechanisms occur across the fluence range 0.15-0.4J/cm2, while no ablation was yet observed. The three regimes resulted in shallow swelling (< 10 nm tall), tall blistering ( 150 nm tall), and annular blistering (damage suppressed at highest intensity, forming a ring shape). Descriptions of the potential mechanisms are discussed.

  5. A statistical mechanics model to predict electromigration induced damage and void growth in solder interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuexing; Yao, Yao; Keer, Leon M.

    2017-02-01

    Electromigration is an irreversible mass diffusion process with damage accumulation in microelectronic materials and components under high current density. Based on experimental observations, cotton type voids dominate the electromigration damage accumulation prior to cracking in the solder interconnect. To clarify the damage evolution process corresponding to cotton type void growth, a statistical model is proposed to predict the stochastic characteristic of void growth under high current density. An analytical solution of the cotton type void volume growth over time is obtained. The synchronous electromigration induced damage accumulation is predicted by combining the statistical void growth and the entropy increment. The electromigration induced damage evolution in solder joints is developed and applied to verify the tensile strength deterioration of solder joints due to electromigration. The predictions agree well with the experimental results.

  6. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Membrane Interactions: Effects of Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxue; St Clair, Johnna R; London, Erwin; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2017-01-17

    Amyloid formation by islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) contributes to β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Perturbation of the β-cell membrane may contribute to IAPP-induced toxicity. We examine the effects of lipid composition, salt, and buffer on IAPP amyloid formation and on the ability of IAPP to induce leakage of model membranes. Even low levels of anionic lipids promote amyloid formation and membrane permeabilization. Increasing the percentage of the anionic lipids, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (POPS) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho(1'-rac-glycerol), enhances the rate of amyloid formation and increases the level of membrane permeabilization. The choice of zwitterionic lipid has no noticeable effect on membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation but in most cases affects leakage, which tends to decrease in the following order: 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > sphingomyelin. Uncharged lipids that increase the level of membrane order weaken the ability of IAPP to induce leakage. Leakage is due predominately to pore formation rather than complete disruption of the vesicles under the conditions used in these studies. Cholesterol at or below physiological levels significantly reduces the rate of vesicle-catalyzed IAPP amyloid formation and decreases the susceptibility to IAPP-induced leakage. The effects of cholesterol on amyloid formation are masked by 25 mol % POPS. Overall, there is a strong inverse correlation between the time to form amyloid and the extent of vesicle leakage. NaCl reduces the rate of membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation by anionic vesicles, but accelerates amyloid formation in solution. The implications for IAPP membrane interactions are discussed, as is the possibility that the loss of phosphatidylserine asymmetry enhances IAPP amyloid formation and membrane damage in vivo via a positive feedback loop.

  7. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  8. Single-molecule visualization of ROS-induced DNA damage in large DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Yongkyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-02-07

    We present a single molecule visualization approach for the quantitative analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced DNA damage, such as base oxidation and single stranded breaks in large DNA molecules. We utilized the Fenton reaction to generate DNA damage with subsequent enzymatic treatment using a mixture of three types of glycosylases to remove oxidized bases, and then fluorescent labeling on damaged lesions via nick translation. This single molecule analytical platform provided the capability to count one or two damaged sites per λ DNA molecule (48.5 kb), which were reliably dependent on the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ion at the micromolar level. More importantly, the labeled damaged sites that were visualized under a microscope provided positional information, which offered the capability of comparing DNA damaged sites with the in silico genomic map to reveal sequence specificity that GTGR is more sensitive to oxidative damage. Consequently, single DNA molecule analysis provides a sensitive analytical platform for ROS-induced DNA damage and suggests an interesting biochemical insight that the genome primarily active during the lysogenic cycle may have less probability for oxidative DNA damage.

  9. Gamma irradiation of isolated rat islets pretransplantation produces indefinite allograft survival in cyclosporine-treated recipients

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.F.; Lake, S.P.; Chamberlain, J.; Thirdborough, S.; Bassett, P.D.; Mistry, N.; Bell, P.R.

    1989-06-01

    In this study we have examined the use of low-dose gamma-irradiation for the reduction of islet immunogenicity in the strong allogeneic combination of WAG rat islets transplanted into diabetic AUG recipients. First, we determined that gamma-irradiation reduced immunogenicity in vitro by use of a modified MLR with WAG islets as stimulators and AUG splenocytes as responders. We then determined the maximum dose of gamma-irradiation that could be used (250 rads) before islet function was affected. As 250 rads islet pretreatment alone was ineffective in prolonging allograft survival, we combined the pretreatment with a short course (days 0, 1, 2; 30 mg/kg) of cyclosporine. We found that CsA was only effective in significantly prolonging allograft survival when given subcutaneously in olive oil. The CsA treatment alone gave a significantly prolonged survival time for the islet allografts (median, 37 days vs. 6 days for controls), but when combined with the 250 rads islet pretreatment a synergistic effect was seen with 100% becoming long-term survivors (greater than 100 days). The long-term surviving AUG rats from both the CsA alone group and the CsA plus 250 rads pretreated islets group were challenged with WAG dendritic cells (DC). The islets from the 250 rads pretreated group were subsequently rejected (day 6) while the CsA alone group were not affected. The role of low dose gamma-irradiation when combined with CsA treatment of islet graft recipients in inducing specific unresponsiveness will be discussed.

  10. The ATM Kinase Induces MicroRNA Biogenesis in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinna; Wan, Guohui; Berger, Franklin G.; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The DNA damage response involves a complex network of processes that detect and repair DNA damage. Here we show that miRNA biogenesis is globally induced upon DNA damage in an ATM-dependent manner. About one fourth of miRNAs are significantly up-regulated after DNA damage, while loss of ATM abolishes their induction. KSRP (KH-type splicing regulatory protein) is a key player that translates DNA damage signaling to miRNA biogenesis. The ATM kinase directly binds to and phosphorylates KSRP, leading to enhanced interaction between KSRP and pri-miRNAs and increased KSRP activity in miRNA processing. Mutations of the ATM phosphorylation sites of KSRP impaired its activity in regulating miRNAs. These findings reveal a mechanism by which DNA damage signaling is linked to miRNA biogenesis. PMID:21329876

  11. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease.

  12. Fracture Induced Sub-Band Absorption as a Precursor to Optical Damage on Fused Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Suratwala, T I; Shen, N; Laurence, T A; Steele, W A; Menapace, J; Feit, M D; Wong, L L

    2010-03-05

    The optical damage threshold of indentation induced flaws on fused silica surfaces was explored. Mechanical flaws were characterized by laser damaged testing, SEM, optical, and photoluminescence microscopy. Localized polishing, chemical etching, and the control of indentation morphology were used to isolate the structural features which limit optical damage. A thin defect layer on fracture surfaces, including those smaller than the wavelength of visible light, was found to be the dominant source of laser damage initiation during illumination with 355nm, 3ns laser pulses. Little evidence was found that either displaced or densified material or fluence intensification plays a significant role in optical damage at fluences >35J/cm{sup 2}. Elimination of the defect layer was shown to increase the overall damage performance of fused silica optics.

  13. The effect of phytosterol protects rats against 4-nitrophenol-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaqin; Song, Meiyan; Li, Yansen; Zhang, Yonghui; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Li, ChunMei

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of phytosterol (PS) in regard to liver damage induced by 4-nitrophenol (PNP). Twenty rats were randomly divided into four groups (Control, PS, PNP, and PNP+PS). The PS and PNP+PS groups were pretreated with PS for one week. The PNP and PNP+PS groups were injected subcutaneously with PNP for 28 days. The control group received a basal diet and was injected with vehicle alone. Treatment with PS prevented the elevation of the total bilirubin levels, as well as an increase in serum alkaline transaminase and aspartate transaminase, which are typically caused by PNP-induced liver damage. Histopathologically showed that liver damage was significantly mitigated by PS treatment. However, there was no significant change in antioxidant enzyme activities, and the Nrf2-antioxidant system was not activated after treatment with PS. These results suggest that PS could mitigate liver damage induced by PNP, but does not enhance antioxidant capacity.

  14. Exercise Ameliorates Endocrine Pancreas Damage Induced by Chronic Cola Drinking in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Losada, Matilde; González, Julián; Müller, Angélica; Ottaviano, Graciela; Cao, Gabriel; Azzato, Francisco; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Milei, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates whether the daily practice of an exercise routine might protect from endocrine pancreas damage in cola drinking rats. Methods Forty-eight Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups depending on a) beverage consumption ad libitum, water (W) or cola beverage (C), and b) physical activity, sedentary (S) or treadmill running (R). Accordingly, 4 groups were studied: WS (water sedentary), WR (water runner), CS (cola sedentary) and CR (cola runner). Body weight, nutritional data, plasma levels of glucose, creatinine, total cholesterol and cholesterol fractions, and triglycerides (enzymocolorimetry), and systolic blood pressure (plethysmography) were measured. After 6 months, euthanasia was performed (overdose sodium thiopental). Pancreatic tissue was immediately excised and conventionally processed for morphometrical and immunohistochemical determinations. Results The effects of running and chronic cola drinking on pancreas morphology showed interaction (p<0.001) rather than simple summation. Cola drinking (CS vs WS) reduced median pancreatic islet area (-30%, 1.8 104 μm2 vs 2.58 104 μm2, p<0.0001) and median β-cell mass (-43%, 3.81 mg vs 6.73 mg, p<0.0001), and increased median α/β ratio (+49%, 0.64 vs 0.43, p< 0.001). In water drinking rats (WR vs WS), running reduced median α-cell mass (-48%, 1.48 mg vs 2.82 mg, p<0.001) and α/β ratio (-56%, 0.19 vs 0.43, p<0.0001). Differently, in cola drinking rats (CR vs CS), running partially restored median islet area (+15%, 2.06 104 μm2 vs 1.79 104 μm2, p<0.05), increased median β-cell mass (+47%, 5.59 mg vs 3.81 mg, p <0.0001) and reduced median α/β ratio (-6%, 0.60 vs 0.64, p<0.05). Conclusion This study is likely the first reporting experimental evidence of the beneficial effect of exercise on pancreatic morphology in cola-drinking rats. Presently, the increase of nearly 50% in β cells mass by running in cola drinking rats is by far the most relevant finding. Moderate running

  15. Enzymes for Pancreatic Islet Isolation Impact Chemokine-Production and Polarization of Insulin-Producing β-Cells with Reduced Functional Survival of Immunoisolated Rat Islet-Allografts as a Consequence

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Paul; Smink, Alexandra M.; Paredes, Genaro; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Kuipers, Jeroen; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; de Haan, Bart J.; Faas, Marijke M.

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether normal variations in enzyme-activities of collagenases applied for rat-islet isolation impact longevity of encapsulated islet grafts. Also we studied the functional and immunological properties of rat islets isolated with different enzyme preparations to determine whether this impacts these parameters. Rat-islets were isolated from the pancreas with two different collagenases with commonly accepted collagenase, neutral protease, and clostripain activities. Islets had a similar and acceptable glucose-induced insulin-release profile but a profound statistical significant difference in production of the chemokines IP-10 and Gro-α. The islets were studied with nanotomy which is an EM-based technology for unbiased study of ultrastructural features of islets such as cell-cell contacts, endocrine-cell condition, ER stress, mitochondrial conditions, and cell polarization. The islet-batch with higher chemokine-production had a lower amount of polarized insulin-producing β-cells. All islets had more intercellular spaces and less interconnected areas with tight cell-cell junctions when compared to islets in the pancreas. Islet-graft function was studied by implanting encapsulated and free islet grafts in rat recipients. Alginate-based encapsulated grafts isolated with the enzyme-lot inducing higher chemokine production and lower polarization survived for a two-fold shorter period of time. The lower survival-time of the encapsulated grafts was correlated with a higher influx of inflammatory cells at 7 days after implantation. Islets from the same two batches transplanted as free unencapsulated-graft, did not show any difference in survival or function in vivo. Lack of insight in factors contributing to the current lab-to-lab variation in longevity of encapsulated islet-grafts is considered to be a threat for clinical application. Our data suggest that seemingly minor variations in activity of enzymes applied for islet

  16. Classification of microscopy images of Langerhans islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å vihlík, Jan; Kybic, Jan; Habart, David; Berková, Zuzana; Girman, Peter; Kříž, Jan; Zacharovová, Klára

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of images of Langerhans islets is a crucial procedure for planning an islet transplantation, which is a promising diabetes treatment. This paper deals with segmentation of microscopy images of Langerhans islets and evaluation of islet parameters such as area, diameter, or volume (IE). For all the available images, the ground truth and the islet parameters were independently evaluated by four medical experts. We use a pixelwise linear classifier (perceptron algorithm) and SVM (support vector machine) for image segmentation. The volume is estimated based on circle or ellipse fitting to individual islets. The segmentations were compared with the corresponding ground truth. Quantitative islet parameters were also evaluated and compared with parameters given by medical experts. We can conclude that accuracy of the presented fully automatic algorithm is fully comparable with medical experts.

  17. Human pancreatic islets develop through fusion of distinct β and α/δ islets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inchul

    2016-10-01

    Human pancreatic islets show unique architecture in which α and δ cells are mostly at the peripheral and perivascular areas. It has remained unknown how such prototype is realized in every islet. Here, I report that fetal islets develop first in two distinct types consisting of β or α/δ cells, respectively. The α/δ islets are variable in shape, composed of α and δ cells evenly intermixed. They are vascularized better but encapsulated poorer than β islets in general. During the development, the β and α/δ islets adjoin and fuse with each other in such a way that α and δ cells form a crescent on β cells and, then, progress to encompass and encroach into β cells. Most mature-form islets appear to develop through the fusion. Islets at various stages of fusion are present concurrently until late gestation, suggesting that the islet fusion is an ongoing developmental process. The α/δ islets appear to play a primary role for the process, approaching toward the fusion partner actively. Direct connection is present between the α/δ islets and neural ganglia undergoing active neurogenesis, suggesting an organ-wide neuroendocrine network development. The fusion of precursor islets appears to be a principle of human pancreatic development providing the prototype of mature islets. The complex development might be a reference for in vitro reproduction of biologically competent islets.

  18. Control of islet intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by interferon-alpha and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, D; Huang, X; Beck, J; Henrich, J; McFarland, N; James, R F; Stewart, T A

    1996-10-01

    The ability of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) to induce the adhesion molecules that characterize the islets of patients with type I diabetes has been investigated. We have found that all tested recombinant IFN-as will induce major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I on arterial endothelial cells. Some but not all IFN-as will induce intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). However, there is only a transient and modest increase in VCAM on arterial endothelial cells. IFN-alpha has very little effect on endothelial MHC class II expression but will induce these proteins on monocytes. Thus, there is a close concordance between the biological actions of IFN-alpha and the appearance of those adhesion molecules induced in the islets of patients with type I diabetes. IFN-alpha is also produced in normal human islets during short-term cultures, probably as a result of the ischemia present at the center of the islet. This induction of IFN-alpha by hypoxia may explain the previously reported spontaneous induction of ICAM-1 in human islets and may also be a contributing factor to the failure of islet grafts.

  19. Laser induced damage in optical materials: eleventh ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1980-07-15

    The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30-31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September-1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  20. Multiscale physics of ion-induced radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, A V

    2014-01-01

    This is a review of a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in the radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We describe different effects that take place on different scales and play major roles in the scenario of interaction of ions with tissue. The understanding of these effects allows an assessment of relative biological effectiveness that relates the physical quantities, such as dose, to the biological values, such as the probability of cell survival.

  1. Impaired repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Cramers, Patricia; Verhoeven, Esther E; Filon, A Ronald; Rockx, Davy A P; Santos, Susy J; van der Leer, Anneke A; Kleinjans, Jos C S; van Zeeland, Albert A; Mullenders, Leon H F

    2011-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR) and sensitive to oxidizing agents, including ionizing radiation. We examined the hypothesis that TCR plays a role in ionizing radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage repair or alternatively that CS plays a role in transcription elongation after irradiation. Irradiation with doses up to 100 Gy did not inhibit RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription in normal and CS-B fibroblasts. In contrast, RNA polymerase I-dependent transcription was severely inhibited at 5 Gy in normal cells, indicating different mechanisms of transcription response to X rays. The frequency of radiation-induced base damage was 2 × 10(-7) lesions/base/Gy, implying that 150 Gy is required to induce one lesion/30-kb transcription unit; no TCR of X-ray-induced base damage in the p53 gene was observed. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that defective TCR underlies the sensitivity of CS to ionizing radiation. Overall genome repair levels of radiation-induced DNA damage measured by repair replication were significantly reduced in CS-A and CS-B cells. Taken together, the results do not provide evidence for a key role of TCR in repair of radiation-induced oxidative damages in human cells; rather, impaired repair of oxidative lesions throughout the genome may contribute to the CS phenotype.

  2. Dissecting the molecular mechanism of ionizing radiation-induced tissue damage in the feather follicle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage.

  3. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  4. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  5. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  6. Effects of cholesterol on pore formation in lipid bilayers induced by human islet amyloid polypeptide fragments: A coarse-grained molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weixin; Wei, Guanghong; Su, Haibin; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Mu, Yuguang

    2011-11-01

    Disruption of the cellular membrane by the amyloidogenic peptide, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), has been considered as one of the mechanisms of β-cell death during type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal region (residues 1-19) of the human version of IAPP is suggested to be primarily responsible for the membrane-disrupting effect of the full-length hIAPP peptide. However, the detailed assembly mode of hIAPP1-19 with membrane remains unclear. To gain insight into the interactions of hIAPP1-19 oligomer with the model membrane, we have employed coarse-grained molecular dynamics self-assembly simulations to study the aggregation of hIAPP1-19 fragments in the binary lipid made of zwitterionic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and anionic dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) in the presence and absence of different levels of cholesterol content. The membrane-destabilizing effect of hIAPP1-19 is found to be modulated by the presence of cholesterol. In the absence of cholesterol, hIAPP1-19 aggregates prefer to locate inside the bilayer, forming pore-like assemblies. While in the presence of cholesterol molecules, the lipid bilayer becomes more ordered and stiff, and the hIAPP1-19 aggregates are dominantly positioned at the bilayer-water interface. The action of cholesterol may suggest a possible way to maintain the membrane integrity by small molecule interference.

  7. UV-induced DNA damage in Cyclops abyssorum tatricus populations from clear and turbid alpine lakes

    PubMed Central

    Tartarotti, Barbara; Saul, Nadine; Chakrabarti, Shumon; Trattner, Florian; Steinberg, Christian E. W.; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Zooplankton from clear alpine lakes thrive under high levels of solar UV radiation (UVR), but in glacially turbid ones they are more protected from this damaging radiation. Here, we present results from experiments done with Cyclops abyssorum tatricus to assess UV-induced DNA damage and repair processes using the comet assay. Copepods were collected from three alpine lakes of differing UV transparency ranging from clear to glacially turbid, and exposed to artificial UVR. In addition, photoprotection levels [mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and lipophilic antioxidant capacity] were estimated in the test populations. Similar UV-induced DNA damage levels were observed among the copepods from all lakes, but background DNA damage (time zero and dark controls) was lowest in the copepods from the glacially turbid lake, resulting in a higher relative DNA damage accumulation. Most DNA strand breaks were repaired after recovery in the dark. Low MAA concentrations were found in the copepods from the glacially turbid lake, while the highest levels were observed in the population from the most UV transparent lake. However, the highest lipophilic antioxidant capacities were measured in the copepods from the lake with intermediate UV transparency. Photoprotection and the ability to repair DNA damage, and consequently reducing UV-induced damage, are part of the response mechanisms in zooplankton to changes in water transparency caused by glacier retreat. PMID:24616551

  8. Toxoplasma gondii infection can induce retinal DNA damage: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Aly, Eman Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    AIM To detect whether Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection of mice can induce retinal DNA damage. METHODS A total of 20 laboratory-bred male Swiss albino mice were used and divided into four groups: control group (non-infected animals); T. gondii infected group; immunosuppressed infected group; and infected group treated with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine. Mice eyes were collected 6wk post infection and retinas were obtained. Each retina was immediately processed for comet assay and the frequency of tailed nuclei (DNA damage) was calculated. In addition, retinal DNA damage was revealed by various comet assay parameters that were provided by the image analysis software including tail length, percentage of DNA in the tail, percentage of tailed cells and tail moment. RESULTS The obtained results showed that T. gondii infection induced a statistically significant increase in the frequency of tailed nuclei, tail length, percentage of DNA in the tail, and tail moment in mice retinal cells compared to the control group (which showed some degree of DNA damage). In immunosuppressed infected group, retinal DNA damage was severing and there was significant increase in various comet assay parameters compared to both control and infected groups. After treatment with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine, retinal DNA damage decreased and all comet assay parameters showed a statistical significant decrease compared to infected groups. CONCLUSION T. gondii infection can induce DNA damage in mice retinal cells. PMID:24967186

  9. Effects of fatigue induced damage on the longitudinal fracture resistance of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Lloyd; Codrington, John; Parkinson, Ian

    2014-07-01

    As a composite material, cortical bone accumulates fatigue microdamage through the repetitive loading of everyday activity (e.g. walking). The accumulation of fatigue microdamage is thought to contribute to the occurrence of fragility fractures in older people. Therefore it is beneficial to understand the relationship between microcrack accumulation and the fracture resistance of cortical bone. Twenty longitudinally orientated compact tension fracture specimens were machined from a single bovine femur, ten specimens were assigned to both the control and fatigue damaged groups. The damaged group underwent a fatigue loading protocol to induce microdamage which was assessed via fluorescent microscopy. Following fatigue loading, non-linear fracture resistance tests were undertaken on both the control and damaged groups using the J-integral method. The interaction of the crack path with the fatigue induced damage and inherent toughening mechanisms were then observed using fluorescent microscopy. The results of this study show that fatigue induced damage reduces the initiation toughness of cortical bone and the growth toughness within the damage zone by three distinct mechanisms of fatigue-fracture interaction. Further analysis of the J-integral fracture resistance showed both the elastic and plastic component were reduced in the damaged group. For the elastic component this was attributed to a decreased number of ligament bridges in the crack wake while for the plastic component this was attributed to the presence of pre-existing fatigue microcracks preventing energy absorption by the formation of new microcracks.

  10. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2013-07-05

    Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb(3+)). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb(3+) emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb(3+)/hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36±1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage.

  11. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  12. RNA m(6)A methylation regulates the ultraviolet-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Laurent, Benoit; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Lu, Zhike; Sheng, Wanqiang; Xu, Chuanyun; Chen, Hao; Ouyang, Jian; Wang, Siqing; Ling, Dominic; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Zou, Lee; Jambhekar, Ashwini; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2017-03-23

    Cell proliferation and survival require the faithful maintenance and propagation of genetic information, which are threatened by the ubiquitous sources of DNA damage present intracellularly and in the external environment. A system of DNA repair, called the DNA damage response, detects and repairs damaged DNA and prevents cell division until the repair is complete. Here we report that methylation at the 6 position of adenosine (m(6)A) in RNA is rapidly (within 2 min) and transiently induced at DNA damage sites in response to ultraviolet irradiation. This modification occurs on numerous poly(A)(+) transcripts and is regulated by the methyltransferase METTL3 (methyltransferase-like 3) and the demethylase FTO (fat mass and obesity-associated protein). In the absence of METTL3 catalytic activity, cells showed delayed repair of ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine adducts and elevated sensitivity to ultraviolet, demonstrating the importance of m(6)A in the ultraviolet-responsive DNA damage response. Multiple DNA polymerases are involved in the ultraviolet response, some of which resynthesize DNA after the lesion has been excised by the nucleotide excision repair pathway, while others participate in trans-lesion synthesis to allow replication past damaged lesions in S phase. DNA polymerase κ (Pol κ), which has been implicated in both nucleotide excision repair and trans-lesion synthesis, required the catalytic activity of METTL3 for immediate localization to ultraviolet-induced DNA damage sites. Importantly, Pol κ overexpression qualitatively suppressed the cyclobutane pyrimidine removal defect associated with METTL3 loss. Thus, we have uncovered a novel function for RNA m(6)A modification in the ultraviolet-induced DNA damage response, and our findings collectively support a model in which m(6)A RNA serves as a beacon for the selective, rapid recruitment of Pol κ to damage sites to facilitate repair and cell survival.

  13. Single-cell analysis challenges the connection between autophagy and senescence induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Bueno e Silva, Mardja Manssur; Thomé, Marcos Paulo; Lenz, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy and senescence have been described as central features of cell biology, but the interplay between these mechanisms remains obscure. Using a therapeutically relevant model of DNA damage-induced senescence in human glioma cells, we demonstrated that acute treatment with temozolomide induces DNA damage, a transitory activation of PRKAA/AMPK-ULK1 and MAPK14/p38 and the sustained inhibition of AKT-MTOR. This produced a transient induction of autophagy, which was followed by senescence. However, at the single cell level, this coordinated transition was not observed, and autophagy and senescence were triggered in a very heterogeneous manner. Indeed, at a population level, autophagy was highly negatively correlated with senescence markers, while in single cells this correlation did not exist. The inhibition of autophagy triggered apoptosis and decreased senescence, while its activation increased temozolomide-induced senescence, showing that DNA damage-induced autophagy acts by suppressing apoptosis.

  14. Regulation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis by the c-Abl tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-Min; Huang, Yinyin; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Kharbanda, Surender; Weichselbaum, Ralph; Kufe, Donald

    1997-01-01

    Activation of the c-Abl protein tyrosine kinase by certain DNA-damaging agents contributes to down-regulation of Cdk2 and G1 arrest by a p53-dependent mechanism. The present work investigates the potential role of c-Abl in apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Transient transfection studies with wild-type, but not kinase-inactive, c-Abl demonstrate induction of apoptosis. Cells that stably express inactive c-Abl exhibit resistance to ionizing radiation-induced loss of clonogenic survival and apoptosis. Cells null for c-abl are also impaired in the apoptotic response to ionizing radiation. We further show that cells deficient in p53 undergo apoptosis in response to expression of c-Abl and exhibit decreases in radiation-induced apoptosis when expressing inactive c-Abl. These findings suggest that c-Abl kinase regulates DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:9037071

  15. Coupling statistics and heat transfer to study laser-induced crystal damage by nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, Guillaume; Dyan, Anthony

    2007-04-16

    By coupling statistics and heat transfer, we investigate numerically laser-induced crystal damage by multi-gigawatt nanosecond pulses. Our model is based on the heating of nanometric absorbing defects that may cooperate when sufficiently aggregated. In that configuration, they induce locally a strong increase of temperature that may lead to a subsequent damage. This approach allows to predict cluster size distribution and damage probabilities as a function of the laser fluence. By studying the influence of the pulse duration onto the laser-induced damage threshold, we have established scaling laws that link the critical laser fluence to its pulse duration tau. In particular, this approach provides an explanation to the deviation from the standard tau(1/2) scaling law that has been recently observed in laser-induced damage experiments with KH(2)PO(4) (KDP) crystals [J.J. Adams et al., Proc. of SPIE 5991, 5991R-1 (2005)]. In the present paper, despite the 3D problem is tackled, we focus our attention on a 1D modeling of thermal diffusion that is shown to provide more reliable predictions than the 3D one. These results indicate that absorbers involved in KDP damage may be associated with a collection of planar defects. First general comparisons with some experimental facts have been performed.

  16. A Topical Mitochondria-Targeted Redox-Cycling Nitroxide Mitigates Oxidative Stress-Induced Skin Damage.

    PubMed

    Brand, Rhonda M; Epperly, Michael W; Stottlemyer, J Mark; Skoda, Erin M; Gao, Xiang; Li, Song; Huq, Saiful; Wipf, Peter; Kagan, Valerian E; Greenberger, Joel S; Falo, Louis D

    2017-03-01

    Skin is the largest human organ, and it provides a first line of defense that includes physical, chemical, and immune mechanisms to combat environmental stress. Radiation is a prevalent environmental stressor. Radiation-induced skin damage ranges from photoaging and cutaneous carcinogenesis caused by UV exposure, to treatment-limiting radiation dermatitis associated with radiotherapy, to cutaneous radiation syndrome, a frequently fatal consequence of exposures from nuclear accidents. The major mechanism of skin injury common to these exposures is radiation-induced oxidative stress. Efforts to prevent or mitigate radiation damage have included development of antioxidants capable of reducing reactive oxygen species. Mitochondria are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis plays a major role in radiation-induced tissue damage. We reasoned that targeting a redox cycling nitroxide to mitochondria could prevent reactive oxygen species accumulation, limiting downstream oxidative damage and preserving mitochondrial function. Here we show that in both mouse and human skin, topical application of a mitochondrially targeted antioxidant prevents and mitigates radiation-induced skin damage characterized by clinical dermatitis, loss of barrier function, inflammation, and fibrosis. Further, damage mitigation is associated with reduced apoptosis, preservation of the skin's antioxidant capacity, and reduction of irreversible DNA and protein oxidation associated with oxidative stress.

  17. Depletion of enteric bacteria diminishes leukocyte infiltration following doxorubicin-induced small intestinal damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jacquelyn S.; King, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims While enteric bacteria have been shown to play a critical role in other forms of intestinal damage, their role in mediating the response to the chemotherapeutic drug Doxorubicin (Doxo) is unclear. In this study, we used a mouse model of intestinal bacterial depletion to evaluate the role enteric bacteria play in mediating Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and, more specifically, in mediating chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration following Doxo treatment. An understanding of this pathway may allow for development of intervention strategies to reduce chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage. Methods Mice were treated with (Abx) or without (NoAbx) oral antibiotics in drinking water for four weeks and then with Doxo. Jejunal tissues were collected at various time points following Doxo treatment and stained and analyzed for apoptosis, crypt damage and restitution, and macrophage and neutrophil number. In addition, RNA expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL1-β, IL-10) and cytokines (CCL2, CC7, KC) was assessed by qRT-PCR. Results In NoAbx mice Doxo-induced damage was associated with rapid induction of apoptosis in jejunal crypt epithelium and an increase weight loss and crypt loss. In addition, we observed an increase in immune-modulating chemokines CCL2, CCL7 and KC and infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils. In contrast, while still positive for induction of apoptosis following Doxo treatment, Abx mice showed neither the overall weight loss nor crypt loss seen in NoAbx mice nor the increased chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration. Conclusion Enteric bacteria play a critical role in Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and are associated with an increase in immune-modulating chemokines and cells. Manipulation of enteric bacteria or the damage pathway may allow for prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage. PMID:28257503

  18. DNA damage as an indicator of pollutant-induced genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    Biological monitoring is an approach of considerable interest to scientists in the field of environmental genotoxicity who are investigating the effects of hazardous substances on the biota. In essence the technique involves an evaluation of various types of responses in living organisms for their potential to identify exposure to dangerous substances and to define or to predict subsequent deleterious effects. The rationale for the selection of DNA damage as an indicator of exposure to genotoxic agents is based mainly on the mechanisms of action of chemicals that are known mutagens and carcinogens. An alkaline unwinding assay that detects excess strand breakage within the DNA polymer was applied to sunfish in a local stream as a biological monitor for environmental genotoxicity due to industrial pollution. The study was conducted over a period of 15 months and the temporal and spatial aspects of the data were evaluated for the effect of remedial action. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Oxidative damage induced in Vicia faba by coke plant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxiang; Lv, Yongkang

    2011-10-01

    The present study investigated toxic impacts of coke plant wastewater over a concentration gradient of COD( Cr) 40-640 mg/l on malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) in roots and leaves of Vicia faba. MDA levels and SOD activities were significantly increased at all concentrations both in roots and leaves of Vicia faba; CAT and POD activities were significantly enhanced in roots at low concentrations and were significantly decreased at high concentrations (COD(Cr) 320 and 640 mg/l for CAT; COD( Cr) 640 mg/l for POD). In leaves, CAT and POD activities remained enhanced at all concentration and did not show significant difference at COD( Cr) 640 mg/l for CAT and COD(Cr) 40, 640 mg/l for POD. These results suggest that coke plant wastewater can cause oxidative damage in roots and leaves of Vicia faba and root enzymes seemed more sensitive to the wastewater.

  20. Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yijun; Zhu, Duming

    2016-01-01

    Since it was proposed in 2007, molecular hydrogen therapy has been widely concerned and researched. Many animal experiments were carried out in a variety of disease fields, such as cerebral infarction, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, radiation injury, chronic hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, stress ulcer, acute sports injuries, mitochondrial and inflammatory disease, and acute erythema skin disease and other pathological processes or diseases. Molecular hydrogen therapy is pointed out as there is protective effect for sepsis patients, too. The impact of molecular hydrogen therapy against sepsis is shown from the aspects of basic vital signs, organ functions (brain, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, etc.), survival rate, and so forth. Molecular hydrogen therapy is able to significantly reduce the release of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress injury. Thereby it can reduce damage of various organ functions from sepsis and improve survival rate. Molecular hydrogen therapy is a prospective method against sepsis.

  1. Oxidative damage of the male reproductive system induced by paraquat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jin-Yan; Lu, Xiao-Ning; Zheng, Peng-Sheng; Xue, Xiang

    2016-10-20

    The effects of paraquat (PQ) on the male reproductive system are unclear. In this study, male rats were divided into four groups (0, 0.5, 2, and 8 mg/kg) and treated with PQ by oral gavage for 8 weeks. At the end of the experiment, a significant decline in sperm count, motility, and viability and an increase in teratospermia were observed in the PQ-treated group (P < 0.05). Further investigation found that PQ resulted in enhanced lipid peroxidation and more apoptosis in the testis tissues, and apoptosis was likely to be associated with activation of the mitochondrial pathway. In summary, our study demonstrated oxidative damage due to PQ on the male reproductive system.

  2. Hypothyroidism Affects Vascularization and Promotes Immune Cells Infiltration into Pancreatic Islets of Female Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castelán, Julia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Castelán, Francisco; Cuevas, Estela

    2015-01-01

    Thyroidectomy induces pancreatic edema and immune cells infiltration similarly to that observed in pancreatitis. In spite of the controverted effects of hypothyroidism on serum glucose and insulin concentrations, the number and proliferation of Langerhans islet cells as well as the presence of extracellular matrix are affected depending on the islet size. In this study, we evaluated the effect of methimazole-induced hypothyroidism on the vascularization and immune cells infiltration into islets. A general observation of pancreas was also done. Twelve Chinchilla-breed female adult rabbits were divided into control (n = 6) and hypothyroid groups (n = 6, methimazole, 0.02% in drinking water for 30 days). After the treatment, rabbits were sacrificed and their pancreas was excised, histologically processed, and stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) or Masson's Trichrome techniques. Islets were arbitrarily classified into large, medium, and small ones. The external and internal portions of each islet were also identified. Student-t-test and Mann-Whitney-U test or two-way ANOVAs were used to compare variables between groups. In comparison with control rabbits, hypothyroidism induced a strong infiltration of immune cells and a major presence of collagen and proteoglycans in the interlobular septa. Large islets showed a high vascularization and immune cells infiltration. The present results show that hypothyroidism induces pancreatitis and insulitis.

  3. Hypothyroidism Affects Vascularization and Promotes Immune Cells Infiltration into Pancreatic Islets of Female Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Castelán, Julia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Castelán, Francisco; Cuevas, Estela

    2015-01-01

    Thyroidectomy induces pancreatic edema and immune cells infiltration similarly to that observed in pancreatitis. In spite of the controverted effects of hypothyroidism on serum glucose and insulin concentrations, the number and proliferation of Langerhans islet cells as well as the presence of extracellular matrix are affected depending on the islet size. In this study, we evaluated the effect of methimazole-induced hypothyroidism on the vascularization and immune cells infiltration into islets. A general observation of pancreas was also done. Twelve Chinchilla-breed female adult rabbits were divided into control (n = 6) and hypothyroid groups (n = 6, methimazole, 0.02% in drinking water for 30 days). After the treatment, rabbits were sacrificed and their pancreas was excised, histologically processed, and stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) or Masson's Trichrome techniques. Islets were arbitrarily classified into large, medium, and small ones. The external and internal portions of each islet were also identified. Student-t-test and Mann-Whitney-U test or two-way ANOVAs were used to compare variables between groups. In comparison with control rabbits, hypothyroidism induced a strong infiltration of immune cells and a major presence of collagen and proteoglycans in the interlobular septa. Large islets showed a high vascularization and immune cells infiltration. The present results show that hypothyroidism induces pancreatitis and insulitis. PMID:26175757

  4. Laser induced damage in optical materials: twelfth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1981-09-01

    The twelfth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30 Sept.-l Oct., 1980. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-l, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific research. Over 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and West Germany. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning materials and measurements, mirrors and surfaces, thin films, and finally fundamental mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power systems. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the symposium. The thirteenth annual symposium is scheduled for 17-18 Nov. 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  5. Sulodexide prevents peripheral nerve damage in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Heung Yong; Lee, Kyung Ae; Song, Sun Kyung; Liu, Wei Jing; Choi, Ji Hae; Song, Chang Ho; Baek, Hong Sun; Park, Tae Sun

    2012-01-15

    We investigated whether sulodexide has additional protective effects against peripheral nerve damage caused by microvascular dysfunction in a rat model of diabetes. Female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into the following 4 groups (n=7-9/group): Normal, Normal+Sulodexide (sulodexide 10mg/kg), diabetic group, and diabetic+Sulodexide (sulodexide 10mg/kg). We assessed current perception threshold, skin blood flow, superoxide dismutase, and proteinuria in experimental rats after oral administration of sulodexide for 20 weeks. We also performed morphometric analysis of sciatic nerves and intraepidermal nerve fibers of the foot. Superoxide dismutase activity in the blood and sciatic nerve were increased significantly after sulodexide treatment in the diabetic group. Current perception threshold was reduced at 2000 Hz (633.3 ± 24.15 vs 741.2 ± 23.5 μA, P<0.05) and skin blood flow was improved (10.90 ± 0.67 vs 8.85 ± 0.49 TPU, P<0.05) in the diabetic+Sulodexide group compared with the diabetic group. The mean myelinated axon area was significantly larger (56.6 ± 2.2 vs 49.8 ± 2.7 μm(2), P<0.05) and the intraepidermal nerve fiber density was significantly less reduced (6.27 ± 0.24 vs 5.40 ± 0.25/mm, P<0.05) in the diabetic+Sulodexide group compared to the diabetic group. Our results demonstrate that sulodexide exhibits protective effects against peripheral nerve damage in a rat experimental model of diabetes. Therefore, these findings suggest that sulodexide is a potential new therapeutic agent for diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  6. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  7. Feasibility of islet magnetic resonance imaging using ferumoxytol in intraportal islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Man; Oh, Seung-Hoon; Oh, Bae Jun; Shim, Wooyoung; Choi, Jin Myung; Yoo, Dongkyeom; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Jung Hee; Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2015-06-01

    There is a clinical need for an alternative labeling agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in islet transplantation. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of islet MRI using ferumoxytol, which is the only clinically-available ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. We compared islet function and viability of control islets and islets labeled with ferumoxytol and/or a heparin-protamine complex (HPF). Efficacy of ferumoxytol labeling was assessed in both ex vivo and in vivo models. Labeling for 48 h with HPF, but not up to 800 μg/mL ferumoxytol, deranged ex vivo islet viability and function. The T2∗ relaxation time was optimal when islets were labeled with 800 μg/mL of ferumoxytol for 48 h. Prussian blue stain, iron content assay, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) supported internalization of ferumoxytol particles. However, the labeling intensity in the ex vivo MRI of islets labeled with ferumoxytol was much weaker than that of islets labeled with ferucarbotran. In syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation, there was a correlation between the total area of visualized islets and the transplanted islet mass. In conclusion, islet MRI using ferumoxytol was feasible in terms of in vitro and in vivo efficacy and safety. However, the weak labeling efficacy is still a hurdle for the clinical application.

  8. Transplantation of Heterospheroids of Islet Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Effective Angiogenesis and Antiapoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Youn; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Han, Jin; Bhang, Suk Ho; Jeong, Gun-Jae; Haque, Muhammad R.; Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Noh, Myungkyung

    2015-01-01

    Although islet transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for type 1 diabetes, there are efficiency concerns that are attributed to poor engraftment of transplanted islets. Hypoxic condition and delayed vasculogenesis induce necrosis and apoptosis of the transplanted islets. To overcome these limitations in islet transplantation, heterospheroids (HSs), which consist of rat islet cells (ICs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), were transplanted to the kidney and liver. The HSs cultured under the hypoxic condition system exhibited a significant increase in antiapoptotic gene expression in ICs. hMSCs in the HSs secreted angiogenic and antiapoptotic proteins. With the HS system, ICs and hMSCs were successfully located in the same area of the liver after transplantation of HSs through the portal vein, whereas the transplantation of islets and the dissociated hMSCs did not result in localization of transplanted ICs and hMSCs in the same area. HS transplantation resulted in an increase in angiogenesis at the transplantation area and a decrease in the apoptosis of transplanted ICs after transplantation into the kidney subcapsule compared with transplantation of islet cell clusters (ICCs). Insulin production levels of ICs were higher in the HS transplantation group compared with the ICC transplantation group. The HS system may be a more efficient transplantation method than the conventional methods for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25344077

  9. Small islets are essential for successful intraportal transplantation in a diabetes mouse model.

    PubMed

    Su, Z; Xia, J; Shao, W; Cui, Y; Tai, S; Ekberg, H; Corbascio, M; Chen, J; Qi, Z

    2010-12-01

    Optimization of islet transplantation protocols is necessary for improved success of treatment for type 1 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the size of islets transplanted into the portal vein (PV) of the liver can affect engraftment in the early post-transplantation in an experimental mouse model. Small (average diameter < 250 μm, group A) or large (average diameter > 250 μm, group B) islets (400 islet equivalents/recipient) purified from normal BALB/c mice were transplanted into syngenic recipients with diabetes induced by STZ. The percentage of mice returning to a non-diabetic status was higher in group A (100%) than that of group B (62.5%). Focal areas of liver necrosis associated with the islets emboli were observed in both groups, but the pathology in group B was significantly worse. Multiple proinflammatory cytokines were significantly higher in group B than that of A at 3 h post-transplantation. Our study determined that the size of islets plays a critical role in the success of intraportal islet transplantation (IPIT) and should be taken into account in future IPIT protocols for the treatment of diabetes.

  10. The Cartography of UV-induced DNA Damage Formation and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage presents a barrier to DNA-templated biochemical processes, including gene expression and faithful DNA replication. Compromised DNA repair leads to mutations, enhancing the risk for genetic diseases and cancer development. Conventional experimental approaches to study DNA damage required a researcher to choose between measuring bulk damage over the entire genome, with little or no resolution regarding a specific location, and obtaining data specific to a locus of interest, without a global perspective. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic tools overcame these limitations and provide high-resolution measurements simultaneously across the genome. In this review, we discuss the available methods for measuring DNA damage and their repair, focusing on genomewide assays for pyrimidine photodimers, the major types of damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These new genomic assays will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability and carcinogenesis.

  11. A protective effect of endomorphins on the oxidative injury of islet.

    PubMed

    Tian, L M; Liu, J; Sun, X L; Gao, C X; Fan, Y; Guo, Q

    2010-08-01

    The antioxidative capacity of endomorphins (EMs), endogenous μ-opioid receptor agonists, has been demonstrated by IN VIVO assays. In this study, we attempt to evaluate the effects of endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2) on pancreatic islet injuries induced by streptozotocin (STZ), alloxan (ALX) and H(2)O(2), respectively. Wistar rats' islets were isolated and purified. The function of the islet cells, the insulin response to glucose stimulation was examined by insulin Radio Immuno Assay and the cell viability was measured by MTT assay. DNA fragments were performed to evaluate the apoptosis, while the cell cycle distribution was analyzed by PI staining flow cytometric analysis. Furthermore, the islet were treated with EM1, EM2 or ALX for 24 h, and the expression of p53 and p21 protein were determined by Western blot. The results showed that STZ, ALX, and H(2)O(2) displayed clear concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on the pancreatic islet cells. While EMs improved the viability of islet induced by STZ, ALX or H(2)O(2), and EMs enhanced insulin accumulation of the cell supernatant after ALX and STZ stimulation. Our data also showed both that EMs inhibited cell apoptosis and cell cycle G1 arrest induced by STZ and ALX through down-regulaing p53 and p21 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that EMs can protect islet cells from STZ, ALX and H(2)O(2) induced injuries. Our observations imply that the endomorphins may have protective effects on islet cells oxidative injury.

  12. DNA Damage and Genomic Instability Induced by Inappropriate DNA Re-Replication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    ml a that sustained rereplication leads to a dramatic decrease factor. Samples were fixed in 67% ethanol (vol/vol), washed twice with PBS, and...significant decrease in cell viability and a cellular DNA damage response. Strikingly, we have observed DNA damage in the absence of a classical...genome re-replicates. In this reporting period, we have shown that re-replication induces a rapid and significant decrease in cell viability and a

  13. Analyzing electrostatic induced damage risk to reticles with an in situ e-reticle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Richard; Sebald, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    E-Reticle system is an electrostatic field test device, which has the form factor of a conventional six inch quartz production reticle. The E-Reticle was used to assess the ESD damage risks in a mask cleaning tool. Test results indicate that a reticle may see higher than ITRS recommended electrostatic potential specifications when mechanical operations and cold DIW rinse start and in progress, hence seeing increased probability of electrostatic induced damages.

  14. UVA-induced damage to DNA and proteins: direct versus indirect photochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, P. M.; Francesconi, S.; Pozzebon, M.; Graindorge, D.; Rochette, P.; Drouin, R.; Sage, E.

    2011-01-01

    UVA has long been known for generating an oxidative stress in cells. In this paper we review the different types of DNA damage induced by UVA, i.e. strand breaks, bipyrimidine photoproducts, and oxidatively damaged bases. Emphasis is given to the mechanism of formation that is further illustrated by the presentation of new in vitro data. Examples of oxidation of proteins involved in DNA metabolism are also given.

  15. Testis damage induced by zinc deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Merker, H J; Günther, T

    1997-04-01

    Male Wistar rats were fed a Zn-deficient diet (1.2 mg/kg of Zn) for 28 days. Testes were then studied by light and electron microscopy. Zn deficiency induced necroses of precursors of germ cells leading to tubular atrophy and affected differentiation of spermatids. This was expressed by the occurrence of 2-4 axoneme-dense fibre-mitochondria complexes in one spermatid. Moreover, outer dense fibres, which normally contain 90% of sperm Zn, were "uncoiled" and flattened. The multiplication of the axoneme-dense fibre-mitochondria complexes induced by Zn deficiency might have been produced by an increase of Fe in spermatids and an increased formation of oxygen free radicals.

  16. Brief Report: Elastin Microfibril Interface 1 and Integrin-Linked Protein Kinase Are Novel Markers of Islet Regenerative Function in Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Jessie R; Creskey, Marybeth M; Muradia, Gauri; Bell, Gillian I; Sherman, Stephen E; Gao, Jun; Stewart, Duncan J; Cyr, Terry D; Hess, David A; Rosu-Myles, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation is proposed as a novel therapy for treating diabetes by promoting the regeneration of damaged islets. The clinical promise of such treatments may be hampered by a high degree of donor-related variability in MSC function and a lack of standards for comparing potency. Here, we set out to identify markers of cultured human MSCs directly associated with islet regenerative function. Stromal cultures from nine separate bone marrow donors were demonstrated to have differing capacities to reduce hyperglycemia in the NOD/SCID streptozotocin-induced diabetic model. Regenerative (R) and non-regenerative (NR) MSC cultures were directly compared using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics. A total of 1,410 proteins were quantified resulting in the identification of 612 upregulated proteins and 275 downregulated proteins by ± 1.2-fold in R-MSC cultures. Elastin microfibril interface 1 (EMILIN-1), integrin-linked protein kinase (ILK), and hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) were differentially expressed in R-MSCs, and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses revealed each candidate as known regulators of integrin signaling. Western blot validation of EMILIN-1, ILK, and HDGF not only showed significantly higher abundance levels in R-MSCs, as compared with NR-MSCs, but also correlated with passage-induced loss of islet-regenerative potential. Generalized estimating equation modeling was applied to examine the association between each marker and blood glucose reduction. Both EMILIN-1 and ILK were significantly associated with blood glucose lowering function in vivo. Our study is the first to identify EMILIN-1 and ILK as prospective markers of islet regenerative function in human MSCs. Stem Cells 2016;34:2249-2255.

  17. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  18. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2003-06-10

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  19. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2001-12-21

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  20. Modeling of laser-induced damage and optic usage at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi M.; Nostrand, Mike; Carr, Wren; Bude, Jeff; Suratwala, Tayyab I.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of laser-induced optics damage has been introduced to benchmark existing optic usage at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which includes the number of optics exchanged for damage repair. NIF has pioneered an optics recycle strategy to allow it to run the laser at capacity since fully commissioned in 2009 while keeping the cost of optics usage manageable. We will show how the damage model is being used to evaluate strategies to streamline our optics loop efficiency, as we strive to increase the laser shot rate without increasing operating costs.

  1. Modeling electrical power absorption and thermally-induced biological tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Zohdi, T I

    2014-01-01

    This work develops a model for thermally induced damage from high current flow through biological tissue. Using the first law of thermodynamics, the balance of energy produced by the current and the energy absorbed by the tissue are investigated. The tissue damage is correlated with an evolution law that is activated upon exceeding a temperature threshold. As an example, the Fung material model is used. For certain parameter choices, the Fung material law has the ability to absorb relatively significant amounts of energy, due to its inherent exponential response character, thus, to some extent, mitigating possible tissue damage. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the model's behavior.

  2. Preliminary Results of Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Detection with Object-Based Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabuncu, A.; Uca Avci, Z. D.; Sunar, F.

    2016-06-01

    Earthquakes are the most destructive natural disasters, which result in massive loss of life, infrastructure damages and financial losses. Earthquake-induced building damage detection is a very important step after earthquakes since earthquake-induced building damage is one of the most critical threats to cities and countries in terms of the area of damage, rate of collapsed buildings, the damage grade near the epicenters and also building damage types for all constructions. Van-Ercis (Turkey) earthquake (Mw= 7.1) was occurred on October 23th, 2011; at 10:41 UTC (13:41 local time) centered at 38.75 N 43.36 E that places the epicenter about 30 kilometers northern part of the city of Van. It is recorded that, 604 people died and approximately 4000 buildings collapsed or seriously damaged by the earthquake. In this study, high-resolution satellite images of Van-Ercis, acquired by Quickbird-2 (Digital Globe Inc.) after the earthquake, were used to detect the debris areas using an object-based image classification. Two different land surfaces, having homogeneous and heterogeneous land covers, were selected as case study areas. As a first step of the object-based image processing, segmentation was applied with a convenient scale parameter and homogeneity criterion parameters. As a next step, condition based classification was used. In the final step of this preliminary study, outputs were compared with streetview/ortophotos for the verification and evaluation of the classification accuracy.

  3. The effect of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage at K9 and UBK7 components surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinda; Ba, Rongsheng; Zheng, Yinbo; Yuan, Jing; Li, Wenhong; Chen, Bo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage. We measured the damage threshold of K9 glass and UBK7 glass optical components at different pulse width, then analysis pulse-width dependence of damage threshold. It is shown that damage threshold at different pulse width conforms to thermal restriction mechanism, Because of cm size laser beam, defect on the optical component surface leads to laser-induced threshold decreased.

  4. Genetic damage induced by organic extract of coke oven emissions on human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qingfeng; Duan, Huawei; Wang, Yadong; Huang, Chuanfeng; Niu, Yong; Dai, Yufei; Bin, Ping; Liu, Qingjun; Chen, Wen; Ma, Junxiang; Zheng, Yuxin

    2012-08-01

    Coke oven emissions are known as human carcinogen, which is a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. In this study, we aimed to clarify the mechanism of action of coke oven emissions induced carcinogenesis and to identify biomarkers of early biological effects in a human bronchial epithelial cell line with CYP1A1 activity (HBE-CYP1A1). Particulate matter was collected in the oven area on glass filter, extracted and analyzed by GC/MS. DNA breaks and oxidative damage were evaluated by alkaline and endonucleases (FPG, hOGG1 and ENDO III)-modified comet assays. Cytotoxicity and chromosomal damage were assessed by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN-Cyt) assay. The cells were treated with organic extract of coke oven emissions (OE-COE) representing 5, 10, 20, 40μg/mL extract for 24h. We found that there was a dose-effect relationship between the OE-COE and the direct DNA damage presented by tail length, tail intensity and Olive tail moment in the comet assay. The presence of lesion-specific endonucleases in the assays increased DNA migration after OE-COE treatment when compared to those without enzymes, which indicated that OE-COE produced oxidative damage at the level of pyrimidine and purine bases. The dose-dependent increase of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds in exposed cells was significant, indicating chromosomal and genomic damage induced by OE-COE. Based on the cytotoxic biomarkers in CBMN-Cyt assay, OE-COE may inhibit nuclear division, interfere with apoptosis, or induce cell necrosis. This study indicates that OE-COE exposure can induce DNA breaks/oxidative damage and genomic instability in HBE-CYP1A1 cells. The FPG-comet assay appears more specific for detecting oxidative DNA damage induced by complex mixtures of genotoxic substances.

  5. Massage and ultrasound as therapeutic modalities in exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Tiidus, P M

    1999-06-01

    Although both massage and ultrasound treatment are used in clinical settings to enhance muscle functional recovery following exercise-induced muscle damage, there is a paucity of experimental evidence for their efficacy. Theoretically both massage and ultrasound could affect some physiological factors associated with enhancement of postexercise muscle recovery. However, the actual physiological mechanisms by which massage or ultrasound could influence postexercise muscle damage and repair are unknown. Most experimental evidence suggests that massage has little influence on muscle blood flow, clearance of "noxious" substances, recovery of postexercise muscle strength, or delayed soreness sensation. However, more data is needed before conclusions can be drawn as to the ability of massage to influence postexercise inflammatory response or various other physiological changes that characterize exercise-induced muscle damage and repair. There is even less information on the ability of ultrasound to influence physiological or functional factors associated with postexercise muscle damage. The few experiments that have been done tend to be contradictory and have yet to consider the range of ultrasound treatment parameters for therapeutic effectiveness in treating postexercise damage and influencing repair processes. Much more research is needed to determine whether either treatment modality can have any therapeutic effect on exercise-induced muscle damage and recovery of postexercise muscle function.

  6. Clustered DNA damages induced by high and low LET radiation, including heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Schenk, H.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Trunk, J.; Monteleone, D.; Sutherland, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages--here defined as two or more lesions (strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines or abasic sites) within a few helical turns--have been postulated as difficult to repair accurately, and thus highly significant biological lesions. Further, attempted repair of clusters may produce double strand breaks (DSBs). However, until recently, there was no way to measure ionizing radiation-induced clustered damages, except DSB. We recently described an approach for measuring classes of clustered damages (oxidized purine clusters, oxidized pyrimidine clusters, abasic clusters, along with DSB). We showed that ionizing radiation (gamma rays and Fe ions, 1 GeV/amu) does induce such clusters in genomic DNA in solution and in human cells. These studies also showed that each damage cluster results from one radiation hit (and its track), thus indicating that they can be induced by very low doses of radiation, i.e. two independent hits are not required for cluster induction. Further, among all complex damages, double strand breaks comprise--at most-- 20%, with the other clustered damages being at least 80%.

  7. The DNA damage response in viral-induced cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, P A; Luftig, M A

    2012-01-31

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has emerged as a critical tumour suppressor pathway responding to cellular DNA replicative stress downstream of aberrant oncogene over-expression. Recent studies have now implicated the DDR as a sensor of oncogenic virus infection. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which tumour viruses activate and also suppress the host DDR. The mechanism of tumour virus induction of the DDR is intrinsically linked to the need for these viruses to promote an S-phase environment to replicate their nucleic acid during infection. However, inappropriate expression of viral oncoproteins can also activate the DDR through various mechanisms including replicative stress, direct interaction with DDR components and induction of reactive oxygen species. Given the growth-suppressive consequences of activating the DDR, tumour viruses have also evolved mechanisms to attenuate these pathways. Aberrant expression of viral oncoproteins may therefore promote tumourigenesis through increased somatic mutation and aneuploidy due to DDR inactivation. This review will focus on the interplay between oncogenic viruses and the DDR with respect to cellular checkpoint control and transformation.

  8. Dimethylformamide-induced liver damage among synthetic leather workers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.D.; Lai, M.Y.; Chen, J.S.; Lin, J.M.; Chiang, J.R.; Shiau, S.J.; Chang, W.S. )

    1991-05-01

    Prevalence of liver injury associated with dimethylformamide (DMF) exposure was determined. Medical examinations, liver function tests, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) determinations were performed on 183 of 204 (76%) employees of a synthetic leather factory. Air concentrations of solvents were measured with personal samplers and gas chromatography. The concentration of DMF in air to which each worker was exposed was categorized. High exposure concentrations of DMF (i.e., 25-60 ppm) were significantly associated with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (ALT greater than or equal to 35 IU/l), a result that did not change even after stratification by hepatitis B carrier status. Modeling by logistic regression demonstrated that exposure to high concentrations of DMF was associated with an elevated ALT (p = .01), whereas hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was slightly but independently associated with an elevated ALT (p = .07). In those workers who had normal ALT values, there occurred still significantly higher mean ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities, especially among those who were not HBsAg carriers. A significant association existed between elevated CPK levels and exposure to DMF. However, an analysis of the CPK isoenzyme among 143 workers did not reveal any specific damage to muscles. This outbreak of liver injury among synthetic leather workers is ascribed to DMF. It is recommended that the occupational standard for DMF and its toxicity among HBsAg carriers be evaluated further.

  9. Laser-induced damage in optical materials: sixteenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Guenther, A H; Milam, D; Newnam, B E

    1987-03-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, CO, 15-17 Oct. 1984. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Approximately 180 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives from England, France, The Netherlands, Scotland, and West Germany. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6,microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin-film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. Harold E. Bennett of the U.S. Naval Weapons Center, Arthur H. Guenther of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, David Milam of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the Symposium.

  10. Direct Stimulation of Islet Insulin Secretion by Glycolytic and Mitochondrial Metabolites in KCl-Depolarized Islets

    PubMed Central

    Deeney, Jude T.; Corkey, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that islet depolarization with 70 mM KCl opens Cx36 hemichannels and allows diffusion of small metabolites and cofactors through the β-cell plasma membrane. We have investigated in this islet “permeabilized” model whether glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates stimulate insulin secretion and how it correlates with ATP production (islet content plus extracellular nucleotide accumulation). Glycolytic intermediates (10 mM) stimulated insulin secretion and ATP production similarly. However, they showed differential sensitivities to respiratory chain or enzyme inhibitors. Pyruvate showed a lower secretory capacity and less ATP production than phosphoenolpyruvate, implicating an important role for glycolytic generation of ATP. ATP production by glucose-6-phosphate was not sensitive to a pyruvate kinase inhibitor that effectively suppressed the phosphoenolpyruvate-induced secretory response and islet ATP rise. Strong suppression of both insulin secretion and ATP production induced by glucose-6-phosphate was caused by 10 μM antimycin A, implicating an important role for the glycerophosphate shuttle in transferring reducing equivalents to the mitochondria. Five citric acid cycle intermediates were investigated for their secretory and ATP production capacity (succinate, fumarate, malate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate at 5 mM, together with ADP and/or NADP+ to feed the NADPH re-oxidation cycles). The magnitude of the secretory response was very similar among the different mitochondrial metabolites but α-ketoglutarate showed a more sustained second phase of secretion. Gabaculine (1 mM, a GABA-transaminase inhibitor) suppressed the second phase of secretion and the ATP-production stimulated by α-ketoglutarate, supporting a role for the GABA shuttle in the control of glucose-induced insulin secretion. None of the other citric acid intermediates essayed showed any suppression of both insulin secretion or ATP-production by the

  11. Treatment with Tacrolimus and Sirolimus Reveals No Additional Adverse Effects on Human Islets In Vitro Compared to Each Drug Alone but They Are Reduced by Adding Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Kloster-Jensen, Kristine; Sahraoui, Afaf; Vethe, Nils Tore; Korsgren, Olle; Bergan, Stein; Foss, Aksel; Scholz, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Tacrolimus and sirolimus are important immunosuppressive drugs used in human islet transplantation; however, they are linked to detrimental effects on islets and reduction of long-term graft function. Few studies investigate the direct effects of these drugs combined in parallel with single drug exposure. Human islets were treated with or without tacrolimus (30 μg/L), sirolimus (30 μg/L), or a combination thereof for 24 hrs. Islet function as well as apoptosis was assessed by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and Cell Death ELISA. Proinflammatory cytokines were analysed by qRT-PCR and Bio-Plex. Islets exposed to the combination of sirolimus and tacrolimus were treated with or without methylprednisolone (1000 μg/L) and the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines was investigated. We found the following: (i) No additive reduction in function and viability in islets existed when tacrolimus and sirolimus were combined compared to the single drug. (ii) Increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines mRNA and protein levels in islets took place. (iii) Methylprednisolone significantly decreased the proinflammatory response in islets induced by the drug combination. Although human islets are prone to direct toxic effect of tacrolimus and sirolimus, we found no additive effects of the drug combination. Short-term exposure of glucocorticoids could effectively reduce the proinflammatory response in human islets induced by the combination of tacrolimus and sirolimus. PMID:26885529

  12. The role of endothelial cells on islet function and revascularization after islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Del Toro-Arreola, Alicia; Robles-Murillo, Ana Karina; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Rivas-Carrillo, Jorge David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Islet transplantation has become a widely accepted therapeutic option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, in order to achieve insulin independence a great number of islets are often pooled from 2 to 4 pancreata donors. Mostly, it is due to the massive loss of islets immediately after transplant. The endothelium plays a key role in the function of native islets and during the revascularization process after islet transplantation. However, if a delayed revascularization occurs, even the remaining islets will also undergo to cell death and late graft dysfunction. Therefore, it is essential to understand how the signals are released from endothelial cells, which might regulate both differentiation of pancreatic progenitors and thereby maintenance of the graft function. New strategies to facilitate islet engraftment and a prompt revascularization could be designed to intervene and might lead to improve future results of islet transplantation. PMID:27002241

  13. Polyphenols in exercise performance and prevention of exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Marco; Angeloni, Cristina; Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Although moderate physical exercise is considered an essential component of a healthy lifestyle that leads the organism to adapt itself to different stresses, exercise, especially when exhaustive, is also known to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and muscle damage. Many efforts have been carried out to identify dietary strategies or micronutrients able to prevent or at least attenuate the exercise-induced muscle damage and stress. Unfortunately most studies have failed to show protection, and at the present time data supporting the protective effect of micronutrients, as antioxidant vitamins, are weak and trivial. This review focuses on those polyphenols, present in the plant kingdom, that have been recently suggested to exert some positive effects on exercise-induced muscle damage and oxidative stress. In the last decade flavonoids as quercetin, catechins, and other polyphenols as resveratrol have caught the scientists attention. However, at the present time drawing a clear and definitive conclusion seems to be untimely.

  14. Polyphenols in Exercise Performance and Prevention of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Although moderate physical exercise is considered an essential component of a healthy lifestyle that leads the organism to adapt itself to different stresses, exercise, especially when exhaustive, is also known to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and muscle damage. Many efforts have been carried out to identify dietary strategies or micronutrients able to prevent or at least attenuate the exercise-induced muscle damage and stress. Unfortunately most studies have failed to show protection, and at the present time data supporting the protective effect of micronutrients, as antioxidant vitamins, are weak and trivial. This review focuses on those polyphenols, present in the plant kingdom, that have been recently suggested to exert some positive effects on exercise-induced muscle damage and oxidative stress. In the last decade flavonoids as quercetin, catechins, and other polyphenols as resveratrol have caught the scientists attention. However, at the present time drawing a clear and definitive conclusion seems to be untimely. PMID:23983900

  15. Chlorogenic acid prevents isoproterenol-induced DNA damage in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingshuai; Li, Jiyang; Liu, Jie; Xu, Mengjiao; Tong, Xiaowen; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical therapeutic agents have been identified as DNA damaging. The present study revealed that isoproterenol (Iso) resulted in DNA damage in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the levels of intracellular oxygen free radicals. Administration of chlorogenic acid (CGA) inhibited this effect. Pretreatment with CGA abrogated the increase in protein expression levels of γ-H2A histone family member X, phosphorylated ataxia telangiectasia mutated, phosphorylated Rad3-related protein, breast cancer 1 and C-terminal Src homologous kinase induced by Iso. In addition, the increase in levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by Iso was inhibited by CGA pretreatment in a dose-dependent manner. The results of the present study suggest that CGA may inhibit Iso-induced VSMC damage via the suppression of ROS generation. Therefore, CGA may be a novel agent for the treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:27634104

  16. Two distinct mechanisms mediate the involvement of bone marrow cells in islet remodeling: neogenesis of insulin-producing cells and support of islet recovery.

    PubMed

    Iskovich, Svetlana; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Sadikov, Tamila; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that small-sized bone marrow cells (BMCs) isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and depleted of lineage markers (Fr25lin(-)) have the capacity to differentiate and contribute to regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we assess some of the characteristics of these cells compared to elutriated hematopoietic progenitors (R/O) and whole BMCs in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced chemical diabetes. The GFP(bright)CD45(+) progeny of whole BMCs and R/O progenitors progressively infiltrate the pancreas with evolution of donor chimerism; are found at islet perimeter, vascular, and ductal walls; and have a modest impact on islet recovery from injury. In contrast, Fr25lin(-) cells incorporate in the islets, convert to GFP(dim)CD45(-)PDX-1(+) phenotypes, produce proinsulin, and secrete insulin with significant contribution to stabilization of glucose homeostasis. The elutriated Fr25lin(-) cells express low levels of CD45 and are negative for SCA-1 and c-kit, as removal of cells expressing these markers did not impair conversion to produce insulin. BMCs mediate two synergistic mechanisms that contribute to islet recovery from injury: support of islet remodeling by hematopoietic cells and neogenesis of insulin-producing cells from stem cells.

  17. Antiapoptotic effects of cerium oxide and yttrium oxide nanoparticles in isolated rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, A; Baeeri, M; Rahimifard, M; Navaei-Nigjeh, M; Mohammadirad, A; Pourkhalili, N; Hassani, S; Kamali, M; Abdollahi, M

    2013-05-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease caused by the impairment of pancreatic β-cells mainly mediated through oxidative stress and related apoptosis. Islets transplantation seems a promising treatment for these patients, but during islets transplant, various types of stresses related to the isolation and transplantation procedure compromise the function and viability of islets. We recently hypothesized that the combination of cerium oxide (CeO2) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) nanoparticles with a potential free radical scavenger behavior should be useful to make isolated islets survive until transplanted. In the present study, oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in isolated rat pancreatic islets exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the protective effects of CeO2 and Y2O3 nanoparticles were investigated. Exposure of islets to H2O2 (50 µm, 2 h) increased intracellular oxidant formation such as reactive oxygen species and subsequently apoptosis and decreased viability, glucose-induced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Pretreatment with CeO2 and/or Y2O3 nanoparticles reduced the oxidant formation and apoptosis and increased viability, glucose-induced ATP production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These results suggest that this combination may protect β-cell apoptosis by improving the oxidative stress-mediated apoptotic pathway.

  18. DNA-damage-inducible (din) loci are transcriptionally activated in competent Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Love, P.E.; Lyle, M.J.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1985-09-01

    DNA damage-inducible (din) operon fusions were generated in Bacillus subtilis by transpositional mutagenesis. These YB886(din::Tn917-lacZ) fusion isolates produced increased ..beta..-galactosidase when exposed to mitomycin C, UV radiation, or ethyl methanesulfonate, indicating that the lacZ structural gene had inserted into host transcriptional units that are induced by a variety of DNA-damaging agents. One of the fusion strains was DNA-repair deficient and phenotypically resembled a UV-sensitive mutant of B. subtilis. Induction of ..beta..-galactosidase also occurred in the competent subpopulation of each of the din fusion strains, independent of exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Both the DNA-damage-inducible and competence-inducible components of ..beta..-galactosidase expression were abolished by the recE4 mutation, which inhibits SOS-like (SOB) induction but does not interfere with the development of the component state. The results indicate that gene expression is stimulated at specific loci within the B. subtilis chromosome both by DNA-damaging agents and by the development of competence and that this response is under the control of the SOB regulatory system. Furthermore, they demonstrate that at the molecular level SOB induction and the development of competence are interrelated cellular events.

  19. Displacement damage induced in iron by gammas and neutrons under irradiation in the IFMIF test cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, S. P.; Fischer, U.

    2011-10-01

    This work presents a complete comparative analysis of the radiation damage induced in iron-based materials in IFMIF by photons and neutrons. The gamma induced damage takes into account, for the first time, both photonuclear and photoatomic reaction mechanisms. The relevant cross sections were taken from available data evaluations. The gamma and neutron radiation fields were calculated by the McDeLicious Monte Carlo code using a 3-D geometry model. Finally the gamma and neutron induced damages in the iron have been assessed inside the IFMIF test cell and the surrounding concrete walls. It was found that the photoatomic mechanism dominates the photonuclear with at least one hundred times higher damage rates. The ratio of the gamma and the neutron induced displacement damage was found to be 10 -3 inside the concrete wall and 10 -5 in the components close to d-Li source. This fraction may increase a few times due to the uncertainty of the evaluated γ-dpa cross sections and the different surviving probabilities for defects produced by gammas and neutrons, nevertheless unlikely exceed 1%.

  20. Quercetin protects hamster spermatogenic cells from oxidative damage induced by diethylstilboestrol.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Ma, Aituan; Shi, W; Zhong, Xiuhui

    2010-10-01

    Quercetin has been reported to be an efficient antioxidant which protects chicken spermatogonial cells from oxidative damage through increasing intracellular antioxidants and decreasing lipid peroxidation. Exposure to diethylstilboestrol (DES) could cause reproductive damage in males, which is associated with oxidative stress. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of quercetin on DES-induced oxidative damage in cultured hamster spermatogenic cells. The cells were treated with different concentrations of DES, and their growth status was observed under inverted microscope. The viability of spermatogenic cells was detected by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT). The contents of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in supernatants and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in cells were detected with spectrophotography. The results showed that quercetin significantly inhibited the DES-induced damage on spermatogenic cells, with the exception of the low-dose group in which no significant difference was observed. The cell survival rate increased significantly in the middle- and high-dose groups. The contents of SOD and GSH-Px were significantly elevated after medication with quercetin (P < 0.01). It can be concluded that quercetin protects spermatogenic cells against DES-induced oxidative damage through increasing intracellular antioxidants and decreasing lipid peroxidation. Quercetin plays a very important role in ameliorating reproductive toxicity induced by environmental oestrogens.

  1. Modification of tumour cell metabolism modulates sensitivity to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Chk1 kinase inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation as potentiators of cytotoxic chemotherapy and demonstrate potent activity in combination with anti-metabolite drugs that increase replication stress through the inhibition of nucleotide or deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Inhibiting other metabolic pathways critical for the supply of building blocks necessary to support DNA replication may lead to increased DNA damage and synergy with an inhibitor of Chk1. A screen of small molecule metabolism modulators identified combinatorial activity between a Chk1 inhibitor and chloroquine or the LDHA/LDHB inhibitor GSK 2837808A. Compounds, such as 2-deoxyglucose or 6-aminonicotinamide, that reduced the fraction of cells undergoing active replication rendered tumour cells more resistant to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage. Withdrawal of glucose or glutamine induced G1 and G2/M arrest without increasing DNA damage and reduced Chk1 expression and activation through autophosphorylation. This suggests the expression and activation of Chk1 kinase is associated with cells undergoing active DNA replication. Glutamine starvation rendered tumour cells more resistant to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage and reversal of the glutamine starvation restored the sensitivity of tumour cells to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage. Chk1 inhibitors may be a potentially useful therapeutic treatment for patients whose tumours contain a high fraction of replicating cells. PMID:28106079

  2. Oleandrin induces DNA damage responses in cancer cells by suppressing the expression of Rad51

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhengqiang; Tian, Baoping; Wang, Xiaohui; Feng, Hanrong; Liang, Ye; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao; Ying, Songmin

    2016-01-01

    Oleandrin is a monomeric compound extracted from leaves and seeds of Nerium oleander. It had been reported that oleandrin could effectively inhibit the growth of human cancer cells. However, the specific mechanisms of the oleandrin-induced anti-tumor effects remain largely unclear. Genomic instability is one of the main features of cancer cells, it can be the combined effect of DNA damage and tumour-specific DNA repair defects. DNA damage plays important roles during tumorigenesis. In fact, most of the current chemotherapy agents were designed to kill cancer cells by inducing DNA damage. In this study, we found that oleandrin was effective to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, and cause rapid DNA damage response, represented by nuclear RPA (Replication Protein A, a single strand DNA binding protein) and γH2AX(a marker for DNA double strand breaks) foci formation. Interestingly, expression of RAD51, a key protein involved in homologous recombination (HR), was suppressed while XRCC1 was up-regulated in oleandrin treated cancer cells. These results suggested that XRCC1 may play a predominant role in repairing oleandrin-induced DNA damage. Collectively, oleandrin may be a potential anti-tumor agent by suppressing the expression of Rad51. PMID:27449097

  3. Combinatorial human progenitor cell transplantation optimizes islet regeneration through secretion of paracrine factors.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Meschino, Michael T; Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Broughton, Heather C; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Hess, David A

    2012-07-20

    Transplanted human bone marrow (BM) and umbilical cord blood (UCB) progenitor cells activate islet-regenerative or revascularization programs depending on the progenitor subtypes administered. Using purification of multiple progenitor subtypes based on a conserved stem cell function, high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity (ALDH(hi)), we have recently shown that transplantation of BM-derived ALDH(hi) progenitors improved systemic hyperglycemia and augmented insulin secretion by increasing islet-associated proliferation and vascularization, without increasing islet number. Conversely, transplantation of culture-expanded multipotent-stromal cells (MSCs) derived from BM ALDH(hi) cells augmented total beta cell mass via formation of beta cell clusters associated with the ductal epithelium, without sustained islet vascularization. To identify paracrine effectors produced by islet-regenerative MSCs, culture-expanded BM ALDH(hi) MSCs were transplanted into streptozotocin-treated nonobese diabetic/severe combine immune deficient (SCID) mice and segregated into islet-regenerative versus nonregenerative cohorts based on hyperglycemia reduction, and subsequently compared for differential production of mRNA and secreted proteins. Regenerative MSCs showed increased expression of matrix metalloproteases, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-activating ligands, and downstream effectors of Wnt signaling. Regenerative MSC supernatant also contained increased levels of pro-angiogenic versus pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented the expansion of ductal epithelial but not beta cells in vitro. Conversely, co-culture with UCB ALDH(hi) cells induced beta cell but not ductal epithelial cell proliferation. Sequential transplantation of MSCs followed by UCB ALDH(hi) cells improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance by increasing beta cell mass associated with the ductal epithelium and by augmenting intra-islet capillary densities. Thus, combinatorial human progenitor cell

  4. Strain-dependent Damage Evolution and Velocity Reduction in Fault Zones Induced by Earthquake Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, J.; Duan, B.

    2009-12-01

    Low-velocity fault zones (LVFZs) with reduced seismic velocities relative to the surrounding wall rocks are widely observed around active faults. The presence of such a zone will affect rupture propagation, near-field ground motion, and off-fault damage in subsequent earth-quakes. In this study, we quantify the reduction of seismic velocities caused by dynamic rup-ture on a 2D planar fault surrounded by a low-velocity fault zone. First, we implement the damage rheology (Lyakhovsky et al. 1997) in EQdyna (Duan and Oglesby 2006), an explicit dynamic finite element code. We further extend this damage rheology model to include the dependence of strains on crack density. Then, we quantify off-fault continuum damage distribution and velocity reduction induced by earthquake rupture with the presence of a preexisting LVFZ. We find that the presence of a LVFZ affects the tempo-spatial distribu-tions of off-fault damage. Because lack of constraint in some damage parameters, we further investigate the relationship between velocity reduction and these damage prameters by a large suite of numerical simulations. Slip velocity, slip, and near-field ground motions computed from damage rheology are also compared with those from off-fault elastic or elastoplastic responses. We find that the reduction in elastic moduli during dynamic rupture has profound impact on these quantities.

  5. Dynamics of DNA Damage Induced Pathways to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Kun; Rajendran, Ramkumar; Doddananjaiah, Manjula

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy is commonly used in cancer treatments, however only 25% of cancers are responsive and a significant proportion develops resistance. The p53 tumour suppressor is crucial for cancer development and therapy, but has been less amenable to therapeutic applications due to the complexity of its action, reflected in 66,000 papers describing its function. Here we provide a systematic approach to integrate this information by constructing a large-scale logical model of the p53 interactome using extensive database and literature integration. The model contains 206 nodes representing genes or proteins, DNA damage input, apoptosis and cellular senescence outputs, connected by 738 logical interactions. Predictions from in silico knock-outs and steady state model analysis were validated using literature searches and in vitro based experiments. We identify an upregulation of Chk1, ATM and ATR pathways in p53 negative cells and 61 other predictions obtained by knockout tests mimicking mutations. The comparison of model simulations with microarray data demonstrated a significant rate of successful predictions ranging between 52% and 71% depending on the cancer type. Growth factors and receptors FGF2, IGF1R, PDGFRB and TGFA were identified as factors contributing selectively to the control of U2OS osteosarcoma and HCT116 colon cancer cell growth. In summary, we provide the proof of principle that this versatile and predictive model has vast potential for use in cancer treatment by identifying pathways in individual patients that contribute to tumour growth, defining a sub population of “high” responders and identification of shifts in pathways leading to chemotherapy resistance. PMID:24023735

  6. A Simple Method to Replace Islet Equivalents for Volume Quantification of Human Islets.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Karthik; Huang, Han-Hung; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Human islets come in a variety of sizes and shapes, and the total volume of islets used for research or clinical transplants must be estimated in a manner that is simple and valid. Islet equivalent (IEQ) measurements are the standard estimate of islet volume. We published a new method (the Kansas method) for estimating rat islet volume using cell numbers that was reliable and valid. Here we modified the method for human islets. We measured the dimensions of isolated human islets showing that they are not spherical and became less so in larger islets, with an average smallest/largest diameter ratio of 0.73 in large islets and 0.85 in small islets. Human islets were individually loaded into 96-well plates, dissociated into single cells, and the total cell number per islet determined with computer-assisted cytometry. Based on the counted cell number per islet, a regression model was created to convert islet diameter to cell number with a high R(2) value (0.99). Separate regression equations for male and female donors or young and old donors were not significantly different than the pooled data and did not improve the regression values. There was an inverse correlation between the cell number per IEQ and islet size. The Kansas method was validated with ATP/cell and cell viability data. Compared to the actual cell count, conventional IEQ measurements overestimated tissue volume of large islets by nearly double. Examples of differences in results obtained from the same data sets normalized to IEQ or the Kansas method included viability and insulin secretion concentrations. The implications of the error associated with the current IEQ method of volume estimation are discussed.

  7. Tetracycline Reduces Kidney Damage Induced by Loxosceles Spider Venom

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Cinthya Kimori; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Masashi, Mizuno; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2017-01-01

    Envenomation by Loxosceles spider can result in two clinical manifestations: cutaneous and systemic loxoscelism, the latter of which includes renal failure. Although incidence of renal failure is low, it is the main cause of death, occurring mainly in children. The sphingomyelinase D (SMase D) is the main component in Loxosceles spider venom responsible for local and systemic manifestations. This study aimed to investigate the toxicity of L. intermedia venom and SMase D on kidney cells, using both In vitro and in vivo models, and the possible involvement of endogenous metalloproteinases (MMP). Results demonstrated that venom and SMase D are able to cause death of human kidney cells by apoptosis, concomitant with activation and secretion of extracellular matrix metalloproteases, MMP-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, cell death and MMP synthesis and secretion can be prevented by tetracycline. In a mouse model of systemic loxoscelism, Loxosceles venom-induced kidney failure was observed, which was abrogated by administration of tetracycline. These results indicate that MMPs may play an important role in Loxosceles venom-induced kidney injury and that tetracycline administration may be useful in the treatment of human systemic loxoscelism. PMID:28257106

  8. Tetracycline Reduces Kidney Damage Induced by Loxosceles Spider Venom.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Cinthya Kimori; van den Berg, Carmen W; Masashi, Mizuno; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2017-03-02

    Envenomation by Loxosceles spider can result in two clinical manifestations: cutaneous and systemic loxoscelism, the latter of which includes renal failure. Although incidence of renal failure is low, it is the main cause of death, occurring mainly in children. The sphingomyelinase D (SMase D) is the main component in Loxosceles spider venom responsible for local and systemic manifestations. This study aimed to investigate the toxicity of L. intermedia venom and SMase D on kidney cells, using both In vitro and in vivo models, and the possible involvement of endogenous metalloproteinases (MMP). Results demonstrated that venom and SMase D are able to cause death of human kidney cells by apoptosis, concomitant with activation and secretion of extracellular matrix metalloproteases, MMP-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, cell death and MMP synthesis and secretion can be prevented by tetracycline. In a mouse model of systemic loxoscelism, Loxosceles venom-induced kidney failure was observed, which was abrogated by administration of tetracycline. These results indicate that MMPs may play an important role in Loxosceles venom-induced kidney injury and that tetracycline administration may be useful in the treatment of human systemic loxoscelism.

  9. Rhabdomyolysis and myocardial damage induced by palytoxin, a toxin of blue humphead parrotfish.

    PubMed

    Okano, H; Masuoka, H; Kamei, S; Seko, T; Koyabu, S; Tsuneoka, K; Tamai, T; Ueda, K; Nakazawa, S; Sugawa, M; Suzuki, H; Watanabe, M; Yatani, R; Nakano, T

    1998-03-01

    A 55-year-old man had rhabdomyolysis and myocardial damage induced by palytoxin. Weakness and myalgia of four extremities occurred five hours after eating a fish. Rhabdomyolysis developed and the serum creatine phosphokinase (CK) was elevated to 40,000 IU/l on the 3rd day. Gastric lavage with activated charcoal and forced mannitol-alkaline diuresis therapy were performed. The patient recovered with no complication such as renal failure. In this case, palytoxin was suggested to induce myocardial damage which was demonstrated by an elevation of the myosin light chain level and a change in electrocardiogram.

  10. Activation of human macrophages by allogeneic islets preparations: inhibition by AOP-RANTES and heparinoids.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Séverine; Oberholzer, José; Bohbot, Alain; Esposito, Guy; Mandes, Karim; Lamartine, Roger; Toso, Christian; Bucher, Pascal; Pinget, Michel; Kessler, Laurence

    2004-04-01

    During transplantation, pancreatic islets release chemokines which promote macrophage attraction, hampering engraftment of islets. The aim of this study was to modulate chemotaxis and the immune response of human macrophages induced by islets. Human monocyte-derived macrophages of healthy subjects were exposed to supernatants of human islets. Chemotaxis, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) release were evaluated. To modulate migration, human macrophages were incubated in the presence of aminooxypentane-regulated on activation, normal, T-cell expressed, and secreted (AOP-RANTES), a potent antagonist of CCR5. Chemotactic activity of islets supernatant was modulated by the addition of heparin or heparinoids [pentosan and calix[8S]arene (C8S)]. AOP-RANTES significantly reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, macrophage chemotaxis and cytokine release induced by islets supernatant. The chemotactic index was reduced from 3.05 +/- 0.27 to 0.71 +/- 12, TNF-alpha from 1205 +/- 52 to 202 +/- 12 pg/ml, and IL-1beta from 234 +/- 12 to 10 +/- 6 pg/ml. The trapping of chemokines by heparinoids reduced the chemotactic activity of islets supernatant from 3.05 +/- 0.27 to 1.2 +/- 0.1 with heparin or pentosan and to 1.72 +/- 0.22 with C8S, and also decreased the TNF-alpha release by human macrophages from 1205 +/- 35 to 1000 +/- 26 (C8S), 250 +/- 21 (heparin) and 320 +/- 19 (pentosan) pg/ml, and IL-1beta from 234 +/- 13 to 151 +/- 5 (C8S), 50 +/- 3 (heparin) and 57 +/- 4 (pentosan) pg/ml. In conclusion, AOP-RANTES and heparinoids inhibit human macrophage activation and migration induced by islets supernatant.

  11. Activation of human macrophages by allogeneic islets preparations: inhibition by AOP-RANTES and heparinoids

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Séverine; Oberholzer, José; Bohbot, Alain; Esposito, Guy; Mandes, Karim; Lamartine, Roger; Toso, Christian; Bucher, Pascal; Pinget, Michel; Kessler, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    During transplantation, pancreatic islets release chemokines which promote macrophage attraction, hampering engraftment of islets. The aim of this study was to modulate chemotaxis and the immune response of human macrophages induced by islets. Human monocyte-derived macrophages of healthy subjects were exposed to supernatants of human islets. Chemotaxis, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release were evaluated. To modulate migration, human macrophages were incubated in the presence of aminooxypentane-regulated on activation, normal, T-cell expressed, and secreted (AOP-RANTES), a potent antagonist of CCR5. Chemotactic activity of islets supernatant was modulated by the addition of heparin or heparinoids [pentosan and calix[8S]arene (C8S)]. AOP-RANTES significantly reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, macrophage chemotaxis and cytokine release induced by islets supernatant. The chemotactic index was reduced from 3·05 ± 0·27 to 0·71 ± 12, TNF-α from 1205 ± 52 to 202 ± 12 pg/ml, and IL-1β from 234 ± 12 to 10 ± 6 pg/ml. The trapping of chemokines by heparinoids reduced the chemotactic activity of islets supernatant from 3·05 ± 0·27 to 1·2 ± 0·1 with heparin or pentosan and to 1·72 ± 0·22 with C8S, and also decreased the TNF-α release by human macrophages from 1205 ± 35 to 1000 ± 26 (C8S), 250 ± 21 (heparin) and 320 ± 19 (pentosan) pg/ml, and IL-1β from 234 ± 13 to 151 ± 5 (C8S), 50 ± 3 (heparin) and 57 ± 4 (pentosan) pg/ml. In conclusion, AOP-RANTES and heparinoids inhibit human macrophage activation and migration induced by islets supernatant. PMID:15056378

  12. Melatonin attenuates brain mitochondria DNA damage induced by potassium cyanide in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiro-aki; Mohanan, Parayanthala V

    2002-09-30

    The effect of potassium cyanide on mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) in mouse brain was investigated in vivo and in vitro. When potassium cyanide (0, 0.1, 1.0 or 2.0 mM) was incubated with a crude mitochondria fraction prepared from mouse brain at 37 degrees C for 60 min, the damage of mtDNA was observed in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the mtDNA damage was prevented by a co-treatment with melatonin (1.5 mM), a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals (*OH). Furthermore, a subcutaneous injection of potassium cyanide (7mg/kg) caused both brain mtDNA damage and severe seizures in mouse. The damage of mtDNA and seizures induced by potassium cyanide were abolished by the pre-injection of melatonin (20 mg/kg). Hydrogen peroxide (1.5 mM) inflicted damage to brain mtDNA in the presence of Fe(2+) (3.0 microM). The damage was abolished by the co-treatment with melatonin. Furthermore, when cyanide (0, 0.1 or 1.0 mM) was incubated with the crude mitochondria fraction prepared from mouse brain, the lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in a concentration-dependent manner. The increased lipid peroxidation was completely inhibited by the co-treatment with melatonin (1.0 mM). These results suggest that reactive oxygen species including the *OH may play a cardinal role for mtDNA damage induced by potassium cyanide. Hence, the present study concluded that melatonin protects against DNA damage induced by the *OH produced by cyanide or hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Storage and microencapsulation of islets for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Charles, K; Harland, R C; Ching, D; Opara, E C

    2000-01-01

    Microencapsulation is an effective means of immunoisolation for pancreatic islet transplants. However, the process of isolating, purifying, encapsulating, and transplanting islets in a single day is labor intensive and difficult for routine use. There is an apparent need for reliable methods of islet storage, and cryopreservation has emerged as an attractive system of islet banking. While studies have shown that cryopreserved islets are viable when tested unencapsulated after thawing, it is not clear if the combination of freezing and encapsulation would affect islet function. The purpose of the present study was to determine the in vitro function of cryopreserved islets following thawing and microencapsulation. Islets were isolated from the pancreata of Sprague-Dawley rats and cryopreserved under liquid nitrogen for either 1 week or 1 month, following an overnight culture at 37 degrees C. Upon thawing, the islets were tested either unencapsulated or after encapsulation in polylysine-alginate membrane. In all experiments islets were preperifused for 1 h at 37 degrees C with a modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing 3.3 mM (60 mg/dl) glucose and maintained at pH 7.4 by continuous gassing with 95% air/5% CO2. Following basal effluent sample collection on ice, the glucose concentration was raised to 16.7 mM (300 mg/dl). It was found that, within 10 min of high glucose stimulation, an average of twofold increase in insulin secretion (p < 0.01) was obtained in islets within or without microcapsules. We conclude that islets cryopreserved for 1 month prior to thawing and microencapsulation retained functional viability as determined in in vitro experiments.

  14. Nature and Consequences of Induced Chromosome Damage in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    There are marked qualitative and quantitative differences in the patterns of chromosomal damage observed after irradiation of spermatogonia, spermatozoa and oocytes of mice. These differences often result from reduced or zero transmission of particular classes of abberration arising in pre-meiotic germ cells. Probably this is the reason why the level of X-chromosomal and autosomal monosomy is not increased after spermatogonial irradiation. Similarly, the reduced transmission of certain d–se deficiencies may help to explain their low F1 frequency after pre-meiotic as compared with later irradiation. Spermatozoal irradiation has revealed no Robertsonian translocations, but has produced some types of reciprocal translocations which apparently are not transmitted to the F1 after spermatogonial treatment because they prevent maturation of the male pre-meiotic germ cell. Thus they cause sterility in males, but not in females. They include X-autosome and Y-autosome translocations, those giving a metacentric or sub-metacentric chromosome (with reciprocal product present) and those in which one break-point is in or near the centromeric heterochromatin while the other is more distally placed. This last group (which grades into male sub-fertile conditions) gives a preponderance of chain configurations (often with one separate univalent) in heterozygotes of both sexes at meiosis and a high incidence of somatic marker chromosomes. Nondisjunction associated with the univalent generates tertiary trisomics, which are usually male-sterile also and may show phenotypic abnormalities. Sterile males with complete separation of X and Y chromosomes have also been reported after mutagenic treatment of meiotic and post-meiotic germ cells. Such separation seems to prevent a primary spermatocyte from forming a secondary one. The usual derivation (in mouse and man) of tertiary trisomics from mothers rather than from fathers may be due to a similar block, together with a general tendency for

  15. Orally administered epigallocatechin gallate attenuates light-induced photoreceptor damage.

    PubMed

    Costa, Belmira Lara da Silveira Andrade da; Fawcett, Rebecca; Li, Guang-Yu; Safa, Rukhsana; Osborne, Neville N

    2008-07-01

    EGCG, a major component of green tea, has a number of properties which includes it being a powerful antioxidant. The purpose of this investigation was to deduce whether inclusion of EGCG in the drinking water of albino rats attenuates the effect of a light insult (2200lx, for 24h) to the retina. TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the outer nuclear layer of the retina, indicating the efficacy of the light insult in inducing photoreceptor degeneration. Moreover, Ret-P1 and the mRNA for rhodopsin located at photoreceptors were also significantly reduced as well as the amplitude of both the a- and b-waves of the electroretinogram was also reduced showing that photoreceptors in particular are affected by light. An increase in protein/mRNA of GFAP located primarily to Müller cells caused by light shows that other retinal components are also influenced by the light insult. However, antigens associated with bipolar (alpha-PKC), ganglion (Thy-1) and amacrine (GABA) cells, in contrast, appeared unaffected. The light insult also caused a change in the content of various proteins (caspase-3, caspase-8, PARP, Bad, and Bcl-2) involved in apoptosis. A number of the changes to the retina caused by a light insult were significantly attenuated when EGCG was in the drinking water. The reduction of the a- and b-waves and photoreceptor specific mRNAs/protein caused by light were significantly less. In addition, EGCG attenuated the changes caused by light to certain apoptotic proteins (especially at after 2 days) but did not appear to significantly influence the light-induced up-regulation of GFAP protein/mRNA. It is concluded that orally administered EGCG blunts the detrimental effect of light to the retina of albino rats where the photoreceptors are primarily affected.

  16. Hyaluronic acid prevents immunosuppressive drug-induced ovarian damage via up-regulating PGRMC1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangfeng; Yan, Guijun; Cheng, Jie; Zhou, Xue; Fang, Ting; Sun, Haixiang; Hou, Yayi; Hu, Yali

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy treatment in women can frequently cause damage to the ovaries, which may lead to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). In this study, we assessed the preventative effects of hyaluronic acid (HA) in immunosuppressive drug-induced POI-like rat models and investigated the possible mechanisms. We found that HA, which was reduced in primary and immunosuppressant-induced POI patients, could protect the immunosuppressant-induced damage to granulosa cells (GCs) in vitro. Then we found that HA blocked the tripterygium glycosides (TG) induced POI-like presentations in rats, including delayed or irregular estrous cycles, reduced 17 beta-estradiol(E2) concentration, decreased number of follicles, destruction of follicle structure, and damage of reproductive ability. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanisms of HA prevention effects on POI, which was associated with promotion of GC proliferation and PGRMC1 expression. In conclusion, HA prevents chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage by promoting PGRMC1 in GCs. This study may provide a new strategy for prevention and treatment of POI. PMID:25558795

  17. Metabolomics applied to the pancreatic islet

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Jessica R.; Jensen, Mette V.; Newgard, Christopher B.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics, the characterization of the set of small molecules in a biological system, is advancing research in multiple areas of islet biology. Measuring a breadth of metabolites simultaneously provides a broad perspective on metabolic changes as the islets respond dynamically to metabolic fuels, hormones, or environmental stressors. As a result, metabolomics has the potential to provide new mechanistic insights into islet physiology and pathophysiology. Here we summarize advances in our understanding of islet physiology and the etiologies of type-1 and type-2 diabetes gained from metabolomics studies. PMID:26116790

  18. Islet Transplantation in Type I Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jamiolkowski, Ryan M.; Guo, Lucie Y.; Li, Yun Rose; Shaffer, Sydney M.; Naji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    For most patients with type I diabetes, insulin therapy and glucose monitoring are sufficient to maintain glycemic control. However, hypoglycemia is a potentially lethal side effect of insulin treatment in patients who are glycemically labile or have hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure [1]. For those patients, an alternative therapy is beta cell replacement via pancreas or islet transplantation. Pancreas transplants using cadaveric donor organs reduce insulin dependence but carry risks involved in major surgery and chronic immunosuppression. Islet transplantation, in which islets are isolated from donor pancreases and intravenously infused, require no surgery and can utilize islets isolated from pancreases unsuitable for whole organ transplantation. However, islet transplantation also requires immunosuppression, and standard steroid regimens may be toxic to beta cells [2]. The 2000 Edmonton Trial demonstrated the first long-term successful islet transplantation by using a glucocorticoid-free immunosuppressive regimen (sirolimus and tacrolimus). The Clinical Islet Transplantation (CIT) Consortium seeks to improve upon the Edmonton Protocol by using anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and TNFα antagonist (etanercept). The trials currently in progress, in addition to research efforts to find new sources of islet cells, reflect enormous potential for islet transplantation in treatment of type I diabetes. PMID:22461742

  19. Esculentin-2CHa-Related Peptides Modulate Islet Cell Function and Improve Glucose Tolerance in Mice with Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Opeolu O.; Srinivasan, Dinesh K.; Owolabi, Bosede O.; Vasu, Srividya; Conlon, J. Michael; Flatt, Peter R.; Abdel-Wahab, Yasser H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The frog skin host-defense peptide esculentin-2CHa (GFSSIFRGVA10KFASKGLGK D20LAKLGVDLVA30CKISKQC) displays antimicrobial, antitumor, and immunomodulatory properties. This study investigated the antidiabetic actions of the peptide and selected analogues. Esculentin-2CHa stimulated insulin secretion from rat BRIN-BD11 clonal pancreatic β-cells at concentrations greater than 0.3 nM without cytotoxicity by a mechanism involving membrane depolarization and increase of intracellular Ca2+. Insulinotropic activity was attenuated by activation of KATP channels, inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and chelation of extracellular Ca2+. The [L21K], [L24K], [D20K, D27K] and [C31S,C37S] analogues were more potent but less effective than esculentin-2CHa whereas the [L28K] and [C31K] analogues were both more potent and produced a significantly (P < 0.001) greater maximum response. Acute administration of [L28K]esculentin-2CHa (75 nmol/kg body weight) to high fat fed mice with obesity and insulin resistance enhanced glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. Twice-daily administration of this dose of [L28K]esculentin-2CHa for 28 days had no significant effect on body weight, food intake, indirect calorimetry or body composition. However, mice exhibited decreased non-fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05), increased non-fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.05) as well as improved glucose tolerance and insulin secretion (P < 0.01) following both oral and intraperitoneal glucose loads. Impaired responses of isolated islets from high fat fed mice to established insulin secretagogues were restored by [L28K]esculentin-2CHa treatment. Peptide treatment was accompanied by significantly lower plasma and pancreatic glucagon levels and normalization of α-cell mass. Circulating triglyceride concentrations were decreased but plasma cholesterol and LDL concentrations were not significantly affected. The data encourage further investigation of the potential of esculentin-2CHa related peptides for

  20. Taurocholic Acid Prevents Biliary Damage Induced by Hepatic Artery Ligation in Cholestatic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Shannon; Onori, Paolo; Gaudio, Eugenio; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Pannarale, Luigi; Franchitto, Antonio; Francis, Heather; Mancinelli, Romina; Carpino, Guido; Venter, Julie; White, Mellanie; Kopriva, Shelley; Vetuschi, Antonella; Sferra, Roberta; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    Background Ischemic injury by hepatic artery ligation (HAL) during obstructive cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) results in bile duct damage, which can be prevented by administration of VEGF-A. The potential regulation of VEGF and VEGF receptor expression and secretion by bile acids in BDL with HAL is unknown. Aims We evaluated whether taurocholic acid (TC) can prevent HAL-induced cholangiocyte damage via the alteration of VEGFR-2 and/or VEGF-A expression. Methods Utilizing BDL, BDL+TC, BDL+HAL, BDL+HAL+TC, and BDL+HAL+wortmannin+TC treated rats, we evaluated cholangiocyte apoptosis, proliferation, and secretion as well VEGF-A and VEGFR-2 expression by immunohistochemistry. In vitro, we evaluated the effects of TC on cholangiocyte secretion of VEGF-A and the dependence of TC-induced proliferation on the activity of VEGFR-2. Results In BDL rats with HAL, chronic feeding of TC prevented HAL-induced loss of bile ducts and HAL-induced decreased cholangiocyte secretion. TC also prevented HAL-inhibited VEGF-A and VEGFR-2 expression in liver sections and HAL-induced circulating VEGF-A levels, which were blocked by wortmannin administration. In vitro, TC stimulated increased VEGF-A secretion by cholangiocytes, which was blocked by wortmannin and stimulated cholangiocyte proliferation that was blocked by VEGFR-2 kinase inhibitor. Conclusion TC prevented HAL-induced biliary damage by upregulation of VEGF-A expression. PMID:20303838

  1. Dielectric-thickness dependence of damage induced by electron-beam irradiation of MNOS gate pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Miyako; Mine, Toshiyuki; Hozawa, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kikuo; Inoue, Jiro; Nagaishi, Hiroshi

    2007-03-01

    We analyzed the electron-irradiation damage induced by electron-beam inspection of MNOS capacitors with various gate-dielectric thicknesses. Damage induced in a MNOS capacitor with SiON dielectric for high-performance CMOS devices was compared with that induced on a MOS capacitor with SiO II dielectric. We found that there is no remarkable difference between the damage to MOS capacitors and that to MNOS capacitors. The induced damage strongly depends on the thickness of the gate dielectric. Damages were induced when a higher-energy electron-beam, whose electron range was larger than the thickness of the gate electrode, was irradiated. When the electron beam was irradiated to a MOS capacitor with gate-dielectric thickness of 10.0 nm the flat-band-voltage shifted due to the created traps. When the electron beam was scanned to a MOS or MNOS capacitor with gate-dielectric thickness of 4.0 nm, Vfb shifted by less than 6 mV. However, the leakage-current density increased to 10 -7 A/cm2 at gate-electrode voltage of 3.0 V. On the other hand, when the electron beam was scanned on a MNOS capacitor with 2.5-nm-thick SiON dielectric, even the leakage current density was not increased. Accordingly, for damage-free inspection when gate-dielectric thickness is 4.0 nm or more, the electron-beam energy should be lower so that the electron range is smaller than the thickness of the gate electrode.

  2. Prevention of UVB Radiation-induced Epidermal Damage by Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Minoru; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Maji, Daisuke; Sato, Keizo; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Ihn, Hironobu; Funasaka, Yoko; Mizushima, Tohru

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation with UV light, especially UVB, causes epidermal damage via the induction of apoptosis, inflammatory responses, and DNA damage. Various stressors, including UV light, induce heat shock proteins (HSPs) and the induction, particularly that of HSP70, provides cellular resistance to such stressors. The anti-inflammatory activity of HSP70, such as its inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), was recently revealed. These in vitro results suggest that HSP70 protects against UVB-induced epidermal damage. Here we tested this idea by using transgenic mice expressing HSP70 and cultured keratinocytes. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB caused epidermal damage such as induction of apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. UVB-induced apoptosis in cultured keratinocytes was suppressed by overexpression of HSP70. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB decreased the cutaneous level of IκB-α (an inhibitor of NF-κB) and increased the infiltration of leukocytes and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the epidermis. These inflammatory responses were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. In vitro, the overexpression of HSP70 suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and increased the level of IκB-α in keratinocytes irradiated with UVB. UVB induced an increase in cutaneous levels of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, both of which were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. This study provides genetic evidence that HSP70 protects the epidermis from UVB-induced radiation damage. The findings here also suggest that the protective action of HSP70 is mediated by anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-DNA damage effects. PMID:20018843

  3. Phosphorylation of Daxx by ATM Contributes to DNA Damage-Induced p53 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qian; Qu, Like; Brewer, Michael D.; Chen, Jiandong; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    p53 plays a central role in tumor suppression. It does so by inducing anti-proliferative processes as a response to various tumor-promoting stresses. p53 is regulated by the ubiquitin ligase Mdm2. The optimal function of Mdm2 requires Daxx, which stabilizes Mdm2 through the deubiquitinase Hausp/USP7 and also directly promotes Mdm2’s ubiquitin ligase activity towards p53. The Daxx-Mdm2 interaction is disrupted upon DNA damage. However, both the mechanisms and the consequence of the Daxx-Mdm2 dissociation are not understood. Here we show that upon DNA damage Daxx is phosphorylated in a manner that is dependent on ATM, a member of the PI 3-kinase family that orchestrates the DNA damage response. The main phosphorylation site of Daxx is identified to be Ser564, which is a direct target of ATM. Phosphorylation of endogenous Daxx at Ser564 occurs rapidly during the DNA damage response and precedes p53 activation. Blockage of this phosphorylation event prevents the separation of Daxx from Mdm2, stabilizes Mdm2, and inhibits DNA damage-induced p53 activation. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Daxx by ATM upon DNA damage disrupts the Daxx-Mdm2 interaction and facilitates p53 activation. PMID:23405218

  4. The improvement of laser induced damage resistance of optical workpiece surface by hydrodynamic effect polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wenqiang; Guan, Chaoliang; Li, Shengyi; Wang, Zhuo

    2016-10-01

    Surface and subsurface damage in optical element will greatly decrease the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) in the intense laser optical system. Processing damage on the workpiece surface can be inevitably caused when the material is removed in brittle or plastic mode. As a non-contact polishing technology, hydrodynamic effect polishing (HEP) shows very good performance on generating an ultra-smooth surface without damage. The material is removed by chemisorption between nanoparticle and workpiece surface in the elastic mode in HEP. The subsurface damage and surface scratches can be effectively removed after the polishing process. Meanwhile ultra-smooth surface with atomic level surface roughness can be achieved. To investigate the improvement of LIDT of optical workpiece, polishing experiment was conducted on a magnetorheological finishing (MRF) silica glass sample. AFM measurement results show that all the MRF directional plastic marks have been removed clearly and the root-mean-square (rms) surface roughness has decreased from 0.673nm to 0.177nm after HEP process. Laser induced damage experiment was conducted with laser pulse of 1064nm wavelength and 10ns time width. Compared with the original state, the LEDT of the silica glass sample polished by HEP has increased from 29.78J/cm2 to 45.47J/cm2. It demonstrates that LIDT of optical element treated by HEP can be greatly improved for ultra low surface roughness and nearly defect-free surface/subsurface.

  5. Aag DNA glycosylase promotes alkylation-induced tissue damage mediated by Parp1.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Jennifer A; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A; Lake, Annabelle; Eichinger, Lindsey W; Shah, Dharini; Jhun, Iny; Limsirichai, Prajit; Bronson, Roderick T; Christiani, David C; Meira, Lisiane B; Samson, Leona D

    2013-04-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of front-line cancer chemotherapeutic compounds, and while these agents effectively kill tumor cells, they also damage healthy tissues. Although base excision repair (BER) is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, initiation of BER can be detrimental. Here we illustrate that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) mediates alkylation-induced tissue damage and whole-animal lethality following exposure to alkylating agents. Aag-dependent tissue damage, as observed in cerebellar granule cells, splenocytes, thymocytes, bone marrow cells, pancreatic β-cells, and retinal photoreceptor cells, was detected in wild-type mice, exacerbated in Aag transgenic mice, and completely suppressed in Aag⁻/⁻ mice. Additional genetic experiments dissected the effects of modulating both BER and Parp1 on alkylation sensitivity in mice and determined that Aag acts upstream of Parp1 in alkylation-induced tissue damage; in fact, cytotoxicity in WT and Aag transgenic mice was abrogated in the absence of Parp1. These results provide in vivo evidence that Aag-initiated BER may play a critical role in determining the side-effects of alkylating agent chemotherapies and that Parp1 plays a crucial role in Aag-mediated tissue damage.

  6. Oxidative damage induced by copper in mouse primary hepatocytes by single-cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Liu, Yang; Song, Wei; Yan, Yunxing; Yan, Wenbao; Liu, Rutao

    2016-01-01

    Copper can disturb the intracellular redox balance, induce oxidative stress, and subsequently cause irreversible damage, leading to a variety of diseases. In the present study, mouse primary hepatocytes were chosen to elucidate the in vitro oxidative damage of short-term copper exposure (10-200 μM) by single-cell analysis. We evaluated the toxicity of copper by reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and oxidative DNA damage at the single-cell level. Oxidative damage induced by copper was verified by the morphological changes, persistent elevations of excessive ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA), a decrease in GSH level, and the oxidative DNA damage. Furthermore, the average ROS generation, GSH consumption, and the indicators in DNA damage did not significantly change at relatively low concentrations (10 or 50 μM), but we can find the alterations of parameters in some single cells clearly. Emphasis on the analysis of single cells is conducive to gain a better understanding on the toxicity of copper. This study will also complement studies on the environmental risk assessment of copper pollution.

  7. DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification occurs via excessive formation of centriolar satellites.

    PubMed

    Löffler, H; Fechter, A; Liu, F Y; Poppelreuther, S; Krämer, A

    2013-06-13

    Centrosome amplification is a frequent phenomenon in malignancies and may facilitate tumorigenesis by promoting chromosomal instability. On the other hand, a centrosome inactivation checkpoint comprising centrosome amplification leading to elimination of cells by mitotic catastrophe has been described in response to DNA damage by ionizing radiation or cytostatic drugs. So far, the exact nature of DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification, which might be overduplication or fragmentation of existing centrosomes, has been controversial. To solve this controversy, we have established a method to distinguish between these two possibilities using A549 cells expressing photoconvertible CETN2-Dendra2. In response to various DNA-damaging treatments, centrosome amplification but not fragmentation was observed. Moreover, centrosome amplification was preceded by excessive formation of centrin-containing centriolar satellites, which were identified as de novo-generated atypical centrin dots staining positive for centriolar satellite markers but negative or only weakly positive for other established centrosomal markers, and which could be verified as centriolar satellites using immunogold electron microscopy. In line with this notion, disruption of dynein-mediated recruitment of centrosomal proteins via centriolar satellites suppressed centrosome amplification after DNA damage, and excessive formation of centriolar satellites could be inhibited by interference with Chk1, a known mediator of centrosome amplification in response to DNA damage. In conclusion, we provide a model in which a Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint induces excessive formation of centriolar satellites constituting assembly platforms for centrosomal proteins, which subsequently leads to centrosome amplification.

  8. Resveratrol protects mouse oocytes from methylglyoxal-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; He, Xiao-Qin; Huang, Xin; Ding, Lu; Xu, Lin; Shen, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Fei; Zhu, Mao-Bi; Xu, Bai-Hui; Qi, Zhong-Quan; Wang, Hai-Long

    2013-01-01

    Methylglyoxal, a reactive dicarbonyl compound, is mainly formed from glycolysis. Methylglyoxal can lead to the dysfunction of mitochondria, the depletion of cellular anti-oxidation enzymes and the formation of advanced glycation ends. Previous studies showed that the accumulation of methylglyoxal and advanced glycation ends can impair the oocyte maturation and reduce the oocyte quality in aged and diabetic females. In this study, we showed that resveratrol, a kind of phytoalexin found in the skin of grapes, red wine and other botanical extracts, can alleviate the adverse effects caused by methylglyoxal, such as inhibition of oocyte maturation and disruption of spindle assembly. Besides, methylglyoxal-treated oocytes displayed more DNA double strands breaks and this can also be decreased by treatment of resveratrol. Further investigation of these processes revealed that methylglyoxal may affect the oocyte quality by resulting in excessive reactive oxygen species production, aberrant mitochondrial distribution and high level lipid peroxidation, and resveratrol can block these cytotoxic changes. Collectively, our results showed that resveratrol can protect the oocytes from methylglyoxal-induced cytotoxicity and this was mainly through the correction of the abnormity of cellular reactive oxygen species metabolism.

  9. Glial cell plasticity in sensory ganglia induced by nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Hanani, M; Huang, T Y; Cherkas, P S; Ledda, M; Pannese, E

    2002-01-01

    Numerous studies have been done on the effect of nerve injury on neurons of sensory ganglia but little is known about the contribution of satellite glial cells (SCs) in these ganglia to post-injury events. We investigated cell-to-cell coupling and ultrastructure of SCs in mouse dorsal root ganglia after nerve injury (axotomy). Under control conditions SCs were mutually coupled, but mainly to other SCs around a given neuron. After axotomy SCs became extensively coupled to SCs that enveloped other neurons, apparently by gap junctions. Serial section electron microscopy showed that after axotomy SC sheaths enveloping neighboring neurons formed connections with each other. Such connections were absent in control ganglia. The number of gap junctions between SCs increased 6.5-fold after axotomy. We propose that axotomy induces growth of perineuronal SC sheaths, leading to contacts between SCs enveloping adjacent neurons and to formation of new gap junctions between SCs. These changes may be an important mode of glial plasticity and can contribute to neuropathic pain.

  10. Testosterone production and spermatogenic damage induced by organophosphorate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Contreras, H R; Paredes, V; Urquieta, B; Del Valle, L; Bustos-Obregón, E

    2006-12-01

    Parathion is an organophosphorate pesticide amply used in agriculture. Many alterations induced by organophosphorate pesticides have been described, such as: cytogenetic alterations in germinal cells, oligozoospermia and teratozoospermia in the mouse. The effect of Parathion, both pure (PP) and commercial (PC), on mouse interstitial cell testosterone production was evaluated in vivo and in vitro. Male mice were intraperitoneally injected with a single dose of 1/3 LD50 of Parathion, both PP and PC. The animals were sacrificed at 1, 8 and 40 days post injection to evaluate the impact of disrupting testosterone production on spermatogonia, spermatocytes and elongated spermatids. The plasma testosterone was assayed by standard radioimmunoanalysis. The same method was used to assay testosterone in the culture medium of interstitial cells obtained from the control and Parathion treated animals at the same time intervals. Sperm count, sperm teratozoospermia and tubular blockage were analyzed for an appraisal of spermatogenesis. Increase in the teratozoospermia and tubular blockage was detected in the PP and PC group at 8 and 40 days post injection. Plasma testosterone levels drop significantly at 8 days and recovered slowly at 40 days only in PP animals as detected in vivo, implying interference of testicular steroidogenesis due to the toxicant. Recuperation of normality occurs at long time intervals. In conclusion, Parathion disturbs the synthesis of testosterone in mice affecting qualitatively the spermatogenesis

  11. Urea-induced oxidative damage in Elodea densa leaves.

    PubMed

    Maleva, Maria; Borisova, Galina; Chukina, Nadezda; Prasad, M N V

    2015-09-01

    Urea being a fertilizer is expected to be less toxic to plants. However, it was found that urea at 100 mg L(-1) caused the oxidative stress in Elodea leaves due to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation that are known to stimulate antioxidant pathway. Urea at a concentration of 500 and 1000 mg L(-1) decreased low-molecular-weight antioxidants. In this case, the antioxidant status of plants was supported by the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and guaiacol peroxidase. A significant increase in the soluble proteins and -SH groups was observed with high concentrations of urea (30-60 % of control). Thus, the increased activity of antioxidant enzymes, low-molecular-weight antioxidants, and induced soluble protein thiols are implicated in plant resistance to oxidative stress imposed by urea. We found that guaiacol peroxidase plays an important role in the removal of the peroxide in Elodea leaves exposed to 1000 mg L(-1)of urea.

  12. Perinatal radiation-induced renal damage in the beagle

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenke, R.S.; Angleton, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The developing perinatal kidney is particularly sensitive to radiation. The pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lesion is related to the destruction of outer cortical developing nephrons and direct radiation injury with secondary hemodynamic alterations in remnant nephrons. In this study, which is part of a life span investigation of the effects of whole-body gamma radiation during prenatal and early postnatal life, dogs were given 0, 0.16, 0.83, or 1.25 Gy irradiation at either 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum and were examined morphometrically and histopathologically at 70 days of age. Although irradiated dogs showed no reduction in the total number of nephrons per kidney, there was a significant increase in the total number and relative percentage of immature, dysplastic glomeruli. In addition, deeper cortical glomeruli of irradiated kidneys exhibited mesangial sclerosis similar to that associated with progressive renal failure in our previous studies. These findings are in accord with those reported at doses of 2.24 to 3.57 Gy and demonstrate that the perinatal kidney is affected by radiation doses much lower than previously demonstrated.

  13. Effect of multiblade slurry saw induced damage on silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Liu, J. K.; Pollock, G. A.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1978-01-01

    A correlation between the optimum etch loss and the depth of damage is established using wafers produced by the Multiblade Slurry (MBS) and the Internal Diameter (ID) saws. The observations are based on the measurement of the performance of solar cells fabricated on these wafers. Sample preparation and test results are described and the following conclusions are made: (1) the amount of silicon removal necessary for optimum solar cell performance coincides with the depth of saw-induced damage; (2) optimization of cell performance is not affected by the method of silicon removal; (3) sawing conditions should be optimized to minimize the extent of saw-induced damage; (4) the MBS saw is found to induce damage to a lesser extent; (5) since the extent of damage in MBS-sawn wafers is in the limit of etch loss required in texture etching, it is possible to achieve optimum improvement in cell performance by merely texture etching the surface of as-sawn wafers.

  14. Sex Differences in Exercise-Induced Muscle Pain and Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dannecker, Erin A.; Liu, Ying; Rector, R. Scott; Thomas, Tom R.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    There is uncertainty about sex differences in exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage due to several methodological weaknesses in the literature. This investigation tested the hypothesis that higher levels of exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage indicators would be found in women than men when several methodological improvements were executed in the same study. Participants (N = 33; 42% women) with an average age of 23 years (SD = 2.82) consented to participate. After a familiarization session, participants visited the laboratory before and across four days after eccentric exercise was completed to induce arm muscle pain and muscle damage. Our primary outcomes were arm pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds. However, we also measured the following indicators of muscle damage: arm girth; resting elbow extension; isometric elbow flexor strength; myoglobin (Mb); tumor necrosis factor (TNFa); interleukin 1beta (IL1b); and total nitric oxide (NO). Temporary induction of muscle damage was indicated by changes in all outcome measures except TNFa, and IL1b. In contrast to our hypotheses, women reported moderately lower and less frequent muscle pain than men. Also, women’s arm girth and Mb levels increased moderately less than men’s, but the differences were not significant. Few large sex differences were detected. PMID:23182229

  15. Physical and balance performance following exercise induced muscle damage in male soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muzaffar Ahmad; Moiz, Jamal Ali; Raza, Shahid; Verma, Shalini; Shareef, M.Y.; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to determine the changes in physical and balance performance following exercise-induced muscle damage using a sport-specific protocol. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen collegiate soccer players were asked to perform a sport-specific sprint protocol to induce muscle damage. The markers of muscle damage (soreness, range of motion, limb girth, muscle strength, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase), physical performance (speed, agility and power) and balance (static and dynamic balance) were assessed at baseline and 24, 48 and 72 hours following the sprint protocol. [Results] All variables, including the markers of muscle damage, physical performance and balance showed a significant difference when assessed at the 4 time points. [Conclusion] The study demonstrated that both the physical and balance performance were affected following repeated sprint protocol in soccer players. It is recommended the balance performance of an athlete be continually assessed following exercise-induced muscle damage so as to determine the appropriate return to sport decision thereby, minimizing the risk of further injury. PMID:27821967

  16. Fibrinogen-induced perivascular microglial clustering is required for the development of axonal damage in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Davalos, Dimitrios; Kyu Ryu, Jae; Merlini, Mario; Baeten, Kim M.; Le Moan, Natacha; Petersen, Mark A.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Smirnoff, Dimitri S.; Bedard, Catherine; Hakozaki, Hiroyuki; Gonias Murray, Sara; Ling, Jennie B.; Lassmann, Hans; Degen, Jay L.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier disruption, microglial activation and neurodegeneration are hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. However, the initial triggers that activate innate immune responses and their role in axonal damage remain unknown. Here we show that the blood protein fibrinogen induces rapid microglial responses toward the vasculature and is required for axonal damage in neuroinflammation. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that microglia form perivascular clusters before myelin loss or paralysis onset and that, of the plasma proteins, fibrinogen specifically induces rapid and sustained microglial responses in vivo. Fibrinogen leakage correlates with areas of axonal damage and induces reactive oxygen species release in microglia. Blocking fibrin formation with anticoagulant treatment or genetically eliminating the fibrinogen binding motif recognized by the microglial integrin receptor CD11b/CD18 inhibits perivascular microglial clustering and axonal damage. Thus, early and progressive perivascular microglial clustering triggered by fibrinogen leakage upon blood-brain barrier disruption contributes to axonal damage in neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:23187627

  17. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay.

    PubMed

    Cobley, James N; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Malone, John K

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical ((·)OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and (·)OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation.

  18. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  19. Laser-induced damage threshold of camera sensors and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Bastian; Ritt, Gunnar; Körber, Michael; Eberle, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The continuous development of laser systems towards more compact and efficient devices constitutes an increasing threat to electro-optical imaging sensors such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices (CCD). These types of electronic sensors are used in day-to-day life but also in military or civil security applications. In camera systems dedicated to specific tasks, also micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) like a digital micromirror device (DMD) are part of the optical setup. In such systems, the DMD can be located at an intermediate focal plane of the optics and it is also susceptible to laser damage. The goal of our work is to enhance the knowledge of damaging effects on such devices exposed to laser light. The experimental setup for the investigation of laser-induced damage is described in detail. As laser sources both pulsed lasers and continuous-wave (CW) lasers are used. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is determined by the single-shot method by increasing the pulse energy from pulse to pulse or in the case of CW-lasers, by increasing the laser power. Furthermore, we investigate the morphology of laser-induced damage patterns and the dependence of the number of destructed device elements on the laser pulse energy or laser power. In addition to the destruction of single pixels, we observe aftereffects like persisting dead columns or rows of pixels in the sensor image.

  20. Physical and balance performance following exercise induced muscle damage in male soccer players.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muzaffar Ahmad; Moiz, Jamal Ali; Raza, Shahid; Verma, Shalini; Shareef, M Y; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to determine the changes in physical and balance performance following exercise-induced muscle damage using a sport-specific protocol. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen collegiate soccer players were asked to perform a sport-specific sprint protocol to induce muscle damage. The markers of muscle damage (soreness, range of motion, limb girth, muscle strength, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase), physical performance (speed, agility and power) and balance (static and dynamic balance) were assessed at baseline and 24, 48 and 72 hours following the sprint protocol. [Results] All variables, including the markers of muscle damage, physical performance and balance showed a significant difference when assessed at the 4 time points. [Conclusion] The study demonstrated that both the physical and balance performance were affected following repeated sprint protocol in soccer players. It is recommended the balance performance of an athlete be continually assessed following exercise-induced muscle damage so as to determine the appropriate return to sport decision thereby, minimizing the risk of further injury.

  1. Attenuation of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage conferred by maximal isometric contractions: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Leonardo C. R.; Denadai, Benedito S.

    2015-01-01

    Although, beneficial in determined contexts, eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) might be unwanted during training regimens, competitions and daily activities. There are a vast number of studies investigating strategies to attenuate EIMD response after damaging exercise bouts. Many of them consist of performing exercises that