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Sample records for islet gip receptor

  1. Reversal of islet GIP receptor down-regulation and resistance to GIP by reducing hyperglycemia in the Zucker rat

    SciTech Connect

    Piteau, Shalea; Olver, Amy; Kim, Su-Jin; Winter, Kyle; Pospisilik, John Andrew; Lynn, Francis; Manhart, Susanne; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Speck, Madeleine; Pederson, Raymond A.; McIntosh, Christopher H.S.

    2007-11-03

    In type 2 diabetes (T2DM) {beta}-cell responsiveness to glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is reduced. In a model of T2DM, the VDF Zucker rat, GIP receptor mRNA and protein levels were shown to be down-regulated. Possible restoration of responsiveness to GIP in Zucker rats by reducing hyperglycemia has been examined. ZDF rats with extreme hyperglycemia demonstrated greater islet GIP receptor mRNA down-regulation (94.3 {+-} 3.8%) than ZF rats (48.8 {+-} 22.8%). GIP receptor mRNA levels in ZDF rats returned to 83.0 {+-} 17.9% of lean following normalization of hyperglycemia by phlorizin treatment and pancreas perfusions demonstrated markedly improved GIP responsiveness. Treatment of VDF rats with a DP IV inhibitor (P32/98) resulted in improved glucose tolerance and restored sensitivity to GIP in isolated pancreata. These findings support the proposal that GIP receptor down-regulation in rodent T2DM is secondary to chronic hyperglycemia and that normalization of glycemia can restore GIP sensitivity.

  2. GIP Contributes to Islet Trihormonal Abnormalities in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Odetunde, Juliana O.; Kim, Wook; Carlson, Olga D.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Egan, Josephine M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Research and clinical treatments on type 2 diabetes mainly focus on insulin deficiency with little attention paid to other islet hormones. Objective: This study tested the hypothesis that glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is involved in diabetes-associated multiislet hormone dysregulation. Design: This paper included a case-control study involving 92 community-based volunteers from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA): 23 with type 2 diabetes on glucose-lowering agents, 25 with newly diagnosed drug-naïve type 2 diabetes, 19 with prediabetes, and 25 with normal glucose tolerance; a separate intervention study with 13 non-BLSA volunteers with type 2 diabetes treated with diet alone, metformin, and/or metformin/sulfonylurea combination; a rodent study; and an in vitro cell line study. Interventions: An oral glucose tolerance test was performed in the BLSA participants. For the intervention study, saline (0.9% NaCl) or synthetic human GIP (20 ng · kg−1 · min−1) was administered to type 2 diabetes subjects for 180 minutes together with a meal, and plasma samples were obtained at predetermined intervals for 360 minutes. A bolus of GIP or placebo was given to C57BL/6 mice. Main Outcome Measures: Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and GIP were measured. Results: After an oral glucose tolerance test, glucose, glucagon, PP, GLP-1, and GIP levels were significantly elevated in type 2 diabetes groups, compared with normal and prediabetes groups. GIP infusion in type 2 diabetes subjects was associated with significantly elevated PP levels compared with placebo. The GIP bolus given to C57BL/6 mice was followed by increased PP levels. GIP receptors were found in both human and mouse PP cells. Conclusions: Up-regulation of GIP production may play an important role in multihormonal dysregulation in type 2 diabetes, most likely through interaction with GIP receptors on islets

  3. A naturally occurring GIP receptor variant undergoes enhanced agonist-induced desensitization, which impairs GIP control of adipose insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Sameer; Patel, Rajesh T; Bruno, Joanne; Panhwar, Muhammad Siyab; Wen, Jennifer; McGraw, Timothy E

    2014-10-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an incretin hormone secreted from gastrointestinal K cells in response to food intake, has an important role in the control of whole-body metabolism. GIP signals through activation of the GIP receptor (GIPR), a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in the development of metabolic disease. Here we demonstrate that GIPR is constitutively trafficked between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments of both GIP-stimulated and unstimulated adipocytes. GIP induces a downregulation of plasma membrane GIPR by slowing GIPR recycling without affecting internalization kinetics. This transient reduction in the expression of GIPR in the plasma membrane correlates with desensitization to the effects of GIP. A naturally occurring variant of GIPR (E354Q) associated with an increased incidence of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in humans responds to GIP stimulation with an exaggerated downregulation from the plasma membrane and a delayed recovery of GIP sensitivity following cessation of GIP stimulation. This perturbation in the desensitization-resensitization cycle of the GIPR variant, revealed in studies of cultured adipocytes, may contribute to the link of the E354Q variant to metabolic disease.

  4. Decreased TCF7L2 protein levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus correlate with downregulation of GIP- and GLP-1 receptors and impaired beta-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Luan; Matveyenko, Aleksey V.; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; McIntosh, Christopher H.S.; Maedler, Kathrin

    2009-01-01

    Recent human genetics studies have revealed that common variants of the TCF7L2 (T-cell factor 7-like 2, formerly known as TCF4) gene are strongly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We have shown that TCF7L2 expression in the β-cells is correlated with function and survival of the insulin-producing pancreatic β-cell. In order to understand how variations in TCF7L2 influence diabetes progression, we investigated its mechanism of action in the β-cell. We show robust differences in TCF7L2 expression between healthy controls and models of T2DM. While mRNA levels were approximately 2-fold increased in isolated islets from the diabetic db/db mouse, the Vancouver Diabetic Fatty (VDF) Zucker rat and the high fat/high sucrose diet-treated mouse compared with the non-diabetic controls, protein levels were decreased. A similar decrease was observed in pancreatic sections from patients with T2DM. In parallel, expression of the receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1R) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP-R) was decreased in islets from humans with T2DM as well as in isolated human islets treated with siRNA to TCF7L2 (siTCF7L2). Also, insulin secretion stimulated by glucose, GLP-1 and GIP, but not KCl or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was impaired in siTCF7L2-treated isolated human islets. Loss of TCF7L2 resulted in decreased GLP-1 and GIP-stimulated AKT phosphorylation, and AKT-mediated Foxo-1 phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion. Our findings suggest that β-cell function and survival are regulated through an interplay between TCF7L2 and GLP-1R/GIP-R expression and signaling in T2DM. PMID:19386626

  5. Regulation of GIP and GLP1 receptor cell surface expression by N-glycosylation and receptor heteromerization.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Gina M; Lynn, Francis C; McIntosh, Christopher H S; Accili, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    In response to a meal, Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP) and Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) are released from gut endocrine cells into the circulation and interact with their cognate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Receptor activation results in tissue-selective pleiotropic responses that include augmentation of glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. N-glycosylation and receptor oligomerization are co-translational processes that are thought to regulate the exit of functional GPCRs from the ER and their maintenance at the plasma membrane. Despite the importance of these regulatory processes, their impact on functional expression of GIP and GLP-1 receptors has not been well studied. Like many family B GPCRs, both the GIP and GLP-1 receptors possess a large extracellular N-terminus with multiple consensus sites for Asn-linked (N)-glycosylation. Here, we show that each of these Asn residues is glycosylated when either human receptor is expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. N-glycosylation enhances cell surface expression and function in parallel but exerts stronger control over the GIP receptor than the GLP-1 receptor. N-glycosylation mainly lengthens receptor half-life by reducing degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. N-glycosylation is also required for expression of the GIP receptor at the plasma membrane and efficient GIP potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion from the INS-1 pancreatic beta cell line. Functional expression of a GIP receptor mutant lacking N-glycosylation is rescued by co-expressed wild type GLP1 receptor, which, together with data obtained using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer, suggests formation of a GIP-GLP1 receptor heteromer.

  6. GLP1- and GIP-producing cells rarely overlap and differ by bombesin receptor-2 expression and responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Berit; Pais, Ramona; Engelstoft, Maja S; Milev, Nikolay B; Richards, Paul; Christiansen, Charlotte B; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jensen, Signe M; Habib, Abdella M; Gribble, Fiona M; Schwartz, Thue W; Reimann, Frank; Holst, Jens J

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are secreted from intestinal endocrine cells, the so-called L- and K-cells. The cells are derived from a common precursor and are highly related, and co-expression of the two hormones in so-called L/K-cells has been reported. To investigate the relationship between the GLP1- and GIP-producing cells more closely, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing a fluorescent marker in GIP-positive cells. In combination with a mouse strain with fluorescent GLP1 cells, we were able to estimate the overlap between the two cell types. Furthermore, we used primary cultured intestinal cells and isolated perfused mouse intestine to measure the secretion of GIP and GLP1 in response to different stimuli. Overlapping GLP1 and GIP cells were rare (∼5%). KCl, glucose and forskolin+IBMX increased the secretion of both GLP1 and GIP, whereas bombesin/neuromedin C only stimulated GLP1 secretion. Expression analysis showed high expression of the bombesin 2 receptor in GLP1 positive cells, but no expression in GIP-positive cells. These data indicate both expressional and functional differences between the GLP1-producing 'L-cell' and the GIP-producing 'K-cell'.

  7. Postprandial stimulation of insulin release by glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Effect of a specific glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor antagonist in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, C C; Kieffer, T J; Jarboe, L A; Usdin, T B; Wolfe, M M

    1996-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a 42-amino acid peptide produced by K cells of the mammalian proximal small intestine and is a potent stimulant of insulin release in the presence of hyperglycemia. However, its relative physiological importance as a postprandial insulinotropic agent is unknown. Using LGIPR2 cells stably transfected with rat GIP receptor cDNA, GIP (1-42) stimulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by GIP (7-30)-NH2. Competition binding assays using stably transfected L293 cells demonstrated an IC50 for GIP receptor binding of 7 nmol/liter for GIP (1-42) and 200 nmol/liter for GIP (7-30)-NH2, whereas glucagonlike peptide-1 (GLP-1) binding to its receptor on ++betaTC3 cells was minimally displaced by GIP (7-30)-NH2. In fasted anesthetized rats, GIP (1-42) stimulated insulin release in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect abolished by the concomitant intraperitoneal administration of GIP (7-30)-NH2 (100 nmol/ kg). In contrast, glucose-, GLP-1-, and arginine-stimulated insulin release were not affected by GIP (7-30)-NH2. In separate experiments, GIP (7-30)-NH2 (100 nmol/kg) reduced postprandial insulin release in conscious rats by 72%. It is concluded that GIP (7-30)-NH2 is a GIP-specific receptor antagonist and that GIP plays a dominant role in mediating postprandial insulin release. PMID:8958204

  8. Understanding interactions of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) with its G-protein coupled receptor through NMR and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Malde, Alpeshkumar K; Srivastava, Sudha S; Coutinho, Evans C

    2007-05-01

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP, or glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide) is a 42-amino acid incretin hormone moderating glucose-induced insulin secretion. Antidiabetic therapy based on GIP holds great promise because of the fact that its insulinotropic action is highly dependent on the level of glucose, overcoming the sideeffects of hypoglycemia associated with the current therapy of Type 2 diabetes. The truncated peptide, GIP(1-30)NH2, has the same activity as the full length native peptide. We have studied the structure of GIP(1-30)NH2 and built a model of its G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). The structure of GIP(1-30)NH2 in DMSO-d6 and H2O has been studied using 2D NMR (total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), double quantum filtered-COSY (DQF-COSY), 13C-heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) experiments, and its conformation built by MD simulations with the NMR data as constraints. The peptide in DMSO-d6 exhibits an alpha-helix between residues Ile12 and Lys30 with a discontinuity at residues Gln19 and Gln20. In H2O, the alpha-helix starts at Ile7, breaks off at Gln19, and then continues right through to Lys30. GIP(1-30)NH2 has all the structural features of peptides belonging to family B1 GPCRs, which are characterized by a coil at the N-terminal and a long C-terminal alpha-helix with or without a break. A model of the seven transmembrane (TM) helices of the GIP receptor (GIPR) has been built on the principles of comparative protein modeling, using the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. The N-terminal domain of GIPR has been constructed from the NMR structure of the N-terminal of corticoptropin releasing factor receptor (CRFR), a family B1 GCPR. The intra and extra cellular loops and the C-terminal have been modeled from fragments retrieved from the PDB. On the basis of the experimental data available for some members of family B1 GPCRs, four pairs of constraints between

  9. Generation of a highly diverse panel of antagonistic chicken monoclonal antibodies against the GIP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Könitzer, Jennifer D.; Pan, Qi; Augustin, Robert; Bandholtz, Sebastian; Harriman, William; Izquierdo, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Raising functional antibodies against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is challenging due to their low density expression, instability in the absence of the cell membrane's lipid bilayer and frequently short extracellular domains that can serve as antigens. In addition, a particular therapeutic concept may require an antibody to not just bind the receptor, but also act as a functional receptor agonist or antagonist. Antagonizing the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor may open up new therapeutic modalities in the treatment of diabetes and obesity. As such, a panel of monoclonal antagonistic antibodies would be a useful tool for in vitro and in vivo proof of concept studies. The receptor is highly conserved between rodents and humans, which has contributed to previous mouse and rat immunization campaigns generating very few usable antibodies. Switching the immunization host to chicken, which is phylogenetically distant from mammals, enabled the generation of a large and diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies containing 172 unique sequences. Three-quarters of all chicken-derived antibodies were functional antagonists, exhibited high-affinities to the receptor extracellular domain and sampled a broad epitope repertoire. For difficult targets, including GPCRs such as GIPR, chickens are emerging as valuable immunization hosts for therapeutic antibody discovery. PMID:28055305

  10. Generation of a highly diverse panel of antagonistic chicken monoclonal antibodies against the GIP receptor.

    PubMed

    Könitzer, Jennifer D; Pramanick, Shreya; Pan, Qi; Augustin, Robert; Bandholtz, Sebastian; Harriman, William; Izquierdo, Shelley

    2017-01-05

    Raising functional antibodies against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is challenging due to their low density expression, instability in the absence of the cell membrane's lipid bilayer and frequently short extracellular domains that can serve as antigens. In addition, a particular therapeutic concept may require an antibody to not just bind the receptor, but also act as a functional receptor agonist or antagonist. Antagonizing the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor may open up new therapeutic modalities in the treatment of diabetes and obesity. As such, a panel of monoclonal antagonistic antibodies would be a useful tool for in vitro and in vivo proof of concept studies. The receptor is highly conserved between rodents and humans, which has contributed to previous mouse and rat immunization campaigns generating very few usable antibodies. Switching the immunization host to chicken, which is phylogenetically distant from mammals, enabled the generation of a large and diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies containing 172 unique sequences. Three-quarters of all chicken-derived antibodies were functional antagonists, exhibited high-affinities to the receptor extracellular domain and sampled a broad epitope repertoire. For difficult targets, including GPCRs such as GIPR, chickens are emerging as valuable immunization hosts for therapeutic antibody discovery.

  11. Immobilization of soluble complement receptor 1 on islets.

    PubMed

    Luan, Nguyen M; Teramura, Yuji; Iwata, Hiroo

    2011-07-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans (islets) is a promising method to treat insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Control of complement activation is necessary to improve graft survival in alloislet and xenoislet transplantation. In this study, human soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) was immobilized on the islet cell surface through poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated phospholipid (PEG-lipid) without loss of islet cell viability or insulin secretion ability. sCR1 on islets effectively inhibits complement activation and protects islets against attack by xenoreactive antibodies and complement. This method will be an efficient means to control early islet loss in clinical islet transplantation and realize xenoislet transplantation in the future.

  12. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor deletion leads to reduced bone strength and quality.

    PubMed

    Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R; Chappard, Daniel; Mabilleau, Guillaume

    2013-10-01

    Bone is permanently remodeled by a complex network of local, hormonal and neuronal factors that affect osteoclast and osteoblast biology. In this context, a role for gastro-intestinal hormones has been proposed based on evidence that bone resorption dramatically falls after a meal. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is one of the candidate hormones as its receptor, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor (GIPR), is expressed in bone. In the present study we investigated bone strength and quality by three-point bending, quantitative x-ray microradiography, microCT, qBEI and FTIR in a GIPR knockout (GIPR KO) mouse model and compared with control wild-type (WT) animals. Animals with a deletion of the GIPR presented with a significant reduction in ultimate load (--11%), stiffness (-16%), total absorbed (-28%) and post-yield energies (-27%) as compared with WT animals. Furthermore, despite no change in bone outer diameter, the bone marrow diameter was significantly increased and as a result cortical thickness was significantly decreased by 20% in GIPR deficient animals. Bone resorption at the endosteal surface was significantly increased whilst bone formation was unchanged in GIPR deficient animals. Deficient animals also presented with a pronounced reduction in the degree of mineralization of bone matrix. Furthermore, the amount of mature cross-links of collagen matrix was significantly reduced in GIPR deficient animals and was associated with lowered intrinsic material properties. Taken together, these data support a positive effect of the GIPR on bone strength and quality. © 2013.

  13. Sweet Taste Receptor Activation in the Gut Is of Limited Importance for Glucose-Stimulated GLP-1 and GIP Secretion.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, Monika Y; Kuhre, Rune E; Christiansen, Charlotte B; Eliasen, Rasmus; Conde-Frieboes, Kilian W; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Holst, Jens J

    2017-04-22

    Glucose stimulates the secretion of the incretin hormones: glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). It is debated whether the sweet taste receptor (STR) triggers this secretion. We investigated the role of STR activation for glucose-stimulated incretin secretion from an isolated perfused rat small intestine and whether selective STR activation by artificial sweeteners stimulates secretion. Intra-luminal administration of the STR agonists, acesulfame K (3.85% w/v), but not sucralose (1.25% w/v) and stevioside (2.5% w/v), stimulated GLP-1 secretion (acesulfame K: 31 ± 3 pmol/L vs. 21 ± 2 pmol/L, p < 0.05, n = 6). In contrast, intra-arterial administration of sucralose (10 mM) and stevioside (10 mM), but not acesulfame K, stimulated GLP-1 secretion (sucralose: 51 ± 6 pmol/L vs. 34 ± 4 pmol/L, p < 0.05; stevioside: 54 ± 6 pmol/L vs. 32 ± 2 pmol/L, p < 0.05, n = 6), while 0.1 mM and 1 mM sucralose did not affect the secretion. Luminal glucose (20% w/v) doubled GLP-1 and GIP secretion, but basolateral STR inhibition by gurmarin (2.5 µg/mL) or the inhibition of the transient receptor potential cation channel 5 (TRPM5) by triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) (100 µM) did not attenuate the responses. In conclusion, STR activation does not drive GIP/GLP-1 secretion itself, nor does it have a role for glucose-stimulated GLP-1 or GIP secretion.

  14. Sweet Taste Receptor Activation in the Gut Is of Limited Importance for Glucose-Stimulated GLP-1 and GIP Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Saltiel, Monika Y.; Kuhre, Rune E.; Christiansen, Charlotte B.; Eliasen, Rasmus; Conde-Frieboes, Kilian W.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Holst, Jens J.

    2017-01-01

    Glucose stimulates the secretion of the incretin hormones: glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). It is debated whether the sweet taste receptor (STR) triggers this secretion. We investigated the role of STR activation for glucose-stimulated incretin secretion from an isolated perfused rat small intestine and whether selective STR activation by artificial sweeteners stimulates secretion. Intra-luminal administration of the STR agonists, acesulfame K (3.85% w/v), but not sucralose (1.25% w/v) and stevioside (2.5% w/v), stimulated GLP-1 secretion (acesulfame K: 31 ± 3 pmol/L vs. 21 ± 2 pmol/L, p < 0.05, n = 6). In contrast, intra-arterial administration of sucralose (10 mM) and stevioside (10 mM), but not acesulfame K, stimulated GLP-1 secretion (sucralose: 51 ± 6 pmol/L vs. 34 ± 4 pmol/L, p < 0.05; stevioside: 54 ± 6 pmol/L vs. 32 ± 2 pmol/L, p < 0.05, n = 6), while 0.1 mM and 1 mM sucralose did not affect the secretion. Luminal glucose (20% w/v) doubled GLP-1 and GIP secretion, but basolateral STR inhibition by gurmarin (2.5 µg/mL) or the inhibition of the transient receptor potential cation channel 5 (TRPM5) by triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) (100 µM) did not attenuate the responses. In conclusion, STR activation does not drive GIP/GLP-1 secretion itself, nor does it have a role for glucose-stimulated GLP-1 or GIP secretion. PMID:28441725

  15. Free fatty acid receptor GPR120 is highly expressed in enteroendocrine K cells of the upper small intestine and has a critical role in GIP secretion after fat ingestion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kanako; Harada, Norio; Sasaki, Kazuki; Yamane, Shunsuke; Iida, Keiko; Suzuki, Kazuyo; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Nasteska, Daniela; Shibue, Kimitaka; Joo, Erina; Harada, Takanari; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-03-01

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin secreted from enteroendocrine K cells in response to meal ingestion. Recently free fatty acid receptor G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 120 was identified as a lipid sensor involved in glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. However, Gpr 120 gene expression and its role in K cells remain unclear, partly due to difficulties in separation of K cells from other intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we purified K cells using GIP-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice, in which K cells can be visualized by GFP fluorescence. GFP-positive cells (K cells) were observed in the small intestine but not in the stomach and colon. K cell number and GIP content in K cells were significantly higher in the upper small intestine than those in the lower small intestine. We also examined the expression levels of several free fatty acid receptors in K cells. Among free fatty acid receptors, GPR120 was highly expressed in the K cells of the upper small intestine compared with the lower small intestine. To clarify the role of GPR120 on K cells in vivo, we used GPR120-deficient mice (GPR120(-/-)). GPR120(-/-) exhibited significantly lower GIP secretion (75% reduction, P < .01) after lard oil ingestion compared with that in wild-type mice. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of GPR120 with grifolic acid methyl ether in wild-type mice significantly attenuated lard oil-induced GIP secretion. In conclusion, GPR120 is expressed abundantly in K cells of the upper small intestine and plays a critical role in lipid-induced GIP secretion.

  16. Xenotransplantation of islets enclosed in agarose microcapsule carrying soluble complement receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Luan, Nguyen Minh; Iwata, Hiroo

    2012-11-01

    Strong immunological reactions remain a major barrier to treating diabetic patients using xenogeneic islets. In a previous study, we developed a method for enclosing islets with agarose microbeads carrying soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1-Mics), a potent complement inhibitor in both classical and alternative complement activation pathways. This is the follow-up in vivo study to evaluate the protective effect of these sCR1-Mics using a xenotransplantation model (rats to mice). ACI/NSIc rat islets enclosed in sCR1-Mics were transplanted into the intraperitoneal cavity of diabetic C57BL/6 mice without immunosuppression therapy. Transplantation of islets in plain agarose microbeads (Mics) was used as a reference. While islets enclosed in plain Mics were rapidly destroyed (graft survival in recipients of 1000 islets: 11.6±3.8 days), transplantation of islets in sCR1-Mics significantly prolonged graft survival (34.1±3.2 days). Moreover, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests revealed that islets in sCR1-Mics normalized blood glucose levels in a similar manner as islets in pancreas of normal mice. In conclusion, sCR1 immobilized onto agarose microbeads exerted some protective effect in xenogeneic islets resulting in prolonged graft survival.

  17. Adverse effect on syngeneic islet transplantation by transgenic coexpression of decoy receptor 3 and heme oxygenase-1 in the islet of NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, S-H; Lin, G-J; Chien, M-W; Chu, C-H; Yu, J-C; Chen, T-W; Hueng, D-Y; Liu, Y-L; Sytwu, H-K

    2013-03-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) blocks both Fas ligand- and LIGHT-induced pancreatic β-cell damage in autoimmune diabetes. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) possesses antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative effects that protect cells against various forms of attack by the immune system. Previously, we have demonstrated that transgenic islets overexpressing DcR3 or murine HO-1 (mHO-1) exhibit longer survival times than nontransgenic islets in syngeneic islet transplantation. In this study, we evaluated whether DcR3 and mHO-1 double-transgenic islets of NOD mice could provide better protective effects and achieve longer islet graft survival than DcR3 or mHO-1 single-transgenic islets after islet transplantation. We generated DcR3 and mHO-1 double-transgenic NOD mice that specifically overexpress DcR3 and HO-1 in islets. Seven hundred islets isolated from double-transgenic, single-transgenic, or nontransgenic NOD mice were syngeneically transplanted into the kidney capsules of newly diabetic female recipients. Unexpectedly, there was no significant difference in the survival time between double-transgenic or nontransgenic NOD islet grafts, and the survival times of double-transgenic NOD islet grafts were even shorter than those of DcR3 or mHO-1 single-transgenic islets. Our data indicate that transplantation of double-transgenic islets that coexpress HO-1 and DcR3 did not result in a better outcome. On the contrary, this strategy even caused an adverse effect in syngeneic islet transplantation.

  18. c-Kit Receptor Signaling Regulates Islet Vasculature, β-Cell Survival, and Function In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhi-Chao; Popell, Alex; Li, Jinming; Silverstein, Jenna; Oakie, Amanda; Yee, Siu-Pok; Wang, Rennian

    2015-11-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit plays an integral role in maintaining β-cell mass and function. Although c-Kit receptor signaling promotes angiogenesis in multiple cell types, its role in islet vasculature is unknown. This study examines the effects of c-Kit-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor isoform A (VEGF-A) and islet vascularization on β-cell function and survival using in vitro cell culture and in vivo mouse models. In cultured INS-1 cells and primary islets, c-Kit regulates VEGF-A expression via the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Juvenile mice with mutated c-Kit (c-Kit(Wv/+)) showed impaired islet vasculature and β-cell dysfunction, while restoring c-Kit expression in β-cells of c-Kit(Wv/+) mice rescued islet vascular defects through modulation of the Akt/mTOR/VEGF-A pathway, indicating that c-Kit signaling in β-cells is a required regulator for maintaining normal islet vasculature. Furthermore, β-cell-specific c-Kit overexpression (c-KitβTg) in aged mice showed significantly increased islet vasculature and β-cell function, but, when exposed to a long-term high-fat diet, c-Kit signaling in c-KitβTg mice induced substantial vascular remodeling, which resulted in increased islet inflammatory responses and β-cell apoptosis. These results suggest that c-Kit-mediated VEGF-A action in β-cells plays a pivotal role in maintaining islet vascularization and function.

  19. The p75 Neurotrophin Receptor Is Required for the Major Loss of Sympathetic Nerves From Islets Under Autoimmune Attack

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Qi; Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Hackney, Daryl J.; Mundinger, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to determine the role of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the loss of islet sympathetic nerves that occurs during the autoimmune attack of the islet. The islets of transgenic (Tg) mice in which β-cells express a viral glycoprotein (GP) under the control of the insulin promotor (Ins2) were stained for neuropeptide Y before, during, and after virally induced autoimmune attack of the islet. Ins2-GPTg mice injected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) lost islet sympathetic nerves before diabetes development but coincident with the lymphocytic infiltration of the islet. The nerve loss wasmarked and islet-selective. Similar nerve loss, chemically induced, was sufficient to impair sympathetically mediated glucagon secretion. In contrast, LCMV-injected Ins2-GPTg mice lacking the p75NTR retained most of their islet sympathetic nerves, despite both lymphocytic infiltration and development of diabetes indistinguishable from that of p75NTR wild-type mice. We conclude that an nducible autoimmune attack of the islet causes a marked and islet-selective loss of sympathetic nerves that precedes islet collapse and hyperglycemia. The p75NTR mediates this nerve loss but plays no role in mediating the loss of islet β-cells or the subsequent diabetes. p75NTR-mediated nerve loss may contribute to the impaired glucose counterregulation seen in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24608438

  20. The localization of oxytocin receptors in the islets of Langerhans in the rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motoaki; Honda, Yuko; Li, Ming-Zi; Masuko, Sadahiko; Murata, Yuzo

    2013-05-10

    In this study, oxytocin receptors (OTRs) in the islets of Langerhans were detected using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical technique. Indeed, OTR mRNA was expressed in the rat pancreas. Double immunohistochemical staining for OTR and either glucagon or insulin demonstrated their co-localization in A-cells or B-cells, respectively. OTR-immunoreactivity in A-cells was stronger than that of B-cells. All A-cells and 94.8% of B-cells were OTR-immunoreactive. We reveal the statistically significant relations of OTR with A-cells and B-cells in the islets of Langerhans. This is the first demonstration of the OTR localization in the islets of Langerhans immunohistochemically. It suggests that oxytocin (OT) is involved in the release of insulin and glucagon.

  1. Layer-by-layer co-immobilization of soluble complement receptor 1 and heparin on islets.

    PubMed

    Luan, Nguyen Minh; Teramura, Yuji; Iwata, Hiroo

    2011-09-01

    Early graft loss due to instant blood-mediated inflammatory reactions (IBMIRs) is a major obstacle of clinical islet transplantation; inhibition of blood coagulation and complement activation is necessary to inhibit IBMIRs. Here, human soluble form complement receptor 1 (sCR1) and heparin were co-immobilized onto the surfaces of islet cells. sCR1 molecules carrying thiol groups were immobilized through maleimide-poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipids anchored in the lipid bilayers of islet cells. Heparin was immobilized on the sCR1 layer via the affinity between sCR1 and heparin, and additional layers of sCR1 and heparin were formed layer-by-layer. The sCR1 and heparin molecules in these layers maintained anti-complement activation and anti-coagulation activities, respectively. This promising method could be employed to reduce the number of islet cells required to reverse hyperglycemia and prolong graft survival in both allo- and xeno-islet transplantation.

  2. The Immunosuppressive Role of Adenosine A2A Receptors in Ischemia Reperfusion Injury and Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Preeti; Linden, Joel; Lobo, Peter; Okusa, Mark Douglas; Brayman, Kenneth Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Activation of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) reduces inflammation by generally inhibiting the activation of pro-inflammatory cells, decreasing endothelial adhesion molecule expression and reducing the release of proinflammatory cytokine mediators. Numerous preclinical studies using selective A2AR agonists, antagonists, A2AR knockout as well as chimeric mice have suggested the therapeutic potential of A2AR agonists for the treatment of ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the immunosuppressive actions of A2AR agonists in murine IRI models of liver, kidney, heart, lung and CNS, and gives details on the cellular effects of A2AR activation in neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells, NKT cells, T effector cells and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells. This is discussed in the context of cytokine mediators involved in inflammatory cascades. Whilst the role of adenosine receptor agonists in various models of autoimmune disease has been well-documented, very little information is available regarding the role of A2AR activation in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). An overview of the pathogenesis of T1DM as well as early islet graft rejection in the immediate peri-transplantation period offers insight regarding the use of A2AR agonists as a beneficial intervention in clinical islet transplantation, promoting islet graft survival, minimizing early islet loss and reducing the number of islets required for successful transplantation, thereby increasing the availability of this procedure to a greater number of recipients. In summary, the use of A2AR agonists as a clinical intervention in IRI and as an adjunct to clinical immunesuppressive regimen in islet transplantation is highlighted. PMID:22934547

  3. Activation of islet 5-HT4 receptor regulates glycemic control through promoting insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Hong, Feng; Chen, Ye; Li, Ji; Yao, Yuan-Sheng; Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Li-Fei; Zhu, Jin-Xia

    2016-10-15

    Mosapride, a gastrointestinal prokinetic drug, is an agonist of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor 4 that also reduces blood glucose. Whether 5-HT4 receptor is distributed in pancreatic islets and whether mosapride can directly stimulate insulin secretion is unclear. In the present study, the protein expression and cellular location of 5-HT4 receptor in pancreas was detected through western blotting and immunofluorescence. The acute effects of 5-HT4 receptor agonists, mosapride and prucalopride, on insulin secretion were investigated in vivo and in vitro in normal and alloxan-induced diabetes rats. The results indicated that 5-HT4 receptor immunoreactivity was co-existed in the islets insulin-immunoreactive cells of rat, mouse, pig and human. However the immunoreactive cells of insulin and 5-HT4 receptor and the protein expression of 5-HT4 receptor were significantly decreased in the pancreas of alloxan-induced diabetes rats. In normal rats, mosapride and prucalopride decreased blood glucose and increased insulin secretion during glucose tolerance test, in association with an increase in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, which was abolished by the 5-HT4 receptor antagonist GR113808. In diabetes rats, mosapride and prucalopride failed to improve blood glucose and insulin levels in the group of 180mg/kg alloxan, but increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the group of 120mg/kg alloxan in vitro. We conclude that 5-HT4 receptor is distributed in the islet β cell. Activation of 5-HT4 receptor is able to stimulate insulin secretion directly, thereby reduce blood glucose. The study provides important experimental evidences for the 5-HT4 receptor regulating insulin secretion and acting as a potential drug target in diabetes treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Niacin-induced hyperglycemia is partially mediated via niacin receptor GPR109a in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihua; So, Wing Yan; Li, Stephen Y T; Cheng, Qianni; Boucher, Barbara J; Leung, Po Sing

    2015-03-15

    The widely used lipid-lowering drug niacin is reported to induce hyperglycemia during chronic and high-dose treatments, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Recently, the niacin receptor [G-protein-coupled receptor, (GPR) 109a], has been localized to islet cells while its potential role therein remains unclear. We, therefore, aimed at investigating how GPR109a regulates islet beta-cell function and its downstream signaling using high-fat diet-induced obese mice and INS-1E beta cells. Eight-week niacin treatment elevated blood glucose concentration in obese mice with increased areas under the curve at oral glucose and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests. Additionally, niacin treatment significantly decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) but induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg) and GPR109a expression in isolated pancreatic islets; concomitantly, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were transiently increased, with decreases in GSIS, intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), but with increased expression of uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2), Pparg and Gpr109a in INS-1E cells. Corroborating these findings, the decreases in GSIS, ΔΨm and cAMP production and increases in ROS, Pparg and GPR109a expression were abolished in INS-1E cells by GPR109a knockdown. Our data indicate that niacin-induced pancreatic islet dysfunction is probably modulated through activation of the islet beta-cell GPR109a-induced ROS-PPARγ-UCP2 pathways.

  5. (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG]: novel, long-acting, mPEGylated antagonist of gastric inhibitory polypeptide for obesity-diabetes (diabesity) therapy.

    PubMed

    McClean, P L; Irwin, N; Hunter, K; Gault, V A; Flatt, P R

    2008-11-01

    Antagonism of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) receptor with daily injection of proline-3 gastric inhibitory polypeptide ((Pro(3))GIP) can reverse or prevent many of the metabolic abnormalities associated with diet-induced obesity-diabetes (diabesity). This study has examined the ability of a novel and longer-acting form of (Pro(3))GIP, (Pro(3))GIP mini-polyethylene glycol ((Pro(3))GIP[mPEG]), to counter diet-induced diabesity in mice, using a daily and intermittent dosing regime. We studied the actions of (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG] at the GIP receptor in vitro and in vivo in both dietary and genetic diabesity. (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG] was completely resistant to degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase IV. (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG] inhibited GIP-induced cAMP and insulin production in vitro. A greater and prolonged antagonism of GIP-induced glucose-lowering action was followed (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG] administration, compared with (Pro(3))GIP. In contrast with (Pro(3))GIP, mice injected once every 3 days for 48 days with (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG] displayed reduced body weight gain and hyperinsulinemia with improved glucose tolerance and insulin secretory responses, compared with high-fat-fed controls. Daily i.p. injection of (Pro(3))GIP, (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG] or (Pro(3))GIP b.i.d. for 21 days also decreased body weight, circulating plasma insulin levels and improved glucose tolerance, compared with high-fat controls. Plasma triglycerides were decreased by (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG] and (Pro(3))GIP b.i.d. treatment groups. The observed changes were accompanied by enhancement of insulin sensitivity in all treatment regimes. (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG] was also effective over 16 days treatment of genetically obese-diabetic ob/ob mice. These data demonstrate the utility of GIP receptor antagonism for the treatment of diabesity and the potential offered by (Pro(3))GIP[mPEG] as a long-acting stable GIP receptor antagonist.

  6. (Pro3)GIP[mPEG]: novel, long-acting, mPEGylated antagonist of gastric inhibitory polypeptide for obesity-diabetes (diabesity) therapy

    PubMed Central

    McClean, P L; Irwin, N; Hunter, K; Gault, V A; Flatt, P R

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antagonism of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) receptor with daily injection of proline-3 gastric inhibitory polypeptide ((Pro3)GIP) can reverse or prevent many of the metabolic abnormalities associated with diet-induced obesity-diabetes (diabesity). This study has examined the ability of a novel and longer-acting form of (Pro3)GIP, (Pro3)GIP mini-polyethylene glycol ((Pro3)GIP[mPEG]), to counter diet-induced diabesity in mice, using a daily and intermittent dosing regime. Experimental approach: We studied the actions of (Pro3)GIP[mPEG] at the GIP receptor in vitro and in vivo in both dietary and genetic diabesity. Key results: (Pro3)GIP[mPEG] was completely resistant to degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase IV. (Pro3)GIP[mPEG] inhibited GIP-induced cAMP and insulin production in vitro. A greater and prolonged antagonism of GIP-induced glucose-lowering action was followed (Pro3)GIP[mPEG] administration, compared with (Pro3)GIP. In contrast with (Pro3)GIP, mice injected once every 3 days for 48 days with (Pro3)GIP[mPEG] displayed reduced body weight gain and hyperinsulinemia with improved glucose tolerance and insulin secretory responses, compared with high-fat-fed controls. Daily i.p. injection of (Pro3)GIP, (Pro3)GIP[mPEG] or (Pro3)GIP b.i.d. for 21 days also decreased body weight, circulating plasma insulin levels and improved glucose tolerance, compared with high-fat controls. Plasma triglycerides were decreased by (Pro3)GIP[mPEG] and (Pro3)GIP b.i.d. treatment groups. The observed changes were accompanied by enhancement of insulin sensitivity in all treatment regimes. (Pro3)GIP[mPEG] was also effective over 16 days treatment of genetically obese-diabetic ob/ob mice. Conclusions and implications: These data demonstrate the utility of GIP receptor antagonism for the treatment of diabesity and the potential offered by (Pro3)GIP[mPEG] as a long-acting stable GIP receptor antagonist. PMID:18695644

  7. Leptin modulates β cell expression of IL-1 receptor antagonist and release of IL-1β in human islets

    PubMed Central

    Maedler, Kathrin; Sergeev, Pavel; Ehses, Jan A.; Mathe, Zoltan; Bosco, Domenico; Berney, Thierry; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Reinecke, Manfred; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2004-01-01

    High concentrations of glucose induce β cell production of IL-1β, leading to impaired β cell function and apoptosis in human pancreatic islets. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring antagonist of IL-1β and protects cultured human islets from glucotoxicity. Therefore, the balance of IL-1β and IL-1Ra may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. In the present study, we observed expression of IL-1Ra in human pancreatic β cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro, chronic exposure of human islets to leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes, decreased β cell production of IL-1Ra and induced IL-1β release from the islet preparation, leading to impaired β cell function, caspase-3 activation, and apoptosis. Exogenous addition of IL-1Ra protected cultured human islets from the deleterious effects of leptin. Antagonizing IL-1Ra by introduction of small interfering RNA to IL-1Ra into human islets led to caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and impaired β cell function. Moreover, siIL-1Ra enhanced glucose-induced β cell apoptosis. These findings demonstrate expression of IL-1Ra in the human β cell, providing localized protection against leptin- and glucose-induced islet IL-1β. PMID:15141093

  8. Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP): From prohormone to actions in endocrine pancreas and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Ugleholdt, Randi

    2011-12-01

    The present thesis consists of one published article and one draft manuscript. Interest in the incretin hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) was reignited by the discovery that GIP receptor deficient mice were unable to gain weight in response to high fat feeding. However, the path from processing of the prohormone to regulation of secretion and establishment of its role in the complicated network of mediators involved in energy mobilization is not fully understood. The biologically active GIP1-42 was found in vivo to be dependent on processing from the immature prohormone by proprotein convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) in the intestinal K-cell. Even so, ~50% of GIP immunoreactive cells do not express PC1/3 raising the possibility that subsets of K-cells exist in which the precursor may be cleaved at alternative sites. Cell line studies did demonstrate that another convertase in endocrine cell types, PC2, mediated cleavage at alternative sites liberating larger and smaller GIP fragments. It was possible to detect fragments of similar size in gel filtration extracts of murine upper jejunum, but the identity, mechanism of processing and function of these immunoreactivities remains uncertain. Once correctly processed GIP1-42 is secreted in response to food intake. The K-cell is believed to directly sense and respond to nutrients in the intestine, but as the molecular profiling of this cell type has just begun, the nutrient sensing machinery and possible feedback regulation are still poorly characterized. When secreted to the blood stream, GIP acts as a mediator of energy mobilization in a complex network with other hormones. An acute and established function of GIP is to exert its incretin function thereby enhancing glucose stimulated insulin secretion necessary for prompt disposal of nutrients, yet GIP also stimulates glucagon secretion to increase blood glucose. In the diabetic state the insulinotropic effect of GIP is impaired and an early inexpedient

  9. Increased GIP signaling induces adipose inflammation via a HIF-1α-dependent pathway and impairs insulin sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu; Okahara, Fumiaki; Osaki, Noriko; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a gut hormone secreted in response to dietary fat and glucose. The blood GIP level is elevated in obesity and diabetes. GIP stimulates proinflammatory gene expression and impairs insulin sensitivity in cultured adipocytes. In obesity, hypoxia within adipose tissue can induce inflammation. The aims of this study were 1) to examine the proinflammatory effect of increased GIP signaling in adipose tissues in vivo and 2) to clarify the association between GIP and hypoxic signaling in adipose tissue inflammation. We administered GIP intraperitoneally to misty (lean) and db/db (obese) mice and examined adipose tissue inflammation and insulin sensitivity. We also examined the effects of GIP and hypoxia on expression of the GIP receptor (GIPR) gene and proinflammatory genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GIP administration increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and increased blood glucose in db/db mice. GIPR and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expressions were positively correlated in the adipose tissue in mice. GIPR expression increased dramatically in differentiated adipocytes. GIP treatment of adipocytes increased MCP-1 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production. Adipocytes cultured either with RAW 264 macrophages or under hypoxia expressed more GIPR and HIF-1α, and GIP treatment increased gene expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and IL-6. HIF-1α gene silencing diminished both macrophage- and hypoxia-induced GIPR expression and GIP-induced IL-6 expression in adipocytes. Thus, increased GIP signaling plays a significant role in adipose tissue inflammation and thereby insulin resistance in obese mice, and HIF-1α may contribute to this process. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Demonstration of. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in rat pancreatic islets using radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Cherksey, B.; Mendelsohn, S.; Zadunaisky, J.; Altszuler, N.

    1982-11-01

    The type of the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors on rat pancreatic islet cells was characterized directly using specific radioligands and displacement agonists and antagonists. Scatchard plots for binding of (/sup 3/H)clonidine (..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist) revealed a dissociation constant, K/sub d/ of 0.542 +/- 0.1 nM and density of binding sites (B/sub max/) of 50.4 +/- 3.6 fmole/mg protein. Similar values were obtained with (/sup 3/H)dihydroergocryptine (antagonist). The various agonists displaced (/sup 3/H)clonidine with the following order of potency: clonidine > epinephrine approx. = norepinephrine > isoproterenol. Yohimbine, the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antagonist, was very effective in displacing (/sup 3/H)clonidine, whereas the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antagonist, prazosin, was much less effective. The data indicate that the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors on rat pancreatic islets are of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ subtype.

  11. Impaired muscarinic type 3 (M3) receptor/PKC and PKA pathways in islets from MSG-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rosane Aparecida; Balbo, Sandra Lucinei; Roma, Letícia Prates; Camargo, Rafael Ludemann; Barella, Luiz Felipe; Vanzela, Emerielle Cristine; de Freitas Mathias, Paulo Cesar; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Boschero, Antonio Carlos; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia

    2013-07-01

    Monosodium glutamate-obese rats are glucose intolerant and insulin resistant. Their pancreatic islets secrete more insulin at increasing glucose concentrations, despite the possible imbalance in the autonomic nervous system of these rats. Here, we investigate the involvement of the cholinergic/protein kinase (PK)-C and PKA pathways in MSG β-cell function. Male newborn Wistar rats received a subcutaneous injection of MSG (4 g/kg body weight (BW)) or hyperosmotic saline solution during the first 5 days of life. At 90 days of life, plasma parameters, islet static insulin secretion and protein expression were analyzed. Monosodium glutamate rats presented lower body weight and decreased nasoanal length, but had higher body fat depots, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia and hypertrigliceridemia. Their pancreatic islets secreted more insulin in the presence of increasing glucose concentrations with no modifications in the islet-protein content of the glucose-sensing proteins: the glucose transporter (GLUT)-2 and glycokinase. However, MSG islets presented a lower secretory capacity at 40 mM K(+) (P < 0.05). The MSG group also released less insulin in response to 100 μM carbachol, 10 μM forskolin and 1 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xantine (P < 0.05, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.01). These effects may be associated with a the decrease of 46 % in the acetylcholine muscarinic type 3 (M3) receptor, and a reduction of 64 % in PKCα and 36 % in PKAα protein expressions in MSG islets. Our data suggest that MSG islets, whilst showing a compensatory increase in glucose-induced insulin release, demonstrate decreased islet M3/PKC and adenylate cyclase/PKA activation, possibly predisposing these prediabetic rodents to the early development of β-cell dysfunction.

  12. Melatonin receptors in pancreatic islets: good morning to a novel type 2 diabetes gene.

    PubMed

    Mulder, H; Nagorny, C L F; Lyssenko, V; Groop, L

    2009-07-01

    Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is primarily released from the pineal gland. It is best known as a regulator of seasonal and circadian rhythms; its levels are high during the night and low during the day. Interestingly, insulin levels also exhibit a nocturnal drop, which has previously been suggested to be controlled, at least in part, by melatonin. This regulation can be explained by the proposed inhibitory action of melatonin on insulin release. Indeed, both melatonin receptor 1A (MTNR1A) and MTNR1B are expressed in pancreatic islets. The role of melatonin in the regulation of glucose homeostasis has been highlighted by three independent publications based on genome-wide association studies of traits connected with type 2 diabetes, such as elevated fasting glucose, and, subsequently, of the disease itself. The studies demonstrate a link between variations in the MTNR1B gene, hyperglycaemia, impaired early phase insulin secretion and beta cell function. The risk genotype predicts the future development of type 2 diabetes. Carriers of the risk genotype exhibit increased expression of MTNR1B in islets. This suggests that these individuals may be more sensitive to the actions of melatonin, leading to impaired insulin secretion. Blocking the inhibition of insulin secretion by melatonin may be a novel therapeutic avenue for type 2 diabetes.

  13. Disruption of GIP/GIPR axis in human adipose tissue is linked to obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ceperuelo-Mallafré, Victòria; Duran, Xavier; Pachón, Gisela; Roche, Kelly; Garrido-Sánchez, Lourdes; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Tinahones, Francisco J; Vicente, Vicente; Pujol, Jordi; Vendrell, Joan; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) has a central role in glucose homeostasis through its amplification of insulin secretion; however, its physiological role in adipose tissue is unclear. Our objective was to define the function of GIP in human adipose tissue in relation to obesity and insulin resistance. GIP receptor (GIPR) expression was analyzed in human sc adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose (VAT) from lean and obese subjects in 3 independent cohorts. GIPR expression was associated with anthropometric and biochemical variables. GIP responsiveness on insulin sensitivity was analyzed in human adipocyte cell lines in normoxic and hypoxic environments as well as in adipose-derived stem cells obtained from lean and obese patients. GIPR expression was downregulated in SAT from obese patients and correlated negatively with body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, and glucose and triglyceride levels. Furthermore, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, glucose, and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) emerged as variables strongly associated with GIPR expression in SAT. Glucose uptake studies and insulin signaling in human adipocytes revealed GIP as an insulin-sensitizer incretin. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that GIP promotes the interaction of GRK2 with GIPR and decreases the association of GRK2 to insulin receptor substrate 1. These effects of GIP observed under normoxia were lost in human fat cells cultured in hypoxia. In support of this, GIP increased insulin sensitivity in human adipose-derived stem cells from lean patients. GIP also induced GIPR expression, which was concomitant with a downregulation of the incretin-degrading enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4. None of the physiological effects of GIP were detected in human fat cells obtained from an obese environment with reduced levels of GIPR. GIP/GIPR signaling is disrupted in insulin-resistant states, such as obesity, and normalizing this

  14. Cholesterol reduction ameliorates glucose-induced calcium handling and insulin secretion in islets from low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Souza, J C; Vanzela, E C; Ribeiro, R A; Rezende, L F; de Oliveira, C A; Carneiro, E M; Oliveira, H C F; Boschero, A C

    2013-04-01

    Changes in cellular cholesterol level may contribute to beta cell dysfunction. Islets from low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) mice have higher cholesterol content and secrete less insulin than wild-type (WT) mice. Here, we investigated the association between cholesterol content, insulin secretion and Ca(2+) handling in these islets. Isolated islets from both LDLR(-/-) and WT mice were used for measurements of insulin secretion (radioimmunoassay), cholesterol content (fluorimetric assay), cytosolic Ca(2+) level (fura-2AM) and SNARE protein expression (VAMP-2, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1A). Cholesterol was depleted by incubating the islets with increasing concentrations (0-10mmol/l) of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD). The first and second phases of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) were lower in LDLR(-/-) than in WT islets, paralleled by an impairment of Ca(2+) handling in the former. SNAP-25 and VAMP-2, but not syntaxin-1A, were reduced in LDLR(-/-) compared with WT islets. Removal of excess cholesterol from LDLR(-/-) islets normalized glucose- and tolbutamide-induced insulin release. Glucose-stimulated Ca(2+) handling was also normalized in cholesterol-depleted LDLR(-/-) islets. Cholesterol removal from WT islets by 0.1 and 1.0mmol/l MβCD impaired both GSIS and Ca(2+) handling. In addition, at 10mmol/l MβCD WT islet showed a loss of membrane integrity and higher DNA fragmentation. Abnormally high (LDLR(-/-) islets) or low cholesterol content (WT islets treated with MβCD) alters both GSIS and Ca(2+) handling. Normalization of cholesterol improves Ca(2+) handling and insulin secretion in LDLR(-/-) islets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, Gary W.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L.

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  16. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  17. A novel insulinotropic mechanism of whole grain-derived γ-oryzanol via the suppression of local dopamine D2 receptor signalling in mouse islet

    PubMed Central

    Kozuka, Chisayo; Sunagawa, Sumito; Ueda, Rei; Higa, Moritake; Ohshiro, Yuzuru; Tanaka, Hideaki; Shimizu-Okabe, Chigusa; Takayama, Chitoshi; Matsushita, Masayuki; Tsutsui, Masato; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Nakata, Masanori; Yada, Toshihiko; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Shimabukuro, Michio; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose γ-Oryzanol, derived from unrefined rice, attenuated the preference for dietary fat in mice, by decreasing hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, no peripheral mechanisms, whereby γ-oryzanol could ameliorate glucose dyshomeostasis were explored. Dopamine D2 receptor signalling locally attenuates insulin secretion in pancreatic islets, presumably via decreased levels of intracellular cAMP. We therefore hypothesized that γ-oryzanol would improve high-fat diet (HFD)-induced dysfunction of islets through the suppression of local D2 receptor signalling. Experimental Approach Glucose metabolism and regulation of molecules involved in D2 receptor signalling in pancreatic islets were investigated in male C57BL/6J mice, fed HFD and treated with γ-oryzanol. In isolated murine islets and the beta cell line, MIN6, the effects of γ-oryzanol on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was analysed using siRNA for D2 receptors and a variety of compounds which alter D2 receptor signalling. Key Results In islets, γ-oryzanol enhanced GSIS via the activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Expression of molecules involved in D2 receptor signalling was increased in islets from HFD-fed mice, which were reciprocally decreased by γ-oryzanol. Experiments with siRNA for D2 receptors and D2 receptor ligands in vitro suggest that γ-oryzanol suppressed D2 receptor signalling and augmented GSIS. Conclusions and Implications γ-Oryzanol exhibited unique anti-diabetic properties. The unexpected effects of γ-oryzanol on D2 receptor signalling in islets may provide a novel; natural food-based, approach to anti-diabetic therapy. PMID:26140534

  18. Glucose activation of islets of Langerhans up-regulates Toll-like receptor 5: possible mechanism of protection.

    PubMed

    Weile, C; Josefsen, K; Buschard, K

    2011-11-01

    Toll-like receptors are pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system that are activated during viral, bacterial or other infections, as well as during disease progression of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR-5) specifically recognizes bacterial infection through binding of flagellin from pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella and Listeria species. We have found that the expression of TLR5 is up-regulated by glucose activation of isolated islets of Langerhans, in contrast to other investigated TLRs (TLR-2, -3, -4, -6 and -9. Stimulation of islets with 10 mm glucose increased the levels of TLR5 mRNA 10-fold (P=0·03) and the TLR-5 protein levels twofold (P=0·04). Furthermore, the protein level of downstream signalling molecule myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) increased 1·6-fold (P=0·01). Activation of TLR-5 in islets lead to a marked reduction of both stimulated and basal secretion of insulin, as well as an increase in production of nitric oxide, proinflammatory cytokines, anti-inflammatory heat-shock protein and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I transporter. We observe no effects of TLR-5 activation on islet survival. We suggest that this regulation by TLR-5 might be beneficial during serious infection such as sepsis by limiting the activity of beta cells during peaks of insulin demand to counteract beta cell damage. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  19. Distinct effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on islet morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Morita, Asuka; Mukai, Eri; Hiratsuka, Ayano; Takatani, Tomozumi; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Lee, Eun Young; Miki, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Although the two anti-diabetic drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4is) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (GLP1RAs), have distinct effects on the dynamics of circulating incretins, little is known of the difference in their consequences on morphology and function of pancreatic islets. We examined these in a mouse model of β cell injury/regeneration. The model mice were generated so as to express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor and a fluorescent protein (Tomato) specifically in β cells. The mice were treated with a DPP4i (MK-0626) and a GLP1RA (liraglutide), singly or doubly, and the morphology and function of the islets were compared. Prior administration of MK-0626 and/or liraglutide similarly protected β cells from DT-induced cell death, indicating that enhanced GLP-1 signaling can account for the cytoprotection. However, 2-week intervention of MK-0626 and/or liraglutide in DT-injected mice resulted in different islet morphology and function: β cell proliferation and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) were increased by MK-0626 but not by liraglutide; α cell mass was decreased by liraglutide but not by MK-0626. Although liraglutide administration nullified MK-0626-induced β cell proliferation, their co-administration resulted in increased GSIS, decreased α cell mass, and improved glucose tolerance. The pro-proliferative effect of MK-0626 was lost by co-administration of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39), indicating that GLP-1 signaling is required for this effect. Comparison of the effects of DPP4is and/or GLP1RAs treatment in a single mouse model shows that the two anti-diabetic drugs have distinct consequences on islet morphology and function.

  20. Cannabinoids inhibit insulin secretion and cytosolic Ca2+ oscillation in islet beta-cells via CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Masanori; Yada, Toshihiko

    2008-01-10

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome. Endogenous cannabinoids act on the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor, a GPCR, and stimulate appetite via central and peripheral actions, while blockade of CB1 receptor reduces body weight in humans. In this study, we aimed to explore a role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in insulin secretion, which could be important in the metabolic effects of the cannabinoid-CB1 system. We found that mRNA for CB1 receptor, but not CB2 receptor, was expressed in mouse pancreatic islets using RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical study revealed that CB1 receptor was expressed in beta-cells. Furthermore, anandamide and a CB1 agonist, arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), inhibited glucose-induced insulin secretion from mouse pancreatic islets. Both anandamide and ACPA inhibited glucose-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillation in mouse pancreatic beta-cells. These results demonstrate a novel peripheral action of cannabinoids to inhibit insulin secretion via CB1 receptors.

  1. Heterotrimeric G-protein shuttling via Gip1 extends the dynamic range of eukaryotic chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Yoichiro; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Ueda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Chemotactic eukaryote cells can sense chemical gradients over a wide range of concentrations via heterotrimeric G-protein signaling; however, the underlying wide-range sensing mechanisms are only partially understood. Here we report that a novel regulator of G proteins, G protein-interacting protein 1 (Gip1), is essential for extending the chemotactic range of Dictyostelium cells. Genetic disruption of Gip1 caused severe defects in gradient sensing and directed cell migration at high but not low concentrations of chemoattractant. Also, Gip1 was found to bind and sequester G proteins in cytosolic pools. Receptor activation induced G-protein translocation to the plasma membrane from the cytosol in a Gip1-dependent manner, causing a biased redistribution of G protein on the membrane along a chemoattractant gradient. These findings suggest that Gip1 regulates G-protein shuttling between the cytosol and the membrane to ensure the availability and biased redistribution of G protein on the membrane for receptor-mediated chemotactic signaling. This mechanism offers an explanation for the wide-range sensing seen in eukaryotic chemotaxis. PMID:27044073

  2. Restoration of insulin secretion in pancreatic islets of protein-deficient rats by reduced expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2.

    PubMed

    Araujo, E P; Amaral, M E C; Filiputti, E; De Souza, C T; Laurito, T L; Augusto, V D; Saad, M J A; Boschero, A C; Velloso, L A; Carneiro, E M

    2004-04-01

    Autocrine and paracrine insulin signaling may participate in the fine control of insulin secretion. In the present study, tissue distribution and protein amounts of the insulin receptor and its major substrates, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2, were evaluated in a model of impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, the protein-deficient rat. Immunoblot and RT-PCR studies showed that the insulin receptor and IRS-2 expression are increased, whilst IRS-1 protein and mRNA contents are decreased in pancreatic islets of protein-deficient rats. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the insulin receptor and IRS-1 and -2 are present in the great majority of islet cells; however, the greatest staining was localized at the periphery, suggesting a co-localization with non-insulin-secreting cells. Exogenous insulin stimulation of isolated islets promoted higher insulin receptor and IRS-1 and -2 tyrosine phosphorylation in islets from protein-deficient rats, as compared with controls. Moreover, insulin-induced IRS-1- and IRS-2-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity are increased in islets of protein-deficient rats. The reduction of IRS-1 and IRS-2 protein expression in islets isolated from protein-deficient rats by the use of antisense IRS-1 or IRS-2 phosphorthioate-modified oligonucleotides partially restored glucose-induced insulin secretion. Thus, the impairment of insulin cell signaling through members of the IRS family of proteins in isolated rat pancreatic islets improves glucose-induced insulin secretion. The present data reinforced the role of insulin paracrine and autocrine signaling in the control of its own secretion.

  3. Coexpression of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B chain and the PDGF. beta. receptor in isolated pancreatic islet cells stimulates DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.; Hallberg, A.; Welsh, N.; Arkhammar, P.; Nilsson, T.; Berggren, P.O. ); Claesson-Welsh, L.; Heldin, C.H. ); Betsholtz, C. ); Berggren, P.O. )

    1990-08-01

    Suspensions rich in pancreatic {beta} cells were transfected by means of electroporation or by using the liposome technique with DNA constructs coding for the {beta} chain of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and the PDGF {alpha} and {beta} receptors to induce a mitotic response in this slowly replicating cell type. Transfection with the B-chain construct induced synthesis of the PDGF B-chain homodimer (PDGF-BB) as assessed by the presence of {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF-BB competing activity in the conditioned medium of the transfected islet cells. Moreover, islet cells transfected with the PDGF {beta}-receptor construct exhibited increased immunofluorescence staining with a PDGF {beta}-receptor antibody. These cells also displayed increased {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF-BB binding compared with control transfected cells. The {beta} cells exhibited elevated levels of ({sup 3}H)inositol trisphosphate after transfection with the B-chain and {beta}-receptor constructs, indicating activation of phospholipase C. Islet cells transfected with the different receptor constructs exhibited different patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation upon ligand activation. The results demonstrate that pancreatic islet cells can be stimulated to increase DNA synthesis by transfection with the PDGF {beta}-receptor gene, whereas cotransfection with the {alpha}-receptor gene may attenuate the growth response.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of D-Ala2GIP on Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in an APP/PS1 mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). An impairment of insulin signaling as well as a desensitization of its receptor has been found in AD brains. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) normalises insulin signaling by facilitating insulin release. GIP directly modulates neurotransmitter release, LTP formation, and protects synapses from the detrimental effects of beta-amyloid fragments on LTP formation, and cell proliferation of progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus. Here we investigate the potential therapeutic property of the new long lasting incretin hormone analogue D-Ala2GIP on key symptoms found in a mouse model of Alzheimer' disease (APPswe/PS1detaE9). Methods D-Ala2GIP was injected for 21 days at 25 nmol/kg ip once daily in APP/PS1 male mice and wild type (WT) littermates aged 6 or 12 months of age. Amyloid plaque load, inflammation biomarkers, synaptic plasticity in the brain (LTP), and memory were measured. Results D-Ala2GIP improved memory in WT mice and rescued the cognitive decline of 12 months old APP/PS1 mice in two different memory tasks. Furthermore, deterioration of synaptic function in the dentate gyrus and cortex was prevented in 12 months old APP/PS1 mice. D-Ala2GIP facilitated synaptic plasticity in APP/PS1 and WT mice and reduced the number of amyloid plaques in the cortex of D-Ala2GIP injected APP/PS1 mice. The inflammatory response in microglia was also reduced. Conclusion The results demonstrate that D-Ala2GIP has neuroprotective properties on key hallmarks found in AD. This finding shows that novel GIP analogues have the potential as a novel therapeutic for AD. PMID:23601582

  5. Expression of the glucose-sensing receptor T1R3 in pancreatic islet: changes in the expression levels in various nutritional and metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Medina, Anya; Nakagawa, Yuko; Ma, Jinhui; Li, Longfei; Hamano, Kunihisa; Akimoto, Toshio; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    We reported recently that the taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3), a subunit of the sweet taste receptor, functions as a cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor in pancreatic β-cells. In the present study, we investigated the expression of T1R3 in pancreatic islets. mRNA for T1R2 and T1R3 was detected in mouse pancreatic islets. Quantitatively, the mRNA expression level of T1R2 was less than 1% of that of T1R3. Immunohistochemically, T1R3 was abundantly expressed in mouse islets whereas T1R2 was barely detected. Most immunoreactive T1R3 was colocalized with insulin and almost all β-cells were positive for T1R3. In addition, T1R3 was expressed in some portion of α-cells. Immunoreactivity of T1R3 in β-cells was markedly reduced in fed mice compared to those in fasting mice. In contrast, mRNA for T1R3 was not different in islets of fasting and fed mice. Glucose-induced insulin-secretion was higher in islets obtained from fasting mice compared to those from fed mice. The expression of T1R3 was markedly reduced in islets of ob/ob mice compared to those of control mice. Similarly, the expression of T1R3 was reduced in islet of db/db mice. In addition, the expression of T1R3 was markedly reduced in β-cells of fatty diabetic rats and GK rats, models of obese and non-obese type 2 diabetes, respectively. These results indicate that T1R3 is expressed mainly in β-cells and the expression levels are different depending upon the nutritional and metabolic conditions.

  6. Melatonin-receptor-1-deficiency affects neurogenic differentiation factor immunoreaction in pancreatic islets and enteroendocrine cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Shalabi, Andree; Fischer, Claudia; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of neurons and in the control of energy balance and metabolism. It plays a key role in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Melatonin is an important rhythmic endocrine signal within the circadian system of mammals and modulates insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. In the mouse pars tuberalis, NeuroD mRNA levels show day/night variation, which is independent of the molecular clock gene mPER1 but depends on the functional melatonin receptor 1 (MT1). So far, little is known about the effect of melatonin on NeuroD synthesis in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, NeuroD protein levels and cellular localization were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in pancreatic islets and duodenal enteroendocrine cells of MT1- and mPER1-deficienct mice. In addition, the localization of NeuroD-positive cells was analyzed by double-immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. In duodenal enteroendocrine cells and pancreatic islets of WT and PER1-deficient mice, NeuroD immunoreaction showed a peak during the early subjective night. In contrast, this peak was absent in MT1-deficent mice. These data suggest that melatonin, by acting on MT1 receptors, affects NeuroD expression in the gastrointestinal tract and thus might contribute to circadian regulation in metabolic functions.

  7. Vitamin D3 restores altered cholinergic and insulin receptor expression in the cerebral cortex and muscarinic M3 receptor expression in pancreatic islets of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Peeyush T; Antony, Sherin; Nandhu, Mohan S; Sadanandan, Jayanarayanan; Naijil, George; Paulose, Chiramadathikudiyil S

    2011-05-01

    Nutritional therapy is a challenging but necessary dimension in the management of diabetes and neurodegenerative changes associated with it. The study evaluates the effect of vitamin D(3) in preventing the altered function of cholinergic, insulin receptors and GLUT3 in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. Muscarinic M3 acetylcholine receptors in pancreas control insulin secretion. Vitamin D(3) treatment in M3 receptor regulation in the pancreatic islets was also studied. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex of male Wistar rats. Immunocytochemistry of muscarinic M3 receptor was studied in the pancreatic islets using specific antibodies. Y-maze was used to evaluate the exploratory and spatial memory. Diabetes induced a decrease in muscarinic M1, insulin and vitamin D receptor expression and an increase in muscarinic M3, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, acetylcholine esterase and GLUT3 expression. Vitamin D(3) and insulin treatment reversed diabetes-induced alterations to near control. Diabetic rats showed a decreased Y-maze performance while vitamin D(3) supplementation improved the behavioural deficit. In conclusion, vitamin D(3) shows a potential therapeutic effect in normalizing diabetes-induced alterations in cholinergic, insulin and vitamin D receptor and maintains a normal glucose transport and utilisation in the cortex. In addition vitamin D(3) modulated muscarinic M3 receptors activity in pancreas and plays a pivotal role in controlling insulin secretion. Hence our findings proved, vitamin D(3) supplementation as a potential nutritional therapy in ameliorating diabetes mediated cortical dysfunctions and suggest an interaction between vitamin D(3) and muscarinic M3 receptors in regulating insulin secretion from pancreas.

  8. Regulation of Endogenous (Male) Rodent GLP-1 Secretion and Human Islet Insulin Secretion by Antagonism of Somatostatin Receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Farb, Thomas B; Adeva, Marta; Beauchamp, Thomas J; Cabrera, Over; Coates, David A; DeShea Meredith, Tamika; Droz, Brian A; Efanov, Alexander; Ficorilli, James V; Gackenheimer, Susan L; Martinez-Grau, Maria A; Molero, Victoriano; Ruano, Gema; Statnick, Michael A; Suter, Todd M; Syed, Samreen K; Toledo, Miguel A; Willard, Francis S; Zhou, Xin; Bokvist, Krister B; Barrett, David G

    2017-09-11

    Incretin and insulin responses to nutrient loads are suppressed in persons with diabetes, resulting in decreased glycemic control. Whereas agents including sulfonylureas and Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4i) partially reverse these effects and provide therapeutic benefit, their modes of action limit efficacy. Because somatostatin (SST) has been shown to suppress both insulin and GLP-1 secretion through the Gi-coupled SST receptor 5 (SSTR5) isoform in vitro, antagonism of SSTR5 may improve glycemic control via intervention in both pathways. Here we show that a novel potent and selective SSTR5 antagonist reverses the blunting effects of SST on insulin secretion from isolated human islets, and demonstrate for the first time that SSTR5 antagonism affords increased levels of systemic GLP-1 in vivo. Knocking out Sstr5 in mice provided a similar increase in systemic GLP-1 levels, which were not increased further by treatment with the antagonist. Treatment of mice with the SSTR5 antagonist in combination with a DPP4i afforded increases in systemic GLP-1 levels that were more than additive, and resulted in greater glycemic control compared to either agent alone. In isolated human islets, the SSTR5 antagonist completely reversed the inhibitory effect of exogenous SST-14 on insulin secretion. Taken together, these data suggest that SSTR5 antagonism should increase circulating GLP-1 levels and stimulate insulin secretion (directly and via GLP-1) in humans, improving glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  9. Glucose-Dependent Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic β-Cell Islets from Male Rats Requires Ca2+ Release via ROS-Stimulated Ryanodine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Paola; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Barrientos, Genaro; Valencia, Marco; Mears, David; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells requires an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). Glucose uptake into β-cells promotes Ca2+ influx and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In other cell types, Ca2+ and ROS jointly induce Ca2+ release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels. Therefore, we explored here if RyR-mediated Ca2+ release contributes to GSIS in β-cell islets isolated from male rats. Stimulatory glucose increased islet insulin secretion, and promoted ROS generation in islets and dissociated β-cells. Conventional PCR assays and immunostaining confirmed that β-cells express RyR2, the cardiac RyR isoform. Extended incubation of β-cell islets with inhibitory ryanodine suppressed GSIS; so did the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), which also decreased insulin secretion induced by glucose plus caffeine. Inhibitory ryanodine or NAC did not affect insulin secretion induced by glucose plus carbachol, which engages inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Incubation of islets with H2O2 in basal glucose increased insulin secretion 2-fold. Inhibitory ryanodine significantly decreased H2O2-stimulated insulin secretion and prevented the 4.5-fold increase of cytoplasmic [Ca2+] produced by incubation of dissociated β-cells with H2O2. Addition of stimulatory glucose or H2O2 (in basal glucose) to β-cells disaggregated from islets increased RyR2 S-glutathionylation to similar levels, measured by a proximity ligation assay; in contrast, NAC significantly reduced the RyR2 S-glutathionylation increase produced by stimulatory glucose. We propose that RyR2-mediated Ca2+ release, induced by the concomitant increases in [Ca2+] and ROS produced by stimulatory glucose, is an essential step in GSIS. PMID:26046640

  10. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... islets, also called islets of Langerhans, are tiny clusters of cells scattered throughout the pancreas. The pancreas ... islets, also called islets of Langerhans, are tiny clusters of cells scattered throughout the pancreas. Pancreatic islets ...

  11. Deletion of ARNT (Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator) in β-Cells Causes Islet Transplant Failure with Impaired β-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Amit; Stokes, Rebecca A.; Lau, Sue Mei; Gunton, Jenny E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Replacing β-cells by islet-transplantation can cure type 1 diabetes, but up to 70% of β-cells die within 10 days of transplantation. ARNT (Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator) regulates β-cell function, and potentially survival. Lack of ARNT impairs the ability of β-cells to respond to physiological stress and potentiates the onset of diabetes, but the exact role of ARNT in graft outcome is unknown. Aim To investigate the effect of β-cell deletion of ARNT on graft outcomes. Methods Islets were isolated from donor mice which had β-cell specific ARNT-deletion (β-ARNT) or littermate floxed controls. The islets were transplanted into diabetic SCID recipients in ratios of (a) 3 donors: 1 recipient, (b) 1 donor: 1 recipient or (c) ½ of the islets from 1 donor: 1 recipient. After 28 days, the kidney containing the graft was removed (nephrectomy) to exclude regeneration of the endogenous pancreas. Results In the supra-physiological-mass model (3∶1), both groups achieved reasonable glycaemia, with slightly higher levels in β-ARNT-recipients. In adequate-mass model (1∶1), β-ARNT recipients had poor glucose control versus floxed-control recipients and versus the β-ARNT donors. In the low-β-cell-mass model (½:1) β-ARNT transplants completely failed, whereas controls had good outcomes. Unexpectedly, there was no difference in the graft insulin content or β-cell mass between groups indicating that the defect was not due to early altered β-cell survival. Conclusion Outcomes for islet transplants lacking β-cell ARNT were poor, unless markedly supra-physiological masses of islets were transplanted. In the 1∶1 transplant model, there was no difference in β-cell volume. This is surprising because transplants of islets lacking one of the ARNT-partners HIF-1α have increased apoptosis and decreased islet volume. ARNT also partners HIF-2α and AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) to form active transcriptional complexes, and further work to

  12. Deletion of ARNT (Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator) in β-cells causes islet transplant failure with impaired β-cell function.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Amit; Stokes, Rebecca A; Lau, Sue Mei; Gunton, Jenny E

    2014-01-01

    Replacing β-cells by islet-transplantation can cure type 1 diabetes, but up to 70% of β-cells die within 10 days of transplantation. ARNT (Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator) regulates β-cell function, and potentially survival. Lack of ARNT impairs the ability of β-cells to respond to physiological stress and potentiates the onset of diabetes, but the exact role of ARNT in graft outcome is unknown. To investigate the effect of β-cell deletion of ARNT on graft outcomes. Islets were isolated from donor mice which had β-cell specific ARNT-deletion (β-ARNT) or littermate floxed controls. The islets were transplanted into diabetic SCID recipients in ratios of (a) 3 donors: 1 recipient, (b) 1 donor: 1 recipient or (c) ½ of the islets from 1 donor: 1 recipient. After 28 days, the kidney containing the graft was removed (nephrectomy) to exclude regeneration of the endogenous pancreas. In the supra-physiological-mass model (3:1), both groups achieved reasonable glycaemia, with slightly higher levels in β-ARNT-recipients. In adequate-mass model (1:1), β-ARNT recipients had poor glucose control versus floxed-control recipients and versus the β-ARNT donors. In the low-β-cell-mass model (½:1) β-ARNT transplants completely failed, whereas controls had good outcomes. Unexpectedly, there was no difference in the graft insulin content or β-cell mass between groups indicating that the defect was not due to early altered β-cell survival. Outcomes for islet transplants lacking β-cell ARNT were poor, unless markedly supra-physiological masses of islets were transplanted. In the 1:1 transplant model, there was no difference in β-cell volume. This is surprising because transplants of islets lacking one of the ARNT-partners HIF-1α have increased apoptosis and decreased islet volume. ARNT also partners HIF-2α and AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) to form active transcriptional complexes, and further work to understand the roles of HIF-2α and AhR in transplant

  13. The effect of the putative endogenous imidazoline receptor ligand, clonidine-displacing substance, on insulin secretion from rat and human islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Susan L F; Atlas, Daphne; James, Roger F L; Morgan, Noel G

    1997-01-01

    The effects of a rat brain extract containing clonidine-displacing substance (CDS), a putative endogenous imidazoline receptor ligand, on insulin release from rat and human isolated islets of Langerhans were investigated.CDS was able to potentiate the insulin secretory response of rat islets incubated at 6 mM glucose, in a dose-dependent manner. The magnitude of this effect was similar to that in response to the well-characterized imidazoline secretagogue, efaroxan.CDS, like other imidazoline secretagogues, was also able to reverse the inhibitory action of diazoxide on glucose-induced insulin release, in both rat and human islets.These effects of CDS on secretion were reversed by the imidazoline secretagogue antagonists, RX801080 and the newly defined KU14R, providing the first evidence that imidazoline-mediated actions of CDS can be blocked by specific imidazoline antagonists.The effects of CDS on insulin secretion were unaffected when the method of preparation involved centri-filtration through a 3,000 Da cut-off membrane or when the extract was treated with protease. These results confirm that the active principle is of low molecular weight and is not a peptide.Overall, the data suggest that CDS behaves as a potent endogenous insulin secretagogue acting at the islet imidazoline receptor. PMID:9138700

  14. Lipopolysaccharides impair insulin gene expression in isolated islets of Langerhans via Toll-Like Receptor-4 and NF-κB signalling.

    PubMed

    Amyot, Julie; Semache, Meriem; Ferdaoussi, Mourad; Fontés, Ghislaine; Poitout, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and is associated with low-grade inflammation. Recent observations suggest that the signalling cascade activated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) binding to Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) exerts deleterious effects on pancreatic β-cell function; however, the molecular mechanisms of these effects are incompletely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that LPS alters insulin gene expression via TLR4 and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in islets. A 24-h exposure of isolated human, rat and mouse islets of Langerhans to LPS dose-dependently reduced insulin gene expression. This was associated in mouse and rat islets with decreased mRNA expression of pancreas-duodenum homebox-1 (PDX-1) and mammalian homologue of avian MafA/l-Maf (MafA). Accordingly, LPS exposure also decreased glucose-induced insulin secretion. LPS repression of insulin, PDX-1 and MafA expression, as well as its inhibition of insulin secretion, were not observed in islets from TLR4-deficient mice. LPS inhibition of β-cell gene expression in rat islets was prevented by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, but not the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway. Our findings demonstrate that LPS inhibit β-cell gene expression in a TLR4-dependent manner and via NF-κB signaling in pancreatic islets, suggesting a novel mechanism by which the gut microbiota might affect pancreatic β-cell function.

  15. Effects of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Svane, Maria S; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Nielsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bendtsen, Flemming; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-04-01

    Exaggerated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is important for postprandial glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), whereas the role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) remains to be resolved. We aimed to explore the relative importance of endogenously secreted GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance and β-cell function after RYGB. We used DPP-4 inhibition to enhance concentrations of intact GIP and GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ex-9) for specific blockage of GLP-1 actions. Twelve glucose-tolerant patients were studied after RYGB in a randomized, placebo-controlled, 4-day crossover study with standard mixed-meal tests and concurrent administration of placebo, oral sitagliptin, Ex-9 infusion, or combined Ex-9-sitagliptin. GLP-1 receptor antagonism increased glucose excursions, clearly attenuated β-cell function, and aggravated postprandial hyperglucagonemia compared with placebo, whereas sitagliptin had no effect despite two- to threefold increased concentrations of intact GLP-1 and GIP. Similarly, sitagliptin did not affect glucose tolerance or β-cell function during GLP-1R blockage. This study confirms the importance of GLP-1 for glucose tolerance after RYGB via increased insulin and attenuated glucagon secretion in the postprandial state, whereas amplification of the GIP signal (or other DPP-4-sensitive glucose-lowering mechanisms) did not appear to contribute to the improved glucose tolerance seen after RYGB.

  16. Upregulated insulin secretion in insulin-resistant mice: evidence of increased islet GLP1 receptor levels and GPR119-activated GLP1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Ahlkvist, L; Brown, K; Ahrén, B

    2013-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that the overall incretin effect and the β-cell responsiveness to glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) are increased in insulin-resistant mice and may contribute to the upregulated β-cell function. Now we examined whether this could, first, be explained by increased islet GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) protein levels and, secondly, be leveraged by G-protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) activation, which stimulates GLP1 secretion. Female C57BL/6J mice, fed a control (CD, 10% fat) or high-fat (HFD, 60% fat) diet for 8 weeks, were anesthetized and orally given a GPR119 receptor agonist (GSK706A; 10 mg/kg) or vehicle, followed after 10 min with gavage with a liquid mixed meal (0.285 kcal). Blood was sampled for determination of glucose, insulin, intact GLP1, and glucagon, and islets were isolated for studies on insulin and glucagon secretion and GLP1R protein levels. In HFD vs CD mice, GPR119 activation augmented the meal-induced increase in the release of both GLP1 (AUCGLP1 81±9.6 vs 37±6.9 pM×min, P=0.002) and insulin (AUCINS 253±29 vs 112±19 nM×min, P<0.001). GPR119 activation also significantly increased glucagon levels in both groups (P<0.01) with, however, no difference between the groups. By contrast, GPR119 activation did not affect islet hormone secretion from isolated islets. Glucose elimination after meal ingestion was significantly increased by GPR119 activation in HFD mice (0.57±0.04 vs 0.43±0.03% per min, P=0.014) but not in control mice. Islet GLP1R protein levels was higher in HFD vs CD mice (0.8±0.1 vs 0.5±0.1, P=0.035). In conclusion, insulin-resistant mice display increased islet GLP1R protein levels and augmented meal-induced GLP1 and insulin responses to GPR119 activation, which results in increased glucose elimination. We suggest that the increased islet GLP1R protein levels together with the increased GLP1 release may contribute to the upregulated β-cell function in insulin resistance.

  17. Vitamin D3 supplementation increases insulin level by regulating altered IP3 and AMPA receptor expression in the pancreatic islets of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Jayanarayanan, Sadanandan; Anju, Thoppil R; Smijin, Soman; Paulose, Cheramadathikudiyil Skaria

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic islets, particularly insulin-secreting β cells, share common characteristics with neurons. Glutamate is one of the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and pancreas, and its action is mediated through glutamate receptors. In the present work, we analysed the role of vitamin D3 in the modulation of AMPA receptor subunit and their functional role in insulin release. Radio receptor binding study in diabetic rats showed a significant increase in AMPA receptor density. Insulin AMPA colabelling study showed an altered AMPA GluR2 and GluR4 subunit expression in the pancreatic beta cells. We also found lowered IP3 content and decreased IP3 receptor in pancreas of diabetic rats. The alterations in AMPA and IP3 receptor resulted in reduced cytosolic calcium level concentration, which further blocks Ca(2+)-mediated insulin release. Vitamin D3 supplementation restored the alteration in vitamin D receptor expression, AMPA receptor density and AMPA and IP3 receptor expression in the pancreatic islets that helps to restore the calcium-mediated insulin secretion. Our study reveals the antidiabetic property of vitamin D3 that is suggested to have therapeutic role through regulating glutamatergic function in diabetic rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Islet Estrogen Receptor-α Is Induced by Hyperglycemia and Protects Against Oxidative Stress-Induced Insulin-Deficient Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Gamze; Alvarez-Mercado, Ana I.; Zarrouki, Bader; Opland, Darren; Liew, Chong Wee; Alonso, Laura C.; Myers, Martin G.; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Poitout, Vincent; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The female steroid, 17β-estradiol (E2), is important for pancreatic β-cell function and acts via at least three estrogen receptors (ER), ERα, ERβ, and the G-protein coupled ER (GPER). Using a pancreas-specific ERα knockout mouse generated using the Cre-lox-P system and a Pdx1-Cre transgenic line (PERαKO−/−), we previously reported that islet ERα suppresses islet glucolipotoxicity and prevents β-cell dysfunction induced by high fat feeding. We also showed that E2 acts via ERα to prevent β-cell apoptosis in vivo. However, the contribution of the islet ERα to β-cell survival in vivo, without the contribution of ERα in other tissues is still unclear. Using the PERαKO−/− mouse, we show that ERα mRNA expression is only decreased by 20% in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, without a parallel decrease in the VMH, making it a reliable model of pancreas-specific ERα elimination. Following exposure to alloxan-induced oxidative stress in vivo, female and male PERαKO−/− mice exhibited a predisposition to β-cell destruction and insulin deficient diabetes. In male PERαKO−/− mice, exposure to E2 partially prevented alloxan-induced β-cell destruction and diabetes. ERα mRNA expression was induced by hyperglycemia in vivo in islets from young mice as well as in cultured rat islets. The induction of ERα mRNA by hyperglycemia was retained in insulin receptor-deficient β-cells, demonstrating independence from direct insulin regulation. These findings suggest that induction of ERα expression acts to naturally protect β-cells against oxidative injury. PMID:24498408

  19. Olfactory receptor Olfr544 responding to azelaic acid regulates glucagon secretion in α-cells of mouse pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Kang, NaNa; Bahk, Young Yil; Lee, NaHye; Jae, YoonGyu; Cho, Yoon Hee; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Byun, Youngjoo; Lee, Eun Jig; Kim, Min-Soo; Koo, JaeHyung

    2015-05-08

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are extensively expressed in olfactory as well as non-olfactory tissues. Although many OR transcripts are expressed in non-olfactory tissues, only a few studies demonstrate the functional role of ORs. Here, we verified that mouse pancreatic α-cells express potential OR-mediated downstream effectors. Moreover, high levels of mRNA for the olfactory receptors Olfr543, Olfr544, Olfr545, and Olfr1349 were expressed in α-cells as assessed using RNA-sequencing, microarray, and quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses. Treatment with dicarboxylic acids (azelaic acid and sebacic acid) increased intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in pancreatic α-cells. The azelaic acid-induced Ca(2+) response as well as glucagon secretion was concentration- and time-dependent manner. Olfr544 was expressed in α-cells, and the EC50 value of azelaic acid to Olfr544 was 19.97 μM, whereas Olfr545 did not respond to azelaic acid. Our findings demonstrate that Olfr544 responds to azelaic acid to regulate glucagon secretion through Ca(2+) mobilization in α-cells of the mouse pancreatic islets, suggesting that Olfr544 may be an important therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pancreatic islet hormone response to oral glucose in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sirinek, K R; O'Dorisio, T M; Howe, B; McFee, A S

    1985-01-01

    Pancreatic islet peptides, as well as other gastrointestinal hormones, have been implicated in both the pathogenesis of obesity and the etiology of associated metabolic derangements. This study evaluated the pancreatic islet and gastrointestinal (GI) hormone response to oral glucose in 20 morbidly obese (151% above ideal body weight) patients. Glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinism, and exaggerated gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) release occurred following glucose ingestion. Significant release of PP occurred in 14 patients, while only six patients had release of somatostatin. No significant changes in plasma concentrations of glucagon occurred. Since GIP is insulinotropic in the presence of hyperglycemia, the hyperinsulinism of morbid obesity may be secondary to the abnormally high glucose-stimulated GIP levels in these patients. Failure of glucagon suppression in response to oral glucose many contribute to the hyperglycemia noted. Somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide may be responsible for some of the metabolic derangements of morbid obesity. PMID:2860876

  1. Regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine osteopontin by GIP in adipocytes - A role for the transcription factor NFAT and phosphodiesterase 3B

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Bilal; Banke, Elin; Guirguis, Emilia; Aakesson, Lina; Manganiello, Vincent; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Groop, Leif; Gomez, Maria F.; Degerman, Eva

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GIP stimulates lipogenesis and osteopontin expression in primary adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GIP-induced osteopontin expression is NFAT-dependent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteopontin expression is PDE3-dependent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteopontin expression is increased in PDE3B KO mice. -- Abstract: The incretin - glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) - and the pro-inflammatory cytokine osteopontin are known to have important roles in the regulation of adipose tissue functions. In this work we show that GIP stimulates lipogenesis and osteopontin expression in primary adipocytes. The GIP-induced increase in osteopontin expression was inhibited by the NFAT (the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells) inhibitor A-285222. Also, the NFAT kinase glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3 was upregulated by GIP. To test whether cAMP might be involved in GIP-mediated effects on osteopontin a number of strategies were used. Thus, the {beta}3-adrenergic receptor agonist CL316,243 stimulated osteopontin expression, an effects which was mimicked by OPC3911, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 3. Furthermore, treatment of phosphodiesterase 3B knock-out mice with CL316,243 resulted in a dramatic upregulation of osteopontin in adipose tissue which was not the case in wild-type mice. In summary, we delineate mechanisms by which GIP stimulates osteopontin in adipocytes. Given the established link between osteopontin and insulin resistance, our data suggest that GIP by stimulating osteopontin expression, also could promote insulin resistance in adipocytes.

  2. Expression of Receptors for Tetanus Toxin and Monoclonal Antibody A2B5 by Pancreatic Islet Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbarth, G. S.; Shimizu, K.; Bowring, M. A.; Wells, S.

    1982-08-01

    Studies of the reaction of antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin with pancreatic islet cells, islet cell tumors, and other human amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation (APUD) tumors are described. By indirect immunofluorescence, antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin were shown to specifically bind to the plasma membrane of human, rat, chicken, and mouse islet cells. The binding of antibody A2B5 to the cell surface of living islet cells has allowed isolation of these cells from a suspension of pancreatic cells by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. In studies designed to determine whether tetanus toxin and antibody A2B5 bound to the same surface antigen, A2B5 and tetanus toxin did not compete for binding to normal islet cells, a human islet cell tumor, or a rat islet cell tumor. In addition to binding to islet cell tumors, antibody A2B5 reacts with frozen sections, isolated cells, and cell lines of neural, neural crest, and APUD origin.

  3. Overexpression of leptin receptors in pancreatic islets of Zucker diabetic fatty rats restores GLUT-2, glucokinase, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, May-Yun; Koyama, Kazunori; Shimabukuro, Michio; Mangelsdorf, David; Newgard, Christopher B.; Unger, Roger H.

    1998-01-01

    The high-Km glucose transporter, GLUT-2, and the high-Km hexokinase of β cells, glucokinase (GK), are required for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). GLUT-2 expression in β cells of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats is profoundly reduced at the onset of β-cell dysfunction of diabetes. Because ZDF rats are homozygous for a mutation in their leptin receptor (OB-R) gene and are therefore leptin-insensitive, we expressed the wild-type OB-R gene in diabetic islets by infusing a recombinant adenovirus (AdCMV-OB-Rb) to determine whether this reversed the abnormalities. Leptin induced a rise in phosphorylated STAT3, indicating that the transferred wild-type OB-R was functional. GLUT-2 protein rose 17-fold in AdCMV-OB-Rb-treated ZDF islets without leptin, and leptin caused no further rise. GK protein rose 7-fold without and 12-fold with leptin. Preproinsulin mRNA increased 64% without leptin and rose no further with leptin, but leptin was required to restore GSIS. Clofibrate and 9-cis-retinoic acid, the partner ligands for binding to peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor α (PPARα) and retinoid X receptor, up-regulated GLUT-2 expression in islets of normal rats, but not in ZDF rats, in which PPARα is very low. Because the fat content of islets of diabetic ZDF rats remains high unless they are treated with leptin, it appears that restoration of GSIS requires normalization of intracellular nutrient homeostasis, whereas up-regulation of GLUT-2 and GK is leptin-independent, requiring only high expression of OB-Rb. PMID:9751766

  4. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells express a restricted set of functionally active chemokine receptors capable of promoting migration to pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Valeria; Malosio, Maria Luisa; Marchesi, Federica; Mercalli, Alessia; Melzi, Raffaella; Giordano, Tiziana; Belmonte, Nathalie; Ferrari, Giuliana; Leone, Biagio Eugenio; Bertuzzi, Federico; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Allavena, Paola; Bonifacio, Ezio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2005-07-15

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are stromal cells with the ability to proliferate and differentiate into many tissues. Although they represent powerful tools for several therapeutic settings, mechanisms regulating their migration to peripheral tissues are still unknown. Here, we report chemokine receptor expression on human BM-MSCs and their role in mediating migration to tissues. A minority of BM-MSCs (2% to 25%) expressed a restricted set of chemokine receptors (CXC receptor 4 [CXCR4], CX3C receptor 1 [CX3CR1], CXCR6, CC chemokine receptor 1 [CCR1], CCR7) and, accordingly, showed appreciable chemotactic migration in response to the chemokines CXC ligand 12 (CXCL12), CX3CL1, CXCL16, CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), and CCL19. Using human pancreatic islets as an in vitro model of peripheral tissue, we showed that islet supernatants released factors able to attract BM-MSCs in vitro, and this attraction was principally mediated by CX3CL1 and CXCL12. Moreover, cells with features of BM-MSCs were detected within the pancreatic islets of mice injected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive BM. A population of bona fide MSCs that also expressed CXCR4, CXCR6, CCR1, and CCR7 could be isolated from normal adult human pancreas. This study defines the chemokine receptor repertoire of human BM-MSCs that determines their migratory activity. Modulation of homing capacity may be instrumental for harnessing the therapeutic potential of BM-MSCs.

  5. The GIP/GIPR axis is functionally linked to GH-secretion increase in a significant proportion of gsp(-) somatotropinomas.

    PubMed

    Regazzo, Daniela; Losa, Marco; Albiger, Nora; Terreni, Maria Rosa; Vazza, Giovanni; Ceccato, Filippo; Emanuelli, Enzo; Denaro, Luca; Scaroni, Carla; Occhi, Gianluca

    2017-02-08

    Objective: Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor (GIPR) overexpression has been recently described in a proportion of gsp(-) somatotropinomas and suggested to be associated with the paradoxical increase of GH (GH-PI) during an oral glucose load. Design and Methods: This study was aimed at linking the GIP/GIPR pathway to GH secretion in 25 somatotropinomas-derived primary cultures and correlating molecular with clinical features in acromegalic patients. Given the impairment of the GIPR/GIPR axis in acromegaly, an additional aim was to assess the effect of GH/IGF-1 stimulation on GIP expression in the enteroendocrine cell line STC-1. Results: nearly 80% of GIPR-expressing somatotropinomas, all of them negative for gsp mutations, show increased GH secretion upon GIP stimulation, higher sensitivity to forskolin but not to somatostatin analogues. Beside increased frequency of GH-PI, GIPR overexpression does not appear to affect acromegalic patients' clinical features. In STC-1 cells transfected with GIP promoter-driven luciferase vector, IGF-1 but not GH induced dose-dependent increase in luciferase activity. Conclusions: we demonstrate that GIPR mediates the GH-PI in a significant proportion of gsp(-) acromegalic patients. In these cases the stimulatory effect of IGF-I on GIP promoter support the hypothesis of a functional GH-IGF1-GIP axis. Further studies based on larger cohorts and the development of a stable transgenic model with inducible GIPR overexpression targeted to pituitary somatotroph lineage will be mandatory to establish the real role of GIPR in the pathogenesis of somatotropinomas.

  6. Loss of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 leads to impaired islet mass and beta cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Stephanie R.; Priyadarshini, Medha; Fuller, Miles H.; Bhardwaj, Tanya; Brodsky, Michael R.; Angueira, Anthony R.; Mosser, Rockann E.; Carboneau, Bethany A.; Tersey, Sarah A.; Mancebo, Helena; Gilchrist, Annette; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Gannon, Maureen; Layden, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of pancreatic β cell mass is a critical factor to help maintain normoglycemia during insulin resistance. Nutrient-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) contribute to aspects of β cell function, including regulation of β cell mass. Nutrients such as free fatty acids (FFAs) contribute to precise regulation of β cell mass by signaling through cognate GPCRs, and considerable evidence suggests that circulating FFAs promote β cell expansion by direct and indirect mechanisms. Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFA2) is a β cell-expressed GPCR that is activated by short chain fatty acids, particularly acetate. Recent studies of FFA2 suggest that it may act as a regulator of β cell function. Here, we set out to explore what role FFA2 may play in regulation of β cell mass. Interestingly, Ffar2−/− mice exhibit diminished β cell mass at birth and throughout adulthood, and increased β cell death at adolescent time points, suggesting a role for FFA2 in establishment and maintenance of β cell mass. Additionally, activation of FFA2 with Gαq/11-biased agonists substantially increased β cell proliferation in in vitro and ex vivo proliferation assays. Collectively, these data suggest that FFA2 may be a novel therapeutic target to stimulate β cell growth and proliferation. PMID:27324831

  7. Regulatory development of geriatric medicines: To GIP or not to GIP?

    PubMed

    De Spiegeleer, Bart; Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Veryser, Lieselotte; Taevernier, Lien; Degroote, Agnes; Stalmans, Sofie

    2016-05-01

    Geriatric patients represent the main users of medicines, but are historically often minimally included in clinical trials, resulting in a gap in the knowledge of the benefit/risk balance of medicines in this heterogeneous population. As the worldwide population is aging, the need for safe and effective medicines for older patients is proportionally increasing. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current regulatory status of the development of geriatric medicines, the encountered challenges and the view of the involved stakeholders, coming to the conclusion whether it is necessary or not to implement a Geriatric Investigation Plan (GIP), by analogy with pediatrics.

  8. Direct effects of glucose, insulin, GLP-1, and GIP on bulbospinal neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in neonatal wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Naoki; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Hidehito; Uchida, Takahiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Imakiire, Toshihiko; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Hiroo

    2017-03-06

    Although patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) often exhibit hypertension, the mechanisms responsible for this correlation are not well known. We hypothesized that the bulbospinal neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are affected by the levels of glucose, insulin, or incretins (glucagon like peptide-1 [GLP-1] or glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide [GIP]) in patients with DM. To investigate whether RVLM neurons are activated by glucose, insulin, GLP-1, or GIP, we examined changes in the membrane potentials of bulbospinal RVLM neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp technique during superfusion with various levels of glucose or these hormones in neonatal Wistar rats. A brainstem-spinal cord preparation was used for the experiments. A low level of glucose stimulated bulbospinal RVLM neurons. During insulin superfusion, almost all the RVLM neurons were depolarized, while during GLP-1 or GIP superfusion, almost all the RVLM neurons were hyperpolarized. Next, histological examinations were performed to examine transporters for glucose and receptors for insulin, GLP-1, and GIP on RVLM neurons. Low-level glucose-depolarized RVLM neurons exhibited the presence of glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3). Meanwhile, insulin-depolarized, GLP-1-hyperpolarized, and GIP-hyperpolarized RVLM neurons showed each of the respective specific receptor. These results indicate that a low level of glucose stimulates bulbospinal RVLM neurons via specific transporters on these neurons, inducing hypertension. Furthermore, an increase in insulin or a reduction in incretins may also activate the sympathetic nervous system and induce hypertension by activating RVLM neurons via their own receptors.

  9. In vivo molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors in pancreatic islet cells and neuroendocrine tumors by miniaturized confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fottner, C; Mettler, E; Goetz, M; Schirrmacher, E; Anlauf, M; Strand, D; Schirrmacher, R; Klöppel, G; Delaney, P; Schreckenberger, M; Galle, P R; Neurath, M F; Kiesslich, R; Weber, M M

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate real time in vivo molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors (sstrs) using a handheld miniaturized confocal laser scan microscope (CLM) in conjunction with fluorescein-labeled octreotate (OcF) in healthy mice and murine models of neuroendocrine tumors. For CLM a small rigid probe (diameter 7 mm) with an integrated single line laser (488 nm) was used (optical slice thickness 7 mum; lateral resolution 0.7 mum). OcF was synthesized via Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis and purified by HPLC showing high-affinity binding to the sstr2 (IC(50) 6.2 nmol). For in vitro evaluation, rat and human pancreatic cancer cells were used and characterized with respect to its sstr subtype expression and functional properties. For in vivo confocal imaging, healthy mouse pancreatic islet and renal tubular cells as well as immunoincompetent nude mice harboring sstr-expressing tumors were evaluated. Incubation of sstr-positive cells with OcF showed a specific time- and dose-dependent staining of sstr-positive cells. CLM showed rapid internalization and homogenous cytoplasmatic distribution. After systemic application to mice (n = 8), specific time-dependent internalization and cytoplasmatic distribution into pancreatic islet cells and tubular cells of the renal cortex was recorded. After injection in tumor-harboring nude mice (n = 8), sstr-positive cells selectively displayed a cell surface and cytoplasmatic staining. CLM-targeted biopsies detected sstr-positive tumor cells with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 100% as correlated with ex vivo immunohistochemistry. CLM with OcF permits real-time molecular, functional, and morphological imaging of sstr-expressing cell structures, allowing the specific visualization of pancreatic islet cells and neuroendocrine tumors in vivo.

  10. GIP increases adipose tissue expression and blood levels of MCP-1 in humans and links high energy diets to inflammation: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Gögebakan, Özlem; Osterhoff, Martin A; Schüler, Rita; Pivovarova, Olga; Kruse, Michael; Seltmann, Anne-Cathrin; Mosig, Alexander S; Rudovich, Natalia; Nauck, Michael; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2015-08-01

    circulating plasma concentrations of MCP-1 (165 ± 12 vs 135 ± 13 pg/ml; GIP vs saline after 240 min; p < 0.05 for all variables) in humans increased independently of circulating insulin or glucose plasma concentrations. GIP stimulation increased Mcp-1 mRNA-expression in co-cultures of differentiated 3T3L1-adipocytes and RAW 264.7 macrophages but not in the isolated cell lines. Similarly, GIP increased MCP-1 transcripts in co-cultures of primary human macrophages with human adipocytes. GIP receptor (GIPR) transcripts were present in primary monocytes and the different cell lines and induced activation of extracellular related kinase (ERK) as well as increases in cAMP, indicating functional receptors. Our findings suggest that the nutrient induced gut hormone GIP may initiate adipose tissue inflammation by triggering a crosstalk of adipocytes and macrophages involving MCP-1. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00774488. This work was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG): grant No. Pf164/021002.

  11. Nkx6.1 regulates islet β-cell proliferation via Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Tessem, Jeffery S; Moss, Larry G; Chao, Lily C; Arlotto, Michelle; Lu, Danhong; Jensen, Mette V; Stephens, Samuel B; Tontonoz, Peter; Hohmeier, Hans E; Newgard, Christopher B

    2014-04-08

    Loss of functional β-cell mass is a hallmark of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and methods for restoring these cells are needed. We have previously reported that overexpression of the homeodomain transcription factor NK6 homeobox 1 (Nkx6.1) in rat pancreatic islets induces β-cell proliferation and enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but the pathway by which Nkx6.1 activates β-cell expansion has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Nkx6.1 induces expression of the nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, members 1 and 3 (Nr4a1 and Nr4a3) orphan nuclear receptors, and that these factors are both necessary and sufficient for Nkx6.1-mediated β-cell proliferation. Consistent with this finding, global knockout of Nr4a1 results in a decrease in β-cell area in neonatal and young mice. Overexpression of Nkx6.1 and the Nr4a receptors results in increased expression of key cell cycle inducers E2F transcription factor 1 and cyclin E1. Furthermore, Nkx6.1 and Nr4a receptors induce components of the anaphase-promoting complex, including ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C, resulting in degradation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. These studies identify a unique bipartite pathway for activation of β-cell proliferation, suggesting several unique targets for expansion of functional β-cell mass.

  12. Effects of CaMKII-Mediated Phosphorylation of Ryanodine Receptor Type 2 on Islet Calcium Handling, Insulin Secretion, and Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Sayali S.; Wang, Tiannan; Manzano, Eiffel John Q.; Yoo, Shin; Lee, Jeongkyung; Chiang, David Y.; Ryan, Nicole; Respress, Jonathan L.; Yechoor, Vijay K.; Wehrens, Xander H. T.

    2013-01-01

    Altered insulin secretion contributes to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. This alteration is correlated with altered intracellular Ca2+-handling in pancreatic β cells. Insulin secretion is triggered by elevation in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) of β cells. This elevation in [Ca2+]cyt leads to activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII), which, in turn, controls multiple aspects of insulin secretion. CaMKII is known to phosphorylate ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2), an intracellular Ca2+-release channel implicated in Ca2+-dependent steps of insulin secretion. Our data show that RyR2 is CaMKII phosphorylated in a pancreatic β-cell line in a glucose-sensitive manner. However, it is not clear whether any change in CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation underlies abnormal RyR2 function in β cells and whether such a change contributes to alterations in insulin secretion. Therefore, knock-in mice with a mutation in RyR2 that mimics its constitutive CaMKII phosphorylation, RyR2-S2814D, were studied. This mutation led to a gain-of-function defect in RyR2 indicated by increased basal RyR2-mediated Ca2+ leak in islets of these mice. This chronic in vivo defect in RyR2 resulted in basal hyperinsulinemia. In addition, S2814D mice also developed glucose intolerance, impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and lowered [Ca2+]cyt transients, which are hallmarks of pre-diabetes. The glucose-sensitive Ca2+ pool in islets from S2814D mice was also reduced. These observations were supported by immunohistochemical analyses of islets in diabetic human and mouse pancreata that revealed significantly enhanced CaMKII phosphorylation of RyR2 in type 2 diabetes. Together, these studies implicate that the chronic gain-of-function defect in RyR2 due to CaMKII hyperphosphorylation is a novel mechanism that contributes to pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23516528

  13. Redox Signal-mediated Enhancement of the Temperature Sensitivity of Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) Elevates Glucose-induced Insulin Secretion from Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Kashio, Makiko; Tominaga, Makoto

    2015-05-08

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a thermosensitive Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel expressed by pancreatic β cells where channel function is constantly affected by body temperature. We focused on the physiological functions of redox signal-mediated TRPM2 activity at body temperature. H2O2, an important molecule in redox signaling, reduced the temperature threshold for TRPM2 activation in pancreatic β cells of WT mice but not in TRPM2KO cells. TRPM2-mediated [Ca(2+)]i increases were likely caused by Ca(2+) influx through the plasma membrane because the responses were abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). In addition, TRPM2 activation downstream from the redox signal plus glucose stimulation enhanced glucose-induced insulin secretion. H2O2 application at 37 °C induced [Ca(2+)]i increases not only in WT but also in TRPM2KO β cells. This was likely due to the effect of H2O2 on KATP channel activity. However, the N-acetylcysteine-sensitive fraction of insulin secretion by WT islets was increased by temperature elevation, and this temperature-dependent enhancement was diminished significantly in TRPM2KO islets. These data suggest that endogenous redox signals in pancreatic β cells elevate insulin secretion via TRPM2 sensitization and activity at body temperature. The results in this study could provide new therapeutic approaches for the regulation of diabetic conditions by focusing on the physiological function of TRPM2 and redox signals. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. A new stable GIP-Oxyntomodulin hybrid peptide improved bone strength both at the organ and tissue levels in genetically-inherited type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Sity Aishah; Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Flatt, Peter R; Bouvard, Beatrice; Chappard, Daniel; Irwin, Nigel; Mabilleau, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) progress worldwide with detrimental effects on several physiological systems including bone tissue mainly by affecting bone quality. Several gut hormones analogues have been proven potent in ameliorating bone quality. In the present study, we used the leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice as a model of obesity and severe T2DM to assess the extent of bone quality alterations at the organ and tissue levels. We also examined the beneficial effects of gut hormone therapy in this model by using a new triple agonist ([d-Ala(2)]GIP-Oxm) active at the GIP, GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. As expected, db/db mice presented with dramatic alterations of bone strength at the organ level associated with deterioration of trabecular and cortical microarchitectures and an augmentation in osteoclast numbers. At the tissue level, these animals presented also with alterations of bone strength (reduced hardness, indentation modulus and dissipated energy) with modifications of tissue mineral distribution, collagen glycation and collagen maturity. The use of [d-Ala(2)]GIP-Oxm considerably improved bone strength at the organ level with modest effects on trabecular microarchitecture. At the tissue level, [d-Ala(2)]GIP-Oxm ameliorated bone strength reductions with positive effects on collagen glycation and collagen maturity. This study provides support for including gut hormone analogues as possible new therapeutic strategies for improving bone quality in bone complications associated to T2DM.

  15. Oral administration of corn zein hydrolysate stimulates GLP-1 and GIP secretion and improves glucose tolerance in male normal rats and Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Noriyuki; Hira, Tohru; Yamada, Nao; Hara, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ileal administration of the dietary protein hydrolysate prepared from corn zein (ZeinH) stimulated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and attenuated hyperglycemia in rats. In this study, to examine whether oral administration of ZeinH improves glucose tolerance by stimulating GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) secretion, glucose tolerance tests were performed in normal Sprague-Dawley male rats and diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) male rats. The test solution was gavaged before ip glucose injection in normal rats or gavaged together with glucose in GK rats. Blood samples were collected from the tail vein or by using the jugular catheter to measure glucose, insulin, GLP-1, and GIP levels. In the ip glucose tolerance test, oral administration of ZeinH (2 g/kg) significantly suppressed the glycemic response accompanied by an immediate increase in plasma GLP-1 and GIP levels in normal rats. In contrast, oral administration of another dietary peptide, meat hydrolysate, did not elicit a similar effect. The glucose-lowering effect of ZeinH was attenuated by a GLP-1 receptor antagonist or by a GIP receptor antagonist. Furthermore, oral ZeinH induced GLP-1 secretion and reduced glycemic response in GK rats under the oral glucose tolerance test. These results indicate that the oral administration of the dietary peptide ZeinH improves glucose tolerance in normal and diabetic rats by its incretin-releasing activity, namely, the incretinotropic effect.

  16. High-Fat Diet During Mouse Pregnancy and Lactation Targets GIP-Regulated Metabolic Pathways in Adult Male Offspring.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Michael; Keyhani-Nejad, Farnaz; Isken, Frank; Nitz, Barbara; Kretschmer, Anja; Reischl, Eva; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Osterhoff, Martin A; Grallert, Harald; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2016-03-01

    Maternal obesity is a worldwide problem associated with increased risk of metabolic diseases in the offspring. Genetic deletion of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) receptor (GIPR) prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice due to specific changes in energy and fat cell metabolism. We investigated whether GIP-associated pathways may be targeted by fetal programming and mimicked the situation by exposing pregnant mice to control or HFD during pregnancy (intrauterine [IU]) and lactation (L). Male wild-type (WT) and Gipr(-/-) offspring received control chow until 25 weeks of age followed by 20 weeks of HFD. Gipr(-/-) offspring of mice exposed to HFD during IU/L became insulin resistant and obese and exhibited increased adipose tissue inflammation and decreased peripheral tissue substrate utilization after being reintroduced to HFD, similar to WT mice on regular chow during IU/L. They showed decreased hypothalamic insulin sensitivity compared with Gipr(-/-) mice on control diet during IU/L. DNA methylation analysis revealed increased methylation of CpG dinucleotides and differential transcription factor binding of promoter regions of genes involved in lipid oxidation in the muscle of Gipr(-/-) offspring on HFD during IU/L, which were inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Our data identify GIP-regulated metabolic pathways that are targeted by fetal programming. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. The Langerhans islet cells of female rabbits are differentially affected by hypothyroidism depending on the islet size.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castelán, J; Nicolás, L; Morimoto, S; Cuevas, E

    2015-04-01

    Effects of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin levels are controversial, and its impact on the Langerhans islet morphology of adult subjects has been poorly addressed. In spite of hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus are more frequent in females than in males, most studies using animal models have been done in males. The effect of hypothyroidism on the immunolabeling of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) and thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) of islet cells is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin concentrations, morphometry of islets, and immunostaining of TRs α1-2 and β1 and TSHR of islet cells in female rabbits. Control and hypothyroid (0.02% of methimazole for 30 days) animals were used to quantify blood levels of glucose and insulin, density of islets, cross-sectional area (CSA) of islets, number of cells per islet, cell proliferation, and the immunolabeling of TRs α1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR. Student's t or Mann-Whitney-U tests, two-way ANOVAs, and Fischer's tests were applied. Concentrations of glucose and insulin, as well as the insulin resistance were similar between groups. Hypothyroidism did not affect the density or the CSA of islets. The analysis of islets by size showed that hypothyroidism reduced the cell number in large and medium islets, but not in small ones. In small islets, cell proliferation was increased. The immunoreactivity of TRα1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR was increased by hypothyroidism in all islet sizes. Our results show that hypothyroidism affects differentially the islet cells depending on the size of islets.

  18. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live. Transplanted islet cells, however, can take over the work of the destroyed cells. The beta cells in these islets will begin to make and release insulin. Researchers hope islet transplantation will help people with ...

  19. Receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of arachidonic acid release in 3T3 fibroblasts. Selective susceptibility to islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, T.; Ui, M.

    1985-06-25

    Thrombin exhibited diverse effects on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. It (a) decreased cAMP in the cell suspension, (b) inhibited adenylate cyclase in the Lubrol-permeabilized cell suspension in a GTP-dependent manner, increased releases of (c) arachidonic acid and (d) inositol from the cell monolayer prelabeled with these labeled compounds, (e) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into the cell monolayer, and (f) increased /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into the cell monolayer in a ouabain-sensitive manner. Most of the effects were reproduced by bradykinin, platelet-activating factor, and angiotensin II. The receptors for these agonists are thus likely to be linked to three separate effector systems: the adenylate cyclase inhibition, the phosphoinositide breakdown leading to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and phospholipase A2 activation, and the Na,K-ATPase activation. Among the effects of these agonists, (a), (b), (c), and (e) were abolished, but (d) and (f) were not, by prior treatment of the cells with islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates the Mr = 41,000 protein, the alpha-subunit of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (Ni), thereby abolishing receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The effects (a), (c), (d), and (e) of thrombin, but not (b), were mimicked by A23187, a calcium ionophore. The effects of A23187, in contrast to those of receptor agonists, were not affected by the treatment of cells with IAP. Thus, the IAP substrate, the alpha-subunit of Ni, or the protein alike, may play an additional role in signal transduction arising from the Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilizing receptors, probably mediating process(es) distal to phosphoinositide breakdown and proximal to Ca/sup 2 +/ gating.

  20. Inhibition by islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin, of P2-purinergic receptor-mediated iodide efflux and phosphoinositide turnover in FRTL-5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okajima, F.; Sho, K.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-08-01

    Exposure of FRTL-5 thyroid cells to ATP (1 microM to 1 mM) resulted in the stimulation of I- efflux in association with the induction of inositol trisphosphate production and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Nonhydrolyzable ATP derivatives, ADP and GTP, were also as effective in magnitude as ATP, whereas neither AMP nor adenosine exerted significant effect on I- efflux, suggesting a P2-purinergic receptor-mediated activation of I- efflux. Treatment of the cells with the islet-activating protein (IAP) pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylated a 41,000 mol wt membrane protein, effectively suppressed the phosphoinositide response to ATP in addition to ATP-dependent I- efflux at agonist concentrations below 10 microM. In contrast, the I- efflux stimulated by TSH, A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate was insusceptible to IAP. The IAP substrate, probably GTP-binding protein, is hence proposed to mediate the activation of P2-purinergic receptor-linked phospholipase-C in FRTL-5 cells. However, the responses to ATP, its nonhydrolyzable derivatives, or ADP at the higher agonist concentrations, especially above 100 microM, were only partially inhibited by IAP, even though the IAP substrate was totally ADP ribosylated by the toxin. The responses to GTP in the whole concentration range tested were not influenced by IAP treatment. Thus, signals arising from the P2-receptor might be transduced to phospholipase-C by two different pathways, i.e. IAP-sensitive and insensitive ones, and result in the stimulation of I- efflux.

  1. EVOLUTIONARY CONSERVATION OF GLUCOSE-DEPENDENT INSULINOTROPIC POLYPEPTIDE (GIP) GENE REGULATION AND THE ENTEROINSULAR AXIS

    PubMed Central

    Musson, Michelle C.; Jepeal, Lisa I.; Sharifnia, Torfay; Wolfe, M. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an important component of the enteroinsular axis, is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion, functioning to maintain nutrient efficiency. Although well-characterized in mammals, little is known regarding GIP transcriptional regulation in Danio rerio (Dr). We previously demonstrated that DrGIP is expressed in the intestine and the pancreas, and we therefore cloned the Dr promoter to compare GIP transcriptional regulation in Dr and mammals. Although no significant homology was indentified between the highly conserved mammalian promoter and the DrGIP promoter, 1072-bp of the DrGIP promoter conferred tissue-specific expression in mammalian cell lines. Deletional analysis of the DrGIP promoter identified two regions that, when deleted, reduced transcription by 75% and 95%, respectively. Mutational analysis of the upstream region suggested involvement of an Nkx binding site, although we were unable to identify the factor binding to this site. The cis element in the downstream region was found to be a GATA binding site. Lastly, overexpression and shRNA experiments identified PAX4 as a potential repressor of DrGIP expression. These findings provide evidence that despite the identification of species-specific transcriptional regulators and differences in GIP expression patterns between Danio rerio and mammals, a moderate degree of regulatory conservation appears to exist. PMID:20621665

  2. Neurotransmitters act as paracrine signals to regulate insulin secretion from the human pancreatic islet.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Menegaz, Danusa; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2014-08-15

    In this symposium review we discuss the role of neurotransmitters as paracrine signals that regulate pancreatic islet function. A large number of neurotransmitters and their receptors has been identified in the islet, but relatively little is known about their involvement in islet biology. Interestingly, neurotransmitters initially thought to be present in autonomic axons innervating the islet are also present in endocrine cells of the human islet. These neurotransmitters can thus be released as paracrine signals to help control hormone release. Here we propose that the role of neurotransmitters may extend beyond controlling endocrine cell function to work as signals modulating vascular flow and immune responses within the islet.

  3. Double incretin receptor knockout (DIRKO) mice reveal an essential role for the enteroinsular axis in transducing the glucoregulatory actions of DPP-IV inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hansotia, Tanya; Baggio, Laurie L; Delmeire, Dominique; Hinke, Simon A; Yamada, Yuichiro; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Seino, Yutaka; Holst, Jens J; Schuit, Frans; Drucker, D J

    2004-05-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are gut-derived incretins that potentiate glucose clearance following nutrient ingestion. Elimination of incretin receptor action in GIPR(-/-) or GLP-1R(-/-) mice produces only modest impairment in glucose homeostasis, perhaps due to compensatory upregulation of the remaining incretin. We have now studied glucose homeostasis in double incretin receptor knockout (DIRKO) mice. DIRKO mice exhibit normal body weight and fail to exhibit an improved glycemic response after exogenous administration of GIP or the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4. Plasma glucagon and the hypoglycemic response to exogenous insulin were normal in DIRKO mice. Glycemic excursion was abnormally increased and levels of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were decreased following oral but not intraperitoneal glucose challenge in DIRKO compared with GIPR(-/-) or GLP-1R(-/-) mice. Similarly, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and the response to forskolin were well preserved in perifused DIRKO islets. Although the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors valine pyrrolidide (Val-Pyr) and SYR106124 lowered glucose and increased plasma insulin in wild-type and single incretin receptor knockout mice, the glucose-lowering actions of DPP-IV inhibitors were eliminated in DIRKO mice. These findings demonstrate that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is maintained despite complete absence of both incretin receptors, and they delineate a critical role for incretin receptors as essential downstream targets for the acute glucoregulatory actions of DPP-IV inhibitors.

  4. Incretin hormone receptors are required for normal beta cell development and function in female mice.

    PubMed

    Omar, Bilal; Ahlkvist, Linda; Yamada, Yuchiro; Seino, Yutaka; Ahrén, Bo

    2016-05-01

    The incretin hormones, glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), potentiate insulin secretion and are responsible for the majority of insulin secretion that occurs after a meal. They may also, however, have a fundamental role in pancreatic beta cell development and function, independently of their role in potentiating insulin secretion after a meal. This has led to observations that a loss of GIP or GLP-1 action affects normal beta cell function, however each one of the incretin hormones may compensate when the action of the other is lost and therefore the overall impact of the incretin hormones on beta cell function is not known. We therefore utilized a mouse line deficient in both the GLP-1 and GIP receptor genes, the double incretin receptor knockout (DIRKO), to determine the consequences of a lifelong, complete lack of incretin hormone action on beta cell function, in vivo, in intact animals. We found that DIRKO mice displayed impaired glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in response to both oral glucose and mixed meal tolerance tests compared to wild-type mice. Assessment of beta cell function using the hyperglycemic clamp technique revealed an 80% decrease in first phase insulin response in DIRKO mice, but a normal second phase insulin secretion. A similar decline was seen when wild-type mice were given acute intravenous injection of glucose together with the GLP-1 receptor antagonist Ex9-39. Ex vivo assessments of the pancreas revealed significantly fewer islets in the pancreata of DIRKO mice despite no differences in total pancreatic mass. Insulin secretion from isolated islets of DIRKO mice was impaired to a similar extent to that seen during the hyperglycemic clamp. Insulin secretion in wild-type islets was impaired by acute treatment with Ex9-39 to a similar extent as the in vivo intravenous glucose tolerance tests. In conclusion, a loss of the action of both incretin hormones results in direct impairment

  5. Transcriptional regulatory factor X6 (Rfx6) increases gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) expression in enteroendocrine K-cells and is involved in GIP hypersecretion in high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuyo; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Kazuki; Nasteska, Daniela; Joo, Erina; Shibue, Kimitaka; Harada, Takanari; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2013-01-18

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin released from enteroendocrine K-cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GIP potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and induces energy accumulation into adipose tissue, resulting in obesity. Plasma GIP levels are reported to be increased in the obese state. However, the molecular mechanisms of GIP secretion and high fat diet (HFD)-induced GIP hypersecretion remain unclear, primarily due to difficulties in separating K-cells from other intestinal epithelial cells in vivo. In this study, GIP-GFP knock-in mice that enable us to visualize K-cells by enhanced GFP were established. Microarray analysis of isolated K-cells from these mice revealed that transcriptional regulatory factor X6 (Rfx6) is expressed exclusively in K-cells. In vitro experiments using the mouse intestinal cell line STC-1 showed that knockdown of Rfx6 decreased mRNA expression, cellular content, and secretion of GIP. Rfx6 bound to the region in the gip promoter that regulates gip promoter activity, and overexpression of Rfx6 increased GIP mRNA expression. HFD induced obesity and GIP hypersecretion in GIP-GFP heterozygous mice in vivo. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analysis showed no significant difference in K-cell number between control fat diet-fed (CFD) and HFD-fed mice. However, GIP content in the upper small intestine and GIP mRNA expression in K-cells were significantly increased in HFD-fed mice compared with those in CFD-fed mice. Furthermore, expression levels of Rfx6 mRNA were increased in K-cells of HFD-fed mice. These results suggest that Rfx6 increases GIP expression and content in K-cells and is involved in GIP hypersecretion in HFD-induced obesity.

  6. CD8+ T cells specific for the islet autoantigen IGRP are restricted in their T cell receptor chain usage

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yannick F.; Eugster, Anne; Dietz, Sevina; Sebelefsky, Christian; Kühn, Denise; Wilhelm, Carmen; Lindner, Annett; Gavrisan, Anita; Knoop, Jan; Dahl, Andreas; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T cells directed against beta cell autoantigens are considered relevant for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Using single cell T cell receptor sequencing of CD8+ T cells specific for the IGRP265-273 epitope, we examined whether there was expansion of clonotypes and sharing of T cell receptor chains in autoreactive CD8+ T cell repertoires. HLA-A*0201 positive type 1 diabetes patients (n = 19) and controls (n = 18) were analysed. TCR α- and β-chain sequences of 418 patient-derived IGRP265-273-multimer+ CD8+ T cells representing 48 clonotypes were obtained. Expanded populations of IGRP265-273-specific CD8+ T cells with dominant clonotypes that had TCR α-chains shared across patients were observed. The SGGSNYKLTF motif corresponding to TRAJ53 was contained in 384 (91.9%) cells, and in 20 (41.7%) patient-derived clonotypes. TRAJ53 together with TRAV29/DV5 was found in 15 (31.3%) clonotypes. Using next generation TCR α-chain sequencing, we found enrichment of one of these TCR α-chains in the memory CD8+ T cells of patients as compared to healthy controls. CD8+ T cell clones bearing the enriched motifs mediated antigen-specific target cell lysis. We provide the first evidence for restriction of T cell receptor motifs in the alpha chain of human CD8+ T cells with specificity to a beta cell antigen. PMID:28300170

  7. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist ameliorates the insulin resistance function of islet β cells via the activation of PDX-1/JAK signaling transduction in C57/BL6 mice with high-fat diet-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tao; Zhang, Hongtao; Li, Sheyu; Tian, Haoming

    2017-04-01

    Long-term exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD) causes glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity in islet β cells and leads to the development of metabolic dysfunctions. Reductions in pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) expression have been shown to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus by causing impairments to islet β cells. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) treatment reduces endogenous insulin resistance in HFD-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the underlying mechanism by which GLP-1 exerts its function in type 2 diabetes mellitus was investigated. The effect of liraglutide (GLP-1 receptor agonist) administration on glucose tolerance, insulin release, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide level was detected in a HFD-induced diabetes C57/BL6 mouse model. Moreover, the role of liraglutide administration on the activity of PDX-1 was quantified to demonstrate the association between the two indicators. The results showed that administration of liraglutide could ameliorate the impairments to β cells due to HFD consumption. Liraglutide restored the insulin capacity and stimulated glucose disposal by improving the function and increasing the number of islet β cells. Furthermore, the hyperplasia and redundant function of islet α cells were inhibited by liraglutide treatment as well. At the molecular level, administration of liraglutide induced the expression of PDX-1, MafA, p-JAK2 and p-Stat3 in HFD model to relatively normal levels. It was suggested that the effect of liraglutide-induced activation of GLP-1 was exerted via activation of PDX-1 rather than its function in decreasing body weight. The study demonstrated that GLP-1 played an essential role in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of the Pancreatic Islet: Implications for Islet Function

    PubMed Central

    Stitzel, Michael L.; Kycia, Ina; Kursawe, Romy; Ucar, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans contain multiple hormone-producing endocrine cells controlling glucose homeostasis. Transcription establishes and maintains islet cellular fates and identities. Genetic and environmental disruption of islet transcription triggers cellular dysfunction and disease. Early transcriptional regulation studies of specific islet genes, including insulin (INS) and the transcription factor PDX1, identified the first cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors governing islet function. Here, we review how human islet “omics” studies are reshaping our understanding of transcriptional regulation in islet (dys)function and diabetes. First, we highlight the expansion of islet transcript number, form, and function and of DNA transcriptional regulatory elements controlling their production. Next, we cover islet transcriptional effects of genetic and environmental perturbation. Finally, we discuss how these studies’ emerging insights should empower our diabetes research community to build mechanistic understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to equip clinicians with tailored, precision medicine options to prevent and treat islet dysfunction and diabetes. PMID:26272056

  9. Conjugated Linoleic Acids Mediate Insulin Release through Islet G Protein-coupled Receptor FFA1/GPR40*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Johannes; Liebscher, Kathrin; Merten, Nicole; Grundmann, Manuel; Mielenz, Manfred; Sauerwein, Helga; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Ulven, Trond; Ullrich, Susanne; Gomeza, Jesús; Drewke, Christel; Kostenis, Evi

    2011-01-01

    Among dietary components, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) have attracted considerable attention as weight loss supplements in the Western world because they reduce fat stores and increase muscle mass. However, a number of adverse effects are also ascribed to the intake of CLAs such as aggravation of insulin resistance and the risk of developing diabetes. However, the mechanisms accounting for the effects of CLAs on glucose homeostasis are incompletely understood. Herein we provide evidence that CLAs specifically activate the cell surface receptor FFA1, an emerging therapeutic target to treat type 2 diabetes. Using different recombinant cellular systems engineered to stably express FFA1 and a set of diverse functional assays including the novel, label-free non-invasive dynamic mass redistribution technology (Corning® Epic® biosensor), both CLA isomers cis-9, trans-11-CLA and trans-10, cis-12-CLA were found to activate FFA1 in vitro at concentrations sufficient to also account for FFA1 activation in vivo. Each CLA isomer markedly increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in insulin-producing INS-1E cells that endogenously express FFA1 and in primary pancreatic β-cells of wild type but not FFA1−/− knock-out mice. Our findings establish a clear mechanistic link between CLAs and insulin production and identify the cell surface receptor FFA1 as a molecular target for CLAs, explaining their acute stimulatory effects on insulin secretion in vivo. CLAs are also revealed as insulinotropic components in widely used nutraceuticals, a finding with significant implication for development of FFA1 modulators to treat type 2 diabetes. PMID:21339298

  10. Basement membrane in pancreatic islet function.

    PubMed

    Kragl, Martin; Lammert, Eckhard

    2010-01-01

    Clinical treatment of diabetic patients by islet transplantation faces various complications. At present, in vitro expansion of islets occurs at the cost of their essential features, which are insulin production and release. However, the recent discovery of blood vessel/beta-cell interactions as an important aspect of insulin transcription, secretion, and proliferation might point us to ways of how this problem could be overcome. The correct function of beta-cells depends on the presence of a basement membrane, a specialized extracellular matrix located around the blood vessel wall in mouse and human pancreatic islets. In this chapter, we summarize how the vascular basement membrane influences insulin transcription, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation. In addition, a brief overview about basement membrane components and their interactions with cell surface receptors is given.

  11. Islet transplantation: immunological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Inverardi, Luca; Kenyon, Norma S; Ricordi, Camillo

    2003-10-01

    Clinical trials of islet transplantation are showing remarkable success, but they require administration of chronic immunosuppression, and are underscoring the large gap that exists between the number of human donors available and the number of patients that could benefit from the procedure. Recent progress has been made in the definition of key immunological mechanisms that are involved in determining islet transplant outcome. Clinical and preclinical studies, and studies in small animal model systems, will all eventually contribute to the definition of efficient and safe protocols for islet transplantation. If the use of xenografts is successful, it might represent a solution to the shortage of human organs.

  12. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of stomach acid. Tumors that arise from islet ... try and shrink the tumors. If the abnormal production of hormones is causing symptoms, you may receive ...

  13. Localization of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (CD26) to human pancreatic ducts and islet alpha cells.

    PubMed

    Augstein, Petra; Naselli, Gaetano; Loudovaris, Thomas; Hawthorne, Wayne J; Campbell, Peter; Bandala-Sanchez, Esther; Rogers, Kelly; Heinke, Peter; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W; Harrison, Leonard C

    2015-12-01

    DPP-4/CD26 degrades the incretins GLP-1 and GIP. The localization of DPP-4 within the human pancreas is not well documented but is likely to be relevant for understanding incretin function. We aimed to define the cellular localization of DPP-4 in the human pancreas from cadaveric organ donors with and without diabetes. Pancreas was snap-frozen and immunoreactive DPP-4 detected in cryosections using the APAAP technique. For co-localization studies, pancreas sections were double-stained for DPP-4 and proinsulin or glucagon and scanned by confocal microscopy. Pancreata were digested and cells in islets and in islet-depleted, duct-enriched digests analyzed for expression of DPP-4 and other markers by flow cytometry. DPP-4 was expressed by pancreatic duct and islet cells. In pancreata from donors without diabetes or with type 2 diabetes, DPP-4-positive cells in islets had the same location and morphology as glucagon-positive cells, and the expression of DPP-4 and glucagon overlapped. In donors with type 1 diabetes, the majority of residual cells in islets were DPP-4-positive. In the human pancreas, DPP-4 expression is localized to duct and alpha cells. This finding is consistent with the view that DPP-4 regulates exposure to incretins of duct cells directly and of beta cells indirectly in a paracrine manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Postnatal development of numbers and mean sizes of pancreatic islets and beta-cells in healthy mice and GIPR(dn) transgenic diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Herbach, Nadja; Bergmayr, Martina; Göke, Burkhard; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Ruediger

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine postnatal islet and beta-cell expansion in healthy female control mice and its disturbances in diabetic GIPR(dn) transgenic mice, which exhibit an early reduction of beta-cell mass. Pancreata of female control and GIPR(dn) transgenic mice, aged 10, 45, 90 and 180 days were examined, using state-of-the-art quantitative-stereological methods. Total islet and beta-cell volumes, as well as their absolute numbers increased significantly until 90 days in control mice, and remained stable thereafter. The mean islet volumes of controls also increased slightly but significantly between 10 and 45 days of age, and then remained stable until 180 days. The total volume of isolated beta-cells, an indicator of islet neogenesis, and the number of proliferating (BrdU-positive) islet cells were highest in 10-day-old controls and declined significantly between 10 and 45 days. In GIPR(dn) transgenic mice, the numbers of islets and beta-cells were significantly reduced from 10 days of age onwards vs. controls, and no postnatal expansion of total islet and beta-cell volumes occurred due to a reduction in islet neogenesis whereas early islet-cell proliferation and apoptosis were unchanged as compared to control mice. Insulin secretion in response to pharmacological doses of GIP was preserved in GIPR(dn) transgenic mice, and serum insulin to pancreatic insulin content in response to GLP-1 and arginine was significantly higher in GIPR(dn) transgenic mice vs. controls. We could show that the increase in islet number is mainly responsible for expansion of islet and beta-cell mass in healthy control mice. GIPR(dn) transgenic mice show a disturbed expansion of the endocrine pancreas, due to perturbed islet neogenesis.

  15. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanak, Mazhar A.; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Levy, Marlon F.

    2014-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation. PMID:24883060

  16. Remodelling sympathetic innervation in rat pancreatic islets ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Vásquez, Siraam; Navarro-Tableros, Víctor; Sánchez-Soto, Carmen; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Hiriart, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islets are not fully developed at birth and it is not clear how they are vascularised and innervated. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is required to guide sympathetic neurons that innervate peripheral organs and also in cardiovascular system and ovary angiogenesis. Pancreatic beta cells of a transgenic mouse that over-expressed NGF in attracts sympathetic hyper-innervation towards them. Moreover, we have previously demonstrated that adult beta cells synthesize and secrete NGF; however, we do not know how is NGF secreted during development, nor if it might be trophic for sympathetic innervation and survival in the pancreas. We analyzed sympathetic innervation and vasculature development in rat pancreatic islets at different developmental stages; foetal (F19), early postnatal (P1), weaning period (P20) and adults. We temporarily correlated these events to NGF secretion by islet cells. Results Sympathetic fibres reached pancreatic islets in the early postnatal period, apparently following blood vessels. The maximal number of sympathetic fibres (TH immunopositive) in the periphery of the islets was observed at P20, and then fibres entered the islets and reached the core where beta cells are mainly located. The number of fibres decreased from that stage to adulthood. At all stages studied, islet cells secreted NGF and also expressed the high affinity receptor TrkA. Foetal and neonatal isolated islet cells secreted more NGF than adults. TrkA receptors were expressed at all stages in pancreatic sympathetic fibres and blood vessels. These last structures were NGF–immunoreactive only at early stages (foetal and P0). Conclusion The results suggest that NGF signalling play an important role in the guidance of blood vessels and sympathetic fibres toward the islets during foetal and neonatal stages and could also preserve innervation at later stages of life. PMID:19534767

  17. Interleukin-1 signaling contributes to acute islet compensation

    PubMed Central

    Hajmrle, Catherine; Smith, Nancy; Spigelman, Aliya F.; Dai, Xiaoqing; Senior, Laura; Bautista, Austin; MacDonald, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    IL-1β is a well-established inducer of both insulin resistance and impaired pancreatic islet function. Despite this, findings examining IL-1 receptor deficiency or antagonism in in vivo animal models, as well as in clinical studies of type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, have led to conflicting results, suggesting that the actions of IL-1β on glycemic control may be pleiotropic in nature. In the present work, we find that the ability of IL-1β to amplify glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from human islets correlates with donor BMI. Islets from obese donors are sensitized to the insulinotropic effects of this cytokine, whereas the stimulatory effects of IL-1β are lost in islets from obese T2D patients, suggesting a role for IL-1 signaling in islet compensation. Indeed, mice deficient in IL-1 receptor type I become glucose intolerant more rapidly than their WT littermates and have impaired secretory responses during the acute stages of inflammatory and metabolic stress induced by LPS and high-fat diet, respectively. IL-1β directly enhances β cell insulin secretion by increasing granule docking and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) complex formation at the plasma membrane. Together, our study highlights the importance of IL-1β signaling in islet compensation to metabolic and inflammatory stress. PMID:27699257

  18. The GIP gamma-tubulin complex-associated proteins are involved in nuclear architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Batzenschlager, Morgane; Masoud, Kinda; Janski, Natacha; Houlné, Guy; Herzog, Etienne; Evrard, Jean-Luc; Baumberger, Nicolas; Erhardt, Mathieu; Nominé, Yves; Kieffer, Bruno; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2013-01-01

    During interphase, the microtubular cytoskeleton of cycling plant cells is organized in both cortical and perinuclear arrays. Perinuclear microtubules (MTs) are nucleated from γ-Tubulin Complexes (γ-TuCs) located at the surface of the nucleus. The molecular mechanisms of γ-TuC association to the nuclear envelope (NE) are currently unknown. The γ-TuC Protein 3 (GCP3)-Interacting Protein 1 (GIP1) is the smallest γ-TuC component identified so far. AtGIP1 and its homologous protein AtGIP2 participate in the localization of active γ-TuCs at interphasic and mitotic MT nucleation sites. Arabidopsis gip1gip2 mutants are impaired in establishing a fully functional mitotic spindle and exhibit severe developmental defects. In this study, gip1gip2 knock down mutants were further characterized at the cellular level. In addition to defects in both the localization of γ-TuC core proteins and MT fiber robustness, gip1gip2 mutants exhibited a severe alteration of the nuclear shape associated with an abnormal distribution of the nuclear pore complexes. Simultaneously, they showed a misorganization of the inner nuclear membrane protein AtSUN1. Furthermore, AtGIP1 was identified as an interacting partner of AtTSA1 which was detected, like the AtGIP proteins, at the NE. These results provide the first evidence for the involvement of a γ-TuC component in both nuclear shaping and NE organization. Functional hypotheses are discussed in order to propose a model for a GIP-dependent nucleo-cytoplasmic continuum. PMID:24348487

  19. The GIP gamma-tubulin complex-associated proteins are involved in nuclear architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Batzenschlager, Morgane; Masoud, Kinda; Janski, Natacha; Houlné, Guy; Herzog, Etienne; Evrard, Jean-Luc; Baumberger, Nicolas; Erhardt, Mathieu; Nominé, Yves; Kieffer, Bruno; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2013-01-01

    During interphase, the microtubular cytoskeleton of cycling plant cells is organized in both cortical and perinuclear arrays. Perinuclear microtubules (MTs) are nucleated from γ-Tubulin Complexes (γ-TuCs) located at the surface of the nucleus. The molecular mechanisms of γ-TuC association to the nuclear envelope (NE) are currently unknown. The γ-TuC Protein 3 (GCP3)-Interacting Protein 1 (GIP1) is the smallest γ-TuC component identified so far. AtGIP1 and its homologous protein AtGIP2 participate in the localization of active γ-TuCs at interphasic and mitotic MT nucleation sites. Arabidopsis gip1gip2 mutants are impaired in establishing a fully functional mitotic spindle and exhibit severe developmental defects. In this study, gip1gip2 knock down mutants were further characterized at the cellular level. In addition to defects in both the localization of γ-TuC core proteins and MT fiber robustness, gip1gip2 mutants exhibited a severe alteration of the nuclear shape associated with an abnormal distribution of the nuclear pore complexes. Simultaneously, they showed a misorganization of the inner nuclear membrane protein AtSUN1. Furthermore, AtGIP1 was identified as an interacting partner of AtTSA1 which was detected, like the AtGIP proteins, at the NE. These results provide the first evidence for the involvement of a γ-TuC component in both nuclear shaping and NE organization. Functional hypotheses are discussed in order to propose a model for a GIP-dependent nucleo-cytoplasmic continuum.

  20. Automated separation of merged Langerhans islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švihlík, Jan; Kybic, Jan; Habart, David

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with separation of merged Langerhans islets in segmentations in order to evaluate correct histogram of islet diameters. A distribution of islet diameters is useful for determining the feasibility of islet transplantation in diabetes. First, the merged islets at training segmentations are manually separated by medical experts. Based on the single islets, the merged islets are identified and the SVM classifier is trained on both classes (merged/single islets). The testing segmentations were over-segmented using watershed transform and the most probable back merging of islets were found using trained SVM classifier. Finally, the optimized segmentation is compared with ground truth segmentation (correctly separated islets).

  1. Application of the SQUG-GIP to the seismic upgrade program of the Savannah River reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Antaki, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    In August 1991, the Savannah River Site (SRS) seismic evaluation program using the Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP) celebrated its third anniversary -- a respectable age for such a new methodology. During these three years, the GIP, developed for the commercial nuclear industry`s Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG), had evolved through Revision 0, Revision 1, Revision 2 and a Revision 2 ``update`` which is currently in the works. This evolution is not surprising for such an important, and in many ways pioneering, document. The various revisions were anticipated at SRS, and the program adjusted accordingly. The verification of seismic adequacy of equipment at the SRS nuclear reactors has been outlined in previous publications. The purpose of this paper is to relate the more practical and managerial aspects of our relatively mature SQUG-GIP implementation program, which will hopefully prove useful to future users of the GIP. This report is divided into four sections, which follow the normal flow of work under GIP: (1) Program Prerequisites (2) Definition of Scope (3) Equipment Evaluations, and (4) Resolution of Outliers.

  2. Application of the SQUG-GIP to the seismic upgrade program of the Savannah River reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Antaki, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    In August 1991, the Savannah River Site (SRS) seismic evaluation program using the Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP) celebrated its third anniversary -- a respectable age for such a new methodology. During these three years, the GIP, developed for the commercial nuclear industry's Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG), had evolved through Revision 0, Revision 1, Revision 2 and a Revision 2 update'' which is currently in the works. This evolution is not surprising for such an important, and in many ways pioneering, document. The various revisions were anticipated at SRS, and the program adjusted accordingly. The verification of seismic adequacy of equipment at the SRS nuclear reactors has been outlined in previous publications. The purpose of this paper is to relate the more practical and managerial aspects of our relatively mature SQUG-GIP implementation program, which will hopefully prove useful to future users of the GIP. This report is divided into four sections, which follow the normal flow of work under GIP: (1) Program Prerequisites (2) Definition of Scope (3) Equipment Evaluations, and (4) Resolution of Outliers.

  3. GIPS: A Software Guide to Sequencing-Based Direct Gene Cloning in Forward Genetics Studies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Wang, Weitao; Zhu, Zhongxu; Zhu, Jianhua; Tan, Deyong; Zhou, Zhipeng; Mao, Chuanzao; Chen, Xin

    2016-04-01

    The Gene Identification via Phenotype Sequencing (GIPS) software considers a range of experimental and analysis choices in sequencing-based forward genetics studies within an integrated probabilistic framework, which enables direct gene cloning from the sequencing of several unrelated mutants of the same phenotype without the need to create segregation populations. GIPS estimates four measurements to help optimize an analysis procedure as follows: (1) the chance of reporting the true phenotype-associated gene; (2) the expected number of random genes that may be reported; (3) the significance of each candidate gene's association with the phenotype; and (4) the significance of violating the Mendelian assumption if no gene is reported or if all candidate genes have failed validation. The usage of GIPS is illustrated with the identification of a rice (Oryza sativa) gene that epistatically suppresses the phenotype of the phosphate2 mutant from sequencing three unrelated ethyl methanesulfonate mutants. GIPS is available at https://github.com/synergy-zju/gips/wiki with the user manual and an analysis example. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Pancreatic islet plasticity: Interspecies comparison of islet architecture and composition

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Donald J.; Kim, Abraham; Miller, Kevin; Hara, Manami

    2010-01-01

    The pancreatic islet displays diverse patterns of endocrine cell arrangement. The prototypic islet, with insulin-secreting β-cells forming the core surrounded by other endocrine cells in the periphery, is largely based on studies of normal rodent islets. Recent reports on large animals, including humans, show a difference in islet architecture, in which the endocrine cells are randomly distributed throughout the islet. This particular species difference has raised concerns regarding the interpretation of data based on rodent studies to humans. On the other hand, further variations have been reported in marsupials and some nonhuman primates, which possess an inverted ratio of β-cells to other endocrine cells. This review discusses the striking plasticity of islet architecture and cellular composition among various species including changes in response to metabolic states within a single species. We propose that this plasticity reflects evolutionary acquired adaptation induced by altered physiological conditions, rather than inherent disparities between species. PMID:20657742

  5. Important role of heparan sulfate in postnatal islet growth and insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Iwao; Noguchi, Naoya; Nata, Koji; Yamada, Shuhei; Kaneiwa, Tomoyuki; Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikeda, Takayuki; Sugihara, Kazushi; Asano, Masahide; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Yamauchi, Akiyo; Shervani, Nausheen Jamal; Uruno, Akira; Kato, Ichiro; Unno, Michiaki; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Takasawa, Shin; and others

    2009-05-22

    Heparan sulfate (HS) binds with several signaling molecules and regulates ligand-receptor interactions, playing an essential role in embryonic development. Here we showed that HS was intensively expressed in pancreatic islet {beta}-cells after 1 week of age in mice. The enzymatic removal of HS in isolated islets resulted in attenuated glucose-induced insulin secretion with a concomitant reduction in gene expression of several key components in the insulin secretion machinery. We further depleted islet HS by inactivating the exostosin tumor-like 3 gene specifically in {beta}-cells. These mice exhibited abnormal islet morphology with reduced {beta}-cell proliferation after 1 week of age and glucose intolerance due to defective insulin secretion. These results demonstrate that islet HS is involved in the regulation of postnatal islet maturation and required to ensure normal insulin secretion.

  6. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor knockout mice have altered bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ding; Cheng, Hua; Hamrick, Mark; Zhong, Qing; Ding, Ke-Hong; Correa, Daniel; Williams, Sandra; Mulloy, Anthony; Bollag, Wendy; Bollag, Roni J; Runner, Royce R; McPherson, James C; Insogna, Karl; Isales, Carlos M

    2005-12-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone, which is secreted from endocrine cells in the small intestine after meal ingestion. GIP has been shown to affect osteoblastic function in vitro; however, the in vivo effects of GIP on bone remodeling remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of GIP in modulating bone turnover, by evaluating serum markers of bone turnover, bone density, bone morphology, and changes in biomechanical bone strength over time (one to five months) in GIP receptor knockout mice (GIPR-/- mice). The GIPR-/- mice showed a decreased bone size, lower bone mass, altered bone microarchitecture and biomechanical properties, and altered parameters for bone turnover, especially in bone formation. Moreover, the effects of GIP on bone mass were site-specific and compensatory mechanism developed over time and ameliorated the impact of the loss of GIP signaling on bone mass. Further, GIPR-/- mice had earlier age-related changes than wild-type mice in body composition, including bone mass, lean body mass, and fat percentage. In summary, our results indicate that GIP has an anabolic effect on bone mass and bone quality and suggests that GIP may be a hormonal link between nutrient ingestion and utilization.

  7. Islet alone versus islet after kidney transplantation: metabolic outcomes and islet graft survival.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shaoping; Markmann, James F; Rickels, Micheal; Yeh, Heidi; Kim, James I; Lian, Moh-Moh; Gu, Yi; Markmann, Eileen; Palanjian, Maral; Barker, Clyde F; Naji, Ali

    2009-09-27

    Isolated islet transplantation with infusions from two to three donor pancreata and Edmonton immunosuppression consistently achieves insulin independence in patients with type 1 diabetes. The success of this protocol has been attributed to a novel combination of immunosuppressive agents and avoidance of steroids; however, the outcome of islet transplantation may differ in kidney transplant recipients who are already immunosuppressed. We compared the metabolic outcomes and graft survival of islet transplantation in our program where nine patients underwent islet transplantation alone treated with Edmonton immunosuppression and eight patients received islet after kidney (IAK) transplants under standard kidney transplant immunosuppression often including steroids. Transplants in the IAK and islet transplantation alone setting demonstrated similar islet potency (islet equivalents/unit insulin reduction) and recipients from both groups routinely gained insulin independence, functional islet mass, and duration of graft survival, however, seemed superior in the IAK group. These results suggest that better islet graft function and survival may be attained using non-Edmonton rather than Edmonton immunosuppression and can include maintenance steroid therapy.

  8. Update on Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Michael; James Shapiro, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation has progressed considerably over the past 12 years, and >750 patients with type 1 diabetes have received islet transplants internationally over this time. Many countries are beginning to accept the transition from research to accepted and funded clinical care, especially for patients with brittle control that cannot be stabilized by more conventional means. Major challenges remain, including the need for more than one donor, and the requirement for potent, chronic immunosuppression. Combining immunological tolerance both to allo- and autoantigens, and a limitless expandable source of stem cell- or xenograft-derived insulin-secreting cells represent remaining hurdles in moving this effective treatment to a potential cure for all those with type 1 or 2 diabetes. PMID:22762022

  9. HLA sensitization in islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rickels, Michael R; Kearns, Jane; Markmann, Eileen; Palanjian, Maral; Markmann, James F; Naji, Ali; Kamoun, Malek

    2006-01-01

    Islet transplantation is an emerging therapy for poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. Currently, islets isolated from multiple donors not HLA-matched to recipients are usually required to achieve insulin-independence. Subsequent HLA sensitization is common following a reduction or discontinuation of immunosuppressive drugs and may be responsible for deterioration in islet graft function. Based on the evidence available to date concerning HLA sensitization in islet transplant recipients, we recommend that future islet transplantation protocols consider the following: (1) minimizing the number of islet donors by, for example, infusing high quality islet preparations of sufficient yield from a single donor rather than pooling islet preparations from multiple donors since a greater number of HLA class I mismatches appears to be associated with increased risk for sensitization; (2) ensuring negative cross-matching of donor lymphocytes and recipient sera by testing prior to islet infusions; (3) avoiding donor-recipient antigen mismatches when an identifiable alloantibody is present pre-transplant (i.e., in the case of a positive PRA pretransplant) but excluding potential recipients who are highly sensitized (e.g., have a PRA > or = 20%); and (4) performing an assessment for HLA sensitization using a sensitive flow cytometric method for alloantibody detection any time there is a reduction in immunosuppressant drug levels or worsening of metabolic control.

  10. Fructose stimulates GLP-1 but not GIP secretion in mice, rats, and humans

    PubMed Central

    Kuhre, Rune E.; Gribble, Fiona M.; Hartmann, Bolette; Reimann, Frank; Windeløv, Johanne A.; Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrients often stimulate gut hormone secretion, but the effects of fructose are incompletely understood. We studied the effects of fructose on a number of gut hormones with particular focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). In healthy humans, fructose intake caused a rise in blood glucose and plasma insulin and GLP-1, albeit to a lower degree than isocaloric glucose. Cholecystokinin secretion was stimulated similarly by both carbohydrates, but neither peptide YY3–36 nor glucagon secretion was affected by either treatment. Remarkably, while glucose potently stimulated GIP release, fructose was without effect. Similar patterns were found in the mouse and rat, with both fructose and glucose stimulating GLP-1 secretion, whereas only glucose caused GIP secretion. In GLUTag cells, a murine cell line used as model for L cells, fructose was metabolized and stimulated GLP-1 secretion dose-dependently (EC50 = 0.155 mM) by ATP-sensitive potassium channel closure and cell depolarization. Because fructose elicits GLP-1 secretion without simultaneous release of glucagonotropic GIP, the pathways underlying fructose-stimulated GLP-1 release might be useful targets for type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity drug development. PMID:24525020

  11. Insulin independence following isolated islet transplantation and single islet infusions.

    PubMed

    Markmann, James F; Deng, Shaoping; Huang, Xiaolun; Desai, Niraj M; Velidedeoglu, Ergun H; Lui, Chengyang; Frank, Adam; Markmann, Eileen; Palanjian, Maral; Brayman, Kenneth; Wolf, Bryan; Bell, Ewan; Vitamaniuk, Marko; Doliba, Nicolai; Matschinsky, Franz; Barker, Clyde F; Naji, Ali

    2003-06-01

    To restore islet function in patients whose labile diabetes subjected them to frequent dangerous episodes of hypoglycemic unawareness, and to determine whether multiple transplants are always required to achieve insulin independence. The recent report by the Edmonton group documenting restoration of insulin independence by islet transplantation in seven consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes differed from previous worldwide experience of only sporadic success. In the Edmonton patients, the transplanted islet mass critical for success was approximately more than 9,000 IEq/kg of recipient body weight and required two or three separate transplants of islets isolated from two to four cadaveric donors. Whether the success of the Edmonton group can be recapitulated by others, and whether repeated transplants using multiple donors will be a universal requirement for success have not been reported. The authors report their treatment with islet transplantation of nine patients whose labile type 1 diabetes was characterized by frequent episodes of dangerous hypoglycemia. In each of the seven patients who have completed the treatment protocol (i.e., one or if necessary a second islet transplant), insulin independence has been achieved. In five of the seven patients only a single infusion of islets was required. To date, only one recipient has subsequently lost graft function, after an initially successful transplant. This patient suffered recurrent hyperglycemia 9 months after the transplant. This report confirms the efficacy of the Edmonton immunosuppressive regimen and indicates that insulin independence can often be achieved by a single transplant of sufficient islet mass.

  12. Fetal endocannabinoids orchestrate the organization of pancreatic islet microarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Malenczyk, Katarzyna; Keimpema, Erik; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Calvigioni, Daniela; Björklund, Peyman; Mackie, Kenneth; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Hökfelt, Tomas G. M.; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Harkany, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are implicated in the control of glucose utilization and energy homeostasis by orchestrating pancreatic hormone release. Moreover, in some cell niches, endocannabinoids regulate cell proliferation, fate determination, and migration. Nevertheless, endocannabinoid contributions to the development of the endocrine pancreas remain unknown. Here, we show that α cells produce the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in mouse fetuses and human pancreatic islets, which primes the recruitment of β cells by CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) engagement. Using subtractive pharmacology, we extend these findings to anandamide, a promiscuous endocannabinoid/endovanilloid ligand, which impacts both the determination of islet size by cell proliferation and α/β cell sorting by differential activation of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) and CB1Rs. Accordingly, genetic disruption of TRPV1 channels increases islet size whereas CB1R knockout augments cellular heterogeneity and favors insulin over glucagon release. Dietary enrichment in ω-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation in mice, which permanently reduces endocannabinoid levels in the offspring, phenocopies CB1R−/− islet microstructure and improves coordinated hormone secretion. Overall, our data mechanistically link endocannabinoids to cell proliferation and sorting during pancreatic islet formation, as well as to life-long programming of hormonal determinants of glucose homeostasis. PMID:26494286

  13. Fetal endocannabinoids orchestrate the organization of pancreatic islet microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Malenczyk, Katarzyna; Keimpema, Erik; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Calvigioni, Daniela; Björklund, Peyman; Mackie, Kenneth; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Hökfelt, Tomas G M; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Harkany, Tibor

    2015-11-10

    Endocannabinoids are implicated in the control of glucose utilization and energy homeostasis by orchestrating pancreatic hormone release. Moreover, in some cell niches, endocannabinoids regulate cell proliferation, fate determination, and migration. Nevertheless, endocannabinoid contributions to the development of the endocrine pancreas remain unknown. Here, we show that α cells produce the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in mouse fetuses and human pancreatic islets, which primes the recruitment of β cells by CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) engagement. Using subtractive pharmacology, we extend these findings to anandamide, a promiscuous endocannabinoid/endovanilloid ligand, which impacts both the determination of islet size by cell proliferation and α/β cell sorting by differential activation of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) and CB1Rs. Accordingly, genetic disruption of TRPV1 channels increases islet size whereas CB1R knockout augments cellular heterogeneity and favors insulin over glucagon release. Dietary enrichment in ω-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation in mice, which permanently reduces endocannabinoid levels in the offspring, phenocopies CB1R(-/-) islet microstructure and improves coordinated hormone secretion. Overall, our data mechanistically link endocannabinoids to cell proliferation and sorting during pancreatic islet formation, as well as to life-long programming of hormonal determinants of glucose homeostasis.

  14. Beneficial effects of a N-terminally modified GIP agonist on tissue-level bone material properties.

    PubMed

    Mabilleau, Guillaume; Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Irwin, Nigel; Simon, Yannick; Audran, Maurice; Flatt, Peter R; Chappard, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Bone remodeling is under complex regulation from nervous, hormonal and local signals, including gut hormones. Among the gut hormones, a role for the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) has been suggested. However, the rapid degradation of GIP in the bloodstream by the ubiquitous enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) precludes therapeutic use. To circumvent this problem, a series of N-terminally modified GIP agonists have been developed, with N-AcGIP being the most promising. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of N-AcGIP on bone at the micro-level using trabecular and cortical microstructural morphology, and at the tissue-level in rats. Copenhagen rats were randomly assigned into control or N-AcGIP-treated groups and received daily injection for 4 weeks. Bone microstructural morphology was assessed by microCT and dynamic histomorphometry and tissue-level properties by nanoindentation, qBEI and infra-red microscopy. Four week treatment with N-AcGIP did not alter trabecular or cortical microstructural morphology. In addition, no significant modifications of mechanical response and properties at the tissue-level were observed in trabecular bone. However, significant augmentations in maximum load (12%), hardness (14%), indentation modulus (13%) and dissipated energy (16%) were demonstrated in cortical bone. These beneficial modifications of mechanical properties at the tissue-level were associated with increased mineralization (22%) and collagen maturity (13%) of the bone matrix. Taken together, the results support a beneficial role of GIP, and particularly stable analogs such as N-AcGIP, on tissue material properties of bone.

  15. A single-islet microplate assay to measure mouse and human islet insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Truchan, Nathan A; Brar, Harpreet K; Gallagher, Shannon J; Neuman, Joshua C; Kimple, Michelle E

    2015-01-01

    One complication to comparing β-cell function among islet preparations, whether from genetically identical or diverse animals or human organ donors, is the number of islets required per assay. Islet numbers can be limiting, meaning that fewer conditions can be tested; other islet measurements must be excluded; or islets must be pooled from multiple animals/donors for each experiment. Furthermore, pooling islets negates the possibility of performing single-islet comparisons. Our aim was to validate a 96-well plate-based single islet insulin secretion assay that would be as robust as previously published methods to quantify glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from mouse and human islets. First, we tested our new assay using mouse islets, showing robust stimulation of insulin secretion 24 or 48 h after islet isolation. Next, we utilized the assay to quantify mouse islet function on an individual islet basis, measurements that would not be possible with the standard pooled islet assay methods. Next, we validated our new assay using human islets obtained from the Integrated Islet Distribution Program (IIDP). Human islets are known to have widely varying insulin secretion capacity, and using our new assay we reveal biologically relevant factors that are significantly correlated with human islet function, whether displayed as maximal insulin secretion response or fold-stimulation of insulin secretion. Overall, our results suggest this new microplate assay will be a useful tool for many laboratories, expert or not in islet techniques, to be able to precisely quantify islet insulin secretion from their models of interest.

  16. Structural and Pharmacological Characterization of Novel Potent and Selective Monoclonal Antibody Antagonists of Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ravn, Peter; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Kunze, Susan; Matthews, Evelyn; Priest, Claire; O'Brien, Siobhan; Collinson, Andie; Papworth, Monika; Fritsch-Fredin, Maria; Jermutus, Lutz; Benthem, Lambertus; Gruetter, Markus; Jackson, Ronald H.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an endogenous hormonal factor (incretin) that, upon binding to its receptor (GIPr; a class B G-protein-coupled receptor), stimulates insulin secretion by beta cells in the pancreas. There has been a lack of potent inhibitors of the GIPr with prolonged in vivo exposure to support studies on GIP biology. Here we describe the generation of an antagonizing antibody to the GIPr, using phage and ribosome display libraries. Gipg013 is a specific competitive antagonist with equally high potencies to mouse, rat, dog, and human GIP receptors with a Ki of 7 nm for the human GIPr. Gipg013 antagonizes the GIP receptor and inhibits GIP-induced insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo. A crystal structure of Gipg013 Fab in complex with the human GIPr extracellular domain (ECD) shows that the antibody binds through a series of hydrogen bonds from the complementarity-determining regions of Gipg013 Fab to the N-terminal α-helix of GIPr ECD as well as to residues around its highly conserved glucagon receptor subfamily recognition fold. The antibody epitope overlaps with the GIP binding site on the GIPr ECD, ensuring competitive antagonism of the receptor. This well characterized antagonizing antibody to the GIPr will be useful as a tool to further understand the biological roles of GIP. PMID:23689510

  17. Structural and pharmacological characterization of novel potent and selective monoclonal antibody antagonists of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Ravn, Peter; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Kunze, Susan; Matthews, Evelyn; Priest, Claire; O'Brien, Siobhan; Collinson, Andie; Papworth, Monika; Fritsch-Fredin, Maria; Jermutus, Lutz; Benthem, Lambertus; Gruetter, Markus; Jackson, Ronald H

    2013-07-05

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an endogenous hormonal factor (incretin) that, upon binding to its receptor (GIPr; a class B G-protein-coupled receptor), stimulates insulin secretion by beta cells in the pancreas. There has been a lack of potent inhibitors of the GIPr with prolonged in vivo exposure to support studies on GIP biology. Here we describe the generation of an antagonizing antibody to the GIPr, using phage and ribosome display libraries. Gipg013 is a specific competitive antagonist with equally high potencies to mouse, rat, dog, and human GIP receptors with a Ki of 7 nm for the human GIPr. Gipg013 antagonizes the GIP receptor and inhibits GIP-induced insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo. A crystal structure of Gipg013 Fab in complex with the human GIPr extracellular domain (ECD) shows that the antibody binds through a series of hydrogen bonds from the complementarity-determining regions of Gipg013 Fab to the N-terminal α-helix of GIPr ECD as well as to residues around its highly conserved glucagon receptor subfamily recognition fold. The antibody epitope overlaps with the GIP binding site on the GIPr ECD, ensuring competitive antagonism of the receptor. This well characterized antagonizing antibody to the GIPr will be useful as a tool to further understand the biological roles of GIP.

  18. Islet cell development.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Anabel; Khoo, Adrian; Tejedo, Juan R; Bedoya, Francisco J; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Over the last years, there has been great success in driving stem cells toward insulin-expressing cells. However, the protocols developed to date have some limitations, such as low reliability and low insulin production. The most successful protocols used for generation of insulin-producing cells from stem cells mimic in vitro pancreatic organogenesis by directing the stem cells through stages that resemble several pancreatic developmental stages. Islet cell fate is coordinated by a complex network of inductive signals and regulatory transcription factors that, in a combinatorial way, determine pancreatic organ specification, differentiation, growth, and lineage. Together, these signals and factors direct the progression from multipotent progenitor cells to mature pancreatic cells. Later in development and adult life, several of these factors also contribute to maintain the differentiated phenotype of islet cells. A detailed understanding of the processes that operate in the pancreas during embryogenesis will help us to develop a suitable source of cells for diabetes therapy. In this chapter, we will discuss the main transcription factors involved in pancreas specification and beta-cell formation.

  19. The Pancreatic Islet Regulome Browser

    PubMed Central

    Mularoni, Loris; Ramos-Rodríguez, Mireia; Pasquali, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The pancreatic islet is a highly specialized tissue embedded in the exocrine pancreas whose primary function is that of controlling glucose homeostasis. Thus, understanding the transcriptional control of islet-cell may help to puzzle out the pathogenesis of glucose metabolism disorders. Integrative computational analyses of transcriptomic and epigenomic data allows predicting genomic coordinates of putative regulatory elements across the genome and, decipher tissue-specific functions of the non-coding genome. We herein present the Islet Regulome Browser, a tool that allows fast access and exploration of pancreatic islet epigenomic and transcriptomic data produced by different labs worldwide. The Islet Regulome Browser is now accessible on the internet or may be installed locally. It allows uploading custom tracks as well as providing interactive access to a wealth of information including Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) variants, different classes of regulatory elements, together with enhancer clusters, stretch-enhancers and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic progenitors and adult human pancreatic islets. Integration and visualization of such data may allow a deeper understanding of the regulatory networks driving tissue-specific transcription and guide the identification of regulatory variants. We believe that such tool will facilitate the access to pancreatic islet public genomic datasets providing a major boost to functional genomics studies in glucose metabolism related traits including diabetes. PMID:28261261

  20. Insulin Plays a Permissive Role for the Vasoactive Effect of GIP Regulating Adipose Tissue Metabolism in Humans.

    PubMed

    Asmar, Meena; Simonsen, Lene; Asmar, Ali; Holst, Jens Juul; Dela, Flemming; Bülow, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in combination with hyperinsulinemia increases blood flow and triglyceride (TAG) clearance in subcutaneous (sc) abdominal adipose tissue in lean humans. The present experiments were performed to further investigate the role of insulin for the vasoactive effect of GIP in adipose tissue metabolism and whether the vasodilatory effect of GIP is dependent on C-peptide. Six lean healthy subjects were studied. The sc abdominal adipose tissue metabolism was assessed by Fick's principle during GIP infusion (1.5 pmol/kg/min) in combination with 1) euglycemic-high insulinemic clamp (Eugluc-Hiinsu), raising plasma insulin concentrations to postprandial levels, 2) hyperglycemic-euinsulinemic clamp (Hygluc-Euinsu), and 3) hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, raising plasma insulin concentrations to supraphysiological levels. During the hyperglycemic clamps, endogenous insulin and C-peptide secretion were inhibited by infusion of the somatostatin analogue octreotide. During GIP infusion, Eugluc-Hiinsu, and hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps, sc abdominal adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) was similar and increased from 2.1 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.4 ml min(-1) (100 g tissue)(-1) to 7.1 ± 0.6 and 7.6 ± 0.1 ml min(-1) (100 g tissue)(-1), respectively (P < .01). ATBF remained virtually constant (2.7 ± 0.4 ml min(-1) [100 g tissue](-1)) during Hygluc-Euinsu and GIP infusion. In addition, adipose tissue TAG clearance increased significantly (P = .03), whereas free fatty acid output (P = .01), glycerol output (P = .02) and free fatty acid/glycerol release ratio (P = .04) decreased during the Eugluc-Hiinsu clamp compared to Hygluc-Euinsu clamp with GIP. In healthy lean humans, insulin is permissive for GIP to induce an increase in blood flow and TAG clearance in sc abdominal adipose tissue. This effect is independent of C-peptide.

  1. Detailed characterisation of STC-1 cells and the pGIP/Neo sub-clone suggests the incretin hormones are translationally regulated.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Anna L; Pan, Xiaobei; Marco-Ramell, Anna; Meharg, Caroline; Green, Brian D

    2017-10-01

    STC-1 is a heterogeneous plurihormonal cell line producing several prominent gut peptide hormones. pGIP/Neo is a genetically selected sub-clone of STC-1 with augmented levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). Morphometric parameters, hormone concentrations, mRNA transcripts, hormone immunocytochemistry and nutrient utilisation/production of these two cell lines were compared. Proglucagon-derived peptides (Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and - 2(GLP-2)) were lower in sub-clone cells than progenitor cells. High Content Analysis found altered intracellular GLP-1, GIP, cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) levels and differing hormone co-localisation. The proportion pGIP/Neo cells containing GIP immunoreactivity (82%) was greater than STC-1 (65%), as were the proportion with 'GIP only', 'GLP-1+GIP' or 'GIP+PYY' immunoreactivity. Most surprisingly mRNA transcripts of the proglucagon and GIP genes were inversely correlated to the levels of their translated peptides. This strongly suggests that proglucagon and GIP are encoded on 'translationally regulated genes' - a characteristic possessed by other endocrine hormones. Metabolomic profiling revealed differences in cellular nutrient utilisation/production and that under normal culture conditions both cell lines exhibit signs of overflow metabolism. These studies provide an insight into the metabolism and properties of these valuable cells, suggesting for the first time that incretin hormone genes are translationally regulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An engineered macroencapsulation membrane releasing FTY720 to precondition pancreatic islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Daniel T; Olingy, Claire E; Chhabra, Preeti; Langman, Linda; Merrill, Parker H; Linhart, Ritu S; Tanes, Michael L; Lin, Dan; Brayman, Kenneth L; Botchwey, Edward A

    2017-02-27

    Macroencapsulation is a powerful approach to increase the efficiency of extrahepatic pancreatic islet transplant. FTY720, a small molecule that activates signaling through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors, is immunomodulatory and pro-angiogenic upon sustained delivery from biomaterials. While FTY720 (fingolimod, Gilenya) has been explored for organ transplantation, in the present work the effect of locally released FTY720 from novel nanofiber-based macroencapsulation membranes is explored for islet transplantation. We screened islet viability during culture with FTY720 and various biodegradable polymers. Islet viability is significantly reduced by the addition of high doses (≥500 ng/mL) of soluble FTY720. Among the polymers screened, islets have the highest viability when cultured with poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV). Therefore, PHBV was blended with polycaprolactone (PCL) for mechanical stability and electrospun into nanofibers. Islets had no detectable function ex vivo following 5 days or 12 h of subcutaneous implantation within our engineered device. Subsequently, we explored a preconditioning scheme in which islets are transplanted 2 weeks after FTY720-loaded nanofibers are implanted. This allows FTY720 to orchestrate a local regenerative milieu while preventing premature transplantation into avascular sites that contain high concentrations of FTY720. These results provide a foundation and motivation for further investigation into the use of FTY720 in preconditioning sites for efficacious islet transplantation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  3. Angiopoetin-2 Signals Do Not Mediate the Hypervascularization of Islets in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal; Lueschen, Navina; Ardestani, Amin; Oberholzer, Jose; Olerud, Johan; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Maedler, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Changes in the islet vasculature have been implicated in the regulation of β-cell survival and function during the progression to type 2 diabetes (T2D). Failure of the β-cell to compensate for the increased insulin demand in obesity eventually leads to diabetes; as a result of the complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors (e.g. ongoing inflammation within the islets) and impaired vascular function. The Angiopoietin/Tie (Ang/Tie) angiogenic system maintains vasculature and is closely related to organ inflammation and angiogenesis. In this study we aimed to identify whether the vessel area within the islets changes in diabetes and whether such changes would be triggered by the Tie-antagonist Ang-2. Methods Immunohistochemical and qPCR analyses to follow islet vascularization and Ang/Tie levels were performed in human pancreatic autopsies and isolated human and mouse islets. The effect of Ang-2 was assessed in β-cell-specific Ang-2 overexpressing mice during high fat diet (HFD) feeding. Results Islet vessel area was increased in autopsy pancreases from patients with T2D. The vessel markers Tie-1, Tie-2 and CD31 were upregulated in mouse islets upon HFD feeding from 8 to 24 weeks. Ang-2 was transiently upregulated in mouse islets at 8 weeks of HFD and under glucolipotoxic conditions (22.2 mM glucose/ 0.5 mM palmitate) in vitro in human and mouse islets, in contrast to its downregulation by cytokines (IL-1β, IFN-ɣ and TNF-α). Ang-1 on the other hand was oppositely regulated, with a significant loss under glucolipotoxic condition, a trend to reduce in islets from patients with T2D and an upregulation by cytokines. Modulation of such changes in Ang-2 by its overexpression or the inhibition of its receptor Tie-2 impaired β-cell function at basal conditions but protected islets from cytokine induced apoptosis. In vivo, β-cell-specific Ang-2 overexpression in mice induced hypervascularization under normal diet but contrastingly led to

  4. Angiopoetin-2 Signals Do Not Mediate the Hypervascularization of Islets in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Payal; Lueschen, Navina; Ardestani, Amin; Oberholzer, Jose; Olerud, Johan; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Maedler, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the islet vasculature have been implicated in the regulation of β-cell survival and function during the progression to type 2 diabetes (T2D). Failure of the β-cell to compensate for the increased insulin demand in obesity eventually leads to diabetes; as a result of the complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors (e.g. ongoing inflammation within the islets) and impaired vascular function. The Angiopoietin/Tie (Ang/Tie) angiogenic system maintains vasculature and is closely related to organ inflammation and angiogenesis. In this study we aimed to identify whether the vessel area within the islets changes in diabetes and whether such changes would be triggered by the Tie-antagonist Ang-2. Immunohistochemical and qPCR analyses to follow islet vascularization and Ang/Tie levels were performed in human pancreatic autopsies and isolated human and mouse islets. The effect of Ang-2 was assessed in β-cell-specific Ang-2 overexpressing mice during high fat diet (HFD) feeding. Islet vessel area was increased in autopsy pancreases from patients with T2D. The vessel markers Tie-1, Tie-2 and CD31 were upregulated in mouse islets upon HFD feeding from 8 to 24 weeks. Ang-2 was transiently upregulated in mouse islets at 8 weeks of HFD and under glucolipotoxic conditions (22.2 mM glucose/ 0.5 mM palmitate) in vitro in human and mouse islets, in contrast to its downregulation by cytokines (IL-1β, IFN-ɣ and TNF-α). Ang-1 on the other hand was oppositely regulated, with a significant loss under glucolipotoxic condition, a trend to reduce in islets from patients with T2D and an upregulation by cytokines. Modulation of such changes in Ang-2 by its overexpression or the inhibition of its receptor Tie-2 impaired β-cell function at basal conditions but protected islets from cytokine induced apoptosis. In vivo, β-cell-specific Ang-2 overexpression in mice induced hypervascularization under normal diet but contrastingly led to hypovascularized islets in response

  5. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future.

  6. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  7. Trophic effects of adipose derived stem cells on Langerhans islets viability--Review.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Isa; Crescenzi, Alessandra; Chaib, Elezar; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro

    2015-07-01

    Langerhans islets transplantation has been proposed to provide an endogenous source of insulin in Type I diabetes. However, the hypoxic stress and the receptor's immune reaction suffered by the implants cause them to fail in sustaining the insulin production along the time. Experimental studies have shown that adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) can secrete cytokines that activate free radical scavengers, antioxidants and chaperone heat/shock proteins leading to reduction of apoptosis in damaged tissues. Therefore, using the PubMed database, we reviewed the experimental studies that investigated the trophic effects of ADSCs on Langerhans islets viability, in vitro and in vivo, from 2009 to 2014. We excluded articles that investigated the effects of other types of mesenchymal stem cells on β-cell survival as well articles that worked in the differentiation of ADSCs into insulin producing cells. The analysis of the experiments revealed that exposure of islets to ADSCs in vitro, even for a short period of time, can enhance islet cell viability and function. In vivo studies also corroborated the trophic effects of ADSCs leading to the improvement of islet function and reduction of the number of the islets required for controlling the receptor's glucose levels. This review can contribute to guide future experiments looking for a long term diabetes treatment employing ADSC trophic effects for the enhancement of transplanted Langerhans islet viability and functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  9. Parathyroid hormone-related protein and its receptors: nuclear functions and roles in the renal and cardiovascular systems, the placental trophoblasts and the pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Thomas L; Cormier, Sarah; Eichinger, Anne; Endlich, Karlhans; Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie; Fischer, Evelyne; Friedman, Peter A; Karaplis, Andrew C; Massfelder, Thierry; Rossert, Jérôme; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter; Silve, Caroline; Stewart, Andrew F; Takane, Karen; Helwig, Jean-Jacques

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of the so-called ‘parathyroid hormone-related protein' (PTHrP) in 1987 was the result of a long quest for the factor which, by mimicking the actions of PTH in bone and kidney, is responsible for the hypercalcemic paraneoplastic syndrome, humoral calcemia of malignancy. PTHrP is distinct from PTH in a number of ways. First, PTHrP is the product of a separate gene. Second, with the exception of a short N-terminal region, the structure of PTHrP is not closely related to that of PTH. Third, in contrast to PTH, PTHrP is a paracrine factor expressed throughout the body. Finally, most of the functions of PTHrP have nothing in common with those of PTH. PTHrP is a poly-hormone which comprises a family of distinct peptide hormones arising from post-translational endoproteolytic cleavage of the initial PTHrP translation products. Mature N-terminal, mid-region and C-terminal secretory forms of PTHrP are thus generated, each of them having their own physiologic functions and probably their own receptors. The type 1 PTHrP receptor, binding both PTH(1-34) and PTHrP(1-36), is the only cloned receptor so far. PTHrP is a PTH-like calciotropic hormone, a myorelaxant, a growth factor and a developmental regulatory molecule. The present review reports recent aspects of PTHrP pharmacology and physiology, including: (a) the identification of new peptides and receptors of the PTH/PTHrP system; (b) the recently discovered nuclear functions of PTHrP and the role of PTHrP as an intracrine regulator of cell growth and cell death; (c) the physiological and developmental actions of PTHrP in the cardiovascular and the renal glomerulo-vascular systems; (d) the role of PTHrP as a regulator of pancreatic beta cell growth and functions, and, (e) the interactions of PTHrP and calcium-sensing receptors for the control of the growth of placental trophoblasts. These new advances have contributed to a better understanding of the pathophysiological role of PTHrP, and will help to identify

  10. OB-Rb gene transfer to leptin-resistant islets reverses diabetogenic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wang, May-Yun; Koyama, Kazunori; Shimabukuro, Michio; Newgard, Christopher B.; Unger, Roger H.

    1998-01-01

    In obese Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats with mutant leptin receptors, pancreatic islets have an ≈50-fold increase in fat (TG), overproduce nitric oxide (NO), and lack a normal proinsulin mRNA response to fatty acids. We overexpressed the wild-type full-length “b” isoform of the leptin receptor (OB-Rb) in ZDF islets by perfusing ZDF pancreata with recombinant adenovirus containing the cDNA encoding OB-Rb. In cultured islets isolated from these animals, leptin lowered islet TG by 87% and completely blocked TG formation from free fatty acids. Overproduction of NO was reduced, and the preproinsulin mRNA response to free fatty acids was restored. This establishes defective leptin action as the proximate cause of lipotoxic diabetes in ZDF rats. PMID:9435258

  11. Islet amyloid polypeptide, islet amyloid, and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Westermark, Per; Andersson, Arne; Westermark, Gunilla T

    2011-07-01

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin) is one of the major secretory products of β-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. It is a regulatory peptide with putative function both locally in the islets, where it inhibits insulin and glucagon secretion, and at distant targets. It has binding sites in the brain, possibly contributing also to satiety regulation and inhibits gastric emptying. Effects on several other organs have also been described. IAPP was discovered through its ability to aggregate into pancreatic islet amyloid deposits, which are seen particularly in association with type 2 diabetes in humans and with diabetes in a few other mammalian species, especially monkeys and cats. Aggregated IAPP has cytotoxic properties and is believed to be of critical importance for the loss of β-cells in type 2 diabetes and also in pancreatic islets transplanted into individuals with type 1 diabetes. This review deals both with physiological aspects of IAPP and with the pathophysiological role of aggregated forms of IAPP, including mechanisms whereby human IAPP forms toxic aggregates and amyloid fibrils.

  12. Oxygenation of the Intraportally Transplanted Pancreatic Islet

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intraportal islet transplantation (IT) is not widely utilized as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. Oxygenation of the intraportally transplanted islet has not been studied extensively. We present a diffusion-reaction model that predicts the presence of an anoxic core and a larger partly functional core within intraportally transplanted islets. Four variables were studied: islet diameter, islet fractional viability, external oxygen partial pressure (P) (in surrounding portal blood), and presence or absence of a thrombus on the islet surface. Results indicate that an islet with average size and fractional viability exhibits an anoxic volume fraction (AVF) of 14% and a function loss of 72% at a low external P. Thrombus formation increased AVF to 30% and function loss to 92%, suggesting that the effect of thrombosis may be substantial. External P and islet diameter accounted for the greatest overall impact on AVF and loss of function. At our institutions, large human alloislets (>200 μm diameter) account for ~20% of total islet number but ~70% of total islet volume; since most of the total transplanted islet volume is accounted for by large islets, most of the intraportal islet cells are likely to be anoxic and not fully functional. PMID:27872862

  13. Impact of islet size on pancreatic islet transplantation and potential interventions to improve outcome.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Daria; Phan, Tammy; Sequi, Marco; Lin, Yong; Freeman, Daniel H; Cicalese, Luca; Rastellini, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Better results have been recently reported in clinical pancreatic islet transplantation (ITX) due mostly to improved isolation techniques and immunosuppression; however, some limitations still exist. It is known that following transplantation, 30% to 60% of the islets are lost. In our study, we have investigated 1) the role of size as a factor affecting islet engraftment and 2) potential procedural manipulations to increase the number of smaller functional islets that can be transplanted. C57/BL10 mice were used as donors and recipients in a syngeneic islet transplant model. Isolated islets were divided by size (large, >300 μm; medium 150-300 μm; small, <150 μm). Each size was transplanted in chemically induced diabetic mice as full (600 IEQ), suboptimal (400 IEQ), and marginal mass (200 IEQ). Control animals received all size islets. Engraftment was defined as reversal of diabetes by day 7 posttransplantation. When the superiority of smaller islets was observed, strategies of overdigestion and fragmentation were adopted during islet isolation in the attempt to reduce islet size and improve engraftment. Smaller islets were significantly superior in engraftment compared to medium, large, and control (all sizes) groups. This was more evident when marginal mass data were compared. In all masses, success decreased as islet size increased. Once islets were engrafted, functionality was not affected by size. When larger islets were fragmented, a significant decrease in islet functionality was observed. On the contrary, if pancreata were slightly overdigested, although not as successful as small naive islets, an increase in engraftment was observed when compared to the control group. In conclusion, smaller islets are superior in engraftment following islet transplantation. Fragmentation has a deleterious effect on islet engraftment. Islet isolations can be performed by reducing islet size with slight overdigestion, and it can be safely adopted to improve clinical

  14. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide confers early phase insulin release to oral glucose in rats: demonstration by a receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J T; Dayanandan, B; Habener, J F; Kieffer, T J

    2000-10-01

    A novel GIP receptor antagonist was developed to evaluate the acute role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in the insulin response to oral glucose in rats. Antisera to an extracellular epitope of the GIP receptor (GIPR) detected immunoreactive GIPR on rat pancreatic beta-cells. Purified GIPR antibody (GIPR Ab) specifically displaced GIP binding to the receptor and blocked GIP-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP. When delivered to rats by ip injection, GIPR Ab had a half-life of approximately 4 days. Treatment with GIPR Ab (1 microg/g BW) blocked the potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by GIP (60 pmol) but not glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, 60 pmol) in anesthetized rats. The insulin response to oral glucose was delayed in conscious unrestrained rats that were pretreated with GIPR Ab. Plasma insulin levels were approximately 35% lower at 10 min in GIPR Ab treated animals compared with controls. As a result, the glucose excursion was greater in the GIPR Ab treated group. Fasting plasma glucose levels were not altered by GIPR Ab. We conclude that release of GIP following oral glucose may act as an anticipatory signal to pancreatic beta-cells to promote rapid release of insulin for glucose disposal.

  15. Targeting pancreatic islets with phage display assisted by laser pressure catapult microdissection.

    PubMed

    Yao, Virginia J; Ozawa, Michael G; Trepel, Martin; Arap, Wadih; McDonald, Donald M; Pasqualini, Renata

    2005-02-01

    Heterogeneity of the microvasculature in different organs has been well documented by multiple methods including in vivo phage display. However, less is known about the diversity of blood vessels within functionally distinct regions of organs. Here, we combined in vivo phage display with laser pressure catapult microdissection to identify peptide ligands for vascular receptors in the islets of Langerhans in the murine pancreas. Protein database analyses of the peptides, CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC, showed sequence identity to two ephrin A-type ligand homologues, A2 and A4. Confocal microscopy confirmed that most immunoreactivity of CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC phage was associated with blood vessels in pancreatic islets. Antibodies recognizing EphA4, a receptor for ephrin-A ligands, were similarly associated with islet blood vessels. Importantly, binding of both islet-homing phage and anti-EphA4 antibody was strikingly increased in blood vessels of pancreatic islet tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice. These results indicate that endothelial cells of blood vessels in pancreatic islets preferentially express EphA4 receptors, and this expression is increased in tumors. Our findings show in vivo phage display and laser pressure catapult microdissection can be combined to reveal endothelial cell specialization within focal regions of the microvasculature.

  16. Oxygen environment and islet size are the primary limiting factors of isolated pancreatic islet survival.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hirotake; Cook, Colin; Wang, Chia-Hao; Medrano, Leonard; Lin, Henry; Kandeel, Fouad; Tai, Yu-Chong; Mullen, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Pancreatic islet transplantation could be an effective treatment option for type 1 diabetes once several issues are resolved, including donor shortage, prevention of islet necrosis and loss in pre- and post-transplantation, and optimization of immunosuppression. This study seeks to determine the cause of necrotic loss of isolated islets to improve transplant efficiency. The oxygen tension inside isolated human islets of different sizes was simulated under varying oxygen environments using a computational in silico model. In vitro human islet viability was also assessed after culturing in different oxygen conditions. Correlation between simulation data and experimentally measured islet viability was examined. Using these in vitro viability data of human islets, the effect of islet diameter and oxygen tension of the culture environment on islet viability was also analyzed using a logistic regression model. Computational simulation clearly revealed the oxygen gradient inside the islet structure. We found that oxygen tension in the islet core was greatly lower (hypoxic) than that on the islet surface due to the oxygen consumption by the cells. The hypoxic core was expanded in the larger islets or in lower oxygen cultures. These findings were consistent with results from in vitro islet viability assays that measured central necrosis in the islet core, indicating that hypoxia is one of the major causes of central necrosis. The logistic regression analysis revealed a negative effect of large islet and low oxygen culture on islet survival. Hypoxic core conditions, induced by the oxygen gradient inside islets, contribute to the development of central necrosis of human isolated islets. Supplying sufficient oxygen during culture could be an effective and reasonable method to maintain isolated islets viable.

  17. Fibroblast populated collagen matrix promotes islet survival and reduces the number of islets required for diabetes reversal.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Reza B; Moeen Rezakhanlou, Alireza; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Ao, Ziliang; Warnock, Garth L; Ghahary, Aziz

    2011-07-01

    Islet transplantation represents a viable treatment for type 1 diabetes. However, due to loss of substantial mass of islets early after transplantation, islets from two or more donors are required to achieve insulin independence. Islet-extracellular matrix disengagement, which occurs during islet isolation process, leads to subsequent islet cell apoptosis and is an important contributing factor to early islet loss. In this study, we developed a fibroblast populated collagen matrix (FPCM) as a novel scaffold to improve islet cell viability and function post-transplantation. FPCM was developed by embedding fibroblasts within type-I collagen and used as scaffold for islet grafts. Viability and insulin secretory function of islets embedded within FPCM was evaluated in vitro and in a syngeneic murine islet transplantation model. Islets embedded within acellular matrix or naked islets were used as control. Islet cell survival and function was markedly improved particularly after embedding within FPCM. The composite scaffold significantly promoted islet isograft survival and reduced the critical islet mass required for diabetes reversal by half (from 200 to 100 islets per recipient). Fibroblast embedded within FPCM produced fibronectin and growth factors and induced islet cell proliferation. No evidence of fibroblast over-growth within composite grafts was noticed. These results confirm that FPCM significantly promotes islet viability and functionality, enhances engraftment of islet grafts and decreases the critical islet mass needed to reverse hyperglycemia. This promising finding offers a new approach to reducing the number of islet donors per recipient and improving islet transplant outcome.

  18. Chronic reduction of insulin receptors in the ventromedial hypothalamus produces glucose intolerance and islet dysfunction in the absence of weight gain.

    PubMed

    Paranjape, Sachin A; Chan, Owen; Zhu, Wanling; Horblitt, Adam M; Grillo, Claudia A; Wilson, Steven; Reagan, Lawrence; Sherwin, Robert S

    2011-11-01

    Insulin is believed to regulate glucose homeostasis mainly via direct effects on the liver, muscle, and adipose tissues. The contribution of insulin's central nervous system effects to disorders of glucose metabolism has received less attention. To evaluate whether postnatal reduction of insulin receptors (IRs) within the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), a brain region critical for glucose sensing, contributes to disorders of peripheral glucose metabolism, we microinjected a lentiviral vector expressing an antisense sequence to knockdown IRs or a control lentiviral vector into the VMH of nonobese nondiabetic rats. After 3-4 mo, we assessed 1) glucose tolerance, 2) hepatic insulin sensitivity, and 3) insulin and glucagon secretion, using the glucose clamp technique. Knockdown of IRs locally in the VMH caused glucose intolerance without altering body weight. Increments of plasma insulin during a euglycemic clamp study failed to suppress endogenous glucose production and produced a paradoxical rise in plasma glucagon in the VMH-IR knockdown rats. Unexpectedly, these animals also displayed a 40% reduction (P < 0.05) in insulin secretion in response to an identical hyperglycemic stimulus (∼220 mg/dl). Our data demonstrate that chronic suppression of VMH-IR gene expression is sufficient to impair glucose metabolism as well as α-cell and β-cell function in nondiabetic, nonobese rats. These data suggest that insulin resistance within the VMH may be a significant contributor to the development of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Anx7 is required for nutritional control of gene expression in mouse pancreatic islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Meera; Eidelman, Ofer; Leighton, Ximena; Glasman, Mirta; Goping, Gertrude; Pollard, Harvey B.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene expression in islets of Langerhans is profoundly sensitive to glucose and other nutrients. Islets of Langerhans in the Anx7(+/-) knockout mouse exhibit a profound reduction in ITPR3 protein expression, defective intracellular calcium signaling, and defective insulin secretion. Additional data presented here also show that mRNA for ITPR3 is virtually undetectable in isolated Anx7(+/-) islets. IP3Receptor type 3 (ITPR3) expression in islets of Langerhans is closely regulated by secretory stimuli, and it has been suggested that the level of the ITPR3 expression controls the ability of the islets to respond to nutritional signals. We report that although control islets respond to glucose in vitro by a transient increment in ITPR3 mRNA, the islets from the Anx7(+/-) mouse remain low. We therefore hypothesized that the Anx7/IP3 Receptor(3)/Ca(2+) signaling pathway plays a role in beta cell responses to glucose, and that in the absence of the Anx7/ITPR3 signaling system, the islets would be unable to discriminate between fed or fasted states in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To test this hypothesis, we subjected Anx7(+/-) and control mice to either food and water ad libidum or to an overnight fast with access to water only. We then isolated the respective islets and compared nutrient-dependent changes in global gene expression under the four conditions using genome-based microarray technology. RESULTS: Anx7 protein expression in these islets is only about 50% of control levels in normal littermate controls, and IPTR3 message and protein are virtually zero. cDNA microarray analyses show that in control animals gene expression is significantly affected by the fasting state. Many of the affected genes have historical relevance to development and differentiation of islets. These include preproglucagon, APOJ, cadherin2, phosphoglucoisomerase, oncostatin M, PAX6, HGF, and cytokeratin 18. However, there are also many other nutritionally sensitive genes in control

  20. Human Islets Have Fewer Blood Vessels than Mouse Islets and the Density of Islet Vascular Structures Is Increased in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brissova, Marcela; Shostak, Alena; Fligner, Corinne L; Revetta, Frank L; Washington, Mary K; Powers, Alvin C; Hull, Rebecca L

    2015-08-01

    Human and rodent islets differ substantially in several features, including architecture, cell composition, gene expression and some aspects of insulin secretion. Mouse pancreatic islets are highly vascularized with interactions between islet endothelial and endocrine cells being important for islet cell differentiation and function. To determine whether human islets have a similar high degree of vascularization and whether this is altered with diabetes, we examined the vascularization of islets from normal human subjects, subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and normal mice. Using an integrated morphometry approach to quantify intra-islet capillary density in human and mouse pancreatic sections, we found that human islets have five-fold fewer vessels per islet area than mouse islets. Islets in pancreatic sections from T2D subjects showed capillary thickening, some capillary fragmentation and had increased vessel density as compared with non-diabetic controls. These changes in islet vasculature in T2D islets appeared to be associated with amyloid deposition, which was noted in islets from 8/9 T2D subjects (and occupied 14% ± 4% of islet area), especially around the intra-islet capillaries. The physiological implications of the differences in the angioarchitecture of mouse and human islets are not known. Islet vascular changes in T2D may exacerbate β cell/islet dysfunction and β cell loss. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Pancreas and islet transplantation. II. Clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, D E

    1981-04-01

    Clinical islet allotransplantation has been a safe, but largely unsuccessful enterprise. It has been difficult to apply techniques that might overcome the islet yield and allograft rejection problems encountered in animal experiments. Over the past decade only 4 of 74 attempts at islet transplantation have been followed by long term withdrawal of exogenous insulin therapy, and there are problems with intrepretation of the outcome in each of theses cases, as discussed in the preceding section. In the islet allograft situation, the failures may have been for technical or for immunological reasons. In the autograft situation, rejection could not occur and the failures were clearly technical. The success rate with islet autografts gives some indication as to what might be achieved with islet allotransplantation if rejection could be prevented in the latter situation. The islet autotransplant experience is not entirely predictative, however, for two reasons: 1) the uncertainty over the contribution of the pancreatic remnant to carbohydrate metabolism when less than the total pancreatectomy is done; 2) the increased difficulty with liberating islets from diseased, fibrotic pancreases. For both islet allo- and autotransplantation, the success rate will probably remain low until more effective techniques are developed for preparation of islets from adult pancreases. For the allograft situation, additional advances will be needed in immunosuppression or in techniques to alter islet graft immunogenicity in order to overcome the rejection phenomenon.

  2. Classification of microscopy images of Langerhans islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å vihlík, Jan; Kybic, Jan; Habart, David; Berková, Zuzana; Girman, Peter; Kříž, Jan; Zacharovová, Klára

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of images of Langerhans islets is a crucial procedure for planning an islet transplantation, which is a promising diabetes treatment. This paper deals with segmentation of microscopy images of Langerhans islets and evaluation of islet parameters such as area, diameter, or volume (IE). For all the available images, the ground truth and the islet parameters were independently evaluated by four medical experts. We use a pixelwise linear classifier (perceptron algorithm) and SVM (support vector machine) for image segmentation. The volume is estimated based on circle or ellipse fitting to individual islets. The segmentations were compared with the corresponding ground truth. Quantitative islet parameters were also evaluated and compared with parameters given by medical experts. We can conclude that accuracy of the presented fully automatic algorithm is fully comparable with medical experts.

  3. In vitro reconstitution of pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The lack of transplantable pancreatic islets is a serious problem that affects the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Beta cells can be induced from various sources of stem or progenitor cells, including induced pluripotent stem cells in the near future; however, the reconstitution of islets from β cells in culture dishes is challenging. The generation of highly functional islets may require three-dimensional spherical cultures that resemble intact islets. This review discusses recent advances in the reconstitution of islets. Several factors affect the reconstitution of pseudoislets with higher functions, such as architectural similarity, cell-to-cell contact, and the production method. The actual transplantation of naked or encapsulated pseudoislets and islet-like cell clusters from various stem cell sources is also discussed. Advancing our understanding of the methods used to reconstitute pseudoislets should expand the range of potential strategies available for developing de novo islets for therapeutic applications.

  4. No mantle formation in rodent islets – the prototype of islet revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kharouta, Michael; Miller, Kevin; Kim, Abraham; Wojcik, Pawel; Kilimnik, German; Dey, Arunangsu; Steiner, Donald F.; Hara, Manami

    2009-01-01

    Emerging reports on human islets emphasize distinct differences from the widely accepted prototype of rodent islets, raising questions over their suitability for human studies. Here we aim at elucidating architectural differences and similarities of human versus rodent islets. The cellular composition and architecture of human and rodent islets were compared through three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. Physiological and pathological changes were examined using islets from various mouse models such as non-obese diabetic (NOD), ob/ob, db/db mice and during pregnancy. A subpopulation of human islets is composed of clusters of alpha-cells within the central beta-cell cores, while the overall proportion of alpha-cells varies among islets. In mouse islets under normal conditions, alpha-cells are localized in the islet periphery, but they do not envelop the entire beta-cell core, so that beta-cells are exposed on the outer layer of the islet, as in most human islets. Also, an increased proportion of alpha-cells within the central core is observed in the pancreas of mouse models exhibiting increased demand for insulin. In summary, human and mouse islets share common architectural features as endocrine micro-organs. Since these may hold a key to better understanding islet plasticity, our concept of the prototypic islet should be revised. PMID:19595468

  5. Human pancreatic islets develop through fusion of distinct β and α/δ islets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inchul

    2016-10-01

    Human pancreatic islets show unique architecture in which α and δ cells are mostly at the peripheral and perivascular areas. It has remained unknown how such prototype is realized in every islet. Here, I report that fetal islets develop first in two distinct types consisting of β or α/δ cells, respectively. The α/δ islets are variable in shape, composed of α and δ cells evenly intermixed. They are vascularized better but encapsulated poorer than β islets in general. During the development, the β and α/δ islets adjoin and fuse with each other in such a way that α and δ cells form a crescent on β cells and, then, progress to encompass and encroach into β cells. Most mature-form islets appear to develop through the fusion. Islets at various stages of fusion are present concurrently until late gestation, suggesting that the islet fusion is an ongoing developmental process. The α/δ islets appear to play a primary role for the process, approaching toward the fusion partner actively. Direct connection is present between the α/δ islets and neural ganglia undergoing active neurogenesis, suggesting an organ-wide neuroendocrine network development. The fusion of precursor islets appears to be a principle of human pancreatic development providing the prototype of mature islets. The complex development might be a reference for in vitro reproduction of biologically competent islets.

  6. Factors controlling pancreatic islet neogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, A.; Pittenger, G.; Rafaeloff, R.; Rosenberg, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have established a model in which cellophane wrapping induces reiteration of the normal ontogeny of beta-cell differentiation from ductal tissue. The secretion of insulin is physiologic and coordinated to the needs of the animal. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in hamsters can be "cured" at least half the time. There appears to be activation of growth factor(s) within the pancreas, acting in an autocrine, paracrine, or juxtacrine manner to induce ductal cell proliferation and differentiation into functioning beta cells. Given the results of our studies to date, it does not seem premature to envisage new approaches to the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Identification of the factor(s) regulating islet-cell proliferation and differentiation in our model may permit islets to be grown in culture. This concept could be extended to induce endocrine cell differentiation in vitro as well. Furthermore, islet-cell growth factors could be used to provide "trophic support" to islet transplants as a means of maintaining graft viability. There may also be greater scope for gene therapy when the growth factor(s) have been isolated, purified, sequenced, and cloned. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 9 PMID:1364089

  7. Combinatorial human progenitor cell transplantation optimizes islet regeneration through secretion of paracrine factors.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Meschino, Michael T; Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Broughton, Heather C; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Hess, David A

    2012-07-20

    Transplanted human bone marrow (BM) and umbilical cord blood (UCB) progenitor cells activate islet-regenerative or revascularization programs depending on the progenitor subtypes administered. Using purification of multiple progenitor subtypes based on a conserved stem cell function, high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity (ALDH(hi)), we have recently shown that transplantation of BM-derived ALDH(hi) progenitors improved systemic hyperglycemia and augmented insulin secretion by increasing islet-associated proliferation and vascularization, without increasing islet number. Conversely, transplantation of culture-expanded multipotent-stromal cells (MSCs) derived from BM ALDH(hi) cells augmented total beta cell mass via formation of beta cell clusters associated with the ductal epithelium, without sustained islet vascularization. To identify paracrine effectors produced by islet-regenerative MSCs, culture-expanded BM ALDH(hi) MSCs were transplanted into streptozotocin-treated nonobese diabetic/severe combine immune deficient (SCID) mice and segregated into islet-regenerative versus nonregenerative cohorts based on hyperglycemia reduction, and subsequently compared for differential production of mRNA and secreted proteins. Regenerative MSCs showed increased expression of matrix metalloproteases, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-activating ligands, and downstream effectors of Wnt signaling. Regenerative MSC supernatant also contained increased levels of pro-angiogenic versus pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented the expansion of ductal epithelial but not beta cells in vitro. Conversely, co-culture with UCB ALDH(hi) cells induced beta cell but not ductal epithelial cell proliferation. Sequential transplantation of MSCs followed by UCB ALDH(hi) cells improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance by increasing beta cell mass associated with the ductal epithelium and by augmenting intra-islet capillary densities. Thus, combinatorial human progenitor cell

  8. Association of proinflammatory cytokines and islet resident leucocytes with islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Matthew J; Hallinger, Daniel; Garcia, Eden; Machida, Yui; Chakrabarti, Swarup; Nadler, Jerry; Galkina, Elena V; Imai, Yumi

    2014-03-01

    Chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes is proposed to affect islets as well as insulin target organs. However, the nature of islet inflammation and its effects on islet function in type 2 diabetes remain unclear. Moreover, the immune cell profiles of human islets in healthy and type 2 diabetic conditions are undefined. We aimed to investigate the correlation between proinflammatory cytokine expression, islet leucocyte composition and insulin secretion in type 2 diabetic human islets. Human islets from organ donors with or without type 2 diabetes were studied. First and second phases of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were determined by perifusion. The expression of inflammatory markers was obtained by quantitative PCR. Immune cells within human islets were analysed by FACS. Type 2 diabetic islets, especially those without first-phase insulin secretion, displayed higher CCL2 and TNFa expression than healthy islets. CD45(+) leucocytes were elevated in type 2 diabetic islets, to a greater extent in moderately functional type 2 diabetic islets compared with poorly functional ones, and corresponded with elevated ALOX12 but not with CCL2 or TNFa expression. T and B lymphocytes and CD11c(+) cells were detectable within both non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic islet leucocytes. Importantly, the proportion of B cells was significantly elevated within type 2 diabetic islets. Elevated total islet leucocyte content and proinflammatory mediators correlated with islet dysfunction, suggesting that heterogeneous insulitis occurs during the development of islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. In addition, the altered B cell content highlights a potential role for the adaptive immune response in islet dysfunction.

  9. Association of proinflammatory cytokines and islet resident leucocytes with islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Matthew J.; Hallinger, Daniel; Garcia, Eden; Machida, Yui; Chakrabarti, Swarup; Nadler, Jerry; Galkina, Elena V.; Imai, Yumi

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes is proposed to affect islets as well as insulin target organs. However, the nature of islet inflammation and its effects on islet function in type 2 diabetes remain unclear. Moreover, the immune cell profiles of human islets in healthy and type 2 diabetic conditions are undefined. We aimed to investigate the correlation between proinflammatory cytokine expression, islet leucocyte composition and insulin secretion in type 2 diabetic human islets. Methods Human islets from organ donors with or without type 2 diabetes were studied. First and second phases of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were determined by perifusion. The expression of inflammatory markers was obtained by quantitative PCR. Immune cells within human islets were analysed by FACS. Results Type 2 diabetic islets, especially those without first-phase insulin secretion, displayed higher CCL2 and TNFa expression than healthy islets. CD45+ leucocytes were elevated in type 2 diabetic islets, to a greater extent in moderately functional type 2 diabetic islets compared with poorly functional ones, and corresponded with elevated ALOX12 but not with CCL2 or TNFa expression. T and B lymphocytes and CD11c+ cells were detectable within both non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic islet leucocytes. Importantly, the proportion of B cells was significantly elevated within type 2 diabetic islets. Conclusions/interpretation Elevated total islet leucocyte content and proinflammatory mediators correlated with islet dysfunction, suggesting that heterogeneous insulitis occurs during the development of islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. In addition, the altered B cell content highlights a potential role for the adaptive immune response in islet dysfunction. PMID:24429578

  10. Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Receptor Deficiency Leads to Impaired Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Mantelmacher, Fernanda Dana; Fishman, Sigal; Cohen, Keren; Pasmanik Chor, Metsada; Yamada, Yuichiro; Zvibel, Isabel; Varol, Chen

    2017-04-15

    The bone marrow (BM) contains controlled specialized microenvironments, or niches, that regulate the quiescence, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a gut-derived incretin hormone that mediates postprandial insulin secretion and has anabolic effects on adipose tissue. Previous studies demonstrated altered bone microarchitecture in mice deficient for GIP receptor (Gipr(-/-) ), as well as the expression of high-affinity GIP receptor by distinct cells constructing the BM HSPC niche. Nevertheless, the involvement of GIP in the process of BM hematopoiesis remains elusive. In this article, we show significantly reduced representation and proliferation of HSPC and myeloid progenitors in the BM of Gipr(-/-) mice. This was further manifested by reduced levels of BM and circulating differentiated immune cells in young and old adult mice. Moreover, GIP signaling was required for the establishment of supportive BM HSPC niches during HSPC repopulation in radioablated BM chimera mice. Finally, molecular profiling of various factors involved in retention, survival, and expansion of HSPC revealed significantly lower expression of the Notch-receptor ligands Jagged 1 and Jagged 2 in osteoblast-enriched bone extracts from Gipr(-/-) mice, which are important for HSPC expansion. In addition, there was increased expression of CXCL12, a factor important for HSPC retention and quiescence, in whole-BM extracts from Gipr(-/-) mice. Collectively, our data suggest that the metabolic hormone GIP plays an important role in BM hematopoiesis.

  11. Ginsenoside Rg3 enhances islet cell function and attenuates apoptosis in mouse islets.

    PubMed

    Kim, S S; Jang, H J; Oh, M Y; Eom, D W; Kang, K S; Kim, Y J; Lee, J H; Ham, J Y; Choi, S Y; Wee, Y M; Kim, Y H; Han, D J

    2014-05-01

    The transplantation of isolated islets is thought to be an attractive approach for curative treatment of diabetes mellitus. Panax ginseng has been used in oriental countries for its pharmacologic effects, such as antidiabetic and antiinflammatory activities. 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), an active ingredient of ginseng saponins, has been reported to enhance insulin secretion-stimulating and antiapoptotic activities in pancreatic beta cells. We performed this study to examine the hypothesis that preoperative Rg3 administration can enhance islet cell function and antiapoptosis before islet transplantation. Balb/c mice were randomly divided into 2 groups according to the administration of Rg3 after islet isolation. Mouse islets were cultured in medium supplemented with or without Rg3. In vitro, islet viability and function were assessed. After treatment of islets with a cytokine cocktail (tumor necrosis factor α, interferon-γ, and interleukin-1β), cell viability, function, and apoptosis were assessed. Cell viability was similar between the 2 groups. Islets cultured in medium supplemented with Rg3 showed 2.3-fold higher glucose-induced insulin secretion than islets cultured in medium without Rg3. After treatment with a cytokine cocktail, glucose-induced insulin release, total insulin content of islets, and apoptosis were significantly improved in Rg3-treated islets compared with cytokine-treated islets. Cytokine-treated islets produced significantly higher levels of nitric oxide (NO) than islets treated with Rg3. These results suggest that preoperative Rg3 administration enhanced islet function before islet transplantation and attenuated both cytokine-induced damage associated with NO production and apoptosis. Rg3 administration might be a prospective management to enhanced islet function and ameliorate early inflammation after transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Feasibility of islet magnetic resonance imaging using ferumoxytol in intraportal islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Man; Oh, Seung-Hoon; Oh, Bae Jun; Shim, Wooyoung; Choi, Jin Myung; Yoo, Dongkyeom; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Jung Hee; Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2015-06-01

    There is a clinical need for an alternative labeling agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in islet transplantation. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of islet MRI using ferumoxytol, which is the only clinically-available ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. We compared islet function and viability of control islets and islets labeled with ferumoxytol and/or a heparin-protamine complex (HPF). Efficacy of ferumoxytol labeling was assessed in both ex vivo and in vivo models. Labeling for 48 h with HPF, but not up to 800 μg/mL ferumoxytol, deranged ex vivo islet viability and function. The T2∗ relaxation time was optimal when islets were labeled with 800 μg/mL of ferumoxytol for 48 h. Prussian blue stain, iron content assay, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) supported internalization of ferumoxytol particles. However, the labeling intensity in the ex vivo MRI of islets labeled with ferumoxytol was much weaker than that of islets labeled with ferucarbotran. In syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation, there was a correlation between the total area of visualized islets and the transplanted islet mass. In conclusion, islet MRI using ferumoxytol was feasible in terms of in vitro and in vivo efficacy and safety. However, the weak labeling efficacy is still a hurdle for the clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Progress in Clinical Encapsulated Islet Xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David K C; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Abalovich, Adrian; Itoh, Takeshi; Mourad, Nizar I; Gianello, Pierre R; Wolf, Eckhard; Cozzi, Emanuele

    2016-11-01

    At the 2015 combined congress of the Cell Transplant Society, International Pancreas and Islet Transplant Association, and International Xenotransplantation Association, a symposium was held to discuss recent progress in pig islet xenotransplantation. The presentations focused on 5 major topics - (1) the results of 2 recent clinical trials of encapsulated pig islet transplantation, (2) the inflammatory response to encapsulated pig islets, (3) methods to improve the secretion of insulin by pig islets, (4) genetic modifications to the islet-source pigs aimed to protect the islets from the primate immune and/or inflammatory responses, and (5) regulatory aspects of clinical pig islet xenotransplantation. Trials of microencapsulated porcine islet transplantation to treat unstable type 1 diabetic patients have been associated with encouraging preliminary results. Further advances to improve efficacy may include (1) transplantation into a site other than the peritoneal cavity, which might result in better access to blood, oxygen, and nutrients; (2) the development of a more biocompatible capsule and/or the minimization of a foreign body reaction; (3) pig genetic modification to induce a greater secretion of insulin by the islets, and/or to reduce the immune response to islets released from damaged capsules; and (4) reduction of the inflammatory response to the capsules/islets by improvements in the structure of the capsules and/or in genetic engineering of the pigs and/or in some form of drug therapy. Ethical and regulatory frameworks for islet xenotransplantation are already available in several countries, and there is now a wider international perception of the importance of developing an internationally harmonized ethical and regulatory framework.

  14. Melatonin and Pancreatic Islets: Interrelationships between Melatonin, Insulin and Glucagon

    PubMed Central

    Peschke, Elmar; Bähr, Ina; Mühlbauer, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin exerts its influence in the periphery through activation of two specific trans-membrane receptors: MT1 and MT2. Both isoforms are expressed in the islet of Langerhans and are involved in the modulation of insulin secretion from β-cells and in glucagon secretion from α-cells. De-synchrony of receptor signaling may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. This notion has recently been supported by genome-wide association studies identifying particularly the MT2 as a risk factor for this rapidly spreading metabolic disturbance. Since melatonin is secreted in a clearly diurnal fashion, it is safe to assume that it also has a diurnal impact on the blood-glucose-regulating function of the islet. This factor has hitherto been underestimated; the disruption of diurnal signaling within the islet may be one of the most important mechanisms leading to metabolic disturbances. The study of melatonin–insulin interactions in diabetic rat models has revealed an inverse relationship: an increase in melatonin levels leads to a down-regulation of insulin secretion and vice versa. Elucidation of the possible inverse interrelationship in man may open new avenues in the therapy of diabetes. PMID:23535335

  15. Melatonin and pancreatic islets: interrelationships between melatonin, insulin and glucagon.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Elmar; Bähr, Ina; Mühlbauer, Eckhard

    2013-03-27

    The pineal hormone melatonin exerts its influence in the periphery through activation of two specific trans-membrane receptors: MT1 and MT2. Both isoforms are expressed in the islet of Langerhans and are involved in the modulation of insulin secretion from β-cells and in glucagon secretion from α-cells. De-synchrony of receptor signaling may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. This notion has recently been supported by genome-wide association studies identifying particularly the MT2 as a risk factor for this rapidly spreading metabolic disturbance. Since melatonin is secreted in a clearly diurnal fashion, it is safe to assume that it also has a diurnal impact on the blood-glucose-regulating function of the islet. This factor has hitherto been underestimated; the disruption of diurnal signaling within the islet may be one of the most important mechanisms leading to metabolic disturbances. The study of melatonin-insulin interactions in diabetic rat models has revealed an inverse relationship: an increase in melatonin levels leads to a down-regulation of insulin secretion and vice versa. Elucidation of the possible inverse interrelationship in man may open new avenues in the therapy of diabetes.

  16. The role of endothelial cells on islet function and revascularization after islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Del Toro-Arreola, Alicia; Robles-Murillo, Ana Karina; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Rivas-Carrillo, Jorge David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Islet transplantation has become a widely accepted therapeutic option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, in order to achieve insulin independence a great number of islets are often pooled from 2 to 4 pancreata donors. Mostly, it is due to the massive loss of islets immediately after transplant. The endothelium plays a key role in the function of native islets and during the revascularization process after islet transplantation. However, if a delayed revascularization occurs, even the remaining islets will also undergo to cell death and late graft dysfunction. Therefore, it is essential to understand how the signals are released from endothelial cells, which might regulate both differentiation of pancreatic progenitors and thereby maintenance of the graft function. New strategies to facilitate islet engraftment and a prompt revascularization could be designed to intervene and might lead to improve future results of islet transplantation. PMID:27002241

  17. RNA editing by ADAR2 is metabolically regulated in pancreatic islets and beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhenji; Zhao, Liyun; Yang, Liu; Huang, Ping; Zhao, Feng; Li, Wenjun; Liu, Yong

    2006-11-03

    RNA editing via the conversion of adenosine (A) to inosine (I) is catalyzed by two major families of adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs), ADAR1 and ADAR2. This genetic recoding process is known to play essential roles in the brain, due in part to changes in functional activities of edited neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels. Little is known, however, about the physiological regulation and function of A to I RNA editing in peripheral tissues and other biological processes. Here, we report that both ADAR1 and ADAR2 are expressed in the murine pancreatic islets, and ADAR2 is primarily localized in the islet endocrine cells. In contrast to ADAR1, ADAR2 transcripts in the pancreatic islets exhibit a nearly 2-fold increase in insulin-resistant mice chronically fed a high fat diet. Concurrent with this diet-induced metabolic stress, RNA editing in the islets is dramatically enhanced for the RNA transcripts encoding the ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit B. Moreover, ADAR2 protein expression is repressed in the islets under fuel deficiency condition during fasting, and this repression can be completely reversed by refeeding. We also show that, specifically in pancreatic beta-cell lines, not only the expression of ADAR2 but also the glutamate receptor subunit B editing and ADAR2 self-editing are markedly augmented in response to glucose at the physiological concentration for insulin secretion stimulation. Thus, RNA editing by ADAR2 in pancreatic islets and beta-cells is metabolically regulated by nutritional and energy status, suggesting that A to I RNA editing is most likely involved in the modulation of pancreatic islet and beta-cell function.

  18. Regulation of glucagon secretion in normal and diabetic human islets by γ-hydroxybutyrate and glycine.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Liu, Chengyang; Nissim, Itzhak; Chen, Jie; Chen, Pan; Doliba, Nicolai; Zhang, Tingting; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Stokes, David; Yudkoff, Marc; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Matschinsky, Franz M; Naji, Ali

    2013-02-08

    Paracrine signaling between pancreatic islet β-cells and α-cells has been proposed to play a role in regulating glucagon responses to elevated glucose and hypoglycemia. To examine this possibility in human islets, we used a metabolomic approach to trace the responses of amino acids and other potential neurotransmitters to stimulation with [U-(13)C]glucose in both normal individuals and type 2 diabetics. Islets from type 2 diabetics uniformly showed decreased glucose stimulation of insulin secretion and respiratory rate but demonstrated two different patterns of glucagon responses to glucose: one group responded normally to suppression of glucagon by glucose, but the second group was non-responsive. The non-responsive group showed evidence of suppressed islet GABA levels and of GABA shunt activity. In further studies with normal human islets, we found that γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a potent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is generated in β-cells by an extension of the GABA shunt during glucose stimulation and interacts with α-cell GHB receptors, thus mediating the suppressive effect of glucose on glucagon release. We also identified glycine, acting via α-cell glycine receptors, as the predominant amino acid stimulator of glucagon release. The results suggest that glycine and GHB provide a counterbalancing receptor-based mechanism for controlling α-cell secretory responses to metabolic fuels.

  19. A Simple Method to Replace Islet Equivalents for Volume Quantification of Human Islets.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Karthik; Huang, Han-Hung; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Human islets come in a variety of sizes and shapes, and the total volume of islets used for research or clinical transplants must be estimated in a manner that is simple and valid. Islet equivalent (IEQ) measurements are the standard estimate of islet volume. We published a new method (the Kansas method) for estimating rat islet volume using cell numbers that was reliable and valid. Here we modified the method for human islets. We measured the dimensions of isolated human islets showing that they are not spherical and became less so in larger islets, with an average smallest/largest diameter ratio of 0.73 in large islets and 0.85 in small islets. Human islets were individually loaded into 96-well plates, dissociated into single cells, and the total cell number per islet determined with computer-assisted cytometry. Based on the counted cell number per islet, a regression model was created to convert islet diameter to cell number with a high R(2) value (0.99). Separate regression equations for male and female donors or young and old donors were not significantly different than the pooled data and did not improve the regression values. There was an inverse correlation between the cell number per IEQ and islet size. The Kansas method was validated with ATP/cell and cell viability data. Compared to the actual cell count, conventional IEQ measurements overestimated tissue volume of large islets by nearly double. Examples of differences in results obtained from the same data sets normalized to IEQ or the Kansas method included viability and insulin secretion concentrations. The implications of the error associated with the current IEQ method of volume estimation are discussed.

  20. Beneficial effects of the transgenic expression of human sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 on pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Jing; Yeom, Hye-Jeong; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Jae-Ghi; Lee, Eun Won; Cho, Bumrae; Lee, Han Sin; Kim, Su Jin; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Sung Joo; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-02-01

    Both human soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-Fc (sTNF-αR-Fc) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) transgenic pigs have been generated previously for xenotransplantation. Here, we investigated whether overexpression of sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 in pig islets prolongs islet xenograft survival. Adult porcine islets were isolated from human sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 transgenic and wild type pigs, and were transplanted into diabetic nude mice. Effects of the expression of both genes on islet apoptosis, chemokine expression, cellular infiltration, antibody production, and islet xenograft survival were analyzed. Human sTNF-αR-Fc transgenic pigs successfully expressed sTNF-αR-Fc in the islets; human HO-1 transgenic pigs expressed significant levels of HO-1 in the islets. Pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival was significantly prolonged in both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups compared with that in the wild type group. Both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups exhibited suppressed intragraft expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and decreased perigraft infiltration of immune cells. However, there was no difference in the anti-pig antibody levels between the groups. Apoptosis of islet cells during the early engraftment was suppressed only in the HO-1 group. Porcine islets from both sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 transgenic pigs prolonged xenograft survival by suppressing islet cell apoptosis or secondary inflammatory responses following islet death, indicating that these transgenic pigs might have applications in successful islet xenotransplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Taurine supplementation modulates glucose homeostasis and islet function.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Everardo M; Latorraca, Marcia Q; Araujo, Eliana; Beltrá, Marta; Oliveras, Maria J; Navarro, Mónica; Berná, Genoveva; Bedoya, Francisco J; Velloso, Licio A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Franz

    2009-07-01

    Taurine is a conditionally essential amino acid for human that is involved in the control of glucose homeostasis; however, the mechanisms by which the amino acid affects blood glucose levels are unknown. Using an animal model, we have studied these mechanisms. Mice were supplemented with taurine for 30 d. Blood glucose homeostasis was assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT). Islet cell function was determined by insulin secretion, cytosolic Ca2+ measurements and glucose metabolism from isolated islets. Islet cell gene expression and translocation was examined via immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Insulin signaling was studied by Western blot. Islets from taurine-supplemented mice had: (i) significantly higher insulin content, (ii) increased insulin secretion at stimulatory glucose concentrations, (iii) significantly displaced the dose-response curve for glucose-induced insulin release to the left, (iv) increased glucose metabolism at 5.6 and 11.1-mmol/L concentrations; (v) slowed cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) oscillations in response to stimulatory glucose concentrations; (vi) increased insulin, sulfonylurea receptor-1, glucokinase, Glut-2, proconvertase and pancreas duodenum homeobox-1 (PDX-1) gene expression and (vii) increased PDX-1 expression in the nucleus. Moreover, taurine supplementation significantly increased both basal and insulin stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in skeletal muscle and liver tissues. Finally, taurine supplemented mice showed an improved IPGTT. These results indicate that taurine controls glucose homeostasis by regulating the expression of genes required for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, taurine enhances peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  2. Storage and microencapsulation of islets for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Charles, K; Harland, R C; Ching, D; Opara, E C

    2000-01-01

    Microencapsulation is an effective means of immunoisolation for pancreatic islet transplants. However, the process of isolating, purifying, encapsulating, and transplanting islets in a single day is labor intensive and difficult for routine use. There is an apparent need for reliable methods of islet storage, and cryopreservation has emerged as an attractive system of islet banking. While studies have shown that cryopreserved islets are viable when tested unencapsulated after thawing, it is not clear if the combination of freezing and encapsulation would affect islet function. The purpose of the present study was to determine the in vitro function of cryopreserved islets following thawing and microencapsulation. Islets were isolated from the pancreata of Sprague-Dawley rats and cryopreserved under liquid nitrogen for either 1 week or 1 month, following an overnight culture at 37 degrees C. Upon thawing, the islets were tested either unencapsulated or after encapsulation in polylysine-alginate membrane. In all experiments islets were preperifused for 1 h at 37 degrees C with a modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing 3.3 mM (60 mg/dl) glucose and maintained at pH 7.4 by continuous gassing with 95% air/5% CO2. Following basal effluent sample collection on ice, the glucose concentration was raised to 16.7 mM (300 mg/dl). It was found that, within 10 min of high glucose stimulation, an average of twofold increase in insulin secretion (p < 0.01) was obtained in islets within or without microcapsules. We conclude that islets cryopreserved for 1 month prior to thawing and microencapsulation retained functional viability as determined in in vitro experiments.

  3. The potential benefit of non-purified islets preparations for islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Webb, M'Balu A; Dennison, Ashley R; James, Roger F

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of islet transplantation, there has been a significant emphasis on the importance of islet purity despite an inevitable associated loss of islet mass during the purification process. One of the key elements of the 'Edmonton Protocol' for islet transplantation published in 2000 was an emphasis on the need for sequential transplants of highly purified islets (averaging 24% beta cell purity) and the close correlation between the numbers of islets transplanted and the success of the procedure. However, the emphasis on islet purity may warrant further consideration as auto transplantation of non-purified islets currently provides the most successful insulin independence rates within the field of islet transplantation. While the role of auto and allo immunity could contribute to the differences in the success rates it is clear that within the clinical setting, significant acinar and ductal contamination is well tolerated. However, one could go further and hypothesize that extra-insular tissue including acinar tissue, ductal tissue, peri-pancreatic lymph nodes and vascular tissue actually confer an advantage to islet survival/function and may even contribute to the insulin secreting capacity of the graft post transplant. As such this review will assess the influence of extra-insular pancreatic tissue on the results of islet transplantation based on published evidence and will also explore the possibility that non-islet pancreatic cells are capable of differentiating into a beta cell phenotype in vivo contributing to an ongoing regeneration of endocrine mass during the period following transplantation.

  4. In vivo effect of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) on the gene expression of calcitonin peptides in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Olga; Gögebakan, Ozlem; Osterhoff, Martin A; Nauck, Michael; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Rudovich, Natalia

    2012-11-10

    Increased plasma levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide-I (CGRP-I) and procalcitonin (Pro-CT) (both also named calcitonin peptides (CT peptides)) are associated with obesity and systemic inflammation. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), a nutrient-dependent incretin hormone, was recently found to induce CGRP-I and CT expression in human adipocytes in vitro. However, a physiological relevance of a possible interaction between GIP and CT peptides has not yet been studied. In this study, we analyzed the effect of GIP on the expression of CGRP-I and CT mRNA in human subcutaneous adipose tissue within a randomized, controlled trial. Seventeen male obese subjects were infused with GIP [2.0 pmol kg(-1) min(-1) for 240 min] or placebo, either in the fasting state, during euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (EC) or hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps (HC). The CGRP-I gene expression was detected in all investigated adipose tissue samples, whereas very low CT expression was found in only 8 out of 116 analyzed samples. No significant influence of either GIP or glucose and insulin infusions on the CGRP-I and CT expression was observed in any of the individual experiments (GIP infusion, EC and HC) or in the combined analysis of all experiments with and without GIP. Furthermore, CGRP-I expression was not correlated with plasma GIP level before or after 240 min of infusions or clamps. In contrast to in vitro data, an acute application of GIP has no effect on mRNA expression of CT peptides in subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Stimulating beta cell replication and improving islet graft function by GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Tian, Lei; Weng, Guobin; Bhagroo, Nicholas V; Sorenson, Robert L; O'Brien, Timothy D; Luo, Jian; Guo, Zhiguang

    2011-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) is predominantly expressed in β cells and intestinal L cells. In this study, we investigated whether oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a GPR119 endogenous ligand, and PSN632408, a GPR119 synthetic agonist, can stimulate β-cell replication in vitro and in vivo and improve islet graft function in diabetic mice. We found that OEA and PSN632408 significantly increased numbers of insulin(+)/5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)(+) β cells in cultured mouse islets in a dose-dependent manner. All diabetic recipient mice, given marginal syngeneic islet transplants with OEA or PSN632408 or vehicle, achieved normoglycemia at 4 weeks after transplantation. However, normoglycemia was achieved significantly faster in OEA- or PSN632408-treated diabetic mice than in vehicle-treated diabetic mice (P < 0.05). The percentage of insulin(+)/BrdU(+) β cells in islet grafts in OEA- and PSN632408-treated mice was significantly higher than in vehicle-treated mice (P < 0.01). Our data demonstrated that OEA and PSN632408 can stimulate β-cell replication in vitro and in vivo and improve islet graft function. Targeting GPR119 is a novel therapeutic approach to increase β-cell mass and to improve islet graft function by stimulating β-cell replication. © 2011 The Authors. Transplant International © 2011 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  6. Islet Transplantation in Type I Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jamiolkowski, Ryan M.; Guo, Lucie Y.; Li, Yun Rose; Shaffer, Sydney M.; Naji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    For most patients with type I diabetes, insulin therapy and glucose monitoring are sufficient to maintain glycemic control. However, hypoglycemia is a potentially lethal side effect of insulin treatment in patients who are glycemically labile or have hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure [1]. For those patients, an alternative therapy is beta cell replacement via pancreas or islet transplantation. Pancreas transplants using cadaveric donor organs reduce insulin dependence but carry risks involved in major surgery and chronic immunosuppression. Islet transplantation, in which islets are isolated from donor pancreases and intravenously infused, require no surgery and can utilize islets isolated from pancreases unsuitable for whole organ transplantation. However, islet transplantation also requires immunosuppression, and standard steroid regimens may be toxic to beta cells [2]. The 2000 Edmonton Trial demonstrated the first long-term successful islet transplantation by using a glucocorticoid-free immunosuppressive regimen (sirolimus and tacrolimus). The Clinical Islet Transplantation (CIT) Consortium seeks to improve upon the Edmonton Protocol by using anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and TNFα antagonist (etanercept). The trials currently in progress, in addition to research efforts to find new sources of islet cells, reflect enormous potential for islet transplantation in treatment of type I diabetes. PMID:22461742

  7. Metabolomics applied to the pancreatic islet

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Jessica R.; Jensen, Mette V.; Newgard, Christopher B.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics, the characterization of the set of small molecules in a biological system, is advancing research in multiple areas of islet biology. Measuring a breadth of metabolites simultaneously provides a broad perspective on metabolic changes as the islets respond dynamically to metabolic fuels, hormones, or environmental stressors. As a result, metabolomics has the potential to provide new mechanistic insights into islet physiology and pathophysiology. Here we summarize advances in our understanding of islet physiology and the etiologies of type-1 and type-2 diabetes gained from metabolomics studies. PMID:26116790

  8. Quantification of β-Cell Mass in Intramuscular Islet Grafts Using Radiolabeled Exendin-4

    PubMed Central

    Espes, Daniel; Selvaraju, Ramkumar; Velikyan, Irina; Krajcovic, Martin; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Eriksson, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an increasing interest in alternative implantation sites to the liver for islet transplantation. Intramuscular implantation has even been tested clinically. Possibilities to monitor β-cell mass would be of huge importance not only for the understanding of islet engraftment but also for the decision of changing the immunosuppressive regime. We have therefore evaluated the feasibility of quantifying intramuscular β-cell mass using the radiolabeled glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonist DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4. Methods One hundred to 400 islets were transplanted to the abdominal muscle of nondiabetic mice. After 3 to 4 weeks, 0.2 to 0.5 MBq [177Lu]DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 was administered intravenously. Sixty minutes postinjection abdominal organs and graft bearing muscle were retrieved, and the radioactive uptake measured in a well counter within 10 minutes. The specific uptake in native and transplanted islets was assessed by autoradiography. The total insulin-positive area of the islet grafts was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Intramuscular islet grafts could easily be visualized by this tracer, and the background uptake was very low. There was a linear correlation between the radioactivity uptake and the number of transplanted islets, both for standardized uptake values and the total radiotracer uptake in each graft (percentage of injected dose). The quantified total insulin area of surviving β cells showed an even stronger correlation to both standardized uptake values (R = 0.96, P = 0.0002) and percentage of injected dose (R = 0.88, P = 0.0095). There was no correlation to estimated α cell mass. Conclusions [177Lu]DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 could be used to quantify β-cell mass after experimental intramuscular islet transplantation. This technique may well be transferred to the clinical setting by exchanging Lutetium-177 radionuclide to a positron emitting Gallium-68. PMID:27819034

  9. Ghrelin Attenuates cAMP-PKA Signaling to Evoke Insulinostatic Cascade in Islet β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dezaki, Katsuya; Damdindorj, Boldbaatar; Sone, Hideyuki; Dyachok, Oleg; Tengholm, Anders; Gylfe, Erik; Kurashina, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Masashi; Kakei, Masafumi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ghrelin reportedly restricts insulin release in islet β-cells via the Gαi2 subtype of G-proteins and thereby regulates glucose homeostasis. This study explored whether ghrelin regulates cAMP signaling and whether this regulation induces insulinostatic cascade in islet β-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Insulin release was measured in rat perfused pancreas and isolated islets and cAMP production in isolated islets. Cytosolic cAMP concentrations ([cAMP]i) were monitored in mouse MIN6 cells using evanescent-wave fluorescence imaging. In rat single β-cells, cytosolic protein kinase-A activity ([PKA]i) and Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were measured by DR-II and fura-2 microfluorometry, respectively, and whole cell currents by patch-clamp technique. RESULTS Ghrelin suppressed glucose (8.3 mmol/L)-induced insulin release in rat perfused pancreas and isolated islets, and these effects of ghrelin were blunted in the presence of cAMP analogs or adenylate cyclase inhibitor. Glucose-induced cAMP production in isolated islets was attenuated by ghrelin and enhanced by ghrelin receptor antagonist and anti-ghrelin antiserum, which counteract endogenous islet-derived ghrelin. Ghrelin inhibited the glucose-induced [cAMP]i elevation and [PKA]i activation in MIN6 and rat β-cells, respectively. Furthermore, ghrelin potentiated voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channel currents without altering Ca2+ channel currents and attenuated glucose-induced [Ca2+]i increases in rat β-cells in a PKA-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS Ghrelin directly interacts with islet β-cells to attenuate glucose-induced cAMP production and PKA activation, which lead to activation of Kv channels and suppression of glucose-induced [Ca2+]i increase and insulin release. PMID:21788571

  10. A protective effect of endomorphins on the oxidative injury of islet.

    PubMed

    Tian, L M; Liu, J; Sun, X L; Gao, C X; Fan, Y; Guo, Q

    2010-08-01

    The antioxidative capacity of endomorphins (EMs), endogenous μ-opioid receptor agonists, has been demonstrated by IN VIVO assays. In this study, we attempt to evaluate the effects of endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2) on pancreatic islet injuries induced by streptozotocin (STZ), alloxan (ALX) and H(2)O(2), respectively. Wistar rats' islets were isolated and purified. The function of the islet cells, the insulin response to glucose stimulation was examined by insulin Radio Immuno Assay and the cell viability was measured by MTT assay. DNA fragments were performed to evaluate the apoptosis, while the cell cycle distribution was analyzed by PI staining flow cytometric analysis. Furthermore, the islet were treated with EM1, EM2 or ALX for 24 h, and the expression of p53 and p21 protein were determined by Western blot. The results showed that STZ, ALX, and H(2)O(2) displayed clear concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on the pancreatic islet cells. While EMs improved the viability of islet induced by STZ, ALX or H(2)O(2), and EMs enhanced insulin accumulation of the cell supernatant after ALX and STZ stimulation. Our data also showed both that EMs inhibited cell apoptosis and cell cycle G1 arrest induced by STZ and ALX through down-regulaing p53 and p21 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that EMs can protect islet cells from STZ, ALX and H(2)O(2) induced injuries. Our observations imply that the endomorphins may have protective effects on islet cells oxidative injury.

  11. 12-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor Improves Functions of Cytokine-Treated Human Islets and Type 2 Diabetic Islets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kaiwen; Xiao, An; Park, So Hyun; Glenn, Lindsey; Jackson, Laura; Barot, Tatvam; Weaver, Jessica R; Taylor-Fishwick, David A; Luci, Diane K; Maloney, David J; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Imai, Yumi; Nadler, Jerry L

    2017-08-01

    The 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO) pathway produces proinflammatory metabolites, and its activation is implicated in islet inflammation associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T2D). We aimed to test the efficacy of ML355, a highly selective, small molecule inhibitor of 12-LO, for the preservation of islet function. Human islets from nondiabetic donors were incubated with a mixture of tumor necrosis factor α , interluekin-1β, and interferon-γ to model islet inflammation. Cytokine-treated islets and human islets from T2D donors were incubated in the presence and absence of ML355. In vitro study. Human islets from organ donors aged >20 years of both sexes and any race were used. T2D status was defined from either medical history or most recent hemoglobin A1c value >6.5%. Glucose stimulation. Static and dynamic insulin secretion and oxygen consumption rate (OCR). ML355 prevented the reduction of insulin secretion and OCR in cytokine-treated human islets and improved both parameters in human islets from T2D donors. ML355 was efficacious in improving human islet function after cytokine treatment and in T2D islets in vitro. The study suggests that the blockade of the 12-LO pathway may serve as a target for both form of diabetes and provides the basis for further study of this small molecule inhibitor in vivo.

  12. Continuous Quadrupole Magnetic Separation of Islets during Digestion Improves Purified Porcine Islet Viability

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Sajja, Venkata Sunil; Rizzari, Michael D.; Scott III, William E.; Kitzmann, Jennifer P.; Kennedy, David J.; Todd, Paul W.; Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Hering, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Islet transplantation (ITx) is an emerging and promising therapy for patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. The islet isolation and purification processes require exposure to extended cold ischemia, warm-enzymatic digestion, mechanical agitation, and use of damaging chemicals for density gradient separation (DG), all of which reduce viable islet yield. In this paper, we describe initial proof-of-concept studies exploring quadrupole magnetic separation (QMS) of islets as an alternative to DG to reduce exposure to these harsh conditions. Three porcine pancreata were split into two parts, the splenic lobe (SPL) and the combined connecting/duodenal lobes (CDL), for paired digestions and purifications. Islets in the SPL were preferentially labeled using magnetic microparticles (MMPs) that lodge within the islet microvasculature when infused into the pancreas and were continuously separated from the exocrine tissue by QMS during the collection phase of the digestion process. Unlabeled islets from the CDL were purified by conventional DG. Islets purified by QMS exhibited significantly improved viability (measured by oxygen consumption rate per DNA, p < 0.03) and better morphology relative to control islets. Islet purification by QMS can reduce the detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to toxic enzymes and density gradient solutions and substantially improve islet viability after isolation. PMID:27843954

  13. Continuous Quadrupole Magnetic Separation of Islets during Digestion Improves Purified Porcine Islet Viability.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Bradley P; Kumar Sajja, Venkata Sunil; Suszynski, Thomas M; Rizzari, Michael D; Scott Iii, William E; Kitzmann, Jennifer P; Mueller, Kate R; Hanley, Thomas R; Kennedy, David J; Todd, Paul W; Balamurugan, Appakalai N; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2016-01-01

    Islet transplantation (ITx) is an emerging and promising therapy for patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. The islet isolation and purification processes require exposure to extended cold ischemia, warm-enzymatic digestion, mechanical agitation, and use of damaging chemicals for density gradient separation (DG), all of which reduce viable islet yield. In this paper, we describe initial proof-of-concept studies exploring quadrupole magnetic separation (QMS) of islets as an alternative to DG to reduce exposure to these harsh conditions. Three porcine pancreata were split into two parts, the splenic lobe (SPL) and the combined connecting/duodenal lobes (CDL), for paired digestions and purifications. Islets in the SPL were preferentially labeled using magnetic microparticles (MMPs) that lodge within the islet microvasculature when infused into the pancreas and were continuously separated from the exocrine tissue by QMS during the collection phase of the digestion process. Unlabeled islets from the CDL were purified by conventional DG. Islets purified by QMS exhibited significantly improved viability (measured by oxygen consumption rate per DNA, p < 0.03) and better morphology relative to control islets. Islet purification by QMS can reduce the detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to toxic enzymes and density gradient solutions and substantially improve islet viability after isolation.

  14. Validation of Methodologies for Quantifying Isolated Human Islets: an Islet Cell Resources Study

    PubMed Central

    Kissler, H.J.; Niland, J.C.; Olack, B.; Ricordi, C.; Hering, B.J.; Naji, A.; Faoud, K.; Oberholzer, J.; Fernandez, L.; Contreras, J.; Stiller, T.; Sowinski, J.; Kaufman, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantification of islet mass is a crucial criterion for defining the quality of the islet product ensuring a potent islet transplant when used as a therapeutic intervention for select patients with type I diabetes. Methods This multi-center study involved all 8 member institutions of the National Institutes of Health-supported Islet Cell Resources (ICR) consortium. The study was designed to validate the standard counting procedure for quantifying isolated, dithizone-stained human islets as a reliable methodology by ascertaining the accuracy, repeatability (intra-observer variability), and intermediate precision (inter-observer variability). The secondary aim of the study was to evaluate a new software-assisted digital image analysis method as a supplement for islet quantification. Results The study demonstrated the accuracy, repeatability and intermediate precision of the standard counting procedure for isolated human islets. This study also demonstrated that software-assisted digital image analysis as a supplemental method for islet quantification was more accurate and consistent than the standard manual counting method. Conclusions Standard counting procedures for enumerating isolated stained human islets is a valid methodology, but computer-assisted digital image analysis assessment of islet mass has the added benefit of providing a permanent record of the isolated islet product being evaluated that improves quality assurance operations of current good manufacturing practice (cGMP). PMID:19719726

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 reduces islet amyloid formation by degrading islet amyloid polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Aston-Mourney, Kathryn; Zraika, Sakeneh; Udayasankar, Jayalakshmi; Subramanian, Shoba L; Green, Pattie S; Kahn, Steven E; Hull, Rebecca L

    2013-02-01

    Deposition of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) as amyloid is a pathological hallmark of the islet in type 2 diabetes, which is toxic to β-cells. We previously showed that the enzyme neprilysin reduces islet amyloid deposition and thereby reduces β-cell apoptosis, by inhibiting fibril formation. Two other enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, are extracellular gelatinases capable of degrading another amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, the constituent of amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease. We therefore investigated whether MMP-2 and MMP-9 play a role in reducing islet amyloid deposition. MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA were present in mouse islets but only MMP-9 activity was detectable. In an islet culture model where human IAPP (hIAPP) transgenic mouse islets develop amyloid but nontransgenic islets do not, a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor (GM6001) and an MMP-2/9 inhibitor increased amyloid formation and the resultant β-cell apoptosis. In contrast, a specific MMP-2 inhibitor had no effect on either amyloid deposition or β-cell apoptosis. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that MMP-9 degraded amyloidogenic hIAPP but not nonamyloidogenic mouse IAPP. Thus, MMP-9 constitutes an endogenous islet protease that limits islet amyloid deposition and its toxic effects via degradation of hIAPP. Because islet MMP-9 mRNA levels are decreased in type 2 diabetic subjects, islet MMP-9 activity may also be decreased in human type 2 diabetes, thereby contributing to increased islet amyloid deposition and β-cell loss. Approaches to increase islet MMP-9 activity could reduce or prevent amyloid deposition and its toxic effects in type 2 diabetes.

  16. A novel high-throughput assay for islet respiration reveals uncoupling of rodent and human islets.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Jakob D; Sereda, Samuel B; Stiles, Linsey; Elorza, Alvaro; Allister, Emma M; Neilson, Andy; Ferrick, David A; Wheeler, Michael B; Shirihai, Orian S

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic beta cell is unique in its response to nutrient by increased fuel oxidation. Recent studies have demonstrated that oxygen consumption rate (OCR) may be a valuable predictor of islet quality and long term nutrient responsiveness. To date, high-throughput and user-friendly assays for islet respiration are lacking. The aim of this study was to develop such an assay and to examine bioenergetic efficiency of rodent and human islets. The XF24 respirometer platform was adapted to islets by the development of a 24-well plate specifically designed to confine islets. The islet plate generated data with low inter-well variability and enabled stable measurement of oxygen consumption for hours. The F1F0 ATP synthase blocker oligomycin was used to assess uncoupling while rotenone together with myxothiazol/antimycin was used to measure the level of non-mitochondrial respiration. The use of oligomycin in islets was validated by reversing its effect in the presence of the uncoupler FCCP. Respiratory leak averaged to 59% and 49% of basal OCR in islets from C57Bl6/J and FVB/N mice, respectively. In comparison, respiratory leak of INS-1 cells and C2C12 myotubes was measured to 38% and 23% respectively. Islets from a cohort of human donors showed a respiratory leak of 38%, significantly lower than mouse islets. The assay for islet respiration presented here provides a novel tool that can be used to study islet mitochondrial function in a relatively high-throughput manner. The data obtained in this study shows that rodent islets are less bioenergetically efficient than human islets as well as INS1 cells.

  17. Single-cell transcriptomes identify human islet cell signatures and reveal cell-type–specific expression changes in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bolisetty, Mohan; Kursawe, Romy; Sun, Lili; Sivakamasundari, V.; Kycia, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by the coordinated action of at least four cell types constituting pancreatic islets. Changes in the proportion and/or function of these cells are associated with genetic and molecular pathophysiology of monogenic, type 1, and type 2 (T2D) diabetes. Cellular heterogeneity impedes precise understanding of the molecular components of each islet cell type that govern islet (dys)function, particularly the less abundant delta and gamma/pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells. Here, we report single-cell transcriptomes for 638 cells from nondiabetic (ND) and T2D human islet samples. Analyses of ND single-cell transcriptomes identified distinct alpha, beta, delta, and PP/gamma cell-type signatures. Genes linked to rare and common forms of islet dysfunction and diabetes were expressed in the delta and PP/gamma cell types. Moreover, this study revealed that delta cells specifically express receptors that receive and coordinate systemic cues from the leptin, ghrelin, and dopamine signaling pathways implicating them as integrators of central and peripheral metabolic signals into the pancreatic islet. Finally, single-cell transcriptome profiling revealed genes differentially regulated between T2D and ND alpha, beta, and delta cells that were undetectable in paired whole islet analyses. This study thus identifies fundamental cell-type–specific features of pancreatic islet (dys)function and provides a critical resource for comprehensive understanding of islet biology and diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:27864352

  18. Islet cryopreservation: improved recovery following taurine pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Hardikar, A A; Risbud, M V; Remacle, C; Reusens, B; Hoet, J J; Bhonde, R R

    2001-01-01

    Simple and efficient freezing methods with maximal postthawing recovery form the basis of ideal cryopreservation. Taurine (2-amino ethanesulfonic acid), an end-product of sulphur amino acid metabolism, is one of the most abundant free amino acids in the body. The membrane stabilizing, free radical scavenging, and osmoregulatory roles of taurine have been well documented. We studied the effect of physiological and supra-physiological concentrations (0.3 and 3.0 mM) of taurine on islet cryopreservation. Islet viability on cryopreservation was significantly improved in both the taurine-treated groups (91.9 +/- 2.3% in 0.3 mM and 94.6 +/- 1.58% in 3.0 mM group, p < 0.05) compared with the controls (85.7 +/- 3.4%). Loss of peripheral islet cells was highly reduced in the taurine group, as examined under phase contrast and quantified by islet morphometric analysis (p < 0.05) using a digital image analysis system. Taurine-treated islets showed significant reduction in lipid peroxidation (0.905 and 0.848 nM MDA/microg protein for 0.3 and 3.0 mM taurine, respectively, p < 0.05) compared with control (1.307 nM MDA/microg protein) islets. In all, 500 islet equivalents (IE) of treated or control group islets were transplanted to BALB/c mice rendered diabetic with STZ. All animals showed a normal glucose clearance following a glucose load. Graft functionality was confirmed by normoglycemia (fasting plasma glucose: fpg < 150 mg/dl) after transplantation and reappearing hyperglycemia (fpg > 200 mg/dl) following removal of the graft. Suboptimal islet transplantation using 250 IE suggests that the grafted islet mass was inadequate for diabetes reversal. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the islet insulin content between the three groups following cryopreservation of the islets at -196 degrees C. Our studies indicate that taurine pretreatment and its continued presence during islet cryopreservation improves the postthawing viable recovery of islets.

  19. Canine islets in an ultrafiltered environment.

    PubMed

    Merrell, R C; Basadonna, G

    1985-11-01

    Molecular sieve membranes can protect pancreatic islets against immune recognition in diabetic patients treated by endocrine tissue replacement. These biocompatible membranes permit the passage of small peptides such as insulin, and preclude the diffusion of immunoglobulins and immunogenic molecules. However, the tissue must function indefinitely in an ultrafiltered environment determined by the sequestering membranes. The chronic perifusion of canine islet tissue was compared in ultrafiltered and microfiltered chambers. The biphasic pattern of insulin release by similar numbers of islets from the same pancrease preparation was not significantly different when tissue was cultured in a micro- or an ultrafiltered environment. The cumulative insulin output of the two systems was quite similar over 3 days of culture. Canine islet tissue can be sustained in an ultrafiltered environment with maintenance of insulin release to glucose stimulation, which is quantitatively similar to islet tissue maintained in chronic perifusion without ultrafiltration.

  20. Current status of encapsulated islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hae Kyung; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2015-07-01

    Islet transplantation is a treatment modality for diabetes mellitus that can maintain insulin levels within a physiologically appropriate range. However, wider clinical application is limited by insufficient donor numbers and a need for lifelong immunosuppression. Despite various clinical and preclinical trials, there is no single standard immunosuppressive regimen that can suppress acute and chronic immune reactions with lower toxicity to grafted islets. One of the strategies for overcoming lifelong immunosuppression is the incorporation of encapsulation technology, which can provide a physical immune barrier by keeping out high molecular weight immune system components, while still allowing low molecular weight oxygen, insulin and nutrients to pass through. Encapsulated islet transplantation approaches that have been studied so far include macroencapsulation, microencapsulation, conformal coating and nanoencapsulation. Herein we will review the basic concepts of islet encapsulation technique, earlier works to recent progress related to clinical studies and corporate investigations on encapsulated islet transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL is neuroprotective in a chronic Parkinson's disease mouse model and increases BNDF expression while reducing neuroinflammation and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanwei; Liu, WeiZhen; Li, Lin; Hölscher, Christian

    2017-02-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). Therefore, treatment to improve insulin resistance in T2DM may be useful for PD patients. Glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a member of the incretin hormone family that can promote insulin release and improve insulin resistance. Several GIP analogues have been developed as potential treatments for T2DM. We had shown previously that D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL, a novel long-acting GIP analogue, can play a neuroprotective role in the PD mouse model induced by acute MPTP injection. The drug reduced damage to the dopaminergic neurons and increased CREB-mediated Bcl-2 expression to prevent apoptosis and reduced chronic inflammation in the brain. In the present study, we further tested the effects of chronic treatment by D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL in a chronic PD mouse model induced by MPTP (25mg/kg ip.) combination with probenecid (250mg/kg ip.) injection for 5 weeks. The results demonstrated that chronic treatment with D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL inhibits MPTP -induced Parkinsonism-like motor disorders in mice, and that the drug prevents dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Moreover, D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL also inhibited the increased levels of expression of α-synuclein in the SNpc and striatum induced by MPTP. Furthermore, drug treatment reduced chronic neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, and increased the expression of BDNF. These findings show that GIP signaling is neuroprotective and holds promise as a novel treatment of PD.

  2. The incretin analogue D-Ala2GIP reduces plaque load, astrogliosis and oxidative stress in an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duffy, A M; Hölscher, C

    2013-01-03

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin is a neuroprotective growth factor, and an impairment of insulin signalling has been found in AD brains. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an incretin hormone, normalises insulin signalling and also acts as a neuroprotective growth factor. GIP plays an important role in memory formation, synaptic plasticity and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the long-lasting incretin hormone analogue D-Ala(2)GIP protects memory formation and synaptic plasticity, reduces plaques, normalises the proliferation of stem cells, reduces the activation of microglia, and prevents the loss of synapses in the cortex of the APPswe/PS1deltaE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. D-Ala(2)GIP was injected for 35 days at 25 nmol/kg i.p. once daily in APP/PS1 male mice and wild-type (WT) littermates aged 6, 12 and 19 months. In a follow-up study, we analysed plaque load, the activation of astrocytes as a means of chronic inflammation in the brain, and oxidative stress in the brains of these mice (8-oxoguanine levels). D-Ala(2)GIP reduced the amyloid plaque load in 12- and 19-month-old mice, and the inflammation response as shown in the reduction of activated astrocytes in 12- and 19-month old APP/PS1 mice. Chronic oxidative stress in the brain was reduced in 12- and 19-month-old mice as shown in the reduction of 8-oxoguanine levels in the cortex of D-Ala(2)GIP-injected APP/PS1 mice. The results demonstrate that D-Ala(2)GIP has neuroprotective properties on key markers found in Alzheimer's disease. This finding shows that novel GIP analogues have the potential to be developed as novel therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunosuppression With CD40 Costimulatory Blockade Plus Rapamycin for Simultaneous Islet-Kidney Transplantation in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Oura, T; Hotta, K; Lei, J; Markmann, J; Rosales, I; Dehnadi, A; Kawai, K; Ndishabandi, D; Smith, R-N; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, T

    2017-03-01

    The lack of a reliable immunosuppressive regimen that effectively suppresses both renal and islet allograft rejection without islet toxicity hampers a wider clinical application of simultaneous islet-kidney transplantation (SIK). Seven MHC-mismatched SIKs were performed in diabetic cynomolgus monkeys. Two recipients received rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG) induction followed by daily tacrolimus and rapamycin (ATG/Tac/Rapa), and five recipients were treated with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and rapamycin (aCD40/Rapa). Anti-inflammatory therapy, including anti-interleukin-6 receptor mAb and anti-tumor necrosis factor-α mAb, was given in both groups. The ATG/Tac/Rapa recipients failed to achieve long-term islet allograft survival (19 and 26 days) due to poor islet engraftment and cytomegalovirus pneumonia. In contrast, the aCD40/Rapa regimen provided long-term islet and kidney allograft survival (90, 94, >120, >120, and >120 days), with only one recipient developing evidence of allograft rejection. The aCD40/Rapa regimen was also tested in four kidney-alone transplant recipients. All four recipients achieved long-term renal allograft survival (100% at day 120), which was superior to renal allograft survival (62.9% at day 120) with triple immunosuppressive regimen (tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids). The combination of anti-CD40 mAb and rapamycin is an effective and nontoxic immunosuppressive regimen that uses only clinically available agents for kidney and islet recipients.

  4. Cutting Edge: Origins, Recruitment, and Regulation of CD11c(+) Cells in Inflamed Islets of Autoimmune Diabetes Mice.

    PubMed

    Klementowicz, Joanna E; Mahne, Ashley E; Spence, Allyson; Nguyen, Vinh; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Murphy, Kenneth M; Tang, Qizhi

    2017-07-01

    In NOD mice, CD11c(+) cells increase greatly with islet inflammation and contribute to autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β cells. In this study, we investigated their origin and mechanism of recruitment. CD11c(+) cells in inflamed islets resembled classical dendritic cells based on their transcriptional profile. However, the majority of these cells were not from the Zbtb46-dependent dendritic-cell lineage. Instead, monocyte precursors could give rise to CD11c(+) cells in inflamed islets. Chemokines Ccl5 and Ccl8 were persistently elevated in inflamed islets and the influx of CD11c(+) cells was partially dependent on their receptor Ccr5. Treatment with islet Ag-specific regulatory T cells led to a marked decrease of Ccl5 and Ccl8, and a reduction of monocyte recruitment. These results implicate a monocytic origin of CD11c(+) cells in inflamed islets and suggest that therapeutic regulatory T cells directly or indirectly regulate their influx by altering the chemotactic milieu in the islets. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone, gastric-inhibitory polypeptide, and vasopressin in normal adrenal glands and cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Galac, S; Kars, V J; Klarenbeek, S; Teerds, K J; Mol, J A; Kooistra, H S

    2010-07-01

    Hypercortisolism caused by an adrenocortical tumor (AT) results from adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-independent hypersecretion of glucocorticoids. Studies in humans demonstrate that steroidogenesis in ATs may be stimulated by ectopic or overexpressed eutopic G protein-coupled receptors. We report on a screening of 23 surgically removed, cortisol-secreting ATs for the expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone (LH), gastric-inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and vasopressin (V(1a), V(1b), and V(2)). Normal adrenal glands served as control tissues. Abundance of mRNA for these receptors was quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), and the presence and localization of these receptors were determined by immunohistochemistry. In both normal adrenal glands and ATs, mRNA encoding for all receptors was present, although the expression abundance of the V(1b) receptor was very low. The mRNA expression abundance for GIP and V(2) receptors in ATs were significantly lower (0.03 and 0.01, respectively) than in normal adrenal glands. The zona fasciculata of normal adrenal glands stained immunonegative for the GIP receptor. In contrast, islands of GIP receptor-immunopositive cells were detected in about half of the ATs. The zona fasciculata of both normal adrenal glands and AT tissue were immunopositive for LH receptor; in ATs in a homogenous or heterogenous pattern. In normal adrenal glands, no immunolabeling for V(1b)R and V(2) receptor was present, but in ATs, V(2) receptor-immunopositive cells were detected. In conclusion, QPCR analysis did not reveal overexpression of LH, GIP, V(1a), V(1b), or V(2) receptors in the ATs. However, the ectopic expression of GIP and V(2) receptor proteins in tumorous zona fasciculata tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of canine cortisol-secreting ATs.

  6. [Isogenic islet transplantation on the rat liver (method for isolation and purification of the Langerhans islets)].

    PubMed

    Chaib, E; Papalois, A; Brons, I G; Calne, R Y

    2000-01-01

    The major indication for pancreas or islet transplantation is diabetes mellitus type I. This process has to supply the insulin necessity keeping glucose under control. We have studied isogenic islet transplantation on the rat (WAG-RT1u) liver. The method of isolation and purification of the islets obtained 2.834 +/- 551.64 islets with purity of 83 +/- 2.45%. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin and seric glucose prior transplantation was 35 mmol/L. The islet transplantation of 2.834 +/- 551.64 islets in the rat liver has normalized glucose test from 9.62 +/- 2.65 mmol/L 10 days after transplantation to 7.43 +/- 0.27 mmol/L later in the follow-up (P < 0.05). The median survival time of the islets was 73 days. In conclusion both the method of isolation and purification of the islets and islet transplantation was effective in the control of the diabetes induced by streptozotocin with median survival time of both islet and rat more than 73 days when rats were sacrified.

  7. Islet cell hormonal responses to hypoglycemia after human islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rickels, Michael R; Schutta, Mark H; Mueller, Rebecca; Markmann, James F; Barker, Clyde F; Naji, Ali; Teff, Karen L

    2005-11-01

    Islet transplantation can eliminate severe hypoglycemic episodes in patients with type 1 diabetes; however, whether intrahepatic islets respond appropriately to hypoglycemia after transplantation has not been fully studied. We evaluated six islet transplant recipients, six type 1 diabetic subjects, and seven nondiabetic control subjects using a stepped hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp. Also, three islet transplant recipients and the seven control subjects underwent a paired hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. In response to hypoglycemia, C-peptide was similarly suppressed in islet transplant recipients and control subjects and was not detectable in type 1 diabetic subjects. Glucagon was significantly more suppressed in type 1 diabetic subjects than in islet transplant recipients (P < 0.01), although the glucagon in islet transplant recipients failed to activate as in the control subjects (P < 0.01). Pancreatic polypeptide failed to activate in both type 1 diabetic subjects and islet transplant recipients compared with control subjects (P < 0.01). In islet transplant recipients, glucagon was suppressed normally by hyperinsulinemia during the euglycemic clamp and was significantly greater during the paired hypoglycemic clamp (P < 0.01). These results suggest that after islet transplantation and in response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia, endogenous insulin secretion is appropriately suppressed and glucagon secretion may be partially restored.

  8. Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bellin, Melena D.; Gelrud, Andres; Arreaza-Rubin, Guillermo; Dunn, Ty B.; Humar, Abhinav; Morgan, Katherine A.; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Rastellini, Cristiana; Rickels, Michael R.; Schwarzenberg, Sarah J.; Andersen, Dana K.

    2015-01-01

    A workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases focused on research gaps and opportunities in total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT) for the management of chronic pancreatitis. The session was held on July 23, 2014 and structured into 5 sessions: (1) patient selection, indications, and timing; (2) technical aspects of TPIAT; (3) improving success of islet autotransplantation; (4) improving outcomes after total pancreatectomy; and (5) registry considerations for TPIAT. The current state of knowledge was reviewed; knowledge gaps and research needs were specifically highlighted. Common themes included the need to identify which patients best benefit from and when to intervene with TPIAT, current limitations of the surgical procedure, diabetes remission and the potential for improvement, opportunities to better address pain remission, GI complications in this population, and unique features of children with chronic pancreatitis considered for TPIAT. The need for a multicenter patient registry that specifically addresses the complexities of chronic pancreatitis and total pancreatectomy outcomes and postsurgical diabetes outcomes was repeatedly emphasized. PMID:25599324

  9. Gamma-induced Positron Spectroscopy (GiPS) at a superconducting electron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterling, Maik; Anwand, Wolfgang; Cowan, Thomas E.; Hartmann, Andreas; Jungmann, Marco; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Krille, Arnold; Wagner, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    A new and unique setup for Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy has been established and optimized at the superconducting linear electron accelerator ELBE at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). The intense, pulsed (26 MHz) photon source (bremsstrahlung with energies up to 16 MeV) is used to generate positrons by means of pair production throughout the entire sample volume. Due to the very short gamma bunches (< 5 ps temporal length), the facility for Gamma-induced Positron Spectroscopy (GiPS) is suitable for positron lifetime spectroscopy using the accelerator's radiofrequency as time reference. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening Spectroscopy are employed by a coincident measurement (Age-Momentum Correlation) of the time-of-arrival and energy of the annihilation photons which in turn significantly reduces the background of scattered photons resulting in spectra with high signal to background ratios. Simulations of the setup using the GEANT4 framework have been performed to yield optimum positron generation rates for various sample materials and improved background conditions.

  10. Internalization and desensitization of the human glucose-dependent-insulinotropic receptor is affected by N-terminal acetylation of the agonist.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Sadek; Dubois-Vedrenne, Ingrid; Laval, Marie; Tikhonova, Irina G; D'Angelo, Romina; Sanchez, Claire; Clerc, Pascal; Gherardi, Marie-Julie; Gigoux, Véronique; Magnan, Remi; Fourmy, Daniel

    2015-10-15

    How incretins regulate presence of their receptors at the cell surface and their activity is of paramount importance for the development of therapeutic strategies targeting these receptors. We have studied internalization of the human Glucose-Insulinotropic Polypeptide receptor (GIPR). GIP stimulated rapid robust internalization of the GIPR, the major part being directed to lysosomes. GIPR internalization involved mainly clathrin-coated pits, AP-2 and dynamin. However, neither GIPR C-terminal region nor β-arrestin1/2 was required. Finally, N-acetyl-GIP recognized as a dipeptidyl-IV resistant analogue, fully stimulated cAMP production with a ∼15-fold lower potency than GIP and weakly stimulated GIPR internalization and desensitization of cAMP response. Furthermore, docking N-acetyl-GIP in the binding site of modeled GIPR showed slighter interactions with residues of helices 6 and 7 of GIPR compared to GIP. Therefore, incomplete or partial activity of N-acetyl-GIP on signaling involved in GIPR desensitization and internalization contributes to the enhanced incretin activity of this peptide.

  11. Direct glucocorticoid inhibition of insulin secretion. An in vitro study of dexamethasone effects in mouse islets.

    PubMed Central

    Lambillotte, C; Gilon, P; Henquin, J C

    1997-01-01

    The direct effects of glucocorticoids on pancreatic beta cell function were studied with normal mouse islets. Dexamethasone inhibited insulin secretion from cultured islets in a concentration-dependent manner: maximum of approximately 75% at 250 nM and IC50 at approximately 20 nM dexamethasone. This inhibition was of slow onset (0, 20, and 40% after 1, 2, and 3 h) and only slowly reversible. It was prevented by a blocker of nuclear glucocorticoid receptors, by pertussis toxin, by a phorbol ester, and by dibutyryl cAMP, but was unaffected by an increase in the fuel content of the culture medium. Dexamethasone treatment did not affect islet cAMP levels but slightly reduced inositol phosphate formation. After 18 h of culture with or without 1 microM dexamethasone, the islets were perifused and stimulated by a rise in the glucose concentration from 3 to 15 mM. Both phases of insulin secretion were similarly decreased in dexamethasone-treated islets as compared with control islets. This inhibition could not be ascribed to a lowering of insulin stores (higher in dexamethasone-treated islets), to an alteration of glucose metabolism (glucose oxidation and NAD(P)H changes were unaffected), or to a lesser rise of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in beta cells (only the frequency of the oscillations was modified). Dexamethasone also inhibited insulin secretion induced by arginine, tolbutamide, or high K+. In this case also the inhibition was observed despite a normal rise of cytoplasmic Ca2+. In conclusion, dexamethasone inhibits insulin secretion through a genomic action in beta cells that leads to a decrease in the efficacy of cytoplasmic Ca2+ on the exocytotic process. PMID:9022074

  12. Glutathione Ethyl Ester Supplementation during Pancreatic Islet Isolation Improves Viability and Transplant Outcomes in a Murine Marginal Islet Mass Model

    PubMed Central

    Raposo do Amaral, Alexandre S.; Pawlick, Rena L.; Rodrigues, Erika; Costal, Flavia; Pepper, Andrew; Ferreira Galvão, Flávio H.; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lucia; Shapiro, A. M.James

    2013-01-01

    Background The success of pancreatic islet transplantation still faces many challenges, mainly related to cell damage during islet isolation and early post-transplant. The increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during islet isolation and the consumption of antioxidant defenses appear to be an important pathway related to islet damage. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we evaluated whether supplementation of glutathione-ethyl-ester (GEE) during islet isolation could improve islet viability and transplant outcomes in a murine marginal islet mass model. We also cultured human islets for 24 hours in standard CMRL media with or without GEE supplementation. Supplementation of GEE decreased the content of ROS in isolated islets, leading to a decrease in apoptosis and maintenance of islet viability. A higher percentage of mice transplanted with a marginal mass of GEE treated islets became euglycemic after transplant. The supplementation of 20 mM GEE in cultured human islets significantly reduced the apoptosis rate in comparison to untreated islets. Conclusions/Significance GEE supplementation was able to decrease the apoptosis rate and intracellular content of ROS in isolated islets and might be considered a potential intervention to improve islet viability during the isolation process and maintenance in culture before islet transplantation. PMID:23424628

  13. In Vivo Islet Protection by a Nuclear Import Inhibitor in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Daniel J.; Zienkiewicz, Jozef; Kendall, Peggy L.; Liu, Danya; Liu, Xueyan; Veach, Ruth Ann; Collins, Robert D.; Hawiger, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin-dependent Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a devastating autoimmune disease that destroys beta cells within the pancreatic islets and afflicts over 10 million people worldwide. These patients face life-long risks for blindness, cardiovascular and renal diseases, and complications of insulin treatment. New therapies that protect islets from autoimmune destruction and allow continuing insulin production are needed. Increasing evidence regarding the pathomechanism of T1D indicates that islets are destroyed by the relentless attack by autoreactive immune cells evolving from an aberrant action of the innate, in addition to adaptive, immune system that produces islet-toxic cytokines, chemokines, and other effectors of islet inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that targeting nuclear import of stress-responsive transcription factors evoked by agonist-stimulated innate and adaptive immunity receptors would protect islets from autoimmune destruction. Principal Findings Here we show that a first-in-class inhibitor of nuclear import, cSN50 peptide, affords in vivo islet protection following a 2-day course of intense treatment in NOD mice, which resulted in a diabetes-free state for one year without apparent toxicity. This nuclear import inhibitor precipitously reduces the accumulation of islet-destructive autoreactive lymphocytes while enhancing activation-induced cell death of T and B lymphocytes derived from autoimmune diabetes-prone, non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that develop T1D. Moreover, in this widely used model of human T1D we noted attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in immune cells. Conclusions These results indicate that a novel form of immunotherapy that targets nuclear import can arrest inflammation-driven destruction of insulin-producing beta cells at the site of autoimmune attack within pancreatic islets during the progression of T1D. PMID:20949090

  14. Generation of human islet-specific regulatory T cells by TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Hull, Caroline M; Nickolay, Lauren E; Estorninho, Megan; Richardson, Max W; Riley, James L; Peakman, Mark; Maher, John; Tree, Timothy I M

    2017-05-01

    Based on the success in animal models of type 1 diabetes (T1D), clinical trials of adoptive regulatory T cell (Treg) therapy are underway using ex vivo expanded polyclonal Tregs. However, pre-clinical data also demonstrate that islet-specific Tregs are more potent than polyclonal Tregs at reversing T1D. Translation of this approach into man will require methods to generate large populations of islet-specific Tregs which, to date, has proved to be a major hurdle. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of lentiviral-mediated T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to confer antigen specificity on polyclonal human Tregs. Targeting has been achieved using TCRs isolated from human islet-specific and viral-specific CD4(+) T cell clones. Engineered T cells demonstrated expression of ectopically-delivered TCRs, resulting in endowment of cognate antigen-specific responses. This enabled antigen-specific suppression at increased potency compared to polyclonal Tregs. However, cells transduced with islet-specific TCRs were less responsive to cognate antigen than viral-specific TCRs, and in some cases, required additional methods to isolate functional antigen-specific Tregs. This study demonstrates the potential of TCR gene transfer to develop islet-specific Treg therapies for effective treatment of T1D, but also highlights that additional optimisation may be required to achieve its full potential. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Calcineurin Signaling Regulates Human Islet β-Cell Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Scott A.; Crutchlow, Michael F.; Ferrari, Alana M.; Raum, Jeffrey C.; Groff, David N.; Rankin, Matthew M.; Liu, Chengyang; De León, Diva D.; Naji, Ali; Kushner, Jake A.; Stoffers, Doris A.

    2010-01-01

    The calcium-regulated phosphatase calcineurin intersects with both calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling pathways in the pancreatic β-cell. Pharmacologic calcineurin inhibition, necessary to prevent rejection in the setting of organ transplantation, is associated with post-transplant β-cell failure. We sought to determine the effect of calcineurin inhibition on β-cell replication and survival in rodents and in isolated human islets. Further, we assessed whether the GLP-1 receptor agonist and cAMP stimulus, exendin-4 (Ex-4), could rescue β-cell replication and survival following calcineurin inhibition. Following treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus, human β-cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Although we detected no human β-cell replication, tacrolimus significantly decreased rodent β-cell replication. Ex-4 nearly normalized both human β-cell survival and rodent β-cell replication when co-administered with tacrolimus. We found that tacrolimus decreased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that calcineurin could regulate replication and survival via the PI3K/Akt pathway. We identify insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2), a known cAMP-responsive element-binding protein target and upstream regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, as a novel calcineurin target in β-cells. Irs2 mRNA and protein are decreased by calcineurin inhibition in both rodent and human islets. The effect of calcineurin on Irs2 expression is mediated at least in part through the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), as NFAT occupied the Irs2 promoter in a calcineurin-sensitive manner. Ex-4 restored Irs2 expression in tacrolimus-treated rodent and human islets nearly to baseline. These findings reveal calcineurin as a regulator of human β-cell survival in part through regulation of Irs2, with implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes following organ transplantation. PMID:20943662

  16. Calcineurin signaling regulates human islet {beta}-cell survival.

    PubMed

    Soleimanpour, Scott A; Crutchlow, Michael F; Ferrari, Alana M; Raum, Jeffrey C; Groff, David N; Rankin, Matthew M; Liu, Chengyang; De León, Diva D; Naji, Ali; Kushner, Jake A; Stoffers, Doris A

    2010-12-17

    The calcium-regulated phosphatase calcineurin intersects with both calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling pathways in the pancreatic β-cell. Pharmacologic calcineurin inhibition, necessary to prevent rejection in the setting of organ transplantation, is associated with post-transplant β-cell failure. We sought to determine the effect of calcineurin inhibition on β-cell replication and survival in rodents and in isolated human islets. Further, we assessed whether the GLP-1 receptor agonist and cAMP stimulus, exendin-4 (Ex-4), could rescue β-cell replication and survival following calcineurin inhibition. Following treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus, human β-cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Although we detected no human β-cell replication, tacrolimus significantly decreased rodent β-cell replication. Ex-4 nearly normalized both human β-cell survival and rodent β-cell replication when co-administered with tacrolimus. We found that tacrolimus decreased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that calcineurin could regulate replication and survival via the PI3K/Akt pathway. We identify insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2), a known cAMP-responsive element-binding protein target and upstream regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, as a novel calcineurin target in β-cells. Irs2 mRNA and protein are decreased by calcineurin inhibition in both rodent and human islets. The effect of calcineurin on Irs2 expression is mediated at least in part through the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), as NFAT occupied the Irs2 promoter in a calcineurin-sensitive manner. Ex-4 restored Irs2 expression in tacrolimus-treated rodent and human islets nearly to baseline. These findings reveal calcineurin as a regulator of human β-cell survival in part through regulation of Irs2, with implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes following organ transplantation.

  17. The heterogeneity of islet autoantibodies and the progression of islet failure in type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Bian, Lingling; Ji, Li; Chen, Yang; Chen, Heng; Gu, Yong; Ma, Bingqin; Gu, Wei; Xu, Xinyu; Shi, Yun; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Dalong; Sun, Zilin; Ma, Jianhua; Jin, Hui; Shi, Xing; Miao, Heng; Xin, Bing; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Zhenwen; Bu, Ruifang; Xu, Lan; Shi, Guangde; Tang, Wei; Li, Wei; Zhou, Dongmei; Liang, Jun; Cheng, Xingbo; Shi, Bimin; Dong, Jixiang; Hu, Ji; Fang, Chen; Zhong, Shao; Yu, Weinan; Lu, Weiping; Wu, Chenguang; Qian, Li; Yu, Jiancheng; Gao, Jialin; Fei, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Xueqin; Cui, Shiwei; Cheng, Jinluo; Xu, Ning; Wang, Guofeng; Han, Guoqing; Xu, Chunrong; Xie, Yun; An, Minmin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhixiao; Cai, Yun; Fu, Qi; Fu, Yu; Zheng, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Hu, Qingfang; Dai, Hao; Jin, Yu; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Kuanfeng; Li, Yifan; Shen, Jie; Zhou, Hongwen; He, Wei; Zheng, Xuqin; Han, Xiao; Yu, Liping; She, Jinxiong; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is heterogeneous in many facets. The patients suffered from type 1 diabetes present several levels of islet function as well as variable number and type of islet-specific autoantibodies. This study was to investigate prevalence and heterogeneity of the islet autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes of type 1 diabetes mellitus; and also discussed the process of islet failure and its risk factors in Chinese type 1 diabetic patients. A total of 1,291 type 1 diabetic patients were enrolled in this study. Demographic information was collected. Laboratory tests including mixed-meal tolerance test, human leukocyte antigen alleles, hemoglobinA1c, lipids, thyroid function and islet autoantibodies were conducted. The frequency of islet-specific autoantibody in newly diagnosed T1DM patients (duration shorter than half year) was 73% in East China. According to binary logistic regressions, autoantibody positivity, longer duration and lower Body Mass Index were the risk factors of islet failure. As the disease developed, autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase declined as well as the other two autoantibodies against zinc transporter 8 and islet antigen 2. The decrease of autoantibodies was positively correlated with aggressive beta cell destruction. Autoantibodies can facilitate the identification of classic T1DM from other subtypes and predict the progression of islet failure. As there were obvious heterogeneity in autoantibodies and clinical manifestation in different phenotypes of the disease, we should take more factors into consideration when identifying type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Noninvasive imaging of islet grafts using positron-emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuxin; Dang, Hoa; Middleton, Blake; Zhang, Zesong; Washburn, Lorraine; Stout, David B.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Atkinson, Mark A.; Phelps, Michael; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Tian, Jide; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2006-07-01

    Islet transplantation offers a potential therapy to restore glucose homeostasis in type 1 diabetes patients. However, islet transplantation is not routinely successful because most islet recipients gradually lose graft function. Furthermore, serological markers of islet function are insensitive to islet loss until the latter stages of islet graft rejection. A noninvasive method of monitoring islet grafts would aid in the assessment of islet graft survival and the evaluation of interventions designed to prolong graft survival. Here, we show that recombinant adenovirus can engineer isolated islets to express a positron-emission tomography (PET) reporter gene and that these islets can be repeatedly imaged by using microPET after transplantation into mice. The magnitude of signal from engineered islets implanted into the axillary cavity was directly related to the implanted islet mass. PET signals attenuated over the following weeks because of the transient nature of adenovirus-mediated gene expression. Because the liver is the preferred site for islet implantation in humans, we also tested whether islets could be imaged after transfusion into the mouse liver. Control studies revealed that both intrahepatic islet transplantation and hyperglycemia altered the biodistribution kinetics of the PET probe systemically. Although transplanted islets were dispersed throughout the liver, clear signals from the liver region of mice receiving PET reporter-expressing islets were detectable for several weeks. Viral transduction, PET reporter expression, and repeated microPET imaging had no apparent deleterious effects on islet function after implantation. These studies lay a foundation for noninvasive quantitative assessments of islet graft survival using PET. diabetes | transplantation

  19. IDDM: an islet or an immune disease?

    PubMed

    Boitard, C; Larger, E; Timsit, J; Sempe, P; Bach, J F

    1994-09-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes develops as a consequence of the selective destruction of insulin-producing cells by an autoimmune reaction. However, the precise series of events which trigger anti-islet autoreactive T cells is still being investigated. Major issues will need to be raised before a comprehensive view of the anti-islet autoimmune reaction can be delineated. These include defining the primary site of activation of autoreactive lymphocytes and exploring hypotheses to explain the chronicity of the diabetes process. These issues all relate with the more general dilemma of the actual role of the islets of Langerhans in breaking self tolerance to beta-cell antigens. By studying non-obese diabetic mice deprived of beta cells following a single injection of a high dose of alloxan at 3 weeks of age, we recently obtained evidence that the activation of autoreactive T cells requires the presence of target islet cells in order to develop.

  20. Glucose intolerance caused by a defect in the entero-insular axis: A study in gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyawaki, Kazumasa; Yamada, Yuichiro; Yano, Hideki; Niwa, Hitoshi; Ban, Nobuhiro; Ihara, Yu; Kubota, Akira; Fujimoto, Shinpei; Kajikawa, Mariko; Kuroe, Akira; Tsuda, Kinsuke; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Tokuyuki; Jomori, Takahito; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Seino, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    Mice with a targeted mutation of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) receptor gene (GIPR) were generated to determine the role of GIP as a mediator of signals from the gut to pancreatic β cells. GIPR−/− mice have higher blood glucose levels with impaired initial insulin response after oral glucose load. Although blood glucose levels after meal ingestion are not increased by high-fat diet in GIPR+/+ mice because of compensatory higher insulin secretion, they are significantly increased in GIPR−/− mice because of the lack of such enhancement. Accordingly, early insulin secretion mediated by GIP determines glucose tolerance after oral glucose load in vivo, and because GIP plays an important role in the compensatory enhancement of insulin secretion produced by a high insulin demand, a defect in this entero-insular axis may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:10611300

  1. Transplantation sites for human and murine islets.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Rebecca A; Cheng, Kim; Lalwani, Amit; Swarbrick, Michael M; Thomas, Helen E; Loudovaris, Thomas; Kay, Tom W; Hawthorne, Wayne J; O'Connell, Philip J; Gunton, Jenny E

    2017-07-22

    Beta cell replacement is a potential cure for type 1 diabetes. In humans, islet transplants are currently infused into the liver via the portal vein, although this site has disadvantages. Here, we investigated alternative transplantation sites for human and murine islets in recipient mice, comparing the portal vein with quadriceps muscle and kidney, liver and spleen capsules. Murine islets were isolated from C57BL6/J mice and transplanted into syngeneic recipients. Human islets were isolated and transplanted into either severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG-1) immunodeficient recipient mice. All recipient mice were 8-12 weeks of age and had been rendered diabetic (defined as blood glucose concentrations ≥20 mmol/l on two consecutive days before transplantation) by alloxan tetrahydrate treatment. Islets were transplanted into five different sites (portal vein, quadriceps muscle, kidney, liver and spleen capsules). Blood glucose concentrations were monitored twice weekly until mice were killed. Dose-response studies were also performed to determine the minimum number of islets required to cure diabetes ('cure' is defined for this study as random fed blood glucose of <15 mmol/l). For transplantation of murine islets into the different sites, the kidney yielded 100% success, followed by muscle (70%), portal vein (60%), spleen capsule (29%) and liver capsule (0%). For human islets, transplantation into the kidney cured diabetes in 75-80% of recipient mice. Transplantation into muscle and portal vein had intermediate success (both 29% at 2000 islet equivalents), while transplantation into liver and spleen capsule failed (0%). With increased islet mass, success rates for muscle grafts improved to 52-56%. For both human and murine islets, equivalent or superior glucose lowering results were obtained for transplantation into skeletal muscle, compared with the portal vein. Unfortunately, kidney grafts are not feasible in human

  2. Regulatory Challenges in Manufacturing of Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Linetsky, E.; Ricordi, C.

    2014-01-01

    At the present time, transplantation of pancreatic islet cells is considered an experimental therapy for a selected cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes, and is conducted under an Investigational New Drug (IND) application. Encouraging results of the Edmonton Protocol published in the year 2000 sparked a renewed interest in clinical transplantation of allogeneic islets, triggering a large number of IND applications for phase I clinical trials. Promising results reported by a number of centers since then prompted the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to consider the possibility of licensing allogeneic islets as a therapeutic treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes. However, prior to licensure, issues such as safety, purity, efficacy, and potency of the islet product must be addressed. This is complicated by the intricate nature of pancreatic islets and limited characterization prior to transplantation. In this context, control of the manufacturing process plays a critical role in the definition of the final product. Despite significant progress made in standardization of the donor organ preservation methods, reagents used, and characterization assays performed to qualify an islet cell product, control of the isolation process remains a challenge. Within the scope of the FDA regulations, islet cells meet the definition of a biologic product, somatic cell therapy, and a drug. In addition, American Association of Blood Banks standards that address cellular therapy products apply to manufacturing facilities accredited by this organization. Control of the source material, isolation process, and final product are critical issues that must be addressed in the context of FDA and other relevant regulations applicable to islet cell products. PMID:18374089

  3. Red Ginseng Administration Before Islet Isolation Attenuates Apoptosis and Improves Islet Function and Transplant Outcome in a Syngeneic Mouse Marginal Islet Mass Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Jang, H J; Kim, S S; Oh, M Y; Kim, H J; Lee, S Y; Eom, D W; Ham, J Y; Han, D J

    2016-05-01

    Transplantation of isolated islets is a promising treatment for diabetes. Red ginseng (RG) is steamed ginseng and has been reported to enhance insulin secretion-stimulating and anti-apoptotic activities in pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that pre-operative RG treatment enhances islet cell function and anti-apoptosis and investigated whether RG improves islet engraftment by transplant of a marginal mass of syngeneic islets pretreated with RG in diabetic mice. Balb/c mice were randomly divided into 2 groups, and 1 group was administered RG (400 mg/kg/day orally) for 7 days before islet isolation. In vitro islet viability and function were assessed. After cytokine treatment, cell viability, function, and apoptosis of islet cells were analyzed. Furthermore, we studied the effects of RG in a syngeneic islet graft model. A marginal mass of syngeneic mouse islets was transplanted into diabetic hosts. Islet pretreatment with RG showed 1.4-fold higher glucose-induced insulin secretion than did control islets. RG pretreatment upregulated B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression and downregulated Bcl-associated X protein (BAX), caspase-3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Glucose-induced insulin release, NO, and apoptosis were significantly improved in RG-pretreated islets compared with cytokine-treated islets. RG-pretreated mice exhibited improved marginal mass islet graft survival compared with controls. These results suggest that pre-operative RG administration enhanced islet function before transplantation and attenuated cytokine-induced damage associated with apoptosis. These studies indicate that inhibition of apoptosis by RG significantly improved islet cell and graft function after isolation and transplantation, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. HLA Class I Sensitization in Islet Transplant Recipients – Report from the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry

    PubMed Central

    Naziruddin, Bashoo; Wease, Steve; Stablein, Donald; Barton, Franca B.; Berney, Thierry; Rickels, Michael R.; Alejandro, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising treatment option for patients severely affected with type 1 diabetes. This report from CITR presents pre- and post-transplant human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I sensitization rates in islet alone transplantation. Data came from 303 recipients transplanted with islet alone between January 1999 and December 2008. HLA class I sensitization was determined by the presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies. Panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) from prior to islet infusion and at 6 months, and yearly post-transplant was correlated to measures of islet graft failure. The cumulative number of mismatched HLA alleles increased with each additional islet infusion from a median of 3 for one infusion to 9 for three infusions. Pre-transplant PRA was not predictive of islet graft failure. However, development of PRA ≥20% post-transplant was associated with 3.6 fold (p=.001) increased hazard ratio for graft failure. Patients with complete graft loss who had discontinued immunosuppression had significantly higher rate of PRA ≥ 20% compared to those with functioning grafts who remained on immunosuppression. Exposure to repeat HLA class I mismatch at second or third islet infusions resulted in less frequent development of de novo HLA class I antibodies when compared to increased class I mismatch. The development of HLA class I antibodies while on immunosuppression is associated with subsequent islet graft failure. The risk of sensitization may be reduced by minimizing the number of islet donors used per recipient, and in the absence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies, repeating HLA class I mismatches with subsequent islet infusions. PMID:22080832

  5. HLA class I sensitization in islet transplant recipients: report from the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry.

    PubMed

    Naziruddin, Bashoo; Wease, Steve; Stablein, Donald; Barton, Franca B; Berney, Thierry; Rickels, Michael R; Alejandro, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising treatment option for patients severely affected with type 1 diabetes. This report from CITR presents pre- and posttransplant human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I sensitization rates in islet-alone transplantation. Data came from 303 recipients transplanted with islet-alone between January 1999 and December 2008. HLA class I sensitization was determined by the presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies. Panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) from prior to islet infusion and at 6 months, and yearly posttransplant was correlated to measures of islet graft failure. The cumulative number of mismatched HLA alleles increased with each additional islet infusion from a median of 3 for one infusion to 9 for three infusions. Pretransplant PRA was not predictive of islet graft failure. However, development of PRA >20% posttransplant was associated with 3.6-fold (p < 0.001) increased hazard ratio for graft failure. Patients with complete graft loss who had discontinued immunosuppression had significantly higher rate of PRA ≥ 20% compared to those with functioning grafts who remained on immunosuppression. Exposure to repeat HLA class I mismatch at second or third islet infusions resulted in less frequent development of de novo HLA class I antibodies when compared to increased class I mismatch. The development of HLA class I antibodies while on immunosuppression is associated with subsequent islet graft failure. The risk of sensitization may be reduced by minimizing the number of islet donors used per recipient, and in the absence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies, repeating HLA class I mismatches with subsequent islet infusions.

  6. Justifying clinical trials for porcine islet xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Cara E; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Edmonton Protocol encouraged a great deal of optimism that a cell-based cure for type I diabetes could be achieved. However, donor organ shortages prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread solution as the supply cannot possibly equal the demand. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has the potential to address these shortages, and recent preclinical and clinical trials show promising scientific support. Consequently, it is important to consider whether the current science meets the ethical requirements for moving toward clinical trials. Despite the potential risks and the scientific unknowns that remain to be investigated, there is optimism regarding the xenotransplantation of some types of tissue, and enough evidence has been gathered to ethically justify clinical trials for the most safe and advanced area of research, porcine islet transplantation. Researchers must make a concerted effort to maintain a positive image for xenotransplantation, as a few well-publicized failed trials could irrevocably damage public perception of xenotransplantation. Because all of society carries the burden of risk, it is important that the public be involved in the decision to proceed. As new information from preclinical and clinical trials develops, policy decisions should be frequently updated. If at any point evidence shows that islet xenotransplantation is unsafe, then clinical trials will no longer be justified and they should be halted. However, as of now, the expected benefit of an unlimited supply of islets, combined with adequate informed consent, justifies clinical trials for islet xenotransplantation.

  7. Pancreatic Islet Cell Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Romer, Anthony I.; Sussel, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This review will discuss recent advances in understanding mouse and human pancreatic islet cell development, novel concepts related to β cell dysfunction and improved approaches for replenishing β cells to treat diabetes. Recent Findings Considerable knowledge about pancreatic islet development and function has been gained using model systems with subsequent validation in human tissues. Recently, several rodent studies have revealed that differentiated adult islet cells retain remarkable plasticity and can be converted to other islet cell types by perturbing their transcription factor profiles. Furthermore, significant advances have been made in the generation of β-like cells from stem cell populations. Therefore, the generation of functionally mature β cells by the in situ conversion of non-β cell populations or by the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells could represent novel mechanisms for replenishing β cells in diabetic patients. Summary The overall conservation between mouse and human pancreatic development, islet physiology and etiology of diabetes encourages the translation of novel β cell replacement therapies to humans. Further deciphering the molecular mechanisms that direct islet cell regeneration, plasticity and function could improve and expand the β cell replacement strategies for treating diabetes. PMID:26087337

  8. Trimeprazine increases IRS2 in human islets and promotes pancreatic β cell growth and function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Yu, Yue; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Opare-Addo, Lynn; Rozzo, Aldo; Sadagurski, Marianna; Norquay, Lisa; Reed, Jessica E.; El Khattabi, Ilham; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.; Sharma, Arun

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of pancreatic β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis during chronic physiologic and immunologic stress is important for cellular and metabolic homeostasis. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) is a regulated adapter protein that links the insulin and IGF1 receptors to downstream signaling cascades. Since strategies to maintain or increase IRS2 expression can promote β cell growth, function, and survival, we conducted a screen to find small molecules that can increase IRS2 mRNA in isolated human pancreatic islets. We identified 77 compounds, including 15 that contained a tricyclic core. To establish the efficacy of our approach, one of the tricyclic compounds, trimeprazine tartrate, was investigated in isolated human islets and in mouse models. Trimeprazine is a first-generation antihistamine that acts as a partial agonist against the histamine H1 receptor (H1R) and other GPCRs, some of which are expressed on human islets. Trimeprazine promoted CREB phosphorylation and increased the concentration of IRS2 in islets. IRS2 was required for trimeprazine to increase nuclear Pdx1, islet mass, β cell replication and function, and glucose tolerance in mice. Moreover, trimeprazine synergized with anti-CD3 Abs to reduce the progression of diabetes in NOD mice. Finally, it increased the function of human islet transplants in streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced) diabetic mice. Thus, trimeprazine, its analogs, or possibly other compounds that increase IRS2 in islets and β cells without adverse systemic effects might provide mechanism-based strategies to prevent the progression of diabetes. PMID:27152363

  9. How to Use Image Analysis for Islet Counting

    PubMed Central

    Girman, Peter; Berkova, Zuzana; Dobolilova, Eva; Saudek, Frantisek

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Assessment of islet mass before islet transplantation requires a reliable technique to enable exact analysis of islet volume. This study aimed to test the applicability of digital image analysis (DIA) for evaluation of samples of purified and non-purified islets. METHODS: Pancreatic islets were isolated from 10 Lewis rats. Samples of purified (n = 10) and non-purified islets (n = 30) were counted conventionally and by using a computerized method. The equipment for the computerized counting consisted of a digital camera installed on a stereomicroscope and connected to a personal computer. Images of 2272x1704 pixels were processed using a previously described non-commercial program originally developed for this purpose. Islets were converted to equivalents using globe and ellipsoid models. The insulin content of purified islets was assessed using radioimmunoassay and was correlated to the absolute and standardized islet number. RESULTS: Mean absolute numbers of purified islets ± SD were 908 ± 130 and 1049 ± 230 (manually and DIA respectively). Mean insulin content ± SD obtained from purified islets was 161 ± 45 mU. The mean equivalents of purified islets (1589 ± 555 for globe and 1219 ± 452 for ellipsoid) significantly correlated with insulin content. However, this correlation was not significant when absolute islet numbers were used, counted using either method. There was no significant difference in absolute non-purified islet numbers assessed by manual and computerized methods (average ± SD in 50 µl samples; 12.6 ± 4.1 and 13.3 ± 5.3 respectively; p = 0.22). The manual method showed a significantly higher yield of islet equivalents (IE; p < 0.001 for both globe and ellipsoid). CONCLUSION: The computer-based system for islet counting correlated better to insulin content than conventional islet estimation and prevented overestimation. Reproducibility and ease of assessment make it potentially applicable to clinical islet transplantation. PMID

  10. Differential responses of the incretin hormones GIP and GLP-1 to increasing doses of dietary carbohydrate but not dietary protein in lean rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing; Kindel, Tammy L.; Tso, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that oral ingestion of nutrients stimulates secretion of the incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1); however, it is unclear whether there is a dose-dependent response between the amount of nutrient ingested and the secretion of the hormones in vivo. Using our lymph fistula rat model, we previously demonstrated that both GIP and GLP-1 responded dose dependently to increasing amounts of infused dietary lipid and that the GLP-1-secreting cells were more sensitive to changes in intestinal lipid content. In the present study, we investigated the dose-dependent relationships between incretin secretion and the two remaining macronutrients, carbohydrate and protein. To accomplish this objective, the major mesenteric lymphatic duct of male Sprague-Dawley rats was cannulated. Each animal received a single bolus (3 ml) of saline, dextrin, whey protein, or casein hydrolysate (0.275, 0.55, 1.1, 2.2, 4.4 kcal) via a surgically inserted duodenal or ileal feeding tube. Lymph was continuously collected for 3 h and analyzed for GIP and GLP-1 content. Both GIP and GLP-1 outputs responded dose dependently to increasing amounts of dietary carbohydrate but not protein. Additionally, we found that the GIP-secreting cells were more sensitive than the GLP-1-secreting cells to changes in intestinal carbohydrate content. PMID:20522638

  11. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibition Activates CREB and Improves Islet Vascularization through VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Samikannu, Balaji; Chen, Chunguang; Lingwal, Neelam; Padmasekar, Manju; Engel, Felix B.; Linn, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Substitution of pancreatic islets is a potential therapy to treat diabetes and it depends on reconstitution of islet’s capillary network. In this study, we addressed the question whether stabilization of Glucagon-Like-Peptide-1 (GLP-1) by inhibiting Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) increases β-cell mass by modulating vascularization. Mouse or porcine donor islets were implanted under kidney capsule of diabetic mice treated with DPP-IV inhibitor sitagliptin. Grafts were analyzed for insulin production, β-cell proliferation and vascularization. In addition, the effect of sitagliptin on sprouting and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)-A expression was examined ex vivo. The cAMP response element-binding (CREB) and VEGF-A/ Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor (VEGFR)-2 signaling pathway leading to islet vascularization was explored. Sitagliptin increased mean insulin content of islet grafts and area of insulin-positive tissue as well as β-cell proliferation. Interestingly, sitagliptin treatment also markedly increased endothelial cell proliferation, microvessel density and blood flow. Finally, GLP-1 (7-36) stimulated sprouting and VEGF expression, which was significantly enhanced by sitagliptin- mediated inhibition of DPP-IV. Our in vivo data demonstrate that sitagliptin treatment phosphorylated CREB and induced islet vascularization through VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. This study paves a new pathway for improvement of islet transplantation in treating diabetes mellitus. PMID:24349326

  12. GIP Contributions to the Regulation of Centromere at the Interface Between the Nuclear Envelope and the Nucleoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Chabouté, Marie-Edith; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Centromeres are known as specific chromatin domains without which eukaryotic cells cannot divide properly during mitosis. Despite the considerable efforts to understand the centromere/kinetochore assembly during mitosis, until recently, comparatively few studies have dealt with the regulation of centromere during interphase. Here, we briefly review and discuss past and recent advances about the architecture of centromeres and their regulation during the cell cycle. Furthermore, we highlight and discuss new findings and hypotheses regarding the specific regulation of centromeres in both plant and animal nuclei, especially with GIP proteins at the interface between the nuclear envelope and the nucleoplasm. PMID:26904080

  13. Preservation of pancreatic islets in cold UW solution before transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Show; Saito, Takuro; Ise, Kazuya; Yamashita, Michitoshi; Sato, Yoshihiro; Saito, Takaharu; Tsukada, Manabu; Oshibe, Ikuro; Kenjo, Akira; Kimura, Takashi; Anazawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Shigeya; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2012-01-01

    Culture of islets prior to transplantation needs to be revisited for maintaining functional islet capacity. This study was conducted to compare cold UW (University of Wisconsin) preservation with conventional culture based on insulin secretory capacity in vitro and in vivo. Islets isolated from Wistar rats were either cultured for 24 h at 37°C in RPMI1640 medium or DMEM containing various concentrations of glucose or preserved for the same period in UW solution or in DMEM solution at 4°C. The islet yield in UW group, but not in other groups, was maintained as comparable with that of fresh islets. Insulin secretory capacity in response to glucose was maintained only in the islets of UW group, but not in other groups. SCID mice given 300 IEQ islets of UW group showed gradual restoration of normoglycemia as found in the mice given freshly isolated islets. Meanwhile, those mice given cultured islets for 24 h at 37°C in RPMI1640 medium showed rapid decrease of blood glucose levels on day 1 followed by relatively elevated levels on day 2, suggesting unstable insulin secretory capacity of islets.   Morphological staining with anti-HMGB1 (high mobility group B1) antibody revealed central damage of islets in all culture groups regardless of glucose concentration and in islets of cold DMEM group, whereas those in the UW group were quite intact. These results suggest that cold preservation in UW solution is simple and beneficial in protecting islets morphologically and functionally before transplantation.

  14. Enumeration of islets by nuclei counting and light microscopic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pisania, Anna; Papas, Klearchos K.; Powers, Daryl E.; Rappel, Michael J.; Omer, Abdulkadir; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.; Colton, Clark K.

    2010-01-01

    Islet enumeration in impure preparations by conventional dithizone staining and visual counting is inaccurate and operator dependent. We examined nuclei counting for measuring the total number of cells in islet preparations, and we combined it with morphological analysis by light microscopy (LM) for estimating the volume fraction of islets in impure preparations. Cells and islets were disrupted with lysis solution and shear, and accuracy of counting successively diluted nuclei suspensions was verified with: (1) visual counting in a hemacytometer after staining with crystal violet, and automatic counting by (2) aperture electrical resistance measurement and (3) flow cytometer measurement after staining with 7-aminoactinomycin-D. DNA content averaged 6.5 and 6.9 pg DNA/cell for rat and human islets, respectively, in agreement with literature estimates. With pure rat islet preparations, precision improved with increasing counts, and samples with about 160 or more islets provided a coefficient of variation of about 6%. Aliquots of human islet preparations were processed for LM analysis by stereological point counting. Total nuclei counts and islet volume fraction from LM analysis were combined to obtain the number of islet equivalents (IE). Total number of IE by the standard method of dithizone staining/manual counting was overestimated by about 90% compared to LM/nuclei counting for 12 freshly isolated human islet research preparations. Nuclei counting combined with islet volume fraction measurements from light microscopy is a novel method for achieving accurate islet enumeration. PMID:20697375

  15. IGF-I overexpression does not promote compensatory islet cell growth in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Katie; Dong, Jing; De Jesus, Kristine; Liu, Jun-Li

    2010-02-01

    Although IGF-I was known to stimulate the growth of pancreatic islet cells from early in vitro experiments and in vivo reports on rodents, recent gene targeting experiments have indicated that IGF-I and its receptor do not play a major role in normal islet cell growth. In our previous reports, liver- or pancreatic-specific IGF-I deficiency caused no decrease in β-cell mass; a general and β-cell-enriched IGF-I overexpression caused no change in normal islet cell growth. On the other hand, increased metabolic demands (such as in obesity and insulin resistance) result in β-cell compensation in cell number and insulin secretion. In order to test whether IGF-I could promote islet cell growth and facilitate islet compensation due to obesity-induced insulin resistance, we have challenged MT-IGF mice to a high-fat diet. After 28 weeks, both MT-IGF mice and wild-type littermates gained comparable 40-57% of body weight, with similar increases in fat masses; all mice maintained a normal sensitivity to insulin and did not become severely hyperglycemic. Nevertheless, compared to wild-type littermates, the equally obese MT-IGF mice maintained improved glucose tolerance and a diminished insulin level; similar to when fed a normal chow diet. More importantly, under IGF-I overexpression, there was no further increase in β-cell mass caused by obesity. Thus, IGF-I overexpression had no significant effect on weight gain and islet cell compensation in response to high-fat diet-induced obesity.

  16. Inhibitory effect of kisspeptins on insulin secretion from isolated mouse islets.

    PubMed

    Vikman, J; Ahrén, B

    2009-11-01

    Islet hormone secretion is regulated by a variety of factors, and many of these signal through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). A novel islet GPCR is GPR54, which couples to the Gq isoform of G proteins, which in turn signal through the phospholipase C pathway. Ligands for GPR54 are kisspeptins, which are peptides encoded in the KISS1 gene and also expressed in islet beta-cells. The KISS1 gene encodes a hydrophobic 145-amino acid protein that is cleaved into a 54-amino acid protein, kisspeptin-54 or KP54. Shorter kisspeptins also exist, such as kisspeptin-10 (KP10) and kisspeptin-13 (KP13). The involvement of GPR54 and kisspeptins in the regulation of islet function is not known. To address this problem, we incubated isolated mouse islets in the presence of KP13 and KP54 for 60 min and measured insulin secretion. We found that both KP13 and KP54 at 10 nM, 100 nM and 1microM inhibited insulin secretion in the presence of 2.8 mM glucose. However, by increasing the glucose concentration, this inhibitory action of the kisspeptins vanished. Thus, at 11.1 mM glucose, KP13 and KP54 inhibited insulin secretion only at high doses, and at 16.7 mM they no longer inhibited insulin secretion in any of the doses. We conclude that kisspeptins inhibit insulin secretion at glucose concentrations below 11.1 mM. This suggests that kisspeptins are regulating insulin secretion at physiological concentrations of glucose. The mechanisms by which kisspeptins regulate islet function and insulin secretion are unknown and will be further investigated.

  17. PACAP Inhibits β-cell Mass Expansion in a Mouse Model of Type II Diabetes: Persistent Suppressive Effects on Islet Density

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Shintani, Norihito; Sakurai, Yusuke; Higashi, Shintaro; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a potent insulinotropic G-protein-coupled receptor ligand, for which morphoregulative roles in pancreatic islets have recently been suggested. Here, we evaluated the effects of pancreatic overexpression of PACAP on morphometric changes of islets in a severe type II diabetes model. Following cross-breeding of obese-diabetic model KKAy mice with mice overexpressing PACAP in their pancreatic β-cells, the resulting KKAy mice with or without PACAP transgene (PACAP/+:Ay/+ or Ay/+ mice) were fed with a high-fat diet up to the age of 11 months. Pancreatic sections from 5- to 11-month-old littermates were examined. Histomorphometric analyses revealed significant suppression of islet mass expansion in PACAP/+:Ay/+ mice compared with Ay/+ mice at 11 months, but no significant difference between PACAP/+ and +/+ (wild-type) mice, as previously reported. The suppressed islet mass in PACAP/+:Ay/+ mice was due to a decrease in islet density but not islet size. In addition, the density of tiny islets (<0.001 mm2) and of insulin-positive clusters in ductal structures were markedly decreased in PACAP/+:Ay/+ mice compared with Ay/+ mice at 5 months of age. In contrast, PACAP overexpression caused no significant effects on the level of aldehyde-fuchsin reagent staining (a measure of β-cell granulation) or the volume and localization of glucagon-positive cells in the pancreas. These results support previously reported inhibitory effects of PACAP on pancreatic islet mass expansion, and suggest it has persistent suppressive effects on pancreatic islet density which may be related with ductal cell-associated islet neogenesis in type II diabetes. PMID:23483824

  18. PACAP Inhibits β-cell Mass Expansion in a Mouse Model of Type II Diabetes: Persistent Suppressive Effects on Islet Density.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Shintani, Norihito; Sakurai, Yusuke; Higashi, Shintaro; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a potent insulinotropic G-protein-coupled receptor ligand, for which morphoregulative roles in pancreatic islets have recently been suggested. Here, we evaluated the effects of pancreatic overexpression of PACAP on morphometric changes of islets in a severe type II diabetes model. Following cross-breeding of obese-diabetic model KKA(y) mice with mice overexpressing PACAP in their pancreatic β-cells, the resulting KKA(y) mice with or without PACAP transgene (PACAP/+:A(y)/+ or A(y)/+ mice) were fed with a high-fat diet up to the age of 11 months. Pancreatic sections from 5- to 11-month-old littermates were examined. Histomorphometric analyses revealed significant suppression of islet mass expansion in PACAP/+:A(y)/+ mice compared with A(y)/+ mice at 11 months, but no significant difference between PACAP/+ and +/+ (wild-type) mice, as previously reported. The suppressed islet mass in PACAP/+:A(y)/+ mice was due to a decrease in islet density but not islet size. In addition, the density of tiny islets (<0.001 mm(2)) and of insulin-positive clusters in ductal structures were markedly decreased in PACAP/+:A(y)/+ mice compared with A(y)/+ mice at 5 months of age. In contrast, PACAP overexpression caused no significant effects on the level of aldehyde-fuchsin reagent staining (a measure of β-cell granulation) or the volume and localization of glucagon-positive cells in the pancreas. These results support previously reported inhibitory effects of PACAP on pancreatic islet mass expansion, and suggest it has persistent suppressive effects on pancreatic islet density which may be related with ductal cell-associated islet neogenesis in type II diabetes.

  19. Xenin-25 potentiates glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide action via a novel cholinergic relay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wice, Burton M; Wang, Songyan; Crimmins, Dan L; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A; Althage, Matthew C; Ford, Eric L; Tran, Hung; Ohlendorf, Matthew; Griest, Terry A; Wang, Qiuling; Fisher, Simon J; Ladenson, Jack H; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2010-06-25

    The intestinal peptides GLP-1 and GIP potentiate glucose-mediated insulin release. Agents that increase GLP-1 action are effective therapies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, GIP action is blunted in T2DM, and GIP-based therapies have not been developed. Thus, it is important to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of GIP action. We developed mice lacking GIP-producing K cells. Like humans with T2DM, "GIP/DT" animals exhibited a normal insulin secretory response to exogenous GLP-1 but a blunted response to GIP. Pharmacologic doses of xenin-25, another peptide produced by K cells, restored the GIP-mediated insulin secretory response and reduced hyperglycemia in GIP/DT mice. Xenin-25 alone had no effect. Studies with islets, insulin-producing cell lines, and perfused pancreata indicated xenin-25 does not enhance GIP-mediated insulin release by acting directly on the beta-cell. The in vivo effects of xenin-25 to potentiate insulin release were inhibited by atropine sulfate and atropine methyl bromide but not by hexamethonium. Consistent with this, carbachol potentiated GIP-mediated insulin release from in situ perfused pancreata of GIP/DT mice. In vivo, xenin-25 did not activate c-fos expression in the hind brain or paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus indicating that central nervous system activation is not required. These data suggest that xenin-25 potentiates GIP-mediated insulin release by activating non-ganglionic cholinergic neurons that innervate the islets, presumably part of an enteric-neuronal-pancreatic pathway. Xenin-25, or molecules that increase acetylcholine receptor signaling in beta-cells, may represent a novel approach to overcome GIP resistance and therefore treat humans with T2DM.

  20. Canagliflozin potentiates GLP-1 secretion and lowers the peak of GIP secretion in rats fed a high-fat high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Hira, Tohru; Koga, Toshiki; Sasaki, Kazuyo; Hara, Hiroshi

    2017-10-14

    The glucose-induced secretion of incretins, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), is dependent on luminal glucose levels and transport of glucose via the sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) in the small intestine. Because GLP-1 and GIP function in decreasing and increasing the body weight, respectively, we aimed to analyze the effect of transient inhibition of SGLT1 by canagliflozin on incretin secretion in an obese rat model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained on a high-fat high-sucrose diet for 6-7 weeks, and plasma GLP-1 and GIP levels were measured during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). In addition, GLP-1 secretion was examined in a murine GLP-1 producing enteroendocrine cell line, GLUTag. Concomitant administration of 10 mg/kg canagliflozin with glucose loading suppressed glucose excursion, increased total GLP-1 levels, and reduced total GIP levels in systemic circulation, as revealed in the OGTT. Total and active GLP-1 levels were increased in portal blood, whereas total and active GIP levels tended to be decreased 15 min after the administration of canagliflozin with glucose. Canagliflozin (at 0.1-30 μM) did not directly affect release of GLP-1 in vitro. These results suggest that the oral administration of canagliflozin suppresses GIP secretion via the inhibition of SGLT1 in the upper part of the intestine and enhances GLP-1 secretion by increasing the glucose delivery to the lower part of the small intestine in an obese rodent model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sensing and Sensibility: Single-Islet-based Quality Control Assay of Cryopreserved Pancreatic Islets with Functionalized Hydrogel Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wanyu; Shu, Zhiquan; Gao, Dayong; Shen, Amy Q

    2016-01-21

    Despite decades of research and clinical studies of islet transplantations, finding simple yet reliable islet quality assays that correlate accurately with in vivo potency is still a major challenge, especially for real-time and single-islet-based quality assessment. Herein, proof-of-concept studies of a cryopreserved microcapsule-based quality control assays are presented for single islets. Individual rat pancreatic islets and fluorescent oxygen-sensitive dye (FOSD) are encapsulated in alginate hydrogel microcapsules via a microfluidic device. To test the susceptibility of the microcapsules and the FOSD to cryopreservation, the islet microcapsules containing FOSD are cryopreserved and the islet functionalities (adenosine triphosphate, static insulin release measurement, and oxygen consumption rate) are assessed after freezing and thawing steps. The cryopreserved islet capsules with FOSD remain functional after encapsulation and freezing/thawing procedures, validating a simple yet reliable individual-islet-based quality control method for the entire islet processing procedure prior to transplantation. This work also demonstrates that the functionality of cryopreserved islets can be improved by introducing trehalose into the routinely used cryoprotectant dimethyl sulfoxide. The functionalized alginate hydrogel microcapsules with embedded FOSD and optimized cryopreservation protocol presented in this work serve as a versatile islet quality assay and offer tremendous promise for tackling existing challenges in islet transplantation procedures.

  2. Sitagliptin decreases ventricular arrhythmias by attenuated glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP)-dependent resistin signalling in infarcted rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsung-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ting; Chang, Nen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) was associated with insulin resistance, in which resistin acts as a critical mediator. We aimed to determine whether sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, can attenuate arrhythmias by regulating resistin-dependent nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in postinfarcted rats. Normoglycaemic male Wistar rats after ligating coronary artery were randomized to either vehicle or sitagliptin for 4 weeks starting 24 h after operation. Post-infarction was associated with increased myocardial noradrenaline [norepinephrine (NE)] levels and sympathetic hyperinnervation. Compared with vehicle, sympathetic innervation was blunted after administering sitagliptin, as assessed by immunofluorescent analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase, growth-associated factor 43 and neurofilament and western blotting and real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NGF. Arrhythmic scores in the sitagliptin-treated infarcted rats were significantly lower than those in vehicle. Furthermore, sitagliptin was associated with reduced resistin expression and increased Akt activity. Ex vivo studies showed that glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) infusion, but not glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), produced similar reduction in resistin levels to sitagliptin in postinfarcted rats. Furthermore, the attenuated effects of sitagliptin on NGF levels can be reversed by wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase antagonist) and exogenous resistin infusion. Sitagliptin protects ventricular arrhythmias by attenuating sympathetic innervation in the non-diabetic infarcted rats. Sitagliptin attenuated resistin expression via the GIP-dependent pathway, which inhibited sympathetic innervation through a signalling pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt protein. PMID:26811539

  3. Sitagliptin decreases ventricular arrhythmias by attenuated glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP)-dependent resistin signalling in infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsung-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ting; Chang, Nen-Chung

    2016-01-25

    Myocardial infarction (MI) was associated with insulin resistance, in which resistin acts as a critical mediator. We aimed to determine whether sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, can attenuate arrhythmias by regulating resistin-dependent nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in postinfarcted rats. Normoglycaemic male Wistar rats after ligating coronary artery were randomized to either vehicle or sitagliptin for 4 weeks starting 24 h after operation. Post-infarction was associated with increased myocardial noradrenaline [norepinephrine (NE)] levels and sympathetic hyperinnervation. Compared with vehicle, sympathetic innervation was blunted after administering sitagliptin, as assessed by immunofluorescent analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase, growth-associated factor 43 and neurofilament and western blotting and real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NGF. Arrhythmic scores in the sitagliptin-treated infarcted rats were significantly lower than those in vehicle. Furthermore, sitagliptin was associated with reduced resistin expression and increased Akt activity. Ex vivo studies showed that glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) infusion, but not glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), produced similar reduction in resistin levels to sitagliptin in postinfarcted rats. Furthermore, the attenuated effects of sitagliptin on NGF levels can be reversed by wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase antagonist) and exogenous resistin infusion. Sitagliptin protects ventricular arrhythmias by attenuating sympathetic innervation in the non-diabetic infarcted rats. Sitagliptin attenuated resistin expression via the GIP-dependent pathway, which inhibited sympathetic innervation through a signalling pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt protein. © 2016 Authors.

  4. Assessing the effect of immunosuppression on engraftment of pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth; Hirakata, Atsushi; Shimizu, Akira; Okumi, Masayoshi; Tchipashvili, Vaja; Hong, Hanzhou; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Sachs, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In addition to ischemia and immunologic factors, immunosuppressive drugs have been suggested as a possible contributing factor to the loss of functional islets following allogeneic islet cell transplantation. Using our previously described islet-kidney transplantation model in miniature swine, we studied whether an islet toxic triple-drug immunosuppressive regimen (cyclosporine + azathioprine + prednisone) affects the islet engraftment process and thus long-term islet function. Design and Methods Donor animals underwent partial pancreatectomy, autologous islet preparation and injection of these islets under the autologous kidney capsule to prepare an islet-kidney (IK). Experimental animals received daily triple drug immunosuppression during the islet engraftment period. Control animals did not receive any immunosuppression during this period. Four to eight weeks later, these engrafted IK were transplanted across a minor histocompatibility mismatched barrier into pancreatectomized, nephrectomized recipient animals at an islet dose of ~ 4500 islet equivalents (IE)/kg recipient weight. Cyclosporine was administered for 12 days to the recipients to induce tolerance of the IK grafts and the animals were followed long-term. Results Diabetes was corrected by IK transplantation in all pancreatectomized recipients on both the control (n=3) and the experimental (n=4) arms of the study and all animals showed normal glucose regulation over the follow-up period. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests performed at 1, 2, > 3 months post-IK transplant showed essentially equivalent glycemic control in both control and experimental animals. Conclusion In this pre-clinical, in vivo large animal model of islet transplantation, the effect of triple drug immunosuppression on islet function does not negatively affect islet engraftment, as assessed by the long-term function of engrafted islets. PMID:23883972

  5. Pancreatic ductal perfusion at organ procurement enhances islet yield in human islet isolation.

    PubMed

    Takita, Morihito; Itoh, Takeshi; Shimoda, Masayuki; Kanak, Mazhar A; Shahbazov, Rauf; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Levy, Marlon F

    2014-11-01

    Pancreas preservation is a major factor influencing the results of islet cell transplantation. This study evaluated the effects of 2 different solutions for pancreatic ductal perfusion (PDP) at organ procurement. Eighteen human pancreases were assigned to 3 groups: non-PDP (control), PDP with ET-Kyoto solution, and PDP with cold storage/purification stock solution. Pancreatic islets were isolated according to the modified Ricordi method. No significant differences in donor characteristics, including cold ischemia time, were observed between the 3 groups. All islet isolations in the PDP groups had more than 400,000 islet equivalence in total islet yield after purification, a significant increase when compared with the control (P = 0.04 and P < 0.01). The islet quality assessments, including an in vivo diabetic nude mice assay and the response of high-mobility group box protein 1 to cytokine stimulation, also showed no significant differences. The proportion of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling-positive cells showing apoptosis in islets in the PDP groups was significantly lower than in the control group (P < 0.05). Both ET-Kyoto solution and cold storage/purification stock solution are suitable for PDP and consistently resulted in isolation success. Further studies with a larger number of pancreas donors should be done to compare the effects of the PDP solutions.

  6. Glucose cycling in islets from healthy and diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.; Chandramouli, V.; Ostenson, C.G.; Loew, H.L.; Landau, B.R.; Efendic, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Pancreatic islets from healthy (control) and neonatally streptozocin-induced diabetic (STZ-D) rats, a model for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, were incubated with {sup 3}H{sub 2}O and 5.5 or 16.7 mM glucose. At 5.5 mM glucose, no detectable ({sup 3}H)glucose was formed. At 16.7 mM, 2.2 patom.islet-1.h-1 of {sup 3}H was incorporated into glucose by the control islets and 5.4 patom.islet-1.h-1 by STZ-D islets. About 75% of the {sup 3}H was bound to carbon-2 of the glucose. Glucose utilization was 35.3 pmol.islet-1.h-1 by the control and 19.0 pmol.islet-1.h-1 by the STZ-D islets. Therefore, 4.5% of the glucose-6-phosphate formed by the control islets and 15.7% by the STZ-D islets was dephosphorylated. This presumably occurred in the beta-cells of the islets catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphatase. An increased glucose cycling, i.e., glucose----glucose-6-phosphate----glucose, in islets of STZ-D rats may contribute to the decreased insulin secretion found in these animals.

  7. Macroporous Three Dimensional PDMS Scaffolds for Extrahepatic Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Eileen; Brady, Ann-Christina; Fraker, Christopher A.; Molano, R. Damaris; Sukert, Steven; Berman, Dora M.; Kenyon, Norma S.; Pileggi, Antonello; Ricordi, Camillo; Stabler, Cherie L.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation has demonstrated success in treating type 1 diabetes. A current limitation is the intrahepatic portal vein transplant site, which is prone to mechanical stress and inflammation. Transplantation of pancreatic islets into alternative sites is preferable, but challenging, as it may require a three-dimensional vehicle to confer mechanical protection and to confine islets to a well-defined, retrievable space where islet neovascularization can occur. We have fabricated biostable, macroporous scaffolds from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and investigated islet retention and distribution, metabolic function, and glucose-dependent insulin secretion within these materials. Islets from multiple sources, including rodents, non-human primates, and humans, were tested in vitro. We observed high islet retention and distribution within PDMS scaffolds, with retention of small islets (< 100 µm) improved through the post-loading addition of fibrin gel. Islets loaded within PDMS scaffolds exhibited viability and function comparable to standard culture conditions when incubated under normal oxygen tensions, but displayed improved viability compared to standard two-dimensional culture controls under low oxygen tensions. In vivo efficacy of scaffolds to support islet grafts was evaluated after transplantation in the omental pouch of chemically-induced diabetic syngeneic rats, which promptly achieved normoglycemia. Collectively, these results are promising in that they indicate the potential for transplanting islets into a clinically relevant, extrahepatic site that provides spatial distribution of islets, as well as intra-device vascularization. PMID:23031502

  8. Endogenous GLP-1 as a key self-defense molecule against lipotoxicity in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenghu; Yuan, Li; Cao, Shuyi

    2015-07-01

    The number of pro-α cells is known to increase in response to β cell injury and these cells then generate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), thus attenuating the development of diabetes. The aim of the present study was to further examine the role and the mechanisms responsible for intra-islet GLP-1 production as a self-protective response against lipotoxicity. The levels of the key enzyme, prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), as well as the synthesis and release of GLP-1 in models of lipotoxicity were measured. Furthermore, islet viability, apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as islet structure were assessed after altering GLP-1 receptor signaling. Both prolonged exposure to palmitate and a high-fat diet facilitated PC1/3 expression, as well as the synthesis and release of GLP-1 induced by β cell injury and the generation of pro-α cells. Prolonged exposure to palmitate increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), partially prevented the detrimental effects induced by palmitate on β cells, resulting in decreased GLP-1 levels. Furthermore, the inhibition of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling by treatment with exendin‑(9-39) further decreased cell viability, increased cell apoptosis and caused a stronger inhibition of the β cell-specific transcription factor, pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1). Moreover, treatment with the GLP-1R agonist, liraglutide, normalized islet structure and function, resulting in a decrease in cell death and in the amelioration of β cell marker expression. Importantly, liraglutide maintained the oxidative balance and decreased inflammatory factor and p65 expression. Overall, our data demonstrate that an increase in the number of pro-α cells and the activation of the intra-islet GLP-1 system comprise a self-defense mechanism for enhancing β cell survival to combat lipid overload, which is in part mediated by oxidative stress and inflammation.

  9. Temporal and Regional Expression of Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Peptide and Its Receptor in Spinal Cord Injured Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Ana Beatriz W.; Forner, Stefania; Martini, Alessandra C.; Patrício, Eliziane S.; Clarke, Julia R.; Costa, Robson; Felix-Alves, João; Vieira, Vilberto José; de Andrade, Edinéia Lemos; Mazzuco, Tânia Longo; Calixto, João Batista

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of movement, sensibility, and autonomic control at the level of the lesion and at lower parts of the body. Several experimental strategies have been used in attempts to increase endogenous mechanisms of neuroprotection, neuroplasticity, and repair, but with limited success. It is known that glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and its receptor (GIPR) can enhance synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis, and axonal outgrowth. However, their role in the injury has never been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in expression levels of both GIP and GIPR in acute and chronic phases of SCI in rats. Following SCI (2 to 24 h after damage), the rat spinal cord showed a lesion in which the epicenter had a cavity with hemorrhage and necrosis. Furthermore, the lesion cavity also showed ballooned cells 14 and 28 days after injury. We found that SCI induced increases in GIPR expression in areas neighboring the site of injury at 6 h and 28 days after the injury. Moreover, higher GIP expression was observed in these regions on day 28. Neuronal projections from the injury epicenter showed an increase in GIP immunoreactivity 24 h and 14 and 28 days after SCI. Interestingly, GIP was also found in progenitor cells at the spinal cord canal 24 h after injury, whereas both GIP and GIPR were present in progenitor cells at the injury epicenter 14 days after in SCI animals. These results suggest that GIP and its receptor might be implicated with neurogenesis and the repair process after SCI. PMID:26421658

  10. Temporal and Regional Expression of Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Peptide and Its Receptor in Spinal Cord Injured Rats.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ana Beatriz W; Forner, Stefania; Martini, Alessandra C; Patrício, Eliziane S; Clarke, Julia R; Costa, Robson; Felix-Alves, João; Vieira, Vilberto José; de Andrade, Edinéia Lemos; Mazzuco, Tânia Longo; Calixto, João Batista; Figueiredo, Claudia Pinto

    2016-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of movement, sensibility, and autonomic control at the level of the lesion and at lower parts of the body. Several experimental strategies have been used in attempts to increase endogenous mechanisms of neuroprotection, neuroplasticity, and repair, but with limited success. It is known that glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and its receptor (GIPR) can enhance synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis, and axonal outgrowth. However, their role in the injury has never been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in expression levels of both GIP and GIPR in acute and chronic phases of SCI in rats. Following SCI (2 to 24 h after damage), the rat spinal cord showed a lesion in which the epicenter had a cavity with hemorrhage and necrosis. Furthermore, the lesion cavity also showed ballooned cells 14 and 28 days after injury. We found that SCI induced increases in GIPR expression in areas neighboring the site of injury at 6 h and 28 days after the injury. Moreover, higher GIP expression was observed in these regions on day 28. Neuronal projections from the injury epicenter showed an increase in GIP immunoreactivity 24 h and 14 and 28 days after SCI. Interestingly, GIP was also found in progenitor cells at the spinal cord canal 24 h after injury, whereas both GIP and GIPR were present in progenitor cells at the injury epicenter 14 days after in SCI animals. These results suggest that GIP and its receptor might be implicated with neurogenesis and the repair process after SCI.

  11. Magnetic resonance-defined periportal steatosis following intraportal islet transplantation: a functional footprint of islet graft survival?

    PubMed

    Markmann, James F; Rosen, Mark; Siegelman, Evan S; Soulen, Michael C; Deng, Shaoping; Barker, Clyde F; Naji, Ali

    2003-07-01

    There is growing interest in more widespread application of isolated islet transplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes; however, the sequelae of long-term islet residence within the liver are unknown. We report herein a consequence of intraportal islet transplantation, specifically the development of periportal hepatic steatosis apparently induced by the local secretion of insulin within the liver.

  12. Extensive Loss of Islet Mass Beyond the First Day After Intraportal Human Islet Transplantation in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Liljebäck, Hanna; Grapensparr, Liza; Olerud, Johan; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation is characterized by a progressive deterioration of islet graft function, which renders many patients once again dependent on exogenous insulin administration within a couple of years. In this study, we aimed to investigate possible engraftment factors limiting the survival and viability of experimentally transplanted human islets beyond the first day after their transplantation to the liver. Human islets were transplanted into the liver of nude mice and characterized 1 or 30 days after transplantation by immunohistochemistry. The factors assessed were endocrine mass, cellular death, hypoxia, vascular density and amyloid formation in the transplanted islets. One day posttransplantation, necrotic cells, as well as apoptotic cells, were commonly observed. In contrast to necrotic death, apoptosis rates remained high 1 month posttransplantation, and the total islet mass was reduced by more than 50% between 1 and 30 days posttransplantation. Islet mass at 30 days posttransplantation correlated negatively to apoptotic death. Vascular density within the transplanted islets remained less than 30% of that in native human islets up to 30 days posttransplantation and was associated with prevailing hypoxia. Amyloid formation was rarely observed in the 1-day-old transplants, but was commonly observed in the 30-day-old islet transplants. We conclude that substantial islet cell death occurs beyond the immediate posttransplantation phase, particularly through apoptotic events. Concomitant low vascularization with prevailing hypoxia and progressive amyloid development was observed in the human islet grafts. Strategies to improve engraftment at the intraportal site or change of implantation site in the clinical setting are needed.

  13. Inhibition of TLR4 protects rat islets against lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ge, Qin Min; Bian, Fan; Dong, Yan; Huang, Chun Mei

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress leads to dysfunction in pancreatic cells, causing a reduction in insulin secretion following exposure to glucose. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) may be activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stress. TLR4 may mediate the initiation of inflammatory and immune defense responses; however, the importance of the LPS/TLR4 interaction in apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in pancreatic β cells remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the importance of TLR4 during LPS‑induced oxidative stress, apoptosis and dysfunction of insulin secretion in isolated islets of rats. LPS‑induced stimulation of TLR4 increased the production of reactive oxygen species and promoted apoptosis by upregulating the expression levels of caspase‑3, poly ADP ribose polymerase and altering the expression ratio of B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2)/Bcl‑2 associated X protein. Additionally, the insulin secretion of islets cells was reduced. Anti‑TLR4 antibody and a knockdown of TLR4 by TLR4‑short hairpin RNA were used to inhibit TLR4 activity, which may reverse LPS‑induced events. The present study determined that in islets exposed to LPS oxidative stress, dysfunction may be partly mediated via the TLR4 pathway. Inhibition of TLR4 may prevent dysfunction of rat islets due to oxidative stress. The present study revealed that targeting the LPS/TLR4 signaling pathway and antioxidant therapy may be a novel treatment for the severely septic patients with hyperglycemia stress.

  14. Disruption of CR6-interacting factor-1 (CRIF1) in mouse islet beta cells leads to mitochondrial diabetes with progressive beta cell failure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Kyung; Joung, Kyong Hye; Ryu, Min Jeong; Kim, Soung Jung; Kim, Hyeongseok; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Seong Eun; Choi, Min Jeong; Chang, Joon Young; Hong, Hyun Jung; Kim, Koon Soon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Kim, Hail; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jin; Shong, Minho

    2015-04-01

    Although mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) dysfunction is believed to be responsible for beta cell dysfunction in insulin resistance and mitochondrial diabetes, the mechanisms underlying progressive beta cell failure caused by defective mitochondrial OxPhos are largely unknown. We examined the in vivo phenotypes of beta cell dysfunction in beta cell-specific Crif1 (also known as Gadd45gip1)-deficient mice. CR6-interacting factor-1 (CRIF1) is a mitochondrial protein essential for the synthesis and formation of the OxPhos complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Crif1(beta-/-) mice exhibited impaired glucose tolerance with defective insulin secretion as early as 4 weeks of age without defects in islet structure. At 11 weeks of age, Crif1(beta-/-) mice displayed characteristic ultrastructural mitochondrial abnormalities as well as severe glucose intolerance. Furthermore, islet area and insulin content was decreased by approximately 50% compared with wild-type mice. Treatment with the glucoregulatory drug exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, was not sufficient to preserve beta cell function in Crif1(beta-/-) mice. Our results indicate that mitochondrial OxPhos dysfunction triggers progressive beta cell failure that is not halted by treatment with a GLP-1 agonist. The Crif1(beta-/-) mouse is a useful model for the study of beta cell failure caused by mitochondrial OxPhos dysfunction.

  15. Pancreatic Islets: Methods for Isolation and Purification of Juvenile and Adult Pig Islets.

    PubMed

    Brandhorst, Heide; Johnson, Paul R V; Brandhorst, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The current situation of organ transplantation is mainly determined by the disbalance between the number of available organs and the number of patients on the waiting list. This obvious dilemma might be solved by the transplantation of porcine organs into human patients. The metabolic similarities which exist between both species made pancreatic islets of Langerhans to that donor tissue which will be most likely transplanted in human recipients. Nevertheless, the successful isolation of significant yields of viable porcine islets is extremely difficult and requires extensive experiences in the field. This review is focussing on the technical challenges, pitfalls and particularities that are associated with the isolation of islets from juvenile and adult pigs considering donor variables that can affect porcine islet isolation outcome.

  16. Response of incretins (GIP and GLP-1) to an oral glucose load in female and male subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiro; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Ikawa, Takashi; Akagami, Takafumi; Murai, Kazuki; Miuchi, Masayuki; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the blood glucose profile and the response of incretins in healthy young subjects by the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We first reported that plasma glucose and GIP levels were higher in males during the early phase of the OGTT.

  17. Clinical Allogeneic and Autologous Islet Cell Transplantation: Update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is categorized as a β-cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients who lack the ability to secrete insulin. Allogeneic islet cell transplantation is for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, and autologous islet cell transplantation is for the prevention of surgical diabetes after a total pancreatectomy. The issues of allogeneic islet cell transplantation include poor efficacy of islet isolation, the need for multiple donor pancreata, difficulty maintaining insulin independence and undesirable side effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Those issues have been solved step by step and allogeneic islet cell transplantation is almost ready to be the standard therapy. The donor shortage will be the next issue and marginal and/or living donor islet cell transplantation might alleviate the issue. Xeno-islet cell transplantation, β-cell regeneration from human stem cells and gene induction of the naïve pancreas represent the next generation of β-cell replacement therapy. Autologous islet cell transplantation after total pancreatectomy for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis with severe abdominal pain is the standard therapy, even though only limited centers are able to perform this treatment. Remote center autologous islet cell transplantation is an attractive option for hospitals performing total pancreatectomies without the proper islet isolation facilities. PMID:21785738

  18. Microwell Scaffolds for the Extrahepatic Transplantation of Islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Buitinga, Mijke; Truckenmüller, Roman; Engelse, Marten A.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Ten Hoopen, Hetty W. M.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; de Koning, Eelco JP.; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Karperien, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic islet transplantation into the liver has the potential to restore normoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes. However, the suboptimal microenvironment for islets in the liver is likely to be involved in the progressive islet dysfunction that is often observed post-transplantation. This study validates a novel microwell scaffold platform to be used for the extrahepatic transplantation of islet of Langerhans. Scaffolds were fabricated from either a thin polymer film or an electrospun mesh of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) block copolymer (composition: 4000PEOT30PBT70) and were imprinted with microwells, ∼400 µm in diameter and ∼350 µm in depth. The water contact angle and water uptake were 39±2° and 52.1±4.0 wt%, respectively. The glucose flux through electrospun scaffolds was three times higher than for thin film scaffolds, indicating enhanced nutrient diffusion. Human islets cultured in microwell scaffolds for seven days showed insulin release and insulin content comparable to those of free-floating control islets. Islet morphology and insulin and glucagon expression were maintained during culture in the microwell scaffolds. Our results indicate that the microwell scaffold platform prevents islet aggregation by confinement of individual islets in separate microwells, preserves the islet’s native rounded morphology, and provides a protective environment without impairing islet functionality, making it a promising platform for use in extrahepatic islet transplantation. PMID:23737999

  19. Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptide: A Novel Regulator of Islet Function, Islet Regeneration, and Selected Gut Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pound, Lynley D; Patrick, Christopher; Eberhard, Chandra E; Mottawea, Walid; Wang, Gen-Sheng; Abujamel, Turki; Vandenbeek, Roxanne; Stintzi, Alain; Scott, Fraser W

    2015-12-01

    Cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) is a naturally occurring secreted peptide that is expressed in several organs with pleiotropic roles in immunomodulation, wound healing, and cell growth. We previously demonstrated that gut Camp expression is upregulated when type 1 diabetes-prone rats are protected from diabetes development. Unexpectedly, we have also identified novel CAMP expression in the pancreatic β-cells of rats, mice, and humans. CAMP was present even in sterile rat embryo islets, germ-free adult rat islets, and neogenic tubular complexes. Camp gene expression was downregulated in young BBdp rat islets before the onset of insulitis compared with control BBc rats. CAMP treatment of dispersed islets resulted in a significant increase in intracellular calcium mobilization, an effect that was both delayed and blunted in the absence of extracellular calcium. Additionally, CAMP treatment promoted insulin and glucagon secretion from isolated rat islets. Thus, CAMP is a promoter of islet paracrine signaling that enhances islet function and glucoregulation. Finally, daily treatment with the CAMP/LL-37 peptide in vivo in BBdp rats resulted in enhanced β-cell neogenesis and upregulation of potentially beneficial gut microbes. In particular, CAMP/LL-37 treatment shifted the abundance of specific bacterial populations, mitigating the gut dysbiosis observed in the BBdp rat. Taken together, these findings indicate a novel functional role for CAMP/LL-37 in islet biology and modification of gut microbiota. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Pancreatic islet cell therapy for type I diabetes: understanding the effects of glucose stimulation on islets in order to produce better islets for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Ping; Wang, Ena; Liu, Eric; Harlan, David M; Li, Xin; Stroncek, David F

    2007-01-03

    While insulin replacement remains the cornerstone treatment for type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM), the transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans has the potential to become an important alternative. And yet, islet transplant therapy is limited by several factors, including far too few donor pancreases. Attempts to expand mature islets or to produce islets from stem cells are far from clinical application. The production and expansion of the insulin-producing cells within the islet (so called beta cells), or even creating cells that secrete insulin under appropriate physiological control, has proven difficult. The difficulty is explained, in part, because insulin synthesis and release is complex, unique, and not entirely characterized. Understanding beta-cell function at the molecular level will likely facilitate the development of techniques to manufacture beta-cells from stem cells. We will review islet transplantation, as well as the mechanisms underlying insulin transcription, translation and glucose stimulated insulin release.

  1. Glucose Oscillations Can Activate an Endogenous Oscillator in Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Joseph P; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Mukhitov, Nikita; Roper, Michael G; Bertram, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic islets manage elevations in blood glucose level by secreting insulin into the bloodstream in a pulsatile manner. Pulsatile insulin secretion is governed by islet oscillations such as bursting electrical activity and periodic Ca2+ entry in β-cells. In this report, we demonstrate that although islet oscillations are lost by fixing a glucose stimulus at a high concentration, they may be recovered by subsequently converting the glucose stimulus to a sinusoidal wave. We predict with mathematical modeling that the sinusoidal glucose signal's ability to recover islet oscillations depends on its amplitude and period, and we confirm our predictions by conducting experiments with islets using a microfluidics platform. Our results suggest a mechanism whereby oscillatory blood glucose levels recruit non-oscillating islets to enhance pulsatile insulin output from the pancreas. Our results also provide support for the main hypothesis of the Dual Oscillator Model, that a glycolytic oscillator endogenous to islet β-cells drives pulsatile insulin secretion.

  2. Using selective withdrawal to encapsulate pancreatic islets for immunoisolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Jason; Murphy, William; Mrksich, Milan

    2005-11-01

    We apply selective-withdrawal for encapsulating insulin-producing pancreatic islets within thin poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coats. Islets placed in an aqueous PEG solution are drawn into the selective-withdrawal spout which then breaks up, leaving the islets surrounded by a thin, 20μm, polymer coat. These coats, whose thickness is independent of the size of the encapsulated islet, are photo-crosslinked to form hydrogel capsules. We can apply multiple coats of varying chemical composition. These coats provide a semi-permeable membrane which allows the islets to respond to changes in glucose concentration by producing insulin in a manner similar to that of unencapsulated islets. Furthermore, the hydrogel capsules exclude large molecules the size of the smallest antibodies. Our results suggest that this microencapsulation technique may be useful for the transplantation of islets for treatment of Type I diabetes.

  3. Pancreatic Ductal Perfusion at Organ Procurement Enhances Islet Yield in Human Islet Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Kanak, Mazhar A.; Shahbazov, Rauf; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Levy, Marlon F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pancreas preservation is a major factor influencing the results of islet cell transplantation. This study evaluated the effects of two different solutions for pancreatic ductal perfusion (PDP) at organ procurement. Methods Eighteen human pancreases were assigned to three groups: non-PDP (control), PDP with ET-Kyoto solution, and PDP with cold storage/purification stock solution. Pancreatic islets were isolated according to the modified Ricordi method. Results No significant differences in donor characteristics, including cold ischemia time, were observed between the three groups. All islet isolations in the PDP groups had >400,000 IEQ in total islet yield post-purification, a significant increase when compared with the control (P = 0.04 and <0.01). The islet quality assessments—including an in vivo diabetic nude mice assay and the response of high-mobility group box protein 1 to cytokine stimulation—also showed no significant differences. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells showing apoptosis in islets in the PDP groups was significantly lower than in the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Both ET-Kyoto solution and cold storage/purification stock solution are suitable for PDP and consistently resulted in isolation success. Further studies with a larger number of pancreas donors should be done to compare the effects of the PDP solutions. PMID:25058879

  4. The influence of porcine pancreas digestion parameters and islet histomorphology on islet isolation outcome.

    PubMed

    Kinasiewicz, J; Sabat, M; Antosiak-Iwańska, M; Godlewska, E; Sitarek, E; Orłowski, T

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of the pig islets of Langerhans is considered as the future treatment for patients suffering from type I diabetes mellitus. Despite the adaptation of modified Ricordi method and highly purified collagenase, the results of pancreas digestions are precarious. Selection of proper donor and optimal digestion procedure are fundamental. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of pancreas procuring parameters on pig islets yield. The pancreata were harvested from 69 market sows weighting over 150 kg. After intraductal injection of cold collagenase solution pancreata were transported in UW solution or under conditions of two layer method (TLM). In laboratory pancreata were digested at 37 degrees C according to Ricordi isolation method or stationary in the bottle. The particular parameters of isolation procedure were considered as substantial. Pig weight, volume of infused collagenase solution, TLM application and pancreas dividing before digestion positively affected islet yield. Additionally, the influence of pancreatic islet tissue histomorphology on isolation outcome was studied. Proper donor selection as well as adequate digestion parameters could improve pig islet recovery during islet isolation.

  5. Islets of stability beyond period doubling

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, R.S.

    1981-11-01

    Period doubling of a periodic orbit of an area preserving map appears to lead to the elimination of all closed invariant curves in the vicinity. We show, however, that there are always islets of stabilhty again beyond the accumulation point of the period doubling sequence.

  6. Engineering biomimetic materials for islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ethan Y; Kronenfeld, Joshua P; Stabler, Cherie L

    2015-01-01

    A closed-loop system that provides both the sensing of glucose and the appropriate dosage of insulin could dramatically improve treatment options for insulin-dependent diabetics. The intrahepatic implantation of allogeneic islets has the potential to provide this intimate control, by transplanting the very cells that have this inherent sensing and secretion capacity. Limiting islet transplantation, however, is the significant loss and dysfunction of islets following implantation, due to the poor engraftment environment and significant immunological attack. In this review, we outline approaches that seek to address these challenges via engineering biomimetic materials. These materials can serve to mimic natural processes that work toward improving engraftment, minimizing inflammation, and directing immunological responses. Biomimetic materials can serve to house cells, recapitulate native microenvironments, release therapeutic agents in a physiological manner, and/or present agents to direct cells towards desired responses. By integrating these approaches, superior platforms capable of improving long-term engraftment and acceptance of transplanted islets are on the horizon.

  7. Improvement of pancreatic islet cell isolation for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hirofumi; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Onaca, Nicolas; Jackson, Andrew; Nobuyo, Hatanaka; Teru, Okitsu; Naoya, Kobayashi; Klintmalm, Göran; Levy, Marlon

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising treatment for diabetes but still faces several challenges. Poor islet isolation efficiency and poor long-term insulin independence are currently two major issues, although donor shortage and the need for immunosuppressants also need to be addressed. We established the Kyoto islet isolation method (KIIM), which has enabled us to isolate and transplant islets even from non–heart-beating donors. KIIM involves 1) cooling the donor pancreas in situ, 2) preserving the ducts with modified Kyoto solution, 3) using a modified two-layer pancreas preservation method, and 4) adjusting the density of the density gradient centrifugation and using an iodixanol-based solution for purification. KIIM has enabled us to transplant 17 islet preparations out of 21 isolations (an 81% success rate). All transplanted islets functioned, and all transplanted patients had improved glycemic control without hypoglycemic unawareness. Recently, we used KIIM for islet isolation from a brain-dead donor at Baylor, which resulted in a very high islet yield (789,984 IE) with high viability (100% by fluorescein diacetate/propidium iodide staining and a stimulation index of 4.7). This preliminary evidence suggests that KIIM may also be promising for islet isolation from brain-dead donors. In addition, to assess engrafted islet mass, we developed a secretory unit of islet transplant objects (SUITO) index: fasting C-peptide (ng/dL) / [fasting blood glucose (mg/dL) – 63] × 1500. This simple index has enabled us to monitor the engrafted islet mass. This index should be useful when deciding whether to perform additional islet transplantations to maintain insulin independence. Poor islet isolation efficacy and poor long-term results could be resolved with ongoing research. PMID:17948109

  8. 3-D Imaging Reveals Participation of Donor Islet Schwann Cells and Pericytes in Islet Transplantation and Graft Neurovascular Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Peng, Shih-Jung; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    The primary cells that participate in islet transplantation are the endocrine cells. However, in the islet microenvironment, the endocrine cells are closely associated with the neurovascular tissues consisting of the Schwann cells and pericytes, which form sheaths/barriers at the islet exterior and interior borders. The two cell types have shown their plasticity in islet injury, but their roles in transplantation remain unclear. In this research, we applied 3-dimensional neurovascular histology with cell tracing to reveal the participation of Schwann cells and pericytes in mouse islet transplantation. Longitudinal studies of the grafts under the kidney capsule identify that the donor Schwann cells and pericytes re-associate with the engrafted islets at the peri-graft and perivascular domains, respectively, indicating their adaptability in transplantation. Based on the morphological proximity and cellular reactivity, we propose that the new islet microenvironment should include the peri-graft Schwann cell sheath and perivascular pericytes as an integral part of the new tissue.

  9. Kyoto islet isolation method: the optimized one for non-heart-beating donors with highly efficient islet retrieval.

    PubMed

    Okitsu, T; Matsumoto, S; Iwanaga, Y; Noguchi, H; Nagata, H; Yonekawa, Y; Maekawa, T; Tanaka, K

    2005-10-01

    The availability of pancreata for clinical cadaveric islet transplantation is restricted to non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs) in Japan. This forced us to modify the current standard islet isolation protocol that was made up for brain-dead donors and make it suitable for NHBDs. The Kyoto islet isolation method is the one with induction of several steps based on the ideas both already reported literally and invented originally by ourselves. Using this islet isolation method, we isolated islets from 13 human pancreata of NHBDs and transplanted 11 preparations to six type-1 diabetic patients. The rate to meet release criteria of Edmonton protocol was 84.6%. Establishment of this method allowed us to begin a clinical islet transplantation program in Japan and to continue to perform the preparation of islets from NHBDs with high rate to meet the release criteria of the Edmonton protocol.

  10. Plasma glucose kinetics and response of insulin and GIP following a cereal breakfast in female subjects: effect of starch digestibility

    PubMed Central

    Péronnet, F; Meynier, A; Sauvinet, V; Normand, S; Bourdon, E; Mignault, D; St-Pierre, D H; Laville, M; Rabasa-Lhoret, R; Vinoy, S

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Foods with high contents of slowly digestible starch (SDS) elicit lower glycemic responses than foods with low contents of SDS but there has been debate on the underlying changes in plasma glucose kinetics, that is, respective contributions of the increase in the rates of appearance and disappearance of plasma glucose (RaT and RdT), and of the increase in the rate of appearance of exogenous glucose (RaE) and decrease in endogenous glucose production (EGP). Subjects/Methods: Sixteen young healthy females ingested in random order four types of breakfasts: an extruded cereal (0.3% SDS: Lo-SDS breakfast) or one of three biscuits (39–45% SDS: Hi-SDS breakfasts). The flour in the cereal products was labeled with 13C, and plasma glucose kinetics were measured using [6,6-2H2]glucose infusion, along with the response of plasma glucose, insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) concentrations. Results: When compared with the Lo-SDS breakfast, after the three Hi-SDS breakfasts, excursions in plasma glucose, the response of RaE, RaT and RdT, and the reduction in EGP were significantly lower (P<0.05). The amount of exogenous glucose absorbed over the 4.5-h postprandial period was also significantly lower by ~31% (P<0.001). These differences were associated with lower responses of GIP and insulin concentrations. Conclusions: Substituting extruded cereals with biscuits slows down the availability of glucose from the breakfast and its appearance in peripheral circulation, blunts the changes in plasma glucose kinetics and homeostasis, reduces excursions in plasma glucose, and possibly distributes the glucose ingested over a longer period following the meal. PMID:25852025

  11. Plasma glucose kinetics and response of insulin and GIP following a cereal breakfast in female subjects: effect of starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Péronnet, F; Meynier, A; Sauvinet, V; Normand, S; Bourdon, E; Mignault, D; St-Pierre, D H; Laville, M; Rabasa-Lhoret, R; Vinoy, S

    2015-06-01

    Foods with high contents of slowly digestible starch (SDS) elicit lower glycemic responses than foods with low contents of SDS but there has been debate on the underlying changes in plasma glucose kinetics, that is, respective contributions of the increase in the rates of appearance and disappearance of plasma glucose (RaT and RdT), and of the increase in the rate of appearance of exogenous glucose (RaE) and decrease in endogenous glucose production (EGP). Sixteen young healthy females ingested in random order four types of breakfasts: an extruded cereal (0.3% SDS: Lo-SDS breakfast) or one of three biscuits (39-45% SDS: Hi-SDS breakfasts). The flour in the cereal products was labeled with (13)C, and plasma glucose kinetics were measured using [6,6-(2)H2]glucose infusion, along with the response of plasma glucose, insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) concentrations. When compared with the Lo-SDS breakfast, after the three Hi-SDS breakfasts, excursions in plasma glucose, the response of RaE, RaT and RdT, and the reduction in EGP were significantly lower (P<0.05). The amount of exogenous glucose absorbed over the 4.5-h postprandial period was also significantly lower by ~31% (P<0.001). These differences were associated with lower responses of GIP and insulin concentrations. Substituting extruded cereals with biscuits slows down the availability of glucose from the breakfast and its appearance in peripheral circulation, blunts the changes in plasma glucose kinetics and homeostasis, reduces excursions in plasma glucose, and possibly distributes the glucose ingested over a longer period following the meal.

  12. Suppression of ROS Production by Exendin-4 in PSC Attenuates the High Glucose-Induced Islet Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Won; Park, Shin-Young; You, Young-Hye; Ham, Dong-Sik; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yang, Hae Kyung; Jeong, In-Kyung; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a major role to fibrotic islet destruction observed in diabetic patients and animal model of diabetes. Exendin-4 (Ex-4) is a potent insulinotropic agent and has been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, there have been no reports demonstrating the effects of Ex-4 on pancreatic islet fibrosis. In this study, Ex-4 treatment clearly attenuated fibrotic islet destruction and improved glucose tolerance and islet survival. GLP-1 receptor expression was upregulated during activation and proliferation of PSCs by hyperglycemia. The activation of PKA pathway by Ex-4 plays a role in ROS production and angiotensin II (Ang II) production. Exposure to high glucose stimulated ERK activation and Ang II-TGF- β1 production in PSCs. Interestingly, Ex-4 significantly reduced Ang II and TGF-β1 production by inhibition of ROS production but not ERK phosphorylation. Ex-4 may be useful not only as an anti-diabetic agent but also as an anti-fibrotic agent in type 2 diabetes due to its ability to inhibit PSC activation and proliferation and improve islet fibrosis in OLETF rats. PMID:27977690

  13. Experimental studies on islets isolation, purification and function in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xinlu; Xue, Wujun; Feng, Xinshun; Tian, Xiaohui; Teng, Yan; Ding, Xiaoming; Pan, Xiaoming; Guo, Qi; He, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    To develop a simple and effective method of islet isolation and purification in rats. Collagenase P was injected into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath to digest the pancreas and isolate islet, then discontinuous gravity gradient purification was used to purify the islet. The purified islets were identified by dithizone staining. The viability of islets was assessed by fluorescence staining of acridine orange (AO) and propidium iodide (PI). The function of purified islets was determined by glucose-stimulated insulin release test and transplantation of rat with streptozocin-induced diabetes. 738±193 islets were recovered after purification. The average purity was 77±13%, the viability of islets was more than 95%. When inspected by glucose stimulation, the secreted insulin concentration was 24.31±5.47 mIU/L when stimulated by low concentration glucose and 37.62±4.29 mIU/L by high concentration glucose. There was significant difference between the two phases (P<0.05). The blood sugar concentration recovered to normal level after two days in the animals with islet transplantation. In conclusion, islets can be procured with good function and shape by using the method of injecting collagenase into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath and purification using discontinuous gravity gradient.

  14. Experimental studies on islets isolation, purification and function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xinlu; Xue, Wujun; Feng, Xinshun; Tian, Xiaohui; Teng, Yan; Ding, Xiaoming; Pan, Xiaoming; Guo, Qi; He, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    To develop a simple and effective method of islet isolation and purification in rats. Collagenase P was injected into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath to digest the pancreas and isolate islet, then discontinuous gravity gradient purification was used to purify the islet. The purified islets were identified by dithizone staining. The viability of islets was assessed by fluorescence staining of acridine orange (AO) and propidium iodide (PI). The function of purified islets was determined by glucose-stimulated insulin release test and transplantation of rat with streptozocin-induced diabetes. 738±193 islets were recovered after purification. The average purity was 77±13%, the viability of islets was more than 95%. When inspected by glucose stimulation, the secreted insulin concentration was 24.31±5.47 mIU/L when stimulated by low concentration glucose and 37.62±4.29 mIU/L by high concentration glucose. There was significant difference between the two phases (P<0.05). The blood sugar concentration recovered to normal level after two days in the animals with islet transplantation. In conclusion, islets can be procured with good function and shape by using the method of injecting collagenase into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath and purification using discontinuous gravity gradient. PMID:26885021

  15. Microfluidic platform for assessing pancreatic islet functionality through dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heileman, K; Daoud, J; Hasilo, C; Gasparrini, M; Paraskevas, S; Tabrizian, M

    2015-07-01

    Human pancreatic islets are seldom assessed for dynamic responses to external stimuli. Thus, the elucidation of human islet functionality would provide insights into the progression of diabetes mellitus, evaluation of preparations for clinical transplantation, as well as for the development of novel therapeutics. The objective of this study was to develop a microfluidic platform for in vitro islet culture, allowing the multi-parametric investigation of islet response to chemical and biochemical stimuli. This was accomplished through the fabrication and implementation of a microfluidic platform that allowed the perifusion of islet culture while integrating real-time monitoring using impedance spectroscopy, through microfabricated, interdigitated electrodes located along the microchamber arrays. Real-time impedance measurements provide important dielectric parameters, such as cell membrane capacitance and cytoplasmic conductivity, representing proliferation, differentiation, viability, and functionality. The perifusion of varying glucose concentrations and monitoring of the resulting impedance of pancreatic islets were performed as proof-of-concept validation of the lab-on-chip platform. This novel technique to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that dictate islet functionality is presented, providing new information regarding islet function that could improve the evaluation of islet preparations for transplantation. In addition, it will lead to a better understanding of fundamental diabetes-related islet dysfunction and the development of therapeutics through evaluation of potential drug effects.

  16. Microfluidic platform for assessing pancreatic islet functionality through dielectric spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heileman, K.; Daoud, J.; Hasilo, C.; Gasparrini, M.; Paraskevas, S.; Tabrizian, M.

    2015-01-01

    Human pancreatic islets are seldom assessed for dynamic responses to external stimuli. Thus, the elucidation of human islet functionality would provide insights into the progression of diabetes mellitus, evaluation of preparations for clinical transplantation, as well as for the development of novel therapeutics. The objective of this study was to develop a microfluidic platform for in vitro islet culture, allowing the multi-parametric investigation of islet response to chemical and biochemical stimuli. This was accomplished through the fabrication and implementation of a microfluidic platform that allowed the perifusion of islet culture while integrating real-time monitoring using impedance spectroscopy, through microfabricated, interdigitated electrodes located along the microchamber arrays. Real-time impedance measurements provide important dielectric parameters, such as cell membrane capacitance and cytoplasmic conductivity, representing proliferation, differentiation, viability, and functionality. The perifusion of varying glucose concentrations and monitoring of the resulting impedance of pancreatic islets were performed as proof-of-concept validation of the lab-on-chip platform. This novel technique to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that dictate islet functionality is presented, providing new information regarding islet function that could improve the evaluation of islet preparations for transplantation. In addition, it will lead to a better understanding of fundamental diabetes-related islet dysfunction and the development of therapeutics through evaluation of potential drug effects. PMID:26339324

  17. Islet Formation during the Neonatal Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kevin; Kim, Abraham; Kilimnik, German; Jo, Junghyo; Moka, Uchenna; Periwal, Vipul; Hara, Manami

    2009-01-01

    The islet of Langerhans is a unique micro-organ within the exocrine pancreas, which is composed of insulin-secreting beta-cells, glucagon-secreting alpha-cells, somatostatin-secreting delta-cells, pancreatic polypeptide-secreting PP cells and ghrelin-secreting epsilon-cells. Islets also contain non-endocrine cell types such as endothelial cells. However, the mechanism(s) of islet formation is poorly understood due to technical difficulties in capturing this dynamic event in situ. We have developed a method to monitor beta-cell proliferation and islet formation in the intact pancreas using transgenic mice in which the beta-cells are specifically tagged with a fluorescent protein. Endocrine cells proliferate contiguously, forming branched cord-like structures in both embryos and neonates. Our study has revealed long stretches of interconnected islets located along large blood vessels in the neonatal pancreas. Alpha-cells span the elongated islet-like structures, which we hypothesize represent sites of fission and facilitate the eventual formation of discrete islets. We propose that islet formation occurs by a process of fission following contiguous endocrine cell proliferation, rather than by local aggregation or fusion of isolated beta-cells and islets. Mathematical modeling of the fission process in the neonatal islet formation is also presented. PMID:19893748

  18. A Method for Murine Islet Isolation and Subcapsular Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zmuda, Erik J.; Powell, Catherine A.; Hai, Tsonwin

    2011-01-01

    Since the early pioneering work of Ballinger and Reckard demonstrating that transplantation of islets of Langerhans into diabetic rodents could normalize their blood glucose levels, islet transplantation has been proposed to be a potential treatment for type 1 diabetes 1,2. More recently, advances in human islet transplantation have further strengthened this view 1,3. However, two major limitations prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread clinical reality: (a) the requirement for large numbers of islets per patient, which severely reduces the number of potential recipients, and (b) the need for heavy immunosuppression, which significantly affects the pediatric population of patients due to their vulnerability to long-term immunosuppression. Strategies that can overcome these limitations have the potential to enhance the therapeutic utility of islet transplantation. Islet transplantation under the mouse kidney capsule is a widely accepted model to investigate various strategies to improve islet transplantation. This experiment requires the isolation of high quality islets and implantation of islets to the diabetic recipients. Both procedures require surgical steps that can be better demonstrated by video than by text. Here, we document the detailed steps for these procedures by both video and written protocol. We also briefly discuss different transplantation models: syngeneic, allogeneic, syngeneic autoimmune, and allogeneic autoimmune. PMID:21525838

  19. Quadrupole Magnetic Sorting of Porcine Islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, Rustin M.; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Kirchhof, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Islet transplantation is emerging as a treatment option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes. Inconsistent isolation, purification, and recovery of large numbers of high-quality islets remain substantial impediments to progress in the field. Removing islets as soon as they are liberated from the pancreas during digestion and circumventing the need for density gradient purification is likely to result in substantially increased viable islet yields by minimizing exposure to proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen intermediates, and mechanical stress associated with centrifugation. This study capitalized on the hypervascularity of islets compared with acinar tissue to explore their preferential enrichment with magnetic beads to enable immediate separation in a magnetic field utilizing a quadrupole magnetic sorting. The results demonstrate that (1) preferential enrichment of porcine islets is achievable, but homogeneous bead distribution within the pancreas is difficult to achieve with current protocols; (2) greater than 70% of islets in the dissociated pancreatic tissue were recovered by quadrupole magnetic sorting, but their purity was low; and (3) infused islets purified by density gradients and subsequently passed through quadrupole magnetic sorting had similar potency as uninfused islets. These results demonstrate proof of concept and define the steps for implementation of this technology in pig and human islet isolation. PMID:19505179

  20. Optimizing Porcine Islet Isolation to Markedly Reduce Enzyme Consumption Without Sacrificing Islet Yield or Function

    PubMed Central

    Holdcraft, Robert W.; Green, Michael L.; Breite, Andrew G.; Circle, Lisa; Meyer, Eric D.; Adkins, Hollie; Harbeck, Steven G.; Smith, Barry H.; Gazda, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Human allogeneic islet transplantation for treatment of type 1 diabetes provides numerous clinical benefits, such as fewer episodes of hypoglycemic unawareness and tighter control of blood glucose levels. Availability of human pancreas for clinical and research use, however, is severely limited. Porcine pancreas offers an abundant source of tissue for optimization of islet isolation methodology and future clinical transplantation, thereby increasing patient access to this potentially lifesaving procedure. Methods Porcine islet isolations were performed using varying amounts of collagenase (7.5, 3.75, or 2.5 Wunsch units per gram tissue) and neutral protease activity (12 000, 6000, or 4000 neutral protease units per gram tissue) and perfusion volumes (1.7 or 0.85 mL/g tissue) to assess their effects on isolation outcomes. Retention of dissociative enzymes within the pancreas during perfusion and digestion was evaluated, along with distribution of the perfusion solution within the tissue. Results Reducing enzyme usage by as much as 67% and perfusion volume by 50% led to equally successful islet isolation outcomes when compared with the control group (48 ± 7% of tissue digested and 1088 ± 299 islet equivalents per gram of pancreas vs 47 ± 11% and 1080 ± 512, respectively). Using margin-marking dye in the perfusion solution to visualize enzyme distribution demonstrated that increasing perfusion volume did not improve tissue infiltration. Conclusions Current protocols for porcine islet isolation consume excessive amounts of dissociative enzymes, elevating cost and limiting research and development. These data demonstrate that islet isolation protocols can be optimized to significantly reduce enzyme usage while maintaining yield and function and thus accelerating progress toward clinical application. PMID:27830180

  1. Effect of liver histopathology on islet cell engraftment in the model mimicking autologous islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag S; Khan, Khalid M; Ma, Xiaobo; Li, Henghong; Wang, Juan; Fan, Lijuan; Chen, Guoling; Smith, Jill P; Cui, Wanxing

    2017-09-13

    The inflammatory milieu in the liver as determined by histopathology is different in individual patients undergoing autologous islet cell transplantation. We hypothesized that inflammation related to fatty-liver adversely impacts islet survival. To test this hypothesis, we used a mouse model of fatty-liver to determine the outcome of syngeneic islet transplantation after chemical pancreatectomy. Mice (C57BL/6) were fed a high-fat-diet from 6 weeks of age until attaining a weight of ≥28 grams (6-8 weeks) to produce a fatty liver (histologically > 30% fat);steatosis was confirmed with lipidomic profile of liver tissue. Islets were infused via the intra-portal route in fatty-liver and control mice after streptozotocin induction of diabetes. Outcomes were assessed by the rate of euglycemia, liver histopathology, evaluation of liver inflammation by measuring tissue cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α by RT-PCR and CD31 expression by immunohistochemistry. The difference in the euglycemic fraction between the normal liver group (90%, 9/10) and the fatty-liver group (37.5%, 3/8) was statistically significant at the 18(th) day post- transplant and was maintained to the end of the study (day 28) (p = 0.019, X(2) = 5.51). Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were elevated in fatty-liver mice (p = 0.042, p = 0.037). Compared to controls cytokine levels were elevated after islet cell transplantation and in transplanted fatty-liver mice as compared to either fatty- or islet transplant group alone (p = NS). A difference in the histochemical pattern of CD31 could not be determined. Fatty-liver creates an inflammatory state which adversely affects the outcome of autologous islet cell transplantation.

  2. Improved yield of canine islet isolation from deceased donors.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Stephen; Williams, S Janette; Otte, Vern; Barchman, Sally; Jones, Cheryl; Ramachandran, Karthik; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa

    2017-08-22

    Canine diabetes is a strikingly prevalent and growing disease, and yet the standard treatment of a twice-daily insulin injection is both cumbersome to pet owners and only moderately effective. Islet transplantation has been performed with repeated success in canine research models, but has unfortunately not been made available to companion animals. Standard protocols for islet isolation, developed primarily for human islet transplantation, include beating-heart organ donation, vascular perfusion of preservation solutions, specialized equipment. Unfortunately, these processes are prohibitively complex and expensive for veterinary use. The aim of the study was to develop a simplified approach for isolating canine islets that is compatible with the financial and logistical restrictions inherent to veterinary medicine for the purpose of translating islet transplantation to a clinical treatment for canine diabetes. Here, we describe simplified strategies for isolating quality islets from deceased canine donors without vascular preservation and with up to 90 min of cold ischemia time. An average of more than 1500 islet equivalents per kg of donor bodyweight was obtained with a purity of 70% (N = 6 animals). Islets were 95% viable and responsive to glucose stimulation for a week. We found that processing only the body and tail of the pancreas increased isolation efficiency without sacrificing islet total yield. Islet yield per gram of tissue increased from 773 to 1868 islet equivalents when the head of the pancreas was discarded (N = 3/group). In summary, this study resulted in the development of an efficient and readily accessible method for obtaining viable and functional canine islets from deceased donors. These strategies provide an ethical means for obtaining donor islets.

  3. Characterization of a novel functional protein in the pancreatic islet: islet homeostasis protein regulation of glucagon synthesis in α cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seh-Hoon; Darwiche, Houda; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Shupe, Thomas; Petersen, Bryon E

    2012-01-01

    We have identified a novel protein in bone marrow-derived insulin-producing cells. Here we characterize this protein, hereby named islet homeostasis protein (IHoP), in the pancreatic islet. Detection of IHoP mRNA and protein was performed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunocytochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Islet homeostasis protein functions were utilizing proliferation, insulin secretion by in vitro assays, and following small interfering RNA protocols for suppression of IHoP. We found that IHoP did not homolog with known pancreatic hormones. Islet homeostasis protein expression was seen in both bone marrow-derived insulin-producing cells and isolated pancreatic islets. Immunohistochemistry on pancreatic islet revealed that IHoP localized to the glucagon-synthesizing α cells. Inhibition of IHoP by small interfering RNA resulted in the loss of glucagon expression, which induced low blood glucose levels (63-85 mg/dL). Subsequently, cellular apoptosis was observed throughout the islet, including the insulin-producing β cells. Islets of preonset diabetic patients showed normal expression of IHoP and glucagon; however, IHoP was lost upon onset of the disease. These data suggest that IHoP could be a new functional protein in the islet and may play a role in islet homeostasis.

  4. A Method for Performing Islet Transplantation Using Tissue-Engineered Sheets of Islets and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirabaru, Masataka; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kitasato, Amane; Ono, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Takayuki; Matsushima, Hajime; Sakai, Yusuke; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Okano, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have a protective effect on islet cells. Cell sheets developed using tissue engineering help maintain the function of the cells themselves. This study describes a tissue engineering approach using islets with MSC sheets to improve the therapeutic effect of islet transplantation. MSCs were obtained from Fischer 344 rats and engineered into cell sheets using temperature-responsive culture dishes. The islets obtained from Fischer 344 rats were seeded onto MSC sheets, and the islets with MSC sheets were harvested by low-temperature treatment after coculture. The functional activity of the islets with MSC sheets was confirmed by a histological examination, insulin secretion assay, and quantification of the levels of cytokines. The therapeutic effects of the islets with MSC sheets were investigated by transplanting the sheets at subcutaneous sites in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Improvement of islet function and viability was shown in situ on the MSC sheet, and the histological examination showed that the MSC sheet maintained adhesion factor on the surface. In the recipient mice, normoglycemia was maintained for at least 84 days after transplantation, and neovascularization was observed. These results demonstrated that islet transplantation in a subcutaneous site would be possible by using the MSC sheet as a scaffold for islets. PMID:26066973

  5. Third Exposure to a Reduced Carbohydrate Meal Lowers Evening Postprandial Insulin and GIP Responses and HOMA-IR Estimate of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Po-Ju; Borer, Katarina T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease mortality. Postprandial hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also occur in metabolically healthy subjects consuming high-carbohydrate diets particularly after evening meals and when carbohydrate loads follow acute exercise. We hypothesized the involvement of dietary carbohydrate load, especially when timed after exercise, and mediation by the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) in this phenomenon, as this incretin promotes insulin secretion after carbohydrate intake in insulin-sensitive, but not in insulin-resistant states. Methods Four groups of eight metabolically healthy weight-matched postmenopausal women were provided with three isocaloric meals (a pre-trial meal and two meals during the trial day) containing either 30% or 60% carbohydrate, with and without two-hours of moderate-intensity exercise before the last two meals. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, GIP, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFAs), and D-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured during 4-h postprandial periods and 3-h exercise periods, and their areas under the curve (AUCs) were analyzed by mixed-model ANOVA, and insulin resistance during fasting and meal tolerance tests within each diet was estimated using homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA-IR). Results The third low-carbohydrate meal, but not the high-carbohydrate meal, reduced: (1) evening insulin AUC by 39% without exercise and by 31% after exercise; (2) GIP AUC by 48% without exercise and by 45% after exercise, and (3) evening insulin resistance by 37% without exercise and by 24% after exercise. Pre-meal exercise did not alter insulin-, GIP- and HOMA-IR- lowering effects of low-carbohydrate diet, but exacerbated evening hyperglycemia. Conclusions Evening postprandial insulin and GIP responses and insulin resistance declined by over 30% after three meals

  6. The isolation and purification of rodent pancreatic islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, Jacqueline F

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes the detailed protocol for the isolation and purification of islets of Langerhans from rodent pancreas using collagenase digestion. The first step of the process is to separate and isolate the insulin-producing islets of Langerhans from the rest of the pancreas. The pancreas is excised from the animal, trimmed of non-pancreatic tissues before being inflated and chopped into small pieces. The connective tissue is then broken down with a collagenase enzyme solution to selectively digest the bulk of the exocrine tissue while leaving the endocrine islets intact and separated from their surrounding non-islet tissue. Once this process is completed, the islets of Langerhans are separated from the remaining mixture by centrifugation and purified by the means of hand picking. Once isolated, the subsequent islets can be used for a number of experimental processes.

  7. Pancreatic polypeptide regulates glucagon release through PPYR1 receptors expressed in mouse and human alpha-cells.

    PubMed

    Aragón, F; Karaca, M; Novials, A; Maldonado, R; Maechler, P; Rubí, B

    2015-02-01

    Plasma levels of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) rise upon food intake. Although other pancreatic islet hormones, such as insulin and glucagon, have been extensively investigated, PP secretion and actions are still poorly understood. The release of PP upon glucose stimulation and the effects of PP on glucagon and insulin secretion were analyzed in isolated pancreatic islets. Expression of PP receptor (PPYR1) was investigated by immunoblotting, quantitative RT-PCR on sorted pancreatic islet cells, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated mouse pancreatic islets, glucose stimulation increased PP release, while insulin secretion was up and glucagon release was down. Direct exposure of islets to PP inhibited glucagon release. In mouse islets, PPYR1 protein was observed by immunoblotting and quantitative RT-PCR revealed PPYR1 expression in the FACS-enriched glucagon alpha-cell fraction. Immunohistochemistry on pancreatic sections showed the presence of PPYR1 in alpha-cells of both mouse and human islets, while the receptor was absent in other islet cell types and exocrine pancreas. Glucose stimulates PP secretion and PP inhibits glucagon release in mouse pancreatic islets. PP receptors are present in alpha-cells of mouse and human pancreatic islets. These data demonstrate glucose-regulated secretion of PP and its effects on glucagon release through PPYR1 receptors expressed by alpha-cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heavy metals, islet function and diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya Wen; Yang, Ching Yao; Huang, Chun Fa; Hung, Dong Zong; Leung, Yuk Man; Liu, Shing Hwa

    2009-01-01

    It has long been believed that heavy metals possess many adverse health effects. Uncontrolled industrialization has released heavy metal pollution in the world. Heavy metal pollutants damage organ functions and disrupt physiological homeostasis. Diabetes mellitus is growing in prevalence worldwide. Several studies have indicated that the deficiency and efficiency of some essential trace metals may play a role in the islet function and development of diabetes mellitus. Some toxic metals have also been shown to be elevated in biological samples of diabetes mellitus patients. In the present work, we review the important roles of heavy metals in islet function and diabetes development in which the in vitro, in vivo or human evidences are associated with exposure to zinc, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and nickel. Through this work, we summarize the evidence which suggests that some heavy metals may play an important role in diabetes mellitus as environmental risk factors.

  9. An immunocytochemical and morphometric study of the rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed Central

    Elayat, A A; el-Naggar, M M; Tahir, M

    1995-01-01

    The rat pancreas has frequently been used as an animal model to study changes in islet cells in pathological conditions, such as diabetes mellitus and islet cell tumours, but detailed quantitative data on the islets are not available. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate (1) the volume density of pancreatic islets, (2) islet diameter, islet volume and islet cell number and (3) islet cell pattern, i.e. the distribution, volume and number of each cell type per islet. The study also investigated the possibility of differences in various pancreatic regions derived from the dorsal primordium. The rat pancreas was divided into 4 regions: lower duodenal (derived from the ventral primordium) and upper duodenal, gastric and splenic regions (derived from the dorsal primordium). Sections were stained immunocytochemically with anti-insulin (B cells), antiglucagon (A cells), antisomatostatin (D cells) and antipancreatic polypeptide (PP cells) antibodies, and were used for morphometric analysis. A total of 1292 islets was examined, 328 from the lower duodenal, 245 from the upper duodenal, 314 from the gastric and 405 from the splenic regions. The mean volume density of the islets per pancreatic tissue was found to be 2.6 +/- 0.1%, 2.3 +/- 0.1%, 2.9 +/- 0.2% and 3.3 +/- 0.2%, in the lower duodenal, upper duodenal, gastric and splenic regions, respectively. The size-frequency distribution of the profile diameters of the islets showed an overall shift of all the size classes towards smaller sizes in the upper duodenal region, and towards larger sizes in the splenic region, as compared with the corresponding classes of the other regions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7559135

  10. Core-shell hydrogel microcapsules for improved islets encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minglin; Chiu, Alan; Sahay, Gaurav; Doloff, Joshua C; Dholakia, Nimit; Thakrar, Raj; Cohen, Joshua; Vegas, Arturo; Chen, Delai; Bratlie, Kaitlin M; Dang, Tram; York, Roger L; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Weir, Gordon C; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-05-01

    Islets microencapsulation holds great promise to treat type 1 diabetes. Currently used alginate microcapsules often have islets protruding outside capsules, leading to inadequate immuno-protection. A novel design of microcapsules with core-shell structures using a two-fluid co-axial electro-jetting is reported. Improved encapsulation and diabetes correction is achieved in a single step by simply confining the islets in the core region of the capsules.

  11. Watery diarrhoea and an islet cell tumour

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, W.; McBrien, D. J.; Creamer, B.

    1964-01-01

    It is suggested that there are two hormonal syndromes associated with noninsulin-secreting islet cell tumours and this case is an example of the non-gastrin-secreting type with watery diarrhoea and hypokalaemia. The patient had histamine-fast achlorhydria and a normal gastric biopsy and no gastrin was recovered from the tumour tissue. The watery diarrhoea was isosmotic with plasma and was increased by an intravenous saline load. There was a dramatic response to steroids. PMID:14209921

  12. Combination of Telmisartan and Linagliptin Preserves Pancreatic Islet Cell Function and Morphology in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuiling; Chan, Leo Ka Yu; Chen, Lihua; Cheng, Tsz Wai; Klein, Thomas; Leung, Po Sing

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic action of telmisartan and linagliptin in ameliorating pancreatic islet functions and morphology in type 2 diabetes mellitus and to delineate the molecular signaling pathway involved. db/db mice were given telmisartan (3 mg/kg) or linagliptin (3 mg/kg) alone or in combination, daily for 8 weeks, and were studied in vivo by fasting and random blood glucose tests, oral glucose tolerance tests, and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests, as well as ex vivo by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and morphology of pancreatic islets. The underlying signaling pathways were examined by Western blot, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and dihydroethidium staining analyses using mouse pancreatic islets and rat β-insulinoma cells. Telmisartan/linagliptin combination induced significantly better glucose homeostasis than the monotherapies. Posttreatment reactive oxygen species level was suppressed most significantly after the telmisartan/linagliptin combined therapy, whereas no significant change in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expressions was observed after treatments. The telmisartan/linagliptin combination preserved pancreatic islet cell functions and morphology via reduction of oxidative stress but independent of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ pathway. Our data shed light on the therapeutic potential of using the telmisartan/linagliptin combination in the treatment of human type 2 diabetes mellitus and its related complications.

  13. CT features of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eelkema, E.A.; Stephens, D.H.; Ward, E.M.; Sheedy, P.F. II

    1984-11-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas, the CT scans of 27 patients with that disease were reviewed. The pancreatic tumor was identified as a mass in 26 patients (96%) Of the 25 tumors evaluated with contrast enhancement, 20 became partially diffusely hyperdense relative to nearby normal pancreatic tissue. Hepatic metastases were identified in 15 patients (56%), regional lymphadenopathy in 10 (37%), atrophy of the gland proximal to the tumor in six (22%), dilatation of the biliary ducts in five (19%), and dilatation of the pancreatic duct in four (15%). The CT appearances of the nonfunctioning islet cell tumors were compared with those of 100 ordinary (ductal) pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Although the two types of tumors were sometimes indistinguishable, features found to be more characteristic of islet cell carcinoma included a pancreatic mass of unusually large size, calcification within the tumor, and contrast enhancement of either the primary tumor or hepatic metastases. Involvement of the celiac axis or proximal superior mesenteric artery was limited to ductal carcinoma.

  14. Increased secretion of insulin and proliferation of islet {beta}-cells in rats with mesenteric lymph duct ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagino, Ko; Yokozawa, Junji; Sasaki, Yu; Matsuda, Akiko; Takeda, Hiroaki; Kawata, Sumio

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was increased during the OGTT or IVGTT in mesenteric lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferation of islet {beta}-cells was upregulated in lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesenteric lymph duct flow has a role in glucose metabolism. -- Abstract: Background and aims: It has been suggested that intestinal lymph flow plays an important role in insulin secretion and glucose metabolism after meals. In this study, we investigated the influence of ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct on glucose metabolism and islet {beta}-cells in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (10 weeks old) were divided into two groups: one underwent ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct above the cistern (ligation group), and the other underwent a sham operation (sham group). After 1 and 2 weeks, fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and the active form of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured. At 2 weeks after the operation, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) were performed. After the rats had been sacrificed, the insulin content of the pancreas was measured and the proliferation of {beta}-cells was assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies against insulin and Ki-67. Results: During the OGTT, the ligation group showed a significant decrease in the plasma glucose concentration at 120 min (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in the plasma insulin concentration by more than 2-fold at 15 min (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the plasma GIP concentration was significantly decreased at 60 min (p < 0.01) in the ligated group, while the active form of GLP-1 showed a significantly higher level at 90 min (1.7-fold; p < 0.05) and 120 min (2.5-fold; p < 0.01). During the IVGTT, the plasma insulin concentration in the ligation group was significantly higher at 2

  15. Human Islets Exhibit Electrical Activity on Microelectrode Arrays (MEA).

    PubMed

    Schönecker, S; Kraushaar, U; Guenther, E; Gerst, F; Ullrich, S; Häring, H-U; Königsrainer, A; Barthlen, W; Drews, G; Krippeit-Drews, P

    2015-05-01

    This study demonstrates for the first time that the microelectrode array (MEA) technique allows analysis of electrical activity of islets isolated from human biopsies. We have shown before that this method, i.e., measuring beta cell electrical activity with extracellular electrodes, is a powerful tool to assess glucose responsiveness of isolated murine islets. In the present study, human islets were shown to exhibit glucose-dependent oscillatory electrical activity. The glucose responsiveness could be furthermore demonstrated by an increase of insulin secretion in response to glucose. Electrical activity was increased by tolbutamide and inhibited by diazoxide. In human islets bursts of electrical activity were markedly blunted by the Na(+) channel inhibitor tetrodotoxin which does not affect electrical activity in mouse islets. Thus, the MEA technique emerges as a powerful tool to decipher online the unique features of human islets.Additionally, this technique will enable research with human islets even if only a few islets are available and it will allow a fast and easy test of metabolic integrity of islets destined for transplantation.

  16. Imaging pancreatic islet cells by positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Karunananthan, Johann; Pelham, Bradley; Kandeel, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    It was estimated that every year more than 30000 persons in the United States - approximately 80 people per day - are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D). T1D is caused by autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic islet (β cells) cells. Islet transplantation has become a promising therapy option for T1D patients, while the lack of suitable tools is difficult to directly evaluate of the viability of the grafted islet over time. Positron emission tomography (PET) as an important non-invasive methodology providing high sensitivity and good resolution, is able to accurate detection of the disturbed biochemical processes and physiological abnormality in living organism. The successful PET imaging of islets would be able to localize the specific site where transplanted islets engraft in the liver, and to quantify the level of islets remain alive and functional over time. This information would be vital to establishing and evaluating the efficiency of pancreatic islet transplantation. Many novel imaging agents have been developed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of PET islet imaging. In this article, we summarize the latest developments in carbon-11, fluorine-18, copper-64, and gallium-68 labeled radioligands for the PET imaging of pancreatic islet cells. PMID:27721939

  17. Comparison of volume estimation methods for pancreatic islet cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, JiřÃ.­; Å vihlík, Jan; Habart, David; Kybic, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution we study different methods of automatic volume estimation for pancreatic islets which can be used in the quality control step prior to the islet transplantation. The total islet volume is an important criterion in the quality control. Also, the individual islet volume distribution is interesting -- it has been indicated that smaller islets can be more effective. A 2D image of a microscopy slice containing the islets is acquired. The input of the volume estimation methods are segmented images of individual islets. The segmentation step is not discussed here. We consider simple methods of volume estimation assuming that the islets have spherical or ellipsoidal shape. We also consider a local stereological method, namely the nucleator. The nucleator does not rely on any shape assumptions and provides unbiased estimates if isotropic sections through the islets are observed. We present a simulation study comparing the performance of the volume estimation methods in different scenarios and an experimental study comparing the methods on a real dataset.

  18. Polymeric Nanomaterials for Islet Targeting and Immunotherapeutic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kaustabh; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai; Korin, Netanel; McCarthy, Jason R.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a proof-of-concept for development of pancreatic islet-targeting nanoparticles for immunomodulatory therapy of autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes. Modified with a unique islet-homing peptide, these polymeric nanomaterials exhibit 3-fold greater binding to islet endothelial cells and a 200-fold greater anti-inflammatory effect through targeted islet endothelial cell delivery of an immunosuppressant drug. Our findings also underscore the need to carefully tailor drug loading and nanoparticle dosage to achieve maximal vascular targeting and immunosuppression. PMID:22196766

  19. Implication of Mitochondrial Cytoprotection in Human Islet Isolation and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Mendoza-Elias, Joshua E.; Qi, Meirigeng; Harvat, Tricia A.; Ahn, Sang Joon; Lee, Dongyoung; Gutierrez, Diana; Jeon, Hyojin; Paushter, Daniel; Oberholzer, José

    2012-01-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus; however, success rates in achieving both short- and long-term insulin independence are not consistent, due in part to inconsistent islet quality and quantity caused by the complex nature and multistep process of islet isolation and transplantation. Since the introduction of the Edmonton Protocol in 2000, more attention has been placed on preserving mitochondrial function as increasing evidences suggest that impaired mitochondrial integrity can adversely affect clinical outcomes. Some recent studies have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve islet cytoprotection by maintaining mitochondrial function and subsequently to improve islet transplantation outcomes. However, the benefits of mitoprotection in many cases are controversial and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This article summarizes the recent progress associated with mitochondrial cytoprotection in each step of the islet isolation and transplantation process, as well as islet potency and viability assays based on the measurement of mitochondrial integrity. In addition, we briefly discuss immunosuppression side effects on islet graft function and how transplant site selection affects islet engraftment and clinical outcomes. PMID:22611495

  20. Beneficial effect of 17{beta}-estradiol on hyperglycemia and islet {beta}-cell functions in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Zhu Baoting

    2010-11-15

    The modulating effect of estrogen on glucose homeostasis remains a controversial issue at present. In this study, we sought to determine the beneficial effect of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) on hyperglycemia and islet {beta}-cell functions in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.p. with STZ to induce a relatively mild diabetic condition. The rats were then treated with E{sub 2} orally at 500 {mu}g/kg body weight/day for 15 days to evaluate the modulating effect on hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, and islet {beta}-cell proliferation. E{sub 2} administration for 10 days significantly lowered plasma glucose levels, increased plasma insulin levels, and improved glucose tolerance by attenuating insulin response to oral glucose loading. These beneficial effects of E{sub 2} were accompanied by increases in islet number and volume, rate of islet cell proliferation, and the amount of insulin secreted. The growth-stimulatory effect of E{sub 2} on islet cells was linked to the functions of the estrogen receptor {alpha}. Notably, these protective effects of E{sub 2} on diabetic conditions were basically not observed when the STZ-treated rats had a more severe degree of islet damage and hyperglycemia. Taken together, we conclude that E{sub 2} can promote the regeneration of damaged pancreatic islets by stimulating {beta}-cell proliferation in diabetic rats, and this effect is accompanied by improvements in glucose tolerance and a decrease in plasma glucose levels. These findings suggest that oral administration of E{sub 2} may be beneficial in diabetic patients with an accelerated loss of islet {beta}-cells.

  1. Deletion of GPR40 Impairs Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion In Vivo in Mice Without Affecting Intracellular Fuel Metabolism in Islets

    PubMed Central

    Alquier, Thierry; Peyot, Marie-Line; Latour, Martin G.; Kebede, Melkam; Sorensen, Christina M.; Gesta, Stephane; Ronald Kahn, C.; Smith, Richard D.; Jetton, Thomas L.; Metz, Thomas O.; Prentki, Marc; Poitout, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The G-protein–coupled receptor GPR40 mediates fatty acid potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but its contribution to insulin secretion in vivo and mechanisms of action remain uncertain. This study was aimed to ascertain whether GPR40 controls insulin secretion in vivo and modulates intracellular fuel metabolism in islets. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Insulin secretion and sensitivity were assessed in GPR40 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates by hyperglycemic clamps and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, respectively. Transcriptomic analysis, metabolic studies, and lipid profiling were used to ascertain whether GPR40 modulates intracellular fuel metabolism in islets. RESULTS Both glucose- and arginine-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo were decreased by ∼60% in GPR40 knockout fasted and fed mice, without changes in insulin sensitivity. Neither gene expression profiles nor intracellular metabolism of glucose and palmitate in isolated islets were affected by GPR40 deletion. Lipid profiling of isolated islets revealed that the increase in triglyceride and decrease in lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine species in response to palmitate in vitro was similar in wild-type and knockout islets. In contrast, the increase in intracellular inositol phosphate levels observed in wild-type islets in response to fatty acids in vitro was absent in knockout islets. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that deletion of GPR40 impairs insulin secretion in vivo not only in response to fatty acids but also to glucose and arginine, without altering intracellular fuel metabolism in islets, via a mechanism that may involve the generation of inositol phosphates downstream of GPR40 activation. PMID:19720802

  2. The effect of ghrelin on Kiss-1 and KissR gene transcription and insulin secretion in rat islets of Langerhans and CRI-D2 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sagheb, Mandana Mahmoodzaeh; Azarpira, Negar; Mokhtary, Mokhtar

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that has been shown to have numerous central and peripheral effects. The central effects including GH secretion, food intake, and energy homeostasis are partly mediated by Kiss1- KissR signaling pathway. Ghrelin and its receptor are also expressed in the pancreatic islets. Ghrelin is one of the key metabolic factors controlling insulin secretion from the islets of Langerhans. We hypothesize that the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on KiSS-1 and KissR in the islet cells may be similar to the same inhibitory effect of ghrelin in the hypothalamus. Materials and Methods: To investigate the effect of ghrelin, we isolated the islets from adult male rats by collagenase and cultured CRI-D2 cell lines. Then, we incubated them with different concentrations of ghrelin for 24 hr. After RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis from both islets and CRI-D2 cells, the relative expression of KiSS-1 and KissR was evaluated by means of real-time PCR. Furthermore, we measured the amount of insulin secreted by the islets after incubation in different concentrations of ghrelin and glucose after 1 hr. Besides, we checked the viability of the cells after 24 hr cultivation. Results: Ghrelin significantly decreased the KiSS-1 and KissR mRNA transcription in rat islets and CRI-D2 cells. Besides, Ghrelin suppressed insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells and CRI-D2 cells. Conclusion: These findings indicate the possibility that KiSS-1 and KissR mRNA expression is mediator of ghrelin function in the islets of Langerhans. PMID:28133522

  3. Islets of Langerhans from prohormone convertase-2 knockout mice show α-cell hyperplasia and tumorigenesis with elevated α-cell neogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw B; Reens, Jaimini; Brocklehurst, Simon R; Betts, Catherine J; Bickerton, Sue; Bigley, Alison L; Jenkins, Richard P; Whalley, Nicky M; Morgan, Derrick; Smith, David M

    2014-02-01

    Antagonism of the effects of glucagon as an adjunct therapy with other glucose-lowering drugs in the chronic treatment of diabetes has been suggested to aggressively control blood glucose levels. Antagonism of glucagon effects, by targeting glucagon secretion or disabling the glucagon receptor, is associated with α-cell hyperplasia. We evaluated the influence of total glucagon withdrawal on islets of Langerhans using prohormone convertase-2 knockout mice (PC2-ko), in which α-cell hyperplasia is present from a young age and persists throughout life, in order to understand whether or not sustained glucagon deficit would lead to islet tumorigenesis. PC2-ko and wild-type (WT) mice were maintained drug-free, and cohorts of these groups sampled at 3, 12 and 18 months for plasma biochemical and morphological (histological, immunohistochemical, electron microscopical and image analytical) assessments. WT mice showed no islet tumours up to termination of the study, but PC2-ko animals displayed marked changes in islet morphology from α-cell hypertrophy/hyperplasia/atypical hyperplasia, to adenomas and carcinomas, these latter being first encountered at 6-8 months. Islet hyperplasias and tumours primarily consisted of α-cells associated to varying degrees with other islet endocrine cell types. In addition to substantial increases in islet neoplasia, increased α-cell neogenesis associated primarily with pancreatic duct(ule)s was present. We conclude that absolute blockade of the glucagon signal results in tumorigenesis and that the PC2-ko mouse represents a valuable model for investigation of islet tumours and pancreatic ductal neogenesis.

  4. Pro-Inflammatory and Pro-Oxidant Status of Pancreatic Islet In Vitro Is Controlled by TLR-4 and HO-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vivot, Kevin; Langlois, Allan; Bietiger, William; Dal, Stéphanie; Seyfritz, Elodie; Pinget, Michel; Jeandidier, Nathalie; Maillard, Elisa; Gies, Jean-Pierre; Sigrist, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    Since their isolation until implantation, pancreatic islets suffer a major stress leading to the activation of inflammatory reactions. The maintenance of controlled inflammation is essential to preserve survival and function of the graft. Identification and targeting of pathway(s) implicated in post-transplant detrimental inflammatory events, is mandatory to improve islet transplantation success. We sought to characterize the expression of the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant mediators during islet culture with a focus on Heme oxygenase (HO-1) and Toll-like receptors-4 signaling pathways. Rat pancreatic islets were isolated and pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant status were evaluated after 0, 12, 24 and 48 hours of culture through TLR-4, HO-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, CCL-2 and IL-6 secretion, ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) production (Dihydroethidine staining, DHE) and macrophages migration. To identify the therapeutic target, TLR4 inhibition (CLI-095) and HO-1 activation (cobalt protoporphyrin,CoPP) was performed. Activation of NFκB signaling pathway was also investigated. After isolation and during culture, pancreatic islet exhibited a proinflammatory and prooxidant status (increase levels of TLR-4, COX-2, CCL-2, IL-6, and ROS). Activation of HO-1 or inhibition of TLR-4 decreased inflammatory status and oxidative stress of islets. Moreover, the overexpression of HO-1 induced NFκB phosphorylation while the inhibition of TLR-4 had no effect NFκB activation. Finally, inhibition of pro-inflammatory pathway induced a reduction of macrophages migration. These data demonstrated that the TLR-4 signaling pathway is implicated in early inflammatory events leading to a pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant status of islets in vitro. Moreover, these results provide the mechanism whereby the benefits of HO-1 target in TLR-4 signaling pathway. HO-1 could be then an interesting target to protect islets before transplantation. PMID:25343247

  5. Microassay for glucose-induced preproinsulin mRNA expression to assess islet functional potency for islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Omori, Keiko; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Todorov, Ivan; Rawson, Jeffrey; Shiang, Keh-Dong; Kandeel, Fouad; Mullen, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    Background The capacity for insulin synthesis in islets is important for islet transplantation to succeed. We developed a micro assay that evaluates the potency of human islets by measuring changes in glucose induced insulin gene (INS) expression using a single islet in octuplicate samples. Methods Poly (A)+ mRNA was purified from a set of single handpicked human islets. Glucose induced mature (post-spliced) and premature (pre-spliced) insulin mRNA were quantified by RT-PCR using several insulin mRNA primers designed at different locations including, intron, exon, and an exon-intron junction. Results The synthesis of premature INS mRNA was significantly increased in islets exposed to high glucose for 16 hours (vs. 4-hour, p<0.01), whereas mature INS mRNA showed no difference. Glucose-induced premature INS mRNA synthesis was attenuated in heat-damaged islets. Stimulation index (SI) calculated by normalizing premature by mature INS mRNA (SI_INS mRNA) positively correlated with SI of insulin release (SI_16h-insulin) from the same set of islets during 16-hour incubation in high or low glucose media, as well as SI of glucose-mediated insulin release obtained from the same islet lot in a perifusion system (N=12). Furthermore, linear multiple regression analysis using SI_INS mRNA and SI_16h-insulin predicted islet transplantation outcome in NODscid mice (N=8). Conclusion The measurement of glucose induced premature INS mRNA normalized by mature INS mRNA can be used to assess the functional quality of human islets and may predict islet function after transplantation in type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:20098276

  6. Different responses of mouse islets and MIN6 pseudo-islets to metabolic stimulation: a note of caution.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Torben; Morsi, Mai; Brüning, Dennis; Schumacher, Kirstin; Rustenbeck, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    MIN6 cells and MIN6 pseudo-islets are popular surrogates for the use of primary beta cells and islets. Even though it is generally agreed that the stimulus-secretion coupling may deviate from that of beta cells or islets, direct comparisons are rare. The present side-by-side comparison of insulin secretion, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)] i ) and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) points out where similarities and differences exist between MIN6 cells and normal mouse beta cells. In mouse islets and MIN6 pseudo-islets depolarization by 40 mM KCl was a more robust insulinotropic stimulus than 30 mM glucose. In MIN6 pseudo-islets, but not in mouse islets, the response to 30 mM glucose was much lower than to 40 mM KCl and could be suppressed by a preceding stimulation with 40 mM KCl. In MIN6 pseudo-islets, glucose was less effective to raise [Ca(2+)] i than in primary islets. In marked contrast to islets, the OCR response of MIN6 pseudo-islets to 30 mM glucose was smaller than to 40 mM KCl and was further diminished by a preceding stimulation with 40 mM KCl. The same pattern was observed when MIN6 pseudo-islets were cultured in 5 mM glucose. As with insulin secretion memory effects on the OCR remained after wash-out of a stimulus. The differences between MIN6 cells and primary beta cells were generally larger in the responses to glucose than to depolarization by KCl. Thus, the use of MIN6 cells in investigations on metabolic signalling requires particular caution.

  7. Effect of polyethylene glycol grafted onto islet capsules on prevention of splenocyte and cytokine attacks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Yun; Nam, Jong Hee; Byun, Youngro

    2004-01-01

    In the graft rejection of transplanted islets, the host's immune cells recognize the islets as antigens, which then stimulate the immune cells to begin the cytokine secretion and also the proliferation of immune cells. To prevent the recognition of islets by the immune cells, we grafted biocompatible polyethylene glycol (PEG) onto the collagen capsule of islets without incurring any changes in the morphology and function of islets. To evaluate the efficiency of PEG grafting, PEG-grafted islets were cultured with splenocytes consisting mainly of lymphocytes and macrophages. A splenocyte proliferation assessment using a BrdU incorporation assay showed that the PEG-grafted islets did not stimulate the splenocytes. In addition, the viability and microorganisms in islet cells of co-cultured PEG-grafted islets were not altered. However, in the co-culture of free islets (control) splenocytes were stimulated; they mainly secreted TNF-alpha and strongly affected the viability and structure of free islets. Furthermore, when islets were treated with the rat recombinant TNF-alpha for 7 days, the viabilities of PEG-grafted and free islets were significantly damaged, although the viability of PEG-grafted islets was higher than that of free islets by nearly three times. These results demonstrate that PEG grafted on the surface of islets could prevent the recognition of islets by splenocytes, but could not completely protect islets from cytokines.

  8. Staining Protocols for Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L.; Heiple, Tiffany; Montgomery, Emily; Zhang, Li; Schneider, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of islet area and numbers and endocrine cell composition in the adult human pancreas vary from several hundred thousand to several million and beta mass ranges from 500 to 1500 mg 1-3. With this known heterogeneity, a standard processing and staining procedure was developed so that pancreatic regions were clearly defined and islets characterized using rigorous histopathology and immunolocalization examinations. Standardized procedures for processing human pancreas recovered from organ donors are described in part 1 of this series. The pancreas is processed into 3 main regions (head, body, tail) followed by transverse sections. Transverse sections from the pancreas head are further divided, as indicated based on size, and numbered alphabetically to denote subsections. This standardization allows for a complete cross sectional analysis of the head region including the uncinate region which contains islets composed primarily of pancreatic polypeptide cells to the tail region. The current report comprises part 2 of this series and describes the procedures used for serial sectioning and histopathological characterization of the pancreatic paraffin sections with an emphasis on islet endocrine cells, replication, and T-cell infiltrates. Pathology of pancreatic sections is intended to characterize both exocrine, ductular, and endocrine components. The exocrine compartment is evaluated for the presence of pancreatitis (active or chronic), atrophy, fibrosis, and fat, as well as the duct system, particularly in relationship to the presence of pancreatic intraductal neoplasia4. Islets are evaluated for morphology, size, and density, endocrine cells, inflammation, fibrosis, amyloid, and the presence of replicating or apoptotic cells using H&E and IHC stains. The final component described in part 2 is the provision of the stained slides as digitized whole slide images. The digitized slides are organized by case and pancreas region in an online pathology database

  9. Staining protocols for human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L; Heiple, Tiffany; Montgomery, Emily; Zhang, Li; Schneider, Lynda

    2012-05-23

    Estimates of islet area and numbers and endocrine cell composition in the adult human pancreas vary from several hundred thousand to several million and beta mass ranges from 500 to 1500 mg. With this known heterogeneity, a standard processing and staining procedure was developed so that pancreatic regions were clearly defined and islets characterized using rigorous histopathology and immunolocalization examinations. Standardized procedures for processing human pancreas recovered from organ donors are described in part 1 of this series. The pancreas is processed into 3 main regions (head, body, tail) followed by transverse sections. Transverse sections from the pancreas head are further divided, as indicated based on size, and numbered alphabetically to denote subsections. This standardization allows for a complete cross sectional analysis of the head region including the uncinate region which contains islets composed primarily of pancreatic polypeptide cells to the tail region. The current report comprises part 2 of this series and describes the procedures used for serial sectioning and histopathological characterization of the pancreatic paraffin sections with an emphasis on islet endocrine cells, replication, and T-cell infiltrates. Pathology of pancreatic sections is intended to characterize both exocrine, ductular, and endocrine components. The exocrine compartment is evaluated for the presence of pancreatitis (active or chronic), atrophy, fibrosis, and fat, as well as the duct system, particularly in relationship to the presence of pancreatic intraductal neoplasia. Islets are evaluated for morphology, size, and density, endocrine cells, inflammation, fibrosis, amyloid, and the presence of replicating or apoptotic cells using H&E and IHC stains. The final component described in part 2 is the provision of the stained slides as digitized whole slide images. The digitized slides are organized by case and pancreas region in an online pathology database creating a

  10. Maternal low-protein diet alters pancreatic islet mitochondrial function in a sex-specific manner in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Theys, Nicolas; Bouckenooghe, Thomas; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Remacle, Claude; Reusens, Brigitte

    2009-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction may be a long-term consequence of a poor nutritional environment during early life. Our aim was to investigate whether a maternal low-protein (LP) diet may program mitochondrial dysfunction in islets of adult progeny before glucose intolerance ensues. To address this, pregnant Wistar rats were fed isocaloric diets containing either 20% protein (control) or 8% protein (LP diet) throughout gestation. From birth, offspring received the control diet. The mitochondrial function was analyzed in islets of 3-mo-old offspring. Related to their basal insulin release, cultured islets from both male and female LP offspring presented a lower response to glucose challenge and a blunted ATP production compared with control offspring. The expression of malate dehydrogenase as well as the subunit 6 of the ATP synthase encoded by mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) was lower in these islets, reducing the capacity of ATP production through the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. However, mtDNA content was unchanged in LP islets compared with control. Several consequences of protein restriction during fetal life were more marked in male offspring. Only LP males showed an increased reactive oxygen species production associated with a higher expression of mitochondrial subunits of the electron transport chain NADH-ubiquinone oxireductase subunit 4L, an overexpression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and uncoupling protein-2, and a strongly reduced beta-cell mass. In conclusion, mitochondrial function is clearly altered in islets from LP adult offspring in a sex-specific manner. That may provide a cellular explanation for the earlier development of glucose intolerance in male than in female offspring of dams fed an LP diet.

  11. Stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors plays a protective role via increased expression of RAF-1 and PDX-1 in hyperglycemic rat pancreatic islet (RIN-m5F) cells

    PubMed Central

    Qvist, Rajes; Ong, Gracie; Karimian, Hamed; Imran, Muhammad; Shah, Ikram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is a widely held view that a progressive reduction of beta-cell mass occurs in the progression of diabetes. RAF-1 kinase and pancreas duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1) are major factors that promote survival of cells and maintain normal insulin functions. In this study we investigated the effect of a β-adrenergic receptor agonist and antagonist on RAF-1 and PDX-1, and their respective effects on apoptosis and insulin release in RIN-m5F cells. Material and methods RIN-m5F cells were cultured in normal (5 mM) and high (25 mM) glucose to mimic diabetic conditions, followed by treatment with 5 µM, 10 µM and 20 µM of isoproterenol and isoproterenol + propranolol for 6, 12 and 24 h. Western blotting and reverse transcription analysis were performed to examine the expression of RAF-1 and PDX-1. Annexin-V-FITC and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to investigate apoptosis. ELISA was used to measure insulin levels. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was conducted to investigate the expression of genes. Results Stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors with isoproterenol significantly induced RAF-1 and PDX-1 genes in a concentration-dependent and time-independent manner. Changes were significant both at protein and mRNA levels. Up-regulation of RAF-1 and PDX-1 was accompanied by improved insulin levels and reduced apoptosis. Concentrations of 10 µM and 20 µM for 12 and 24 h were more effective in achieving significant differences in the experimental and control groups. Propranolol reversed the effect of isoproterenol mostly at maximum concentrations and time periods. Conclusions A positive effect of a β-adrenergic agonist on RAF-1 and PDX-1, reduction in β-cell apoptosis and improved insulin contents can help to understand the pathogenesis of diabetes and to develop novel approaches for the β-cell dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:28261303

  12. Alpha1-antitrypsin monotherapy prolongs islet allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Eli C; Shapiro, Leland; Bowers, Owen J; Dinarello, Charles A

    2005-08-23

    Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetic patients shows promising results with the use of nondiabetogenic immunosuppressive therapy. However, in addition to compromising the immune system of transplant recipients, long-term studies demonstrate that islet viability is impaired. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of immunosuppressive agents, monotherapy with clinical-grade human alpha1-antitrypsin (hAAT), the major serum serine-protease inhibitor, prolongs islet graft survival and normoglycemia in transplanted allogeneic diabetic mice, lasting until the development of anti-hAAT antibodies. Compared to untreated or albumin-control-treated graft recipients, which rejected islets at day 10, AAT-treated mice displayed diminished cellular infiltrates and intact intragraft insulin production throughout treatment. Using peritoneal infiltration models, we demonstrate that AAT decreases allogeneic fibroblast-elicited natural-killer-cell influx by 89%, CD3-positive cell influx by 44%, and thioglycolate-elicited neutrophil emigration by 66%. ATT also extended islet viability in mice after streptozotocin-induced beta cell toxicity. In vitro, several islet responses to IL-1beta/IFNgamma stimulation were examined. In the presence of AAT, islets displayed enhanced viability and inducible insulin secretion. Islets also released 36% less nitric oxide and 82% less macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and expressed 63% fewer surface MHC class II molecules. TNFalpha release from IL-1beta/IFNgamma-stimulated islet cells was reduced by 99%, accompanied by an 8-fold increase in the accumulation of membrane TNFalpha on CD45-positive islet cells. In light of the established safety record and the nondiabetogenic potential of AAT, these data suggest that AAT may be beneficial as adjunctive therapy in patients undergoing islet transplantation.

  13. Enhancement of in vitro and in vivo function of agarose-encapsulated porcine islets by changes in the islet microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Holdcraft, Robert W; Gazda, Lawrence S; Circle, Lisa; Adkins, Hollie; Harbeck, Steven G; Meyer, Eric D; Bautista, Melissa A; Martis, Prithy C; Laramore, Melissa A; Vinerean, Horatiu V; Hall, Richard D; Smith, Barry H

    2014-01-01

    The transplantation of porcine islets of Langerhans to treat type 1 diabetes may provide a solution to the demand for insulin-producing cells. Porcine islets encapsulated in agarose-agarose macrobeads have been shown to function in nonimmunosuppressed xenogeneic models of both streptozotocin-induced and autoimmune type 1 diabetes. One advantage of agarose encapsulation is the ability to culture macrobeads for extended periods, permitting microbiological and functional assessment. Herein we describe optimization of the agarose matrix that results in improved islet function. Porcine islets (500 IEQs) from retired breeding sows were encapsulated in 1.5% SeaKem Gold (SG), 0.8% SG, or 0.8% Litex (Li) agarose, followed by an outer capsule of 5% SG agarose. Insulin production by the encapsulated islets exhibited an agarose-specific effect with 20% (0.8% SG) to 50% (0.8% Li) higher initial insulin production relative to 1.5% SG macrobeads. Insulin production was further increased by 40-50% from week 2 to week 12 in both agarose types at the 0.8% concentration, whereas islets encapsulated in 1.5% SG agarose increased insulin production by approximately 20%. Correspondingly, fewer macrobeads were required to restore normoglycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female CD(SD) rats that received 0.8% Li (15 macrobeads) or 0.8% SG (17 macrobeads) as compared to 1.5% SG (19 macrobeads). Islet cell proliferation was also observed during the first 2 months postencapsulation, peaking at 4 weeks, where approximately 50% of islets contained proliferative cells, including β-cells, regardless of agarose type. These results illustrate the importance of optimizing the microenvironment of encapsulated islets to improve islet performance and advance the potential of islet xenotransplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

  14. Microencapsulation of pancreatic islets in a water insoluble polyacrylate.

    PubMed

    Sugamori, M E; Sefton, M V

    1989-01-01

    Rat pancreatic islets were encapsulated in a water insoluble polyacrylate (Eudragit RL), a model polymer, by coaxial extrusion and interfacial precipitation. Despite exposure to organic solvents and nonsolvents (diethyl phthalate, corn oil, and mineral oil) and to shear, the islets survived encapsulation. They continued to secrete insulin into the tissue culture medium and responded to glucose in both static glucose challenges and perifusion assays as well and as long as control islets which were not encapsulated, but were maintained in tissue culture alongside the encapsulated islets. Unfortunately, there was a great deal of variability in the performance of all islets studied, making unequivocal conclusions difficult. Some encapsulated islets survived more than 140 days in vitro and histologically appeared healthy. However, there appeared to be a general deterioration in insulin secretion capacity following prolonged culture in all islets, with corresponding changes (e.g., central necrosis) visible by microscopy. Although Eudragit RL is not practical as an encapsulation polymer, this study was useful in demonstrating that islets may be encapsulated in materials other than alginate-polylysine, and ultimately in materials that may have a more optimum blend of the desired properties: biocompatibility, permselectivity, and mechanical durability.

  15. Pancreas++: Automated Quantification of Pancreatic Islet Cells in Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongyu; Martin, Bronwen; Cai, Huan; Fiori, Jennifer L.; Egan, Josephine M.; Siddiqui, Sana; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The microscopic image analysis of pancreatic Islet of Langerhans morphology is crucial for the investigation of diabetes and metabolic diseases. Besides the general size of the islet, the percentage and relative position of glucagon-containing alpha-, and insulin-containing beta-cells is also important for pathophysiological analyses, especially in rodents. Hence, the ability to identify, quantify and spatially locate peripheral, and “involuted” alpha-cells in the islet core is an important analytical goal. There is a dearth of software available for the automated and sophisticated positional quantification of multiple cell types in the islet core. Manual analytical methods for these analyses, while relatively accurate, can suffer from a slow throughput rate as well as user-based biases. Here we describe a newly developed pancreatic islet analytical software program, Pancreas++, which facilitates the fully automated, non-biased, and highly reproducible investigation of islet area and alpha- and beta-cell quantity as well as position within the islet for either single or large batches of fluorescent images. We demonstrate the utility and accuracy of Pancreas++ by comparing its performance to other pancreatic islet size and cell type (alpha, beta) quantification methods. Our Pancreas++ analysis was significantly faster than other methods, while still retaining low error rates and a high degree of result correlation with the manually generated reference standard. PMID:23293605

  16. Induction of Protective Genes Leads to Islet Survival and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjun; Ferran, Christiane; Attanasio, Chiara; Calise, Fulvio; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2011-01-01

    Islet transplantation is the most valid approach to the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, the function of transplanted islets is often compromised since a large number of β cells undergo apoptosis induced by stress and the immune rejection response elicited by the recipient after transplantation. Conventional treatment for islet transplantation is to administer immunosuppressive drugs to the recipient to suppress the immune rejection response mounted against transplanted islets. Induction of protective genes in the recipient (e.g., heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), A20/tumor necrosis factor alpha inducible protein3 (tnfaip3), biliverdin reductase (BVR), Bcl2, and others) or administration of one or more of the products of HO-1 to the donor, the islets themselves, and/or the recipient offers an alternative or synergistic approach to improve islet graft survival and function. In this perspective, we summarize studies describing the protective effects of these genes on islet survival and function in rodent allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation models and the prevention of onset of diabetes, with emphasis on HO-1, A20, and BVR. Such approaches are also appealing to islet autotransplantation in patients with chronic pancreatitis after total pancreatectomy, a procedure that currently only leads to 1/3 of transplanted patients being diabetes-free. PMID:22220267

  17. Autologous Pancreatic Islet Transplantation in Human Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Maffi, Paola; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Nano, Rita; Sordi, Valeria; Melzi, Raffaella; Mercalli, Alessia; Scavini, Marina; Esposito, Antonio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Cantarelli, Elisa; Messina, Carlo; Bernardi, Massimo; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Staudacher, Carlo; Doglioni, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Secchi, Antonio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The liver is the current site of choice for pancreatic islet transplantation, even though it is far from being ideal. We recently have shown in mice that the bone marrow (BM) may be a valid alternative to the liver, and here we report a pilot study to test feasibility and safety of BM as a site for islet transplantation in humans. Four patients who developed diabetes after total pancreatectomy were candidates for the autologous transplantation of pancreatic islet. Because the patients had contraindications for intraportal infusion, islets were infused in the BM. In all recipients, islets engrafted successfully as shown by measurable posttransplantation C-peptide levels and histopathological evidence of insulin-producing cells or molecular markers of endocrine tissue in BM biopsy samples analyzed during follow-up. Thus far, we have recorded no adverse events related to the infusion procedure or the presence of islets in the BM. Islet function was sustained for the maximum follow-up of 944 days. The encouraging results of this pilot study provide new perspectives in identifying alternative sites for islet infusion in patients with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, this is the first unequivocal example of successful engraftment of endocrine tissue in the BM in humans. PMID:23733196

  18. Islet and Stem Cell Encapsulation for Clinical Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster 3rd, Clarence E.; Lakey, Jonathan R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues. PMID:25148368

  19. Morphological changes of post-isolation of caprine pancreatic islet.

    PubMed

    Hani, Homayoun; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Tengku Ibrahim, Tengku Azmi; Mohd-Lila, Mohd-Azmi; Sarsaifi, Kazhal; Camalxaman, Siti Nazrina; Othman, Abas Mazni

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is commonly used to treat diabetes. Cell isolation and purification methods can affect the structure and function of the isolated islet cells. Thus, the development of cell isolation techniques that preserve the structure and function of pancreatic islet cells is essential for enabling successful transplantation procedures. The impact of purification procedures on cell function can be assessed by performing ultrastructure and in vivo studies. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caprine islets purification procedure on islet cell ultrastructure and functional integrity prior to and post-isolation/purification. The islets were isolated from caprine pancreas by using an optimized collagenase XI-S concentration, and the cells were subsequently purified using Euro-Ficoll density gradient. In vitro viability of islets was determined by fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide staining. Static incubation was used to assess functionality and insulin production by islet cells in culture media when exposed to various levels of glucose. Pancreatic tissues were examined by using light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. In vivo viability and functionality of caprine islets were assessed by evaluating the transplanted islets in diabetic mice. Insulin assay of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion test showed that the insulin levels increased with increasing concentration of glucose. Thus, purified islets stimulated with high glucose concentration (25 mM) secreted higher levels of insulin (0.542 ± 0.346 μg/L) than the insulin levels (0.361 ± 0.219, 0.303 ± 0.234 μg/L) secreted by exposure to low glucose concentrations (1.67 mM). Furthermore, insulin levels of recipient mice were significantly higher (p < 0.001) than those prior to xenotransplantation. In addition, following islets transplantation, there was significant enhancement in blood glucose

  20. Is islet transplantation a realistic approach to curing diabetes?

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Man; Kim, Kwang-Won

    2017-01-01

    Since the report of type 1 diabetes reversal in seven consecutive patients by the Edmonton protocol in 2000, pancreatic islet transplantation has been reappraised based on accumulated clinical evidence. Although initially expected to therapeutically target long-term insulin independence, islet transplantation is now indicated for more specific clinical benefits. With the long-awaited report of the first phase 3 clinical trial in 2016, allogeneic islet transplantation is now transitioning from an experimental to a proven therapy for type 1 diabetes with problematic hypoglycemia. Islet autotransplantation has already been therapeutically proven in chronic pancreatitis with severe abdominal pain refractory to conventional treatments, and it holds promise for preventing diabetes after partial pancreatectomy due to benign pancreatic tumors. Based on current evidence, this review focuses on islet transplantation as a realistic approach to treating diabetes.

  1. Identification of prosomatostatin in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed Central

    Patzelt, C; Tager, H S; Carroll, R J; Steiner, D F

    1980-01-01

    A 12.5-kilodalton protein not related to insulin or glucagon was detected in pulse-chase-labeled rat islets of Langerhans. Although this protein reacted poorly with various somatostatin antisera, analysis of two-dimensional peptide maps showed that it contains all of the tryptic fragments of somatostatin, which is located at its COOH terminus. Proteolytic conversion of the putative prosomatostatin, which took place parallel to the processing of proinsulin and proglucagon in pulse-chase experiments, coincided with the appearance of newly synthesized somatostatin and proceeded without the apparent involvement of major intermediate forms. Images PMID:6771754

  2. Membranes to achieve immunoprotection of transplanted islets

    PubMed Central

    Schweicher, Julien; Nyitray, Crystal; Desai, Tejal A.

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of islet or beta cells is seen as the cure for type 1 diabetes since it allows physiological regulation of blood glucose levels without requiring any compliance from the patients. In order to circumvent the use of immunosuppressive drugs (and their side effects), semipermeable membranes have been developed to encapsulate and immunoprotect transplanted cells. This review presents the historical developments of immunoisolation and provides an update on the current research in this field. A particular emphasis is laid on the fabrication, characterization and performance of membranes developed for immunoisolation applications. PMID:24389172

  3. Islet cell autoantigens in insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, M A; Maclaren, N K

    1993-01-01

    A burgeoning number of antigenic targets of the islet cell autoimmunity in IDD have been identified, and more can be anticipated through improved methods for their identification. The challenge for those investigating the pathogenesis of IDD will be to assign the relative importance of these antigens to the development of the disease, and to resolve whether there is a dominant primary immunologic event that is followed by a series of secondary immunizations to a variety of normally sequestered islet cell antigens in the sequence of pathogenic events that culminate in IDD. One interesting observation that may have potential pathogenic implications is the observation that of all islet cell autoantigens described, only two (i.e., 64 kD/GAD, 38 kD) are reactive in their native configurations, implying that recognition of conformational epitopes is most important. This property argues for primary immunizing agents rather than secondary ones after release of denatured antigens and antigenic recognition through their epitopes. Given the complex and multiple physiological functions of islet cells and the continuous variation in their activity, it is reasonable to speculate that the speed of the progression to IDD could vary between individuals with respect to their insulin needs and the relative activities of their islets. Activated islets may express autoantigens that have only limited expression in quiescent islets. The often times striking variation in the severity of insulitis seen in different islets of a single pancreas may be explained by the level of activity of individual islets. Furthermore, disparity in HLA-DR/DQ associations with disease may involve differences in the immunological recognition of autoantigens. Whereas there is still much to learn, it is clear that disease predictability and disease intervention studies have been enhanced through the identification of the islet cell autoantigens in IDD. Images PMID:8408615

  4. Oxygen supply by photosynthesis to an implantable islet cell device.

    PubMed

    Evron, Y; Zimermann, B; Ludwig, B; Barkai, U; Colton, C K; Weir, G C; Arieli, B; Maimon, S; Shalev, N; Yavriyants, K; Goldman, T; Gendler, Z; Eizen, L; Vardi, P; Bloch, K; Barthel, A; Bornstein, S R; Rotem, A

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of islet cells is an effective treatment for type 1 diabetes with critically labile metabolic control. However, during islet isolation, blood supply is disrupted, and the transport of nutrients/metabolites to and from the islet cells occurs entirely by diffusion. Adequate oxygen supply is essential for function/survival of islet cells and is the limiting factor for graft integrity. Recently, we developed an immunoisolated chamber system for transplantation of human islets without immunosuppression. This system depended on daily oxygen supply. To provide independence from this external source, we incorporated a novel approach based on photosynthetically-generated oxygen. The chamber system was packed sandwich-like with a slab of immobilized photosynthetically active microorganisms (Synechococcus lividus) on top of a flat light source (LEDs, red light at 660 nm, intensity of 8 μE/m(2)/s). Islet cells immobilized in an alginate slab (500-1,000 islet equivalents/cm(2)) were mounted on the photosynthetic slab separated by a gas permeable silicone rubber-Teflon membrane, and the complete module was sealed with a microporous polytetrafluorethylene (Teflon) membrane (pore size: 0.4 μm) to protect the contents from the host immune cells. Upon illumination, oxygen produced by photosynthesis diffused via the silicone Teflon membrane into the islet compartment. Oxygen production from implanted encapsulated microorganisms was stable for 1 month. After implantation of the device into diabetic rats, normoglycemia was achieved for 1 week. Upon retrieval of the device, blood glucose levels returned to the diabetic state. Our results demonstrate that an implanted photosynthetic bioreactor can supply oxygen to transplanted islets and thus maintain islet viability/functionality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Benefits of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging of labeled islets

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sang-Man; Oh, Seung-Hoon; Oh, Bae Jun; Suh, Sunghwan; Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jung Hee; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    While a few studies have demonstrated the benefit of PEGylation in islet transplantation, most have employed renal subcapsular models and none have performed direct comparisons of islet mass in intraportal islet transplantation using islet magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, our aim was to demonstrate the benefit of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation with a novel algorithm for islet MRI. Islets were PEGylated after ferucarbotran labeling in a rat syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation model followed by comparisons of post-transplant glycemic levels in recipient rats infused with PEGylated (n = 12) and non-PEGylated (n = 13) islets. The total area of hypointense spots and the number of hypointense spots larger than 1.758 mm2 of PEGylated and non-PEGylated islets were quantitatively compared. The total area of hypointense spots (P < 0.05) and the number of hypointense spots larger than 1.758 mm2 (P < 0.05) were higher in the PEGylated islet group 7 and 14 days post translation (DPT). These results translated into better post-transplant outcomes in the PEGylated islet group 28 DPT. In validation experiments, MRI parameters obtained 1, 7, and 14 DPT predicted normoglycemia 4 wk post-transplantation. We directly demonstrated the benefit of islet PEGylation in protection against nonspecific islet destruction in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation using a novel algorithm for islet MRI. This novel algorithm could serve as a useful tool to demonstrate such benefit in future clinical trials of islet transplantation using PEGylated islets. PMID:25483878

  6. Benefits of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging of labeled islets.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Man; Oh, Seung-Hoon; Oh, Bae Jun; Suh, Sunghwan; Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jung Hee; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    While a few studies have demonstrated the benefit of PEGylation in islet transplantation, most have employed renal subcapsular models and none have performed direct comparisons of islet mass in intraportal islet transplantation using islet magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, our aim was to demonstrate the benefit of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation with a novel algorithm for islet MRI. Islets were PEGylated after ferucarbotran labeling in a rat syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation model followed by comparisons of post-transplant glycemic levels in recipient rats infused with PEGylated (n = 12) and non-PEGylated (n = 13) islets. The total area of hypointense spots and the number of hypointense spots larger than 1.758 mm(2) of PEGylated and non-PEGylated islets were quantitatively compared. The total area of hypointense spots (P < 0.05) and the number of hypointense spots larger than 1.758 mm(2) (P < 0.05) were higher in the PEGylated islet group 7 and 14 days post translation (DPT). These results translated into better post-transplant outcomes in the PEGylated islet group 28 DPT. In validation experiments, MRI parameters obtained 1, 7, and 14 DPT predicted normoglycemia 4 wk post-transplantation. We directly demonstrated the benefit of islet PEGylation in protection against nonspecific islet destruction in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation using a novel algorithm for islet MRI. This novel algorithm could serve as a useful tool to demonstrate such benefit in future clinical trials of islet transplantation using PEGylated islets.

  7. Zinc and Zinc Transporter Regulation in Pancreatic Islets and the Potential Role of Zinc in Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Mariea D.; Mohanasundaram, Daisy M.; Drogemuller, Chris J.; Lang, Carol J.; Zalewski, Peter D.; Coates, P. Toby

    2010-01-01

    The critical trace element zinc is essential for normal insulin production, and plays a central role in cellular protection against apoptosis and oxidative stress. The regulation of zinc within the pancreas and β-cells is controlled by the zinc transporter families ZnT and ZIP. Pancreatic islets display wide variability in the occurrence of these molecules. The zinc transporter, ZnT8 is an important target for autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. Gene polymorphisms of this transporter confer sensitivity for immunosuppressive drugs used in islet transplantation. Understanding the biology of zinc transport within pancreatic islets will provide insight into the mechanisms of β-cell death, and may well reveal new pathways for improvement of diabetes therapy, including islet transplantation. This review discusses the possible roles of zinc in β-cell physiology with a special focus on islet transplantation. PMID:21713314

  8. Impact of Size in Pancreatic Islet Transplantation and Potential Interventions to Improve Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Daria; Phan, Tammy; Sequi, Marco; Lin, Yong; Freeman, Daniel H.; Cicalese, Luca; Rastellini, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Better results have been recently reported in clinical pancreatic islet transplantation (ITX) due mostly to improved isolation techniques and immunosuppression; however, some limitations still exist. It is known that following transplantation from 30 to 60% of the islets is lost. In our study, we have investigated: 1) the role of size as a factor affecting islet engraftment and, 2) potential procedural manipulations to increase the number of smaller functional islets that can be transplanted. C57/BL10 mice were used as donors and recipients in a syngeneic islet transplant model. Isolated islets were divided by size (large, >300 µm; medium 150–300 µm; small, ρ50 µm). Each size was transplanted in chemically induced diabetic mice as full (600 IEq), suboptimal (400 IEq), and marginal mass (200 IEq). Control animals received all size islets. Engraftment was defined as reversal of diabetes by day 7 post-transplantation. When the superiority of smaller islets was observed, strategies of over-digestion and fragmentation were adopted during islet isolation in the attempt to reduce islet size and improve engraftment. Smaller islets were significantly superior in engraftment as compared to medium, large, and control (all sizes) groups. This was more evident when marginal mass data were compared. In all masses, success decreased as islet sizes increased. Once islets were engrafted, functionality was not affected by size. When larger islets were fragmented, a significant decrease in islet functionality was observed. On the contrary, if pancreata were slightly over-digested, although not as successful as small naive islets, an increase in engraftment was observed when compared to the control group. In conclusion, smaller islets are superior in engraftment following islet transplantation. Fragmentation has a deleterious effect on islet engraftment. Islet isolations can be performed reducing islet size with slight over-digestion and it can be safely adopted to improve

  9. Assignment of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) to chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Fernald, A.A.; Bell, G.I.; Le Beau, M.M.

    1995-08-10

    The gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) was localized, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to human chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion and mutations in the GIPR gene may be related to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Endoscopic biopsy of islet transplants in the gastric submucosal space provides evidence of islet graft rejection in diabetic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Fujita, Minoru; Bottino, Rita; Piganelli, Jon D.; McGrath, Kevin; Li, Jiang; Lee, Whayoung; Iwase, Hayato; Wijkstrom, Martin; Bertera, Suzanne; Long, Cassandra; Landsittel, Douglas; Haruma, Ken; Cooper, David K.C.; Hara, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transplantation of islets into the gastric submucosal space (GSMS) has several advantages (e.g., avoidance of the instant blood-mediated inflammatory response [IBMIR], ability to biopsy). The aim of this study was to determine whether endoscopic biopsy of islet allografts transplanted into the GSMS in diabetic pigs can provide histopathological and immunohistochemical information that correlates with the clinical course (e.g.,, blood glucose level, insulin requirement). Islet allografts (Group1: 10,000 kIEq /kg [n = 4]; Group2: 15,000 kIEq /kg [n = 2]) were transplanted into the GSMS of diabetic pigs under immunosuppression. In Group2, the anti-oxidant, BMX-001 was applied during preservation, isolation, and culture of the islets, and at the time of transplantation. Endoscopic biopsies of the islet grafts were obtained one or 2 weeks after transplantation, and histopathological features were compared with the clinical course (e.g., blood glucose, insulin requirement). In Group1, in the absence of anti-oxidant therapy, most of the islets became fragmented, and there was no reduction in exogenous insulin requirement. In Group2, with an increased number of transplanted islets in the presence of BMX-001, more healthy insulin-positive islet masses were obtained at biopsy and necropsy (4 weeks), and these correlated with reductions in both blood glucose level and insulin requirement. In all cases, inflammatory cell infiltrates were present. After islet transplantation into the GSMS, endoscopic biopsy can provide information on graft rejection, which would be an immense advantage in clinical islet transplantation. PMID:26857703

  11. Kinetics of proinsulin conversion in human islets.

    PubMed

    Sizonenko, S; Irminger, J C; Buhler, L; Deng, S; Morel, P; Halban, P A

    1993-06-01

    Islets isolated from human cadaver pancreas were pulse-labeled (10 min with [3H]leucine) and then incubated for a 180-min chase. Islets and chase medium were collected every 15 min and analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC to quantify the percentage of radioactively labeled proinsulin, conversion intermediates, and fully processed insulin. Release of proinsulin-related labeled products into the chase medium was < 10% of total. Whereas 50% of labeled proinsulin had been lost by conversion within 45 min, fully processed insulin only appeared with a half-time of 100 min. This discrepancy is attributable to accumulation of radioactive conversion intermediates. Des 64.65 split proinsulin was a minor component, reaching a maximum of 5.2 +/- 1.7% (n = 4) at 60 min of chase. By contrast, des 31.32 split proinsulin--and a truncated form lacking the first three residues of C-peptide--rose progressively to 29.3 +/- 1.4% by 75 min, and declined thereafter. The accumulation of des 31.32 split proinsulin rather than the des 64.65 split form during the conversion of human proinsulin reflects slower conversion at the C-peptide/A-chain than at the B-chain/C-peptide junction, and is consistent with the appearance of this particular conversion intermediate in the circulation.

  12. 2007 update on allogeneic islet transplantation from the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry (CITR).

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    As of October 1, 2007, 25 North American medical institutions and one European islet transplant center reported detailed information to the Registry on 315 allograft recipients, of which 285 were islet alone (IA) and 30 were islet after kidney (IAK). Of the 114 IA recipients expected at 4 years after their last infusion, 12% were insulin independent, 16% were insulin dependent with detectable C-peptide, 40% had no detectable C-peptide, and 32% had missing C-peptide data or were lost to follow-up. Of the IA recipients, 72% achieved insulin independence at least once over 3 years and multiple infusions. Factors associated with achievement of insulin independence included islet size >1.0 expressed as IEQs per islet number [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.5, p = 0.06], additional infusions given (HR = 1.5, p = 0.01), lower pretransplant HbA(1c) (HR = 1.2 each %-age unit, p = 0.02), donor given insulin (HR = 2, p = 0.003), daclizumab given at any infusion (HR = 1.9, p = 0.06), and shorter cold storage time (HR = 1.04, p = 0.03), mutually adjusted in a multivariate model. Severe hypoglycemia prevalence was reduced from 78-83% preinfusion to less than 5% throughout the first year post-last infusion, and to 18% adjusted for missing data at 3 years post-last infusion. In Year 1 post-first infusion for IA recipients, 53% experienced a Grade 3-5 or serious adverse event (AE) and 35% experienced a severe AE related to either an infusion procedure or immunosuppression. In Year 1 post-first infusion, 33% of IA subjects and 35% of IAK subjects had an AE related to the infusion procedure, while 35% of IA subjects and only 27% of IAK subjects had an AE related to the immunosuppression therapy. Five deaths were reported, of which two were classified as probably related to the infusion procedure or immunosuppression, and 10 cases of neoplasm, of which two were classified as probably related to the procedure or immunosuppression. Islet transplantation continues to show short-term benefits of

  13. A macroporous heparin-releasing silk fibroin scaffold improves islet transplantation outcome by promoting islet revascularisation and survival.

    PubMed

    Mao, Duo; Zhu, Meifeng; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Ma, Rong; Yang, Xiaoqing; Ke, Tingyu; Wang, Lianyong; Li, Zongjin; Kong, Deling; Li, Chen

    2017-09-01

    Islet transplantation is considered the most promising therapeutic option with the potential to cure diabetes. However, efficacy of current clinical islet transplantation is limited by long-term graft dysfunction and attrition. We have investigated the therapeutic potential of a silk fibroin macroporous (SF) scaffold for syngeneic islet transplantation in diabetic mice. The SF scaffold was prepared via lyophilisation, which enables incorporation of active compounds including cytokines, peptide and growth factors without compromising their biological activity. For the present study, a heparin-releasing SF scaffold (H-SF) in order to evaluate the versatility of the SF scaffold for biological functionalisation. Islets were then co-transplanted with H-SF or SF scaffolds in the epididymal fat pad of diabetic mice. Mice from both H-SF and SF groups achieved 100% euglycaemia, which was maintained for 1year. More importantly, the H-SF-islets co-transplantation led to more rapid reversal of hyperglycaemia, complete normalisation of glucose responsiveness and lower long-term blood glucose levels. This superior transplantation outcome is attributable to H-SF-facilitated islet revascularisation and cell proliferation since significant increase of islet endocrine and endothelial cells proliferation was shown in grafts retrieved from H-SF-islets co-transplanted mice. Better intra-islet vascular reformation was also evident, accompanied by VEGF upregulation. In addition, when H-SF was co-transplanted with islets extracted from vegfr2-luc transgenic mice in vivo, sustained elevation of bioluminescent signal that corresponds to vegfr2 expression was collected, implicating a role of heparin-dependent activation of endogenous VEGF/VEGFR2 pathway in promoting islet revascularisation and proliferation. In summary, the SF scaffolds provide an open platform as scaffold development for islet transplantation. Furthermore, given the pro-angiogenic, pro-survival and minimal post

  14. Biomolecular Surface Engineering of Pancreatic Islets with Thrombomodulin

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John T.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Qu, Zheng; Cui, Wanxing; Urlam, Murali K.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2010-01-01

    Islet transplantation has emerged as a promising treatment for Type 1 diabetes, but its clinical impact remains limited by early islet destruction mediated by prothrombotic and innate inflammatory responses elicited upon transplantation. Thrombomodulin (TM) acts as an important regulator of thrombosis and inflammation through its capacity to channel the catalytic activity of thrombin towards generation of activated protein C (APC), a potent anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory agent. We describe herein a novel biomolecular strategy for re-engineering the surface of pancreatic islets with TM. A biosynthetic approach was employed to generate recombinant human TM (rTM) bearing a C-terminal azide group, which facilitated site-specific biotinylation of rTM through Staudinger ligation. Murine pancreatic islets were covalently biotinylated through targeting of cell surface amines and aldehydes, and both islet viability and the surface density of streptavidin were maximized through optimization of biotinylation conditions. rTM was immobilized on islet surfaces through streptavidin-biotin interactions, resulting in a nearly three-fold increase in the catalytic capacity of islets to generate APC. PMID:20102751

  15. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in subdermal islet transplant sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-03-01

    Exogenous insulin administration is the mainstay treatment therapy for patients with Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, for select patients, clinical islet transplantation is an alternative therapeutic treatment. In this procedure, islets are transplanted into the hepatic portal vein, and despite improved success within the last decade, obstacles are still associated with this approach. It has been discovered that the subcutaneous space may be an effective alternative site for islet transplantation, and may provide advantages of easy access and potential for simple monitoring. The ability to monitor islet viability and the transplant microenvironment may be key to future success in islet transplantation. A subcutaneous device-less technique has been developed to facilitate angiogenesis in the islet transplant site, however, a method for monitoring the potential engraftment site have yet to be explored fully. Here we demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis in mice with 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks post-catheter implant on both sides of the abdomen using a FujiFilm VisualSonics Vevo-LAZR system. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities exhibited gradual vessel growth successfully induced by catheter implantation. Our study demonstrates the ability of employing photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound imaging to track angiogenesis around the catheter site prior to islet transplantation.

  16. Microfluidic device for multimodal characterization of pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Javeed Shaikh; Wang, Yong; Harvat, Tricia A; Oberholzer, Jose; Eddington, David T

    2009-01-07

    A microfluidic device to perfuse pancreatic islets while simultaneously characterizing their functionality through fluorescence imaging of the mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in addition to enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) quantification of secreted insulin was developed and characterized. This multimodal characterization of islet function will facilitate rapid assessment of tissue quality immediately following isolation from donor pancreas and allow more informed transplantation decisions to be made which may improve transplantation outcomes. The microfluidic perfusion chamber allows flow rates of up to 1 mL min(-1), without any noticeable perturbation or shear of islets. This multimodal quantification was done on both mouse and human islets. The ability of this simple microfluidic device to detect subtle variations in islet responses in different functional assays performed in short time-periods demonstrates that the microfluidic perfusion chamber device can be used as a new gold standard to perform comprehensive islet analysis and obtain a more meaningful predictive value for islet functionality prior to transplantation into recipients, which is currently difficult to predict using a single functional assay.

  17. Glucose Oscillations Can Activate an Endogenous Oscillator in Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Mukhitov, Nikita; Roper, Michael G.; Bertram, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets manage elevations in blood glucose level by secreting insulin into the bloodstream in a pulsatile manner. Pulsatile insulin secretion is governed by islet oscillations such as bursting electrical activity and periodic Ca2+ entry in β-cells. In this report, we demonstrate that although islet oscillations are lost by fixing a glucose stimulus at a high concentration, they may be recovered by subsequently converting the glucose stimulus to a sinusoidal wave. We predict with mathematical modeling that the sinusoidal glucose signal’s ability to recover islet oscillations depends on its amplitude and period, and we confirm our predictions by conducting experiments with islets using a microfluidics platform. Our results suggest a mechanism whereby oscillatory blood glucose levels recruit non-oscillating islets to enhance pulsatile insulin output from the pancreas. Our results also provide support for the main hypothesis of the Dual Oscillator Model, that a glycolytic oscillator endogenous to islet β-cells drives pulsatile insulin secretion. PMID:27788129

  18. Prediction of marginal mass required for successful islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Papas, Klearchos K; Colton, Clark K; Qipo, Andi; Wu, Haiyan; Nelson, Rebecca A; Hering, Bernhard J; Weir, Gordon C; Koulmanda, Maria

    2010-02-01

    Islet quality assessment methods for predicting diabetes reversal (DR) following transplantation are needed. We investigated two islet parameters, oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and OCR per DNA content, to predict transplantation outcome and explored the impact of islet quality on marginal islet mass for DR. Outcomes in immunosuppressed diabetic mice were evaluated by transplanting mixtures of healthy and purposely damaged rat islets for systematic variation of OCR/DNA over a wide range. The probability of DR increased with increasing transplanted OCR and OCR/DNA. On coordinates of OCR versus OCR/DNA, data fell into regions in which DR occurred in all, some, or none of the animals with a sharp threshold of around 150-nmol/min mg DNA. A model incorporating both parameters predicted transplantation outcome with sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 94%, respectively. Marginal mass was not constant, depended on OCR/DNA, and increased from 2,800 to over 100,000 islet equivalents/kg body weight as OCR/DNA decreased. We conclude that measurements of OCR and OCR/DNA are useful for predicting transplantation outcome in this model system, and OCR/DNA can be used to estimate the marginal mass required for reversing diabetes. Because human clinical islet preparations in a previous study had OCR/DNA.

  19. Has the gap between pancreas and islet transplantation closed?

    PubMed

    Niclauss, Nadja; Morel, Philippe; Berney, Thierry

    2014-09-27

    Both pancreas and islet transplantations are therapeutic options for complicated type 1 diabetes. Until recent years, outcomes of islet transplantation have been significantly inferior to those of whole pancreas. Islet transplantation is primarily performed alone in patients with severe hypoglycemia, and recent registry reports have suggested that results of islet transplantation alone in this indication may be about to match those of pancreas transplant alone in insulin independence. Figures of 50% insulin independence at 5 years for either procedure have been cited. In this article, we address the question whether islet transplantation has indeed bridged the gap with whole pancreas. Looking at the evidence to answer this question, we propose that although pancreas may still be more efficient in taking recipients off insulin than islets, there are in fact numerous "gaps" separating both procedures that must be taken into the equation. These "gaps" relate to organ utilization, organ allocation, indication for transplantation, and morbidity. In-depth analysis reveals that islet transplantation, in fact, has an edge on whole pancreas in some of these aspects. Accordingly, attempts should be made to bridge these gaps from both sides to achieve the same level of success with either procedure. More realistically, it is likely that some of these gaps will remain and that both procedures will coexist and complement each other, to ensure that β cell replacement can be successfully implemented in the greatest possible number of patients with type 1 diabetes.

  20. Chronic overproduction of islet amyloid polypeptide/amylin in transgenic mice: lysosomal localization of human islet amyloid polypeptide and lack of marked hyperglycaemia or hyperinsulinaemia.

    PubMed

    Höppener, J W; Verbeek, J S; de Koning, E J; Oosterwijk, C; van Hulst, K L; Visser-Vernooy, H J; Hofhuis, F M; van Gaalen, S; Berends, M J; Hackeng, W H

    1993-12-01

    Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is characterised by hyperglycaemia, peripheral insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion and pancreatic islet amyloid formation. The major constituent of islet amyloid is islet amyloid polypeptide (amylin). Islet amyloid polypeptide is synthesized by islet beta cells and co-secreted with insulin. The ability of islet amyloid polypeptide to form amyloid fibrils is related to its species-specific amino acid sequence. Islet amyloid associated with diabetes is only found in man, monkeys, cats and racoons. Pharmacological doses of islet amyloid polypeptide have been shown to inhibit insulin secretion as well as insulin action on peripheral tissues (insulin resistance). To examine the role of islet amyloid polypeptide in the pathogenesis of Type 2 diabetes, we have generated transgenic mice with the gene encoding either human islet amyloid polypeptide (which can form amyloid) or rat islet amyloid polypeptide, under control of an insulin promoter. Transgenic islet amyloid polypeptide mRNA was detected in the pancreas in all transgenic mice. Plasma islet amyloid polypeptide levels were significantly elevated (up to 15-fold) in three out of five transgenic lines, but elevated glucose levels, hyperinsulinaemia and obesity were not observed. This suggests that insulin resistance is not induced by chronic hypersecretion of islet amyloid polypeptide. Islet amyloid polypeptide immunoreactivity was localized to beta-cell secretory granules in all mice. Islet amyloid polypeptide immunoreactivity in beta-cell lysosomes was seen only in mice with the human islet amyloid polypeptide gene, as in human beta cells, and might represent an initial step in intracellular formation of amyloid fibrils.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Leptin Administration Enhances Islet Transplant Performance in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Denroche, Heather C.; Quong, Whitney L.; Bruin, Jennifer E.; Tudurí, Eva; Asadi, Ali; Glavas, Maria M.; Fox, Jessica K.; Kieffer, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Islet transplantation is an effective method to obtain long-term glycemic control for patients with type 1 diabetes, yet its widespread use is limited by an inadequate supply of donor islets. The hormone leptin has profound glucose-lowering and insulin-sensitizing action in type 1 diabetic rodent models. We hypothesized that leptin administration could reduce the dose of transplanted islets required to achieve metabolic control in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. We first performed a leptin dose-response study in C57Bl/6 mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes to determine a leptin dose insufficient to reverse hyperglycemia. Subsequently, we compared the ability of suboptimal islet transplants of 50 or 125 syngeneic islets to achieve glycemic control in STZ-induced diabetic C57Bl/6 mice treated with or without this dose of leptin. The dose-response study revealed that leptin reverses STZ-induced diabetes in a dose-dependent manner. Supraphysiological leptin levels were necessary to restore euglycemia but simultaneously increased risk of hypoglycemia, and also lost efficacy after 12 days of administration. In contrast, 1 µg/day leptin only modestly reduced blood glucose but maintained efficacy throughout the study duration. We then administered 1 µg/day leptin to diabetic mice that underwent transplantation of 50 or 125 islets. Although these islet doses were insufficient to ameliorate hyperglycemia alone, coadministration of leptin with islet transplantation robustly improved control of glucose and lipid metabolism, without increasing circulating insulin levels. This study reveals that low-dose leptin administration can reduce the number of transplanted islets required to achieve metabolic control in STZ-induced diabetic mice. PMID:23656888

  2. Improvement in outcomes of clinical islet transplantation: 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Barton, Franca B; Rickels, Michael R; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Hering, Bernhard J; Wease, Stephen; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Oberholzer, Jose; Odorico, Jon S; Garfinkel, Marc R; Levy, Marlon; Pattou, Francois; Berney, Thierry; Secchi, Antonio; Messinger, Shari; Senior, Peter A; Maffi, Paola; Posselt, Andrew; Stock, Peter G; Kaufman, Dixon B; Luo, Xunrong; Kandeel, Fouad; Cagliero, Enrico; Turgeon, Nicole A; Witkowski, Piotr; Naji, Ali; O'Connell, Philip J; Greenbaum, Carla; Kudva, Yogish C; Brayman, Kenneth L; Aull, Meredith J; Larsen, Christian; Kay, Tom W H; Fernandez, Luis A; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Bellin, Melena; Shapiro, A M James

    2012-07-01

    To describe trends of primary efficacy and safety outcomes of islet transplantation in type 1 diabetes recipients with severe hypoglycemia from the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry (CITR) from 1999 to 2010. A total of 677 islet transplant-alone or islet-after-kidney recipients with type 1 diabetes in the CITR were analyzed for five primary efficacy outcomes and overall safety to identify any differences by early (1999-2002), mid (2003-2006), or recent (2007-2010) transplant era based on annual follow-up to 5 years. Insulin independence at 3 years after transplant improved from 27% in the early era (1999-2002, n = 214) to 37% in the mid (2003-2006, n = 255) and to 44% in the most recent era (2007-2010, n = 208; P = 0.006 for years-by-era; P = 0.01 for era alone). C-peptide ≥0.3 ng/mL, indicative of islet graft function, was retained longer in the most recent era (P < 0.001). Reduction of HbA(1c) and resolution of severe hypoglycemia exhibited enduring long-term effects. Fasting blood glucose stabilization also showed improvements in the most recent era. There were also modest reductions in the occurrence of adverse events. The islet reinfusion rate was lower: 48% by 1 year in 2007-2010 vs. 60-65% in 1999-2006 (P < 0.01). Recipients that ever achieved insulin-independence experienced longer duration of islet graft function (P < 0.001). The CITR shows improvement in primary efficacy and safety outcomes of islet transplantation in recipients who received transplants in 2007-2010 compared with those in 1999-2006, with fewer islet infusions and adverse events per recipient.

  3. Umami Receptor Activation Increases Duodenal Bicarbonate Secretion via Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Release in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joon-Ho; Inoue, Takuya; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Luminal nutrient chemosensing during meal ingestion is mediated by intestinal endocrine cells, which regulate secretion and motility via the release of gut hormones. We have reported that luminal coperfusion of l-Glu and IMP, common condiments providing the umami or proteinaceous taste, synergistically increases duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) possibly via taste receptor heterodimers, taste receptor type 1, member 1 (T1R1)/R3. We hypothesized that glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) or glucagon-like peptide (GLP) is released by duodenal perfusion with l-Glu/IMP. We measured DBS with pH and CO2 electrodes through a perfused rat duodenal loop in vivo. GIP, exendin (Ex)-4 (GLP-1 receptor agonist), or GLP-2 was intravenously infused (0.01–1 nmol/kg/h). l-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally perfused with or without bolus intravenous injection (3 or 30 nmol/kg) of the receptor antagonists Pro3GIP, Ex-3(9-39), or GLP-2(3-33). GIP or GLP-2 infusion dose-dependently increased DBS, whereas Ex-4 infusion gradually decreased DBS. Luminal perfusion of l-Glu/IMP increased DBS, with no effect of Pro3GIP or Ex-3(9-39), whereas GLP-2(3-33) inhibited l-Glu/IMP-induced DBS. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)(6–28) intravenously or NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester coperfusion inhibited the effect of l-Glu/IMP. Perfusion of l-Glu/IMP increased portal venous concentrations of GLP-2, followed by a delayed increase of GLP-1, with no effect on GIP release. GLP-1/2 and T1R1/R3 were expressed in duodenal endocrine-like cells. These results suggest that luminal l-Glu/IMP-induced DBS is mediated via GLP-2 release and receptor activation followed by VIP and nitric oxide release. Because GLP-1 is insulinotropic and GLP-2 is intestinotrophic, umami receptor activation may have additional benefits in glucose metabolism and duodenal mucosal protection and regeneration. PMID:21846840

  4. Clinical islet transplantation at the University of California, San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Posselt, Andrew M; Szot, Gregory L; Frassetto, Lynda A; Masharani, Umesh; Stock, Peter G

    2010-01-01

    The UCSF clinical islet transplant program has evolved to utilize immunosuppressive strategies that do not rely on CNIs or other nephro- and beta-cell-toxic immunosuppressive agents. These novel strategies depend on lymphocyte-depleting induction immunotherapy and maintenance immunosuppression with novel agents that focus on co-stimulation and/or lymphocyte migration blockade. These drugs are well tolerated, frequently allow establishment of insulin independence after single islet infusions, and minimize allosensitization. Our early results suggest these regimens will be attractive immunosuppressive agents for future protocols in allogeneic islet transplantation as well as protocols utilizing stem-cell-derived beta cells.

  5. Extrahepatic islet transplantation with microporous polymer scaffolds in syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models.

    PubMed

    Gibly, Romie F; Zhang, Xiaomin; Graham, Melanie L; Hering, Bernhard J; Kaufman, Dixon B; Lowe, William L; Shea, Lonnie D

    2011-12-01

    Intraportal transplantation of islets has successfully treated select patients with type 1 diabetes. However, intravascular infusion and the intrahepatic site contribute to significant early and late islet loss, yet a clinical alternative has remained elusive. We investigated non-encapsulating, porous, biodegradable polymer scaffolds as a vehicle for islet transplantation into extrahepatic sites, using syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models. Scaffold architecture was modified to enhance cell infiltration leading to revascularization of the islets with minimal inflammatory response. In the diabetic mouse model, 125 islets seeded on scaffolds implanted into the epididymal fat pad restored normoglycemia within an average of 1.95 days and transplantation of only 75 islets required 12.1 days. Increasing the pore size to increase islet-islet interactions did not significantly impact islet function. The porcine model was used to investigate early islet engraftment. Increasing the islet seeding density led to a greater mass of engrafted islets, though the efficiency of islet survival decreased. Transplantation into the porcine omentum provided greater islet engraftment than the gastric submucosa. These results demonstrate scaffolds support murine islet transplantation with high efficiency, and feasibility studies in large animals support continued pre-clinical studies with scaffolds as a platform to control the transplant microenvironment.

  6. Raldh3 expression in diabetic islets reciprocally regulates secretion of insulin and glucagon from pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Mitsuru; Karasawa, Hiroshi; Sakakibara, Sachiko; Shinagawa, Akira

    2010-10-08

    We have previously reported that obesity-induced diabetes developed in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed BDF1 mice. This is caused by insufficient insulin response to an excess glucose load. In this study, we have shown that the enhanced expression of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 3 (Raldh3) causes functional disorders of pancreatic islets in diabetic mouse models. In the pancreatic islets of HFD-induced diabetic BDF1 mice and spontaneously diabetic C57BL/KsJ(db/db) mice, gene expression analysis with oligonucleotide microarray revealed a significant increase in Raldh3 expression. Exposure to a culture medium containing a higher glucose concentration (25 mM) significantly increased Raldh3 expression in murine MIN6 and alphaTC1 clone 9 cells, which derived from the α and β-cells of pancreatic islets, respectively. Overexpression of Raldh3 reduced the insulin secretion in MIN6 cells, and surprisingly, increased the glucagon secretion in alphaTC1 clone 9 cells. Furthermore, the knockdown of Raldh3 expression with siRNA decreased the glucagon secretion in alphaTC1 clone 9 cells. Raldh3 catalyzes the conversion of 13-cis retinal to 13-cis retinoic acid and we revealed that 13-cis retinoic acid significantly reduces cell viability in MIN6 and alphaTC1 clone 9 cells, but not in cells of H4IIEC3, 3T3-L1, and COS-1 cell lines. These findings suggest that an increasing expression of Raldh3 deregulates the balanced mechanisms of insulin and glucagon secretion in the pancreatic islets and may induce β-cell dysfunction leading to the development of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of rosiglitazone treatment in the modulation of islet hormones and hormone-like peptides: a combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Sukriye; Bolkent, Sema; Sundler, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Rosiglitazone, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist, is an insulin sensitizing agent in peripheral tissues. This study investigated islet hormones and hormone-like peptides expression patterns in rosiglitazone treated streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats by using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization methods. Animals were divided into four groups. I. Group: Intact control rats. II. Group: Rosiglitazone-treated controls. III. Group: STZ-diabetic rats. IV. Group: Rosiglitazone-treated diabetic animals. Rosiglitazone was given for 7 days at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight. In the STZ-diabetic group, there were significant differences in islet hormones and hormone like peptides cell numbers compared to rosiglitazone control group and intact control group. There were significant differences in cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cell numbers between rosiglitazone control group and rosiglitazone + STZ-diabetic group. We detected a significant decrease in glucagon mRNA signals in rosiglitazone-treated control group compared to intact controls. We found a statistically significant difference in islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) mRNA signals between the STZ-diabetic group and the rosiglitazone + STZ-diabetic group. Besides, we also demonstrated co-localization of peptides by using double and triple histochemistry. In conclusion, our results show that short-term rosiglitazone treatment had a preservative effect to some extent on the expression of islet hormones and hormone-like peptides to maintain the islet function.

  8. Serotonin- and Dopamine-Related Gene Expression in db/db Mice Islets and in MIN6 β-Cells Treated with Palmitate and Oleate.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, L R; Mizgier, M L; Busso, D; Olmos, P; Galgani, J E; Valenzuela, R; Mezzano, D; Aranda, E; Cortés, V A; Santos, J L

    2016-01-01

    High circulating nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) concentration, often reported in diabetes, leads to impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) through not yet well-defined mechanisms. Serotonin and dopamine might contribute to NEFA-dependent β-cell dysfunction, since extracellular signal of these monoamines decreases GSIS. Moreover, palmitate-treated β-cells may enhance the expression of the serotonin receptor Htr2c, affecting insulin secretion. Additionally, the expression of monoamine-oxidase type B (Maob) seems to be lower in islets from humans and mice with diabetes compared to nondiabetic islets, which may lead to increased monoamine concentrations. We assessed the expression of serotonin- and dopamine-related genes in islets from db/db and wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, the effect of palmitate and oleate on the expression of such genes, 5HT content, and GSIS in MIN6 β-cell was determined. Lower Maob expression was found in islets from db/db versus WT mice and in MIN6 β-cells in response to palmitate and oleate treatment compared to vehicle. Reduced 5HT content and impaired GSIS in response to palmitate (-25%; p < 0.0001) and oleate (-43%; p < 0.0001) were detected in MIN6 β-cells. In conclusion, known defects of GSIS in islets from db/db mice and MIN6 β-cells treated with NEFAs are accompanied by reduced Maob expression and reduced 5HT content.

  9. Serotonin- and Dopamine-Related Gene Expression in db/db Mice Islets and in MIN6 β-Cells Treated with Palmitate and Oleate

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, L. R.; Olmos, P.; Galgani, J. E.; Valenzuela, R.; Aranda, E.; Cortés, V. A.; Santos, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    High circulating nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) concentration, often reported in diabetes, leads to impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) through not yet well-defined mechanisms. Serotonin and dopamine might contribute to NEFA-dependent β-cell dysfunction, since extracellular signal of these monoamines decreases GSIS. Moreover, palmitate-treated β-cells may enhance the expression of the serotonin receptor Htr2c, affecting insulin secretion. Additionally, the expression of monoamine-oxidase type B (Maob) seems to be lower in islets from humans and mice with diabetes compared to nondiabetic islets, which may lead to increased monoamine concentrations. We assessed the expression of serotonin- and dopamine-related genes in islets from db/db and wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, the effect of palmitate and oleate on the expression of such genes, 5HT content, and GSIS in MIN6 β-cell was determined. Lower Maob expression was found in islets from db/db versus WT mice and in MIN6 β-cells in response to palmitate and oleate treatment compared to vehicle. Reduced 5HT content and impaired GSIS in response to palmitate (−25%; p < 0.0001) and oleate (−43%; p < 0.0001) were detected in MIN6 β-cells. In conclusion, known defects of GSIS in islets from db/db mice and MIN6 β-cells treated with NEFAs are accompanied by reduced Maob expression and reduced 5HT content. PMID:27366756

  10. Differential wiring of local excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to islet cells in rat spinal lamina II demonstrated by laser scanning photostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Go; Kawasaki, Yasuhiko; Ji, Ru-Rong; Strassman, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    The substantia gelatinosa (lamina II) of the spinal dorsal horn contains inhibitory and excitatory interneurons that are thought to play a critical role in the modulation of nociception. However, the organization of the intrinsic circuitry within lamina II remains poorly understood. We used glutamate uncaging by laser scanning photostimulation to map the location of neurons that give rise to local synaptic inputs to islet cells, a major class of inhibitory interneuron in lamina II. We also mapped the distribution of sites on the islet cells that exhibited direct (non-synaptic) responses to uncaging of excitatory and inhibitory transmitters. Local synaptic inputs to islet cells arose almost entirely from within lamina II, and these local inputs included both excitatory and inhibitory components. Furthermore, there was a striking segregation in the location of sites that evoked excitatory versus inhibitory synaptic inputs, such that inhibitory presynaptic neurons were distributed more proximal to the islet cell soma. This was paralleled in part by a differential distribution of transmitter receptor sites on the islet cell, in that inhibitory sites were confined to the peri-somatic region while excitatory sites were more widespread. This differential organization of excitatory and inhibitory inputs suggests a principle for the wiring of local circuitry within the substantia gelatinosa. PMID:17289782

  11. A Multicenter Study: North American Islet Donor Score in Donor Pancreas Selection for Human Islet Isolation for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, Doug; Shapiro, A.M. James; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Takita, Morihito; Levy, Marlon F.; Posselt, Andrew M.; Szot, Gregory L.; Savari, Omid; Barbaro, Barbara; McGarrigle, James; Yeh, Chun Chieh; Oberholzer, Jose; Lei, Ji; Chen, Tao; Lian, Moh; Markmann, James F.; Alvarez, Alejandro; Linetsky, Elina; Ricordi, Camillo; Balamurugan, A. N.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Wilhelm, Joshua J.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo; Liu, Chengyang; Min, Zaw; Li, Yanjing; Naji, Ali; Fernandez, Luis A.; Ziemelis, Martynas; Danobeitia, Juan S.; Millis, J. Michael; Witkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Selection of an optimal donor pancreas is the first key task for successful islet isolation. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study in 11 centers in North America to develop an islet donor scoring system using donor variables. The data set consisting of 1,056 deceased donors was used for development of scoring system to predict islet isolation success (defined as post-purification islet yield >400,000 islet equivalents). With an aid of univariate logistic regression analyses, we developed North American Islet Donor Score (NAIDS) ranging 0 through 100 points. The c-index in the development cohort was 0.73 [95% confidence interval 0.70 - 0.76]. The success rate increased proportionally as NAIDS increased, from 6.8% success in NAIDS < 50 points to 53.7% success in NAIDS ≥ 80 points. We further validated NAIDS using a separate set of data consisting of 179 islet isolations. Comparable outcome of NAIDS was observed in the validation cohort. The NAIDS may be a useful tool for donor pancreas selection in the clinical practice. Apart from its utility in clinical decision-making, the NAIDS may also be used in research setting as a standardized measurement of pancreas quality. PMID:26922947

  12. [Xenogeneic cell therapeutics: Treatment of type 1 diabetes using porcine pancreatic islets and islet cells].

    PubMed

    Godehardt, Antonia W; Schilling-Leiß, Dagmar; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Tönjes, Ralf R

    2015-11-01

    In view of the existing shortage of human donor organs and tissues, xenogeneic cell therapeutics (xCT) offer an alternative for adequate treatment. In particular, porcine pancreatic islets and islet cells have already entered the field of experimental therapy for type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients. Thereby, xCT depict challenging products with a glance on medical, ethical, and regulatory questions. With cross-species transplantation (xenotransplantation), the risk of immunological graft rejection as well as the risk of infectious transmission of microbial and viral pathogens must be considered. This includes the bidirectional transmission of microorganisms from graft to host as well as from host to graft. Crossing the border of species requires a critical risk-benefit evaluation as well as a thorough longtime surveillance of transplant recipients after treatment. The international legal and regulatory requirements for xCT are inter alia based on the World Health Organization criteria summarized in the Changsha Communiqué (2008). In the European Union, they were reflected by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) Guideline on Xenogeneic Cell-based Medicinal Products following the implementation of the Regulation on Advanced Therapies (ATMP). On the basis of this regulation, the first non-clinical and clinical experiences were obtained for porcine islets. The results suggest that supportive treatment of T1DM risk patients with xCT may be an alternative to established allogeneic organ transplantation in the future.

  13. Combining gemcitabine, cisplatin, and ifosfamide (GIP) is active in patients with relapsed metastatic germ-cell tumors (GCT): a prospective multicenter GETUG phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Fizazi, K; Gravis, G; Flechon, A; Geoffrois, L; Chevreau, C; Laguerre, B; Delva, R; Eymard, J C; Rolland, F; Houede, N; Laplanche, A; Burcoveanu, D; Culine, S

    2014-05-01

    The standard treatment of patients with metastatic germ-cell tumor (GCT) relapsing after first-line chemotherapy is based on a cisplatin and ifosfamide-containing three-drug regimen, which usually yields a complete response (CR) rate <50%. As gemcitabine consistently displayed activity in patients with advanced GCT and as synergy with cisplatin was reported, we integrated this drug into the salvage triplet regimen and assessed its activity in this phase II study. The GIP regimen consisted in gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) day 1 and 5, ifosfamide 1200 mg/m(2)/day day 1-5, cisplatin 20 mg/m(2)/day day 1-5, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 263 μg/day day 7-15, repeated every 3 weeks for four cycles. Eligibility criteria were that patients had favorable prognostic factors to conventional-dose salvage chemotherapy including a testis primary tumor and a previous CR to first-line chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The primary end point was the CR rate and a two-stage Simon design was used. Thirty-seven patients were accrued and 29 (78%) achieved a favorable response, including a CR in 20 (54%) and a partial response with normalization of tumor markers (PRm-) in 9 (24%). With a median follow-up of 53 months (13-81), the 2-year overall survival rate is 73% (57%-84%) and the continuous progression-free survival rate is 51% (35%-66%). Myelosuppression was the main toxicity including febrile neutropenia in 8 (22%) patients and 18 (50%) cases required platelet infusion. No grade 3 and 4 peripheral neurotoxicity or renal toxicity occurred. Two patients died of treatment-related toxicity, one of them with cancer progression. In a multicenter context, four cycles of the GIP regimen achieved a high CR rate in patients with relapsed testicular GCT. The GIP regimen avoided severe neurotoxicity and yielded a high survival rate. NCT00127049.

  14. The release of GLP-1 and ghrelin, but not GIP and CCK, by glucose is dependent upon the length of small intestine exposed.

    PubMed

    Little, Tanya J; Doran, Selena; Meyer, James H; Smout, Andre J P M; O'Donovan, Deirdre G; Wu, Keng-Liang; Jones, Karen L; Wishart, Judith; Rayner, Christopher K; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2006-09-01

    Previous observations suggest that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released into the bloodstream only when dietary carbohydrate enters the duodenum at rates that exceed the absorptive capacity of the proximal small intestine to contact GLP-1 bearing mucosa in more distal bowel. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of modifying the length of small intestine exposed to glucose on plasma concentrations of GLP-1 and also glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), insulin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and ghrelin, and antropyloric pressures. Glucose was infused at 3.5 kcal/min into the duodenum of eight healthy males (age 18-59 yr) over 60 min on the first day into an isolated 60-cm segment of the proximal small intestine ("short-segment infusion"); on the second day, the same amount of glucose was infused with access to the entire small intestine ("long-segment infusion"). Plasma GLP-1 increased and ghrelin decreased (P < 0.05 for both) during the long-, but not the short-, segment infusion. By contrast, increases in plasma CCK and GIP did not differ between days. The rises in blood glucose and plasma insulin were greater during the long- than during the short-segment infusion (P < 0.05). During the long- but not the short-segment infusion, antral pressure waves (PWs) were suppressed (P < 0.05). Isolated pyloric PWs and basal pyloric pressure were stimulated on both days. In conclusion, the release of GLP-1 and ghrelin, but not CCK and GIP, is dependent upon >60 cm of the intestine being exposed to glucose.

  15. Glucose Metabolism, Islet Architecture, and Genetic Homogeneity in Imprinting of [Ca2+]i and Insulin Rhythms in Mouse Islets

    PubMed Central

    Nunemaker, Craig S.; Dishinger, John F.; Dula, Stacey B.; Wu, Runpei; Merrins, Matthew J.; Reid, Kendra R.; Sherman, Arthur; Kennedy, Robert T.; Satin, Leslie S.

    2009-01-01

    We reported previously that islets isolated from individual, outbred Swiss-Webster mice displayed oscillations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) that varied little between islets of a single mouse but considerably between mice, a phenomenon we termed “islet imprinting.” We have now confirmed and extended these findings in several respects. First, imprinting occurs in both inbred (C57BL/6J) as well as outbred mouse strains (Swiss-Webster; CD1). Second, imprinting was observed in NAD(P)H oscillations, indicating a metabolic component. Further, short-term exposure to a glucose-free solution, which transiently silenced [Ca2+]i oscillations, reset the oscillatory patterns to a higher frequency. This suggests a key role for glucose metabolism in maintaining imprinting, as transiently suppressing the oscillations with diazoxide, a KATP-channel opener that blocks [Ca2+]i influx downstream of glucose metabolism, did not change the imprinted patterns. Third, imprinting was not as readily observed at the level of single beta cells, as the [Ca2+]i oscillations of single cells isolated from imprinted islets exhibited highly variable, and typically slower [Ca2+]i oscillations. Lastly, to test whether the imprinted [Ca2+]i patterns were of functional significance, a novel microchip platform was used to monitor insulin release from multiple islets in real time. Insulin release patterns correlated closely with [Ca2+]i oscillations and showed significant mouse-to-mouse differences, indicating imprinting. These results indicate that islet imprinting is a general feature of islets and is likely to be of physiological significance. While islet imprinting did not depend on the genetic background of the mice, glucose metabolism and intact islet architecture may be important for the imprinting phenomenon. PMID:20037650

  16. Down-regulation of pancreatic transcription factors and incretin receptors in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kaneto, Hideaki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the most prevalent and serious metabolic diseases. Under diabetic conditions, chronic hyperglycemia and subsequent induction of oxidative stress deteriorate pancreatic β-cell function, which leads to the aggravation of type 2 diabetes. Although such phenomena are well known as glucose toxicity, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this review article, we describe the possible molecular mechanism for β-cell dysfunction found in type 2 diabetes, focusing on (1) oxidative stress, (2) pancreatic transcription factors (PDX-1 and MafA) and (3) incretin receptors (GLP-1 and GIP receptors). Under such conditions, nuclear expression levels of PDX-1 and MafA are decreased, which leads to suppression of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In addition, expression levels of GLP-1 and GIP receptors are decreased, which likely contributes to the impaired incretin effects found in diabetes. Taken together, it is likely that down-regulation of pancreatic transcription factors (PDX-1 and MafA) and down-regulation of incretin receptors (GLP-1 and GIP receptors) explain, at least in part, the molecular mechanism for β-cell dysfunction found in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24379916

  17. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  18. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  19. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  20. MULTIHORMONAL ISLET CELL CARCINOMAS IN THREE KOMODO DRAGONS (VARANUS KOMODOENSIS).

    PubMed

    Eustace, Ronan; Garner, Michael M; Cook, Kimberly; Miller, Christine; Kiupel, Matti

    2017-03-01

      Multihormonal pancreatic islet cell carcinomas were found in one female and two male captive geriatric Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis). Gross changes in the pancreas were visible in two of the cases. Clinical signs noted in the Komodo dragons were lethargy, weakness, and anorexia. Histologically, the tumors were comprised of nests and cords of well-differentiated neoplastic islet cells with scant amounts of eosinophilic cytoplasm and round, euchromatic nuclei, with rare mitoses. Infiltration by the islet cell tumor into the surrounding acinar tissue was observed in all cases, but no metastatic foci were seen. Multihormone expression was observed in all tumors, which labeled strongly positive for glucagon and somatostatin and focally positive for polypeptide. Pancreatic islet cell neoplasms should be considered in the differential diagnosis for geriatric Komodo dragons presenting with weakness, lethargy, and poor appetite.

  1. Engineering a Local Microenvironment for Pancreatic Islet Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, Maria M.; Stabler, Cherie L.

    2013-01-01

    Intraportal islet transplantation has emerged as a promising treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Nevertheless, long-term efficacy has been limited to a marginal number of patients. Outcomes have been restricted, in part, by challenges associated with the transplant site, poor vascularization, and disruption of the native islet architecture during the isolation process. Engineering a biomaterial platform that recapitulates critical components of the pancreatic environment can serve to address these hurdles. This review highlights the challenges and opportunities in engineering 3-D niches for islets, specifically: the importance of site selection; the application of scaffold functionalization to present bioactive motifs; and the development of technologies for enhancing implant nutritional profiles. The potential of these novel approaches to improve islet engraftment and duration of function is discussed. PMID:23769320

  2. Islet inflammation: A unifying target for diabetes treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Yumi; Dobrian, Anca D.; Morris, Margaret A.; Nadler, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, islet inflammation has emerged as a contributor to the loss of functional β cell mass in both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Evidence supports that over-nutrition and insulin resistance result in the production of proinflammatory mediators by β cells. In addition to compromising β cell function and survival, cytokines may recruit macrophages into islets, thus augmenting inflammation. Limited, but intriguing, data implies a role of adaptive immune response in islet dysfunction in T2D. Clinical trials validated anti-inflammatory therapies in T2D, while immune therapy for T1D remains challenging. Further research is required to improve our understanding of islet inflammatory pathways, and to identify more effective therapeutic targets for T1D and T2D. PMID:23484621

  3. Islet cell xenotransplantation: a serious look toward the clinic.

    PubMed

    Samy, Kannan P; Martin, Benjamin M; Turgeon, Nicole A; Kirk, Allan D

    2014-01-01

    Type I diabetes remains a significant clinical problem in need of a reliable, generally applicable solution. Both whole organ pancreas and islet allotransplantation have been shown to grant patients insulin independence, but organ availability has restricted these procedures to an exceptionally small subset of the diabetic population. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has been pursued as a potential means of overcoming the limits of allotransplantation, and several preclinical studies have achieved near-physiologic function and year-long survival in clinically relevant pig-to-primate model systems. These proof-of-concept studies have suggested that xenogeneic islets may be poised for use in clinical trials. In this review, we examine recent progress in islet xenotransplantation, with a critical eye toward the gaps between the current state of the art and the state required for appropriate clinical investigation.

  4. Islet Cell Xenotransplantation: A Serious Look Towards the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Samy, Kannan P.; Martin, Benjamin; Turgeon, Nicole A.; Kirk, Allan D.

    2014-01-01

    Type I diabetes remains a significant clinical problem in need of a reliable, generally applicable solution. Both whole organ pancreas and islet allotransplantation have been shown to grant patients insulin independence, but organ availability has restricted these procedures to an exceptionally small subset of the diabetic population. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has been pursued as a potential means of overcoming the limits of allotransplantation, and several preclinical studies have achieved near-physiologic function and yearlong survival in clinically relevant pig to primate model systems. These proof-of-concept studies have suggested that xenogeneic islets may be poised for use in clinical trials. In this commentary, we examine recent progress in islet xenotransplantation, with a critical eye towards the gaps between the current state of the art and the state required for appropriate clinical investigation. PMID:24806830

  5. In situ application of hydrogel-type fibrin-islet composite optimized for rapid glycemic control by subcutaneous xenogeneic porcine islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Nam, Hye-Young; Lim, Hyun-Ju; Shin, Jun-Seop; Shin, Jin-Young; Ryu, Ju-Hee; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick-Chan; Jin, Sang-Man; Kim, Hang-Rae; Kim, Sang-Joon; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2012-09-10

    Maximum engraftment of transplanted islets is essential for the clinical application of a subcutaneous site. Significant barriers to the current approaches are associated with their low effectiveness, complexity and unproven biosafety. Here, we evaluated and optimized a fibrin-islet composite for effective glycemic control in a subcutaneous site whose environment is highly hypoxic due to low vascularization potential. In the setting of xenogeneic porcine islet transplantation into the subcutaneous space of a diabetic mouse, the in vivo islet functions were greatly affected by the concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin. The optimized hydrogel-type fibrin remarkably reduced the marginal islet mass to approximately one tenth that of islets without fibrin. This marginal islet mass was comparable to that in the setting of the subcapsular space of the kidney, which is a highly vascularized organ. Highly vascularized structures were generated inside and on the outer surface of the grafts. A hydrogel-type fibrin-islet composite established early diabetic control within an average of 3.4days after the transplantation. In the mechanistic studies, fibrin promoted local angiogenesis, enhanced islet viability and prevented fragmentation of islets into single cells. In conclusion, in situ application of hydrogel-type fibrin-islet composite may be a promising modality in the clinical success of subcutaneous islet transplantation.

  6. Leptin rapidly suppresses insulin release from insulinoma cells, rat and human islets and, in vivo, in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, R N; Wang, Z L; Wang, R M; Hurley, J D; Smith, D M; Ghatei, M A; Withers, D J; Gardiner, J V; Bailey, C J; Bloom, S R

    1997-01-01

    Obesity is associated with diabetes, and leptin is known to be elevated in obesity. To investigate whether leptin has a direct effect on insulin secretion, isolated rat and human islets and cultured insulinoma cells were studied. In all cases, mouse leptin inhibited insulin secretion at concentrations within the plasma range reported in humans. Insulin mRNA expression was also suppressed in the cultured cells and rat islets. The long form of the leptin receptor (OB-Rb) mRNA was present in the islets and insulinoma cell lines. To determine the significance of these findings in vivo, normal fed mice were injected with two doses of leptin. A significant decrease in plasma insulin and associated rise in glucose concentration were observed. Fasted normal and leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice showed no response to leptin. A dose of leptin, which mimicked that found in normal mice, was administered to leptin-deficient, hyperinsulinemic ob/ob mice. This caused a marked lowering of plasma insulin concentration and a doubling of plasma glucose. Thus, leptin has a powerful acute inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. These results suggest that the action of leptin may be one mechanism by which excess adipose tissue could acutely impair carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:9389736

  7. A preclinical evaluation of alternative site for islet allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    He, Sirong; Yuan, Yujia; Han, Pengfei; Wang, Dan; Chen, Younan; Liu, Jingping; Tian, Bole; Yang, Guang; Yi, Shounan; Gao, Fabao; Zhong, Zhihui; Li, Hongxia; Cheng, Jingqiu; Lu, Yanrong

    2017-01-01

    The bone marrow cavity (BMC) has recently been identified as an alternative site to the liver for islet transplantation. This study aimed to compare the BMC with the liver as an islet allotransplantation site in diabetic monkeys. Diabetes was induced in Rhesus monkeys using streptozocin, and the monkeys were then divided into the following three groups: Group1 (islets transplanted in the liver with immunosuppressant), Group 2 (islets transplanted in the tibial BMC), and Group 3 (islets transplanted in the tibial BMC with immunosuppressant). The C-peptide and blood glucose levels were preoperatively measured. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was conducted to assess graft function, and complete blood cell counts were performed to assess cell population changes. Cytokine expression was measured using an enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) and MILLIPLEX. Five monkeys in Group 3 exhibited a significantly increased insulin-independent time compared with the other groups (Group 1: 78.2 ± 19.0 days; Group 2: 58.8 ± 17.0 days; Group 3: 189.6 ± 26.2 days) and demonstrated increases in plasma C-peptide 4 months after transplantation. The infusion procedure was not associated with adverse effects. Functional islets in the BMC were observed 225 days after transplantation using the dithizone (DTZ) and insulin/glucagon stains. Our results showed that allogeneic islets transplanted in the BMC of diabetic Rhesus monkeys remained alive and functional for a longer time than those transplanted in the liver. This study was the first successful demonstration of allogeneic islet engraftment in the BMC of non-human primates (NHPs). PMID:28358858

  8. Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kurt W.; Head, W. Steve

    2013-01-01

    The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36−/−). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36+/− and Cx36−/− mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology. PMID:24326425

  9. Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Short, Kurt W; Head, W Steve; Piston, David W

    2014-02-01

    The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36(-/-)). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36(+/-) and Cx36(-/-) mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology.

  10. Clinical islet transplant: current and future directions towards tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, A M James; Nanji, Sulaiman A; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2003-12-01

    The ultimate goal of islet transplantation is to completely correct the diabetic state from an unlimited donor source, without the need for chronic immunosuppressive drug therapy. Although islet transplantation provides an opportunity to develop innovative strategies for tolerance in the clinic, both alloimmune and autoimmune barriers must be controlled, if stable graft function is to be maintained long-term. After islet extraction from the pancreas, the cellular graft may be stored in tissue culture or cryopreserved for banking, providing an opportunity not only to optimally condition the recipient but also to allow in vitro immunologic manipulation of the graft before transplantation, unlike solid organ grafts. As such, islets may be considered a "special case." Remarkable progress has occurred in the last three years, with dramatic improvements in outcomes after clinical islet transplantation. The introduction of a steroid-free, sirolimus-based, anti-rejection protocol and islets prepared from two (or rarely three) donors led to high rates of insulin independence. The "Edmonton Protocol" has been successfully replicated by other centers in an international multicenter trial. A number of key refinements in pancreas transportation, processing, purification on non-ficoll-based media, storage of islets in culture for two days and newer immunological conditioning and induction therapies have led to continued advancement through extensive collaboration between key centers. This review outlines the historical development of islet transplantation over the past 30 years, provides an update on current clinical outcomes, and summarizes a series of unique opportunities for development and early testing of tolerance protocols in patients.

  11. Pancreatic islet enhancer clusters enriched in type 2 diabetes risk-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Gaulton, Kyle J; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Mularoni, Loris; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Akerman, Ildem; Tena, Juan J; Morán, Ignasi; Gómez-Marín, Carlos; van de Bunt, Martijn; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Castro, Natalia; Nammo, Takao; Cebola, Inês; García-Hurtado, Javier; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Pattou, François; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Gloyn, Anna L; Ravassard, Philippe; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Müller, Ferenc; McCarthy, Mark I; Ferrer, Jorge

    2014-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects over 300 million people, causing severe complications and premature death, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Pancreatic islet dysfunction is central in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, and understanding islet genome regulation could therefore provide valuable mechanistic insights. We have now mapped and examined the function of human islet cis-regulatory networks. We identify genomic sequences that are targeted by islet transcription factors to drive islet-specific gene activity and show that most such sequences reside in clusters of enhancers that form physical three-dimensional chromatin domains. We find that sequence variants associated with type 2 diabetes and fasting glycemia are enriched in these clustered islet enhancers and identify trait-associated variants that disrupt DNA binding and islet enhancer activity. Our studies illustrate how islet transcription factors interact functionally with the epigenome and provide systematic evidence that the dysregulation of islet enhancers is relevant to the mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes.

  12. A 3D map of the islet routes throughout the healthy human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; Gagniuc, Paul A.; Gubceac, Elvira; Mardare, Liliana; Popescu, Irinel; Dima, Simona; Militaru, Manuella

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans are fundamental in understanding diabetes. A healthy human pancreas from a donor has been used to asses various islet parameters and their three-dimensional distribution. Here we show that islets are spread gradually from the head up to the tail section of the pancreas in the form of contracted or dilated islet routes. We also report a particular anatomical structure, namely the cluster of islets. Our observations revealed a total of 11 islet clusters which comprise of small islets that surround large blood vessels. Additional observations in the peripancreatic adipose tissue have shown lymphoid-like nodes and blood vessels captured in a local inflammatory process. Our observations are based on regional slice maps of the pancreas, comprising of 5,423 islets. We also devised an index of sphericity which briefly indicates various islet shapes that are dominant throughout the pancreas. PMID:26417671

  13. The islet endothelial cell: a novel contributor to beta cell secretory dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Meghan F; Hull, Rebecca L

    2017-06-01

    The pancreatic islet is highly vascularised, with an extensive capillary network. In addition to providing nutrients and oxygen to islet endocrine cells and transporting hormones to the peripheral circulation, islet capillaries (comprised primarily of islet endothelial cells) are an important source of signals that enhance survival and function of the islet beta cell. In type 2 diabetes, and animal models thereof, evidence exists of morphological and functional abnormalities in these islet endothelial cells. In diabetes, islet capillaries are thickened, dilated and fragmented, and islet endothelial cells express markers of inflammation and activation. In vitro data suggest that this dysfunctional islet endothelial phenotype may contribute to impaired insulin release from the beta cell. This review examines potential candidate molecules that may mediate the positive effects of islet endothelial cells on beta cell survival and function under normal conditions. Further, it explores possible mechanisms underlying the development of islet endothelial dysfunction in diabetes and reviews therapeutic options for ameliorating this aspect of the islet lesion in type 2 diabetes. Finally, considerations regarding differences between human and rodent islet vasculature and the potentially unforeseen negative consequences of strategies to expand the islet vasculature, particularly under diabetic conditions, are discussed.

  14. Compensatory islet response to insulin resistance revealed by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Zhou, Jian -Ying; Liew, Chong Wee; Shirakawa, Jun; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Kahraman, Sevim; De Jesus, Dario F.; Bhatt, Shweta; Kim, Jong -Seo; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Camp, II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei -Jun; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2015-07-07

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selected reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In conclusion, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. In conclusion, these data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093.

  15. Compensatory islet response to insulin resistance revealed by quantitative proteomics

    DOE PAGES

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Zhou, Jian -Ying; Liew, Chong Wee; ...

    2015-07-07

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selectedmore » reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In conclusion, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. In conclusion, these data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093.« less

  16. Pancreatic islet autotransplantation for nonmalignant and malignant indications.

    PubMed

    Tanhehco, Yvette C; Weisberg, Stuart; Schwartz, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    The standard therapy for patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and severe abdominal pain is total pancreatectomy (TP) followed by islet autotransplantation (IAT) to prevent the development of brittle diabetes. In adult patients, narcotic independence is achieved in up to 73% of patients 1 to 5 years after transplantation whereas insulin independence is achieved in up to 40% of patients 1 to 2 years after transplantation. Pediatric patients have shown similar outcomes for narcotic independence (up to 79%) but better outcomes for insulin independence (up to 56% 1 year after transplantation). The quality of life of both adult and pediatric patients improved significantly after TP-IAT using the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 survey. IAT after pancreatectomy is also performed for patients with benign and malignant disease of the pancreas. The limited studies in this patient population suggest that IAT may be potentially beneficial for carefully selected patients when sufficient numbers of islet cells can be isolated. Further studies involving a larger number of patients are needed to determine the risks and benefits of IAT in patients with malignancy. The feasibility of IAT depends on the availability of a laboratory that can isolate the pancreatic islet cells. An on-site laboratory is the traditional model; however, remote processing of pancreatic islets has been reported to result in successful outcomes. This review discusses the outcomes of adult and pediatric autologous pancreatic islet cell transplantation for CP and pancreatic tumors as well as laboratory processing of pancreatic islet cells. © 2015 AABB.

  17. Adaptation of pancreatic islet cyto-architecture during development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegel, Deborah A.; Hara, Manami; Periwal, Vipul

    2016-04-01

    Plasma glucose in mammals is regulated by hormones secreted by the islets of Langerhans embedded in the exocrine pancreas. Islets consist of endocrine cells, primarily α, β, and δ cells, which secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin, respectively. β cells form irregular locally connected clusters within islets that act in concert to secrete insulin upon glucose stimulation. Varying demands and available nutrients during development produce changes in the local connectivity of β cells in an islet. We showed in earlier work that graph theory provides a framework for the quantification of the seemingly stochastic cyto-architecture of β cells in an islet. To quantify the dynamics of endocrine connectivity during development requires a framework for characterizing changes in the probability distribution on the space of possible graphs, essentially a Fokker-Planck formalism on graphs. With large-scale imaging data for hundreds of thousands of islets containing millions of cells from human specimens, we show that this dynamics can be determined quantitatively. Requiring that rearrangement and cell addition processes match the observed dynamic developmental changes in quantitative topological graph characteristics strongly constrained possible processes. Our results suggest that there is a transient shift in preferred connectivity for β cells between 1-35 weeks and 12-24 months.

  18. Compensatory Islet Response to Insulin Resistance Revealed by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Gedeon, Nicholas; Kahraman, Sevim; De Jesus, Dario F.; Bhatt, Shweta; Kim, Jong-Seo; Clauss, Therese RW; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2015-01-01

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selected reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In summary, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. These data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093. PMID:26151086

  19. Intraportal islet transplantation: the impact of the liver microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Delaune, Vaihere; Berney, Thierry; Lacotte, Stéphanie; Toso, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The portal vein remains the preferred site for pancreatic islet transplantation due to its easy access and low morbidity. However, despite great progress in isolation and transplantation protocols over the past few years, it is still associated with the early loss of some 50-70% of transplanted islets. The complex liver microenvironment itself presumably plays an important role in this loss. The present review focuses on the specifics of the liver microenvironment, notably the localized hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury following transplantation, the low oxygenation of the portal vein, the instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction, the endogenous liver immune system, and the gut-liver axis, and how they can each have an impact on the transplanted islets. It identifies the potential, or already applied, clinical interventions for improving intraportal islet survival, and pinpoints those promising areas still lacking preclinical research. Future interventions on clinical intraportal islet transplantation need to take into account the global context of the liver microenvironment, with multi-point interventions being most likely to improve early islet survival and engraftment. © 2017 The Authors. Transplant International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Steunstichting ESOT.

  20. Elevation of cytosolic calcium by imidazolines in mouse islets of Langerhans: implications for stimulus-response coupling of insulin release.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, R. M.; Hashmi, M. N.; Kane, C.; Squires, P. E.; Dunne, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. Microfluorimetry techniques with fura-2 were used to characterize the effects of efaroxan (200 microM), phenotolamine (200-500 microM) and idazoxan (200-500 microM) on the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in mouse isolated islets of Langerhans. 2. The imidazoline receptor agonists efaroxan and phentolamine consistently elevated cytosolic Ca2+ by mechanisms that were dependent upon Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane; there was no rise in [Ca2+]i when Ca2+ was removed from outside of the islets and diazoxide (100-250 microM) attenuated the responses. 3. Modulation of cytosolic [Ca2+]i by efaroxan and phentolamine was augmented by glucose (5-10 mM) which both potentiated the magnitude of the response and reduced the onset time of imidazoline-induced rises in [Ca2+]i. 4. Efaroxan- and phentolamine-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i were unaffected by overnight pretreatment of islets with the imidazolines. Idazoxan failed to increase [Ca2+]i under any experimental condition tested. 5. The putative endogenous ligand of imidazoline receptors, agmatine (1 microM-1 mM), blocked KATP channels in isolated patches of beta-cell membrane, but effects upon [Ca2+]i could not be further investigated since agmatine disrupts fura-2 fluorescence. 6. In conclusion, the present study shows that imidazolines will evoke rises in [Ca2+]i in intact islets, and this provides an explanation to account for the previously described effects of imidazolines on KATP channels, the cell membrane potential and insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. PMID:8922740

  1. Chronic Glucose Exposure Systematically Shifts the Oscillatory Threshold of Mouse Islets: Experimental Evidence for an Early Intrinsic Mechanism of Compensation for Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Eric; Thompson, Benjamin; Vadrevu, Suryakiran; Lu, Shusheng; Kennedy, Robert T.; Ha, Joon; Sherman, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Mouse islets exhibit glucose-dependent oscillations in electrical activity, intracellular Ca2+ and insulin secretion. We developed a mathematical model in which a left shift in glucose threshold helps compensate for insulin resistance. To test this experimentally, we exposed isolated mouse islets to varying glucose concentrations overnight and monitored their glucose sensitivity the next day by measuring intracellular Ca2+, electrical activity, and insulin secretion. Glucose sensitivity of all oscillation modes was increased when overnight glucose was greater than 2.8mM. To determine whether threshold shifts were a direct effect of glucose or involved secreted insulin, the KATP opener diazoxide (Dz) was coapplied with glucose to inhibit insulin secretion. The addition of Dz or the insulin receptor antagonist s961 increased islet glucose sensitivity, whereas the KATP blocker tolbutamide tended to reduce it. This suggests insulin and glucose have opposing actions on the islet glucose threshold. To test the hypothesis that the threshold shifts were due to changes in plasma membrane KATP channels, we measured cell KATP conductance, which was confirmed to be reduced by high glucose pretreatment and further reduced by Dz. Finally, treatment of INS-1 cells with glucose and Dz overnight reduced high affinity sulfonylurea receptor (SUR1) trafficking to the plasma membrane vs glucose alone, consistent with insulin increasing KATP conductance by altering channel number. The results support a role for metabolically regulated KATP channels in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. PMID:26697721

  2. Correlation of pancreatic histopathologic findings and islet yield in children with chronic pancreatitis undergoing total pancreatectomy and islet autotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Manivel, Juan C; Bellin, Melena D; Carlson, Annelisa M; Moran, Antoinette; Freeman, Martin L; Hering, Bernhard J; Sutherland, David E R

    2010-01-01

    The probability of insulin independence after intraportal islet autotransplantation (IAT) for chronic pancreatitis (CP) treated by total pancreatectomy (TP) relates to the number of islets isolated from the excised pancreas. Our goal was to correlate the islet yield with the histopathologic findings and the clinical parameters in pediatric (age, <19 years) CP patients undergoing TP-IAT. Eighteen pediatric CP patients aged 5 to 18 years (median, 15.6 years) who underwent TP-IAT were studied. Demographics and clinical history came from medical records. Histopathologic specimens from the pancreas were evaluated for presence and severity of fibrosis, acinar cell atrophy, inflammation, and nesidioblastosis by a surgical pathologist blinded to clinical information. Fibrosis and acinar atrophy negatively correlated with islet yield (P = 0.02, r = -0.50), particularly in hereditary CP (P = 0.01). Previous duct drainage surgeries also had a strong negative correlation (P = 0.01). Islet yield was better in younger (preteen) children (P = 0.02, r = -0.61) and in those with pancreatitis of shorter duration (P = 0.04, r = -0.39). For preserving beta cell mass, it is best to perform TP-IAT early in the course of CP in children, and prior drainage procedures should be avoided to maximize the number of islets available, especially in hereditary disease.

  3. Hyaluronan and hyaluronan binding proteins are normal components of mouse pancreatic islets and are differentially expressed by islet endocrine cell types.

    PubMed

    Hull, Rebecca L; Johnson, Pamela Y; Braun, Kathleen R; Day, Anthony J; Wight, Thomas N

    2012-10-01

    The pancreatic islet comprises endocrine, vascular, and neuronal cells. Signaling among these cell types is critical for islet function. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key regulator of cell-cell signals, and while some islet ECM components have been identified, much remains unknown regarding its composition. We investigated whether hyaluronan, a common ECM component that may mediate inflammatory events, and molecules that bind hyaluronan such as versican, tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6 (TSG-6), and components of inter-α-trypsin inhibitor (IαI), heavy chains 1 and 2 (ITIH1/ITIH2), and bikunin, are normally produced in the pancreatic islet. Mouse pancreata and isolated islets were obtained for microscopy (with both paraformaldehyde and Carnoy's fixation) and mRNA. Hyaluronan was present predominantly in the peri-islet ECM, and hyaluronan synthase isoforms 1 and 3 were also expressed in islets. Versican was produced in α cells; TSG-6 in α and β cells; bikunin in α, β, and δ cells; and ITIH1/ITIH2 predominantly in β cells. Our findings demonstrate that hyaluronan, versican, TSG-6, and IαI are normal islet components and that different islet endocrine cell types contribute these ECM components. Thus, dysfunction of either α or β cells likely alters islet ECM composition and could thereby further disrupt islet function.

  4. Direct Stimulation of Islet Insulin Secretion by Glycolytic and Mitochondrial Metabolites in KCl-Depolarized Islets

    PubMed Central

    Deeney, Jude T.; Corkey, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that islet depolarization with 70 mM KCl opens Cx36 hemichannels and allows diffusion of small metabolites and cofactors through the β-cell plasma membrane. We have investigated in this islet “permeabilized” model whether glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates stimulate insulin secretion and how it correlates with ATP production (islet content plus extracellular nucleotide accumulation). Glycolytic intermediates (10 mM) stimulated insulin secretion and ATP production similarly. However, they showed differential sensitivities to respiratory chain or enzyme inhibitors. Pyruvate showed a lower secretory capacity and less ATP production than phosphoenolpyruvate, implicating an important role for glycolytic generation of ATP. ATP production by glucose-6-phosphate was not sensitive to a pyruvate kinase inhibitor that effectively suppressed the phosphoenolpyruvate-induced secretory response and islet ATP rise. Strong suppression of both insulin secretion and ATP production induced by glucose-6-phosphate was caused by 10 μM antimycin A, implicating an important role for the glycerophosphate shuttle in transferring reducing equivalents to the mitochondria. Five citric acid cycle intermediates were investigated for their secretory and ATP production capacity (succinate, fumarate, malate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate at 5 mM, together with ADP and/or NADP+ to feed the NADPH re-oxidation cycles). The magnitude of the secretory response was very similar among the different mitochondrial metabolites but α-ketoglutarate showed a more sustained second phase of secretion. Gabaculine (1 mM, a GABA-transaminase inhibitor) suppressed the second phase of secretion and the ATP-production stimulated by α-ketoglutarate, supporting a role for the GABA shuttle in the control of glucose-induced insulin secretion. None of the other citric acid intermediates essayed showed any suppression of both insulin secretion or ATP-production by the

  5. Coxsackie–adenovirus receptor expression is enhanced in pancreas from patients with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hodik, M; Anagandula, M; Fuxe, J; Krogvold, L; Dahl-Jørgensen, K; Hyöty, H; Sarmiento, L; Frisk, G

    2016-01-01

    Objectives One of the theories connecting enterovirus (EV) infection of human islets with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the development of a fertile field in the islets. This implies induction of appropriate proteins for the viral replication such as the coxsackie–adenovirus receptor (CAR). The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent CAR is expressed in human islets of Langerhans, and what conditions that would change the expression. Design Immunohistochemistry for CAR was performed on paraffin-embedded pancreatic tissue from patients with T1D (n=9 recent onset T1D, n=4 long-standing T1D), islet autoantibody-positive individuals (n=14) and non-diabetic controls (n=24) individuals. The expression of CAR was also examined by reverse transcription PCR on microdissected islets (n=5), exocrine tissue (n=5) and on explanted islets infected with EV or exposed to chemokines produced by EV-infected islet cells. Results An increased frequency of patients with T1D and autoantibody-positive individuals expressed CAR in the pancreas (p<0.039). CAR staining was detected more frequently in pancreatic islets from patients with T1D and autoantibody-positive subjects (15/27) compared with (6/24) non-diabetic controls (p<0.033). Also in explanted islets cultured in UV-treated culture medium from coxsackievirus B (CBV)-1-infected islets, the expression of the CAR gene was increased compared with controls. Laser microdissection of pancreatic tissue revealed that CAR expression was 10-fold higher in endocrine compared with exocrine cells of the pancreas. CAR was also expressed in explanted islets and the expression level decreased with time in culture. CBV-1 infection of explanted islets clearly decreased the expression of CAR (p<0.05). In contrast, infection with echovirus 6 did not affect the expression of CAR. Conclusions CAR is expressed in pancreatic islets of patients with T1D and the expression level of CAR is increased in explanted islets exposed to proinflammatory

  6. Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor expression is enhanced in pancreas from patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hodik, M; Anagandula, M; Fuxe, J; Krogvold, L; Dahl-Jørgensen, K; Hyöty, H; Sarmiento, L; Frisk, G

    2016-01-01

    One of the theories connecting enterovirus (EV) infection of human islets with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the development of a fertile field in the islets. This implies induction of appropriate proteins for the viral replication such as the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent CAR is expressed in human islets of Langerhans, and what conditions that would change the expression. Immunohistochemistry for CAR was performed on paraffin-embedded pancreatic tissue from patients with T1D (n=9 recent onset T1D, n=4 long-standing T1D), islet autoantibody-positive individuals (n=14) and non-diabetic controls (n=24) individuals. The expression of CAR was also examined by reverse transcription PCR on microdissected islets (n=5), exocrine tissue (n=5) and on explanted islets infected with EV or exposed to chemokines produced by EV-infected islet cells. An increased frequency of patients with T1D and autoantibody-positive individuals expressed CAR in the pancreas (p<0.039). CAR staining was detected more frequently in pancreatic islets from patients with T1D and autoantibody-positive subjects (15/27) compared with (6/24) non-diabetic controls (p<0.033). Also in explanted islets cultured in UV-treated culture medium from coxsackievirus B (CBV)-1-infected islets, the expression of the CAR gene was increased compared with controls. Laser microdissection of pancreatic tissue revealed that CAR expression was 10-fold higher in endocrine compared with exocrine cells of the pancreas. CAR was also expressed in explanted islets and the expression level decreased with time in culture. CBV-1 infection of explanted islets clearly decreased the expression of CAR (p<0.05). In contrast, infection with echovirus 6 did not affect the expression of CAR. CAR is expressed in pancreatic islets of patients with T1D and the expression level of CAR is increased in explanted islets exposed to proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines produced by infected

  7. Pancreatic Islet Survival and Engraftment Is Promoted by Culture on Functionalized Spider Silk Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ulrika; Dekki Shalaly, Nancy; Zaitsev, Sergei V.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets is one approach for treatment of diabetes, however, hampered by the low availability of viable islets. Islet isolation leads to disruption of the environment surrounding the endocrine cells, which contributes to eventual cell death. The reestablishment of this environment is vital, why we herein investigated the possibility of using recombinant spider silk to support islets in vitro after isolation. The spider silk protein 4RepCT was formulated into three different formats; 2D-film, fiber mesh and 3D-foam, in order to provide a matrix that can give the islets physical support in vitro. Moreover, cell-binding motifs from laminin were incorporated into the silk protein in order to create matrices that mimic the natural cell environment. Pancreatic mouse islets were thoroughly analyzed for adherence, necrosis and function after in vitro maintenance on the silk matrices. To investigate their suitability for transplantation, we utilized an eye model which allows in vivo imaging of engraftment. Interestingly, islets that had been maintained on silk foam during in vitro culture showed improved revascularization. This coincided with the observation of preserved islet architecture with endothelial cells present after in vitro culture on silk foam. Selected matrices were further evaluated for long-term preservation of human islets. Matrices with the cell-binding motif RGD improved human islet maintenance (from 36% to 79%) with preserved islets architecture and function for over 3 months in vitro. The islets established cell-matrix contacts and formed vessel-like structures along the silk. Moreover, RGD matrices promoted formation of new, insulin-positive islet-like clusters that were connected to the original islets via endothelial cells. On silk matrices with islets from younger donors (<35 year), the amount of newly formed islet-like clusters found after 1 month in culture were almost double compared to the initial number of islets

  8. Pancreatic Islet Survival and Engraftment Is Promoted by Culture on Functionalized Spider Silk Matrices.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ulrika; Ria, Massimiliano; Åvall, Karin; Dekki Shalaly, Nancy; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Berggren, Per-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets is one approach for treatment of diabetes, however, hampered by the low availability of viable islets. Islet isolation leads to disruption of the environment surrounding the endocrine cells, which contributes to eventual cell death. The reestablishment of this environment is vital, why we herein investigated the possibility of using recombinant spider silk to support islets in vitro after isolation. The spider silk protein 4RepCT was formulated into three different formats; 2D-film, fiber mesh and 3D-foam, in order to provide a matrix that can give the islets physical support in vitro. Moreover, cell-binding motifs from laminin were incorporated into the silk protein in order to create matrices that mimic the natural cell environment. Pancreatic mouse islets were thoroughly analyzed for adherence, necrosis and function after in vitro maintenance on the silk matrices. To investigate their suitability for transplantation, we utilized an eye model which allows in vivo imaging of engraftment. Interestingly, islets that had been maintained on silk foam during in vitro culture showed improved revascularization. This coincided with the observation of preserved islet architecture with endothelial cells present after in vitro culture on silk foam. Selected matrices were further evaluated for long-term preservation of human islets. Matrices with the cell-binding motif RGD improved human islet maintenance (from 36% to 79%) with preserved islets architecture and function for over 3 months in vitro. The islets established cell-matrix contacts and formed vessel-like structures along the silk. Moreover, RGD matrices promoted formation of new, insulin-positive islet-like clusters that were connected to the original islets via endothelial cells. On silk matrices with islets from younger donors (<35 year), the amount of newly formed islet-like clusters found after 1 month in culture were almost double compared to the initial number of islets

  9. Human islet mass, morphology, and survival after cryopreservation using the Edmonton protocol

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Priya M; Mohan, Viswanathan; Ganthimathy, Sekhar; Anjana, Ranjit M; Gunasekaran, S; Thiagarajan, Venkatachalam; Churchill, Thomas A; Kin, Tatsuya; Shapiro, AM James; Lakey, Jonathan RT

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess recovery, cell death, and cell composition of post-thaw cultured human islets. Cryopreserved islets were provided by the Clinical Islet Transplant Program, Edmonton, Canada. Islets were processed using media prepared in accordance with Pre-Edmonton and Edmonton protocols. Cryopreserved islets were rapidly thawed and cultured for 24 h, 3 d, 5 d, and 7 d, following which they were processed for histology. Islet quantification, integrity, morphology and tissue turnover were studied via hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Ultrastructure was studied by electron microscopy and endocrine cell composition by immunohistochemistry. Using the Pre-Edmonton protocol, islet recovery was 50.1% and islet survival was 50% at 24 h while for the Edmonton protocol, the islet recovery was 69.4% (p < 0.001) and islet survival, 50% at ≈2.5 d. With an increasing culture duration although the physical integrity was retained there was an increasing loss of cohesivity both at light microscopic and at ultrastructure level regardless of the protocols used. Percentage islet survival and tissue turnover correlated negatively with culture duration in both protocols. The Edmonton protocol appears to preserve the islets better. However, culture duration adversely affects islet survival and quality, indicating the need for more optimal cryopreservation and culture techniques. PMID:24759005

  10. Human islet mass, morphology, and survival after cryopreservation using the Edmonton protocol.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Priya M; Mohan, Viswanathan; Ganthimathy, Sekhar; Anjana, Ranjit M; Gunasekaran, S; Thiagarajan, Venkatachalam; Churchill, Thomas A; Kin, Tatsuya; Shapiro, A M James; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess recovery, cell death, and cell composition of post-thaw cultured human islets. Cryopreserved islets were provided by the Clinical Islet Transplant Program, Edmonton, Canada. Islets were processed using media prepared in accordance with Pre-Edmonton and Edmonton protocols. Cryopreserved islets were rapidly thawed and cultured for 24 h, 3 d, 5 d, and 7 d, following which they were processed for histology. Islet quantification, integrity, morphology and tissue turnover were studied via hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Ultrastructure was studied by electron microscopy and endocrine cell composition by immunohistochemistry. Using the Pre-Edmonton protocol, islet recovery was 50.1% and islet survival was 50% at 24 h while for the Edmonton protocol, the islet recovery was 69.4% (p<0.001) and islet survival, 50% at ≈2.5 d. With an increasing culture duration although the physical integrity was retained there was an increasing loss of cohesivity both at light microscopic and at ultrastructure level regardless of the protocols used. Percentage islet survival and tissue turnover correlated negatively with culture duration in both protocols. The Edmonton protocol appears to preserve the islets better. However, culture duration adversely affects islet survival and quality, indicating the need for more optimal cryopreservation and culture techniques.

  11. Biomembrane and receptor mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.; Bertoli, E.

    1987-01-01

    This book cover the reviews on biomembrane dynamics; recent spectroscopic studies. Topics covered are freeze fracture: Seeing and thinking biological membranes, membrane proteins and receptors: structure and organisation; techniques to determine the transbilayer distribution and mobility of phospholipids in biological membranes, transbilayer organisation of phospholipids in the plasma membranes of pro-erythroblasts and normal and abnormal red cells, aminophospholipid translocation in the erythroctye membrane is mediated by a specific AIP-dependent enzyme; membrane protein interactions, lipid-protein interactions: selectively and receptor binding, membrane fluidity in the regulation of membrane-linked enzymes, the lipid regulation of receptor functions, microheterogencity of biological membrane: structural and functional implications, fusion-fission reactions in biological membranes and in phospholpid bilayers, methods for studying the structure and function of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein, methods for studying metabolite transport in mitochondria, transport of metabolites in mitochondria, membrane gangliosides and allied glycosphingolipids: Biochemical features and physicochemical properties, the use of merocyanine 540 for monitoring aggregation properties of sialogangliosides in solution, hormone reception at the cell surface - an overview, double role for GIP in the stimulus secretion sequence of mast cells and neurophils, tumor promoters and hormone receptor coupling mechanisms in the anterior pituitary. The regulation of hormone-dependent adenylate cyclase in native membranes and systems reconstituted from purified components.- Immunological tools for the study of plasma membrane receptors.

  12. NMR spectroscopy in beta cell engineering and islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Papas, K K; Colton, C K; Gounarides, J S; Roos, E S; Jarema, M A; Shapiro, M J; Cheng, L L; Cline, G W; Shulman, G I; Wu, H; Bonner-Weir, S; Weir, G C

    2001-11-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising method for restoring normoglycemia and alleviating the long term complications of diabetes. Widespread application of islet transplantation is hindered by the limited supply of human islets and requires a large increase in the availability of suitable insulin secreting tissue as well as robust quality assessment methodologies that can ensure safety and in vivo efficacy. We explore the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in two areas relevant to beta cell engineering and islet transplantation: (1) the effect of genetic alterations on glucose metabolism, and (2) quality assessment of islet preparations prior to transplantation. Results obtained utilizing a variety of NMR techniques demonstrate the following: (1) Transfection of Rat1 cells with the c-myc oncogene (which may be involved in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation) and overexpression of Bcl-2 (which may protect cells from stresses such as hypoxia and exposure to cytokines) introduce a wide array of alterations in cellular biochemistry, including changes in anaerobic and oxidative glucose metabolism, as assessed by 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopy. (2) Overnight incubation of islets and beta cells in the bottom of centrifuge tubes filled with medium at room temperature, as is sometimes done in islet transportation, exposes them to severe oxygen limitations that may cause cell damage. Such exposure, leading to reversible or irreversible damage, can be observed with NMR-detectable markers using conventional 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopy of extracts. In addition, markers of irreversible damage (as well as markers of hypoxia) can be detected and quantified without cell extraction using high-resolution magic angle spinning 1H NMR spectroscopy. Finally, acute ischemia in a bed of perfused beta cells leads to completely reversible changes that can be followed in real time with 31P NMR spectroscopy.

  13. An 'alpha-beta' of pancreatic islet microribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Eliasson, Lena

    2017-01-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are cellular, short, non-coding ribonucleotides acting as endogenous posttranscriptional repressors following incorporation in the RNA-induced silencing complex. Despite being chemically and mechanistically very similar, miRNAs exert a multitude of different cellular effects by acting on mRNA species, whose gene-products partake in a wide array of processes. Here, the aim was to review the knowledge of miRNA expression and action in the islet of Langerhans. We have focused on: 1) physiological consequences of islet or beta cell specific inhibition of miRNA processing, 2) mechanisms regulating processing of miRNAs in islet cells, 3) presence and function of miRNAs in alpha versus beta cells - the two main cell types of islets, and 4) miRNA mediators of beta cell decompensation. It is clear that miRNAs regulate pancreatic islet development, maturation, and function in vivo. Moreover, processing of miRNAs appears to be altered by obesity, diabetes, and aging. A number of miRNAs (such as miR-7, miR-21, miR-29, miR-34a, miR-212/miR-132, miR-184, miR-200 and miR-375) are involved in mediating beta cell dysfunction and/or compensation induced by hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, cytotoxic cytokines, and in rodent models of fetal metabolic programming prediabetes and overt diabetes. Studies of human type 2 diabetic islets underline that these miRNA families could have important roles also in human type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, there is a genuine gap of knowledge regarding miRNA expression and function in pancreatic alpha cells. Progress in this area would be enhanced by improved in vitro alpha cell models and better tools for islet cell sorting.

  14. Survival of encapsulated islets: More than a membrane story

    PubMed Central

    Barkai, Uriel; Rotem, Avi; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    At present, proven clinical treatments but no cures are available for diabetes, a global epidemic with a huge economic burden. Transplantation of islets of Langerhans by their infusion into vascularized organs is an experimental clinical protocol, the first approach to attain cure. However, it is associated with lifelong use of immunosuppressants. To overcome the need for immunosuppression, islets are encapsulated and separated from the host immune system by a permselective membrane. The lead material for this application is alginate which was tested in many animal models and a few clinical trials. This review discusses all aspects related to the function of transplanted encapsulated islets such as the basic requirements from a permselective membrane (e.g., allowable hydrodynamic radii, implications of the thickness of the membrane and relative electrical charge). Another aspect involves adequate oxygen supply, which is essential for survival/performance of transplanted islets, especially when using large retrievable macro-capsules implanted in poorly oxygenated sites like the subcutis. Notably, islets can survive under low oxygen tension and are physiologically active at > 40 Torr. Surprisingly, when densely crowded, islets are fully functional under hyperoxic pressure of up to 500 Torr (> 300% of atmospheric oxygen tension). The review also addresses an additional category of requirements for optimal performance of transplanted islets, named auxiliary technologies. These include control of inflammation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and the intra-capsular environment. The review highlights that curing diabetes with a functional bio-artificial pancreas requires optimizing all of these aspects, and that significant advances have already been made in many of them. PMID:27011906

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Islets of Langerhans Encapsulated in Alginate

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy S.; O'Sullivan, Esther; D'Aoust, Laura N.; Omer, Abdulkadir; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Fisher, Robert J.; Weir, Gordon C.

    2011-01-01

    Improved methods have recently been developed for assessing islet viability and quantity in human islet preparations for transplantation, and these measurements have proven useful for predicting transplantation outcome. The objectives of this study were to adapt these methods for use with microencapsulated islets, to verify that they provide meaningful quantitative measurements, and to test them with two model systems: (1) barium alginate and (2) barium alginate containing a 70% (w/v) perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion, which presents challenges to use of these assays and is of interest in its own right as a means for reducing oxygen supply limitations to encapsulated tissue. Mitochondrial function was assessed by oxygen consumption rate measurements, and the analysis of data was modified to account for the increased solubility of oxygen in the PFC-alginate capsules. Capsules were dissolved and tissue recovered for nuclei counting to measure the number of cells. Capsule volume was determined from alginate or PFC content and used to normalize measurements. After low oxygen culture for 2 days, islets in normal alginate lost substantial viable tissue and displayed necrotic cores, whereas most of the original oxygen consumption rate was recovered with PFC alginate, and little necrosis was observed. All nuclei were recovered with normal alginate, but some nuclei from nonrespiring cells were lost with PFC alginate. Biocompatibility tests revealed toxicity at the islet periphery associated with the lipid emulsion used to provide surfactants during the emulsification process. We conclude that these new assay methods can be applied to islets encapsulated in materials as complex as PFC-alginate. Measurements made with these materials revealed that enhancement of oxygen permeability of the encapsulating material with a concentrated PFC emulsion improves survival of encapsulated islets under hypoxic conditions, but reformulation of the PFC emulsion is needed to reduce toxicity

  16. Optimal device and method for transportation of isolated porcine islet.

    PubMed

    Kim, T-S; Lee, H-S; Oh, S-H; Moon, H; Lee, S; Song, S; Shin, M; Park, J B; Kim, S-J; Joh, J-W; Lee, S-K

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the optimal method for transportation of isolated porcine islets from an isolation facility to a transplant hospital or research center in terms of temperature, oxygen supply, and shaking effect. Commercially available insulator boxes with thermoregulators exposed for 5 hours under two external temperatures (4°C and 37°C) were monitored using HOBO temperature loggers. To find the optimal transport device, we compared islet counts, viability, quality, and function in conical tubes, gas-permeable bags (GPB) and gas-permeable flasks (GPF) after 1, 3 and 5 hours. To evaluate the effects of shaking on islets, we also analyzed the difference between a control and a shaking group in each device with time. Commercially available Styrofoam insulators with thermoregulators maintained the internal temperature near the target. Islet recovery rate for GPF, which was higher than other devices, was maintained, while those decreased with time for conical tube and GPB containers adenosine diphosphate/adenosine triphosphate (ADP/ATP) ratio for GPF was lower than other devices, albeit not significantly fluoroscein acrimide/propidium iodide (AO/PI) ratio for GPF was higher than other devices after 5 hours. Glucose stimulated index was not different among the devices. In comparison with the control group, shaking yielded comparable islet survival, viability and function. Our study demonstrated that the use of commercially available insulator boxes with thermoregulators maintained internal temperature close to the target value and that GPF was more favorable for islet oxygenation during transportation. This study also suggested negligible impact of shaking on isolated porcine islets during transportation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of resident lymphocytes in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, M; Uvebrant, K; Skog, O; Sarmiento, L; Avartsson, J; Storm, P; Vickman, P; Bertilsson, P-A; Fex, M; Korgsgren, O; Cilio, C M

    2017-03-01

    The current view of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is that it is an immune-mediated disease where lymphocytes infiltrate the pancreatic islets, promote killing of beta cells and cause overt diabetes. Although tissue resident immune cells have been demonstrated in several organs, the composition of lymphocytes in human healthy pancreatic islets have been scarcely studied. Here we aimed to investigate the phenotype of immune cells associated with human islets of non-diabetic organ donors. A flow cytometry analysis of isolated islets from perfused pancreases (n = 38) was employed to identify alpha, beta, T, natural killer (NK) and B cells. Moreover, the expression of insulin and glucagon transcripts was evaluated by RNA sequencing. Up to 80% of the lymphocytes were CD3(+) T cells with a remarkable bias towards CD8(+) cells. Central memory and effector memory phenotypes dominated within the CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells and most CD8(+) T cells were positive for CD69 and up to 50-70% for CD103, both markers of resident memory cells. The frequency of B and NK cells was low in most islet preparations (12 and 3% of CD45(+) cells, respectively), and the frequency of alpha and beta cells varied between donors and correlated clearly with insulin and glucagon mRNA expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated the predominance of canonical tissue resident memory CD8(+) T cells associated with human islets. We believe that these results are important to understand more clearly the immunobiology of human islets and the disease-related phenotypes observed in diabetes.

  18. Regulation of core clock genes in human islets.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovic, Jelena A; Olsson, Anders H; Nagorny, Cecilia L; Malmgren, Siri; Dekker-Nitert, Marloes; Ling, Charlotte; Mulder, Hindrik

    2012-07-01

    Nearly all mammalian cells express a set of genes known as clock genes. These regulate the circadian rhythm of cellular processes by means of negative and positive autoregulatory feedback loops of transcription and translation. Recent genomewide association studies have demonstrated an association between a polymorphism near the circadian clock gene CRY2 and elevated fasting glucose. To determine whether clock genes could play a pathogenetic role in the disease, we examined messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of core clock genes in human islets from donors with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses were used to assess expression of the core clock genes CLOCK, BMAL-1, PER1 to 3, and CRY1 and 2 in human islets. Insulin secretion and insulin content in human islets were measured by radioimmunoassay. The mRNA levels of PER2, PER3, and CRY2 were significantly lower in islets from donors with type 2 diabetes mellitus. To investigate the functional relevance of these clock genes, we correlated their expression to insulin content and glycated hemoglobin levels: mRNA levels of PER2 (ρ = 0.33, P = .012), PER3 (ρ = 0.30, P = .023), and CRY2 (ρ = 0.37, P = .0047) correlated positively with insulin content. Of these genes, expression of PER3 and CRY2 correlated negatively with glycated hemoglobin levels (ρ = -0.44, P = .0012; ρ = -0.28, P = .042). Furthermore, in an in vitro model mimicking pathogenetic conditions, the PER3 mRNA level was reduced in human islets exposed to 16.7 mmol/L glucose per 1 mmol/L palmitate for 48 hours (P = .003). Core clock genes are regulated in human islets. The data suggest that perturbations of circadian clock components may contribute to islet pathophysiology in human type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Maternal vitamin D-restricted diet has consequences in the formation of pancreatic islet/insulin-signaling in the adult offspring of mice.

    PubMed

    Maia-Ceciliano, Thais C; Barreto-Vianna, Andre R C; Barbosa-da-Silva, Sandra; Aguila, Marcia B; Faria, Tatiane S; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A

    2016-10-01

    The maternal deficiency of vitamin D can act on organogenesis in mice offspring, being a risk factor for chronic diseases in adulthood. This study investigates the effects of maternal deficiency of vitamin D on structural islet remodeling and insulin-signaling pathway in the offspring. We studied male C57Bl/6 offspring at 3-month old (n = 10/group) from mother fed one of the two diets: control diet (C) or vitamin D-restricted diet (VitD(-)). After weaning, offspring only fed the control diet ad libitum. In the offspring, we studied insulin production, islet remodeling, and islet protein expression of the insulin-signaling pathway (Western blotting, isolated islet, n = 5/group). VitD(-) offspring showed greater glycemia (P = 0.012), smaller beta-cell mass (P = 0.014), and hypoinsulinemia (P = 0.024) than C offspring. Comparing VitD(-) offspring with C offspring, we observed lower protein levels in islet of insulin (P = 0.003), insulin receptor substrate-1 (P = 0.025), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases (P = 0.045), 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (P = 0.017), protein kinase B (P = 0.028), with reduced expression of pancreas/duodenum homeobox-1 (PDX-1) (P = 0.016), glucose transporter-2 (P = 0.003), and glucokinase (P = 0.045). The maternal vitamin D-restricted diet modifies the development of the pancreas of the offspring, leading to islet remodeling and altered insulin-signaling pathway. The decrease of PDX-1 is probably significant to the changes in the beta-cell mass and insulin secretion in adulthood.

  20. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells enhance insulin secretion from human islets via N-cadherin interaction and prolong function of transplanted encapsulated islets in mice.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Elisa; Meier, Raphael P H; Mahou, Redouan; Seebach, Jörg D; Wandrey, Christine; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Buhler, Leo H; Gonelle-Gispert, Carmen

    2017-09-29

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) enhance viability and function of islets of Langerhans. We aimed to examine the interactions between human MSC and human islets of Langerhans that influence the function of islets. Human MSC and human islets (or pseudoislets, obtained after digestion and reaggregation of islet cells) were cocultured with or without cellular contact and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion assays were performed to assess cell function. The expression of several adhesion molecules, notably ICAM-1 and N-cadherin on islets and MSC, was investigated by qPCR. The role of N-cadherin was analyzed by adding an anti-N-cadherin antibody in islets cultured with or without MSC for 24 h followed by insulin measurements in static incubation assays. Islets and MSC were coencapsulated in new hydrogel microspheres composed of calcium alginate and covalently crosslinked polyethylene glycol. Encapsulated cells were transplanted intraperitoneally in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and glycemia was monitored. Islet function was evaluated by the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. In vitro, free islets and pseudoislets cocultured in contact with MSC showed a significantly increased insulin secretion when compared to islets or pseudoislets cultured alone or cocultured without cell-to-cell contact with MSC (p < 0.05). The expression of ICAM-1 and N-cadherin was present on islets and MSC. Blocking N-cadherin prevented the enhanced insulin secretion by islets cultured in contact with MSC whereas it did not affect insulin secretion by islets cultured alone. Upon transplantation in diabetic mice, islets microencapsulated together with MSC showed significantly prolonged normoglycemia when compared with islets alone (median 69 and 39 days, respectively, p < 0.01). The intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test revealed an improved glycemic response in mice treated with islets microencapsulated together with MSC compared to mice transplanted with islets

  1. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  2. The Effect of Leptin and Adiponectin on KiSS-1 and KissR mRNA Expression in Rat Islets of Langerhans and CRI-D2 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodzadeh Sagheb, Mandana; Azarpira, Negar; Yaghobi, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Leptin and adiponectin are the two key metabolic hormones secreted from adipocytes to control food intake and energy expenditure. The action of both hormones in regulation of Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) secretion from the hypothalamus is mediated through Kisspeptins. Kisspeptins are products of KiSS-1 gene. Leptin and adiponectin are modulators of KiSS-1 expression in the hypothalamus. These peptides have also important roles in pancreatic β-cells to control insulin synthesis and secretion and their receptors are detected in Langerhans islets. We hypothesized that leptin and adiponectin might alter KiSS-1 and Kiss Receptor mRNA expression in the islets. Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate any modulatory effect that leptin and adiponectin may have on the expression of Kiss-1 and KiSSR gene in Langerhans islets. Materials and Methods: We isolated the islets from adult male rats by collagenase and cultured CRI-D2 cell lines to investigate the effect of leptin and adiponectin. Then, we incubated them with different concentrations of leptin and adiponectin for 24 hours. After that, RNA was extracted from the islets and CRI-D2 cells and transcripted to cDNA. KiSS-1 and KissR expression levels were evaluated by real time PCR. Results: In islet and CRI-D2 cells, leptin increased the KiSS-1 mRNA expression significantly, but adiponectin decreased it was expected. Conclusions: These findings indicated the possibility that KiSS-1 mRNA expression is a mediator of leptin and adiponectin function in the islets. PMID:24910643

  3. Optimal pig donor selection in islet xenotransplantation: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-tao; Yu, Liang; Lyu, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2014-08-01

    Islet transplantation is an attractive treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Xenotransplantation, using the pig as a donor, offers the possibility of an unlimited supply of islet grafts. Published studies demonstrated that pig islets could function in diabetic primates for a long time (>6 months). However, pig-islet xenotransplantation must overcome the selection of an optimal pig donor to obtain an adequate supply of islets with high-quality, to reduce xeno-antigenicity of islet and prolong xenograft survival, and to translate experimental findings into clinical application. This review discusses the suitable pig donor for islet xenotransplantation in terms of pig age, strain, structure/function of islet, and genetically modified pig.

  4. Multicenter Australian trial of islet transplantation: improving accessibility and outcomes.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, P J; Holmes-Walker, D J; Goodman, D; Hawthorne, W J; Loudovaris, T; Gunton, J E; Thomas, H E; Grey, S T; Drogemuller, C J; Ward, G M; Torpy, D J; Coates, P T; Kay, T W

    2013-07-01

    Whilst initial rates of insulin independence following islet transplantation are encouraging, long-term function using the Edmonton Protocol remains a concern. The aim of this single-arm, multicenter study was to evaluate an immunosuppressive protocol of initial antithymocyte globulin (ATG), tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) followed by switching to sirolimus and MMF. Islets were cultured for 24 h prior to transplantation. The primary end-point was an HbA1c of <7% and cessation of severe hypoglycemia. Seventeen recipients were followed for ≥ 12 months. Nine islet preparations were transported interstate for transplantation. Similar outcomes were achieved at all three centers. Fourteen of the 17 (82%) recipients achieved the primary end-point. Nine (53%) recipients achieved insulin independence for a median of 26 months (range 7-39 months) and 6 (35%) remain insulin independent. All recipients were C-peptide positive for at least 3 months. All subjects with unstimulated C-peptide >0.2 nmol/L had cessation of severe hypoglycemia. Nine of the 17 recipients tolerated switching from tacrolimus to sirolimus with similar graft outcomes. There was a small but significant reduction in renal function in the first 12 months. The combination of islet culture, ATG, tacrolimus and MMF is a viable alternative for islet transplantation.

  5. Protein-Mediated Interactions of Pancreatic Islet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The islets of Langerhans collectively form the endocrine pancreas, the organ that is soley responsible for insulin secretion in mammals, and which plays a prominent role in the control of circulating glucose and metabolism. Normal function of these islets implies the coordination of different types of endocrine cells, noticeably of the beta cells which produce insulin. Given that an appropriate secretion of this hormone is vital to the organism, a number of mechanisms have been selected during evolution, which now converge to coordinate beta cell functions. Among these, several mechanisms depend on different families of integral membrane proteins, which ensure direct (cadherins, N-CAM, occludin, and claudins) and paracrine communications (pannexins) between beta cells, and between these cells and the other islet cell types. Also, other proteins (integrins) provide communication of the different islet cell types with the materials that form the islet basal laminae and extracellular matrix. Here, we review what is known about these proteins and their signaling in pancreatic β-cells, with particular emphasis on the signaling provided by Cx36, given that this is the integral membrane protein involved in cell-to-cell communication, which has so far been mostly investigated for effects on beta cell functions. PMID:24278783

  6. Human islet allotransplantation: world experience and current status.

    PubMed

    Cretin, N; Bühler, L; Fournier, B; Caulfield, A; Oberholzer, J; Mentha, G; Morel, P

    1998-01-01

    Currently type-I diabetes mellitus is treated with exogenous insulin administration, but traditional insulin therapy does not prevent long-term systemic complications and therefore alternatives should be sought. Presently the only option is to substitute the insulin-producing beta cells in order to obtain a more physiological way to deliver insulin. Simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation is an established procedure. Pancreas transplantation, however, is a major surgical procedure with a high rate of complications. Transplantation of the isolated insulin-secreting islets of Langerhans is an alternative approach, which is easier and safer than whole organ transplantation. Since 1990, clinical trials of islet transplantation have begun in a few specialized centers worldwide and the International Islet Registry counting 305 human islet allografts at the end of 1995. Insulin independence at 1 year was achieved in 8% of the patients, but 20% of cases showed a graft function with a normal basal C peptide and improved glycemic regulation. We review here the different aspects of human islets of Langerhans allotransplatation, namely historical aspects, indications, isolation and purification procedures and the results obtained.

  7. Pentitols and insulin release by isolated rat islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Montague, W.; Taylor, K. W.

    1968-01-01

    1. Insulin secretion was studied in isolated islets of Langerhans obtained by collagenase digestion of rat pancreas. In addition to responding to glucose and mannose as do whole pancreas and pancreas slices in vitro, isolated rat islets also secrete insulin in response to xylitol, ribitol and ribose, but not to sorbitol, mannitol, arabitol, xylose or arabinose. 2. Xylitol and ribitol readily reduce NAD+ when added to a preparation of ultrasonically treated islets. 3. Adrenaline (1μm) inhibits the effects of glucose and xylitol on insulin release. Mannoheptulose and 2-deoxy-glucose, however, inhibit the response to glucose but not that to xylitol. 4. The intracellular concentration of glucose 6-phosphate is increased when islets are incubated with glucose but not with xylitol, suggesting that xylitol does not promote insulin release by conversion into glucose 6-phosphate. 5. Theophylline (5mm) potentiates the effect of 20mm-glucose on insulin release from isolated rat islets of Langerhans, but has no effect on xylitol-mediated release. These results indicate that xylitol does not stimulate insulin release by alterations in the intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP. 6. A possible role for the metabolism of hexoses via the pentose phosphate pathway in the stimulation of insulin release is discussed. PMID:4879533

  8. Effect of GLP-1 and GIP on C-peptide secretion after glucagon or mixed meal tests: Significance in assessing B-cell function in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, C; Del Toro, R; Lauria, A; Maurizi, A R; Fallucca, S; Cappelli, A; Angeletti, S; Lachin, J M; Pozzilli, P

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the different B-cell responses after a glucagon stimulation test (GST) versus mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT). We conducted GST and MMTT in 10 healthy people (aged 25-40 years) and measured C-peptide, gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at different time points after the administration of 1 mg i.v. glucagon for GST or a liquid mixed meal for MMTT. The GST stimulated C-peptide showed a mean increase of 147.1%, whereas the mean increase of MMTT stimulated C-peptide was 99.82% (Δincrease = 47.2%). Maximum C-peptide level reached with the MMTT was greater than that obtained with the GST (C-pept max MMTT = 2.35 nmol/L vs C-pep max GST = 1.9 nmol/L). A positive and linear correlation was found between the GST incremental area under the curve C-peptide and the MMTT incremental area under the curve C-peptide (r = 0.618, P = .05). After GST, there was no increment of GIP and glucagon like peptide-1 levels compared to baseline levels. A positive and linear correlation between GIP and C-peptide levels was observed only for the MMTT (r = 0.922, P = .008) indicating that in the GST, the C-peptide response is independent of the incretin axis response. Although the 2 stimulation tests may elicit a similar response in C-peptide secretion, B-cell response to MMTT depends on a functionally normal incretin axis. These results may have implications when investigating the B-cell response in people with diabetes and for studies in which stimulated C-peptide secretion is used as primary or secondary outcome for response to therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Regulation of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass by growth factor and hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao; Chang, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction and destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells is a hallmark of diabetes. Better understanding of cellular signals in beta cells will allow development of therapeutic strategies for diabetes, such as preservation and expansion of beta-cell mass and improvement of beta-cell function. During the past several decades, the number of studies analyzing the molecular mechanisms, including growth factor/hormone signaling pathways that impact islet beta-cell mass and function, has increased exponentially. Notably, somatolactogenic hormones including growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors (GHR, PRLR, and IGF-1R) are critically involved in beta-cell growth, survival, differentiation, and insulin secretion. In this chapter, we focus more narrowly on GH, PRL, and IGF-1 signaling, and GH-IGF-1 cross talk. We also discuss how these signaling aspects contribute to the regulation of beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In particular, our novel findings of GH-induced formation of GHR-JAK2-IGF-1R protein complex and synergistic effects of GH and IGF-1 on beta-cell signaling, proliferation, and antiapoptosis lead to a new concept that IGF-1R may serve as a proximal component of GH/GHR signaling.

  10. Human islet amyloid polypeptide expression in COS-1 cells. A model of intracellular amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, T. D.; Butler, P. C.; Kreutter, D. K.; Kane, L. A.; Eberhardt, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is characterized by concurrent loss of beta-cells and deposition of islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). We have previously demonstrated that IAPP-derived amyloid forms intracellularly in humans with chronic excess insulin expression (eg, insulinoma and insulin receptor antibody-induced insulin resistance). To determine whether overexpression of IAPP results in intracellular amyloid in mammalian cells, we transfected COS cells with vectors expressing amyloidogenic human IAPP or non-amyloidogenic rat IAPP. Transfected COS-1 cells secreted comparable amounts of human IAPP and rat IAPP (2.1 to 2.8 nmol/L/48 hours). After 96 hours, 90% of cells expressing human IAPP contained amyloid fibrils and were degenerating or dead, whereas cells transfected with rat IAPP lacked amyloid and were viable. Thus, overexpression of human IAPP can result in intracellular amyloid formation that is associated with cell death, suggesting that intracellular amyloid may play a role in beta-cell loss in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7677175

  11. Transcriptome of pancreas-specific Bmpr1a-deleted islets links to TPH1–5-HT axis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Mishina, Yuji; Baten, Akma; Morahan, Grant; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is crucial for the development and function of numerous organs, but its role on the function of pancreatic islets is not completely clear. To explore this question, we applied the high throughput transcriptomic analyses on the islets isolated from mice with a pancreas-specific deletion of the gene, Bmpr1a, encoding the type 1a BMP receptor. Consistently, these pBmpr1aKO mice had impaired glucose homeostasis at 3 months, and were more severely affected at 12 months of age. These had lower fasting blood insulin concentrations, with reduced expression of several key regulators of β-cell function. Importantly, transcriptomic profiling of 3-month pBmpr1aKO islets and bioinformatic analyses revealed abnormal expression of 203 metabolic genes. Critically among these, the tryptophan hydroxylase 1 gene (Tph1), encoding the rate-limiting enzyme for the production of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) was the highest over-expressed one. 5-HT is an important regulator of insulin secretion from β cells. Treatment with excess 5-HT inhibited this secretion. Thus our transcriptomic analysis links two highly conserved molecular pathways the BMP signaling and the TPH1–5-HT axis on glucose homeostasis. PMID:26187948

  12. Aldosterone decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo in mice and in murine islets

    PubMed Central

    Luo, P.; Kreger, M. T.; Brissova, M.; Dai, C.; Whitfield, T. T.; Kim, H. S.; Wasserman, D. H.; Powers, A. C.; Brown, N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Aldosterone concentrations increase in obesity and predict the onset of diabetes. We investigated the effects of aldosterone on glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in vivo and in vitro. Methods We assessed insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in aldosterone synthase-deficient (As [also known as Cyp11b2]−/−)and wild-type mice using euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic and hyperglycaemic clamps, respectively. We also conducted studies during high sodium intake to normalise renin activity and potassium concentration in As−/− mice. We subsequently assessed the effect of aldosterone on insulin secretion in vitro in the presence or absence of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in isolated C57BL/6J islets and in the MIN6 beta cell line. Results Fasting glucose concentrations were reduced in As−/−mice compared with wild-type. During hyperglycaemic clamps, insulin and C-peptide concentrations increased to a greater extent in As−/− than in wild-type mice. This was not attributable to differences in potassium or angiotensin II, as glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was enhanced in As−/− mice even during high sodium intake. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity between As−/− and wild-type mice in euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp studies. In islet and MIN6 beta cell studies, aldosterone inhibited glucose and isobutylmethylxanthine-stimulated insulin secretion, an effect that was not blocked by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism, but was prevented by the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol. Conclusions/interpretation We demonstrated that aldosterone deficiency or excess modulates insulin secretion in vivo and in vitro via reactive oxygen species and in a manner that is independent of mineralocorticoid receptors. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of glucose intolerance in conditions of relative aldosterone excess. PMID:21519965

  13. Identification of T cell subsets and class I and class II antigen expression in islet grafts and pancreatic islets of diabetic BioBreeding/Worcester rats.

    PubMed Central

    Weringer, E. J.; Like, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    The BioBreeding/Worcester (BB/Wor) rat develops a spontaneous disorder that closely resembles human insulin-dependent (Type I) diabetes mellitus. The syndrome is preceded by lymphocytic insulitis that destroys pancreatic beta cells. The morphologic features of the spontaneous insulitis lesions are also observed within islets transplanted beneath the renal capsule of diabetes-prone and diabetic animals. This study reports the results of experiments in which immunohistochemical techniques were used to characterize the phenotype of the infiltrating mononuclear cells and detect the expression of class I and class II MHC antigens in native islets and islet transplants in diabetic and diabetes-prone BB/Wor rats. The infiltrates within native pancreatic islets and islet grafts were comprised predominantly of Ia+ cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) CD4+ cells (helper/inducer lymphocytes and macrophages), CD5+ (pan-T) cells and smaller numbers of CD8+ (cytotoxic/suppressor and NK) cells. Pancreatic and graft insulitis were accompanied by markedly enhanced class I antigen expression on islet and exocrine cells. Class II (Ia) antigens were not detected on normal islet cells, islets undergoing insulitis or on islet transplants subjected to immune attack. In islet grafts stained with polymorphic MAbs that distinguish Ia antigens of donor and host origin, Ia antigen expression was limited to infiltrating dendritic cells and macrophages of host origin. It is concluded that the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells that comprise the insulitis lesion in spontaneous BB/Wor diabetes, and the inflammatory attack on islets transplanted into diabetic BB/Wor rats are the same, that pancreatic islet and graft insulitis occur in the presence of enhanced class I antigen expression but in the absence of class II antigen expression, and that infiltrating Ia+ cells within islet grafts are exclusively of recipient (BB/Wor) origin and may explain the initiation of immune insulitis

  14. Pancreatic islet surface bioengineering with a heparin-incorporated starPEG nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Lou, Shaofeng; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Zhang, Jimin; Deng, Juan; Kong, Deling; Li, Chen

    2017-09-01

    Cell surface engineering could protect implanted cells from host immune rejections while modify the cellular landscape for better post-transplantation graft function and survival. Islet transplantation is considered the most promising therapeutic option with the potential to cure diabetes. Current approach to improve clinical efficacy of pancreatic islet transplantation is alginate encapsulation. However, disappointing outcomes have been reported in clinical trials due to larger islet size resulted by encapsulation and alginate-elicited host immune responses. We have developed an ultrathin nanofilm of starPEG with incorporated heparin (Hep-PEG) that binds covalently to the amine groups of islet surface membrane via its N-hydroxysuccinimide groups. The Hep-PEG nanocoating elicited minimal alteration on islet volume in culture. Hep-PEG-coated islets exhibited robust islet viability accompanied by uncompromised islet insulin secretory function. Instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction was also reduced by Hep-PEG islet coating, accompanied by enhanced intra-islet revascularization. In addition, despite its semi-permeability, Hep-PEG islet coating promoted the survival of islets exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines. Considering that inflammation and hypoxia are primary causes of immediate cell loss for cell therapy, the Hep-PEG nanofilm represents a viable approach for cell surface engineering which would improve the clinical outcome of cell therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional assessment of automatically sorted pancreatic islets using large particle flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Anja; Ludwig, Barbara; Krautz, Christian; Bornstein, Stefan; Solimena, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The size composition of human islet preparations has been attributed to functional potency, islet survival and transplantation outcomes. In the early post-transplantation phase islets are supplied with oxygen by diffusion only and are at risk of critical hypoxia. The high rate of early islet graft dysfunction is in part attributed to this condition. It has been presumed that islets with smaller diameter, and therefore smaller diffusion distance, are superior to large islets regarding early survival rate and graft function. In this study we aimed to evaluate Complex Object Parametric Analysis and Sorting (COPAS) as a device for automated sorting of human islets. The use of COPAS was validated for accuracy and sensitivity using polystyrene beads of known diameters. Based on time of flight relative to particle isolated islets were then automatically sorted and analyzed for viability and function using handpicked islets as control. Our results suggest that COPAS enables the automated and accurate sorting of islets with no negative impact on their integrity and viability. Thus, COPAS is an adequate tool for size-specific analysis of pancreatic islets and may be considered as part of a platform for automated high-throughput screening of pancreatic islets.

  16. Glucose-induced β cell production of IL-1β contributes to glucotoxicity in human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Maedler, Kathrin; Sergeev, Pavel; Ris, Frédéric; Oberholzer, José; Joller-Jemelka, Helen I.; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Kaiser, Nurit; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia is suggested to be detrimental to pancreatic β cells, causing impaired insulin secretion. IL-1β is a proinflammatory cytokine acting during the autoimmune process of type 1 diabetes. IL-1β inhibits β cell function and promotes Fas-triggered apoptosis in part by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Recently, we have shown that increased glucose concentrations also induce Fas expression and β cell apoptosis in human islets. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that IL-1β may mediate the deleterious effects of high glucose on human β cells. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels resulted in increased production and release of IL-1β, followed by NF-κB activation, Fas upregulation, DNA fragmentation, and impaired β cell function. The IL-1 receptor antagonist protected cultured human islets from these deleterious effects. β cells themselves were identified as the islet cellular source of glucose-induced IL-1β. In vivo, IL-1β–producing β cells were observed in pancreatic sections of type 2 diabetic patients but not in nondiabetic control subjects. Similarly, IL-1β was induced in β cells of the gerbil Psammomys obesus during development of diabetes. Treatment of the animals with phlorizin normalized plasma glucose and prevented β cell expression of IL-1β. These findings implicate an inflammatory process in the pathogenesis of glucotoxicity in type 2 diabetes and identify the IL-1β/NF-κB pathway as a target to preserve β cell mass and function in this condition. PMID:12235117

  17. Functional tissue engineering of the liver and islets.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapies by using hepatocytes and islets have recently been evaluated as a new therapeutic modality for patients with many forms of liver diseases and insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus. In most of the recently conducted clinical trials, cells have been delivered into liver vasculatures by infusing them through the portal circulation. More recently, tissue engineering-based approaches have spurred significant interests, using hepatocytes and islets in which small but functional new tissues would be created in vivo. Under circumstances in which a higher level of cell engraftment could be obtained, these approaches could provide therapeutic effects. Considerable efforts have been given to sustaining engineered tissues and maintaining their therapeutic effects. This review highlights several strategies that can achieve a higher level of cell survival for creating new functional liver and islet tissues.

  18. Cellular communication and heterogeneity in pancreatic islet insulin secretion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Richard K P; Piston, David W

    2014-08-01

    Coordinated pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion are a hallmark of the islet of Langerhans. These coordinated behaviors are lost when β cells are dissociated, which also leads to increased insulin secretion at low glucose levels. Islets without gap junctions exhibit asynchronous electrical activity similar to dispersed cells, but their secretion at low glucose levels is still clamped off, putatively by a juxtacrine mechanism. Mice lacking β cell gap junctions have near-normal average insulin levels, but are glucose intolerant due to reduced first-phase and pulsatile insulin secretion, illustrating the importance of temporal dynamics. Here, we review the quantitative data on islet synchronization and the current mathematical models that have been developed to explain these behaviors and generate greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular Communication and Heterogeneity in Pancreatic Islet Insulin Secretion Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Richard K.P.; Piston, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion are a hallmark of the islet of Langerhans. These coordinated behaviors are lost when β-cells are dissociated, which also leads to increased insulin secretion at low glucose. Islets without gap junctions exhibit asynchronous electrical activity similar to dispersed cells, but their secretion at low glucose is still clamped off, putatively by a juxtacrine mechanism. Mice lacking β-cell gap junctions have near-normal average insulin levels, but are glucose intolerant due to reduced first-phase and pulsatile insulin secretion, illustrating the importance of temporal dynamics. We review the quantitative data on islet synchronization and the current mathematical models that have been developed to explain these behaviors and generate greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:24679927

  20. Genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells for improved islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Ye, Zhaoyang; Mahato, Ram I

    2011-10-03

    The use of adult stem cells for therapeutic purposes has met with great success in recent years. Among several types of adult stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow (BM) and other sources have gained popularity for basic research and clinical applications because of their therapeutic potential in treating a variety of diseases. Because of their tissue regeneration potential and immune modulation effect, MSCs were recently used as cell-based therapy to promote revascularization, increase pancreatic β-cell proliferation, and avoid allograft rejection in islet transplantation. Taking advantage of the recent progress in gene therapy, genetically modified MSCs can further enhance and expand the therapeutic benefit of primary MSCs while retaining their stem-cell-like properties. This review aims to gain a thorough understanding of the current obstacles to successful islet transplantation and discusses the potential role of primary MSCs before or after genetic modification in islet transplantation.

  1. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) regulates metabolism and insulin secretion from a clonal rat pancreatic beta cell line BRIN-BD11 and mouse islets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Younan; Carlessi, Rodrigo; Walz, Nikita; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Keane, Kevin; John, Abraham N; Jiang, Fang-Xu; Carnagarin, Revathy; Dass, Crispin R; Newsholme, Philip

    2016-05-05

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein, associated with lipid catabolism and insulin resistance. In the present study, PEDF increased chronic and acute insulin secretion in a clonal rat β-cell line BRIN-BD11, without alteration of glucose consumption. PEDF also stimulated insulin secretion from primary mouse islets. Seahorse flux analysis demonstrated that PEDF did not change mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic function. The cytosolic presence of the putative PEDF receptor - adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) - was identified, and ATGL associated stimulation of glycerol release was robustly enhanced by PEDF, while intracellular ATP levels increased. Addition of palmitate or ex vivo stimulation with inflammatory mediators induced β-cell dysfunction, effects not altered by the addition of PEDF. In conclusion, PEDF increased insulin secretion in BRIN-BD11 and islet cells, but had no impact on glucose metabolism. Thus elevated lipolysis and enhanced fatty acid availability may impact insulin secretion following PEDF receptor (ATGL) stimulation.

  2. Islet-intrinsic effects of CFTR mutation.

    PubMed

    Koivula, Fiona N Manderson; McClenaghan, Neville H; Harper, Alan G S; Kelly, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the most significant extra-pulmonary comorbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and accelerates lung decline. In addition to the traditional view that CFRD is a consequence of fibrotic destruction of the pancreas as a whole, emerging evidence may implicate a role for cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in the regulation of insulin secretion from the pancreatic islet. Impaired first-phase insulin responses and glucose homeostasis have also been reported in CF patients. CFTR expression in both human and mouse beta cells has been confirmed, and recent studies have shown differences in endocrine pancreatic morphology from birth in CF. Recent experimental evidence suggests that functional CFTR channels are required for insulin exocytosis and the regulation of membrane potential in the pancreatic beta cell, which may account for the impairments in insulin secretion observed in many CF patients. These novel insights suggest that the pathogenesis of CFRD is more complicated than originally thought, with implications for diabetes treatment and screening in the CF population. This review summarises recent emerging evidence in support of a primary role for endocrine pancreatic dysfunction in the development of CFRD. Summary • CF is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CFTR gene • The vast majority of morbidity and mortality in CF results from lung disease. However CFRD is the largest extra-pulmonary co-morbidity and rapidly accelerates lung decline • Recent experimental evidence shows that functional CFTR channels are required for normal patterns of first phase insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta cell • Current clinical recommendations suggest that insulin is more effective than oral glucose-lowering drugs for the treatment of CFRD. However, the emergence of CFTR corrector and potentiator drugs may offer a personalised approach to treating diabetes in the CF population.

  3. Monomethylated-adenines potentiate glucose-induced insulin production and secretion via inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity in rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Boland, Brandon B; Alarcón, Cristina; Ali, Almas; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Monomethyladenines have effects on DNA repair, G-protein-coupled receptor antagonism and autophagy. In islet ß-cells, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) has been implicated in DNA-repair and autophagy, but its mechanism of action is unclear. Here, the effect of monomethylated adenines was examined in rat islets. 3-MA, N6-methyladenine (N6-MA) and 9-methyladenine (9-MA), but not 1- or 7-monomethylated adenines, specifically potentiated glucose-induced insulin secretion (3-4 fold; p ≤ 0.05) and proinsulin biosynthesis (∼2-fold; p ≤ 0.05). Using 3-MA as a 'model' monomethyladenine, it was found that 3-MA augmented [cAMP]i accumulation (2-3 fold; p ≤ 0.05) in islets within 5 minutes. The 3-, N6- and 9-MA also enhanced glucose-induced phosphorylation of the cAMP/protein kinase-A (PKA) substrate cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Treatment of islets with pertussis or cholera toxin indicated 3-MA mediated elevation of [cAMP]i was not mediated via G-protein-coupled receptors. Also, 3-MA did not compete with 9-cyclopentyladenine (9-CPA) for adenylate cyclase inhibition, but did for the pan-inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Competitive inhibition experiments with PDE-isoform specific inhibitors suggested 3-MA to have a preference for PDE4 in islet ß-cells, but this was likely reflective of PDE4 being the most abundant PDE isoform in ß-cells. In vitro enzyme assays indicated that 3-, N6- and 9-MA were capable of inhibiting most PDE isoforms found in ß-cells. Thus, in addition to known inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3'K)/m Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, 3-MA also acts as a pan-phosphodiesterase inhibitor in pancreatic ß-cells to elevate [cAMP]i and then potentiate glucose-induced insulin secretion and production in parallel.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in isolated guinea-pig islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Schrey, M P; Montague, W

    1983-01-01

    Previous studies have reported an increased turnover of phospholipid in isolated islets of Langerhans in response to raised glucose concentrations. The present investigation was thus undertaken to determine the nature of any phospholipases that may be implicated in this phenomenon by employing various radiolabelled exogenous phospholipids. Hydrolysis of 1-acyl-2-[14C]arachidonoylglycerophosphoinositol by a sonicated preparation of islets optimally released radiolabelled lysophosphatidylinositol, arachidonic acid and 1,2-diacylglycerol at pH 5,7 and 9 respectively. This indicates the presence of a phospholipase A1 and a phospholipase C. However, the lack of any labelled lysophosphatidylinositol production when 2-acyl-1-[14C]stearoylglycerophosphoinositol was hydrolysed argues against a role for phospholipase A2 in the release of arachidonic acid. Phospholipase C activity as measured by phosphatidyl-myo-[3H]inositol hydrolysis was optimal around pH8, required Ca2+ for activity and was predominantly cytosolic in origin. The time course of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis at pH 6 indicated a precursor-product relationship for 1,2-diacylglycerol and arachidonic acid respectively. The release of these two products when phosphatidylinositol was hydrolysed by either islet or acinar tissue was similar. However, phospholipase A1 activity was 20-fold higher in acinar tissue. Substrate specificity studies with islet tissue revealed that arachidonic acid release from phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine was only 8% and 2.5% respectively of that from phosphatidylinositol. Diacylglycerol lipase was also demonstrated in islet tissue being predominantly membrane bound and stimulated by Ca2+. The availability of non-esterified arachidonic acid in islet cells could be regulated by changes in the activity of a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C acting in concert with a diacylglycerol lipase. PMID:6362663

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Protects Islets from Amyloid-induced Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Daniel T.; Tu, Ling-Hsien; Zraika, Sakeneh; Hogan, Meghan F.; Templin, Andrew T.; Hull, Rebecca L.; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Kahn, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP, also known as amylin) as islet amyloid is a characteristic feature of the pancreas in type 2 diabetes, contributing to increased β-cell apoptosis and reduced β-cell mass. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is active in islets and cleaves hIAPP. We investigated whether hIAPP fragments arising from MMP-9 cleavage retain the potential to aggregate and cause toxicity, and whether overexpressing MMP-9 in amyloid-prone islets reduces amyloid burden and the resulting β-cell toxicity. Synthetic hIAPP was incubated with MMP-9 and the major hIAPP fragments observed by MS comprised residues 1–15, 1–25, 16–37, 16–25, and 26–37. The fragments 1–15, 1–25, and 26–37 did not form amyloid fibrils in vitro and they were not cytotoxic when incubated with β cells. Mixtures of these fragments with full-length hIAPP did not modulate the kinetics of fibril formation by full-length hIAPP. In contrast, the 16–37 fragment formed fibrils more rapidly than full-length hIAPP but was less cytotoxic. Co-incubation of MMP-9 and fragment 16–37 ablated amyloidogenicity, suggesting that MMP-9 cleaves hIAPP 16–37 into non-amyloidogenic fragments. Consistent with MMP-9 cleavage resulting in largely non-amyloidogenic degradation products, adenoviral overexpression of MMP-9 in amyloid-prone islets reduced amyloid deposition and β-cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that increasing islet MMP-9 activity might be a strategy to limit β-cell loss in type 2 diabetes. PMID:26483547

  6. Evaluation of the NanoCHIP® Gastrointestinal Panel (GIP) Test for Simultaneous Detection of Parasitic and Bacterial Enteric Pathogens in Fecal Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Ken Dror, Shifra; Pavlotzky, Elsa; Barak, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis is a global health problem associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Rapid and accurate diagnosis is crucial to allow appropriate and timely treatment. Current laboratory stool testing has a long turnaround time (TAT) and demands highly qualified personnel and multiple techniques. The need for high throughput and the number of possible enteric pathogens compels the implementation of a molecular approach which uses multiplex technology, without compromising performance requirements. In this work we evaluated the feasibility of the NanoCHIP® Gastrointestinal Panel (GIP) (Savyon Diagnostics, Ashdod, IL), a molecular microarray-based screening test, to be used in the routine workflow of our laboratory, a big outpatient microbiology laboratory. The NanoCHIP® GIP test provides simultaneous detection of nine major enteric bacteria and parasites: Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Giardia sp., Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Dientamoeba fragilis, and Blastocystis spp. The required high-throughput was obtained by the NanoCHIP® detection system together with the MagNA Pure 96 DNA purification system (Roche Diagnostics Ltd., Switzerland). This combined system has demonstrated a higher sensitivity and detection yield compared to the conventional methods in both, retrospective and prospective samples. The identification of multiple parasites and bacteria in a single test also enabled increased efficiency of detecting mixed infections, as well as reduced hands-on time and work load. In conclusion, the combination of these two automated systems is a proper response to the laboratory needs in terms of improving laboratory workflow, turn-around-time, minimizing human errors and can be efficiently integrated in the routine work of the laboratory. PMID:27447173

  7. Evaluation of the NanoCHIP® Gastrointestinal Panel (GIP) Test for Simultaneous Detection of Parasitic and Bacterial Enteric Pathogens in Fecal Specimens.

    PubMed

    Ken Dror, Shifra; Pavlotzky, Elsa; Barak, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis is a global health problem associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Rapid and accurate diagnosis is crucial to allow appropriate and timely treatment. Current laboratory stool testing has a long turnaround time (TAT) and demands highly qualified personnel and multiple techniques. The need for high throughput and the number of possible enteric pathogens compels the implementation of a molecular approach which uses multiplex technology, without compromising performance requirements. In this work we evaluated the feasibility of the NanoCHIP® Gastrointestinal Panel (GIP) (Savyon Diagnostics, Ashdod, IL), a molecular microarray-based screening test, to be used in the routine workflow of our laboratory, a big outpatient microbiology laboratory. The NanoCHIP® GIP test provides simultaneous detection of nine major enteric bacteria and parasites: Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Giardia sp., Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Dientamoeba fragilis, and Blastocystis spp. The required high-throughput was obtained by the NanoCHIP® detection system together with the MagNA Pure 96 DNA purification system (Roche Diagnostics Ltd., Switzerland). This combined system has demonstrated a higher sensitivity and detection yield compared to the conventional methods in both, retrospective and prospective samples. The identification of multiple parasites and bacteria in a single test also enabled increased efficiency of detecting mixed infections, as well as reduced hands-on time and work load. In conclusion, the combination of these two automated systems is a proper response to the laboratory needs in terms of improving laboratory workflow, turn-around-time, minimizing human errors and can be efficiently integrated in the routine work of the laboratory.

  8. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yong; Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema; Zhang, Yongkang; Jain, Sumit; Skidgel, Randal A.; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Mazzone, Theodore; Holterman, Mark J.

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  9. DAMP production by human islets under low oxygen and nutrients in the presence or absence of an immunoisolating-capsule and necrostatin-1

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A.; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M.; Tjoelker, Reina S.; de Haan, Bart J.; Engelse, Marten A.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In between the period of transplantation and revascularization, pancreatic islets are exposed to low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions. In the present study we mimicked those conditions in vitro to study the involvement of different cell death processes, release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMP), and associated in vitro immune activation. Under low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions, apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis occur in human islets. Necroptosis is responsible for DAMP-release such as dsDNA, uric acid, and HMGB1. The sensors of the innate immune system able to recognize these DAMPs are mainly TLR, NOD receptors, and C-type lectins. By using cell-lines with a non-functional adaptor molecule MyD88, we were able to show that the islet-derived DAMPs signal mainly via TLR. Immunoisolation in immunoprotective membranes reduced DAMP release and immune activation via retention of the relative large DAMPs in the capsules. Another effective strategy was suppressing necroptosis using the inhibitor nec-1. Although the effect on cell-survival was minor, nec-1 was able to reduce the release of HMGB1 and its associated immune activation. Our data demonstrate that in the immediate post-transplant period islets release DAMPs that in vitro enhance responses of innate immune cells. DAMP release can be reduced in vitro by immunoisolation or intervention with nec-1. PMID:26419792

  10. Improved hypothermic short-term storage of isolated mouse islets by adding serum to preservation solutions.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuko; Okitsu, Teru; Xibao, Liu; Teramae, Hiroki; Okonogi, Atsuhito; Toyoda, Kentaro; Uemoto, Shinji; Fukushima, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Preserving isolated islets at low temperature appears attractive because it can keep islet quantity comparable to freshly isolated islets. In this study, we evaluated the effect of serum as an additive to preservation solutions on islet quality after short-term hypothermic storage. Isolated mouse islets were preserved at 4°C in University of Wisconsin solution (UW) alone, UW with serum, M-Kyoto solution (MK) alone or MK with serum. We then assessed islet quantity, morphology, viability and function in vitro as well as in vivo. Islet quantity after storage in all four solutions was well maintained for up to 120 h. However, islets functioned for different duration; glucose-stimulated insulin release assay revealed that the duration was 72 h when islets were stored in UW with serum and MK with serum, but only 24 h in UW alone, and the islet function disappeared immediately in MK alone. Viability assay confirmed that more than 70% islet cells survived for up to 48 h when islets are preserved in UW with serum and MK with serum, but the viability decreased rapidly in UW alone and MK alone. In in vivo bioassays using 48-h preserved isogeneic islets, all recipient mice restored normal blood glucose concentrations by transplants preserved in UW with serum or MK with serum, whereas 33.3% recipients and no recipient restored diabetes by transplants preserved in UW alone and in MK alone respectively. Adding serum to both UW and MK improves their capability to store isolated islets by maintaining islet functional viability.

  11. Improved hypothermic short-term storage of isolated mouse islets by adding serum to preservation solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yasuko; Okitsu, Teru; Xibao, Liu; Teramae, Hiroki; Okonogi, Atsuhito; Toyoda, Kentaro; Uemoto, Shinji; Fukushima, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Preserving isolated islets at low temperature appears attractive because it can keep islet quantity comparable to freshly isolated islets. In this study, we evaluated the effect of serum as an additive to preservation solutions on islet quality after short-term hypothermic storage. Isolated mouse islets were preserved at 4°C in University of Wisconsin solution (UW) alone, UW with serum, M-Kyoto solution (MK) alone or MK with serum. We then assessed islet quantity, morphology, viability and function in vitro as well as in vivo. Islet quantity after storage in all four solutions was well maintained for up to 120 h. However, islets functioned for different duration; glucose-stimulated insulin release assay revealed that the duration was 72 h when islets were stored in UW with serum and MK with serum, but only 24 h in UW alone, and the islet function disappeared immediately in MK alone. Viability assay confirmed that more than 70% islet cells survived for up to 48 h when islets are preserved in UW with serum and MK with serum, but the viability decreased rapidly in UW alone and MK alone. In in vivo bioassays using 48-h preserved isogeneic islets, all recipient mice restored normal blood glucose concentrations by transplants preserved in UW with serum or MK with serum, whereas 33.3% recipients and no recipient restored diabetes by transplants preserved in UW alone and in MK alone respectively. Adding serum to both UW and MK improves their capability to store isolated islets by maintaining islet functional viability. PMID:23552019

  12. Duct- to islet-cell differentiation and islet growth in the pancreas of duct-ligated adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, R N; Klöppel, G; Bouwens, L

    1995-12-01

    We investigated the growth of islet beta and alpha cells in adult rats which had undergone partial pancreatic duct ligation. Whereas the non-ligated head portion of the pancreas remained unaffected in terms of histology and cell population dynamics, the ligated tail part of the pancreas showed pronounced changes in histology and cell growth. These changes included replacement of exocrine acini by ductal complexes and significant growth of islet cells. Using immunocytochemistry and morphometry, we found that the beta-cell population had nearly doubled within 1 week and that a smaller, but also significant growth of the alpha-cell population had occurred. In addition, small islets and islet-cell clusters were more numerous in the pancreatic tail, indicating islet neogenesis. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse labelling index of beta and alpha cells increased five fold and threefold, respectively, in the tail. However, the observed beta-cell labelling index remained below 1% which was largely insufficient to explain the increased number of beta cells. This indicates that recruitment from a proliferating stem-cell compartment was the main source for the beta-cell hyperplasia. A tenfold-elevated BrdU labelling index (18%) was observed in the duct-cell compartment which was identified by specific immunostaining for cytokeratin 20. Transitional cytodifferentiation forms between duct cells expressing cytokeratin 20 and beta cells expressing insulin, or alpha cells expressing glucagon, were demonstrated by double immunostaining. Pancreatic duct ligation also induced the expression of the beta-cell-specific glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT-2) in duct cells, indicating their metaplastic state. We concluded that in this adult rat model, t