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Sample records for isoflurane minimum alveolar

  1. Effects of fentanyl on isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration and cardiovascular function in mechanically ventilated goats.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T B; Stegmann, G F; Dzikiti, L N; Hellebrekers, L J

    2011-04-23

    The effects of fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane and cardiovascular function in mechanically ventilated goats were evaluated using six healthy goats (three does and three wethers). Following induction of general anaesthesia with isoflurane delivered via a mask, endotracheal intubation was performed and anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane. The baseline MAC of isoflurane (that is, the lowest alveolar concentration required to prevent gross purposeful movement) in response to clamping a claw with a vulsellum forceps was determined. Immediately after baseline isoflurane MAC determination, the goats received, on separate occasions, one of three fentanyl treatments, administered intravenously: a bolus of 0.005 mg/kg followed by constant rate infusion (CRI) of 0.005 mg/kg/hour (treatment LFENT), a bolus of 0.015 mg/kg followed by CRI of 0.015 mg/kg/hour (treatment MFENT) or a bolus of 0.03 mg/kg followed by CRI of 0.03 mg/kg/hour (treatment HFENT). Isoflurane MAC was redetermined during the fentanyl CRI treatments. Cardiopulmonary parameters were monitored. A four-week washout period was allowed between treatments. The observed baseline isoflurane MAC was 1.32 (1.29 to 1.36) per cent. Isoflurane MAC decreased to 0.98 (0.92 to 1.01) per cent, 0.75 (0.69 to 0.79) per cent and 0.58 (0.51 to 0.65) per cent following LFENT, MFENT and HFENT respectively. Cardiovascular function was not adversely affected. The quality of recovery from general anaesthesia was good, although exaggerated tail-wagging was observed in some goats following MFENT and HFENT.

  2. Relationship of feline bispectral index to multiples of isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Leigh A; Greene, Stephen A; Grimm, Kurt A; Tranquilli, William J

    2005-06-01

    The study reported here was done to determine the relationship between bispectral index (BIS) values and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) multiples of isoflurane in cats. Isoflurane MAC was determined using the tail-clamp method in eight domestic cats. Ten days later, the cats were anesthetized a second time with isoflurane at each of five MAC multiples administered in random order. Ventilation was controlled and, after a 20-min equilibration period at each MAC multiple of isoflurane, BIS data were collected for 5 min and the median BIS value calculated. Data from each isoflurane MAC multiple were compared using analysis of variance for repeated measures, and statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The MAC of isoflurane (mean +/- 1 standard deviation) was 1.8% +/- 0.2%. BIS values at 0.5 MAC could not be recorded due to spontaneous movement in all eight cats. BIS values at 2.0 MAC were confounded by burst suppression in seven of the eight cats. Over the range of 0.8 to 1.5 MAC, BIS values decreased significantly with increasing end-tidal isoflurane concentrations. Mean (+/- 1 standard deviation) BIS measurements were 32 +/- 3 at 0.8 MAC, 20 +/- 4 at 1.0 MAC, and 5 +/- 3 at 1.5 MAC. Therefore, BIS values are inversely and linearly related to end-tidal isoflurane concentrations in anesthetized cats. However, the consistently low BIS values recorded in this study suggest that clinical BIS endpoints used to titrate anesthetic agents in humans may not be applicable to cats.

  3. Brainstem Regions Affecting Minimum Alveolar Concentration and Movement Pattern during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jinks, Steven L.; Bravo, Milo; Satter, Omar; Chan, Yuet-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Background Spinal transection or selective delivery of volatile anesthetics to the spinal cord reduces minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), whereas precollicular decerebration does not. The authors sought to determine which brainstem regions influence anesthetic requirements and movement responses with isoflurane. Methods Movement (biceps femoris electromyogram) and MAC were measured in adult rats before and after decerebration at the precollicular, mid-collicular, pontine or medullary level, or decerebellation. Additional experiments assessed the effects of lidocaine inactivation of the mesencephalic locomotor region on MAC and the effects of isoflurane on nociceptive neuronal responses in this region. Results Transections placed at the level of the mid-colliculus, rostral pons, and pontomedullary junction significantly reduced MAC by approximately 10, 40, and 45%, respectively. MAC was decreased 9% after mid-medullary transections that were placed caudal to the nucleus raphe magnus but rostral to the dorsal reticular nucleus; however, only weak, single movements occurred. Caudal medullary transections at the obex decreased MAC by 60%. Bilateral inactivation of the mesencephalic locomotor region with lidocaine caused a reversible, 32% decrease in MAC and reduced the number and amplitude of movements at sub-MAC isoflurane concentrations. Neuronal responses of mesencephalic locomotor region neurons to supramaximal noxious tail clamp were reduced by 87% by 1.2 MAC isoflurane. Conclusions The authors conclude that the mesencephalic locomotor region influences anesthetic requirements and promotes repetitive movement with sub-MAC isoflurane by facilitating ventral spinal locomotor circuits, where anesthetics seem to exert their key immobilizing effects. However, net brainstem influences on MAC seem to result from interaction among descending nociceptive and locomotor modulatory pathways. PMID:20098133

  4. Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine and Their Combination Reduce Isoflurane Minimum Alveolar Concentration in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Chavez, Julio R.; Gutierrez-Blanco, Eduardo; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Victoria-Mora, José M.; Tendillo-Cortijo, Francisco; Santos-González, Martín; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination delivered as a bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI) on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MACISO) in dogs were evaluated. Seven healthy adult dogs were included. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. For each dog, baseline MAC (MACISO/BASAL) was determined after a 90-minute equilibration period. Thereafter, each dog received one of the following treatments (loading dose, CRI): lidocaine 2 mg kg−1, 100 µg kg−1 minute−1; dexmedetomidine 2 µg kg−1, 2 µg kg−1 hour−1; or their combination. MAC was then determined again after 45- minutes of treatment by CRI. At the doses administered, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination significantly reduced MACISO by 27.3% (range: 12.5–39.2%), 43.4% (33.3–53.3%) and 60.9% (46.1–78.1%), respectively, when compared to MACISO/BASAL. The combination resulted in a greater MACISO reduction than the two drugs alone. Their use, at the doses studied, provides a clinically important reduction in the concentration of ISO during anaesthesia in dogs. PMID:25232737

  5. Effects of isoflurane upon minimum alveolar concentration and cerebral cortex depression in pigs and goats: an interspecies comparison.

    PubMed

    Haga, Henning A; Ranheim, Birgit; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2011-02-01

    This study compared the effects of isoflurane in pigs (n=10 Yorkshire-Landrace cross) and dairy goats (n=10) by evaluation of electroencephalographic (EEG) burst suppression thresholds (BST) in the cerebral cortex and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values in the spinal cord. The study also investigated whether individual MAC values can predict the effects of isoflurane on the cerebral cortex. MAC values and BST/MAC ratios were significantly different between species. Inhibition of movement by isoflurane may be less effective in pigs than in goats. No significant correlation was found between individual MAC and BST values, indicating that in single animals the individual MAC poorly reflects the cerebrocortical depressant effect of isoflurane in pigs and goats.

  6. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Julio R.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). Results The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% ± 0.04%, 0.99% ± 0.009%, 0.97% ± 0.02%, and 0.99% ± 0.01%, respectively. Conclusions The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane. PMID:26605541

  7. Comparison of the effects of epidural or intravenous methadone on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Campagnol, Daniela; Teixeira-Neto, Francisco J; Peccinini, Rosangela G; Oliveira, Flávia A; Alvaides, Renata K; Medeiros, Luiza Q

    2012-06-01

    The effects of epidural and intravenous (IV) methadone (0.5mg/kg) on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (ISO(MAC)) were compared in dogs. Six dogs (16.5 ± 2.5 kg bodyweight) received three treatments in random order during isoflurane anaesthesia, with a 7 day washout interval between each study. Methadone was injected via a lumbosacral epidural catheter introduced 10 cm cranially into the epidural canal and the electrical stimulation for ISO(MAC) determination was applied either to the thoracic (EP(T) treatment) or to the pelvic limb (EP(P) treatment) during separate study days. In the IV treatment, ISO(MAC) was determined via electrical stimulation of the pelvic limb. Variables were recorded before (baseline), 2.5 and 5h after drug injection. The ISO(MAC) decreased significantly (P<0.05) from baseline at 2.5 and 5h after methadone in all treatments. At 2.5h, the magnitude of ISO(MAC) reduction did not differ between treatments (mean decreases from baseline: 30-33%). The ISO(MAC) reduction lasted longer following epidural methadone in the thoracic limb (decreases from baseline: 30% at 5h in the EP(T) treatment vs. 19% and 16% in the EP(P) and IV treatments, respectively). Although the isoflurane sparing effect provided by epidural methadone was not significantly greater than IV methadone during the initial stage (2.5h), it was more prolonged than the IV route in specific dermatomes (5h in the thoracic limb) with the epidural technique employed. Methadone may therefore provide a greater isoflurane sparing effect when administered epidurally, compared to IV, when noxious stimulation occurs in specific dermatomes.

  8. Determination of minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs and cats using the up-and-down method. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Michele; Quandt, Jane; Hofmeister, Erik

    2016-06-01

    Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) is a reliable measurement of the potency of inhaled anesthetic agents. The determination of MAC in different species has followed a fairly consistent methodology. In people, MAC is determined with the up-and-down method, whereas in animal the bracketing technique is commonly used. The objectives of this study were to determine the MAC value of isoflurane in dogs and cats using the up-and-down method and to determine the MAC value of isoflurane at extubation (MACex). General anesthesia was induced in 13 dogs and 5 cats with 5% isoflurane in oxygen. An initial end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.3% was used for the first dog and of 1.6% for the first cat and maintained constant for ≥20min. A noxious stimulus in the form of Carmalt forceps was applied to the base of the tail for no more than one minute or until movement was noticed. After stimulation, the response was recorded as positive (movement) or negative (no movement) and the animal was recovered. The end-tidal isoflurane concentration of the following animal was increased or decreased by 0.1% if the response of the previous animal to the stimulus was negative or positive, respectively. Isoflurane MAC values in dogs were 1.27% and 1.23%. Isoflurane MAC value in cats was 1.58%. MACex value was 0.45% in dogs and in cats. The up-and-down method for MAC determination achieved similar results when compared to MAC values of isoflurane in dogs and cats reported in the literature using the bracketing technique.

  9. The effect of multimodal analgesia on minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane for skin incision at constant bispectral index

    PubMed Central

    Savitha, Keelara Shivalingaiah; Dhanpal, Radhika; Shilpa, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multimodal analgesia (MMA) by synergy with volatile anesthetics minimizes their use thus decreasing operation theater pollution and greenhouse gas emission. Aims: To estimate minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) requirement of isoflurane (ISO) for skin incision with use of MMA in the study group versus conventional regime in the control group for a constant bispectral index (BIS). To observe the side effects of analgesic drugs administered in the study. Settings and Design: Forty-two patients of American Society of Anesthesiologist Class I and II scheduled for lumbar spine surgery were included in this prospective, randomized, double-blind, clinical study. They were randomly allocated into two groups of 21 each. Materials and Methods: Group A (MMA group/study group) received injections diclofenac sodium, paracetamol, clonidine, and fentanyl and local infiltration (bupivacaine with adrenaline). Group B (conventional regime group/control group) received injections paracetamol and fentanyl and local infiltration (saline with adrenaline). Preemptive analgesia was practiced in the study. The MAC of ISO for skin incision was documented. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent sample t-test: To compare MACISO for skin incision between the two groups. One sample t-test: To compare the standard mean concentration with the means of the two groups. Chi-square test: To compare adverse effects between the groups. P < 5% was considered statistically significant. Results: The MACISO requirement was significantly lower in the study group at the time of skin incision for BIS of 50–55 compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Post extubation, 43% had nausea and 9% had vomiting in the control group. None of the patients in either group had intraoperative awareness. Conclusion: We conclude that preemptive MMA has synergistic effect with ISO. It effectively reduces MACISO to skin incision to a greater degree. PMID:27746535

  10. Comparison of equi-minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane and isoflurane on bispectral index values during both wash in and wash out phases: A prospective randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madhu; Shri, Iti; Sakia, Prashant; Govil, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: At equal minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), volatile agents may produce different bispectral index (BIS) values especially at low BIS levels when the effect is volatile agent specific. The present study was performed to compare the BIS values produced by sevoflurane and isoflurane at equal MAC and thereby assessing which is a better hypnotic agent. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologists I and II patients undergoing elective mastoidectomy were divided into groups receiving either isoflurane or sevoflurane, and at equi-MAC. BIS value was measured during both wash in and wash out phase, keeping other parameters same. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman two-way analysis and Mann-Whitney U-test. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: BIS value was significantly lower with sevoflurane at all MAC values as compared to isoflurane, except in the beginning and at MAC awake. However, both the drugs proved to be cardiostable. Conclusion: At equi-MAC sevoflurane produces lower BIS values during wash in as well as wash out phase as compared to isoflurane, reflecting probably an agent specific effect and a deficiency in BIS algorithm for certain agents and their interplay. PMID:25788739

  11. Effects of intravenous administration of perzinfotel, fentanyl, and a combination of both drugs on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Yukie; Lerche, Phillip; Eppler, C Mark; Muir, William W

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE-To determine the effects of IV administration of perzinfotel and a perzinfotel-fentanyl combination on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in dogs. ANIMALS-6 healthy sexually intact Beagles (3 males and 3 females). PROCEDURES-All dogs were instrumented with a telemetry device for continuous monitoring of heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and core body temperature (at a femoral artery). Dogs were anesthetized with propofol (6 mg/kg, IV) and isoflurane. Isoflurane MAC values were determined in 3 experiments in each dog, separated by at least 7 days, before (baseline) and after the following treatments: no treatment (anesthetic only), perzinfotel (20 mg/kg, IV), fentanyl (5 microg/kg bolus, IV, followed by a continuous IV infusion at 0.15 microg/kg/min), and a fentanyl-perzinfotel combination (20 mg of perzinfotel/kg, IV, plus the fentanyl infusion). Bispectral index and oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry were also monitored throughout anesthesia. RESULTS-Without treatment, the mean +/- SD isoflurane MAC for all 6 dogs was 1.41 +/- 0.10%. Baseline MAC was 1.42 +/- 0.08%. Intravenous administration of perzinfotel, fentanyl, and the perzinfotel-fentanyl combination significantly decreased the MAC by 39%, 35%, and 66%, respectively. Perzinfotel and perzinfotel-fentanyl administration yielded significant increases in the bispectral index. Mean, systolic, and diastolic arterial blood pressures significantly increased from baseline values when perzinfotel was administered. Systolic arterial blood pressure significantly increased from the baseline value when perzinfotel-fentanyl was administered. No adverse effects were detected. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-IV administration of perzinfotel, fentanyl, or a perzinfotel-fentanyl combination reduced isoflurane MAC in dogs and increased arterial blood pressure.

  12. Prediction of movement following noxious stimulation during 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia by means of middle latency auditory evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Leistritz, L; Kochs, E; Galicki, M; Witte, H

    2002-06-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of generalized dynamic neural networks for the design of a two-valued anesthetic depth indicator during isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia. The indicator construction is based on the processing of middle latency auditory evoked responses (MLAER) in combination with the observation of the patient's movement reaction to skin incision. The framework of generalized dynamic neural networks does not require any data preprocessing, visual data inspection or subjective feature extraction. The study is based on a data set of 106 patients scheduled for elective surgery under isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia. The processing of the measured MLAER is performed by a recurrent neural network that transforms the MLAER signals into signals having a very uncomplex structure. The evaluation of these signals is self-evident, and yields to a simple threshold classifier. Using only evoked potentials before the pain stimulus, the patient's reaction could be predicted with a probability of 81.5%. The MLAER is closely associated to the patient's reaction to skin incision following noxious stimulation during 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia. In combination with other parameters, MLAER could contribute to an objective and trustworthy movement prediction to noxious stimulation.

  13. Reduction of the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs using a constant rate of infusion of lidocaine-ketamine in combination with either morphine or fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Delia; Benito, Javier; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a constant rate of infusion of lidocaine and ketamine in combination with either morphine or fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MAC(ISO)) during ovariohysterectomy in dogs. Female dogs (n=44) were premedicated with acepromazine and midazolam. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. Dogs received ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/h) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/h) together with morphine (0.24 mg/kg/h; MLK) or fentanyl (0.0036 mg/kg/h; FLK). The control group received Ringer's lactate solution. A skin incision was used as the noxious stimulus. The MAC(ISO) value was obtained with Dixon's up-and-down method. MAC(ISO) was 0.7±0.0 vol.% in the control group, 0.3±0.0 vol.% in the MLK group (45% MAC reduction) and 0.0±0.0 vol.% in the FLK group (97% MAC reduction). A combination of fentanyl with lidocaine and ketamine decreased the MAC(ISO) in dogs; this decrease was more pronounced than that produced by morphine, lidocaine and ketamine.

  14. Effects of Methadone on the Minimum Anesthetic Concentration of Isoflurane, and Its Effects on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Ventilation during Isoflurane Anesthesia in Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Pypendop, Bruno Henri; Zangirolami Filho, Darcio; Sousa, Samuel Santos; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal effects of intramuscular methadone administration on the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in hens, and to evaluate the effects of the isoflurane-methadone combination on heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure and ventilation. Thirteen healthy adult hens weighing 1.7 ± 0.2 kg were used. The MAC of isoflurane was determined in each individual using the bracketing method. Subsequently, the reduction in isoflurane MAC produced by methadone (3 or 6 mg kg-1, IM) was determined by the up-and-down method. Stimulation was applied at 15 and 30 minutes, and at 45 minutes if the bird had not moved at 30 minutes. Isoflurane MAC reduction was calculated at each time point using logistic regression. After a washout period, birds were anesthetized with isoflurane and methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM was administered. Heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, blood gas values and invasive blood pressure were measured at 1.0 and 0.7 isoflurane MAC, and during 45 minutes after administration of methadone once birds were anesthetized with 0.7 isoflurane MAC. Fifteen minutes after administration of 3 mg kg-1 of methadone, isoflurane MAC was reduced by 2 (-9 to 13)% [logistic regression estimate (95% Wald confidence interval)]. Administration of 6 mg kg-1 of methadone decreased isoflurane MAC by 29 (11 to 46)%, 27 (-3 to 56)% and 10 (-8 to 28)% after 15, 30 and 45 minutes, respectively. Methadone (6 mg kg-1) induced atrioventricular block in three animals and ventricular premature contractions in two. Methadone caused an increase in arterial blood pressure and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, while heart rate and pH decreased. Methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM significantly reduced isoflurane MAC by 30% in hens 15 minutes after administration. At this dose, methadone caused mild respiratory acidosis and increase in systemic blood pressure. PMID:27018890

  15. Effects of Methadone on the Minimum Anesthetic Concentration of Isoflurane, and Its Effects on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Ventilation during Isoflurane Anesthesia in Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Escobar, André; da Rocha, Rozana Wendler; Pypendop, Bruno Henri; Zangirolami Filho, Darcio; Sousa, Samuel Santos; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal effects of intramuscular methadone administration on the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in hens, and to evaluate the effects of the isoflurane-methadone combination on heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure and ventilation. Thirteen healthy adult hens weighing 1.7 ± 0.2 kg were used. The MAC of isoflurane was determined in each individual using the bracketing method. Subsequently, the reduction in isoflurane MAC produced by methadone (3 or 6 mg kg(-1), i.m.) was determined by the up-and-down method. Stimulation was applied at 15 and 30 minutes, and at 45 minutes if the bird had not moved at 30 minutes. Isoflurane MAC reduction was calculated at each time point using logistic regression. After a washout period, birds were anesthetized with isoflurane and methadone, 6 mg kg(-1) i.m. was administered. Heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, blood gas values and invasive blood pressure were measured at 1.0 and 0.7 isoflurane MAC, and during 45 minutes after administration of methadone once birds were anesthetized with 0.7 isoflurane MAC. Fifteen minutes after administration of 3 mg kg(-1) of methadone, isoflurane MAC was reduced by 2 (-9 to 13)% [logistic regression estimate (95% Wald confidence interval)]. Administration of 6 mg kg(-1) of methadone decreased isoflurane MAC by 29 (11 to 46)%, 27 (-3 to 56)% and 10 (-8 to 28)% after 15, 30 and 45 minutes, respectively. Methadone (6 mg kg(-1)) induced atrioventricular block in three animals and ventricular premature contractions in two. Methadone caused an increase in arterial blood pressure and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, while heart rate and pH decreased. Methadone, 6 mg kg(-1) i.m. significantly reduced isoflurane MAC by 30% in hens 15 minutes after administration. At this dose, methadone caused mild respiratory acidosis and increase in systemic blood pressure.

  16. Minimum anesthetic concentration and cardiovascular dose-response relationship of isoflurane in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Young K; Lee, Scott S; Suh, Euy H; Lee, Lyon; Lee, Hee C; Lee, Hyo J; Yeon, Seong C

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) and dose-related cardiovascular effects of isoflurane during controlled ventilation in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus). The MAC was determined for 10 cinereous vultures as the midpoint between the end-tidal isoflurane concentration that allows gross purposeful movement and that which prevents the movement in response to clamping a pedal digit. Immediately after the MAC was determined, the cardiovascular effects of isoflurane at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 times the MAC were investigated in seven of the 10 birds. The MAC of isoflurane for 10 cinereous vultures during controlled ventilation was 1.06 +/- 0.07% (mean +/- SD). When the isoflurane concentration was increased to 1.5 and 2.0 times the MAC, there was significant dose-dependent decrease in the arterial blood pressure. However, the heart rate did not change over a range of 1.0 to 2.0 times the MAC.

  17. Determination of minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane in juvenile swine.

    PubMed

    Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T; Swanson, Cliff

    2008-04-01

    Pigs are important animal models in veterinary and medical research and have been widely used in experiments requiring surgical anesthesia. Sevoflurane is an inhalant anesthetic with unique properties that make it an ideal anesthetic for mask induction and anesthesia maintenance. However, there are relatively few studies reporting the anesthetic requirements for sevoflurane in juvenile swine, an age group that is commonly used in research experiments. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine the Minimum Alveolar Concentration (MAC) for sevoflurane in juvenile swine. Sevoflurane anesthesia was induced in six Yorkshire-cross pigs of approximately 9 weeks-of-age and MAC for sevoflurane was determined. The sevoflurane MAC value was determined to be 3.5+/-0.1% which is notably higher than values reported in the literature for pigs. This discrepancy in MAC values may represent changes in anesthetic requirements between different age groups of pigs and differences in the type of stimulus used to determine MAC.

  18. Neonatal Repeated Exposure to Isoflurane not Sevoflurane in Mice Reversibly Impaired Spatial Cognition at Juvenile-Age.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhui; Zhao, Yanhong; Yang, Junjun; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Peijun

    2017-02-01

    Inhalation anesthetics facilitate surgical procedures in millions of children each year. However, animal studies demonstrate that exposure to the inhalation anesthetic isoflurane may cause neuronal cell death in developing brains. The long-term cytotoxic effects of sevoflurane, the most popular pediatric anesthetic, have not been compared with isoflurane. Thus, this study was designed to compare the effects of equipotent doses of these two anesthetics on neonatal long-term neurotoxicity. Postnatal 7-day-old (P7) C57/BL male mice were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane or 2.2% sevoflurane 2 h a day for 3 days. Non-anesthetized mice served as controls. The effects of anesthesia on learning and memory were assessed using the Morris Water Maze (MWM) at Postnatal days 30 (P30) and P60 respectively. The hippocampal content of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits (NMDA), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and synaptophysin (Syn) were determined by Western Blot. Neuron structure and apoptosis were assessed via Nissl and TUNEL staining, respectively. The isoflurane group exhibited cognitive impairment at P30. Repeated inhalation of isoflurane or sevoflurane caused different degrees of apoptosis and damaged hippocampal neurons in neonatal mice, particularly isoflurane. In neonatal mice, repeated exposure to isoflurane, but not sevoflurane, caused spatial cognitive impairments in juvenile mice. Our findings suggest that isoflurane induces significantly greater neurodegeneration than an equipotent minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane.

  19. Concentration-dependent isoflurane effects on withdrawal reflexes in pigs and the role of the stimulation paradigm.

    PubMed

    Spadavecchia, C; Haga, H A; Ranheim, B

    2012-12-01

    In this prospective two-phase experimental trial, 10 pigs were anaesthetized twice with isoflurane only. In the first phase, the individual minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was determined and in the second phase the effects on withdrawal reflexes of increasing end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (from 1.6% to 2.8%) were assessed. Single, 10 and 60 repeated electrical stimulations were used to evoke withdrawal reflexes which were recorded and quantified by electromyography. Recruitment curves for reflex amplitude for increasing stimulation intensities and isoflurane concentrations were constructed. Isoflurane MAC was 1.9 ± 0.3%. Reflexes evoked by repeated stimulation were suppressed at isoflurane concentrations significantly higher than those which suppressed complex movements during MAC determination (P=0.014 and P=0.006 for 10 and 60 repeated stimuli respectively). Isoflurane up to 2.8% was still not able to abolish reflex activity evoked by repeated stimulations in all pigs. Single stimulation reflexes were suppressed at significantly lower concentrations than repeated stimulation reflexes (P=0.008 and P=0.004 for 10 and 60 repeated stimuli, respectively). Reflex amplitude was significantly correlated with isoflurane concentration (P<0.001, r=-0.85) independent of the individual MAC. The findings indicate that the level at which isoflurane suppresses withdrawal reflexes is dependent on the stimulation paradigm (single vs. repeated electrical stimulation), and there is limited value in expressing reflex withdrawal suppression in terms of MAC as purposeful and reflex movements are independently affected by isoflurane in individual animals.

  20. The comparative effects of sevoflurane versus isoflurane on cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, Yuji; Takahashi, Ken-Ichiro; Saito, Shigeru; Goto, Fumio

    2006-07-01

    The use of volatile anesthetics has been reported to alter cerebrovascular carbon dioxide (CO2) reactivity. We examined the comparative effects of sevoflurane versus isoflurane on cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity in 40 patients with diabetes mellitus. Anesthesia was maintained with either 1.0 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration of sevoflurane or 1.0 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration of isoflurane in 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide. A 2.5-MHz pulsed transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the right temporal window for continuous measurement of mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery. After establishing baseline middle cerebral artery velocity values and cardiovascular hemodynamics, we increased end-tidal CO2 by decreasing ventilatory frequency by 2-5 breaths/min and repeated the measurements. These were then used to calculate absolute and relative CO2 reactivity. Absolute CO2 reactivity was less in insulin-treated patients with either sevoflurane or isoflurane compared with those patients on oral antidiabetic drugs or dietary therapy (sevoflurane group: diet = 2.6 +/- 0.6; oral antidiabetic drug = 2.5 +/- 0.8; insulin = 1.6 +/- 0.8*; isoflurane group: diet = 3.3 +/- i0.7; oral antidiabetic drug = 3.4 +/- 0.7; insulin = 1.9 +/- 0.7* cm.s(-1).mm Hg(-1); *P < 0.05, respectively). Relative CO2 reactivity showed a similar pattern in the diet-controlled and oral antidiabetic groups, absolute and relative CO2 reactivities were lower with sevoflurane versus isoflurane. Hence, we conclude that cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity in insulin-dependent patients is impaired under both sevoflurane and isoflurane anesthesia.

  1. Effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Doherty, Thomas J; da Cunha, Anderson F; Leonardi, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in alpacas. Eight healthy, intact male, adult alpacas were studied on 2 separate occasions. Anesthesia was induced with SEVO, and baseline MAC (MACB) determination began 45 min after induction. After MACB determination, alpacas were randomly given either an intravenous (IV) loading dose (LD) and infusion of saline or a loading dose [ketamine = 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW); lidocaine = 2 mg/kg BW] and an infusion of ketamine (25 μg/kg BW per minute) in combination with lidocaine (50 μg/kg BW per minute), and MACSEVO was re-determined (MACT). Quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were also evaluated. Mean MACB was 1.88% ± 0.13% and 1.89% ± 0.14% for the saline and ketamine + lidocaine groups, respectively. Ketamine and lidocaine administration decreased (P < 0.05) MACB by 57% and mean MACT was 0.83% ± 0.10%. Saline administration did not change MACB. Time to determine MACB and MACT was not significantly different between the treatments. The quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were not different between groups. The infusion of ketamine combined with lidocaine significantly decreased MACSEVO by 57% and did not adversely affect time-to-standing or quality of recovery.

  2. Effects of Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine or Their Combination on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Sevoflurane in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    MORAN-MUÑOZ, Rafael; IBANCOVICHI, J. A.; Gutierrez-BLANCO, Eduardo; ACEVEDO-ARCIQUE, Carlos M.; Victoria MORA, J. Mauro; TENDILLO, Francisco J.; SANTOS-GONZALEZ, Martin; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine the effects of lidocaine (LIDO) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) or their combination (LIDO–DEX), administered by constant-rate infusion (CRI), on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Seven healthy mongrel dogs were used with a 2-week washout interval between treatments in this study. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen, and MAC of sevoflurane was determined after 90 min equilibration period in the dogs (SEV-MACBASAL). Then, sevoflurane MAC was determined again in the dogs after 45 min equilibration period of one of the following treatments: an intravenous loading dose of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by 6 mg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACLIDO); an intravenous loading dose of dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg followed by 2 µg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACDEX); or their combination (SEV-MACLIDO-DEX). These SEV-MACs were determined in duplicate. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tuckey test when appropriate. The SEV-MACBASAL was 1.82 ± 0.06%, SEV-MACLIDO was 1.38 ± 0.08%, SEV-MACDEX was 1.22 ± 0.10%, and SEV-MACLIDO-DEX was 0.78 ± 0.06%. The CRI administration of lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination produced a significant reduction in the MAC of sevoflurane by 26.1 ± 9.0% (P<0.0001), 43.7 ± 11.8% (P<0.0002) and 54.4 ± 9.8% (P<0.0001), respectively. The MAC reduction was significantly greater after the CRI combination of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine when compared with lidocaine CRI (P<0.0001) or dexmedetomidine CRI treatments (P<0.025). PMID:24572631

  3. Effect of flumazenil on sevoflurane requirements for minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake and recovery status

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Peng; Zhou, Cheng; Li, Kai-Yu; Guo, Li-Juan; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: It is controversial that whether the GABA receptors contribute to the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics. This study was to detect the effect of GABA receptors on the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics by evaluation of the effect of intravenous flumazenil on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration–awake (MAC-Awake) and emergence mental status. Methods: This study included two steps. Firstly, 49 healthy patients, aged 20-40 years scheduled for elective surgeries, were randomly assigned to two groups, a flumazenil group (n=24) and a saline group (n=25). The flumazenil group received 0.006 mg/Kg IV, and the control group received the same volume of saline 20 min before induction. The flumazenil group and the control group were compared with regard to MAC-Awake (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of eye opening in response to a verbal command). We used the mask inhalation to measure the MAC-Awake by up-and-down method. The second steps, 60 patients undergoing lower abdomen surgeries were randomly divided into two groups, a experimental group (n=30) and a saline group (n=30). All patients were anesthetized with sevoflurane/sulfentanil. The experimental group received flumazenil at 0.006 mg/Kg IV, and the control group received the same volume of saline at the end of surgery. We recorded the time to awake and extubation. After extubation, the patients’ recovery status was scored with the Mini-Mental state examination (MMSE) system in post anesthesia care unit (PACU). Results: The MAC-Awake was 0.65% in the control group and 0.82% in the flumazenil group (p=0.34). After extubation, the recovery time and time to extubation showed no difference between the flumazenil group and the saline group (p>0.05). But the 10 min and 15 min MMSE scores after extubation were better in the flumazenil group than those in the saline group (p<0.05). There was no difference for MMSE scores after 30 min between two groups. Conclusion: We

  4. Effects of desflurane and isoflurane on hepatic and renal functions and coagulation profile during donor hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Toprak, H I; Şahin, T; Aslan, S; Karahan, K; Şanli, M; Ersoy, M Ö

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of two inhalation anesthetics desflurane and isoflurane on postoperative hepatic and renal functions as well as coagulation profiles in living donors undergoing right hepatectomy. This study was performed on 80 patients who were randomly allocated to group D (desflurane, n = 40) or group I (isoflurane, n = 40) after Faculty Ethics Committee approval. After induction, isoflurane or desflurane was used with air/oxygen for anesthetic maintenance. The isoflurane or desflurane concentration was set at one minimum alveolar concentration (MAC). Remifentanil was infused for analgesia as well as cisatracurium. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), international normalized ratio (INR), albumin, total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, platelet count, and hemoglobin levels were analyzed preoperatively at end of the operation, and on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 30. Both AST and ALT differed significantly and continually except on POD 30. AST showed significant elevations from the end of the operation to POD 2 and ALT, from the end of the operation to POD 5 in group I compared with group D. INR was significantly higher from the end of the operation to POD 3 in group I and to POD 2 in group D. At the end of the operation as well as on POD 1 and POD 2, INR was significantly increased in group I compared with group D. Albumin level was significantly lower at the end of the operation in both groups, but it was not different. No patient developed hepatic or renal failure. Our study showed better postoperative hepatic tests and INR using desflurane than isoflurane at equivalent doses of 1 MAC in living donors undergoing right hepatectomy.

  5. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation under different inhaled concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in pigs undergoing hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Alexandre Hideaki; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Hamaji, Marcelo Waldir M; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Ida, Keila Kazue; Fantoni, Denise T; Auler, José Otavio Costa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalant anesthesia induces dose-dependent cardiovascular depression, but whether fluid responsiveness is differentially influenced by the inhalant agent and plasma volemia remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in pigs undergoing hemorrhage. METHODS: Twenty-five pigs were randomly anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data were registered sequentially at minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M1), 1.25 (M2), and 1.00 (M3). Then, following withdrawal of 30% of the estimated blood volume, these data were registered at a minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M4) and 1.25 (M5). RESULTS: The minimum alveolar concentration increase from 1.00 to 1.25 (M2) decreased the cardiac index and increased the central venous pressure, but only modest changes in mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were observed in all groups from M1 to M2. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure was only observed with desflurane. Following blood loss (M4), pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation and central venous pressure increased (p<0.001) and mean arterial pressure decreased in all groups. Under hypovolemia, the cardiac index decreased with the increase of anesthesia depth in a similar manner in all groups. CONCLUSION: The effects of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were not different during normovolemia or hypovolemia. PMID:26735220

  6. A mechanical stimulator for the determination of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of halothane in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sobair, A T; Cottrell, D F; Camburn, M A

    1993-01-01

    The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of halothane was determined in New Zealand White rabbits. Tracheal anaesthetic concentrations were measured using a Siemens Servo Gas Monitor. A stimulator was used to deliver precisely controlled mechanical stimuli for the determination of MAC. Movement of the rabbit's head was recorded using a force transducer attached to the teeth. Evidence is presented that for the determination of MAC a precise nociceptive threshold is preferable to the so-called supramaximal stimulus used in clinical anaesthesia and in determination of anaesthetic potency. We conclude that techniques for the determination of MAC which disregard either sensitization of sensory mechanisms by producing tissue inflammation or the possibility of nerve compression by severe mechanical stimuli are of questionable value. The use of the mechanical stimulator described, or a similar device, would help in the standardization of the determination of MAC in all species by facilitating the application of a force of controlled amplitude, duration and velocity, thereby removing some of the variables which confound comparative studies of MAC.

  7. Effects of a single bolus intravenous dose of tramadol on minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Itami, Takaharu; Kawase, Kodai; Tamaru, Naomichi; Ishizuka, Tomohito; Tamura, Jun; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Umar, Mohammed A; Inoue, Hiroki; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    Tramadol is an atypical opioid analgesic widely used in small animal practice. This study was designed to determine the effect of a single intravenous (IV) dose of tramadol on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Six beagle dogs were anesthetized twice to determine the sevoflurane MAC with or without an administration of tramadol (4 mg/kg, IV) at 7 days interval. The sevoflurane MAC was determined using a tail clamp method in each dog ventilated with positive pressure ventilation. The tramadol administration produced a significant reduction in the sevoflurane MAC by 22.3 ± 12.2% (1.44 ± 0.28% with tramadol versus 1.86 ± 0.30% without tramadol, P=0.010). This MAC reduction had been determined from 122 ± 19 to 180 ± 41 min following the tramadol administration. During this period, the plasma concentrations of tramadol and its metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol (M1), decreased from 429 ± 64 to 332 ± 55 ng/ml and from 136 ± 24 to 114 ± 68 ng/ml, respectively, but these changes were not statistically significant. There was no significant difference in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure and SpO2 between the control and tramadol treatment. The dogs that received tramadol treatment sometimes breathed spontaneously. Therefore, their respiratory rates significantly increased, and PETCO2 decreased during the MAC determination. In conclusion, the single IV dose of tramadol produced a significant reduction in the sevoflurane MAC in dogs.

  8. Evaluation of ASPAN's preoperative patient teaching videos on general, regional, and minimum alveolar concentration/conscious sedation anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Krenzischek, D A; Wilson, L; Poole, E L

    2001-06-01

    This descriptive study was undertaken as part of a clinical improvement effort by the ASPAN Research and Education Committees to evaluate adult patients' perception of and satisfaction with the ASPAN Preoperative Patient Teaching videotape on general, regional, and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC)/conscious sedation anesthesia. Research findings on the use of videotapes for preoperative education are mixed. Some studies have reported that the use of videotapes increases knowledge and decreases anxiety, whereas other studies have shown a minimal effect on knowledge and anxiety. A convenience sample of 96 adult patients was chosen from those who were scheduled for surgeries with the above anesthesia techniques in 11 US hospitals and/or surgical centers within 4 ASPAN regional boundaries. Patients viewed the videotape the day(s) before surgery and then completed ASPAN's Preoperative Anesthesia Patient Teaching Questionnaire to measure patient perception and satisfaction. Sixty percent of the patients were women, and 50% had a college degree or higher. The average age of the patients was 51 (+/-17.2). Overall satisfaction scores had a potential range of 10 to 40, with higher scores indicating greater satisfaction. The mean satisfaction score for this study was 35 (+/-6.6). No significant relationships were found between satisfaction with the videotape and age, gender, or educational level. Patients were asked to rank each of 4 teaching methods. Among the choices of individualized instruction, written materials, Internet-based instruction, and videotape, the videotape method was ranked as most preferred. The information obtained from this study will be used to modify and improve the content of the patient education videotape produced by ASPAN.

  9. The anesthetic interaction of propofol and sevoflurane on the minimum alveolar concentration preventing motor movement (MACNM) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Singsank-Coats, Jill; Seddighi, Reza; Rohrbach, Barton W; Cox, Sherry K; Egger, Christine M; Doherty, Thomas J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of propofol on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane needed to prevent motor movement (MAC(NM)) in dogs subjected to a noxious stimulus using randomized crossover design. Six, healthy, adult beagles (9.2 ± 1.3 kg) were used. Dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane on 3 occasions, at weekly intervals, and baseline MAC(NM) (MAC(NM-B)) was determined on each occasion. Propofol treatments were administered as loading dose (LD) and constant rate infusion (CRI) as follows: Treatment 1 (T1) was 2 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 4.5 mg/kg BW per hour; T2 was 4 mg/kg BW and 9 mg/kg BW per hour; T3 was 8 mg/kg BW and 18 mg/kg BW per hour, respectively. Treatment MAC(NM) (MAC(NM-T)) determination was initiated 60 min after the start of the CRI. Two venous blood samples were collected and combined at each MAC(NM-T) determination for measurement of blood propofol concentration using high-performance liquid chromatography method (HPLC). Data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA and are presented as least square means (LSM) ± standard error of means (SEM). Propofol infusions in the range of 4.5 to 18 mg/kg BW per hour resulted in mean blood concentrations between 1.3 and 4.4 μg/mL, and decreased (P < 0.05) sevoflurane MAC(NM) in a concentration-dependent manner. The percentage decrease in MAC(NM) was 20.5%, 43.0%, and 68.3%, with corresponding blood propofol concentrations of 1.3 ± 0.3 μg/mL, 2.5 ± 0.3 μg/mL, and 4.4 ± 0.3 μg/mL, for T1, T2, and T3, respectively. Venous blood propofol concentrations were strongly correlated (r = 0.855, P < 0.0001) with the decrease in MAC(NM). In dogs, propofol decreased the sevoflurane MAC(NM) in a concentration-dependent manner.

  10. Interaction between maropitant and carprofen on sparing of the minimum alveolar concentration for blunting adrenergic response (MAC-BAR) of sevoflurane in dogs

    PubMed Central

    FUKUI, Sho; OOYAMA, Norihiko; TAMURA, Jun; UMAR, Mohammed Ahmed; ISHIZUKA, Tomohito; ITAMI, Takaharu; MIYOSHI, Kenjiro; SANO, Tadashi; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2017-01-01

    Maropitant, a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, may provide analgesic effects by blocking pharmacological action of substance P. Carprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug commonly used for pain control in dogs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a combination of maropitant and carprofen on the minimum alveolar concentration for blunting adrenergic response (MAC-BAR) of sevoflurane in dogs. Six healthy adult beagle dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane four times with a minimum of 7-day washout period. On each occasion, maropitant (1 mg/kg) alone, carprofen (4 mg/kg) alone, a combination of maropitant (1 mg/kg) and carprofen (4 mg/kg), or saline (0.1 ml/kg) was subcutaneously administered at 1 hr prior to the first electrical stimulation for the sevoflurane MAC-BAR determination. The sevoflurane MAC-BAR was significantly reduced by maropitant alone (2.88 ± 0.73%, P=0.010), carprofen alone (2.96 ± 0.38%, P=0.016) and the combination (2.81 ± 0.51%, P=0.0003), compared with saline (3.37 ± 0.56%). There was no significant difference in the percentage of MAC-BAR reductions between maropitant alone, carprofen alone and the combination. The administration of maropitant alone and carprofen alone produced clinically significant sparing effects on the sevoflurane MAC-BAR in dogs. However, the combination of maropitant and carprofen did not produce any additive effect on the sevoflurane MAC-BAR reduction. Anesthetic premedication with a combination of maropitant and carprofen may not provide any further sparing effect on anesthetic requirement in dogs. PMID:28111373

  11. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to...

  12. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to...

  13. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... inhalation: (1) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for...

  14. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... inhalation: (1) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for...

  15. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... inhalation: (1) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for...

  16. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  17. The Influence of Isoflurane Anaesthesia on the Rat Grimace Scale

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Amy L.; Golledge, Huw D. R.; Leach, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Over 234,000 rats were used in regulated procedures in the UK in 2014, many of which may have resulted in some degree of pain. When using animals in research, there is an ethical and legal responsibility to alleviate or at least reduce pain to an absolute minimum. To do this, we must be able to effectively assess pain in an accurate and timely manner. The Rat Grimace Scale (RGS) is a pain assessment tool, which is suggested to be both accurate and rapid in pain assessment. Many procedures involve the use of general anaesthesia. To date, the effects of anaesthesia on the RGS have not been assessed, limiting its potential utility for assessing pain following anaesthesia. Forty-eight Lister hooded rats were used in this study (24 in part A and 24 in a separate part B). Rats were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups in part A; short duration isoflurane exposure, short duration control exposure (air) and one of two treatment groups in part B; surgical duration isoflurane exposure or surgical duration control exposure (oxygen). Rats were placed into an anaesthetic induction chamber and isoflurane, or control gas piped into the chamber for either 4 (short duration exposure) or 12 minutes (surgical duration exposure). Following recovery, photographs of the rats’ faces were taken and then scored blindly using the RGS. Short duration isoflurane anaesthesia had no effect on RGS scores. However, when rats are anaesthetised for a longer duration, akin to a simple routine surgical procedure, the RGS score increases significantly and this increase remains on repeated exposure to this duration of anaesthesia over a 4-day period. This should be accounted for when using the RGS to assess pain in rats in the immediate time period following procedures involving the use of isoflurane anaesthesia. PMID:27855184

  18. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to isoflurane by measurement of isoflurane exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Prado, C; Tortosa, J A; Ibarra, I; Luna, A; Periago, J F

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between isoflurane environmental concentrations in operating rooms and the corresponding isoflurane concentration in the exhaled air of the operating personnel at the end of the exposure has been investigated. Isoflurane was retained in an adsorbent cartridge and after thermal desorption the concentration was estimated by gas chromatography. Significant correlation between environmental and exhaled air isoflurane concentrations allowed the establishment of a biological exposure index and biological exposure limits corresponding to proposed atmospheric threshold values.

  19. A randomized multicenter study of remifentanil compared with alfentanil, isoflurane, or propofol in anesthetized pediatric patients undergoing elective strabismus surgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, P J; Lerman, J; Suresh, S; McGowan, F X; Coté, C J; Landsman, I; Henson, L G

    1997-05-01

    Remifentanil hydrochloride is a new, ultrashort-acting opioid metabolized by nonspecific plasma and tissue esterases. We conducted this multicenter study to examine the hemodynamic response and recovery profile of premedicated children undergoing strabismus repair who were randomly assigned to receive one of four treatment drugs (remifentanil, alfentanil, isoflurane, or propofol) along with nitrous oxide and oxygen for maintenance of anesthesia. Induction of anesthesia was by nitrous oxide, oxygen, and halothane or nitrous oxide, oxygen, and propofol. Anesthesia was then maintained with remifentanil 1.0 microgram/kg over 30-60 s, followed by a constant infusion of 1.0 microgram.kg-1.min-1, alfentanil 100 micrograms/kg bolus followed by a constant infusion of 2.5 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, propofol 2.5 mg/kg bolus followed by a constant infusion of 200 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, or isoflurane 1.0 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration. The infusions of the anesthetics and the administration of the inhaled gases were adjusted clinically by predetermined protocols. Elapsed time intervals from the end of surgery to the time the patients were tracheally extubated and displayed purposeful movement, as well as the time the patients met the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and hospital discharge times, were recorded. Heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured at fixed intervals. In addition, cardiovascular side effects (bradycardia, hypotension, and hypertension) as well as vomiting, pruritus, agitation, and postoperative hypoxemia were also noted. There were no significant differences in patient demographics among the treatment groups. There was no difference in the early recovery variables (times to extubation and purposeful movement) or the times to PACU and hospital discharge among groups. There were significant differences in side effects among the groups. Patients who received remifentanil had higher PACU objective pain-discomfort scores than those

  20. Carbon monoxide production from degradation of desflurane, enflurane, isoflurane, halothane, and sevoflurane by soda lime and Baralyme.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z X; Eger, E I; Laster, M J; Chortkoff, B S; Kandel, L; Ionescu, P

    1995-06-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that soda lime and Baralyme brand absorbent can degrade inhaled anesthetics to carbon monoxide (CO). We examined the factors that govern CO production and found that these include: 1) The anesthetic used: for a given minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC)-multiple, the magnitude of CO production (greatest to least) is desflurane > or = enflurane > isoflurane > halothane = sevoflurane. 2) The absorbent dryness: completely dry soda lime produces much more CO than absorbent with just 1.4% water content, and soda lime containing 4.8% or more water (standard soda lime contains 15% water) generates no CO. In contrast, both completely dry Baralyme and Baralyme with 1.6% water produce high concentrations of CO, and Baralyme containing 4.7% water produces concentrations equaling those produced by soda lime containing 1.4% water. Baralyme containing 9.7% or more water and standard Baralyme (13% water) do not generate CO.3) The type of absorbent: at a given water content, Baralyme produces more CO than does soda lime. 4) The temperature: an increased temperature increases CO production. 5) The anesthetic concentration: more CO is produced from higher anesthetic concentrations. These results suggest that CO generation can be avoided for all anesthetics by using soda lime with 4.8% (or more) water or Baralyme with 9.7% (or more) water, and by using inflow rates of less than 2-3 L/min. Such inflow rates are low enough to ensure that the absorbent does not dry out.

  1. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Parrot, A; Fartoukh, M; Cadranel, J

    2015-04-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage occurs relatively rarely and is a therapeutic emergency because it can quickly lead to acute respiratory failure, which can be fatal. Hemoptysis associated with anemia and pulmonary infiltrates suggest the diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage, but may be absent in one third of cases including patients in respiratory distress. The diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage is based on the findings of a bronchoalveolar lavage. The causes are numerous. It is important to identify alveolar hemorrhage due to sepsis, then separate an autoimmune cause (vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, connective tissue disease and Goodpasture's syndrome) with the search for autoantibodies and biopsies from readily accessible organs, from a non-immune cause, performing echocardiography. Lung biopsy should be necessary only in exceptional cases. If the hemorrhage has an immune cause, treatment with steroids and cyclophosphamide may be started. The indications for treatment with rituximab are beginning to be established (forms that are not severe and refractory forms). The benefit of plasma exchange is unquestionable in Goodpasture's syndrome. In patients with an immune disease that can lead to an alveolar hemorrhage, removing any source of infection is the first priority.

  2. Lidocaine attenuates cognitive impairment after isoflurane anesthesia in old rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daowei; Cao, Lin; Wang, Zhi; Li, Jiejie; Washington, Jacqueline M; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2012-03-17

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a clinical phenomenon that has drawn significant attention from the public and scientific community. Age is a risk factor for POCD. However, the contribution of general anesthesia/anesthetics to POCD and the underlying neuropathology are not clear. Here, we showed that 18-month-old male Fisher 344 rats exposed to 1.2% isoflurane, a general anesthetic, for 2h had significant learning and memory impairments assessed at 2-4 weeks after isoflurane exposure. These isoflurane effects were attenuated by intravenous lidocaine (1.5mg/kg as a bolus and then 2mg/kg/h during isoflurane exposure), a local anesthetic that has neuroprotective effect. Exposure to isoflurane or isoflurane plus lidocaine did not change the neuronal and synaptic density as well as the expression of NeuN (a neuronal protein), drebrin (a dendritic spine protein), synaptophysin (a synaptic protein), activated caspase 3 and caspase-activated DNase in the hippocampus at 29 days after isoflurane exposure when cognitive impairment was present. Isoflurane and lidocaine did not affect the amount of β-amyloid peptide, total tau and phospho-tau in the cerebral cortex as well as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus at 29 days after isoflurane exposure. Thus, isoflurane induces learning and memory impairment in old rats. Lidocaine attenuates these isoflurane effects. Isoflurane may not cause long-lasting neuropathological changes.

  3. Charcoal as an airway isoflurane reflection filter.

    PubMed

    Dahm, S L; Steptoe, P; Luttropp, H H; Reinstrup, P

    1998-03-01

    The isoflurane-saving and CO2-retaining effects of a charcoal filter were compared with a Siemens standard heat and moisture (HME) exchanger and an emptied specimen (dummy). Isoflurane was delivered during the inspiratory phase and consumption investigated at 10, 15 and 25 cycles min-1. The investigation was performed by ventilation with humidified air with a constant end-tidal CO2 and temperature. For a comparison, isoflurane was delivered in a conventional manner via the ventilator. The arrangement with a charcoal filter reduced the isoflurane consumption by a factor of 2.0-2.6, depending on ventilatory rate. Most of the saving was a result of the method of isoflurane delivery (factor 1.4-2.0), while adding the reflector gave a further reduction (factor 1.3-1.5). One circumstance that reduced the net efficiency of the charcoal filter was that it also reflected CO2; consequently, total minute ventilation had to be increased to maintain constant end-tidal CO2.

  4. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity. PMID:28228717

  5. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  6. Isoflurane Selectively Inhibits Distal Mitochondrial Complex I in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Suthammarak, Wichit; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC) is a possible target of volatile anesthetics (VAs). Complex I enzymatic activities are inhibited by VAs, and dysfunction of complex I can lead to hypersensitivity to VAs in worms and in people. Mutant analysis in Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans suggests that VAs may specifically interfere with complex I function at the binding site for its substrate ubiquinone. We hypothesized that isoflurane inhibits electron transport by competing with ubiquinone for binding to complex I. METHODS Wildtype and mutant C. elegans were used to study the effects of isoflurane on isolated mitochondria. Enzymatic activities of the ETC were assayed and dose-response curves determined using established techniques. Two-dimensional native gels of mitochondrial proteins were performed after exposure of mitochondria to isoflurane. RESULTS Complex I is the most sensitive component of the ETC to isoflurane inhibition; however the proximal portion of complex I (the flavoprotein) is relatively insensitive to isoflurane. Isoflurane and quinone do not compete for a common binding site on complex I. The absolute rate of complex I enzymatic activity in vitro does not predict immobilization of the animal by isoflurane. Isoflurane had no measurable effect on stability of mitochondrial supercomplexes. Reduction of ubiquinone by complex I displayed positive cooperative kinetics not disrupted by isoflurane. CONCLUSIONS Isoflurane directly inhibits complex I at a site distal to the flavoprotein subcomplex. However, we have excluded our original hypothesis that isoflurane and ubiquinone compete for a common hydrophobic binding site on complex I. In addition, immobilization of the nematode by isoflurane is not due to limiting absolute amounts of complex I electron transport as measured in isolated mitochondria. PMID:21467554

  7. Discrimination of auditory stimuli during isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Manuel J; Navas, Jinna A; Greene, Stephen A; Rector, David M

    2008-10-01

    Deep isoflurane anesthesia initiates a burst suppression pattern in which high-amplitude bursts are preceded by periods of nearly silent electroencephalogram. The burst suppression ratio (BSR) is the percentage of suppression (silent electroencephalogram) during the burst suppression pattern and is one parameter used to assess anesthesia depth. We investigated cortical burst activity in rats in response to different auditory stimuli presented during the burst suppression state. We noted a rapid appearance of bursts and a significant decrease in the BSR during stimulation. The BSR changes were distinctive for the different stimuli applied, and the BSR decreased significantly more when stimulated with a voice familiar to the rat as compared with an unfamiliar voice. These results show that the cortex can show differential sensory responses during deep isoflurane anesthesia.

  8. The mitochondrial pathway of anesthetic isoflurane-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiying; Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Lu, Yan; Xu, Zhipeng; Knapp, Andrew; Yue, Yun; Xu, Tiejun; Xie, Zhongcong

    2010-02-05

    The common inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce apoptosis, which then leads to accumulation of beta-amyloid protein, the hallmark feature of Alzheimer disease neuropathogenesis. The underlying molecular mechanism of the isoflurane-induced apoptosis is largely unknown. We, therefore, set out to assess whether isoflurane can induce apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins, enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. We performed these studies in cultured cells, primary neurons, and mice. Here we show for the first time that treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h can increase pro-apoptotic factor Bax levels, decrease anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 levels, increase ROS accumulation, facilitate cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol, induce activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and finally cause apoptosis as compared with the control condition. We have further found that isoflurane can increase the mRNA levels of Bax and reduce the mRNA levels of Bcl-2. The isoflurane-induced ROS accumulation can be attenuated by the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA. Finally, the anesthetic desflurane does not induce activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. These results suggest that isoflurane may induce apoptosis through Bcl-2 family proteins- and ROS-associated mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. These findings, which have identified at least partially the molecular mechanism by which isoflurane induces apoptosis, will promote more studies aimed at studying the potential neurotoxic effects of anesthetics.

  9. Isoflurane versus sevoflurane with interscalene block for shoulder arthroscopic procedures: Value of process capability indices as an additional tool for data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tantry, Thrivikrama Padur; Karanth, Harish; Shenoy, Sunil P; Ayya, Shreekantha V; Shetty, Pramal K; Adappa, Karunakara K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Hypotensive anaesthesia reduces intra-articular bleed and promotes visualisation during arthroscopy. The haemodynamic effects of inhalational agents isoflurane and sevoflurane were studied extensively, and both were found to reduce mean arterial pressures (MBP) to an equivalent magnitude. We investigated the relative ability of isoflurane vis-a-vis sevoflurane to maintain the target systolic blood pressure (SBP) in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopic procedures. Methods: In a prospective randomised study, 59 patients in two groups of 30 and 29 patients each received concomitant general anaesthesia (1.2–1.5 MAC of isoflurane and sevoflurane) and interscalene brachial plexus block. Nitrous oxide was used in both groups. Intraoperatively, serial blood pressure recordings of SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), MBP and heart rates were done at every 3rd min intervals. The manipulations needed to achieve target SBP (T = 90 mmHg) for optimal arthroscopic visualisation and treat unacceptable hypotensive episodes were noted. Conventional statistical tests and process capability index (PCI) evaluation were both deployed for data analysis. Results: Lower mean SBP and DBPs were recorded for isoflurane patients as compared to sevoflurane (P < 0.05, for mean, maximum and minimum recordings). Higher mean heart rates were recorded for isoflurane (P < 0.05). PCIs indicated that isoflurane was superior to sevoflurane in the ease of achieving target SBP of 90 mmHg as well as maintaining blood pressures in the range of 80–100 mmHg. Conclusion: Isoflurane provides better intraoperative haemodynamic status vis-a-vis sevoflurane in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopic surgery with preliminary interscalene blockade. The PCI can be a useful additional medical data analysis tool. PMID:28003697

  10. Dopamine uptake dynamics are preserved under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodnik, Zachary D; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-08

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is commonly used for measuring the kinetics of dopamine release and uptake. For experiments using an anesthetized preparation, urethane is preferentially used because it does not alter dopamine uptake kinetics compared to freely moving animals. Unfortunately, urethane is highly toxic, can induce premature death during experiments, and cannot be used for recovery surgeries. Isoflurane is an alternative anesthetic that is less toxic than urethane, produces a stable level of anesthesia over extended periods, and is often used for recovery surgeries. Despite these benefits, the effects of isoflurane on dopamine release and uptake have not been directly characterized. In the present studies, we assessed the utility of isoflurane for voltammetry experiments by testing dopamine signaling parameters under baseline conditions, after treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine, and after exposure to increasing concentrations of isoflurane. Our results indicate that surgical levels of isoflurane do not significantly alter terminal mechanisms of dopamine release and uptake over prolonged periods of time. Consequently, we propose that isoflurane is an acceptable anesthetic for voltammetry experiments, which in turn permits the design of studies in which dopamine signaling is examined under anesthesia prior to recovery and subsequent experimentation in the same animals.

  11. Evaluation of Isoflurane Overdose for Euthanasia of Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Travis L; Nagamine, Claude M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal mice (that is, pups younger than 6 d) must be exposed to CO2 for as long as 50 min to achieve euthanasia. Alternatively, other inhalant anesthetic agents have been used to euthanize laboratory rodent species. We investigated the efficacy of isoflurane at saturated vapor pressure to euthanize neonatal mice. Neonatal mice (n = 76; age, 1 or 2 d) were exposed to isoflurane in a sealed, quart-size (0.95-L) plastic bag at room temperature. Righting and withdrawal reflexes were absent in less than 2 min. After 30 min of exposure to isoflurane, pups were removed and monitored for recovery. All pups were cyanotic and showed no detectable signs of life when they were removed from the bag. However, after 30 to 120 min after removal from the bag, 24% of isoflurane-overexposed pups began gasping and then resumed normal respiration and regained a normal pink coloration. These results demonstrate that isoflurane overexposure at saturated vapor pressure for 30 min is insufficient to euthanize neonatal mice and that isoflurane overexposure must be followed by a secondary means of euthanasia. PMID:27177567

  12. Isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane use in cane toads (Rhinella marina)

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kaleigh E.; Strahl-Heldreth, Danielle; Clark-Price, Stuart C.

    2016-01-01

    Anaesthetic chamber concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane that resulted in loss of righting reflex within 15 minutes in 50 per cent of toads (Rhinella marina) exposed (ED50-LRR<15MIN) were identified. The median and range ED50-LRR<15MIN was 1.4 (0.9–1.4) per cent for isoflurane, 1.75 (1.1–1.9) per cent for sevoflurane and 4.4 (4.3–5.5) per cent for desflurane. Subsequently, toads were exposed to 1.5 times the ED50-LRR<15MIN and times to loss and return of righting reflex were identified. All toads for all anaesthetics lost righting reflex. The median and range loss of righting reflex was 4:00 (3:00–5:30) minutes for isoflurane, 4:45 (3:30–7:00) minutes for sevoflurane, and 4:15 (4:00–5:30) minutes for desflurane and was not different between anaesthetics. Time to return of righting reflex was 175 (123–211) minutes for isoflurane, 192 (116–383) minutes for sevoflurane and 74 (52–220) minutes for desflurane. Time to return of righting reflex was significantly shorter for desflurane compared with isoflurane or sevoflurane. The use of isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane can be used to provide immobilisation to cane toads and potentially other anurans. Induction times are likely similar when using an anaesthetic chamber to provide anaesthesia. However recovery time may take twice as long when utilising isoflurane or sevoflurane over desflurane. PMID:27651914

  13. Single and repeated exposures to the volatile anesthetic isoflurane do not impair operant performance in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jennifer L; Chelonis, John J; Fogle, Charles M; Orser, Beverley A; Paule, Merle G

    2016-09-01

    Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction (POCD) is a complication that can occur in the elderly after anesthesia and surgery and is characterized by impairments in information processing, memory, and executive function. Currently, it is unclear whether POCD is due to the effects of surgery, anesthesia, or perhaps some interaction between these or other perioperative variables. Studies in rodents suggest that the development of POCD may be related directly to anesthesia-induced neuroactivity. Volatile anesthetics have been shown to increase cellular inflammation and apoptosis within the hippocampus of aged rodents, while producing corresponding impairments in hippocampal-dependent brain functions. However, it is unclear whether volatile anesthetics can affect additional aspects of cognition that do not primarily depend upon the hippocampus. The purpose of this study was to use established operant tests to examine the effects of isoflurane on aspects of behavioral inhibition, learning, and motivation in aged rats. Twenty-one adult Sprague-Dawley rats (11 male, 10 female) were trained to perform fixed consecutive number (FCN), incremental repeated acquisition (IRA), and progressive ratio (PR) tasks for a minimum of 15 months prior to receiving anesthesia. At 23 months of age, rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane or medical grade air for 2h. Initial results revealed that a 2h exposure to isoflurane had no effect on IRA, FCN, or PR performance. Thus, rats received 3 additional exposures to 1.3% isoflurane or medical grade air: 2, 4 and 6h exposures with 2 weeks elapsing before exposure two, 3 weeks elapsing between exposures two and three, and 2 weeks elapsing between exposures three and four. These additional exposures had no observable effects on performance of any operant task. These results suggest that single and repeated exposures to isoflurane do not impair the performance of aged rats in tasks designed to measure behavioral inhibition, learning, and motivation. This

  14. In vivo field recordings effectively monitor the mouse cortex and hippocampus under isoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yi-qing; Wang, Li-fang; Chen, Chao; Gao, Teng; Zhao, Zi-fang; Li, Cheng-hui

    2016-01-01

    Isoflurane is a widely used inhaled anesthetic in the clinical setting. However, the mechanism underlying its effect on consciousness is under discussion. Therefore, we investigated the effect of isoflurane on the hippocampus and cortex using an in vivo field recording approach. Our results showed that 1.3%, 0.8%, and 0.4% isoflurane exerted an inhibitory influence on the mouse hippocampus and cortex. Further, high frequency bands in the cortex and hippocampus showed greater suppression with increasing isoflurane concentration. Our findings suggest that in vivo field recordings can monitor the effect of isoflurane anesthesia on the mouse cortex and hippocampus. PMID:28197191

  15. Increased mitochondrial ATP production capacity in brain of healthy mice and a mouse model of isolated complex I deficiency after isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Manjeri, Ganesh R; Rodenburg, Richard J; Blanchet, Lionel; Roelofs, Suzanne; Nijtmans, Leo G; Smeitink, Jan A; Driessen, Jacques J; Koopman, Werner J H; Willems, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    We reported before that the minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane is decreased in complex I-deficient mice lacking the NDUFS4 subunit of the respiratory chain (RC) (1.55 and 0.81% at postnatal (PN) 22-25 days and 1.68 and 0.65% at PN 31-34 days for wildtype (WT) and CI-deficient KO, respectively). A more severe respiratory depression was caused by 1.0 MAC isoflurane in KO mice (respiratory rate values of 86 and 45 at PN 22-25 days and 69 and 29 at PN 31-34 days for anesthetized WT and KO, respectively). Here, we address the idea that isoflurane anesthesia causes a much larger decrease in brain mitochondrial ATP production in KO mice thus explaining their increased sensitivity to this anesthetic. Brains from WT and KO mice of the above study were removed immediately after MAC determination at PN 31-34 days and a mitochondria-enriched fraction was prepared. Aliquots were used for measurement of maximal ATP production in the presence of pyruvate, malate, ADP and creatine and, after freeze-thawing, the maximal activity of the individual RC complexes in the presence of complex-specific substrates. CI activity was dramatically decreased in KO, whereas ATP production was decreased by only 26% (p < 0.05). The activities of CII, CIII, and CIV were the same for WT and KO. Isoflurane anesthesia decreased the activity of CI by 30% (p < 0.001) in WT. In sharp contrast, it increased the activity of CII by 37% (p < 0.001) and 50% (p < 0.001) and that of CIII by 37% (p < 0.001) and 40% (p < 0.001) in WT and KO, respectively, whereas it tended to increase that of CIV in both WT and KO. Isoflurane anesthesia increased ATP production by 52 and 69% in WT (p < 0.05) and KO (p < 0.01), respectively. Together these findings indicate that isoflurane anesthesia interferes positively rather than negatively with the ability of CI-deficient mice brain mitochondria to convert their main substrate pyruvate into ATP.

  16. Isoflurane as an inhalational anesthetic agent in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, Susan E.

    1990-01-01

    Isoflurane is the most recently available inhalational anesthetic agent on the market today. Although there have been few clinical trials comparing its use to halothane and methoxyflurane, the pharmacology of the agent suggests certain situations in which it may be the preferable agent. These include avian anesthesia, geriatric patients, patients with cardiovascular disease or hepatic disease, critically ill and unstable patients, cases such as brachiocephalics where upper airway obstruction is a concern during recovery, patients where increases in intracranial pressure should be avoided, and cesarean section. In addition, the rapid recoveries seen with isoflurane may be an advantage for outpatient surgeries. PMID:17423714

  17. Antimicrobial effects of liquid anesthetic isoflurane on Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M; Acheampong, Edward; Powell, Garry; Lobach, Ludmila; Logan, David A; Parveen, Zahida; Armstead, Valerie; Mukhtar, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that can grow in yeast morphology or hyphal form depending on the surrounding environment. This ubiquitous fungus is present in skin and mucus membranes as a potential pathogen that under opportunistic conditions causes a series of systemic and superficial infections known as candidiasis, moniliasis or simply candidiasis. There has been a steady increase in the prevalence of candidiasis that is expressed in more virulent forms of infection. Although candidiasis is commonly manifested as mucocutaneous disease, life-threatening systemic invasion by this fungus can occur in every part of the body. The severity of candidal infections is associated with its morphological shift such that the hyphal morphology of the fungus is most invasive. Of importance, aberrant multiplication of Candida yeast is also associated with the pathogenesis of certain mucosal diseases. In this study, we assessed the anti-candidal activity of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in liquid form in comparison with the anti-fungal agent amphotericin B in an in vitro culture system. Exposure of C. albicans to isoflurane (0.3% volume/volume and above) inhibited multiplication of yeast as well as formation of hyphae. These data suggest development of potential topical application of isoflurane for controlling a series of cutaneous and genital infections associated with this fungus. Elucidiation of the mechanism by which isoflurane effects fungal growth could offer therapeutic potential for certain systemic fungal infections. PMID:17094810

  18. Postanesthetic Effects of Isoflurane on Behavioral Phenotypes of Adult Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Ayako; Kobayashi, Ayako; Takase, Kenkichi; Goto, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane was previously the major clinical anesthetic agent but is now mainly used for veterinary anesthesia. Studies have reported widespread sites of action of isoflurane, suggesting a wide array of side effects besides sedation. In the present study, we phenotyped isoflurane-treated mice to investigate the postanesthetic behavioral effects of isoflurane. We applied comprehensive behavioral test batteries comprising sensory test battery, motor test battery, anxiety test battery, depression test battery, sociability test battery, attention test battery, and learning test battery, which were started 7 days after anesthesia with 1.8% isoflurane. In addition to the control group, we included a yoked control group that was exposed to the same stress of handling as the isoflurane-treated animals before being anesthetized. Our comprehensive behavioral test batteries revealed impaired latent inhibition in the isoflurane-treated group, but the concentration of residual isoflurane in the brain was presumably negligible. The yoked control group and isoflurane-treated group exhibited higher anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test and impaired learning function in the cued fear conditioning test. No influences were observed in sensory functions, motor functions, antidepressant behaviors, and social behaviors. A number of papers have reported an effect of isoflurane on animal behaviors, but no systematic investigation has been performed. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to systematically investigate the general health, neurological reflexes, sensory functions, motor functions, and higher behavioral functions of mice exposed to isoflurane as adults. Our results suggest that the postanesthetic effect of isoflurane causes attention deficit in mice. Therefore, isoflurane must be used with great care in the clinical setting and veterinary anesthesia. PMID:25806517

  19. Isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion attenuates oxidative and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sosunov, Sergey A; Ameer, Xavier; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina; Ratner, Veniamin I; Ten, Vadim S

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that in mice subjected to hypoxia-ischemia (HI) brain injury isoflurane anesthesia initiated upon reperfusion limits a release of mitochondrial oxidative radicals by inhibiting a recovery of complex-I dependent mitochondrial respiration. This significantly attenuates an oxidative stress and reduces the extent of HI brain injury. Neonatal mice were subjected to HI, and at the initiation of reperfusion were exposed to isoflurane with or without mechanical ventilation. At the end of HI and isoflurane exposure cerebral mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 emission rates were measured followed by an assessment of cerebral oxidative damage and infarct volumes. At 8 weeks after HI navigational memory and brain atrophy were assessed. In vitro, direct effect of isoflurane on mitochondrial H2O2 emission was compared to that of complex-I inhibitor, rotenone. Compared to controls, 15 minutes of isoflurane anesthesia inhibited recovery of the compex I-dependent mitochondrial respiration and decreased H2O2 production in mitochondria supported with succinate. This was associated with reduced oxidative brain injury, superior navigational memory and decreased cerebral atrophy compared to the vehicle-treated HI-mice. Extended isoflurane anesthesia was associated with sluggish recovery of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the neuroprotection was lost. However, when isoflurane anesthesia was supported with mechanical ventilation the CBF recovery improved, the event associated with further reduction of infarct volume compared to HI-mice exposed to isoflurane without respiratory support. Thus, in neonatal mice brief isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion limits mitochondrial release of oxidative radicals and attenuates an oxidative stress. This novel mechanism contributes to neuroprotective action of isoflurane. The use of mechanical ventilation during isoflurane anesthesia counterbalances negative effect of isoflurane anesthesia on recovery of

  20. The effects of isoflurane on airway smooth muscle crossbridge kinetics in Fisher and Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Duracher, Caroline; Blanc, François-Xavier; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; David, Jean Stéphane; Riou, Bruno; Lecarpentier, Yves; Coirault, Catherine

    2005-07-01

    Our aim was to determine how isoflurane modified crossbridge (CB) number and kinetics in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and to compare its effects in Fisher and Lewis rats, two strains with differences in airway responsiveness. The effects of isoflurane (2 MAC) on isotonic and isometric contractility in tracheal ASM strips were investigated after methacholine (10(-6) M)-induced contraction. CB mechanics and kinetics were analyzed using the formalism of Huxley's equations adapted to ASM. After isoflurane, maximum velocity did not differ from baseline in Lewis rats, whereas it was significantly less than baseline in Fisher rats ( approximately 25%), the most reactive strain. Isoflurane totally reversed methacholine-induced increase in active CB number in Lewis rats (2.4 +/- 0.5 versus 1.8 +/- 0.4 10(9)/mm(2) after methacholine and isoflurane, respectively) whereas reversal was only partial in Fisher rats (2.7 +/- 0.4 versus 2.1 +/- 0.3 10(9)/mm(2) after methacholine and isoflurane, respectively). Isoflurane induced a 40% increase in attachment step duration in both strains and an almost twofold increase in the CB cycle duration compared with baseline in Lewis rats. The isoflurane-induced increase in detachment step duration was less in Lewis than in Fisher rats (P < 0.05). We concluded that isoflurane modulated CB number and CB cycling rates of isolated rat ASM differently depending on the level of airway responsiveness.

  1. Comparison of isoflurane and sevoflurane for anesthesia in beaver.

    PubMed

    Breck, Stewart W; Gaynor, James S

    2003-04-01

    We compared the hemodynamic and respiratory effects, recovery time, and cost of two gas inhalants (isoflurane and sevoflurane) for anesthetic induction and maintenance of beaver (Castor canadensis) during surgery to implant radio transmitters in the peritoneal cavity. Heart rate, respiratory rate, relative hemoglobin saturation with oxygen (SpO2), and body temperature were measured every 5 min for the first 45 min, and arterial blood gas was measured once, 25 min into the anesthetic procedure. Induction for either agent was smooth and rapid. Heart rate and respiratory rate both decreased during the procedure though neither was lower than baseline values reported in the literature for beaver. Relative hemoglobin saturation with oxygen, body temperature, and blood gas variables did not differ between each anesthetic regime. Both inhalants caused slight respiratory acidosis. Recovery time from anesthesia was highly variable (1-178 min) but did not differ statistically between drugs. Sevoflurane costs ($22.30/60 min) were much higher than isoflurane costs ($3.50/60 min). We recommend isoflurane or sevoflurane for anesthetic induction and maintenance of beaver because of the lack of physiologic differences.

  2. Monitoring and mitigating isoflurane emissions during inhalational anesthesia of mice.

    PubMed

    Todd, Thomas E; Morse, Jennifer M; Casagni, Todd J; Engelman, Robert W

    2013-10-01

    Establishing a program to monitor waste anesthetic gas (WAG) in order to limit personnel exposure requires measuring the levels of WAG emitted and determining the effectiveness of scavenging methods to reduce such levels. In this study, the authors used infrared spectroscopy to measure levels of WAG emitted while anesthetizing mice with isoflurane for 15 min. They evaluated four different WAG scavenging conditions during induction and maintenance anesthesia: two conditions that used passive techniques and two that used active techniques. Isoflurane concentrations were measured at three different locations: in the operator's vicinity, at the mouse-facemask interface and in the room environment. Passive scavenging of WAG improved when chambers were purged with oxygen after induction and when a diaphragm-sealed facemask delivered a reduced anesthetic flow rate during maintenance anesthesia. Active scavenging of WAG improved when a relief intake opening was provided in the induction chamber's vacuum line, vacuum draw after induction was regulated and the anesthetic flow rate and vacuum scavenging draw were balanced during maintenance anesthesia using a facemask that separated the breathing space from the scavenging zone. Additionally, time-weighted average isoflurane WAG levels detected by personal dosimeters correlated with real-time measurements made using infrared spectroscopy. These observations contribute to the development of a substantiated program for monitoring WAG air quality.

  3. High fat diet reduces neuroprotection of isoflurane post-treatment: role of carboxyl-terminal modulator protein-Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Deng, Jiao; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2014-01-01

    Objective High fat diet (HFD) contributes to the increased prevalence of obesity and hyperlipidemia in young adults, a possible cause for their recent increase in stroke. Isoflurane post-treatment provides neuroprotection. We determined whether isoflurane post-treatment induced neuroprotection in HFD-fed mice. Design and Methods Six-week old CD-1 male mice were fed HFD or regular diet (RD) for 5 or 10 weeks. Their hippocampal slices (400 µm) were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Some slices were exposed to isoflurane for 30 min immediately after OGD. Some mice had a 90-min middle cerebral arterial occlusion and were post-treated with 2% isoflurane for 30 min. Results OGD time-dependently induced cell injury. This injury was dose-dependently reduced by isoflurane. The effect was apparent at 1% or 2% isoflurane in RD-fed mice but required 3% isoflurane in HFD-fed mice. HFD influenced the isoflurane effects in DG. OGD increased carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP), an Akt inhibitor, and decreased Akt signaling. Isoflurane reduced these effects. LY294002, an Akt activation inhibitor, attenuated the isoflurane effects. HFD increased CTMP and reduced Akt signaling. Isoflurane improved neurological outcome in the RD-fed mice but not in the HFD-fed mice. Conclusions HFD attenuated isoflurane post-treatment-induced neuroprotection possibly due to decreased prosurvival Akt signaling. PMID:25142024

  4. ANESTHETIC INDUCTION AND RECOVERY PARAMETERS IN BEARDED DRAGONS (POGONA VITTICEPS): COMPARISON OF ISOFLURANE DELIVERED IN 100% OXYGEN VERSUS 21% OXYGEN.

    PubMed

    O, Odette; Churgin, Sarah M; Sladky, Kurt K; Smith, Lesley J

    2015-09-01

    Inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps, n=6) were anesthetized for 1 hr using isoflurane in either 100% oxygen or 21% oxygen (FI 21; medical-grade room air). Parameters of anesthetic depth were recorded throughout both induction and recovery by an observer blinded to the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), including the loss and return of withdrawal and righting reflexes, muscle tone, ability to intubate or extubate, and return to spontaneous respiration. Physiologic data were recorded every 5 min throughout the anesthetic procedures, including heart rate, body temperature, end-tidal CO2, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2), and percent expired isoflurane. Lizards were subjected to application of a noxious stimulus (needle stick) at 0, 30, and 60 min, and responses recorded. Following a minimum 7-day washout period, the experiment was repeated with each lizard subjected to the other protocol in a randomized, complete crossover design. The only statistically significant difference was a lower mean SpO2 in the group inspiring 21% oxygen (P<0.0020). No statistically significant differences were detected in any parameters during induction or recovery; however, all values were uniformly shorter for the FI 21 group, indicating a possible clinically significant difference. A larger sample size may have detected statistically significant differences. Further studies are needed to evaluate these effects in other reptile species and with the concurrent use of injectable anesthetic and analgesic drugs.

  5. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kevan; Dell, Sharon; Birken, Catherine; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is often asymptomatic despite significant changes in chest imaging. Diagnosis is often made when patients become symptomatic in adulthood. There are still no proven treatments, but earlier diagnosis may allow for evaluation of preventative strategies that could improve outcome. It is an important diagnosis to consider in children who have marked radiographic findings with no or very mild symptoms or physical findings. Diagnosis can be made with imaging alone but may necessitate lung biopsy for definitive diagnosis. PMID:27445543

  6. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Srinivas, G Vijay; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant neoplasm of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma seen in childhood and adolescence. The most frequent site is the head and neck accounting for 40% of all cases and other involved sites are genitourinary tract, retroperitoneum, and to a lesser extent, the extremities. RMS is relatively uncommon in the oral cavity and the involvement of the jaws is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 50-year-old female with oral RMS involving maxillary alveolar region with clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:27194887

  7. The potential dual effects of anesthetic isoflurane on Aβ-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhipeng; Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Zhang, Jun; McAuliffe, Sayre; Pan, Chuxiong; Zhang, Yiying; Ichinose, Fumito; Yue, Yun; Xie, Zhongcong

    2011-11-01

    β-amyloid protein (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity is the main component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathogenesis. Inhalation anesthetics have long been considered to protect against neurotoxicity. However, recent research studies have suggested that the inhalation anesthetic isoflurane may promote neurotoxicity by inducing apoptosis and increasing Aβ levels. We therefore set out to determine whether isoflurane can induce dose- and time-dependent dual effects on Aβ-induced apoptosis: protection versus promotion. H4 human neuroglioma cells, primary neurons from naive mice, and naive mice were treated with Aβ and/or isoflurane, and levels of caspase-3 cleavage (activation), apoptosis, Bcl-2, Bax, and cytosolic calcium were determined. Here we show for the first time that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for six hours or 30 minutes potentiated, whereas the treatment with 0.5% isoflurane for six hours or 30 minutes attenuated, the Aβ-induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, anesthesia with 1.4% isoflurane for two hours potentiated, whereas the anesthesia with 0.7% isoflurane for 30 minutes attenuated, the Aβ-induced caspase-3 activation in vivo. The high concentration isoflurane potentiated the Aβ-induced reduction in Bcl-2/Bax ratio and caused a robust elevation of cytosolic calcium levels. The low concentration isoflurane attenuated the Aβ-induced reduction in Bcl-2/Bax ratio and caused only a mild elevation of cytosolic calcium levels. These results suggest that isoflurane may have dual effects (protection or promotion) on Aβ-induced toxicity, which potentially act through the Bcl-2 family proteins and cytosolic calcium. These findings would lead to more systematic studies to determine the potential dual effects of anesthetics on AD-associated neurotoxicity.

  8. Isoflurane does not cause neuroapoptosis but reduces astroglial processes in young adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Isoflurane, a volatile anesthetic widely used clinically, has been implicated to be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic. The claim about isoflurane causing neural apoptosis remains controversial. In this study, we investigated the effects of isoflurane exposures on apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signals, cell proliferation and neurogenesis, and astroglial processes in young adult mouse brains. Methods Sixty 6-week-old mice were randomly assigned to four anesthetic concentration groups (0 as control and 0.6%, 1.3%, and 2%) with four recovery times (2 h and 1, 6, and 14 d) after 2-h isoflurane exposure. Immunohistochemistry measurements of activated caspase-3 and Bcl-xl for apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signals, respectively, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin for reactive astrocytosis, doublecortin (Dcx) for neurogenesis, and BrdU for cell proliferation were performed. Results Contrary to the previous conclusion derived from studies with neonatal rodents, we found no evidence of isoflurane-induced apoptosis in the adult mouse brain. Neurogenesis in the subgranule zone of the dentate gyrus was not affected by isoflurane. However, there is a tendency of reduced cell proliferation after 2% isoflurane exposure. VIM and GFAP staining showed that isoflurane exposure caused a delayed reduction of astroglial processes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Conclusion Two-hour exposure to isoflurane did not cause neuroapoptosis in adult brains. The delayed reduction in astroglial processes after isoflurane exposure may explain why some volatile anesthetics can confer neuroprotection after experimental stroke because reduced glial scarring facilitates better long-term neuronal recoveries. PMID:22146123

  9. Isoflurane induced cognitive impairment in aged rats through hippocampal calcineurin/NFAT signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Qian, Min; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiangyang

    2015-05-15

    Calcineurin (CaN) over-activation constrains synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Upon CaN activation, NFAT imports into the nucleus and guides its downstream genes, which also affect neuronal and synaptic function. Aberrant CaN/NFAT signaling involves in neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, but its role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) remains uninvestigated. Inhaled anesthetic isoflurane facilitates the development of POCD, and the present study investigated the role of CaN/NFAT signaling in isoflurane induced cognitive impairment of aged rats, and the therapeutic effects of CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA). The results indicated that hippocampal CaN activity increased and peaked at 6 h after isoflurane exposure, and NFAT, especially NFATc4, imported into the nucleus following CaN activation. Furthermore, phamacological inhibition of CaN by CsA markedly attenuated isoflurane induced aberrant CaN/NFATc4 signaling in the hippocampus, and rescued relevant spatial learning and memory impairment of aged rats. Overall, the study suggests hippocampal CaN/NFAT signaling as the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced cognitive impairment, and provides potential therapeutic target and possible treatment methods for POCD. - Highlights: • Isoflurane induces hippocampal calcineurin activation. • Isoflurane induces hippocampal NFAT, especially NFATc4, nuclear import. • Cyclosporine A attenuates isoflurane induced aberrant calcineurin/NFAT signaling. • Cyclosporine A rescues isoflurane induced cognitive impairment. • Calcineurin/NFAT signaling is the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced synaptic dysfunction and cognitive impairment.

  10. Anesthetic Isoflurane Increases Phosphorylated Tau Levels Mediated by Caspase Activation and Aβ Generation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2012-01-01

    Anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to promote Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathogenesis by inducing caspase activation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ). Phosphorylation of tau protein is another important feature of AD neuropathogenesis. However, the effects of isoflurane on phosphorylated tau levels remain largely to be determined. We therefore set out to determine whether isoflurane can increase phosphorylated tau levels. 5 to 8 month-old wild-type and AD transgenic mice [B6.Cg-Tg (APPswe, PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J] were treated with 1.4% isoflurane for two hours. The mice brain tissues were harvested at six, 12 and 24 hours after the anesthesia. For the in vitro studies, primary neurons from wild-type and the AD transgenic mice were exposed to 2% isoflurane for six hours, and were harvested at the end of anesthesia. The harvested brain tissues and neurons were subjected to Western blot analysis by which the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at Serine 262 (Tau-PS262) were determined. Here we show that the isoflurane anesthesia increased Tau-PS262 levels in brain tissues and primary neurons from the wild-type and AD transgenic mice. Moreover, the isoflurane anesthesia may induce a greater increase in Tau-PS262 levels in primary neurons and brain tissues from the AD transgenic mice. Finally, caspase activation inhibitor Z-VAD and Aβ generation inhibitor L-685,458 attenuated the isoflurane-induced increases in Tau-PS262 levels. In conclusion, clinically relevant isoflurane anesthesia increases phosphorylated tau levels, which may result from the isoflurane-induced caspase activation and Aβ generation. These findings will promote more studies to determine the effects of anesthetics on tau phosphorylation. PMID:22745746

  11. Cerebrovascular responsiveness to carbon dioxide in dogs with 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane.

    PubMed

    McPherson, R W; Briar, J E; Traystman, R J

    1989-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) responsiveness to alterations in arterial CO2 tensions (PaCO2) during 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane anesthesia was assessed. Dogs were initially anesthetized with thiopental (12 mg/kg, iv bolus), their tracheae intubated, after which anesthesia was maintained with 1.4% isoflurane. In eight animals three levels of PaCO2 (25, 40, and 60 mmHg) were studied during 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane. Mean arterial blood pressure, sagittal sinus pressure, and cerebrospinal fluid pressure were measured and CBF was determined using radiolabeled microspheres. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was maintained constant at approximately 80 mmHg by inflation of a balloon in the midthoracic aorta. CBF during normocapnia was 70 +/- 14 and 118 +/- 18 ml.min-1.100 g-1 with 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane, respectively. As PaCO2 was decreased and increased, CBF decreased and increased to 42 +/- 7% and 185 +/- 16% of control, respectively, during 1.4% isoflurane. During 2.8% isoflurane, hypocapnia decreased CBF to 39 +/- 6% of control, but CBF did not increase with hypercapnia. In a second group of animals (n = 8), the effects of changes in CPP during hypercapnia with 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane were assessed. Increasing CPP approximately 25 mmHg with both 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane increased CBF but did not change CVR from control. With 1.4% isoflurane, the cerebral vasculature constricts with hypocapnia and dilates with hypercapnia, whereas with 2.8% isoflurane, vasoconstriction to hypocapnia is retained but vasodilation to hypercapnia is absent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Propofol and magnesium attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation via inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition pore

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and induce caspase activation and apoptosis, which may lead to learning and memory impairment. Cyclosporine A, a blocker of mPTP opening might attenuate the isoflurane-induced mPTP opening, lessening its ripple effects. Magnesium and anesthetic propofol are also mPTP blockers. We therefore set out to determine whether propofol and magnesium can attenuate the isoflurane-induced caspase activation and mPTP opening. Methods We investigated the effects of magnesium sulfate (Mg2+), propofol, and isoflurane on the opening of mPTP and caspase activation in H4 human neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express full-length human amyloid precursor protein (APP) (H4 APP cells) and in six day-old wild-type mice, employing Western blot analysis and flowcytometry. Results Here we show that Mg2+ and propofol attenuated the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in H4-APP cells and mouse brain tissue. Moreover, Mg2+ and propofol, the blockers of mPTP opening, mitigated the isoflurane-induced mPTP opening in the H4-APP cells. Conclusion These data illustrate that Mg2+ and propofol may ameliorate the isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity by inhibiting its mitochondrial dysfunction. Pending further studies, these findings may suggest the use of Mg2+ and propofol in preventing and treating anesthesia neurotoxicity. PMID:22901676

  13. Effects of halothane, isoflurane and enflurane on isolated rat heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Miralles, F S; Carceles, M D; Laorden, M L; Hernandez, J

    1989-05-01

    Since the effects in the intact organism are complicated by central as well as peripheral effects, we compared the direct cardiac effects of three commonly used inhalational anaesthetics--halothane, isoflurane and enflurane--on isolated heart muscle. Concentration-response curves for inotropic, chronotropic and ventricular automaticity effects of halothane, isoflurane and enflurane (0.1-2% v/v) on electrically stimulated left atria, right atria and right ventricles of the rat were obtained. All three inhalational anaesthetics significantly decreased contractile force; the inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) of enflurane was 0.55 +/- 0.06% v/v, significantly lower than halothane (0.96 +/- 0.08% v/v) and isoflurane (0.67 +/- 0.05% v/v). Similar results were obtained on atrial nomotopic rate. Halothane, isoflurane and enflurane produced negative chronotropic effects in this preparation. On the other hand, halothane and isoflurane significantly reduced the ventricular ectopic automaticity. However enflurane (0.3, 0.5, 1% v/v) increased ventricular rate. There were statistically significant differences between the IC50 values of atrial and ventricular rate for halothane and isoflurane. These results indicate: (a) direct negative inotropic and chronotropic effects for the three inhalational anaesthetics tested; (b) anti-dysrhythmic actions for halothane and isoflurane; and (c) dysrhythmogenic effects of enflurane.

  14. Lower doses of isoflurane treatment has no beneficial effects in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracerebral hemorrhage is a subtype of stroke that has a poor prognosis without an adequate therapy. Recently, the use of anesthetics such as isoflurane has been shown to be protective after cerebral ischemia. However, the potential therapeutic effect of isoflurane after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has not been fully explored. Results In this study, male Sprague–Dawley rats (SD) were subjected to ICH and randomized into controls and 1.2% or 1.5% isoflurane posttreatment groups. Brain water content, neurological outcomes and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP2-MMP9) plasma levels were quantified at 24 hours. Isoflurane treatment did not reduce brain edema compared with controls in any of the applied isoflurane concentrations. Moreover, consistent with this lack of effect on brain edema, isoflurane posttreatment did not affect neurological outcomes in any of the tests used. Plasma MMP levels did not change. Conclusion Our data suggested that there is no neuroprotection after isoflurane posttreatment in a rat model of ICH. PMID:24138708

  15. Glutamate transporter type 3 mediates isoflurane preconditioning-induced acute phase of neuroprotection in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liaoliao; Deng, Jiao; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-09-01

    A pre-exposure to isoflurane reduces ischemic brain injury in rodents (isoflurane preconditioning). This neuroprotection has acute and delayed phases. Our previous in vitro studies suggest that the acute phase may involve excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). We determine whether this protection involves EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. Adult male EAAT3 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates were exposed or were not exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 30 min. Sixty minutes later, they were subjected to a 90- or 60-min middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO). Their neurological outcomes were evaluated 24h after the MCAO. In another experiment, cerebral cortex was harvested for Western blotting at 30 min after animals were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 30 min. Here, we showed that isoflurane reduced brain infarct volumes and improved neurological functions of wild-type mice after a 90-min MCAO. However, isoflurane pre-exposure did not change the neurological outcome of EAAT3 knockout mice no matter whether the MCAO was for 90 min or 60 min. Isoflurane increased phospho-Akt, a survival-promoting protein, in the wild-type mice but not in the EAAT3 knockout mice. The isoflurane-induced neuroprotection in the wild-type mice was abolished by LY294004, an Akt activation inhibitor. LY294004 alone did not affect the neurological outcome of the wild-type or EAAT3 knockout mice after focal brain ischemia. These results suggest that the isoflurane preconditioning-induced acute phase of neuroprotection involves EAAT3. The downstream event includes Akt activation.

  16. JNK pathway may be involved in isoflurane-induced apoptosis in the hippocampi of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujuan; Wang, Fei; Liu, Chuiliang; Zeng, Minting; Han, Xue; Luo, Tao; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Jie; Wang, Huaqiao

    2013-06-17

    Previous studies have demonstrated that isoflurane, a commonly used volatile anesthetic, can induce widespread apoptosis in the neonatal animal brains and result in persistent cognitive impairment. Isoflurane-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) overload and activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis may be involved in this neurodegeneration. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling can regulate the expression of the Bcl-2 family members that modulates mitochondrial membrane integrity. Therefore, we hypothesize that JNK signaling pathway activation contributes to isoflurane-induced apoptosis in the brain. In this study, Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats at postnatal day 7 were exposed to 1.1% isoflurane or air for 4h. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 at 5 μg, 10 μg, 20 μg, 30 μg or the vehicle was intraventricularly administered before the exposure. Neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampi of neonatal rats was detected by TUNEL 6h after isoflurane or air exposure. The protein expression of phospho-JNK, phospho-c-Jun, and caspase-3 as well as the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL and Akt/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β pathway was detected by Western blotting. Isoflurane significantly increased apoptotic cells in the hippocampal CA1, CA3, and DG regions. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 dose-dependently inhibited isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis and increase of caspase-3 and phospho-JNK. SP600125 also attenuated isoflurane-induced down-regulation of Bcl-xL and maintained the activated Akt level to increase the phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9. Our results indicate that JNK activation contributes to isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Maintaining Bcl-xL and Akt activation may be involved in the neuroprotective effects of SP600125.

  17. Increased extrasynaptic GluN2B expression is involved in cognitive impairment after isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Li, Lunxu; Li, Zhengqian; Cao, Yiyun; Fan, Dongsheng; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing concern regarding the postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in the aging population, and general anesthetics are believed to be involved. Isoflurane exposure induced increased N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) GluN2B subunit expression following anesthesia, which was accompanied by alteration of the cognitive function. However, whether isoflurane affects this expression in different subcellular compartments, and is involved in the development of POCD remains to be elucidated. The aims of the study were to investigate the effects of isoflurane on the expression of the synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR subunits, GluN2A and GluN2B, as well as the associated alteration of cognitive function in aged rats. The GluN2B antagonist, Ro25-6981, was given to rats exposed to isoflurane to determine the role of GluN2B in the isoflurane-induced alteration of cognitive function. The results showed that spatial learning and memory tested in the Morris water maze (MWM) was impaired at least 7 days after isoflurane exposure, and was returned to control levels 30 days thereafter. Ro25-6981 treatment can alleviate this impairment. Extrasynaptic GluN2B protein expression, but not synaptic GluN2B or GluN2A, increased significantly after isoflurane exposure compared to non-isoflurane exposure, and returned to control levels approximately 30 days thereafter. The results of the present study indicated that isoflurane induced the prolonged upregulation of extrasynaptic GluN2B expression after anesthesia and is involved in reversible cognitive impairment.

  18. High Glucose Enhances Isoflurane-Induced Neurotoxicity by Regulating TRPC-Dependent Calcium Influx.

    PubMed

    Liu, ZhongJie; Ma, ChangQing; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, QingGuo; Xu, Rui; Zhang, HongFei; Lei, HongYi; Xu, ShiYuan

    2017-01-06

    Isoflurane is a commonly used inhalational anesthetic that can induce neurotoxicity via elevating cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)). High glucose regulates the expression of a family of non-selective cation channels termed transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels that may contribute to Ca(2+) influx. In the present study, we investigated whether high glucose enhances isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity by regulating TRPC-dependent Ca(2+) influx. First, we evaluated toxic damage in mice primary cultured hippocampal neurons and human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cells) after hyperglycemia and isoflurane exposure. Next, we investigated cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, TRPC mRNA expression levels and tested the effect of the TRPC channel blocker SKF96365 on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cells treated with high glucose or/and isoflurane. Finally, we employed knocked down TRPC6 to demonstrate the role of TRPC in high glucose-mediated enhancement of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. The results showed that high glucose could enhance isoflurane-induecd toxic damage in primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose enhanced the isoflurane-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) in SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose elevated TRPC mRNA expression, especially that of TRPC6. SKF96365 and knock down of TRPC6 were able to inhibit the high glucose-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) and decrease isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells cultured with high glucose. Our findings indicate that high glucose could elevate TRPC expression, thus increasing Ca(2+) influx and enhancing isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity.

  19. Anesthetic Propofol Attenuates the Isoflurane-Induced Caspase-3 Activation and Aβ Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Xu, Zhipeng; Yue, Yun; Golde, Todd E.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Moir, Robert D.; Xie, Zhongcong

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation and deposition of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) are the hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease. The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase activation and increase Aβ accumulation. In addition, recent studies suggest that isoflurane may directly promote the formation of cytotoxic soluble Aβ oligomers, which are thought to be the key pathological species in AD. In contrast, propofol, the most commonly used intravenous anesthetic, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to compare the effects of isoflurane and propofol alone and in combination on caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization in vitro and in vivo. Naïve and stably-transfected H4 human neuroglioma cells that express human amyloid precursor protein, the precursor for Aβ; neonatal mice; and conditioned cell culture media containing secreted human Aβ40 or Aβ42 were treated with isoflurane and/or propofol. Here we show for the first time that propofol can attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in cultured cells and in the brain tissues of neonatal mice. Furthermore, propofol-mediated caspase inhibition occurred when there were elevated levels of Aβ. Finally, isoflurane alone induces Aβ42, but not Aβ40, oligomerization, and propofol can inhibit the isoflurane-mediated oligomerization of Aβ42. These data suggest that propofol may mitigate the caspase-3 activation by attenuating the isoflurane-induced Aβ42 oligomerization. Our findings provide novel insights into the possible mechanisms of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity that may aid in the development of strategies to minimize potential adverse effects associated with the administration of anesthetics to patients. PMID:22069482

  20. Hyperglycolysis is exacerbated after traumatic brain injury with fentanyl vs. isoflurane anesthesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Statler, Kimberly D; Janesko, Keri L; Melick, John A; Clark, Robert S B; Jenkins, Larry W; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2003-12-19

    Despite common use of narcotics in the clinical management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), in experimental models rats treated with fentanyl have exhibited worse functional outcome and more CA1 hippocampal death than rats treated with standard isoflurane anesthesia. We hypothesized that greater post-traumatic excitotoxicity, reflected by cerebral glucose utilization (CMRglu), may account for detrimental effects of fentanyl vs. isoflurane. Rats were anesthetized with either isoflurane (1% by inhalation) or fentanyl (10 mcg/kg iv bolus then 50 mcg/kg/h infusion). 14C-deoxyglucose autoradiography was performed 45 min after controlled cortical impact (CCI) to left parietal cortex (n=4 per anesthetic group) or in uninjured rats after 45 min of anesthesia (n=3 per anesthetic group). Uninjured rats treated with fentanyl vs. isoflurane showed 35-45% higher CMRglu in all brain structures (p<0.05) except CA3. After TBI in rats treated with isoflurane, CMRglu increased significantly only in ipsilateral CA1 and ipsilateral parietal cortex (p<0.05 vs. isoflurane uninjured). Conversely, after TBI in rats treated with fentanyl, CMRglu increased markedly and bilaterally in CA1 and CA3 (p<0.05 vs. fentanyl uninjured), but not ipsilateral parietal cortex. In contralateral CA1, CMRglu was nearly two times greater after TBI in fentanyl vs. isoflurane treated rats (p<0.05). Hyperglycolysis was exacerbated in CA1 and CA3 hippocampus after TBI in rats treated with fentanyl vs. isoflurane anesthesia. This post-traumatic hyperglycolysis suggests greater excitotoxicity and concurs with reports of worse functional outcome and more CA1 hippocampal death after TBI with fentanyl vs. isoflurane anesthesia.

  1. TNF-α receptor antagonist attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, NENGLI; LIANG, YAFENG; YANG, PEI; WANG, WEIJIAN; ZHANG, XUEZHENG; WANG, JUNLU

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a common clinical in aged patients, is characterized by deficits in cognitive functions in patients following anesthesia and surgery. It has been demonstrated that isoflurane may lead to cognitive impairment in aged rats; however, effective clinical interventions for preventing this disorder are limited. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been suggested to be involved in neuroinflammation as well as the development of POCD. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate whether TNF-α signaling is involved in the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats, and whether TNF-α receptor antagonist are able to attenuate isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. A population of 20-month-old rats were administered TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 or an equal volume of saline by intraperitoneal injection 12 h prior to exposure to isoflurane to model cognitive impairment following anesthesia in old patients. Then the rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4 h. In the control group, rats showed impaired cognitive functions evaluated by Morris water maze assay after isoflurane exposure. Furthermore, isoflurane exposure induced marked upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in the hippocampus tissue. In the experimental group, intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 significantly attenuated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Further investigation revealed that intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 notably suppressed isoflurane-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Collectively, the present results suggest that TNF-α receptor antagonist may serve as a potential agent for the prevention of anesthesia-induced cognitive decline in aged patients. PMID:27347079

  2. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  3. Emergency management of alveolar osteitis.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2011-12-01

    Patients with urgent dental problems who present to emergency departments (EDs) during weekday office hours are usually referred to their dentists, often after being provided with analgesia. Outside these hours, however, ED professionals may have to provide treatment before referral. One dental emergency with which patients may present but of which ED staff are unlikely to have experience is alveolar osteitis, a painful condition that occurs usually after tooth extraction. This article defines alveolar osteitis and describes management in an ED.

  4. Awakening arterial blood and end-tidal concentrations of isoflurane in female surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tso-Chou; Lu, Chih-Cherng; Hsu, Che-Hao; Pergolizz, Joseph V.; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Ho, Shung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Delayed extubation occurs after isoflurane anesthesia, especially following prolonged surgical duration. We aimed to determine the arterial blood concentrations of isoflurane and the correlation with end-tidal concentrations for predicting emergence from general anesthesia. Thirty-four American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I–II gynecologic patients were included. General anesthesia was maintained with a fixed 2% inspiratory isoflurane in 6 L/minute oxygen, which was discontinued after surgery. One milliliter of arterial blood was obtained for the determination of isoflurane concentration by gas chromatography at 20 and 10 minutes before and 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after discontinuation, in addition to the time of eye opening to verbal command, defined as awakening. Inspiratory and end-tidal concentrations were simultaneously detected by an infrared analyzer. The mean awakening arterial blood concentration of isoflurane was 0.20%, which was lower than the simultaneous end-tidal concentration 0.23%. The differences between arterial and end-tidal concentrations during emergence fell into an acceptable range (±1.96 standard deviation). After receiving a mean time of 108-minute general anesthesia, the time to eye opening after discontinuing isoflurane was 18.5 minutes (range 11–30, median 18 minutes), without statistical significance with anesthesia duration (P = 0.078) and body mass index (P = 0.170). We demonstrated the awakening arterial blood concentration of isoflurane in female patients as 0.20%. With well-assisted ventilation, the end-tidal concentration could be an indicator for the arterial blood concentration to predict emergence from shorter duration of isoflurane anesthesia. PMID:27472727

  5. Nitrous oxide plus isoflurane induces apoptosis and increases β-amyloid protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Yu; Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Xu, Zhipeng; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yiying; Norton, David; Tian, Ming; Li, Shuren; Xie, Zhongcong

    2009-01-01

    Background Some anesthetics have been suggested to induce neurotoxicity including promotion of Alzheimer’s disease neuropathogenesis. Nitrous oxide and isoflurane are common anesthetics. Here, we set out to assess effects of nitrous oxide and/or isoflurane on apoptosis and β-amyloid (Aβ) levels in H4 human neuroglioma cells and primary neurons from naïve mice. Methods The cells or neurons were exposed to 70% nitrous oxide and/or 1% isoflurane for six hours. The cells or neurons and conditioned media were harvested at the end of the treatment. Caspase-3 activation, apoptosis, processing of amyloid precursor protein, and Aβ levels were determined. Results Treatment with a combination of 70% nitrous oxide and 1% isoflurane for six hours induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in H4 naïve cells and primary neurons from naïve mice. The 70% nitrous oxide plus 1% isoflurane, but neither alone, for six hours induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis, and increased levels of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme and Aβ in H4-amyloid precursor protein cells. In addition, the nitrous oxide plus isoflurane-induced Aβ generation was reduced by a broad caspase inhibitor Z-VAD. Finally, the nitrous oxide plus isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation was attenuated by γ-secretase inhibitor L-685,458, but potentiated by exogenously added Aβ. Conclusion These results suggest that common anesthetics nitrous oxide plus isoflurane may promote neurotoxicity by inducing apoptosis and increasing Aβ levels. The generated Aβ may further potentiate apoptosis to form another round of apoptosis and Aβ generation. More studies, especially the in vivo confirmation of these in vitro findings, are needed. PMID:19741497

  6. The Physiologic Effects of Isoflurane, Sevoflurane, and Hypothermia Used for Anesthesia in Neonatal Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Huss, Monika K; Chum, Helen H; Chang, Angela G; Jampachairsi, Katechan; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2016-01-01

    Information regarding effective anesthetic regimens for neonatal rat pups is limited. Here we investigated whether isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia maintains physiologic parameters more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in neonatal rat pups. Rat pups (age, 4 d) were randomly assigned to receive isoflurane, sevoflurane, or hypothermia. Physiologic parameters monitored at 1, 5, 10, and 15 min included heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and oxygen saturation (%SpO2). Other parameters evaluated were loss and return of righting reflex, paw withdrawal reflex, and maternal acceptance. Corticosterone and glucose were sampled at 20 min and 24 h after anesthesia induction. Once a surgical plane of anesthesia was achieved, a skin incision was made on the right lateral thigh. After the procedure, all pups were accepted and cared for by their dam. Isoflurane- and sevoflurane-treated pups maintained higher HR, RR, %SpO2, and glucose levels than did hypothermia-treated pups. For both the isoflurane and sevoflurane groups, HR and RR were significantly lower at 10 and 15 min after anesthesia than at 1 min. Compared with hypothermia, isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia provided shorter times to loss of and return of the righting reflex. Although corticosterone did not differ among the groups, glucose levels were higher at 20 min after anesthesia induction than at 24 h in all anesthetic groups. We conclude that both isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia maintain physiologic parameters (HR, RR, %SpO2) more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in 4-d-old rat pups.

  7. Ventricular Arrhythmias and Mortality Associated with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in a Porcine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Regueiro-Purriños, Marta; Fernández-Vázquez, Felipe; de Prado, Armando Perez; Altónaga, Jose R; Cuellas-Ramón, Carlos; Ajenjo-Silverio, Jose M; Orden, Asuncion; Gonzalo-Orden, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia of the myocardium can lead to reversible or irreversible injury depending on the severity and duration of the preceding ischemia. Here we compared sevoflurane and isoflurane with particular reference to their hemodynamic effects and ability to modify the effects of acute severe myocardial ischemia and reperfusion on ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Female Large White pigs were premedicated with ketamine, midazolam, and atropine. Propofol was given intravenously for the anesthetic induction, and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Endovascular, fluoroscopy-guided, coronary procedures were performed to occlude the midleft anterior descending artery by using a coronary angioplasty balloon. After 75 min, the balloon catheter system was withdrawn and the presence of adequate reperfusion flow was verified. The pigs were followed for 2 mo, and overall mortality rate was calculated. The isoflurane group showed lower arterial pressure throughout the procedure, with the difference reaching statistical significance after induction of myocardial ischemia. The ventricular fibrillation rate was higher in isoflurane group (81.3%) than the sevoflurane group (51.7%; relative risk, 1.57 [1.03 to 2.4]). Overall survival was lower in the isoflurane group (75%) than the sevoflurane group (96.4%). In conclusion, in this porcine model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, sevoflurane was associated with higher hemodynamic stability and fewer ventricular arrhythmias and mortality than was isoflurane. PMID:21333167

  8. Field use of isoflurane as an inhalant anesthetic in the American marten (Martes americana).

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Marion; Cheveau, Marianne; Imbeau, Louis; Lair, Stéphane

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness and practicality of using isoflurane as an inhalation anesthetic with oxygen as a gas carrier for American martens (Martes americana) in a field setting. Sixty-eight martens were trapped in the Waswanipi Cree Model Forest (Québec, Canada) from October to November 2005 and anesthetized with isoflurane in 100% oxygen (1 l/min) using a face mask. Induction setting of isoflurane was 3% for all animals. Mean (+/-SD) length of induction was 1.8+/-1.2 min. Maintenance isoflurane settings ranged from 1% to 4%. Procedures lasted an average of 16.4+/-7.1 min and were uneventful. Length of recovery, defined as the interval between the end of the procedure and animal release, was short (6.3+/-2.8 min), and well below reported lengths of recovery using injectable anesthetics (>/=70 min). As compared to open drop administration of isoflurane described in previous studies, the use of an anesthesia machine prevents the risk of potential fatal anesthetic overdose. We conclude that among anesthesia techniques currently available, isoflurane with oxygen as a gas carrier is a safe and useful field anesthetic in martens, when issues with equipment portability can be overcome.

  9. Distinct effects of isoflurane on basal BOLD signals in tissue/vascular microstructures in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tsurugizawa, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Kato, Fusao

    2016-01-01

    Isoflurane is a well-known volatile anesthetic. However, it remains equivocal whether its effects on BOLD signal differ depending on the types of intracranial structures, such as capillaries and large blood vessels. We compared dose-dependent effect of isoflurane on the basal BOLD signals in distinct cerebral structures (tissue structure or large vessels) using high resolution T2*-images at 9.4 T MRI system in rat somatosensory cortex. The local field potential (LFP) in the somatosensory cortex and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were also investigated. Isoflurane induced inverted U-shaped dose-dependent change in BOLD signal in large vessels and tissue regions: BOLD signal under 2.0% and 2.5% isoflurane significantly increased from the maintenance dose (1.5%) and that under 3.0% was similar to maintenance dose. Remarkably, BOLD signal increase in tissue regions under 2.5% was significantly smaller than that in large vessels. The MAP decreased monotonically due to the dose of isoflurane and the LFP was strongly suppressed under high dose (2.5% and 3.0%). These results indicate that isoflurane-induced alteration of MAP and neuronal activity affected BOLD signal and, especially, BOLD signal in the tissue regions was more affected by the neuronal activity. PMID:27976678

  10. Isoflurane compared with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia in patients undergoing heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Che-Hao; Hsu, Yung-Chi; Huang, Go-Shine; Lu, Chih-Cherng; Ho, Shung-Tai; Liaw, Wen-Jinn; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Tso-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Inhalation anesthetics provide myocardial protection for cardiac surgery. This study was undertaken to compare the perioperative effects between isoflurane and fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia for heart transplantation. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by reviewing the medical records of heart transplantation in a single medical center from 1990 to 2013. Patients receiving isoflurane or fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia were included. Those with preoperative severe pulmonary, hepatic, or renal comorbidities were excluded. The perioperative variables and postoperative short-term outcomes were analyzed, including blood glucose levels, urine output, inotropic use, time to extubation, and length of stay in the intensive care units. After reviewing 112 heart transplantations, 18 recipients with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia, and 29 receiving isoflurane anesthesia with minimal low-flow technique were analyzed. After cessation of cardiopulmonary bypass, recipients with isoflurane anesthesia had a significantly lower mean level and a less increase of blood glucose, as compared with those receiving fentanyl-based anesthesia. In addition, there was less use of dobutamine upon arriving the intensive care unit and a shorter time to extubation after isoflurane anesthesia. Compared with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia, isoflurane minimal low-flow anesthesia maintained better perioperative homeostasis of blood glucose levels, less postoperative use of inotropics, and early extubation time among heart-transplant recipients without severe comorbidities. PMID:27583900

  11. A comparison of sevoflurane and isoflurane for short-term anesthesia in polecats (Mustela eversmanni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaynor, J. S.; Wimsatt, J.; Mallinckrodt, C.; Biggins, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-four Siberian polecats (Mustela eversmanni) from 12 litters were anesthetized with either inhaled sevoflurane or isoflurane. With 7% delivered sevoflurane and 5% delivered isoflurane, time to loss of righting reflex (mean +/- SE) with sevoflurane (1.9 +/- 0.1 min) was significantly shorter compared with isoflurane (2.6 +/- 0.1 min). During maintenance at a light plane of anesthesia, systolic arterial pressure was significantly higher with sevoflurane (83 +/- 2 mm Hg) compared with isoflurane (66 +/- 2 mm Hg), and heart rate was significantly lower with sevoflurane (191 +/- 3 beats/min) compared with isoflurane (204 +/- 3 beats/min). There was no difference in respiratory rate jugular venous pH, pCO3, HCO3-, base excess, or recovery of righting reflex. Induction of anesthesia is more rapid and blood pressure is better maintained with sevoflurane compared with isoflurane; therefore, sevoflurane may be less stressful and safer. Inhaled sevoflurane should be an appropriate anesthetic for black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) in laboratory and field conditions.

  12. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  13. Isoflurane does not aggregate inside POPC bilayers at high pressure: Implications for pressure reversal of general anaesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieteska, J. R.; Welche, P. R. L.; Tu, K.-M.; ElGamacy, Mohammad; Csanyi, G.; Payne, M. C.; Chau, P.-L.

    2015-10-01

    We placed isoflurane, a general anaesthetic, inside palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers at clinical concentration, and performed molecular dynamics simulations at atmospheric and raised pressures, using two different thermodynamic ensembles. We also performed a simulation of this system with isoflurane at ten times the clinical concentration. We found that isoflurane did not aggregate inside POPC membranes at 20 MPa, nor at 40 MPa. The implications of these findings for pressure reversal is discussed, in light of the high-pressure neurological syndrome.

  14. Laser Doppler flowmetry signals to quantify effects of isoflurane on the peripheral cardiovascular system of healthy rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Fizanne, Lionel; Roux, Jérôme; Asfar, Pierre; Cales, Paul; Rousseau, David; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2007-12-01

    The optical Doppler effect resulting from interactions between laser light photons and red blood cells of the microcirculation is used to characterize the influence of isoflurane, an halogenated volatile anesthetic, on the peripheral cardiovascular system. After having recorded laser Doppler flowmetry blood perfusion signals on isoflurane-induced anesthetized healthy rats, wavelet analyses show a significant decrease of the myogenic and neurogenic activities when isoflurane dose increases from 1.5% to 3%. Moreover, the approximate entropy shows a weak decrease of signal irregularity when dose of isoflurane increases. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of the optical Doppler effect in physiological and pharmacological applications.

  15. Cardiorespiratory effects of isoflurane in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) anesthetized with intramuscular medetomidine and zolazepam/tiletamine

    PubMed Central

    JEONG, Dong-Hyuk; YANG, Jeong-Jin; SEOK, Seong-Hoon; SONG, Dong-Joo; YEON, Seong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the dose-dependent effects of isoflurane on various cardiovascular parameters and the stable range of isoflurane concentrations in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus). Seven Asiatic black bears were intramuscularly injected with medetomidine, zolazepam and tiletamine (MZT) to induce anesthesia, and anesthesia was maintained by administering isoflurane in 100% oxygen (4 l/min) without mechanical ventilation. Several cardiovascular parameters were measured at five end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5%). Blood was collected from the femoral artery before administration of isoflurane and after each administration for immediate blood gas analysis. Isoflurane produced dose-dependent increases in heart rate, respiratory rate, minute volume, end-tidal carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressure and the partial pressure of arterial CO2, and dose-dependent decreases in non-invasive blood pressure and tidal volume. Rectal temperature, oxygenation and acid-base balance were unaffected by isoflurane. All parameters in this study were in a clinically acceptable range at all times. The data show that the combination of MZT and isoflurane is suitable for general anesthesia in Asiatic black bears with spontaneous breathing during prolonged procedures. End-tidal isoflurane concentrations of 0.5 to 2.5% can be used in Asiatic black bears without adverse side effects. PMID:27725350

  16. The cerebrovascular effects of adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine infusions under propofol and isoflurane anaesthesia in sheep.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, J A; Upton, R N; Grant, C; Martinez, A

    2002-12-01

    Infusions of catecholamines are frequently administered to patients receiving propofol or isoflurane anaesthesia. Interactions between these drugs may affect regional circulations, such as the brain. The aim of this animal (sheep) study was to determine the effects of ramped infusions of adrenaline, noradrenaline (10, 20, 40 micrograms/min) and dopamine (10, 20, 40 micrograms/kg/min) on cerebral blood flow (CBF), intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2). These measurements were made under awake physiological conditions, and during continuous propofol (15 mg/min) or 2% isoflurane anaesthesia. All three catecholamines significantly and equivalently increased mean arterial pressure from baseline in a dose-dependent manner in the three cohorts (P < 0.001). In the awake cohort (n = 8), dopamine (P < 0.01) significantly increased CBF from baseline whilst adrenaline and noradrenaline did not (P > 0.05). Under propofol (n = 6) and isoflurane (n = 6), all three catecholamines significantly increased CBF (P < 0.001). Dopamine caused the greatest increase in CBF, and was associated with significant increases in ICP (awake: P < 0.001; propofol P < 0.05; isoflurane P < 0.001) and CVR (isoflurane P < 0.05). No significant changes in CMRO2 were demonstrated. Under propofol and isoflurane anaesthesia, the cerebrovascular effects of catecholamines were significantly different from the awake, physiological state, with dopamine demonstrating the most pronounced effects, particularly under propofol. Dopamine-induced hyperaemia was associated with other cerebrovascular changes. In the presence of an equivalent effect on mean arterial pressure, the exaggerated cerebrovascular effects under anaesthesia appear to be centrally mediated, possibly induced by propofol- or isoflurane-dependent changes in blood-brain barrier permeability, thereby causing a direct influence on the cerebral vasculature.

  17. Isoflurane protects against human endothelial cell apoptosis by inducing sphingosine kinase-1 via ERK MAPK.

    PubMed

    Bakar, Adnan M; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Lee, H Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a major clinical problem affecting virtually every patient requiring critical care. Volatile anesthetics are frequently used during the perioperative period and protect the heart and kidney against ischemia and reperfusion injury. We aimed to determine whether isoflurane, the most commonly used volatile anesthetic in the USA, protects against endothelial apoptosis and necrosis and the mechanisms involved in this protection. Human endothelial EA.hy926 cells were pretreated with isoflurane or carrier gas (95% room air + 5% CO(2)) then subjected to apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-α or to necrosis with hydrogen peroxide. DNA laddering and in situ Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) staining determined EA.hy926 cell apoptosis and percent LDH released determined necrosis. We also determined whether isoflurane modulates the expression and activity of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1) and induces the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK MAPK) as both enzymes are known to protect against cell death. Isoflurane pretreatment significantly decreased apoptosis in EA.hy926 cells as evidenced by reduced TUNEL staining and DNA laddering without affecting necrosis. Mechanistically, isoflurane induces the phosphorylation of ERK MAPK and increased SK1 expression and activity in EA.hy926 cells. Finally, selective blockade of SK1 (with SKI-II) or S1P(1) receptor (with W146) abolished the anti-apoptotic effects of isoflurane. Taken together, we demonstrate that isoflurane, in addition to its potent analgesic and anesthetic properties, protects against endothelial apoptosis most likely via SK1 and ERK MAPK activation. Our findings have significant clinical implication for protection of endothelial cells during the perioperative period and patients requiring critical care.

  18. Bispectral index as a predictor of sedation depth during isoflurane or midazolam sedation in ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Sackey, P V; Radell, P J; Granath, F; Martling, C R

    2007-06-01

    Bispectral index (BIS) is used for monitoring anaesthetic depth with inhaled anaesthetic agents in the operating room but has not been evaluated as a monitor of sedation depth in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting with these agents. If BIS could predict sedation depth in ICU patients, patient disturbances could be reduced and oversedation avoided. Twenty ventilator-dependent ICU patients aged 27 to 80 years were randomised to sedation with isoflurane via the AnaConDa or intravenous midazolam. BIS (A-2000 XP, version 3.12), electromyogram activity (EMG) and Signal Quality Index were measured continuously. Hourly clinical evaluation of sedation depth according to Bloomsbury Sedation Score (Bloomsbury) was performed. The median BIS value during a 10-minute interval prior to the clinical evaluation at the bedside was compared with Bloomsbury. Nurses performing the clinical sedation scoring were blinded to the BIS values. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was measured and compared with Bloomsbury. Correlation was poor between BIS and Bloomsbury in both groups (Spearman's rho 0.012 in the isoflurane group and -0.057 in the midazolam group). Strong correlation was found between BIS and EMG (Spearman's rho 0.74). Significant correlation was found between end-tidal isoflurane concentration and Bloomsbury (Spearman's rho 0.47). In conclusion, BIS XP does not reliably predict sedation depth as measured by clinical evaluation in non-paralysed ICU patients sedated with isoflurane or midazolam. EMG contributes significantly to BIS values in isoflurane or midazolam sedated, non-paralysed ICU patients. End-tidal isoflurane concentration appeared to be a better indicator of clinical sedation depth than BIS.

  19. Subclinical Carbon Monoxide Limits Apoptosis in the Developing Brain After Isoflurane Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ying; Levy, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Volatile anesthetics cause widespread apoptosis in the developing brain. Carbon monoxide (CO) has antiapoptotic properties, and exhaled endogenous CO is commonly rebreathed during low-flow anesthesia in infants and children, resulting in subclinical CO exposure. Thus, we aimed to determine whether CO could limit isoflurane-induced apoptosis in the developing brain. METHODS Seven-day-old male CD-1 mouse pups underwent 1-hour exposure to 0 (air), 5, or 100 ppm CO in air with or without isoflurane (2%). We assessed carboxyhemoglobin levels, cytochrome c peroxidase activity, and cytochrome c release from forebrain mitochondria after exposure and quantified the number of activated caspase-3 positive cells and TUNEL positive nuclei in neocortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus/thalamus. RESULTS Carboxyhemoglobin levels approximated those expected in humans after a similar time-weighted CO exposure. Isoflurane significantly increased cytochrome c peroxidase activity, cytochrome c release, the number of activated caspase-3 cells, and TUNEL positive nuclei in the forebrain of air-exposed mice. CO, however, abrogated isoflurane-induced cytochrome c peroxidase activation and cytochrome c release from forebrain mitochondria and decreased the number of activated caspase-3 positive cells and TUNEL positive nuclei after simultaneous exposure with isoflurane. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, the data indicate that CO can limit apoptosis after isoflurane exposure via inhibition of cytochrome c peroxidase depending on concentration. Although it is unknown whether CO directly inhibited isoflurane-induced apoptosis, it is possible that low-flow anesthesia designed to target rebreathing of specific concentrations of CO may be a desired strategy to develop in the future in an effort to prevent anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity in infants and children. PMID:24413549

  20. Carbon dioxide, but not isoflurane, elicits ultrasonic vocalizations in female rats.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, J; De Rantere, D; Fernandez, N J; Krajacic, A; Pang, D S J

    2013-10-01

    Gradual filling of a chamber with carbon dioxide is currently listed by the Canadian Council on Animal Care guidelines as a conditionally acceptable method of euthanasia for rats. Behavioural evidence suggests, however, that exposure to carbon dioxide gas is aversive. Isoflurane is less aversive than carbon dioxide and may be a viable alternative, though objective data are lacking for the period leading up to loss of consciousness. It has been shown that during negative states, such as pain and distress, rats produce ultrasonic vocalizations. The objective of this study was to detect ultrasonic vocalizations during exposure to carbon dioxide gas or isoflurane as an indicator of a negative state. Specialized recording equipment, with a frequency detection range of 10 to 200 kHz, was used to register these calls during administration of each agent. Nine female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to either carbon dioxide or isoflurane on two different occasions. All rats vocalized in the ultrasonic range (30 to 70 kHz) during exposure to carbon dioxide. When exposed to isoflurane, no calls were detected from any of the animals. The frequent occurrence of ultrasonic vocalizations during carbon dioxide exposure suggests that the common practice of carbon dioxide euthanasia is aversive to rats and that isoflurane may be a preferable alternative.

  1. Local Versus Global Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia on Visual Processing in the Fly Brain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract What characteristics of neural activity distinguish the awake and anesthetized brain? Drugs such as isoflurane abolish behavioral responsiveness in all animals, implying evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether this conservation is reflected at the level of neural activity. Studies in humans have shown that anesthesia is characterized by spatially distinct spectral and coherence signatures that have also been implicated in the global impairment of cortical communication. We questioned whether anesthesia has similar effects on global and local neural processing in one of the smallest brains, that of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Using a recently developed multielectrode technique, we recorded local field potentials from different areas of the fly brain simultaneously, while manipulating the concentration of isoflurane. Flickering visual stimuli (‘frequency tags’) allowed us to track evoked responses in the frequency domain and measure the effects of isoflurane throughout the brain. We found that isoflurane reduced power and coherence at the tagging frequency (13 or 17 Hz) in central brain regions. Unexpectedly, isoflurane increased power and coherence at twice the tag frequency (26 or 34 Hz) in the optic lobes of the fly, but only for specific stimulus configurations. By modeling the periodic responses, we show that the increase in power in peripheral areas can be attributed to local neuroanatomy. We further show that the effects on coherence can be explained by impacted signal-to-noise ratios. Together, our results show that general anesthesia has distinct local and global effects on neuronal processing in the fruit fly brain. PMID:27517084

  2. Effect of halothane, isoflurane and desflurane on lower oesophageal sphincter tone.

    PubMed

    Chassard, D; Tournadre, J P; Berrada, K R; Bryssine, B; Bouletreau, P

    1996-12-01

    We have studied the effects of volatile anaesthetics on lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) tone in three groups of eight pigs allocated randomly to receive end-tidal concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 MAC of desflurane, isoflurane or halothane for 15 min. LOS and oesophageal barrier pressures (BrP = LOSP - gastric pressure) were measured using a manometric method. The decrease in BrP paralleled the decrease in LOS pressure and was significant at 0.5 MAC for isoflurane and at 1.0 MAC for halothane. At 1.5 MAC, BrP values were approximately 62% of baseline values for halothane, 37% for isoflurane and 83% for desflurane. Inter-group comparisons showed that BrP did not differ at baseline and at 0.5 MAC. At 1.0 MAC the effect of isoflurane on BrP was significantly different from desflurane (P < 0.001) and halothane (P < 0.02) whereas the effect of desflurane on BrP was not significantly different from halothane. At 1.5 MAC the effect of isoflurane on BrP was significantly different from desflurane (P < 0.01) and halothane (P < 0.05) whereas the effect of desflurane on BrP was not significantly different from halothane. We conclude that desflurane maintained BrP and this may be clinically important in patients at high risk of regurgitation.

  3. Effects of isoflurane on measurement of fluorescence spectra and CLSM imaging in Acetabularia acetabulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, WenLi; Quan, Zhou; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    The volatile halogenated methyl ethyl ether is used as anesthetic to inhibit actin-based dynamics directly or indirectly in animal cells. In plant cells, most intracellular movements are related with actin pathways too. We utilized isoflurane to study the dynamic choloroplast organization in unicellular baby and adult alga Acetabularia acetabulum. Fluorescence spectra were measured and choloroplast movements were recorded by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) imaging in in Acetabularia acetabulum. Isoflurane was effective in the unicellular baby and adult organisms and showed time- dependent actin-inhibition patterns. Acetabularia acetabulum cells were treated for different times with isoflurane saturated solutions in artificial seawater (it was defined to be 100% isoflurane). The intensity of fluorescence at 680nm and 730nm were progressively decreased at 100% isoflurane. It was remarkable difference between fluorescence spectra of baby and adult Acetabularia were inhibited by isoflurance, adult Acetabularia cells showed more sensitive. Whereas the choloroplast in Acetabularia acetabulum was commendably imaged by CLSM at 20 and 40 zoom.

  4. A Mitochondrion-Targeted Antioxidant Ameliorates Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoru; Zhang, Hui; Hao, Shuangying; Ji, Muhuo; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane possesses neurotoxicity and can induce cognitive deficits, particularly in aging mammals. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) have been linked to the early pathogenesis of this disorder. However, the role of mtROS remains to be evaluated due to a lack of targeted method to treat mtROS. Here, we determined in aging mice the effects of the mitochondrion-targeted antioxidant SS-31, on cognitive deficits induced by isoflurane, a general inhalation anesthetic. We further investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the effects of SS-31 on hippocampal neuro-inflammation and apoptosis. The results showed that isoflurane induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficit, which was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction including reduced ATP contents, increased ROS levels, and mitochondrial swelling. Treatment with SS-31 significantly ameliorated isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits through the improvement of mitochondrial integrity and function. Mechanistically, SS-31 treatment suppressed pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing the levels of NF-κB, NLRP3, caspase 1, IL-1β, and TNF-α; and inhibited the apoptotic pathway by decreasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, reducing the release of cytochrome C, and blocking the cleavage of caspase 3. Our results indicate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may be attenuated by mitochondrion-targeted antioxidants, such as SS-31. Therefore, SS-31 may have therapeutic potentials in preventing injuries from oxidative stresses that contribute to anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity.

  5. Cardiorespiratory dose-response relationship of isoflurane in Cinereous vulture (Aegypius monachus) during spontaneous ventilation

    PubMed Central

    SEOK, Seong-Hoon; JEONG, Dong-Hyuk; HONG, Il-Hwa; LEE, Hee-Chun; YEON, Seong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesia is an inevitably important component of diagnosis and treatments examining the health condition of wild animals. Not only does anesthesia become an essential tool in minimizing stress of the patients and providing an opportunity to deliver accurate and safe procedures, but it also ensures the safety of the medical crew members. This study was conducted to investigate the dose-response cardiorespiratory effects of isoflurane during spontaneous ventilation in ten cinereous vultures. Each bird was administered isoflurane at initial concentration of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 and then an end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (ETiso) of 1.0% for an equilibration period of 15 min in the given order. At the end of the equilibration period, the direct blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and end tidal CO2 partial pressure (PETCO2) were recorded, and blood gas analysis was performed. Increasing isoflurane concentrations during spontaneous ventilation led to dose-dependent increases in HR and PETCO2, with minimal changes in RR, decreased arterial BP and respiratory acidosis. Overall, isoflurane for anesthesia of spontaneously breathing cinereous vultures is a suitable choice for diagnostic or surgical procedures. PMID:27725351

  6. Effects of isoflurane on the actions of neuromuscular blockers on the muscle nicotine acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanxiang; Yao, Shanglong; Nie, Hui; Lü, Bin

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that volatile anesthetic enhancement of muscle relaxation is the result of combined drug effects on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The poly A m RNA from muscle by isolation were microinjected into Xenopus oocytes for receptor expression. Concentration-effect curves for the inhibition of Ach-induced currents were established for vecuronium, rocuranium, and isoflurane. Subsequently, inhibitory effects of NDMRs were studied in the presence of the isoflurane at a concentration equivalent to half the concentration producing a 50% inhibition alone. All tested drugs produced rapid and readily reversible concentration-dependent inhibition. The 50% inhibitory concentration values were 889 micromol/L (95% CI: 711-1214 micromol). 33.4 micromol (95% CI: 27.1-41.7 nmol) and 9.2 nmol (95% CI: 7.9-12.3 nmol) for isoflurane. rocuranium and vecuronium, respectively. Coapplication of isoflurane significantly enhanced the inhibitory effects of rocuranium and vecuronium, and it was especially so at low concentration of NMDRs. Isoflurane increases the potency of NDMRs, possibly by enhancing antagonist affinity at the receptor site.

  7. Electrical stimulation of the parabrachial nucleus induces reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Muindi, Fanuel; Kenny, Jonathan D; Taylor, Norman E; Solt, Ken; Wilson, Matthew A; Brown, Emery N; Van Dort, Christa J

    2016-06-01

    Clinically, emergence from general anesthesia is viewed as a passive process where anesthetics are discontinued at the end of surgery and anesthesiologists wait for the drugs to wear off. The mechanisms involved in emergence are not well understood and there are currently no drugs that can actively reverse the state of general anesthesia. An emerging hypothesis states that brain regions that control arousal become active during emergence and are a key part of the return to wakefulness. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that electrical activation of the glutamatergic parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in the brainstem is sufficient to induce reanimation (active emergence) during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a marker of neural activity, we first show a selective increase in active neurons in the PBN during passive emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then electrically stimulated the PBN to assess whether it is sufficient to induce reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia. Stimulation induced behavioral arousal and restoration of the righting reflex during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. In contrast, stimulation of the nearby central inferior colliculus (CIC) did not restore the righting reflex. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed that stimulation produced a significant decrease in EEG delta power during PBN stimulation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the PBN provides critical arousal input during emergence from isoflurane anesthesia.

  8. The cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane after premedication of healthy dogs undergoing elective surgery.

    PubMed

    Abed, Janan M; Pike, Fred S; Clare, Monica C; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    Sevoflurane and isoflurane are commonly used in veterinary anesthesia. The objective of this prospective, randomized, open-label clinical study was to compare the cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane via direct arterial blood pressure measurements and the lithium dilution cardiac output (LDCO) on premedicated healthy dogs undergoing elective tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). Nineteen client-owned dogs were included. All dogs were premedicated with hydromorphone (0.05 mg/kg IV and glycopyrrolate 0.01 mg/kg subcutaneously). Ten dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane and nine dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane. Eighteen dogs were instrumented with a dorsal pedal arterial catheter, and one dog had a femoral arterial catheter. All dogs had continuous, direct systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP), and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressure readings as well as heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), stroke volume variation (SVV), and pulse pressure variation (PPV) recorded q 5 min during the surgical procedure. There was no significant statistical difference in all parameters between the sevoflurane and isoflurane treatment groups. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane inhalant anesthetics appear to have similar hemodynamic effects when used as part of a multimodal anesthetic protocol in premedicated healthy dogs undergoing an elective surgical procedure.

  9. Isoflurane compared with midazolam for sedation in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, K. L.; Willatts, S. M.; Prys-Roberts, C.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare isoflurane with midazolam for sedation of ventilated patients. DESIGN--Randomised control study. Setting--Intensive care unit in university teaching hospital. PATIENTS--Sixty patients aged 18-76 who required mechanical ventilation. INTERVENTIONS--Sedation with either 0.1-0.6% isoflurane in an air-oxygen mixture (30 patients) or a continuous intravenous infusion of midazolam 0.01-0.20 mg/kg/h (30 patients). Sedation was assessed initially and hourly thereafter on a six point scale. Incremental intravenous doses of morphine 0.05 mg/kg were given for analgesia as required. The trial sedative was stopped when the patient was judged ready for weaning from ventilatory support or at 24 hours (whichever was earlier). END POINT--Achievement of a predetermined level of sedation for as much of the time as possible. MAIN RESULTS--Isoflurane produced satisfactory sedation for a greater proportion of time (86%) than midazolam (64%), and patients sedated with isoflurane recovered more rapidly from sedation. CONCLUSION--Isoflurane is a promising alternative technique for sedation of ventilated patients in the intensive care unit. PMID:2500195

  10. Primary diffuse alveolar septal amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Poh, S C; Tjia, T S; Seah, H C

    1975-01-01

    The case is reported of a 61-year-old man with primary diffuse alveolar septal pulmonary amyloidosis. Amyloid infiltration of the heart and other organs was also observed. The clinical findings and laboratory investigations reveal features characteristic of defective gas transfer with pulmonary oedema due to left ventricular failure from myocardial involvement. Images PMID:1179316

  11. Pupil Size in Relation to Cortical States during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Jeung Eun; Han, Hio-Been

    2016-01-01

    In neuronal recording studies on anesthetized animals, reliable measures for the transitional moment of consciousness are frequently required. Previous findings suggest that pupil fluctuations reflect the neuronal states during quiet wakefulness, whose correlation was unknown for the anesthetized condition. Here, we investigated the pupillary changes under isoflurane anesthesia simultaneously with the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG). The pupil was tracked by using a region-based active contour model. The dose was given to the animal in a stepwise increasing mode (simulating induction of anesthesia) or in a stepwise decreasing mode (simulating emergence of anesthesia). We found that the quickly widening pupil action (mydriasis) characterizes the transitional state in anesthesia. Mydriasis occurred only in the light dose in the emergence phase, and the events were accompanied by an increase of burst activity in the EEG followed by EMG activity in 47% of the mydriasis events. Our findings suggest that recording such pupil changes may offer a noncontact monitoring tool for indexing the transitional state of the brain, particularly when a lower threshold dose is applied. PMID:27122995

  12. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for the Anesthetics Halothane, Isoflurane, and Desflurane in the Pig (SUS SCROFA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    swine (3-4 months old; 20 ± 2 [mean ± SD] kg) were exposed to a mixture of 3.0% desflurane, 0.5% sevoflurane , 0.4% isoflurane, and 0.2% halothane...B.H. Johnson, and R.B. Weiskopf. 1990. Pharmacokinetics of desfiurane, sevoflurane , isoflurane, and halothane in pigs. Anesth. Analg. 71:340-348. 10

  13. Comparison of isoflurane and alfaxalone (Alfaxan) for the induction of anesthesia in flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) undergoing orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Villaverde-Morcillo, Silvia; Benito, Javier; García-Sánchez, Rubén; Martín-Jurado, Olga; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2014-06-01

    Used since the 1970s as an avian anesthetic, the neurosteroid alfaxalone has been reformulated to avoid side effects from its castor oil excipient. This case report describes the clinical use of a new alfaxalone formulation (Alfaxan) as an intravenous anesthetic induction agent in wild isoflurane-anesthetized rose flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus). Twenty-five male and female rose flamingos underwent orthopedic surgery using isoflurane anesthesia. The animals were induced following one of two protocols: inhaled isoflurane by facemask (ISO; n = 9) or intravenous alfaxalone (2 mg/kg; ALF; n = 16). The time and quality of anesthetic induction (until first signs of muscle relaxation) and the time and quality of recovery (sternal recumbency) were recorded using a scoring system. Mild sedation was first observed at 18.4 +/- 3.8 min and 1.7 +/- 0.3 min, following isoflurane and alfaxalone administration, respectively (P < 0.001). Alfaxalone induction time was significantly shorter and induction quality was considered smoother than in the ISO group. Flamingos given alfaxalone induction required lower isoflurane concentrations for maintenance anesthesia than did flamingos induced with mask isoflurane (1.5-2 % vol vs. 4-5 % vol for ALF vs. ISO, respectively). Alfaxalone produced moderate cardiorespiratory effects not seen in the isoflurane induction group. Recovery times were similar with both protocols without significant differences in quality and length. The new alfaxalone formulation produces a safe and effective anesthetic induction in rose flamingos and has significant isoflurane-sparing effects during anesthesia.

  14. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment via inhibition of isoflurane-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in ATP levels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Hou, Lengchen; Chen, Dan; Lin, Fuqing; Chang, Tao; Li, Mengzhu; Zhang, Lingling; Niu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Huiying; Fu, Shukun; Zheng, Junhua

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The inhaled general anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase-3 activation in vitro and in vivo. The underlying mechanisms and functional consequences of this activity remain unclear. Isoflurane can induce caspase-3 activation by causing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen, a novel antioxidant, against isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment. Methods: H4 human neuroglioma cells overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein were treated with saline or hydrogen-rich saline (HS, 300 μM), with or without 2% isoflurane, for 6 h or 3 h. Western blot analysis, fluorescence assays, and a mitochondrial swelling assay were used to evaluate caspase-3 activation, levels of ROS and ATP, and mitochondrial function. The effect of the interaction of isoflurane (1.4% for 2 h) and HS (5 mL/kg) on cognitive function in mice was also evaluated using a fear conditioning test. Results: We found that HS attenuated isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation. Moreover, HS treatment mitigated isoflurane-induced ROS accumulation, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores, reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduction in cellular ATP levels. Finally, HS significantly alleviated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in mice. Conclusions: Our results suggest that HS attenuates isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment via inhibition of isoflurane-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in ATP levels. These findings warrant further research into the underlying mechanisms of this activity, and indicate that HS has the potential to attenuate anesthesia neurotoxicity. PMID:28386342

  15. [Comparative study of the behavior of isoflurane and halothane in pediatric anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, F; Castilla, M; Fernández, M I; Caballero, J E

    1992-01-01

    This study involves 60 patients below the age of 14 years who were subjected to short duration surgical procedures under inhalation anesthesia with halothane and isoflurane at equivalent CAM in 50% protoxide. The objectives of the study were: a) to establish which of the two inhalational agents produced the more rapid anesthetic induction; b) to determine which exerted the more marked potentiation of the neuromuscular blockade induced by succinylcholine, and c) to compare the anesthetic quality during the induction and recovery periods of both halogenated agents. Induction was more rapid after halothane (mean induction time of 2.91 +/- 0.97 min) than after isoflurane (mean induction time of 6.24 +/- 2.88 min; p less than 0.001). Potentiation of succinylcholine induced neuromuscular blockade was greater after isoflurane than after halothane: the mean time of apnea was 4.56 +/- 1.82 min for isoflurane and 3.41 +/- 1.63 min for halothane (p less than 0.05). Undesirable effects were larger in patients treated with isoflurane than in patients anesthetized with halothane (mean score: 12.60 +/- 3.53 points vs 14.41 +/- 2.33 points; p less than 0.001). The analysis of anesthetic quality during the recovery period gave a mean punctuation of 16.62 +/- 2.21 to patients treated with halothane, whereas patients anesthetized with isoflurane showed a lower score of 14.25 +/- 1.99 points (p less than 0.001). The higher scores corresponded to the most well tolerated anesthetic induction and recovery. The highest attainable score in this study was 18.

  16. Isoflurane impairs odour discrimination learning in rats: differential effects on short- and long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, R. A.; Duscher, P.; Van Dyke, K.; Lee, M.; Andrei, A. C.; Perouansky, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Anaesthetics suppress the formation of lasting memories at concentrations that do not suppress perception, but it is unclear which elements of the complex cascade leading from a conscious experience to a lasting memory trace are disrupted. Experiments in conscious humans suggest that subhypnotic concentrations of anaesthetics impair consolidation or maintenance rather than acquisition of a representation (long-term more than short-term memory). We sought to test whether these agents similarly impair learning in rats. Methods We used operant conditioning in rats to examine the effect of isoflurane on acquisition compared with long-term (24 h) memory of non-aversive olfactory memories using two different odour discrimination tasks. Rats learned the ‘valences’ of odour pairs presented either separately (task A) or simultaneously (task B), under control conditions and under isoflurane inhalation. In a separate set of experiments, we tested the ability of the animals to recall a learning set that had been acquired 24 h previously. Results Under 0.4% isoflurane inhalation, the average number of trials required to reach criterion performance (18 correct responses in 20 successive trials) increased from 21.9 to 43.5 (P<0.05) and 24.2 to 54.4 (P<0.05) for tasks A and B, respectively. Under 0.3% isoflurane inhalation, only task B was impaired (from 24.2 to 31.5 trials, P<0.05). Recall at 24 h was dose-dependently impaired or prevented by isoflurane for both tasks. Conclusions Isoflurane interfered with long-term memory of odour valence without preventing its acquisition. This paradigm may serve as a non-aversive animal model of conscious amnesia. PMID:22258200

  17. Temporal and concentration effects of isoflurane anaesthesia on intestinal tissue oxygenation and perfusion in horses.

    PubMed

    Hopster, K; Hopster-Iversen, C; Geburek, F; Rohn, K; Kästner, S B R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of duration of anaesthesia and concentration of isoflurane on global perfusion as well as intestinal microperfusion and oxygenation. Nine Warmblood horses were premedicated with xylazine; anaesthesia was induced with midazolam and ketamine, and maintained with isoflurane. Horses were ventilated to normocapnia. During 7 h of anaesthesia, mean arterial blood pressures (MAP), heart rate, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, expiratory isoflurane concentration (ETIso) and cardiac output using lithium dilution were measured; cardiac index (CI) was calculated. Intestinal microperfusion and oxygenation were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry and white-light spectrophotometry. Surface probes were placed via median laparotomy on the serosal and mucosal site of the jejunum and the pelvic flexion of the colon. After 3 h of constant ETIso (1.4%), ETIso was increased in 0.2% increments up to 2.4%, followed by a decrease to 1.2% and an increase to 1.4%. The CI and MAP decreased continuously with increasing ETIso to 40 ± 5 mL/kg/min and 52 ± 8 mmHg, respectively. Microperfusion and oxygenation remained unchanged until an ETIso of 2.0% resulted in CI and MAP of 48 ± 5 mL/kg/min and 62 ± 6 mmHg, respectively, and then decreased rapidly. When ETIso decreased back to baseline, CI, MAP, microperfusion and oxygenation recovered to baseline. Isoflurane concentration but not duration of isoflurane anaesthesia influenced central and intestinal oxygenation and perfusion in healthy horses. Under isoflurane, intestinal perfusion appeared to be preserved until a threshold MAP or blood flow was reached.

  18. Comparison of isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia after premedication with butorphanol in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Divers, Sonia M; Schumacher, Juergen; Stahl, Scott; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen J

    2005-06-01

    The anesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects of butorphanol followed by sevoflurane or isoflurane were compared in 23 male green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Heart and respiratory rates were recorded before administration of butorphanol (2 mg/kg i.m.) and at 30 min after premedication. Anesthesia was induced in 12 iguanas (group 1) with isoflurane (5%) and in 11 iguanas (group 2) with sevoflurane (7%). Heart rate, relative arterial oxygen hemoglobin saturation (SpO2), and end-tidal CO2 concentrations (EtCO2) were measured every minute for the first 5 min and every 5 min thereafter. Arterial blood gas parameters were determined at 10 and 40 min after induction. Thirty minutes after butorphanol administration, no significant changes in heart and respiratory rate were seen as compared with baseline values. Quality and time to induction were superior with butorphanol-sevoflurane (6 +/- 3 min) than with butorphanol-isoflurane (9 +/- 4 min). Vaporizer settings during maintenance ranged between 1-3% and 2-4%, respectively. No significant differences in heart rate were noted between groups. In the sevoflurane group, SpO2 values were > 90% throughout. Although SpO2, values were < 90% at 20, 25, and 30 min in the isoflurane group, no significant differences in SpO2 values were seen over time and between groups. A significant decrease in EtCO2 with time was present in both groups, with no significant differences between the groups. At 10 and 40 min, arterial blood oxygen saturation values were > 90% in both groups and no significant differences were noted with time and between groups. Recovery time was significantly longer in the butorphanol-isoflurane group (35 +/- 27 min) than in the butorphanol-sevoflurane group (7 +/- 4 min). The cardiopulmonary effects of butorphanol-isoflurane and butorphanol-sevoflurane assessed in this study are similar, and both inhalants appear to be safe and effective for induction and maintenance in the green iguana.

  19. Mechanisms of force inhibition by halothane and isoflurane in intact rat cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Peter J; Loiselle, Denis S

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms underlying the negative inotropic effect of the volatile anaesthetics halothane and isoflurane using twenty-two intact, right ventricular trabeculae of rat. [Ca2+]i was measured qualitatively using either fluo-3 or fura-2, loaded into the cytosol via the acetoxymethyl (AM) ester form. Diastolic sarcomere length was adjusted to 2.1-2.2 μm and experiments were performed at 21-23°C. Halothane (02.5-3 %) and isoflurane (0.48-4 %) produced dose-dependent decreases in the amplitudes of the intracellular Ca2+ transients and twitch force. When the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator signals were corrected for changes in autofluorescence, neither volatile anaesthetic significantly changed diastolic [Ca2+]i. The ability of halothane and isoflurane to induce Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of quiescent trabeculae was examined. When the superfusate was Ca2+ and Na+ free (thereby preventing Na+- Ca2+ exchange and Ca2+ influx), 2 % halothane, but not 4 % isoflurane, evoked a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Halothane and isoflurane produced reversible, dose-dependent changes in cellular autofluorescence, the pattern of which was consistent with an increase in concentration of the reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine nucleotides and flavoproteins. This observation supports the putative inhibitory action of volatile anaesthetics at the site of Complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Addition of the fatty acid hexanoate, a substrate that can be metabolized in the face of Complex I inhibition, did not appreciably attenuate the anaesthetic-induced negative inotropy; however, it greatly diminished autofluorescence changes. To determine whether direct actions of the volatile anaesthetics on the contractile system contributed to the negative inotropy, external [Ca2+] was varied to modulate the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient. In the presence of 2 % halothane or 4 % isoflurane, restoration of the peak Ca2+ transient to control levels

  20. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of augmentation effect of isoflurane on mivacurium.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Pandey, Mamta

    2009-06-01

    This study evaluated the augmentation effect of isoflurane (ISO) given before or after the mivacurium (MIV) injection. Consented 33 adults (18-58 years), ASA I patients of both sexes were randomly assigned into three groups. In group 1 (no ISO) patients--IV propofol (0.5-1 mg/kg) for induction and (25-50 mg) aliquots every 2-5 minutes, N2O (60%) in O2 by mask, was followed by IV MIV (0.04 mg/kg). In group 2 (ISO before MIV) patients-IV propofol as in group 1 and ISO in N2O (60%) and O2 to achiever end tidal level 1% for 10 minutes was followed by same dose of IV MIV. In group 3 (ISO after MIV) patients-after propofol and IV MIV as above, ISO in N2O (60%) and O2 was given to get end tidal level 1% for 10 minutes. All patients were breathing spontaneously using tight fitting facemask and respiration was assisted to keep ETCO2 (35-40 mmHg), SaO2 100%. To monitor MIV effect, ulnar nerve was stimulated at wrist using supramaximal double burst stimuli (DBS). Adductor pollicis response was recorded on myograph-2000 (Biometer, Denmark). Twitch amplitude (D1) and tetanic fade DBSr (D2/D1) were calculated for each stimulus and recorded. Peak MIV effect (D1 suppression by approximately equal to 90% and abolished D2) was significantly (p < 0.05) more in group 2 patients (ISO before MIV) than in group 1 (control) or group 3 (ISO after MIV) patients. ISO given prior of MIV administration significantly augmented the effect of MIV. When ISO was started after MIV injection probably the quick hydrolysis of MIV limited the augmentation effect to tetanic fade only as compared to the patients, who did not get ISO at any point of study. Prior administration of ISO causes intense MIV block at adductor pollicis.

  1. Anesthetic effects of isoflurane on the tonotopic map and neuronal population activity in the rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Noda, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2015-09-01

    Since its discovery nearly four decades ago, sequential microelectrode mapping using hundreds of recording sites has been able to reveal a precise tonotopic organization of the auditory cortex. Despite concerns regarding the effects that anesthesia might have on neuronal responses to tones, anesthesia was essential for these experiments because such dense mapping was elaborate and time-consuming. Here, taking an 'all-at-once' approach, we investigated how isoflurane modifies spatiotemporal activities by using a dense microelectrode array. The array covered the entire auditory cortex in rats, including the core and belt cortices. By comparing neuronal activity in the awake state with activity under isoflurane anesthesia, we made four observations. First, isoflurane anesthesia did not modify the tonotopic topography within the auditory cortex. Second, in terms of general response properties, isoflurane anesthesia decreased the number of active single units and increased their response onset latency. Third, in terms of tuning properties, isoflurane anesthesia shifted the response threshold without changing the shape of the frequency response area and decreased the response quality. Fourth, in terms of population activities, isoflurane anesthesia increased the noise correlations in discharges and phase synchrony in local field potential (LFP) oscillations, suggesting that the anesthesia made neuronal activities redundant at both single-unit and LFP levels. Thus, while isoflurane anesthesia had little effect on the tonotopic topography, its profound effects on neuronal activities decreased the encoding capacity of the auditory cortex.

  2. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. Study of pulmonary circulation].

    PubMed

    Orea Tejeda, A; Atencio, C; Sandoval, J; Lupi Herrera, E

    1982-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare disease of unknown etiology which consists of alveolar deposit of calcium microspheres. We report the procedures for the diagnosis of this disease, as well as the hemodynamic features of the pulmonary circulation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and cor pulmonale were documented. The active and passive factors involved in PAH are analyzed. We conclude that alveolar hypoxia and estructural vascular changes play a major role in the genesis of PAH.

  3. [Persistent dento-alveolar pain disorder (PDAP)].

    PubMed

    Warnsinck, C J; Koutris, M; Shemesh, H; Lobbezoo, F

    2015-02-01

    Dento-alveolar pain is common in the orofacial area. Persistent dento-alveolar pain could be experienced without an identifiable etiology with poor response to existing treatments. Confusion about the diagnosis and classification of persistent dento-alveolar pain (PDAP) disorders could explain the difficulties in treatment and unfavorable prognosis. Recently, initial steps were made to improve the taxonomy and diagnostic criteria for PDAP in order to improve clinical research and care.

  4. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine–Ketamine with Isoflurane for Anesthesia of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera)

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Lana; Snyder, Lindsey BC; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare isoflurane with a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, administered intramuscularly, for anesthesia in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In a prospective, complete crossover study, adult chinchillas (n = 8; age, 2 to 5 y) were anesthetized with a combination of dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (4 mg/kg IM). Atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 45 min after dexmedetomidine–ketamine administration. For comparison, anesthesia also was induced and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, delivered by facemask. Anesthetic and physiologic parameters were recorded during each anesthesia, including various reflexes, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and SpO2. Food intake, fecal output, and body weight were recorded daily for 6 d after each anesthetic trial. Induction time, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature did not differ significantly between the 2 anesthetic protocols. Recovery times were shorter and SpO2 was higher in animals that received isoflurane delivered in 100% oxygen. Food intake and fecal output were reduced in the dexmedetomidine–ketamine group for as long as 3 d after anesthesia, whereas isoflurane had no signifcant effect on food intake or fecal output. Both anesthetic protocols provided effective anesthesia in chinchillas. However, when anesthetized with dexmedetomidine–ketamine, chinchillas received room air and became hypoxemic. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of oxygen supplementation on anesthetic recovery and on the recovery of food intake and fecal output in chinchillas. PMID:27177565

  5. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Joel P.; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C.; Hoppa, Michael B.; Ryan, Timothy A.; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ influx without significantly altering the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca2+]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e). Lowering external Ca2+ to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca2+ entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca2+ entry without significant direct effects on Ca2+-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca2+ influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system. PMID:26351670

  6. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine-Ketamine with Isoflurane for Anesthesia of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Fox, Lana; Snyder, Lindsey Bc; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare isoflurane with a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, administered intramuscularly, for anesthesia in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In a prospective, complete crossover study, adult chinchillas (n = 8; age, 2 to 5 y) were anesthetized with a combination of dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (4 mg/kg IM). Atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 45 min after dexmedetomidine-ketamine administration. For comparison, anesthesia also was induced and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, delivered by facemask. Anesthetic and physiologic parameters were recorded during each anesthesia, including various reflexes, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and SpO2. Food intake, fecal output, and body weight were recorded daily for 6 d after each anesthetic trial. Induction time, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature did not differ significantly between the 2 anesthetic protocols. Recovery times were shorter and SpO2 was higher in animals that received isoflurane delivered in 100% oxygen. Food intake and fecal output were reduced in the dexmedetomidine-ketamine group for as long as 3 d after anesthesia, whereas isoflurane had no signifcant effect on food intake or fecal output. Both anesthetic protocols provided effective anesthesia in chinchillas. However, when anesthetized with dexmedetomidine-ketamine, chinchillas received room air and became hypoxemic. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of oxygen supplementation on anesthetic recovery and on the recovery of food intake and fecal output in chinchillas.

  7. Preliminary investigation into the ventilatory effects of midazolam in isoflurane-anaesthetised goats.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, George F; Bester, Lynette

    2012-05-30

    The ventilatory effects of intravenous midazolam (MDZ) were evaluated in isoflurane- anaesthetised goats. Eight female goats aged 2-3 years were fasted from food and water for 12 h. Anaesthesia was then induced using a face mask with isoflurane in oxygen, whilst the trachea was intubated with a cuffed tracheal tube and anaesthesia maintained with isoflurane at 1.5% end-tidal concentration. Ventilation was spontaneous. The goats were treated with either a saline placebo (PLC) or MDZ intravenously at 0.2 mg/kg. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used for the analysis of data. Significance was taken at the 0.05 level. Differences between treatments were not statistically significant (p > 0.05) for tidal volume, ventilation rate, tidal volume/kg (VT/kg) and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure. Within treatments, VT and VT/kg differed 5 min after MDZ administration; this was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The occurrence of apnoea in the MDZ-treated goats was statistically significant (p = 0.04) compared with the PLC treated goats. Intravenous MDZ at 0.2 mg/kg administered to isoflurane-anaesthetised goats may result in transient apnoea and a mild decrease in VT and VT/kg.

  8. Effect of dexmedetomidine bolus dose on isoflurane consumption in surgical patients under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Reshma B.; Rajappa, Geetha C.; Govindswamy, Suresh; Thamanna, Prathima P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Various adjuvants have been introduced to decrease the dose of volatile agents and their side effects. Dexmedetomidine a potent alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist is one such agent. Our objective is to assess the effect of preanesthetic dexmedetomidine on isoflurane consumption and its effect on intraoperative hemodynamic stability and recovery profile. Setting and Design: This prospective, randomized controlled, double-blind study was done in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Group 1 received saline infusion and Group 2 received dexmedetomidine infusion in a dose of 1 μg/kg over 10 min given 15 min before induction. Vital parameters and bispectral index (BIS) values were noted throughout the surgery. Patients were induced and intubated as per the standard protocol and maintained with N2O: O2 = 1:1 mixture at 2 L/min and isoflurane concentration adjusted to achieve BIS values of 45–60. Demographic profile, hemodynamic variables, total isoflurane consumption, and recovery profile data were collected. Statistics: Independent t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare the average anesthetic consumption, hemodynamics, and recovery profile between two groups. Results: End-tidal concentration and total isoflurane consumption in Group 2 were 0.56 ± 0.11 and 10.69 ± 3.01 mL, respectively, with P < 0.001 which was statistically significant compared to Group 1 which were 0.76 ± 0.14 and 13.76 ± 3.84 mL. Postintubation and intraoperative mean arterial pressure values were significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group with P < 0.001. Conclusion: Preanesthetic bolus dose of dexmedetomidine is a useful adjuvant to reduce isoflurane consumption. PMID:27746567

  9. Preferential effect of isoflurane on top-down vs. bottom-up pathways in sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Aeyal; Grady, Sean M.; Krause, Bryan M.; Uhlrich, Daniel J.; Manning, Karen A.; Banks, Matthew I.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of loss of consciousness (LOC) under anesthesia is unknown. Because consciousness depends on activity in the cortico-thalamic network, anesthetic actions on this network are likely critical for LOC. Competing theories stress the importance of anesthetic actions on bottom-up “core” thalamo-cortical (TC) vs. top-down cortico-cortical (CC) and matrix TC connections. We tested these models using laminar recordings in rat auditory cortex in vivo and murine brain slices. We selectively activated bottom-up vs. top-down afferent pathways using sensory stimuli in vivo and electrical stimulation in brain slices, and compared effects of isoflurane on responses evoked via the two pathways. Auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferent stimulation in brain slices evoked short latency current sinks in middle layers, consistent with activation of core TC afferents. By contrast, visual stimuli in vivo and stimulation of CC and matrix TC afferents in brain slices evoked responses mainly in superficial and deep layers, consistent with projection patterns of top-down afferents that carry visual information to auditory cortex. Responses to auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferents in brain slices were significantly less affected by isoflurane compared to responses triggered by visual stimuli in vivo and CC/matrix TC afferents in slices. At a just-hypnotic dose in vivo, auditory responses were enhanced by isoflurane, whereas visual responses were dramatically reduced. At a comparable concentration in slices, isoflurane suppressed both core TC and CC/matrix TC responses, but the effect on the latter responses was far greater than on core TC responses, indicating that at least part of the differential effects observed in vivo were due to local actions of isoflurane in auditory cortex. These data support a model in which disruption of top-down connectivity contributes to anesthesia-induced LOC, and have implications for understanding the neural basis of

  10. Isoflurane abolishes spontaneous firing of serotonin neurons and masks their pH/CO2 chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Johansen, Sara L.; Wu, Yuanming; Harris, Michael B.; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons from the mouse and rat rostral medulla are stimulated by increased CO2 when studied in culture or brain slices. However, the response of 5-HT neurons has been variable when animals are exposed to hypercapnia in vivo. Here we examined whether halogenated inhalational anesthetics, which activate TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels, could mask an effect of CO2 on 5-HT neurons. During in vivo plethysmography in mice, isoflurane (1%) markedly reduced the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) by 78–96% depending upon mouse strain and ambient temperature. In a perfused rat brain stem preparation, isoflurane (1%) reduced or silenced spontaneous firing of medullary 5-HT neurons in situ and abolished their responses to elevated perfusate Pco2. In dissociated cell cultures, isoflurane (1%) hyperpolarized 5-HT neurons by 6.52 ± 3.94 mV and inhibited spontaneous firing. A subsequent decrease in pH from 7.4 to 7.2 depolarized neurons by 4.07 ± 2.10 mV, but that was insufficient to reach threshold for firing. Depolarizing current restored baseline firing and the firing frequency response to acidosis, indicating that isoflurane did not block the underlying mechanisms mediating chemosensitivity. These results demonstrate that isoflurane masks 5-HT neuron chemosensitivity in vitro and in situ and markedly decreases the HCVR in vivo. The use of this class of anesthetic has a particularly potent inhibitory effect on chemosensitivity of 5-HT neurons. PMID:25695656

  11. Inhibition of T-type calcium current in rat thalamocortical neurons by isoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, Veit-Simon; DiGruccio, Michael R.; Uebele, Victor N.; Renger, John J.; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2012-01-01

    Thalamocortical (TC) neurons provide the major sensory input to the mammalian somatosensory cortex. Decreased activity of these cells may be pivotal in the ability of general anesthetics to induce loss of consciousness and promote sleep (hypnosis). T-type voltage-gated calcium currents (T-currents) have a key function regulating the cellular excitability of TC neurons and previous studies have indicated that volatile general anesthetics may alter the excitability of these neurons. Using a patch-clamp technique, we investigated the mechanisms whereby isoflurane, a common volatile anesthetic, modulates isolated T-currents and T-current-dependent excitability of native TC neurons in acute brain slices of the rat. In voltage-clamp experiments, we found that isoflurane strongly inhibited peak amplitude of T-current, yielding an IC50 of 1.1% at physiological membrane potentials. Ensuing biophysical studies demonstrated that inhibition was more prominent at depolarized membrane potentials as evidenced by hyperpolarizing shifts in channel availability curves. In current-clamp experiments we found that isoflurane decreased the rate of depolarization of low-threshold-calcium spikes (LTCSs) and consequently increased the latency of rebound spike firing at the same concentrations that inhibited isolated T-currents. This effect was mimicked by a novel selective T-channel blocker 3,5-dichloro-N-[1-(2,2-dimethyl-tetrahydro-pyran-4-ylmethyl)-4-fluoro-piperidin-4-ylmethyl]-benzamide (TTA-P2). In contrast, isoflurane and TTA-P2 had minimal effect on resting membrane potential and cell input resistance. We propose that depression of thalamic T-currents may contribute to some clinical properties of isoflurane. PMID:22491022

  12. Effects of isoflurane on somatosensory-evoked potentials in calves: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Truchetti, Geoffrey; Burns, Patrick; Nichols, Sylvain; Parent, Joane

    2015-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) are used to monitor sensory function and are often recorded under general anesthesia. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of isoflurane on SSEPs in calves as it has not been reported. Eight calves (mean age: 40 days), were included in the study. Calves were anesthetized with a randomized sequence of four different isoflurane partial pressures. Blood gas analysis was performed before each measurement. SSEP were induced by repeated stimulation of the common dorsal digital nerve III. SSEPs were recorded from the lumbo-sacral junction (s-SSEP) and the head (c-SSEP). Latency and inter-amplitude of each peak were measured. For s-SSEP: One negative (Nsp1) and two positive (Psp1 and Psp2) peaks were identified in all tracings except for two calves. There was a significant effect of isoflurane on the latency of Psp2 (P = 0.01). Inter-amplitude decreased significantly with PaO2, PaCO2 and temperature (P < 0.05). Psp2 latency decreased with PaO2 (P = 0.01). For c-SSEP: two positive (Pc1 and Pc2) and two negative (Nc1 and Nc2) peaks were identified. There were identifiable peaks for the analysis of Pc1 latencies only. There was a significant positive linear relation between end-tidal isoflurane partial pressure (ETiso) and Pc1 latency (P = 0.04). None of the co-variables had a significant effect on the latency of Pc1 (P > 0.1). Isoflurane has a major impact on the recording of c-SSEP. Recording should be done at the lowest ETiso as possible, and anesthesia parameters should be kept constant.

  13. Monitoring cerebral oxygenation and local field potential with a variation of isoflurane concentration in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Hyuk; Shin, Teo Jeon; Kim, Seonghyun; Bae, Jayyoung; Cho, Dongrae; Ham, Jinsil; Park, Ji-Young; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Jeong, Seongwook; Lee, Boreom; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate experimentally how anesthetic levels affect cerebral metabolism measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and to identify a robust marker among NIRS parameters to discriminate various stages of anesthetic depth in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. In order to record the hemodynamic changes and local field potential (LFP) in the brain, fiber-optic cannulae and custom-made microelectrodes were implanted in the frontal cortex of the skull. The NIRS and LFP signals were continuously monitored before, during and after isoflurane anesthesia. As isoflurane concentration is reduced, the level of oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin concentrations of the frontal cortex decreased gradually, while deoxyhemoglobin increased. The reflectance ratio between 730nm and 850nm and burst suppression ratio (BSR) correspond similarly with the change of oxyhemoglobin during the variation of isoflurane concentration. These results suggest that NIRS signals in addition to EEG may provide a possibility of developing a new anesthetic depth index. PMID:27867719

  14. The Systemic Inflammation of Alveolar Hypoxia Is Initiated by Alveolar Macrophage–Borne Mediator(s)

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jie; Wood, John G.; Blanco, Victor Gustavo; Gonzalez, Norberto C.

    2009-01-01

    Alveolar hypoxia produces widespread systemic inflammation in rats. The inflammation appears to be triggered by activation of mast cells by a mediator released from alveolar macrophages, not by the reduced systemic partial pressure of oxygen (PO2). If this is correct, the following should apply: (1) neither mast cells nor tissue macrophages should be directly activated by hypoxia; and (2) mast cells should be activated when in contact with hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not with hypoxic tissue macrophages. We sought here to determine whether hypoxia activates isolated alveolar macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and peritoneal mast cells, and to study the response of the microcirculation to supernatants of these cultures. Rat mesenteric microcirculation intravital microscopy was combined with primary cultures of alveolar macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and peritoneal mast cells. Supernatant of hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not of hypoxic peritoneal macrophages, produced inflammation in mesentery. Hypoxia induced a respiratory burst in alveolar, but not peritoneal macrophages. Cultured peritoneal mast cells did not degranulate with hypoxia. Immersion of mast cells in supernatant of hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not in supernatant of hypoxic peritoneal macrophages, induced mast cell degranulation. Hypoxia induced release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a mast cell secretagogue, from alveolar, but not peritoneal macrophages or mast cells. We conclude that a mediator released by hypoxic alveolar macrophages activates mast cells and triggers systemic inflammation. Reduced systemic PO2 and activation of tissue macrophages do not play a role in this phenomenon. The inflammation could contribute to systemic effects of diseases featuring alveolar hypoxia. PMID:19244200

  15. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout mice have a decreased isoflurane requirement to induce loss of righting reflex.

    PubMed

    Lee, S N; Li, L; Zuo, Z

    2010-12-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) uptake extracellular glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. EAAT type 3 (EAAT3), the main neuronal EAAT, is expressed widely in the CNS. We have shown that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity and trafficking to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that EAAT3 mediates isoflurane-induced anesthesia. To test this hypothesis, the potency of isoflurane to induce immobility and hypnosis, two major components of general anesthesia, was compared in the CD-1 wild-type mice and EAAT knockout mice that had a CD-1 strain gene background. Hypnosis was assessed by loss of righting reflex in this study. The expression of EAAT1 and EAAT2, two widely expressed EAATs in the CNS, in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord was not different between the EAAT3 knockout mice and wild-type mice. The concentration required for isoflurane to cause immobility to painful stimuli, a response involving primarily reflex loops in the spinal cord, was not changed by EAAT3 knockout. However, the EAAT3 knockout mice were more sensitive to isoflurane-induced hypnotic effects, which may be mediated by hypothalamic sleep neural circuits. Interestingly, the EAAT3 knockout mice did not have an altered sensitivity to the hypnotic effects caused by ketamine, an i.v. anesthetic that is a glutamate receptor antagonist and does not affect EAAT3 activity. These results suggest that EAAT3 modulates the sensitivity of neural circuits to isoflurane. These results, along with our previous findings which suggests that isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity, indicate that EAAT3 may regulate isoflurane-induced behavioral changes, including anesthesia.

  16. Dexmedetomidine Acts via the JAK2/STAT3 Pathway to Attenuate Isoflurane-Induced Neurocognitive Deficits in Senile Mice

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yanna; Zhang, Yuan; Han, Liu; Chen, Lihai; Xu, Yajie; Sun, Fan; Ji, Muhuo; Yang, Jianjun; Bao, Hongguang

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits could be alleviated by dexmedetomidine in young animal subjects. In the current study, we examine whether dexmedetomidine could also alleviate isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits in senile animals. Methods Senile male C57BL/6 mice (20 months) received dexmedetomidine (50 μg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 minutes prior to isoflurane exposure (1.3% for 4 h). Cognitive function was assessed 19 days later using a 5-day testing regimen with Morris water maze. Some subjects also received pretreatment with α2 adrenoreceptor antagonist atipamezole (250 μg/kg, i.p.), JAK2 inhibitor AG490 (15 mg/kg i.p.) or STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 (40 mg/kg i.p.) 30 minutes prior to dexmedetomidine. Results Isoflurane exposure increased and reduced the time spent in the quadrant containing the target platform in training sessions. The number of crossings over the original target quadrant was also decreased. Dexmedotomidine attenuated such effects. Effects of dexmedotomidine were reduced by pretreatment with atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Increased phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 in the hippocampus induced by isoflurane was augmented by dexmedetomidine. Effects of dexmedetomidine on JAK2/STAT3 phosphorylation were attenuated by atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Isoflurane promoted neuronal apoptosis and increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and BAD, and reduced Bcl-2 expression. Attenuation of such effects by dexmedotomidine was partially blocked by atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine could protect against isoflurane-induced spatial learning and memory impairment in senile mice by stimulating the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. Such findings encourage the use of dexmedetomidine in geriatric patients receiving isoflurane anesthesia. PMID:27768775

  17. The common inhaled anesthetic isoflurane increases aggregation of huntingtin and alters calcium homeostasis in a cell model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiujun; Liang Ge; Yang Hui; Wang Shouping; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Wei Huafeng

    2011-02-01

    Isoflurane is known to increase {beta}-amyloid aggregation and neuronal damage. We hypothesized that isoflurane will have similar effects on the polyglutamine huntingtin protein and will cause alterations in intracellular calcium homeostasis. We tested this hypothesis in striatal cells from the expanded glutamine huntingtin knock-in mouse (STHdh{sup Q111/Q111}) and wild type (STHdh{sup Q7/Q7}) striatal neurons. The primary cultured neurons were exposed for 24 h to equipotent concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium and with or without xestospongin C, a potent endoplasmic reticulum inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist. Aggregation of huntingtin protein, cell viability, and calcium concentrations were measured. Isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane all increased the aggregation of huntingtin in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells, with isoflurane having the largest effect. Isoflurane induced greater calcium release from the ER and relatively more cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} huntingtin cells than in the wild type STHdh{sup Q7/Q7} striatal cells. However, sevoflurane and desflurane caused less calcium release from the ER and less cell damage. Xestospongin C inhibited the isoflurane-induced calcium release from the ER, aggregation of huntingtin, and cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells. In summary, the Q111 form of huntingtin increases the vulnerability of striatal neurons to isoflurane neurotoxicity through combined actions on the ER IP{sub 3} receptors. Calcium release from the ER contributes to the anesthetic induced huntingtin aggregation in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} striatal cells.

  18. Dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Binjiang; Li, Xue

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of α2 adrenergic receptor agonists, dexmedetomidine generates sedation, anti-anxiety and anesthesia effects by hyperpolarizing noradrenergic nerve cells in locus coeruleus. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment, and the possible underlying mechanism in aging rat. Firstly, we used isoflurane-induced aging rat model to analyze the therapeutical effect of dexmedetomidine on cognitive impairment. Next, commercial ELISA kits were used to analyze tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and caspase-3 levels. In addition, Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression of P38 MAPK, PTEN and phosphorylation-Akt (p-Akt) expression. Our results showed that the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine significantly attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aging rat. Moreover, dexmedetomidine significantly inhibited these TNF-α, IL-1β, MDA, SOD and caspase-3 activities in isoflurane-induced aging rat. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective effects of dexmedetomidine on isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment significantly suppressed Bcl-xL/Bad rate, P38 MAPK and PTEN protein expression and activated p-Akt protein expression in aging rat. Collectively, neuroprotective effect of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat. PMID:26770320

  19. Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 by isoflurane preconditioning during tolerance against neuronal injury induced by oxygen glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qifang; Zhu, Yesen; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Hui; Liu, Heping

    2008-09-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. The HO-1 isozyme is induced by a variety of factors such as heat, heme, ischemia, and hydrogen peroxide. In recent years, mounting findings have suggested that HO-1 has a neuroprotective activity against ischemic injury. The neuroprotective role of isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, has been well documented, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms involved. Recently, isoflurane has been shown to up-regulate HO-1 in the liver. In this study, we show that isoflurane preconditioning promotes the survival of cultured ischemic hippocampal neurons by increasing the number of surviving neurons and their viability. Further study by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that isoflurane preconditioning significantly increases HO-1 expression in oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury. Furthermore, inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin partially abolishes isoflurane preconditioning's protective effect as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in OGD neurons. These findings indicated that the neuroprotective role of isoflurane preconditioning against OGD-induced injury might be associated with its role in up-regulating HO-1 in ischemic neurons.

  20. Fluorine-19 NMR and computational quantification of isoflurane binding to the voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Bondarenko, Vasyl; Granata, Daniele; Bu, Weiming; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Loll, Patrick J.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) play an important role in general anesthesia. Electrophysiology measurements suggest that volatile anesthetics such as isoflurane inhibit NaV by stabilizing the inactivated state or altering the inactivation kinetics. Recent computational studies suggested the existence of multiple isoflurane binding sites in NaV, but experimental binding data are lacking. Here we use site-directed placement of 19F probes in NMR experiments to quantify isoflurane binding to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac. 19F probes were introduced individually to S129 and L150 near the S4–S5 linker, L179 and S208 at the extracellular surface, T189 in the ion selectivity filter, and all phenylalanine residues. Quantitative analyses of 19F NMR saturation transfer difference (STD) spectroscopy showed a strong interaction of isoflurane with S129, T189, and S208; relatively weakly with L150; and almost undetectable with L179 and phenylalanine residues. An orientation preference was observed for isoflurane bound to T189 and S208, but not to S129 and L150. We conclude that isoflurane inhibits NaChBac by two distinct mechanisms: (i) as a channel blocker at the base of the selectivity filter, and (ii) as a modulator to restrict the pivot motion at the S4–S5 linker and at a critical hinge that controls the gating and inactivation motion of S6. PMID:27856739

  1. Predictors of alveolar air leaks.

    PubMed

    Loran, David B; Woodside, Kenneth J; Cerfolio, Robert J; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2002-08-01

    Persistent air leaks are caused by the failure of the postoperative lung to achieve a configuration that is physiologically amenable to healing. The raw pulmonary surface caused by the dissection of the fissure often is separated from the pleura, and the air leak fails to close. Additionally, higher air flow thorough an alveolar-pleural fistula seems to keep the fistula open. Other factors that interfere with wound healing, such as steroid use, diabetes, or malnutrition, can result in persistence of the leak. A thoracic surgeon can minimize the incidence of air leak through meticulous surgical technique and can identify patients in whom the balance of risks (Table 1) and benefits warrant operative intervention based on an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology.

  2. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  3. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  4. Effects of xenon and isoflurane on apoptosis and inflammation in a porcine myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Sopka, Sasa; Mertens, Christine; Roehl, Anna Bettina; Schiffl, Katharina; Rossaint, Rolf; Classen-Linke, Irmgard

    2013-03-01

    Volatile anaesthetics can reduce the infarction size in myocardial tissue when administered before and during experimentally induced ischaemia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether xenon is beneficial compared to isoflurane in limiting myocardial tissue apoptosis and inflammation induced by experimental ischaemia-reperfusion injury in a porcine right ventricular infarction model. Twenty-one animals used for this study randomly received isoflurane, xenon or thiopental, (n=6-8 per group). Myocardial infarction was induced for 90min, followed by reperfusion for 120min. Tissues from the left and right ventricles were removed from the sites of infarction, reperfusion and remote areas, and processed for immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis (caspase-3 staining) and neutrophilic infiltration (naphthol AS-D chloroacetate-specific esterase) were assessed and evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using an ANOVA of repeated measures. Density of apoptotic cells were higher in tissues from animals that were anesthetized with xenon. This effect was significant in comparison to isoflurane (p=0.0177). Neutrophilic infiltration was significantly higher in the right compared to the left ventricle (p<0.001), whereas no significant differences in the number of granulocytes based on the anaesthetic regime or the different tissue areas were found. We conclude that xenon, in the early phase of ischaemia and reperfusion, induces a significant increase in apoptosis compared to isoflurane. Therefore, clinical use of this anaesthetic in cardiocompromised patients should be taken with care until more long-term studies have been carried out. The increased neutrophilic infiltration in the right vs. the left ventricle indicates the right ventricle being more susceptible to ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

  5. Effects of isoflurane or propofol on postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Erasso, Diana M; Camporesi, Enrico M; Mangar, Devanand; Saporta, Samuel

    2013-09-12

    An increasing number of in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that anesthesia and surgery could be risk factors for later cognitive impairment in the young and aged brain. General anesthesia has been shown to impair spatial memory in rats and this performance is dependent on hippocampal function and postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis. Anesthetic induced alteration of one or more stages of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis may in part explain this cognitive impairment following anesthesia. Three different populations of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) were labeled with different thymidine analogs (EdU, IdU, and CldU) at 4, 8, and 21 days, respectively, in young (3-month-old) and aged (20-month-old) rats prior to a 3h exposure to isoflurane, control, propofol, or 10% intralipid. 24h following general anesthesia, brains were collected for analysis. The number of cells co-localized with neuronal differentiation and maturation labels with each of the thymidine analogs was quantified. In addition, new cell proliferation 24hr following anesthesia was assessed with anti-Ki67. The effect of anesthesia on astrocytes was also assessed with anti-S100β. Isoflurane or propofol did not affect new cell proliferation, as assessed by Ki67, in the DG of young or aged rats. However, propofol significantly decreased the number of differentiating neurons and increased the number of astrocytes in the DG of young, but not aged, rats. Isoflurane significantly decreased the number of maturing neurons and increased the number of astrocytes in the DG of aged, but not young, rats. Isoflurane and propofol anesthesia altered postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in an age and agent dependent matter.

  6. Isoflurane enhances both fast and slow synaptic inhibition in the hippocampus at amnestic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors has long been considered an important target for a variety of general anesthetics. In the hippocampus, two types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition coexist: GABAA,fast, which is expressed primarily at peri-somatic sites, and GABAA,slow, which is expressed primarily in the dendrites. Their spatial segregation suggests distinct functions: GABAA,slow may control plasticity of dendritic synapses, while GABAA,fast controls action potential initiation at the soma. We examined modulation of GABAA,fast and GABAA,slow inhibition by isoflurane at amnesic concentrations, and compared it to modulation by behaviorally equivalent doses of the GABAA receptor-selective drug etomidate. Methods Whole-cell recordings were conducted at near-physiological temperature from pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal cultures obtained from C57BL/6 x 129/SvJ F1 hybrid mice. GABAA receptor-mediated currents were isolated using glutamate receptor antagonists. GABAA,slow currents were evoked by electrical stimulation in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Miniature GABAA,fast currents were recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Results 100 µM isoflurane (approximately EC50,amnesia) slowed fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic current decay by approximately 25%. Higher concentrations, up to 400 µM, produced proportionally greater effects without altering current amplitudes. The effects on GABAA,slow were approximately one-half those produced by equi-amnesic concentrations of etomidate. Conclusions Isoflurane enhances both types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition to similar degrees at amnesic concentrations. This pattern differs from etomidate, which at low concentrations selectively enhances slow inhibition. These effects of isoflurane are sufficiently large that they may contribute substantially to its suppression of hippocampal learning and memory. PMID:22343472

  7. The direction dependence of thermoregulatory vasoconstriction during isoflurane/epidural anesthesia in humans.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, M; Sessler, D I; McGuire, J; Blanchard, D; Schroeder, M; Moayeri, A

    1993-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that once thermoregulatory vasoconstriction is triggered at a given core temperature during isoflurane anesthesia, redilation starts at a substantially higher core temperature. To avoid direct perception of cutaneous cooling and warming, we used epidural anesthesia and limited our thermal manipulations to the blocked area. Seven volunteers were anesthetized with isoflurane/epidural anesthesia (approximately T9 dermatomal level). Core hypothermia was induced by surface cooling restricted to the legs. Cooling was continued until fingertip blood flow suddenly decreased (vasoconstriction threshold). The core was then rewarmed by heating the legs until fingertip flow suddenly increased toward initial values (redilation threshold). The difference between the two thresholds defined the direction-dependent hysteresis. Vasoconstriction occurred at 35.2 +/- 0.6 degrees C and vasodilation at 36.2 +/- 0.5 degrees C (P < 0.01, paired t-test); consequently, the hysteresis was 1.0 +/- 0.6 degrees C. The observed hysteresis suggests that thermoregulatory responses during combined isoflurane/epidural anesthesia are not determined simply by instantaneous thermal input to central controllers, but may also depend on the direction of core temperature change.

  8. Temperature-dependent effects of halothane and isoflurane on the isolated left atrium.

    PubMed

    Laorden, M L; Miralles, F S; Cárceles, M D; Hernández, J; Puig, M M

    1990-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether changes in temperature alter the effects of halothane and isoflurane on isolated left atria. Concentration-response curves for inotropic effects at different temperatures (30 degrees C, 37 degrees C, 40 degrees C) on electrically stimulated left atria of the rat were obtained. The change of temperature modified the maximal negative inotropic response to halothane. The maximal decrease induced by halothane was 12 +/- 2.3 per cent at 37 degrees C and 18 +/- 2.5 per cent at 30 degrees C. When the temperature increased up to 40 degrees C the maximal decrease of atrial inotropism was 46 +/- 2.1 per cent--significantly higher than obtained at 37 degrees C. However, the maximal effect obtained by isoflurane was not significantly affected by temperature (30 degrees C = 7 +/- 1.6 per cent; 37 degrees C = 8 +/- 1.8 per cent; 40 degrees C = 2 +/- 0.8 per cent). Furthermore the potency of halothane (expressed as the concentration which produced 50 per cent inhibition - IC 50 per cent), decreased significantly at 30 degrees C (IC 50 = 1.34 +/- 0.18) and increased at 40 degrees C (IC 50 = 0.44 +/- 0.17) when compared with its potency at 37 degrees C (IC 50 = 0.96 +/- 0.08). On the other hand changes in temperature did not significantly modify the IC 50 for isoflurane obtained at 37 degrees C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Effect of isoflurane on somatosensory evoked potentials in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kortelainen, Jukka; Vipin, Ashwati; Thow Xin Yuan; Mir, Hasan; Thakor, Nitish; Al-Nashash, Hasan; All, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) are widely used in the clinic as well as research to study the functional integrity of the different parts of sensory pathways. However, most general anesthetics, such as isoflurane, are known to suppress SEPs, which might affect the interpretation of the signals. In animal studies, the usage of anesthetics during SEP measurements is inevitable due to which detailed effect of these drugs on the recordings should be known. In this paper, the effect of isoflurane on SEPs was studied in a rat model. Both time and frequency properties of the cortical recordings generated by stimulating the tibial nerve of rat's hindlimb were investigated at three different isoflurane levels. While the anesthetic agent is shown to generally suppress the amplitude of the SEP, the effect was found to be nonlinear influencing more substantially the latter part of waveform. This finding will potentially help us in future work aiming at separating the effects of anesthetics on SEP from those due to injury in the ascending neural pathways.

  10. The metabolomic profile during isoflurane anesthesia differs from propofol anesthesia in the live rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Makaryus, Rany; Lee, Hedok; Yu, Mei; Zhang, Shaonan; Smith, S David; Rebecchi, Mario; Glass, Peter S; Benveniste, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Development of noninvasive techniques to discover new biomarkers in the live brain is important to further understand the underlying metabolic pathways of significance for processes such as anesthesia-induced apoptosis and cognitive dysfunction observed in the undeveloped brain. We used in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and two different signal processing approaches to test the hypothesis that volatile (isoflurane) and intravenous (propofol) anesthetics at equipotent doses produce distinct metabolomic profiles in the hippocampus and parietal cortex of the live rodent. For both brain regions, prolonged isoflurane anesthesia was characterized by higher levels of lactate (Lac) and glutamate compared with long-lasting propofol. In contrast, propofol anesthesia was characterized by very low concentrations of Lac ([lac]) as well as glucose. Quantitative analysis revealed that the [lac] was fivefold higher with isoflurane compared with propofol anesthesia and independent of [lac] in blood. The metabolomic profiling further demonstrated that for both brain regions, Lac was the most important metabolite for the observed differences, suggesting activation of distinct metabolic pathways that may impact mechanisms of action, background cellular functions, and possible agent-specific neurotoxicity. PMID:21266982

  11. Absorption and degradation of sevoflurane and isoflurane in a conventional anesthetic circuit.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Laster, M J; Eger, E I; Taheri, S

    1991-06-01

    Soda lime and Baralyme degrade sevoflurane, the rate of degradation being a direct function of temperature. We tested whether this degradation would impede the development of an anesthetizing concentration of sevoflurane (compared with isoflurane, a compound that is not degraded) in a circle-absorption system having an increased temperature consequent to (a) carbon dioxide production (200 mL/min) and absorption; and (b) a low inflow rate (70 mL/min). We also measured the temperatures reached in various parts of the absorption system when used in clinical practice, finding that peak temperatures usually reached 37 degrees - 46 degrees C when low inflow rates (500 mL/min) were applied. The tests in the model system demonstrated that soda lime and Baralyme absorbed both sevoflurane and isoflurane, and that both absorbants degraded sevoflurane but not isoflurane. Baralyme produced a fourfold greater degradation of sevoflurane vapor than did soda lime (0.66 mL/min compared with 0.17 mL/min). However, except for a slight delay at the start of anesthesia, neither absorption nor degradation should noticeably affect the requirement for anesthetic delivery in clinical practice, even in low-flow systems.

  12. Isoflurane anaesthetic depth in goats monitored using the bispectral index of the electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Antognini, J F; Wang, X W; Carstens, E

    2000-09-01

    The bispectral index (BIS) of the electroencephalogram has recently been used to monitor the depth of anaesthesia in humans. The BIS is a dimensionless number that varies between 0 and 100. We hypothesized that the BIS could also be used to monitor depth of isoflurane anaesthesia in goats. Needle electrodes were placed over the frontal region of the scalp of goats and 5%, isoflurane was administered via a mask. The BIS number was determined at clinically relevant end-points. The BIS number did not change when the animals became recumbent (95 +/- 5 to 94 +/- 7, n = 15), but decreased to 65 +/- 13 and 64 +/- 15 when the corneal reflex and withdrawal response to a noxious stimulus, respectively, were lost (p < 0.001, n = 12). Direct laryngoscopy and intubation increased the BIS (56 +/- 7 to 83 +/- 11; p < 0.05, n = 10), as did a noxious pinch to the dew-claw (57 +/- 9; to 76 +/- 9; p < 0.05, n = 10). The spectral edge (frequency below which 95% of the total power resided) paralleled the change in BIS. We conclude that the depth of isoflurane anaesthesia in goats can be monitored using the BIS, although further work is needed to determine its sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Swimming exercise ameliorates neurocognitive impairment induced by neonatal exposure to isoflurane and enhances hippocampal histone acetylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, T; Ren, F; Huang, C S; Zou, W Y; Yang, Y; Pan, Y D; Sun, B; Wang, E; Guo, Q L

    2016-03-01

    Isoflurane-induced neurocognitive impairment in the developing rodent brain is well documented, and regular physical exercise has been demonstrated to be a viable intervention for some types of neurocognitive impairment. This study was designed to investigate the potential protective effect of swimming exercise on both neurocognitive impairment caused by repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane and the underlying molecular mechanism. Mice received 0.75% isoflurane exposures for 4h on postnatal days 7, 8, and 9. From the third month after anesthesia, the mice were subjected to regular swimming exercise for 4weeks, followed by a contextual fear condition (CFC) trial. We found that repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane reduced freezing behavior during CFC testing and deregulated hippocampal histone H4K12 acetylation. Conversely, mice subjected to regular swimming exercise showed enhanced hippocampal H3K9, H4K5, and H4K12 acetylation levels, increased numbers of c-Fos-positive cells 1h after CFC training, and less isoflurane-induced memory impairment. We also observed increases in histone acetylation and of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during the swimming exercise program. The results suggest that neonatal isoflurane exposure-induced memory impairment was associated with dysregulation of H4K12 acetylation, which may lead to less hippocampal activation following learning tasks. Swimming exercise was associated with enhanced hippocampal histone acetylation and CBP expression. Exercise most likely ameliorated isoflurane-induced memory impairment by enhancing hippocampal histone acetylation and activating more neuron cells during memory formation.

  14. Orexin-A facilitates emergence of the rat from isoflurane anesthesia via mediation of the basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Na; Yang, Cen; Ouyang, Peng-Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Ran, Ming-Zi; Tong, Li; Dong, Hai-Long; Liu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that orexinergic neurons involve in promoting emergence from anesthesia of propofol, an intravenous anesthetics, while whether both of orexin-A and orexin-B have promotive action on emergence via mediation of basal forebrain (BF) in isoflurane anesthesia has not been elucidated. In this study, we observed c-Fos expressions in orexinergic neurons following isoflurane inhalation (for 0, 30, 60, and 120min) and at the time when the righting reflex returned after the cessation of anesthesia. The plasma concentrations of orexin-A and -B in anesthesia-arousal process were measured by radioimmunoassay. Orexin-A and -B (30 or 100pmol) or the orexin receptor-1 and -2 antagonist SB-334867A and TCS-OX2-29 (5 or 20μg) were microinjected into the basal forebrain respectively. The effects of them on the induction (loss of the righting reflex) and the emergence time (return of the righting reflex) under isoflurane anesthesia were observed. The results showed that the numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive orexinergic neurons in the hypothalamus decreased over time with continued isoflurane inhalation, but restored at emergence. Similar alterations were observed in changes of plasma orexin-A concentrations but not in orexin-B during emergence. Administration of orexins had no effect on the induction time, but orexin-A facilitated the emergence of rats from isoflurane anesthesia while orexin-B didn't. Conversely, microinjection of the orexin receptor-1 antagonist SB-334867A delayed emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. The results indicate that orexin-A plays a promotive role in the emergence of isoflurane anesthesia and this effect is mediated by the basal forebrain.

  15. Isoflurane Preconditioning Induces Neuroprotection by Up-Regulation of TREK1 in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Kong, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the neuroprotection and mechanism of isoflurane on rats with spinal cord ischemic injury. Total 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the four groups (n=10). Group A was sham-operation group; group B was ischemia group; group C was isoflurane preconditioning group; group D was isoflurane preconditioning followed by ischemia treatment group. Then the expressions of TWIK-related K+ channel 1 (TREK1) in the four groups were detected by immunofluorescent assay, real time-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and western blot. The primary neurons of rats were isolated and cultured under normal and hypoxic conditions. Besides, the neurons under two conditions were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-TREK1 and lentivirual to overexpress and silence TREK1. Additionally, the neurons were treated with isoflurane or not. Then caspase-3 activity and cell cycle of neurons under normal and hypoxic conditions were detected. Furthermore, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH) was detected using NAD+/NADH quantification colorimetric kit. Results showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of TREK1 increased significantly in group C and D. In neurons, when TREK1 silenced, isoflurane treatment improved the caspase-3 activity. In hypoxic condition, the caspase-3 activity and sub-G1 cell percentage significantly increased, however, when TREK1 overexpressed the caspase-3 activity and sub-G1 cell percentage decreased significantly. Furthermore, both isoflurane treatment and overexpression of TREK1 significantly decreased NADH. In conclusion, isoflurane-induced neuroprotection in spinal cord ischemic injury may be associated with the up-regulation of TREK1. PMID:27469140

  16. Toward therapeutic pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria Decarlo

    2006-11-01

    In humans, age results in loss of pulmonary alveoli; menopause accelerates loss of diffusing capacity, an index of alveolar surface area; and disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) results in loss of alveoli. Thus, an important goal for investigators is to generate knowledge that allows induction of pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans. Our enthusiasm for this goal and our assessment of its feasibility are based on work in several laboratories over the last decade that has disproved the notion that pulmonary alveoli are incapable of regeneration, and on the growing evidence that signals that regulate programs of alveolar turnover (loss and regeneration) are conserved from rodents to humans. We review animal models of alveolar loss and regeneration and their conservation during evolution, and hence their relevance to humans.

  17. Lung alveolar epithelium and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Flamein, Florence; Epaud, Ralph; Clement, Annick; Guillot, Loic

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a group of lung disorders characterized by various levels of inflammation and fibrosis. The current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of ILD strongly suggests a central role of the alveolar epithelium. Following injury, alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may actively participate in the restoration of a normal alveolar architecture through a coordinated process of re-epithelialization, or in the development of fibrosis through a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Complex networks orchestrate EMT leading to changes in cell architecture and behaviour, loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal properties. In the lung, AECs themselves may serve as a source of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by acquiring a mesenchymal phenotype. This review covers recent knowledge on the role of alveolar epithelium in the pathogenesis of ILD. The mechanisms underlying disease progression are discussed, with a main focus on the apoptotic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and the developmental pathway.

  18. Lung epithelial branching program antagonizes alveolar differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Daniel R; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Miller, Rachel K; Ji, Hong; Akiyama, Haruhiko; McCrea, Pierre D; Chen, Jichao

    2013-11-05

    Mammalian organs, including the lung and kidney, often adopt a branched structure to achieve high efficiency and capacity of their physiological functions. Formation of a functional lung requires two developmental processes: branching morphogenesis, which builds a tree-like tubular network, and alveolar differentiation, which generates specialized epithelial cells for gas exchange. Much progress has been made to understand each of the two processes individually; however, it is not clear whether the two processes are coordinated and how they are deployed at the correct time and location. Here we show that an epithelial branching morphogenesis program antagonizes alveolar differentiation in the mouse lung. We find a negative correlation between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation temporally, spatially, and evolutionarily. Gain-of-function experiments show that hyperactive small GTPase Kras expands the branching program and also suppresses molecular and cellular differentiation of alveolar cells. Loss-of-function experiments show that SRY-box containing gene 9 (Sox9) functions downstream of Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)/Kras to promote branching and also suppresses premature initiation of alveolar differentiation. We thus propose that lung epithelial progenitors continuously balance between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation, and such a balance is mediated by dual-function regulators, including Kras and Sox9. The resulting temporal delay of differentiation by the branching program may provide new insights to lung immaturity in preterm neonates and the increase in organ complexity during evolution.

  19. Are Panoramic Radiographs Reliable to Diagnose Mild Alveolar Bone Resorption?

    PubMed Central

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated. PMID:21991470

  20. Are panoramic radiographs reliable to diagnose mild alveolar bone resorption?

    PubMed

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated.

  1. Clinicophysiological and haemodynamic effects of fentanyl with xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine in isoflurane-anaesthetised water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Singh, Gyan D; Kinjavdekar, Prakash; Amarpal; Aithal, Hari P; Pawde, Abhijeet M; Zama, Malik M S; Singh, Jasmeet; Tiwary, Ramesh

    2013-03-18

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the sedative, analgesic and clinical effects of xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine with fentanyl as pre-anaesthetics in water buffaloes and to compare the dose-sparing effect of xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine on thiopental for induction and isoflurane for maintenance of anaesthesia in water buffaloes. Six male water buffaloes randomly received intravenous fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and xylazine (0.05 mg/kg body weight), fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and medetomidine (2.5 µg/kg body weight), fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and dexmedetomidine (5.0 µg/kg body weight) at weekly intervals in groups I1, I2 and I3, respectively. After 15 min, the animals were restrained in right lateral recumbency and anaesthesia was induced by 5% thiopental sodium administered intravenously. The intubated animal was connected to the large animal anaesthesia machine and isoflurane in 100% oxygen (5 L/min) was insufflated for 60 min. The treatments were compared by clinicophysiological, haematobiochemical and haemodynamic parameters. Fentanyl-medetomidine and fentanyl-dexmedetomidine produced more cardiovascular depression during the pre-anaesthetic period but less depression of cardio-respiratory dynamics in the post induction and maintenance period. Quicker recovery was recorded in I2 and I3 groups. A lower dose of thiopental was required in group I3 (4.33 mg/kg ± 0.66 mg/kg) than in groups I2 (4.41 mg/kg ± 0.98 mg/kg) and I1 (4.83 mg/kg ± 0.79 mg/kg). The dose of isoflurane was less in group I3 (45.50 mL ± 5.45 mL) than in group I1 and I2 (48.66 mL ± 5.10 mL and 48.00 mL ± 6.38 mL). Better anaesthesia was recorded with fentanyl-dexmedetomidine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I3) than with fentanyl-medetomidine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I2) and fentanyl-xylazine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I1). Fentanyl-medetomidine and fentanyl-dexmedetomidine were better pre-anaesthetic agents in comparison to

  2. Urokinase plasminogen activator released by alveolar epithelial cells modulates alveolar epithelial repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Van Leer, Coretta; Stutz, Monika; Haeberli, André; Geiser, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Intra-alveolar fibrin is formed following lung injury and inflammation and may contribute to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrin turnover is altered in patients with pulmonary fibrosis, resulting in intra-alveolar fibrin accumulation, mainly due to decreased fibrinolysis. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC) repair the injured alveolar epithelium by migrating over the provisional fibrin matrix. We hypothesized that repairing alveolar epithelial cells modulate the underlying fibrin matrix by release of fibrinolytic activity, and that the degree of fibrinolysis modulates alveolar epithelial repair on fibrin. To test this hypothesis we studied alveolar epithelial wound repair in vitro using a modified epithelial wound repair model with human A549 alveolar epithelial cells cultured on a fibrin matrix. In presence of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta, wounds increase by 800% in 24 hours mainly due to detachment of the cells, whereas in serum-free medium wound areas decreases by 22.4 +/- 5.2% (p < 0.01). Increased levels of D-dimer, FDP and uPA in the cell supernatant of IL-1beta-stimulated A549 epithelial cells indicate activation of fibrinolysis by activation of the plasmin system. In presence of low concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, including specific blocking anti-uPA antibodies, alveolar epithelial repair in vitro was improved, whereas in presence of high concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, a decrease was observed mainly due to decreased spreading and migration of cells. These findings suggest the existence of a fibrinolytic optimum at which alveolar epithelial repair in vitro is most efficient. In conclusion, uPA released by AEC alters alveolar epithelial repair in vitro by modulating the underlying fibrin matrix.

  3. Review of secondary alveolar cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Cho-Lee, Gui-Youn; García-Díez, Eloy-Miguel; Nunes, Richard-Agostinho; Martí-Pagès, Carles; Sieira-Gil, Ramón; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The alveolar cleft is a bony defect that is present in 75% of the patients with cleft lip and palate. Although secondary alveolar cleft repair is commonly accepted for these patients, nowadays, controversy still remains regarding the surgical technique, the timing of the surgery, the donor site, and whether the use of allogenic materials improve the outcomes. The purpose of the present review was to evaluate the protocol, the surgical technique and the outcomes in a large population of patients with alveolar clefts that underwent secondary alveolar cleft repair. Materials and Methods: A total of 109 procedures in 90 patients with alveolar cleft were identified retrospectively after institutional review board approval was obtained. The patients were treated at a single institution during a period of 10 years (2001-2011). Data were collected regarding demographics, type of cleft, success parameters of the procedure (oronasal fistulae closure, unification of the maxillary segments, eruption and support of anterior teeth, support to the base of the nose, normal ridge form for prosthetic rehabilitation), donor site morbidity, and complications. Pre- and postoperative radiological examination was performed by means of orthopantomogram and computed tomography (CT) scan. Results: The average patient age was 14.2 years (range 4–21.3 years). There were 4 right alveolar-lip clefts, 9 left alveolar-lip clefts, 3 bilateral alveolar-lip clefts, 18 right palate-lip clefts, 40 left palate-lip clefts and 16 bilateral palate-lip clefts. All the success parameters were favorable in 87 patients. Iliac crest bone grafts were employed in all cases. There were three bone graft losses. In three cases, allogenic materials used in a first surgery performed in other centers, underwent infection and lacked consolidation. They were removed and substituted by autogenous iliac crest bone graft. Conclusions: The use of autogenous iliac crest for secondary alveolar bone grafting

  4. Prolonged duration of isoflurane anesthesia impairs spatial recognition memory through the activation of JNK1/2 in the hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Miao, Bei; Chen, Ying

    2017-02-24

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a frequent complication with surgery and anesthesia, and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Our aim was to investigate the effect of different durations of isoflurane anesthesia on spatial recognition memory and activation of JNK1/2 in the hippocampus of mice. In the present study, adult male mice were anesthetized with isoflurane for different durations (1.5% isoflurane for 1, 2, and 4 h). Spatial recognition memory was determined using spontaneous alternation and two-trial recognition memory in Y-maze at 24 h after anesthesia. The activation of JNK1/2 in the hippocampus was tested using western blot. Mice treated with isoflurane for 4 h showed significantly decreased spontaneous alternations and decreased exploration parameters compared with the no anesthesia group, but this was not observed in mice treated with isoflurane for 1 or 2 h. The protein levels of p-JNK1/2 in the hippocampus were significantly increased at 10 min after isoflurane anesthesia for 1, 2, and 4 h compared with no anesthesia. However, only isoflurane anesthesia for 4 h still increased JNK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 levels at 24 h after anesthesia. We concluded that prolonged duration of isoflurane anesthesia maintained the activation of JNK1/2, which led to memory impairment at 24 h after anesthesia.

  5. Crystal structure of isoflurane bound to integrin LFA-1 supports a unified mechanism of volatile anesthetic action in the immune and central nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongmin; Astrof, Nathan S.; Liu, Jin-Huan; Wang, Jia-huai; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2009-09-15

    Volatile anesthetics (VAs), such as isoflurane, induce a general anesthetic state by binding to specific targets (i.e., ion channels) in the central nervous system (CNS). Simultaneously, VAs modulate immune functions, possibly via direct interaction with alternative targets on leukocytes. One such target, the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), has been shown previously to be inhibited by isoflurane. A better understanding of the mechanism by which isoflurane alters protein function requires the detailed information about the drug-protein interaction at an atomic level. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the LFA-1 ligand-binding domain (I domain) in complex with isoflurane at 1.6 {angstrom}. We discovered that isoflurane binds to an allosteric cavity previously implicated as critical for the transition of LFA-1 from the low- to the high-affinity state. The isoflurane binding site in the I domain involves an array of amphiphilic interactions, thereby resembling a 'common anesthetic binding motif' previously predicted for authentic VA binding sites. These results suggest that the allosteric modulation of protein function by isoflurane, as demonstrated for the integrin LFA-1, might represent a unified mechanism shared by the interactions of volatile anesthetics with targets in the CNS. Crystal structure of isoflurane bound to integrin LFA-1 supports a unified mechanism of volatile anesthetic action in the immune and central nervous systems.

  6. Isoflurane unveils a critical role of glutamate transporter type 3 in regulating hippocampal GluR1 trafficking and context-related learning and memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, J; Wang, Z; Mi, W; Zuo, Z

    2014-07-11

    Glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3) may play a role in cognition. Isoflurane enhances EAAT3 trafficking to the plasma membrane. Thus, we used isoflurane to determine how EAAT3 might regulate learning and memory and the trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors, such as GluR1, to the plasma membrane, a fundamental biochemical process for learning and memory. Here, isoflurane increased EAAT3 but did not change GluR1 levels in the plasma membrane of wild-type mouse hippocampus. Isoflurane increased protein phosphatase activity in the wild-type and EAAT3(-/-) mouse hippocampus. Also, isoflurane reduced GluR1 in the plasma membrane and decreased phospho-GluR1 in EAAT3(-/-) mice. The phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid attenuated these effects. Finally, isoflurane inhibited context-related fear conditioning in EAAT3(-/-) mice but not in wild-type mice. Thus, isoflurane may increase GluR1 trafficking to the plasma membrane via EAAT3 and inhibit GluR1 trafficking via protein phosphatase. Lack of EAAT3 effects leads to decreased GluR1 trafficking and impaired cognition after isoflurane exposure in EAAT3(-/-) mice.

  7. Evidence for the Use of Isoflurane as a Replacement for Chloral Hydrate Anesthesia in Experimental Stroke: An Ethical Issue

    PubMed Central

    Maud, Pétrault; Thavarak, Ouk; Cédrick, Lachaud; Michèle, Bastide; Vincent, Bérézowski; Olivier, Pétrault; Régis, Bordet

    2014-01-01

    Since an ethical issue has been raised regarding the use of the well-known anesthetic agent chloral hydrate, owing to its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in animals, attention of neuroscientists has turned to finding out an alternative agent able to meet not only potency, safety, and analgesic efficacy, but also reduced neuroprotective effect for stroke research. The aim of this study was to compare the potential of chloral hydrate and isoflurane for both modulating the action of the experimental neuroprotectant MK801 and exerting analgesia. After middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, no difference was observed in 24 h survival rate, success of ischemia, or infarct volume reduction between both anesthetics. However, isoflurane exerted a more pronounced analgesic effect than chloral hydrate as evidenced by formalin test 3 hours after anesthesia onset, thus encouraging the use of isoflurane in experimental stroke models. PMID:24719888

  8. Isoflurane anesthesia promotes cognitive impairment by inducing expression of β-amyloid protein-related factors in the hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Hu, Xueyuan; Guan, Wei; Luan, Li; Li, Bei; Tang, Qichao; Fan, Honggang

    2017-01-01

    Isoflurane anesthesia has been shown to be responsible for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and development of AD in the older age groups. However, the pathogenesis of AD-related cognitive impairments induced by isoflurane anesthesia remains elusive. Thus, this study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which isoflurane anesthesia caused AD-related cognitive impairments. Aged Wistar rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 12), 1 control group (CONT) and 5 isoflurane treated (ISO) groups (ISO 0, ISO 0.5D, ISO 1D, ISO 3D and ISO 7D). The CONT group inhaled 30% O2 for 2 h without any anesthesia. ISO groups were placed under anesthesia with 3% isoflurane and then exposed to 1.5% isoflurane delivered in 30% O2 for 2 h. Rats in each ISO group were then analyzed immediately (ISO 0) or at various time points (0.5, 1, 3 or 7 day) after this exposure. Cognitive function was assessed using the Morris water maze test. Protein levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-site APP cleavage enzyme-1 (BACE-1) and Aβ42 peptide were analyzed in hippocampal samples by Western blot. β-Amyloid (Abeta) plaques were detected in hippocampal sections by Congo red staining. Compared with controls, all ISO groups showed increased escape latency and impaired spatial memory. Isoflurane increased APP mRNA expression and APP protein depletion, promoting Aβ42 overproduction, oligomerization and accumulation. However, isoflurane did not affect BACE-1 expression. Abeta plaques were observed only in those ISO groups sacrificed at 3 or 7 d. Our data indicate that aged rats exposed to isoflurane had increased APP mRNA expression and APP protein depletion, with Aβ42 peptide overproduction and oligomerization, resulting in formation of Abeta plaques in the hippocampus. Such effects might have contributed to cognitive impairments, including in spatial memory, observed in these rats after isoflurane anesthesia.

  9. Prostate cancer cell malignancy via modulation of HIF-1α pathway with isoflurane and propofol alone and in combination

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H; Benzonana, L L; Zhao, H; Watts, H R; Perry, N J S; Bevan, C; Brown, R; Ma, D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Surgery is considered to be the first line treatment for solid tumours. Recently, retrospective studies reported that general anaesthesia was associated with worse long-term cancer-free survival when compared with regional anaesthesia. This has important clinical implications; however, the mechanisms underlying those observations remain unclear. We aim to investigate the effect of anaesthetics isoflurane and propofol on prostate cancer malignancy. Methods: Prostate cancer (PC3) cell line was exposed to commonly used anaesthetic isoflurane and propofol. Malignant potential was assessed through evaluation of expression level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and its downstream effectors, cell proliferation and migration as well as development of chemoresistance. Results: We demonstrated that isoflurane, at a clinically relevant concentration induced upregulation of HIF-1α and its downstream effectors in PC3 cell line. Consequently, cancer cell characteristics associated with malignancy were enhanced, with an increase of proliferation and migration, as well as development of chemoresistance. Inhibition of HIF-1α neosynthesis through upper pathway blocking by a PI-3K-Akt inhibitor or HIF-1α siRNA abolished isoflurane-induced effects. In contrast, the intravenous anaesthetic propofol inhibited HIF-1α activation induced by hypoxia or CoCl2. Propofol also prevented isoflurane-induced HIF-1α activation, and partially reduced cancer cell malignant activities. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that modulation of HIF-1α activity by anaesthetics may affect cancer recurrence following surgery. If our data were to be extrapolated to the clinical setting, isoflurane but not propofol should be avoided for use in cancer surgery. Further work involving in vivo models and clinical trials is urgently needed to determine the optimal anaesthetic regimen for cancer patients. PMID:25072260

  10. Dose-dependent effects of the clinical anesthetic isoflurane on Octopus vulgaris: a contribution to cephalopod welfare.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Winlow, William; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in animal welfare legislation relating to invertebrates has provoked interest in methods for the anesthesia of cephalopods, for which different approaches to anesthesia have been tried but in most cases without truly anesthetizing the animals. For example, several workers have used muscle relaxants or hypothermia as forms of "anesthesia." Several inhalational anesthetics are known to act in a dose-dependent manner on the great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, a pulmonate mollusk. Here we report, for the first time, on the effects of clinical doses of the well-known inhalational clinical anesthetic isoflurane on the behavioral responses of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris. In each experiment, isoflurane was equilibrated into a well-aerated seawater bath containing a single adult O. vulgaris. Using a web camera, we recorded each animal's response to touch stimuli eliciting withdrawal of the arms and siphon and observed changes in the respiratory rate and the chromatophore pattern over time (before, during, and after application of the anesthetic). We found that different animals of the same size responded with similar behavioral changes as the isoflurane concentration was gradually increased. After gradual application of 2% isoflurane for a maximum of 5 min (at which time all the responses indicated deep anesthesia), the animals recovered within 45-60 min in fresh aerated seawater. Based on previous findings in gastropods, we believe that the process of anesthesia induced by isoflurane is similar to that previously observed in Lymnaea. In this study we showed that isoflurane is a good, reversible anesthetic for O. vulgaris, and we developed a method for its use.

  11. A New Device for Alveolar Bone Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Omar; Pérez, Daniel; Páramo, Viviana; Falcón, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    We present a retrospective review of a new technique for the transportation of alveolar bone using a Hyrax device modified by the principal author (O.A.V.). There were seven patients (five males and two females), including five patients with cleft palate and lip diagnosis, one patient with a high-speed gunshot wound, and one patient with facial trauma sequel due to mandibular fracture. They were all treated with an alveolar bone transportation technique (ABT) through the use of the modified Hyrax device (VEGAX). Before surgery, distraction osteogenesis of the bifocal type was performed on four patients, and the trifocal type was performed on the other three patients. However, in one case, direct dental anchorage was not used, only orthodontic appliances. In all the cases, new bone formation and gingival tissue around the defect were obtained, posterior to the alveolar distraction process; no complications were observed in any patient. In one case, two teeth involved in the disk of the ABT were extracted, due to a previous condition of periodontal disease. The alveolar bone transport with the VEGAX device is an accessible technique for almost every patient with alveolar defects due to diverse causes. In all the presented cases, predictability and success were demonstrated. PMID:22655120

  12. Labour time required for piglet castration with isoflurane-anaesthesia using shared and stationary inhaler devices.

    PubMed

    Weber, Sabrina; Das, Gürbüz; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Gauly, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Isoflurane-anaesthesia combined with an analgesic represents a welfare-friendly method of pain mitigation for castration of piglets. However, it requires an inhaler device, which is uneconomic for small farms. Sharing a device among farms may be an economical option if the shared use does not increase labour time and the resulting costs. This study aimed to investigate the amount and components of labour time required for piglet castration with isoflurane anaesthesia performed with stationary and shared devices. Piglets (N = 1579) were anaesthetised with isoflurane (using either stationary or shared devices) and castrated.The stationary devices were used in a group (n = 5) of larger farms (84 sows/farm on an average), whereas smaller farms (n = 7; 32 sows/farm on an average) shared one device. Each farm was visited four times and labour time for each process-step was recorded. The complete process included machine set-up, anaesthesia and castration by a practitioner, and preparation, collection and transport of piglets by a farmer. Labour time of the complete process was increased (P = 0.012) on farms sharing a device (266 s/piglet) compared to farms using stationary devices (177 s/ piglet), due to increased time for preparation (P = 0.055), castration (P = 0.026) and packing (P = 0.010) when sharing a device. However, components of the time budget of farms using stationary or shared devices did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Cost arising from time spent by farmers did not differ considerably between the use of stationary (0.28 Euro per piglet) and shared (0.26 Euro) devices. It is concluded that costs arising from the increased labour time due to sharing a device can be considered marginal, since the high expenses originating from purchasing an inhaler device are shared among several farms.

  13. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injury after Mandibular Third Molar Extraction: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to systematically review the comprehensive overview of literature data about injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction to discover the prevalence of injury, the risk factors, recovery rates, and alternative methods of treatment. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic databases. Articles from January 2009 to June 2014 were searched. English language articles with a minimum of 6 months patient follow-up and injury analysis by patient’s reporting, radiographic, and neurosensory testing were selected. Results In total, 84 literature sources were reviewed, and 14 of the most relevant articles that are suitable to the criteria were selected. Articles were analyzed on men and women. The influence of lower third molar extraction (especially impacted) on the inferior alveolar nerve was clearly seen. Conclusions The incidence of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction was about 0.35 - 8.4%. The injury of the inferior alveolar nerve can be predicted by various radiological signs. There are few risk factors that may increase the risk of injury to the nerve such as patients over the age of 24 years old, with horizontal impactions, and extraction by trainee surgeons. Recovery is preferable and permanent injury is very rare. PMID:25635208

  14. Isoflurane to prolong medetomidine/ ketamine anaesthesia in six adult female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Adams, W A; Robinson, K J; Jones, R S; Sanderson, S

    2003-01-04

    Six adult female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) were anaesthetised for the placement of intrauterine contraceptive devices, microchips for identification, routine blood sampling, and physical measurements. Anaesthesia was induced with medetomidine in combination with ketamine administered by intramuscular injection with a projectile syringe. Induction was smooth and rapid, but five of the animals were insufficiently relaxed for orotracheal intubation. The plane of anaesthesia was deepened by administering isoflurane delivered in oxygen and nitrous oxide, and general anaesthesia was maintained for up to 74 minutes. The action of medetomidine was reversed at the end of each procedure with atipamezole, and the animals recovered smoothly and uneventfully.

  15. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  16. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  17. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  18. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, M. Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Patel, Vipul J.; Walia, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  19. Idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with diffuse alveolar damage.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-S; Chen, T-L; Tzen, C-Y; Lin, F-J; Peng, M-J; Wu, C-L; Chen, P-J

    2002-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with myositis is defined by the presence of interstitial changes on radiographic examination. The reported prevalence of ILD varies from 0% to nearly 50%. However, only rarely has the pathological pattern of diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) associated with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) been reported. We report five patients with IIM (one with dermatomyositis, one with polymyositis, and three with amyopathic dermatomyositis) and respiratory failure. Four underwent open lung biopsy with pathological proof of diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Despite intensive immunosuppressive therapy, all of them died. In addition to the case reports, we discuss DAD in patients with IIM.

  20. Isoflurane waste anesthetic gas concentrations associated with the open-drop method.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas K; Mook, Deborah M

    2009-01-01

    The open-drop technique is used frequently for anesthetic delivery to small rodents. Operator exposure to waste anesthetic gas (WAG) is a potential occupational hazard if this method is used without WAG scavenging. This study was conducted to determine whether administration of isoflurane by the open-drop technique without exposure controls generates significant WAG concentrations. We placed 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 ml of liquid isoflurane into screw-top 500 or 1000 ml glass jars. WAG concentration was measured at the opening of the container and 20 and 40 cm from the opening, a distance at which users likely would operate, at 1, 2, or 3 min WAG was measured by using a portable infrared gas analyzer. Mean WAG concentrations at the vessel opening were as high as 662 +/- 168 ppm with a 500 ml jar and 122 +/- 87 ppm with a 1000 ml jar. At operator levels, WAG concentrations were always at or near 0 ppm. For measurements made at the vessel opening, time was the only factor that significantly affected WAG concentration when using the 500 ml jar. Neither time nor liquid volume were significant factors when using 1000 ml jar. At all liquid volumes and time points, the WAG concentration associated with using the 500 ml container was marginally to significantly greater than that for the 1000 ml jar.

  1. [Recovery of psychomotor and cognitive functions following anesthesia. Propofol/alfentanil and thiopental/isoflurane/ alfentanil].

    PubMed

    Schwender, D; Müller, A; Madler, M; Faber-Züllig, E; Ilmberger, J

    1993-09-01

    Recent changes in the medical system have resulted in a significant increase of ambulatory surgical procedures. Therefore, a safe and short postoperative recovery period and, especially, the full recovery of complex psychological function after general anaesthesia have become increasingly important. In the present study we investigated the recovery of psychomotor and cognitive function after general anaesthesia with propofol/alfentanil and thiopentone/isoflurane/alfentanil. PATIENTS AND METHODS. Institutional approval and informed consent was obtained in 40 female ASA I or II patients undergoing diagnostic laparoscopy. As oral premedication the patients received chloracepat (10-20 mg) 45 min before the start of anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced in group I with propofol (2.5 mg/kg) and maintained with propofol (6-12 mg/kg/h)/alfentanil (0.05 mg/kg) and 50% N2O in O2. The patients of group II received thiopentone (5 mg/kg) for induction and isoflurane (0.5-1.5 vol%)/alfentanil (0.05 mg/kg) and 50% N2O in O2 for maintenance of general anaesthesia. In particular we measured the following parameters: (1) The recovery time, defined as the interval between the termination of the anesthetic and the patient's correct recall of her birth date. (2) The choice reaction times to optical stimuli (red or green light), which was used as a parameter for attention and psychomotor function. (3) The score in the "Zahlen-Verbindungs-Test" in which the patients had to connect numbers from 1 to 90 in correct order. This is also a parameter to quantify attention and psychomotor function. (4) The digit span which is a value derived from the number of correctly reproduced digits from a list presented to the patients. It is a measure of numerical memory. (5) The Munich Verbal Learning Test, which is the German version of the California Verbal Learning Test. It represents the number of correctly reproduced words from a previously presented list and is a measure of the verbal memory. (6

  2. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after exposure to sevoflurane and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Vrbanović Mijatović, Vilena; Šerman, Ljiljana; Gamulin, Ozren

    2017-02-21

    Pulmonary surfactant, consisting primarily of phospholipids and four surfactant-specific proteins, is among the first structures that is exposed to inhalation anesthetics. Consequently, changes of pulmonary surfactant due to this exposure could cause respiratory complications after long anesthetic procedures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to explore the effects of two inhalation anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, on a commercially available pulmonary surfactant. The research was primarily focused on the effect of anesthetics on the lipid component of the surfactant. Four different concentrations of anesthetics were added, and the doses were higher from the low clinical doses typically used. Recorded spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis, and the Student's t-test was performed to confirm the results. The exposure to both anesthetics induced similar changes, consistent with the increase of the anesthetic concentration. The most pronounced effect was on the hydrophilic head group of phospholipids, which is in agreement with the disruption of the hydrogen bond, caused by the anesthetics. A change in the band intensities of CH2 stretching vibrations, indicative of a disordering effect of anesthetics on the hydrophobic tails of phospholipids, was also observed. Changes induced by isoflurane appear to be more pronounced than those induced by sevoflurane. Furthermore, our results suggest that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool in studying anesthetic effects on pulmonary surfactant.

  3. Isoflurane and desflurane at clinically relevant concentrations induce amyloid {beta}-peptide oligomerization: An NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Pravat K Fodale, Vincenzo

    2009-02-13

    Current understanding on Alzheimer's disease (AD) reveals that soluble amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) oligomeric formation plays an important role in AD pathophysiology. A potential role for several inhaled anesthetics in promoting A{beta} oligomer formation has been suggested. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, we previously demonstrated that at a high concentration (higher than clinically relevant concentrations), the inhaled anesthetics halothane and isoflurane, interact with specific amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31) and induce A{beta} oligomerization. The present study confirms this is true at a clinically relevant concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane induce A{beta} oligomerization by inducing chemical shift changes of the critical amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31), reinforcing the evidence that perturbation of these three crucial residues indeed plays an important role in oligomerization. These findings support the emerging hypothesis that several commonly used inhaled anesthetics could be involved in neurodegeneration, as well as risk factor for accelerating the onset of AD.

  4. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after exposure to sevoflurane and isoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Mijatović, Vilena Vrbanović; Šerman, Ljiljana; Gamulin, Ozren

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, consisting primarily of phospholipids and four surfactant-specific proteins, is among the first structures that is exposed to inhalation anesthetics. Consequently, changes of pulmonary surfactant due to this exposure could cause respiratory complications after long anesthetic procedures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to explore the effects of two inhalation anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, on a commercially available pulmonary surfactant. The research was primarily focused on the effect of anesthetics on the lipid component of the surfactant. Four different concentrations of anesthetics were added, and the doses were higher from the low clinical doses typically used. Recorded spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis, and the Student’s t-test was performed to confirm the results. The exposure to both anesthetics induced similar changes, consistent with the increase of the anesthetic concentration. The most pronounced effect was on the hydrophilic head group of phospholipids, which is in agreement with the disruption of the hydrogen bond, caused by the anesthetics. A change in the band intensities of CH2 stretching vibrations, indicative of a disordering effect of anesthetics on the hydrophobic tails of phospholipids, was also observed. Changes induced by isoflurane appear to be more pronounced than those induced by sevoflurane. Furthermore, our results suggest that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool in studying anesthetic effects on pulmonary surfactant. PMID:28027455

  5. Propofol Compared to Isoflurane Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Immature Swine Cerebral Cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, D. B.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-08

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in an immature swine model anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery in order to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared-spectroscopy. Compared to isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol also decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked accumulation of lactate. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype which resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations which typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may play a role in neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain.

  6. Isoflurane induces a protein kinase C alpha-dependent increase in cell-surface protein level and activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2005-05-01

    Glutamate transporters regulate extracellular concentrations of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. We have shown that the commonly used anesthetic isoflurane increased the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 (excitatory amino acid transporter 3, EAAT3) possibly via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. In this study, we showed that isoflurane induced a time- and concentration-dependent redistribution of EAAT3 to the cell membrane in C6 glioma cells. This redistribution was inhibited by staurosporine, a pan PKC inhibitor, or by 12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12,13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Go6976) at a concentration that selectively inhibits conventional PKC isozymes (PKC alpha, -beta, and -gamma). This isoflurane-induced EAAT3 redistribution was also blocked when the expression of PKC alpha but not PKC beta proteins was down-regulated by the respective antisense oligonucleotides. The isoflurane-induced increase of glutamate uptake by EAAT3 was abolished by the down-regulation of PKC alpha expression. Immunoprecipitation with an anti-EAAT3 antibody pulled down more PKC alpha in cells exposed to isoflurane than in control cells. Isoflurane also increased the phosphorylated EAAT3 and the redistribution of PKC alpha to the particulate fraction of cells. Consistent with the results in C6 cells, isoflurane also increased EAAT3 cell-surface expression and enhanced the association of PKC alpha with EAAT3 in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Our results suggest that the isoflurane-induced increase in EAAT3 activity requires an increased amount of EAAT3 protein in the plasma membrane. These effects are PKC alpha-dependent and may rely on the formation of an EAAT3-PKC alpha complex. Together, these results suggest an important mechanism for the regulation of glutamate transporter functions and expand our understanding of isoflurane pharmacology at cellular and molecular levels.

  7. Blood -brain barrier disruption was less under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia via a PI3K/Akt pathway in early cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Mellender, Scott J; Kiss, Geza K; Liu, Xia; Weiss, Harvey R

    2017-02-24

    One of the important factors altering the degree of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in cerebral ischemia is the anesthetic used. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway has been reported to be involved in modulating BBB permeability and in isoflurane induced neuroprotection. This study was performed to compare the degree of BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia under isoflurane vs pentobarbital anesthesia and to determine whether inhibition of PI3K/Akt would affect the disruption in the early stage of focal cerebral ischemia. Permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion was performed in rats under 1.4% isoflurane or pentobarbital (50mg/kg i.p.) anesthesia with controlled ventilation. In half of each group LY294002, which is a PI3K/Akt inhibitor, was applied on the ischemic cortex immediately after MCA occlusion. After one hour of MCA occlusion, the transfer coefficient (Ki) of (14)C-α-aminoisobutyric acid ((14)C-AIB) was determined to quantify the degree of BBB disruption. MCA occlusion increased the Ki both in the isoflurane and pentobarbital anesthetized rats. However, the value of Ki was lower under isoflurane (11.5±6.0μL/g/min) than under pentobarbital (18.3±7.1μL/g/min) anesthesia. The Ki of the contralateral cortex of the pentobarbital group was higher (+74%) than that of the isoflurane group. Application of LY294002 on the ischemic cortex increased the Ki (+99%) only in the isoflurane group. The degree of BBB disruption by MCA occlusion was significantly lower under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. Our data demonstrated the importance of choice of anesthetics and suggest that PI3K/Akt signaling pathway plays a significant role in altering BBB disruption in cerebral ischemia during isoflurane but not during pentobarbital anesthesia.

  8. Short-Term Effects of Ketamine and Isoflurane on Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction in an Experimental Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wessler, Benjamin; Madias, Christopher; Pandian, Natesa; Link, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Background. General anesthesia is an essential element of experimental medical procedures. Ketamine and isoflurane are agents commonly used to induce and maintain anesthesia in animals. The cardiovascular effects of these anesthetic agents are diverse, and the response of global myocardial function is unknown. Methods. In a series of 15 swine, echocardiography measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were obtained before the animals received anesthesia (baseline), after an intramuscular injection of ketamine (postketamine) and after inhaled isoflurane (postisoflurane). Results. The mean LVEF of an unanesthetized swine was 47 ± 3%. There was a significant decrease in the mean LVEF after administration of ketamine to 41 + 6.5% (P = 0.003). The addition of inhaled isoflurane did not result in further decrease in mean LVEF (mean LVEF 38 ± 7.2%, P = 0.22). Eight of the swine had an increase in their LVEF with sympathetic stimulation. Conclusions. In our experimental model the administration of ketamine was associated with decreased LV function. The decrease may be largely secondary to a blunting of sympathetic tone. The addition of isoflurane to ketamine did not significantly change LV function. A significant number of animals had returned to preanesthesia LV function with sympathetic stimulation. PMID:22347646

  9. Effect of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the magnitude and time course of neuromuscular block produced by vecuronium, pancuronium and atracurium.

    PubMed

    Vanlinthout, L E; Booij, L H; van Egmond, J; Robertson, E N

    1996-03-01

    We have compared the ability of equipotent concentrations of isoflurane and sevoflurane to enhance the effect of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs. Ninety ASA I and II patients of both sexes, aged 18-50 yr, were stratified into three blocker groups (Vec, Pan and Atr), to undergo neuromuscular block with vecuronium (n = 30), pancuronium (n = 30) or atracurium (n = 30), respectively. Within each group, patients were allocated randomly to one of three anaesthetic subgroups to undergo maintenance of anaesthesia with: (1) alfentanil-nitrous oxide-oxygen (n = 10); (2) alfentanil-nitrous oxide-oxygen-isoflurane (n = 10); or (3) alfentanil-nitrous oxide-oxygen-sevoflurane (n = 10) anaesthesia. During maintenance of anaesthesia, end-tidal concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and nitrous oxide were 0.95, 1.70 and 70%, respectively. Both the evoked integrated electromyogram and mechanomyogram of the adductor pollicis brevis muscle were measured simultaneously. In the Vec and Pan groups, a total dose of 40 micrograms kg-1 of vecuronium or pancuronium, respectively, was given, and in the Atr group a total dose of atracurium 100 micrograms kg-1. Each blocker was given in four equal doses and administered cumulatively. We showed that 0.95% isoflurane and 1.70% sevoflurane (corresponding to 0.8 MAC of each inhalation anaesthetic, omitting the MAC contribution of nitrous oxide) augmented and prolonged the neuromuscular block produced by vecuronium, pancuronium and atracurium to a similar degree.

  10. Time Course of Isoflurane-Induced Vasodilation: A Doppler Ultrasound Study of the Left Coronary Artery in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lenzarini, Francesca; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Faita, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Isoflurane is widely used as vasodilator in studies of coronary flow reserve (CFR) in small animals, but the protocols have not been standardized. This study assessed the time course of the increase in isoflurane-induced flow in the mouse coronary artery by pulsed-wave Doppler measurements at 1% isoflurane concentration maintained for 6 min and then increased to 2.5% for 30 min. Velocity-time integral and velocity peak values were best fitted by the sigmoid model, which allowed derivation of the mean time (Tt90 = 14 min) of high-isoflurane needed to reach 90% of the hyperemic plateau value. In subsequent experiments, CFR was measured at 4 min (mean time of literature data) and 14 min of hyperemic response. The 4-min CFR was significantly lower than the 14 -min CFR, and the Bland-Altman plot revealed significant bias of the 4-min CFR against the 14-min CFR. This result suggests that measurements of flow velocity at times shorter than 14 min may be inappropriate for expressing the effective value of CFR.

  11. Occupational exposure to isoflurane during anaesthesia induction with standard and scavenging double masks in dogs, pigs and ponies.

    PubMed

    Säre, H; Ambrisko, T D; Moens, Y

    2011-07-01

    Induction of anaesthesia using a face mask may cause workplace pollution with anaesthetics. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the use of a standard versus a scavenging double face mask on isoflurane pollution during induction of anaesthesia in experimental animals: six dogs, 12 pigs and five ponies. Pigs were anaesthetized only once using either mask type randomly (n = 6). Dogs and ponies were anaesthetized twice, using different mask types for each occasion in a random order with at least 14 days between experiments. The masks were attached to a Bain breathing system (dogs and pigs) or to a circle system (ponies) using a fresh gas flow of 300 or 50 mL/kg/min, respectively, with 5% vaporizer dial setting. Isoflurane concentrations were measured in the anaesthetist's breathing zone using an infrared photoacoustic spectrometer. The peak isoflurane concentrations (pollution) during baseline and induction periods were compared with Wilcoxon test in all species, and values between the mask types were compared with either Wilcoxon (ponies and dogs) or Mann-Whitney tests (pigs) (P < 0.05). Pollution was higher during induction when compared with baseline regardless of the mask type used but it was only statistically significant in dogs and pigs. Pollution was lower during induction with double versus single masks but it was only significant in pigs. Despite the lack of statistical significance, large and consistent differences were noted in all species, hence using scavenging masks is recommended to reduce isoflurane workplace pollution.

  12. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  13. Isoflurane leakage from non-rebreathing rodent anaesthesia circuits: comparison of emissions from conventional and modified ports.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Bolon, B

    2006-04-01

    Chronic exposure to low levels of fluorocarbon-based waste anaesthetic gas (WAG) has been linked to a multitude of human health problems. We have shown that isoflurane exhaust from passive gas-scavenging canisters is often quite high when using conventional rodent anaesthesia protocols and equipment. Another likely source of WAG build-up in rodent procedure rooms is leakage at the interface between the breathing circuit and the animal's face. We evaluated this possibility using three non-rebreathing circuits: traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson (type E). For the Mapleson E circuit, a conical rodent facemask was attached and used in one of two configurations: normal aperture, or aperture modified with a latex diaphragm (cut from an unpowdered surgical glove) to reduce the orifice diameter and tighten the seal. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with isoflurane (5% for induction, 2% or 3.5% for maintenance) in oxygen (2 L/min for induction, 1 L/min for maintenance). Isoflurane leakage was assessed by real-time spectrophotometry. In 94% of the trials, three configurations - traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson E with unmodified mask - permitted isoflurane leakage approaching or exceeding 100 ppm at the face/port interface. In contrast, the Mapleson circuit with diaphragm-modified mask emitted significantly (Pisoflurane (peak of 9.5+/-1.7 ppm [mean+/-standard error]). These data indicate that (1) WAG leakage from standard rodent non-rebreathing circuits is substantial, and that (2) a simple, rapid, and economical modification to a conventional rodent facemask can significantly reduce WAG exposure to workers performing many rodent anaesthesia procedures in one session.

  14. Differential effects of hyperventilation on cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation during sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hinohara, Hiroshi; Kadoi, Yuji; Ide, Masanobu; Kuroda, Masataka; Saito, Shigeru; Mizutani, Akio

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of increase in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation when modulating hyperventilation during orthopedic surgery under sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol anesthesia. Twenty-four patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery were randomly divided into sevoflurane, isoflurane, and propofol groups. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol administration with 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide at anesthetic drug concentrations adequate to maintain bispectral values between 45 and 50. A 2.0-MHz transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the temporal window, and mean blood flow velocity in the MCA (V (mca)) was continuously measured. The extremity was exsanguinated with an Esmarch bandage, and the pneumatic tourniquet was inflated to a pressure of 450 mmHg. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, V (mca) and arterial blood gases were measured every minute for 10 min after release of the tourniquet in all three groups. Immediately after tourniquet release, the patients' respiratory rates were increased to tightly maintain end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO(2)) at 35 mmHg. No change in partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO(2)) was observed pre- and posttourniquet deflation in any of the three groups. Increase in V (mca) in the isoflurane group was greater than that in the other two groups after tourniquet deflation. In addition, during the study period, no difference in V (mca) after tourniquet deflation was observed between the propofol and sevoflurane groups. Hyperventilation could prevent an increase in V (mca) in the propofol and sevoflurane groups after tourniquet deflation. However, hyperventilation could not prevent an increase in V (mca) in the isoflurane group.

  15. Differential increases in blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery after tourniquet deflation during sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, Y; Kawauchi, C H; Ide, M; Saito, S; Mizutani, A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the comparative effects of sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol on cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation during orthopaedic surgery. Thirty patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery were randomly divided into sevoflurane, isoflurane and propofol groups. Anaesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol infusion in 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide, in whatever concentrations were necessary to keep bispectral index values between 45 and 50. Ventilatory rate or tidal volume was adjusted to target PaCO2 of 35 mmHg. A 2.0 MHz transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the temporal window and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery was continuously measured. The extremity was exsanguinated with an Esmarch bandage and the pneumatic tourniquet was inflated to a pressure of 450 mmHg. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, velocity in the middle cerebral artery and arterial blood gas analysis were measured every minute for 10 minutes after release of the tourniquet in all three groups. Velocity in the middle cerebral artery in the three groups increased for five minutes after tourniquet deflation. Because of the different cerebrovascular effects of the three agents, the degree of increase in flow velocity in the isoflurane group was greater than in the other two groups, the change in flow velocity in the propofol group being the lowest (at three minutes after deflation 40 +/- 7%, 32 +/- 6% and 28 +/- 10% in the isoflurane, sevoflurane and propofol groups respectively, P < 0.05).

  16. Alveolar Bone Fracture: Pathognomonic Sign for Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Peled, Eli; Norman, Doron; Lin, Shaul

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Dental injuries, especially luxation and avulsion, are common. Dental trauma can cause alveolar bone fracture that can lead to tooth loss and malocclusion. Single tooth alveolar bone fractures are difficult to identify unless it protrudes through the overlying mucosa and can be visualized. Pain, malocclusion, and tooth mobility provide signs of suspected alveolar bone fractures. Integrity of the proximate alveolar bone should be examined for fractures where avulsion, luxation, or other tooth trauma is detected. Any suggestion of alveolar fractures should be further investigated with an appropriate radiograph. Summary: This case report shows a pathognomonic sign that detects and diagnosis single tooth alveolar bone fractures, i.e., a localized hematoma crossing the attached gingiva from the free gingival margin to the vestibular mucosa. This should serve as a warning for localized alveolar bone fracture. A visualized hematoma and gentle, careful palpation may help detect covered fractures when the overlying mucosa is not perforated.

  17. 2011 Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Arctic sea ice from March 7, 2011, to Sept. 9, 2011, ending with a comparison of the 30-year average minimum extent, shown in yellow, and the Northwest Passage, in red. (no audio) ...

  18. Critical role of serine 465 in isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Feng, Xiaorong; Sando, Julianne J; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-12-15

    Glutamate transporters (also called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs) bind extracellular glutamate and transport it to intracellular space to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. We previously showed that isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, enhanced the activity of EAAT3, a major neuronal EAAT. This effect required a protein kinase C (PKC) alpha-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. In this study, we prepared COS7 cells stably expressing EAAT3 with or without mutations of potential PKC phosphorylation sites in the putative intracellular domains. Here we report that mutation of threonine 5 or threonine 498 to alanine did not affect the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. However, the mutation of serine 465 to alanine abolished isoflurane-induced increase of EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane. The mutation of serine 465 to aspartic acid increased the expression of EAAT3 in the plasma membrane and also abolished the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. These results suggest an essential role of serine 465 in the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution and a direct effect of PKC on EAAT3. Consistent with these results, isoflurane induced an increase in phosphorylation of wild type, T5A, and T498A EAAT3, and this increase was absent in S465A and S465D. Our current results, together with our previous data that showed the involvement of PKCalpha in the isoflurane effects on EAAT3, suggest that the phosphorylation of serine 465 in EAAT3 by PKCalpha mediates the increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to plasma membrane after isoflurane exposure.

  19. Alveolar distraction osteogenesis for implant site development.

    PubMed

    Batal, Hussam S; Cottrell, David A

    2004-02-01

    Alveolar distraction osteogenesis can be a valuable tool for implant site development. Simultaneous regeneration of hard and soft tissue and an overall decrease in treatment time compared with other methods of site preparation can be an advantage. The authors advocate the concept of "prosthetically driven alveolar distraction." Surgical planning should begin with visualization of the final restoration to determine the volume and position of the soft and hard tissue deficiency. Surgical guides will help the surgeon determine the vector of distraction. Adherence to surgical principles to avoid damage to adjacent vital structures and maintain vascular supply to the transport segment is necessary for success. Bone grafting may be necessary before or after distraction to increase the surgical success of the procedure. Close follow-up is needed to verify the appropriate distraction vector and volume. Patient management and acceptance should be considered in distractor design and placement.

  20. Dephasing and diffusion on the alveolar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschle, L. R.; Kurz, F. T.; Kampf, T.; Wagner, W. L.; Duerr, J.; Stiller, W.; Konietzke, P.; Wünnemann, F.; Mall, M. A.; Wielpütz, M. O.; Schlemmer, H. P.; Ziener, C. H.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a surface model of spin dephasing in lung tissue that includes both susceptibility and diffusion effects to provide a closed-form solution of the Bloch-Torrey equation on the alveolar surface. The nonlocal susceptibility effects of the model are validated against numerical simulations of spin dephasing in a realistic lung tissue geometry acquired from synchotron-based μ CT data sets of mouse lung tissue, and against simulations in the well-known Wigner-Seitz model geometry. The free induction decay is obtained in dependence on microscopic tissue parameters and agrees very well with in vivo lung measurements at 1.5 Tesla to allow a quantification of the local mean alveolar radius. Our results are therefore potentially relevant for the clinical diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases.

  1. Rare lung diseases II: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed. PMID:18551202

  2. Treatment of Adult Primary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the distal air spaces and terminal bronchi, which may lead to impaired gas exchange. This accumulation of surfactant is due to decreased clearance by the alveolar macrophages. Its primary, most common form, is currently considered an autoimmune disease. Better knowledge of the causes of PAP have led to the emergence of alternatives to whole lung lavage, although this is still considered the treatment of choice. Most studies are case series, often with limited patient numbers, so the level of evidence is low. Since the severity of presentation and clinical course are variable, not all patients will require treatment. Due to the low level of evidence, some objective criteria based on expert opinion have been arbitrarily proposed in an attempt to define in which patients it is best to initiate treatment.

  3. Endoscopic sensing of alveolar pH

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, D.; Tanner, M. G.; McAughtrie, S.; Yu, F.; Mills, B.; Choudhary, T. R.; Seth, S.; Craven, T. H.; Stone, J. M.; Mati, I. K.; Campbell, C. J.; Bradley, M.; Williams, C. K. I.; Dhaliwal, K.; Birks, T. A.; Thomson, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Previously unobtainable measurements of alveolar pH were obtained using an endoscope-deployable optrode. The pH sensing was achieved using functionalized gold nanoshell sensors and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The optrode consisted of an asymmetric dual-core optical fiber designed for spatially separating the optical pump delivery and signal collection, in order to circumvent the unwanted Raman signal generated within the fiber. Using this approach, we demonstrate a ~100-fold increase in SERS signal-to-fiber background ratio, and demonstrate multiple site pH sensing with a measurement accuracy of ± 0.07 pH units in the respiratory acini of an ex vivo ovine lung model. We also demonstrate that alveolar pH changes in response to ventilation. PMID:28101415

  4. [Alveolar haemorrhage following a cannabis water pipe].

    PubMed

    Moatemri, Z; Zaibi, H; Dabboussi, S; Mhamedi, S; Aichaouia, C; Khadhraoui, M; Cheikh, R

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory toxicity of cannabis is well-known today particularly with the new consumption patterns. We report the case of a 25-year-old man admitted for haemoptysis, with unfavourable outcome and acute respiratory failure. Various explorations concluded to acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. Etiological assessment was initially negative. Outcome was favourable during hospitalization, authorizing the discharge of our patient. Two days later, alveolar haemorrhage recur, with positive toxicological tests for cannabis and the patient admits smoking cannabis by plastic "bang". We illustrate, through this case, the severity of respiratory complications caused by new methods of using cannabis, particularly with plastic 'bang', hence the need to insist of the importance of supported withdrawal and to inform young people how these techniques are serious.ssss.

  5. Effects of Live-Trapping and Isoflurane Anesthesia on Free-Ranging American Martens (Martes americana).

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Maria C; Muller, Lisa I; Keenlance, Paul; Sanders, Robert L; Witt, Jill C; Miller, Debra L

    2017-02-23

    Seventy-two free-ranging American martens ( Martes americana ) in Michigan were immobilized using isoflurane from 2011 to 2015. In total, 129 anesthetic procedures were performed with no mortalities. Hypothermia and hyperthermia were the most common anesthetic complications, and the mean rectal temperatures were significantly higher during summer than in winter. Dental abnormalities were common; the majority of abnormal findings were broken or discolored teeth attributed to previous dental trauma and were not trap-induced. Blood (n=72) was analyzed from 53 martens for venous blood gas, lactate, hematocrit, and/or selected serum biochemistry analytes. Lactate concentration was measured by two different devices (VetScan i-STAT 1 and Lactate Plus) and compared for clinical agreement for 26 samples. Both methods for lactate measurement provided statistically similar results. Using domestic feline reference ranges, the acid-base status and relative arterial oxygen saturation of anesthetized martens in this study were normal as determined by blood pH and pulse oximetry, respectively. Serum biochemistry parameters, multiple environmental parameters, and marten-specific attributes were evaluated for their influence on lactate in American martens using linear regression and an information-theoretic approach with model averaging. Blood urea nitrogen was in all of the top models and was positively related to lactate (ß=0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.00-0.04). Initial body temperature, ambient temperature, and time from trap discovery until immobilization of martens were informative predictors for lactate level. Recommendations for the live-trapping and isoflurane anesthesia of free-ranging martens include using caution during warmer summer months, minimizing disturbance prior to induction, monitoring lactate in addition to vital rates, and being prepared to prevent or treat both hypothermia and hyperthermia during any time of year.

  6. Isoflurane Promotes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Malignancy by Activating the Akt-Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhua; Shao, Xueqian

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortalities worldwide, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Surgery remains one of the front-line treatment options for NSCLC, but events within the perioperative period were found to affect cancer prognosis, such as anesthesia procedures. Isoflurane, a commonly used volatile anesthetic, enhances the malignant potential of renal, prostate, and ovarian cancer cells, but its effects on NSCLC development have not been previously reported. Material/Methods CCK-8 and MTT cell proliferation assays were used to analyze NSCLC cell proliferation. Metastatic ability was examined by wound healing and transwell assays. We used Western blot analysis to study the mechanism of effect of Isoflurane in NSCLC development. Results We demonstrated that isoflurane promotes proliferation, migration and invasiveness of NSCLC cells, as well as upregulation of the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway in NSCLC cells. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt-mTOR signaling abolished the ability of isoflurane to promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of NSCLC cells, indicating that isoflurane promotes NSCLC cell malignancy by activating the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. Conclusions Isoflurane promotes NSCLC proliferation, migration and invasion by activating the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27897153

  7. Record Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Arctic sea ice reached a record low in September 2007, below the previous record set in 2005 and substantially below the long-term average. This image shows the Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, 2007. In this image, blue indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice concentration, and turquoise indicates loosely packed sea ice. The black circle at the North Pole results from an absence of data as the satellite does not make observations that far north. Three contour lines appear on this image. The red line is the 2007 minimum, as of September 15, about the same time the record low was reached, and it almost exactly fits the sea ice observed by AMSR-E. The green line indicates the 2005 minimum, the previous record low. The yellow line indicates the median minimum from 1979 to 2000.

  8. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage.

  9. Mast cells in the human alveolar wall: an electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Guz, A

    1981-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by electronmicroscopy in the alveolar wall of the lung in 20 subjects (10 normal, 10 abnormal). A quantitative and qualitative study was made of the mast cells. In the normal lung there was an average concentration of 350 mast cells/mm2 of alveolar wall and in the abnormal 523/mm2. Mast cells occupied approximately 1.6-2.1% of the area of the alveolar wall. There was marked variation in the structure of the mast cell granules but no differences between those in the normal and abnormal lungs. There was evidence that constant degranulation of mast cells may be occurring in the lung. The role that alveolar mast cells may play in the vasoconstrictor response to alveolar hypoxia is discussed. It is suggested that the tachypnoea present in asthma may partly be due to release of mediators from sensitised mast cells within the alveolar wall. Images PMID:7328180

  10. Minimum Conflict Mainstreaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awen, Ed; And Others

    Computer technology is discussed as a tool for facilitating the implementation of the mainstreaming process. Minimum conflict mainstreaming/merging (MCM) is defined as an approach which utilizes computer technology to circumvent such structural obstacles to mainstreaming as transportation scheduling, screening and assignment of students, testing,…

  11. Minimum Critical Values Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.

    2005-07-11

    This report provides minimum critical values for various 30-cm water-reflected uranium and plutonium oxide and nitrate aqueous mixtures as calculated by the SCALE CSAS1X sequence using the 238-group ENDF/B-V neutron cross-section library. The minimum values were determined through parametric searches in one-dimensional geometry. The calculations have been performed to obtain the minimum values: critical volume and mass for spheres, critical radius for cylinders, critical thickness for slabs, and minimum critical concentration (infinite geometry) for the following homogeneous mixtures: (1) UO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (2) UNH for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (3) PuO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu); and (4) PuNH for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu). All bounding surfaces were fully reflected by 30 cm of H{sub 2}O.

  12. Conformational origin of temperature changes in the IR spectrum of isoflurane. A cryosolution and ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikova, S. M.; Rutkowski, K. S.; Horochowska, M.; Rospenk, M.

    2017-04-01

    The IR spectrum of isoflurane dissolved in liquid Kr, and Xe, and Raman spectrum of pure liquid are registered and analyzed. Fundamental bands are assigned using "anharm" option of ab initio calculations. Estimations based on calculated thermodynamic and spectroscopic parameters confirm experimentally found temperature effect of noticeable redistribution of intensity of selected pair of bands ascribed to the most populated two rotamers. Concentrations of two rotamers become comparable at T∼295 K.

  13. The effect of isoflurane anaesthesia and buprenorphine on the mouse grimace scale and behaviour in CBA and DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Amy; Kitson, Gemma; Skalkoyannis, Benjamin; Leach, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Prevention or alleviation of pain in laboratory mice is a fundamental requirement of in vivo research. The mouse grimace scale (MGS) has the potential to be an effective and rapid means of assessing pain and analgesic efficacy in laboratory mice. Preliminary studies have demonstrated its potential utility for assessing pain in mouse models that involve potentially painful procedures. The next step in validation is to determine if the other procedures that are integral to these models, i.e. anaesthesia or analgesia, result in any changes in MGS score which would need to be taken into account when using this tool to assess post-procedural pain. Here, spontaneous behaviour and MGS data for CBA and DBA/2 mice were recorded at baseline and following either isoflurane anaesthesia (suitable to perform abdominal surgery) or 0.05 mg/kg s.c. buprenorphine. In line with previous studies, isoflurane anaesthesia alone had limited effects on the spontaneous behaviour in either strain of mice. Administration of buprenorphine resulted in increased periods of activity e.g. walking and chewing bedding in CBA mice. These effects were not demonstrated in DBA/2 mice. In comparison, buprenorphine alone had no impact on MGS score in either strain of mice, however DBA/2 mice showed a significant increase in MGS score following isoflurane anaesthesia. The presence of this increased MGS score must be taken into account when attempting to use the MGS to assess pain in DBA/2 mice. Further work should be carried out to establish the presence of this isoflurane effect in other strains and the potential influence of gender on the MGS. This further validation is necessary prior to implementation of this technique in clinical scenarios.

  14. Trehalose protects from aggravation of amyloid pathology induced by isoflurane anesthesia in APP(swe) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Perucho, Juan; Casarejos, Maria J; Gomez, Ana; Solano, Rosa M; de Yébenes, Justo Garcia; Mena, Maria A

    2012-03-01

    There is an open controversy about the role of surgery and anesthesia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies have shown a high prevalence of these procedures in subjects with AD but the interpretation of these studies is difficult because of the co-existence of multiple variables. Experimental studies in vitro and in vivo have shown that small molecular weight volatile anesthetics enhance amyloidogenesis in vitro and produce behavioral deficits and brain lesions similar to those found in patients with AD. We examined the effect of co-treatment with trehalose on isoflurane-induced amyloidogenesis in mice. WT and APP(swe) mice, of 11 months of age, were exposed to 1% isoflurane, 3 times, for 1.5 hours each time and sacrificed 24 hours after their last exposure to isoflurane. The right hemi-brain was used for histological analysis and the contra-lateral hemi-brain used for biochemical studies. In this study, we have shown that repetitive exposure to isoflurane in pre-symptomatic mature APP(swe) mice increases apoptosis in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, enhances astrogliosis and the expression of GFAP and that these effects are prevented by co-treatment with trehalose, a disaccharide with known effects as enhancer of autophagy. We have also confirmed that in our model the co-treatment with trehalose increases the expression of autophagic markers as well as the expression of chaperones. Cotreatment with trehalose reduces the levels of β amyloid peptide aggregates, tau plaques and levels of phospho-tau. Our study, therefore, provides new therapeutic avenues that could help to prevent the putative pro-amyloidogenic properties of small volatile anesthetics.

  15. Effects of dobutamine hydrochloride on cardiovascular function in horses anesthetized with isoflurane with or without acepromazine maleate premedication.

    PubMed

    Schier, Mara F; Raisis, Anthea L; Secombe, Cristy J; Hosgood, Giselle; Musk, Gabrielle C; Lester, Guy D

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of acepromazine maleate premedication on cardiovascular function before and after infusion of dobutamine hydrochloride for 30 minutes in isoflurane-anesthetized horses. ANIMALS 6 healthy adult horses. PROCEDURES Each horse was anesthetized once following premedication with acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg, IV) administered 30 minutes prior to anesthetic induction (ACP+ treatment) and once without premedication (ACP- treatment). Anesthesia was induced with IV administration of xylazine hydrochloride (0.8 mg/kg), ketamine hydrochloride (2.2 mg/kg), and diazepam (0.08 mg/kg). Horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency, and anesthesia was maintained via inhalation of isoflurane delivered in oxygen. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was adjusted to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 60 mm Hg (interquartile range [25th to 75th percentile], 57 to 63 mm Hg) for at least 15 minutes. Cardiac index, oxygen delivery index, and femoral arterial blood flow indices were determined 60 minutes after anesthetic induction (baseline). Dobutamine was then infused to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 80 mm Hg (interquartile range, 76 to 80 mm Hg). Data collection was repeated 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion for comparison with baseline values. RESULTS Complete data sets were available from 5 of the 6 horses. Dobutamine administration resulted in significant increases in oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices but no significant change in cardiac index for each treatment. However, at baseline or 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion, findings for the ACP+ and ACP- treatments did not differ. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, dobutamine administration increased oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices, but these changes were unaffected by premedication with acepromazine.

  16. Evaluation of the Cerebral State Index in Cats under Isoflurane Anaesthesia: Dose-Effect Relationship and Prediction of Clinical Signs

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana R.; Ribeiro, Lénio; Ferreira, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the cerebral state index (CSI) in reflecting different levels of isoflurane anaesthesia was evaluated in ten cats subjected to four end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (EtIso), each maintained for 15 minutes (0.8%, 1.2%, 1.6%, or 2.0% EtIso). The CSI, hemodynamic data, ocular reflexes, and eye position were recorded for each EtIso concentration. Pharmacodynamic analysis of CSI with EtIso was performed, as well as prediction probability analysis with a clinical scale based on the eye reflexes. The CSI values showed great variability. Between all parameters, burst suppression ratio showed the better fitting with the sigmoidal concentration-effect model (R2 = 0.93) followed by CSI (R2 = 0.82) and electromyographic activity (R2 = 0.79). EtIso was the variable with better prediction of the clinical scale of anaesthesia (prediction probability value of 0.94). Although the CSI values decrease with increasing isoflurane concentrations, the huge variability in CSI values may be a strong limitation for its use in cats and it seems to be no better than EtIso as a predictor of clinical signs. PMID:24616823

  17. Effects of isoflurane and propofol on hepatic and renal functions and coagulation profile after right hepatectomy in living donors.

    PubMed

    Ozgul, U; Ucar, M; Erdogan, M A; Aydogan, M S; Toprak, H I; Colak, C; Durmus, M; Ersoy, M O

    2013-04-01

    We compared postoperative hepatic and renal functions and coagulation profiles in living donors undergoing right hepatectomy under isoflurane (n = 40) versus propofol (n = 40) anesthesia. After induction, anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane/air-O2 (group I) or propofol/air-O2 (group P) in addition to remifentanil and atracurium infusion in both groups. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), albumin, total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), platelet count, and hemoglobin levels were measured in the preoperative period, after end of the operation, and on the first, third, fifth and seventh postoperative days (PODs). INR was significantly increased on POD 3 and aPTT on POD 5 in group I compared with group P (P < .05). Albumin level was significantly lower in Group I on POD 1 and 3 (P < .05). GFR was significantly lower on POD 1 in the group I compared with group P (P < .05). The postoperative coagulation, GFR, and albumin values were superior following administration of propofol than isoflurane in donors who underwent living hepatectomy; however, both approaches were clinically safe, with no significant clinical difference.

  18. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  19. Pharmacological inhibition of PTEN attenuates cognitive deficits caused by neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane via inhibition of NR2B-mediated tau phosphorylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Xin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianfang; Li, Shiyong; Zhao, Yilin; Wang, Jintao; Luo, Ailin

    2017-03-01

    Evidence has shown that children exposed to repeated anesthesia in early childhood display long-term cognitive disabilities. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Our previous study has indicated the involvement of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in isoflurane-induced decrease of self-renewal capacity in hippocampal neural precursor cells. Additionally, it is demonstrated by others that PTEN inhibition could protect against cognitive impairment via reduction of tau phosphorylation in the alzheimer's disease model. Therefore, in the present in vivo study, we aimed to examine the effects of PTEN inhibition on the cognitive dysfunction and tau hyperphosphorylation caused by neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane. Our results showed that the neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane resulted in the activation of PTEN in the hippocampus. The treatment of PTEN inhibitor BPV (pic) restored PSD-95 synthesis, and attenuated tau phosphorylation as well as the cognitive dysfunction caused by the repeated isoflurane exposures. In addition, BPV (pic) treatment reversed the activation of NR2B-containing NMDARs induced by repeated isoflurane exposures, while in turn, the antagonism of NR2B subunit with ifenprodil alleviated tau phosphorylation, indicating a possible role of NR2B as the downstream of PTEN in mediating tau phosphorylation in the neonatal rats repeatedly exposed to isoflurane. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel role of PTEN in mediating tau phosphorylation and cognitive deficits caused by neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane, implying that targeting on PTEN may be a potential therapeutic approach for the anesthetic-related cognitive decline in the developing brain.

  20. Isoflurane, But Not the Nonimmobilizers F6 and F8, Inhibits Rat Spinal Cord Motor Neuron CaV1 Calcium Currents

    PubMed Central

    Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Montoya-Gacharna, Jose V.; Xu, Fang; Blanck, Thomas J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Volatile anesthetics decrease Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Ca2+ influences neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Because volatile anesthetics act specifically on the spinal cord to produce immobility, we examined the effect of isoflurane and the nonimmobilizers F6 (1, 2- dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane) and F8 (2, 3- dichlorooctafluorobutane) on CaV1 and CaV2 Ca2+ channels in spinal cord motor neurons and dorsal root ganglion neurons. Methods Using patch clamping, we compared the effects of isoflurane with those of F6 and F8 on CaV1 and CaV2 channels in isolated, cultured adult rat spinal cord motor neurons and on CaV1 and CaV2 channels in adult rat dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons. Results In spinal cord motor neurons, isoflurane, but not F6 or F8, inhibited currents through CaV1 channels. Isoflurane and at least one of the nonimmobilizers inhibited currents through CaV1 and CaV2 channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons and Cav2 in spinal cord motor neurons Conclusion The findings that isoflurane, but not nonimmobilizers, inhibited CaV1 Ca2+ channels in spinal cord motor neurons are consistent with the notion that spinal cord motor neurons might mediate isoflurane-induced immobility. Additional studies are required to examine whether inhibition of CaV1 calcium currents in spinal cord motor neurons are sufficient, or whether actions on other channels/proteins also contribute to isoflurane-induced immobility. PMID:26702867

  1. An estimation of mechanical stress on alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening and closure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng-Long; Song, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Zhao-Yan; Zhang, Su; Chen, Ya-Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Alveolar overdistension and mechanical stresses generated by repetitive opening and closing of small airways and alveoli have been widely recognized as two primary mechanistic factors that may contribute to the development of ventilator-induced lung injury. A long-duration exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to even small, shear stresses could lead to the changes in cytoskeleton and the production of inflammatory mediators. In this paper, we have made an attempt to estimate in situ the magnitudes of mechanical stresses exerted on the alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening by using a tape-peeling model of McEwan and Taylor (35). To this end, we first speculate the possible ranges of capillary number (Ca) ≡ μU/γ (a dimensionless combination of surface tension γ, fluid viscosity μ, and alveolar opening velocity U) during in vivo alveolar opening. Subsequent calculations show that increasing respiratory rate or inflation rate serves to increase the values of mechanical stresses. For a normal lung, the predicted maximum shear stresses are <15 dyn/cm(2) at all respiratory rates, whereas for a lung with elevated surface tension or viscosity, the maximum shear stress will notably increase, even at a slow respiratory rate. Similarly, the increased pressure gradients in the case of elevated surface or viscosity may lead to a pressure drop >300 dyn/cm(2) across a cell, possibly inducing epithelial hydraulic cracks. In addition, we have conceived of a geometrical model of alveolar opening to make a prediction of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) required to splint open a collapsed alveolus, which as shown by our results, covers a wide range of pressures, from several centimeters to dozens of centimeters of water, strongly depending on the underlying pulmonary conditions. The establishment of adequate regional ventilation-to-perfusion ratios may prevent recruited alveoli from reabsorption atelectasis and accordingly, reduce the required levels of

  2. Decompression of inferior alveolar nerve: case report.

    PubMed

    Marques, Tiago Miguel Santos; Gomes, Joana Marques

    2011-01-01

    Paresthesia as a result of mechanical trauma is one of the most frequent sensory disturbances of the inferior alveolar nerve. This case report describes surgical treatment for paresthesia caused by a compressive phenomenon within the mandibular canal. The cause of the compression, a broken instrument left in the patient's mouth during previous endodontic therapy, was identified during routine radiography and computed tomography. Once the foreign object was removed by surgery, the paresthesia resolved quickly. This case highlights the potential for an iatrogenic mechanical cause of paresthesia.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Gingival Tissue and Alveolar Bone during Alveolar Bone Healing*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Kwon, Joseph; Kook, Min-Suk; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun; Sohn, Sungoh; Jung, Seunggon; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is orchestrated by the surrounding supporting tissues and involves the build-up of osteogenic cells, which orchestrate remodeling/healing through the expression of numerous mediators and signaling molecules. Periodontal regeneration models have proven useful for studying the interaction and communication between alveolar bone and supporting soft tissue. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare proteins with altered expression in gingival soft tissue and alveolar bone following tooth extraction. For target identification and validation, hard and soft tissue were extracted from mini-pigs at the indicated times after tooth extraction. From triplicate experiments, 56 proteins in soft tissue and 27 proteins in alveolar bone were found to be differentially expressed before and after tooth extraction. The expression of 21 of those proteins was altered in both soft tissue and bone. Comparison of the activated networks in soft tissue and alveolar bone highlighted their distinct responsibilities in bone and tissue healing. Moreover, we found that there is crosstalk between identified proteins in soft tissue and alveolar bone with respect to cellular assembly, organization, and communication. Among these proteins, we examined in detail the expression patterns and associated networks of ATP5B and fibronectin 1. ATP5B is involved in nucleic acid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and neurological disease, and fibronectin 1 is involved in cellular assembly, organization, and maintenance. Collectively, our findings indicate that bone regeneration is accompanied by a profound interaction among networks regulating cellular resources, and they provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the healing of periodontal tissue after tooth extraction. PMID:23824910

  4. Estrogen regulates pulmonary alveolar formation, loss, and regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria Decarlo

    2004-12-01

    Lung tissue elastic recoil and the dimension and number of pulmonary gas-exchange units (alveoli) are major determinants of gas-exchange function. Loss of gas-exchange function accelerates after menopause in the healthy aged and is progressively lost in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The latter, a disease of midlife and later, though more common in men than in women, is a disease to which women smokers and never smokers may be more susceptible than men; it is characterized by diminished lung tissue elastic recoil and presently irremediable alveolar loss. Ovariectomy in sexually immature rats diminishes the formation of alveoli, and estrogen prevents the diminution. In the present work, we found that estrogen receptor-alpha and estrogen receptor-beta, the only recognized mammalian estrogen receptors, are required for the formation of a full complement of alveoli in female mice. However, only the absence of estrogen receptor-beta diminishes lung elastic tissue recoil. Furthermore, ovariectomy in adult mice results, within 3 wk, in loss of alveoli and of alveolar surface area without a change of lung volume. Estrogen replacement, after alveolar loss, induces alveolar regeneration, reversing the architectural effects of ovariectomy. These studies 1) reveal estrogen receptors regulate alveolar size and number in a nonredundant manner, 2) show estrogen is required for maintenance of already formed alveoli and induces alveolar regeneration after their loss in adult ovariectomized mice, and 3) offer the possibility estrogen can slow alveolar loss and induce alveolar regeneration in women with COPD.

  5. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  6. [The in vivo penetration of erythromycin into alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Carré, P; Piva, F; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1990-01-01

    In order to appreciate the in vivo penetration of erythromycin the alveolar spaces a broncho-alveolar lavage was carried out in 24 guinea pigs, 30 minutes, 1 hour 30 minutes and three hours after a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mgms. of erythromycin. The erythromycin dose was assessed by a microbiological method in the alveolar macrophages and the supernatant of the broncho-alveolar lavage liquid. The intramacrophage concentrations of erythromycin were 3.9, 11.5 and 12 times higher than the serum concentrations at 30 minutes, 1 hour 30 and three hours respectively. The concentrations in the broncho-alveolar lavage liquid was always higher than the serum concentrations tacking account of the different dilutions estimated with relation to the glucose concentrations. At 30 minutes, 1 hour 30 minutes and three hours the alveolar macrophages contained 1.9; 7.6 and 6 times more erythromycin respectively than the lavage supernatant. From the first half hour of its administration the erythromycin was concentrated in the alveolar spaces, in particular within the macrophages. Already noted in vitro, this rapidity of erythromycin concentration in vivo in alveolar macrophages appears to be one of the reasons to explain its activity against micro-organisms developing within macrophages.

  7. Disruption of Hippocampal Neuregulin 1-ErbB4 Signaling Contributes to the Hippocampus-dependent Cognitive Impairment Induced by Isoflurane in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Min; Su, Fan; Ji, Mu-Huo; Zhang, Guang-Fen; Qiu, Li-Li; Jia, Min; Gao, Jun; Xie, Zhongcong; Yang, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background A prolonged isoflurane exposure may lead to cognitive decline in rodents. Neuregulin 1 (NRG1)-ErbB4 signaling plays a key role in the modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity through regulating the neurotransmission. We hypothesized hippocampal NRG1-ErbB4 signaling is involved in isoflurane-induced cognitive impairments in aged mice. Methods Fourteen-month old C57BL/6 mice were randomized to receive 100% O2 exposure, vehicle injection after 100% O2 exposure, vehicle injection after exposure to isoflurane carried by 100% O2, NRG1-β1 injection after exposure to isoflurane carried by 100% O2, and NRG1-β1 and an ErbB4 inhibitor AG1478 injection after exposure to isoflurane carried by 100% O2. Fear conditioning test was used to assess the cognitive function of mice 48 h post-exposure. The brain tissues were harvested 48 h post-exposure to determine the levels of NRG1, ErbB4, p-ErbB4, parvalbumin, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 in the hippocampus using western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunofluorescence. Results The percentage of freezing time to context was decreased from 50.28 ± 11.53% to 30.82 ± 10.00% and the hippocampal levels of NRG1, p-ErbB4/ErbB4, parvalbumin, and GAD67 were decreased from 172.79 ± 20.85 ng/g, 69.15 ± 12.20%, 101.68 ± 11.21%, and 104.71 ± 6.85%, to 112.92 ± 16.65 ng/g, 42.26 ± 9.71%, 75.89 ± 10.26%, and 73.87 ± 16.89%, respectively, after isoflurane exposure. NRG1-β1 attenuated the isoflurane-induced hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairment and the declines in the hippocampal NRG1, p-ErbB4/ErbB4, parvalbumin, and GAD67. AG1478 inhibited the NRG1-β1’s rescuing effects. Conclusions Disruption of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling in the parvalbumin-positive interneurons might, at least partially, contribute to the isoflurane-induced hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairment after exposure to isoflurane carried by 100% O2 in aged mice. PMID:24589481

  8. Relative effects of asbestos and wollastonite on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pailes, W H; Judy, D J; Resnick, H; Castranova, V

    1984-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages were exposed in culture to chrysotile asbestos, wollastonite, or latex, and the effects on various biochemical and physiological parameters related to cellular viability and fibrogenicity were determined. Exposure of alveolar macrophages to asbestos, wollastonite, or latex for 3 d has no effect on oxygen consumption or cellular volume. However, treatment of alveolar macrophages with as little as 25 micrograms asbestos/ml for 1 d increases lysosomal enzyme release and decreases membrane integrity, i.e., decreases trypan blue exclusion and increases leakage of cytosolic enzymes. In contrast, exposure of alveolar macrophages to wollastonite or latex at 250 micrograms/ml does not induce lysosomal enzyme release or alter membrane integrity even after 3 d of exposure in culture. These data suggest that chrysotile asbestos damages rabbit alveolar macrophages, while wollastonite, a potential substitute for asbestos, is far less cytotoxic.

  9. Reversible anesthesia of captive California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with medetomidine, midazolam, butorphanol, and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Spelman, Lucy H

    2004-03-01

    Two adult California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) were effectively anesthetized 13 times with medetomidine (0.010-0.013 mg/kg), midazolam (0.2-0.26 mg/kg), and butorphanol (0.2-0.4 mg/kg) by i.m. hand or pole syringe injection. For each anesthetic event, atropine (0.02 mg/kg, i.m.) was administered 6-20 min after initial injections, and oxygen administration via face mask or nasal insufflation began at the same time. Light anesthesia was induced in 8-22 min and lasted 13-78 min. During eight of the procedures, isoflurane (0.5-2.0%) was administered via face mask or endotracheal tube for an additional 30-120 min to facilitate longer procedures or surgery. Anesthesia was antagonized with atipamezole (0.05-0.06 mg/kg) and naltrexone (0.1 mg/kg) in seven events, with the addition of flumazenil (0.0002-0.002 mg/kg) in six events. The antagonists were administered by i.m. injection 42-149 min after administration of the induction agents. All sea lions recovered to mild sedation within 4-17 min after administration of the antagonists.

  10. Isoflurane and Sevoflurane Induce Severe Hepatic Insulin Resistance in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Stella P.; Broussard, Josiane L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anesthesia induces insulin resistance, which may contribute to elevated blood glucose and adverse post-operative outcomes in critically ill patients, and impair glycemic control in surgical patients with diabetes. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which anesthesia impairs insulin sensitivity. Here we investigate the effects of anesthesia on insulin sensitivity in metabolic tissues. Methods Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed in 32 lean (control diet; n = 16 conscious versus n = 16 anesthetized) and 24 fat-fed (6 weeks fat-feeding; n = 16 conscious versus n = 8 anesthetized) adult male mongrel dogs in conjunction with tracer methodology to differentiate hepatic versus peripheral insulin sensitivity. Propofol was administered as an intravenous bolus (3mg/kg) to initiate anesthesia, which was then maintained with inhaled sevoflurane or isoflurane (2–3%) for the duration of the procedure. Results Anesthesia reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity by approximately 50% in both lean and fat-fed animals as compared to conscious animals, and insulin action at the liver was almost completely suppressed during anesthesia such that hepatic insulin sensitivity was decreased by 75.5% and; 116.2% in lean and fat-fed groups, respectively. Conclusion Inhaled anesthesia induces severe hepatic insulin resistance in a canine model. Countermeasures that preserve hepatic insulin sensitivity may represent a therapeutic target that could improve surgical outcomes in both diabetic and healthy patients. PMID:27802272

  11. Brainstem stimulation increases functional connectivity of basal forebrain-paralimbic network in isoflurane-anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Siveshigan; Liu, Xiping; Baracskay, Péter; Hudetz, Anthony G

    2014-09-01

    Brain states and cognitive-behavioral functions are precisely controlled by subcortical neuromodulatory networks. Manipulating key components of the ascending arousal system (AAS), via deep-brain stimulation, may help facilitate global arousal in anesthetized animals. Here we test the hypothesis that electrical stimulation of the oral part of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) under light isoflurane anesthesia, associated with loss of consciousness, leads to cortical desynchronization and specific changes in blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional connectivity (FC) of the brain. BOLD signals were acquired simultaneously with frontal epidural electroencephalogram before and after PnO stimulation. Whole-brain FC was mapped using correlation analysis with seeds in major centers of the AAS. PnO stimulation produced cortical desynchronization, a decrease in δ- and θ-band power, and an increase in approximate entropy. Significant increases in FC after PnO stimulation occurred between the left nucleus Basalis of Meynert (NBM) as seed and numerous regions of the paralimbic network. Smaller increases in FC were present between the central medial thalamic nucleus and retrosplenium seeds and the left caudate putamen and NBM. The results suggest that, during light anesthesia, PnO stimulation preferentially modulates basal forebrain-paralimbic networks. We speculate that this may be a reflection of disconnected awareness.

  12. Minimum fuel mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    The minimum fuel mode of the NASA F-15 research aircraft is designed to minimize fuel flow while maintaining constant net propulsive force (FNP), effectively reducing thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), during cruise flight conditions. The test maneuvers were at stabilized flight conditions. The aircraft test engine was allowed to stabilize at the cruise conditions before data collection initiated; data were then recorded with performance seeking control (PSC) not-engaged, then data were recorded with the PSC system engaged. The maneuvers were flown back-to-back to allow for direct comparisons by minimizing the effects of variations in the test day conditions. The minimum fuel mode was evaluated at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers and focused on three altitudes: 15,000; 30,000; and 45,000 feet. Flight data were collected for part, military, partial, and maximum afterburning power conditions. The TSFC savings at supersonic Mach numbers, ranging from approximately 4% to nearly 10%, are in general much larger than at subsonic Mach numbers because of PSC trims to the afterburner.

  13. Design for Minimum Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Design for Minimum Risk (DFMR) is a term used by NASA programs as an expansion of the general hazard reduction process where if an identified hazard cannot be eliminated, the design is modified to reduce the associated mishap risk to an acceptable level. DFMR is a set of specific requirements to minimize risk. DFMR is not well understood and there are many misconceptions concerning the meaning and use. This paper will provide insight into the use of DFMR for space applications; it s comparison to other hazard mitigation strategies and examples of how the approach has been used in the past. It will also highlight documents used by NASA on various programs to determine DFMR.

  14. Arterial hypertension perpetuates alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros Vanderlei, Janine Montenegro Toscano Moura; Messora, Michel Reis; Fernandes, Patrícia Garani; Novaes, Arthur B; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; de Moraes Grisi, Marcio Fernando; Scombatti de Souza, Sergio Luis; Gerlach, Raquel Fernanda; Antoniali, Cristina; Taba, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the impact of hypertension on the progression of periodontitis (PD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether hypertension affects PD by enhancing bone loss even after the stimulus for PD induction is removed. Ligature-induced PD was created on the first mandibular molars of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive rats (Wistar Kyoto-WKY). The animals were assigned to non-ligated controls (C) and PD groups: WKY-C, WKY-PD, SHR-C, and SHR-PD. After 10 days, five animals of each group were killed and the ligatures of the other animals were removed. On the 21st day (11 days without PD induced), the remaining animals were killed. The jaws were defleshed and the amount of bone loss was measured. After 10 days, the PD groups showed more bone loss than its controls (P < .05); SHR-PD = 0.72 ± 0.05 mm, SHR-C = 0.39 ± 0.04 mm, WKY-PD = 0.75 ± 0.04 mm, and WKY-C = 0.56 ± 0.04 mm. The cumulative bone loss on day 21 (0.94 ± 0.13 mm) was significantly worse than on day 10 only in SHR-PD group (P < .05). The final bone loss differences between PD and C groups accounted for 102% (SHR) and 26% (WKY) increase in comparison with the initial control levels. Hypertension is associated with progressive alveolar bone loss even when the stimulus for PD induction is removed and it may be speculated that host condition perpetuates alveolar bone loss.

  15. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2012-12-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness.

  16. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  17. Isoflurane Exposure Induces Cell Death, Microglial Activation and Modifies the Expression of Genes Supporting Neurodevelopment and Cognitive Function in the Male Newborn Piglet Brain

    PubMed Central

    Fleiss, Bobbi; Kawano, Go; Ezzati, Mojgan; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Hristova, Mariya; Bennett, Kate; Fierens, Igor; Burnett, Ryan; Chaban, Badr; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Oliver-Taylor, Aaron; Tachsidis, Ilias; Rostami, Jamshid; Gressens, Pierre; Sanders, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of the brain to general anesthesia during early infancy may adversely affect its neural and cognitive development. The mechanisms mediating this are complex, incompletely understood and may be sexually dimorphic, but include developmentally inappropriate apoptosis, inflammation and a disruption to cognitively salient gene expression. We investigated the effects of a 6h isoflurane exposure on cell death, microglial activation and gene expression in the male neonatal piglet brain. Piglets (n = 6) were randomised to: (i) naive controls or (ii) 6h isoflurane. Cell death (TUNEL and caspase-3) and microglial activation were recorded in 7 brain regions. Changes in gene expression (microarray and qPCR) were assessed in the cingulate cortex. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded throughout. Isoflurane anesthesia induced significant increases in cell death in the cingulate and insular cortices, caudate nucleus, thalamus, putamen, internal capsule, periventricular white matter and hippocampus. Dying cells included both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Significantly, microglial activation was observed in the insula, pyriform, hippocampus, internal capsule, caudate and thalamus. Isoflurane induced significant disruption to the expression of 79 gene transcripts, of these 26 are important for the control of transcription and 23 are important for the mediation of neural plasticity, memory formation and recall. Our observations confirm that isoflurane increases apoptosis and inflammatory responses in the neonatal piglet brain but also suggests novel additional mechanisms by which isoflurane may induce adverse neural and cognitive development by disrupting the expression of genes mediating activity dependent development of neural circuits, the predictive adaptive responses of the brain, memory formation and recall. PMID:27898690

  18. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  19. A Suspected Case of an Alveolar Haemorrhage Caused by Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Sakoda, Yoritake; Arimori, Yojiro; Ueno, Masakatsu; Matsumoto, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    A 39-year-old man treated with dasatinib for chronic myelogenous leukaemia presented to our hospital with haemoptysis, coughing, and dyspnoea. Chest radiography and computed tomography revealed ground-glass opacities and a crazy-paving pattern. Bronchoalveolar lavage was not performed due to serious hypoxemia and bleeding. Significant bleeding from the peripheral bronchi led to a diagnosis of an alveolar haemorrhage. Dasatinib-induced alveolar haemorrhaging was suspected based on the clinical findings. His condition improved immediately after dasatinib withdrawal and initiation of steroid therapy. Reports of alveolar haemorrhaging induced by dasatinib are rare. As such, this is considered an important case. PMID:28090053

  20. In vitro study of gas effects on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Voisin, C

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the biological effects of gas pollutants on alveolar macrophages several in vitro systems have been developed. We described here an original method of cell culture in aerobiosis, which permitted direct contact between the atmosphere and the target cells. We studied the long term (24 h) and short term (30 min) effects of NO2 on alveolar macrophages. Our results demonstrated that exposure of alveolar macrophages to gas pollutants may be responsible for either cell injury or cell activation associated with the release of various bioactive mediators (superoxide anion, neutrophil chemotactic activity). Cell culture in aerobiosis opens new ways for the research on the biological effects of gas pollutants.

  1. Hippocampal glutamate level and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) are up-regulated in senior rat associated with isoflurane-induced spatial learning/memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiangdong; Xu, Chengshi; Wang, Hui; Xu, Jie; Liu, Weiran; Wang, Yun; Jia, Xingyuan; Xie, Zhongcong; Xu, Zhipeng; Ji, Chao; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive decline is a clinical concern especially for senior patients. It is generally recognized that glutamatergic system plays a crucial role in the physiopathologic process of neurocognitive deterioration. However, alterations of glutamatergic system in prolonged isoflurane-induced learning/memory decline are still unclear. This study investigates the question whether glutamate concentration and corresponding transporters or receptors display any alternations in aged rat suffering from isoflurane-induced learning/memory impairment. 111 male Sprague-Dawley rats (>18 months) were randomly divided into two main groups: hippocampal microdialysis group (n = 38) and western blotting group (n = 73). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups including (1) control subgroup (n = 6 and 10, receiving no behavioral trial, anesthesia or air exposure); (2) air-exposed subgroup (n = 7 and 15, receiving behavioral trial and air exposure but not anesthesia); (3) isoflurane anesthesia subgroup (n = 25 and 48, receiving both behavioral trial and anesthesia). The isoflurane-exposed rats were further divided into a learning/memory-impaired subgroup and a non-learning/memory-impaired subgroup according to their behavioral performance, which was measured using Morris water maze. Hippocampal glutamate concentrations in microdialysates were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Expression levels of GLAST, GLT-1, NMDAR1, NMDAR2A/B, AMPAR and tau in hippocampus were assessed via quantitative Western blotting. The incidences of learning/memory impairment of isoflurane-exposed rats in hippocampal microdialysis group and western blotting group were 12.0 (3/25) and 10.4 % (5/48) respectively. The intra-anesthesia hippocampal glutamate levels were significantly lower than those of non-anesthesized rats. The learning/memory-impaired rats showed a long-lasting increased glutamate level from 24 h after isoflurane exposure to the end of the study, but the other

  2. Oscillatory patterns in hippocampus under light and deep isoflurane anesthesia closely mirror prominent brain states in awake animals.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Brian; Wang, Yingxue; Pastalkova, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus exhibits a variety of distinct states of activity under different conditions. For instance the rhythmic patterns of activity orchestrated by the theta oscillation during running and REM sleep are markedly different from the large irregular activity (LIA) observed during awake resting and slow wave sleep. We found that under different levels of isoflurane anesthesia activity in the hippocampus of rats displays two distinct states, which have several qualities that mirror the theta and LIA states. These data provide further evidence that the two states are intrinsic modes of the hippocampus; while also characterizing a preparation that could be useful for studying the natural activity states in hippocampus.

  3. Ion Mobility Studies on the Negative Ion-Molecule Chemistry of Isoflurane and Enflurane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Méndez, Ramón; Watts, Peter; Howse, David C.; Procino, Immacolata; McIntyre, Henry; Mayhew, Chris A.

    2017-02-01

    In the present work we present an investigation of the negative ion-molecule chemistry of the anaesthetics isoflurane, ISOF, and enflurane, ENF, in an ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry (IMS/MS), in both air and nitrogen. Hexachloroethane (HCE) was introduced in both air and nitrogen to produce Cl- as a reactant ion. This study was undertaken owing to uncertainties in the chemical processes, which lead to the cluster ions reported in other work (Eiceman et al. Anal. Chem. 61, 1093-1099, 1). In particular for ISOF the product ion observed was ISOF.Cl-, and it was suggested that the Cl- was formed by dissociative electron attachment (DEA) although there was mention of a chlorine containing contaminant. We show in this study that ISOF and ENF do not produce Cl- in an IMS system either by capture of free electrons or reaction with O2 -. This demonstrates that the Cl- containing ions, reported in the earlier study, must have been the result of a chlorine containing contaminant as suggested. The failure of ISOF and ENF to undergo DEA was initially surprising given the high calculated electron affinities, but further calculations showed that this was a result of the large positive vertical attachment energies (VAEs). This experimental work has been supported by electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP level, and is consistent with those obtained in a crossed electron-molecular beam two sector field mass spectrometer. An unusual observation is that the monomer complexes of ISOF and ENF with O2 - are relatively unstable compared with the dimer complexes.

  4. Assessment of the changes in alveolar bone quality after fixed orthodontic therapy: A trabecular structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Abdolaziz; Zarif Najafi, Hooman; Sabet, Maryam; Saki, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tooth displacement changes the periodontium. The aim of orthodontic treatment is desired tooth movement with minimum side effects on the alveolar bone quality. The aim of the present study was to assess changes of alveolar trabeculation in children, young adults and adults and the two genders. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 63 patients who had been treated in Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, were chosen with convenient sampling method. They were divided into three groups based on their age. Their digitized panoramic radiographs (PRs) were evaluated at six interdental sites from the mesial aspect of the mandibular second molars to the distal aspect of the mandibular first premolars using a visual index. The trabeculation pattern was assigned as either dense (score 3), dense-sparse (score 2) or sparse (score 1). Data were imported to SPSS. Mean of the scores before treatment (score B) and mean of them after treatment (score A) were compared for each group with paired t-test. Changes between score B and sore A of the groups were compared using one-way ANOVA and post hoc tests. Results. Mean score A was significantly higher than mean score B in children (P = 0.001). In contrast, mean score A was significantly lower than mean score B in young adults (P = 0.003). Conclusion. Orthodontists should be cautious when treating young adults and adults regarding the probable, yet possibly temporary, negative effects of orthodontic therapy on the alveolar bone quality. PMID:28096944

  5. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in Afghan pika (Ochotona rufescens rufescens).

    PubMed

    Madarame, H; Kumagai, M; Suzuki, J; Watanabe, A; Konno, S

    1989-07-01

    Lung lesions of 60 Afghan pikas (Ochotona rufescens rufescens) were examined histologically; 38 cases of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis were found. Neither sex was predominantly affected, and there was no predilection for age.

  6. Interrelationships between the Human Alveolar Macrophage and Alpha-1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Allen B.

    1973-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages lavaged from human lungs contain protease activity at an optimum pH of 3.0 and possibly a lesser peak of activity at pH 5.5. Protease activity measured at pH 4.1 is inhibited by purified alpha-1-antitrypsin. Fluorescent antibody studies of human alveolar macrophages showed that alpha-1-antitrypsin is present in normal alveolar macrophages. In addition, macrophages from a patient with a homozygous deficiency of alpha-1-antitrypsin exhibited less fluorescence when incubated in autologous serum than the same macrophages incubated in normal serum. Macrophages from normal subjects showed maximal fluorescence when removed from the lung and additional incubation with serum did not increase fluorescence. These results implicate the human alveolar macrophage as a possible source of an enzyme that may cause emphysema in patients deficient in alpha-1-antitrypsin. They also show that alpha-1-antitrypsin has access to the alveolus in normal subjects. Images PMID:4201266

  7. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  8. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER DECREASED IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGE CYTOKINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including increased hospitalizations for lung infection. Normal lung immune responses to bacterial infection include alveolar macrophage cytokine production and...

  9. Complications in the treatment with alveolar extraosseous distractors. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Grandjean, Alfredo; Reininger, David

    2015-01-01

    Background To review the literature that analyses the types and frequency of complications associated with the use of extraosseous alveolar distraction from 2007 to 2013. Material and Methods Review of the literature in PubMed, using these keywords; alveolar ridge, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, complication, literature review. Inclusion criteria were: articles published between 2007 and 2013 that included the distraction protocol, the complications encountered and the time when they occurred. Results According to the above criteria, 12 articles were included in this review, where 334 extraosseous distractors were placed and 395 complications were encountered, of which 19 (4.81%) were intraoperative, 261 (66.07%) postoperative and 115 (29.11 %) were postdistraction. The most common complication was the incorrect distraction vector found in 105 cases (26.58%), in 23 cases (5.82%) there were severe complications, of which 14 (3.54%) were mandibular fracture and 9 (2.27%) were fractures of the distractor elements. Conclusions According to this review, although alveolar distraction is a safe and predictable technique, it can cause complications; however, they are usually minor and easily resolved without affecting the treatment outcome. Key words: Alveolar ridge, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, complication, literature review. PMID:25858083

  10. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    PubMed

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials.

  11. Alveolar Macrophages Prevent Lethal Influenza Pneumonia By Inhibiting Infection Of Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardani, Amber; Boulton, Adam; Kim, Taeg S.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major human pathogen that produces significant morbidity and mortality. To explore the contribution of alveolar macrophages (AlvMΦs) in regulating the severity of IAV infection we employed a murine model in which the Core Binding Factor Beta gene is conditionally disrupted in myeloid cells. These mice exhibit a selective deficiency in AlvMΦs. Following IAV infection these AlvMΦ deficient mice developed severe diffuse alveolar damage, lethal respiratory compromise, and consequent lethality. Lethal injury in these mice resulted from increased infection of their Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells (T1AECs) and the subsequent elimination of the infected T1AECs by the adaptive immune T cell response. Further analysis indicated AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of the cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) pathway genes in T1AECs in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes in a T1AECs cell line reduced the susceptibility of T1AECs to IAV infection, suggesting that AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of this pathway contributes to the resistance of T1AECs to IAV infection. Furthermore, inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes, as well as blockade of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptors in the AlvMΦ deficient mice reduced the susceptibility of their T1AECs to IAV infection and protected these mice from lethal infection. These results suggest that AlvMΦs may utilize a previously unappreciated mechanism to protect T1AECs against IAV infection, and thereby reduce the severity of infection. The findings further suggest that the cysLT pathway and the receptors for cysLT metabolites represent potential therapeutic targets in severe IAV infection. PMID:28085958

  12. Application of Mathematical Models in Combination with Monte Carlo Simulation for Prediction of Isoflurane Concentration in an Operation Room Theater

    PubMed Central

    ZARE SAKHVIDI, Mohammad Javad; BARKHORDARI, Abolfazl; SALEHI, Maryam; BEHDAD, Shekoofeh; FALLAHZADEH, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Applicability of two mathematical models in inhalation exposure prediction (well mixed room and near field-far field model) were validated against standard sampling method in one operation room for isoflurane. Ninety six air samples were collected from near and far field of the room and quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Isoflurane concentration was also predicted by the models. Monte Carlo simulation was used to incorporate the role of parameters variability. The models relatively gave more conservative results than the measurements. There was no significant difference between the models and direct measurements results. There was no difference between the concentration prediction of well mixed room model and near field far field model. It suggests that the dispersion regime in room was close to well mixed situation. Direct sampling showed that the exposure in the same room for same type of operation could be up to 17 times variable which can be incorporated by Monte Carlo simulation. Mathematical models are valuable option for prediction of exposure in operation rooms. Our results also suggest that incorporating the role of parameters variability by conducting Monte Carlo simulation can enhance the strength of prediction in occupational hygiene decision making. PMID:23912206

  13. Sensitivity to isoflurane anesthesia increases in autism spectrum disorder Shank3(+/∆c) mutant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Schaefer, Michele; Gray, Christy; Yang, Ya; Furmanski, Orion; Liu, Sufang; Worley, Paul; Mintz, C David; Tao, Feng; Johns, Roger A

    Autism is a heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, impaired communication skills, and restricted and repetitive behavior. The abnormal behaviors of these patients can make their anesthetic and perioperative management difficult. Evidence in the literature suggests that some patients with autism or specific autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit altered responses to pain and to anesthesia or sedation. A genetic mouse model of one particular ASD, Phelan McDermid Syndrome, has been developed that has a Shank3 haplotype truncation (Shank3(+/Δc)). These mice exhibit important characteristics of autism that mimic human autistic behavior. Our study demonstrates that a Shank3(+/ΔC) mutation in mice is associated with a reduction in both the MAC and RREC50 of isoflurane and down regulation of NR1 in vestibular nuclei and PSD95 in spinal cord. Decreased expression of NR1 and PSD95 in the central nervous system of Shank3(+/ΔC) mice could help reduce the MAC and RREC50 of isoflurane, which would warrant confirmation in a clinical study. If Shank3 mutations are found to affect anesthetic sensitivity in patients with ASD, better communication and stricter monitoring of anesthetic depth may be necessary.

  14. Activation of the canonical nuclear factor-κB pathway is involved in isoflurane-induced hippocampal interleukin-1β elevation and the resultant cognitive deficits in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng-Qian; Rong, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Ya-Jie; Ni, Cheng; Tian, Xiao-Sheng; Mo, Na; Chui, De-Hua; Guo, Xiang-Yang

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Isoflurane induces hippocampal IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits in aged rats. •Isoflurane transiently activates the canonical NF-κB pathway in aged rat hippocampus. •NF-κB inhibitor mitigates isoflurane-induced IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits. •We report a linkage between NF-κB signaling, IL-1β expression, and cognitive changes. -- Abstract: Although much recent evidence has demonstrated that neuroinflammation contributes to volatile anesthetic-induced cognitive deficits, there are few existing mechanistic explanations for this inflammatory process. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane on canonical nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling, and to explore its association with hippocampal interleukin (IL)-1β levels and anesthetic-related cognitive changes in aged rats. After a 4-h exposure to 1.5% isoflurane in 20-month-old rats, increases in IκB kinase and IκB phosphorylation, as well as a reduction in the NF-κB inhibitory protein (IκBα), were observed in the hippocampi of isoflurane-exposed rats compared with control rats. These events were accompanied by an increase in NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation at 6 h after isoflurane exposure and hippocampal IL-1β elevation from 1 to 6 h after isoflurane exposure. Nevertheless, no significant neuroglia activation was observed. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate markedly suppressed the IL-1β increase and NF-κB signaling, and also mitigated the severity of cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze task. Overall, our results demonstrate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may stem from upregulation of hippocampal IL-1β, partially via activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, in aged rats.

  15. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  16. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  17. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Edoxaban Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Yashio, Akihiro; Kashima, Satoko; Mochizuki, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The main adverse effect of anticoagulant therapy is bleeding, and major bleeding, including intracranial, gastrointestinal, and retroperitoneal bleeding, has been reported as an adverse effect of edoxaban, a direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC). Bleeding during systemic anticoagulation with edoxaban presents a therapeutic conundrum, because there is currently no safe or efficacious reversal agent to stop major bleeding. Case Report. A 51-year-old woman had multiple traumatic injuries, including lower limb fractures. On day 8, she developed deep venous thrombosis, and edoxaban was administered orally. On day 38, she developed fungemia, which was treated with an antifungal drug. On day 43, she presented with dyspnea. Chest computed tomography scan showed bilateral diffuse ground-glass opacities in the whole lung fields. The results of the subsequent workup (i.e., serum levels of the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, antinuclear antibody, and antiglomerular basement membrane antibody) and microbiological study were unremarkable. Based on these findings, her condition was diagnosed as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with edoxaban therapy. The lung opacities disappeared spontaneously after edoxaban therapy was discontinued. Conclusion. DAH is a dangerous complication associated with edoxaban therapy. DOACs, including edoxaban, should be prescribed with caution, especially for patients in a critical condition. PMID:27872767

  18. Tooth rotation and alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Peretz, B; Machtei, E E

    1996-07-01

    Tooth rotation and periodontal breakdown has not been thoroughly studied due to lack of quantitative tools. The purpose of the present study was to examine this correlation, with respect to alveolar bone loss, from direct observation of 17 skulls. A photograph of the mandibular occlusal plane was taken from a fixed reference point, and the midcentral fossa and the extreme mesial and distal points of each tooth were marked on the photograph. A computer program established the arch form of each mandibular from the midtooth landmarks. The angle between individual teeth and the arch (at any given point) was calculated. Bone loss, indicated by the distance of the bone crest from the cementoenamel junction, was measured at six reference points around each tooth with a caliper. A positive correlation, through weak, was found between increased tooth rotation and greater bone loss. Mean bone loss of teeth with rotation of 20 degrees and greater was 4.03 mm, while that of teeth with less than 20 degrees of rotation was 3.49 mm.

  19. Lung vasculitis and alveolar hemorrhage: pathology.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary vasculitides are a diverse group of limited and systemic disorders associated with inflammation of pulmonary vessels and parenchyma. These diseases often have distinctive clinical, serological, and histopathological features-extrapulmonary sites of involvement, circulating autoantibodies, predispositions for small or large vessels, and others. Some have characteristic inflammatory lesions; others are characterized by the absence of such lesions. Frequently pathological findings overlap, rendering classification, and diagnosis a challenge. The anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small-vessel diseases constitute the major pulmonary vasculitides. These include Wegener granulomatosis (WG), Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS), and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). Less frequently, diseases such as polyarteritis nodosa, Takayasu arteritis, Behçet syndrome, and connective tissue diseases may involve pulmonary vessels, but these entities are better associated with extrapulmonary disease. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a severe manifestation of pulmonary vasculitis. DAH is most commonly seen in small-vessel vasculitides, specifically MPA and WG. Other syndromes associated with DAH include Goodpasture syndrome, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Less commonly, DAH may be secondary to infection or drugs/toxins. Furthermore, in the absence of discernable systemic disease, DAH may be idiopathic-referred to as isolated pulmonary capillaritis (IPC) or idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH), depending on the presence of capillaritis.

  20. Prophylactic Melatonin Attenuates Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Aged Rats through Hippocampal Melatonin Receptor 2 - cAMP Response Element Binding Signalling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yajie; Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Yang, Ning; Zhou, Yang; Rong, Xiaoying; Qian, Min; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2017-03-01

    Melatonin exerts many physiological effects via melatonin receptors, among which the melatonin-2 receptor (MT2 ) plays a critical role in circadian rhythm disorders, Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. A melatonin replacement strategy has been tested previously, and MT2 was a critical target during the process. cAMP response element binding (CREB) is an essential transcription factor for memory formation and could be involved in MT2 signalling. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effects of prophylactic melatonin on inhaled anaesthetic isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment, and to determine whether the protective effects of melatonin are dependent on MT2 and downstream CREB signalling in the hippocampus of aged rats. The results showed that prophylactic melatonin attenuated isoflurane-induced decreases in plasma/hippocampal melatonin levels and cognitive impairment in aged rats. Furthermore, 4P-PDOT, a selective MT2 antagonist, blocked the protective effects of melatonin on isoflurane-induced decreases in both hippocampal MT2 expression and downstream CREB phosphorylation. And 4P-PDOT blocked the attenuation of melatonin on isoflurane-induced memory impairment. Collectively, the results suggest that the protective effects of prophylactic melatonin are dependent on hippocampal MT2 -CREB signalling, which could be a potential therapeutic target for anaesthetic-induced cognitive impairment.

  1. Daily Isoflurane Exposure Increases Barbiturate Insensitivity in Medullary Respiratory and Cortical Neurons via Expression of ε-Subunit Containing GABA ARs

    PubMed Central

    Hengen, Keith B.; Nelson, Nathan R.; Stang, Kyle M.; Johnson, Stephen M.; Smith, Stephanie M.; Watters, Jyoti J.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Behan, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The parameters governing GABAA receptor subtype expression patterns are not well understood, although significant shifts in subunit expression may support key physiological events. For example, the respiratory control network in pregnant rats becomes relatively insensitive to barbiturates due to increased expression of ε-subunit-containing GABAARs in the ventral respiratory column. We hypothesized that this plasticity may be a compensatory response to a chronic increase in inhibitory tone caused by increased central neurosteroid levels. Thus, we tested whether increased inhibitory tone was sufficient to induce ε-subunit upregulation on respiratory and cortical neurons in adult rats. Chronic intermittent increases in inhibitory tone in male and female rats was induced via daily 5-min exposures to 3% isoflurane. After 7d of treatment, phrenic burst frequency was less sensitive to barbiturate in isoflurane-treated male and female rats in vivo. Neurons in the ventral respiratory group and cortex were less sensitive to pentobarbital in vitro following 7d and 30d of intermittent isoflurane-exposure in both male and female rats. The pentobarbital insensitivity in 7d isoflurane-treated rats was reversible after another 7d. We hypothesize that increased inhibitory tone in the respiratory control network and cortex causes a compensatory increase in ε-subunit-containing GABAARs. PMID:25748028

  2. Quantitative assessment of new cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus and learning after isoflurane or propofol anesthesia in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Erasso, Diana M; Chaparro, Rafael E; Quiroga Del Rio, Carolina E; Karlnoski, Rachel; Camporesi, Enrico M; Saporta, Samuel

    2012-03-02

    There is a growing body of evidence showing that a statistically significant number of people experience long-term changes in cognition after anesthesia. We hypothesize that this cognitive impairment may result from an anesthetic-induced alteration of postnatal hippocampal cell proliferation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of isoflurane and propofol on new cell proliferation and cognition of young (4 month-old) and aged (21 month-old). All rats were injected intraperitoneally (IP) with 50 mg/kg of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immediately after anesthesia. A novel appetitive olfactory learning test was used to assess learning and memory two days after anesthesia. One week after anesthesia, rats were euthanized and the brains analyzed for new cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus, and proliferation and migration of newly formed cells in the subventricular zone to the olfactory bulb. We found that exposure to either isoflurane (p=0.017) or propofol (p=0.006) decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in young, but not in aged rats. This anesthetic-induced decrease was specific to new cell proliferation in the hippocampus, as new cell proliferation and migration to the olfactory bulb was unaffected. Isoflurane anesthesia produced learning impairment in aged rats (p=0.044), but not in young rats. Conversely, propofol anesthesia resulted in learning impairment in young (p=0.01), but not in aged rats. These results indicate that isoflurane and propofol anesthesia affect postnatal hippocampal cell proliferation and learning in an age dependent manner.

  3. Midazolam/ketamine induction and isoflurane maintenance of anaesthesia in a 2-month-old, hand-raised African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Stegmann, G F

    2004-03-01

    The use of a midazolam/ketamine combination for induction of anaesthesia in a 2-month-old, hand-raised buffalo calf (Syncerus caffer) is described to allow endotracheal intubation for the maintenance of anaesthesia with isoflurane and oxygen. Intraoperative complications were hypotension and hypothermia. For postoperative analgesia meloxicam and butorphanol was administered intramuscularly.

  4. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part I: a Systematic Review of Surgical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this first part of a two-part series was to review the literature concerning the indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages and surgical techniques of the lateralization and transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve, followed by the placement of an implant in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC database, academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014 and comprised English-language articles that included adult patients between 18 and 80 years old with minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal who had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) repositioning with a minimum 6 months of follow-up. Results A total of 16 studies were included in this review. Nine were related to IAN transposition, 4 to IAN lateralization and 3 to both transposition and lateralization. Implant treatment results and complications were presented. Conclusions Inferior alveolar nerve lateralization and transposition in combination with the installation of dental implants is sometimes the only possible procedure to help patients to obtain a fixed prosthesis, in edentulous atrophic posterior mandibles. With careful pre-operative surgical and prosthetic planning, imaging, and extremely precise surgical technique, this procedure can be successfully used for implant placement in edentulous posterior mandibular segments. PMID:25937873

  5. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  6. Inhibition of isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3 by serine 465 sequence-specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Li, Liaoliao; Washington, Jacqueline M; Xu, Xuebing; Sando, Julianne J; Lin, Daowei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2011-03-25

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) transport glutamate into cells to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain nontoxic extracellular glutamate levels for neurons. We showed previously that the commonly used volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases the transporting activity of EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. This effect requires a protein kinase C (PKC) α-mediated and S465-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that specific peptides can be designed to block this effect. We conjugated a 10-amino acid synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of EAAT3 around the S465 to a peptide that can facilitate permeation of the plasma membrane. This fusion peptide inhibited the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane in C6 cells and hippocampus. It did not affect the basal EAAT3 activity. This peptide also attenuated isoflurane-induced increase of PKCα in the immunoprecipitates produced by an anti-EAAT3 antibody. A scrambled peptide that has the same amino acid composition as the S465 sequence-specific peptide but has a random sequence did not change the effects of isoflurane on EAAT3. The S465 sequence-specific peptide, but not the scrambled peptide, is a good PKCα substrate in in vitro assay. These peptides did not affect cell viability. These results, along with our previous findings, strongly suggest that PKCα interacts with EAAT3 to regulate its functions. The S465 sequence-specific peptide may interrupt this interaction and is an effective inhibitor for the regulation of EAAT3 activity and trafficking by PKCα and isoflurane.

  7. [Sevoflurane and isoflurane during thoracic operations under artificial one-lung ventilation in patients at a high surgical and anesthesiological risk].

    PubMed

    Riabova, O S; Vyzhigina, M A; Zhukova, S G; Titov, V A; Kulagina, T Iu; Parshin, V D; Sandrikov, V A; Buniatian, A A

    2007-01-01

    The specific features of balanced anesthesia utilizing sevoflurane (versus isoflurane) during thoracic operations under artificial one-lung ventilation (AOL ) have been studied in patients at high operative and anesthetic risks. Unlike isoflurane, sevflurane fails to cause vasodilatation in both the greater and lesser circulation (including in the gas-exchange part ofpulmonary circulation). The difference of the anesthetics in their vasodilating capacity in the vessels of pulmonary and systemic circulation determines various mechanisms of pathophysiological and adaptive circulatory changes in pulmonary collapse and under AOL V Under sevoflurane anesthesia, compensatory blood flow limitation along the collaborated lung due to permanently vasohypertension in gas-exchange microcirculation is accompanied by a systemic circulatory response that is aimed at reducing right ventricular load. Termination of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in the collaborated lung occurs not early than 80-125 min of AOLV, fails to lead to recovery of impaired gas exchange due to vasohypertension and high shunt in the ventilated lung, and is attended by right ventricular overload. The latter differentiates sevoflurane anesthesia from isoflurane one wherein completion of pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction upon 80-125-min exposure to AOL V results in the recovery of gas exchange to the baseline levels. The pattern of reperfusion changes in ventilation emergence in the operated lung under anesthesia using both sevoflurane and isoflurane is of no significant pathological tinge and it is followed by no pulmonary and systemic metabolic disturbances. Isoflurane should be recognized to be preferable component at the stage of anesthesia maintenance in patients with cardiopulmonary diseases during thoracic operations under prolonged AOL V (more than 2 hours).

  8. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part II: a Systematic Review of Neurosensory Complications

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This article, the second in a two-part series, continues the discussion of inferior alveolar nerve lateralization/transposition for dental implant placement. The aim of this article is to review the scientific literature and clinical reports in order to analyse the neurosensory complications, risks and disadvantages of lateralization/transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve followed by implant placement in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC databases, as well as academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014. Articles in English language, which included adult patients between 18 - 80 years of age who had minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal and had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) repositioning, with minimum 6 months of follow-up, were included. Results A total of 21 studies were included in this review. Ten were related to IAN transposition, 7 to IAN lateralization and 4 to both transposition and lateralization. The IAN neurosensory disturbance function was present in most patients (99.47% [376/378]) for 1 to 6 months. In total, 0.53% (2/378) of procedures the disturbances were permanent. Conclusions Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning is related to initial transient change in sensation in the majority of cases. The most popular causes of nerve damage are spatula-caused traction in the mucoperiosteal flap, pressure due to severe inflammation or retention of fluid around the nerve and subsequent development of transient ischemia, and mandibular body fracture. PMID:25937874

  9. Retinoic acid in alveolar development, maintenance and regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Maden, Malcolm; Hind, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Recent data suggest that exogenous retinoic acid (RA), the biologically active derivative of vitamin A, can induce alveolar regeneration in a rat model of experimental emphysema. Here, we describe a mouse model of disrupted alveolar development using dexamethasone administered postnatally. We show that the effects of dexamethasone are concentration dependent, dose dependent, long lasting and result in a severe loss of alveolar surface area. When RA is administered to these animals as adults, lung architecture and the surface area per unit of body weight are completely restored to normal. This remarkable effect may be because RA is required during normal alveolar development and administering RA re-awakens gene cascades used during development. We provide evidence that RA is required during alveologenesis in the mouse by showing that the levels of the retinoid binding proteins, the RA receptors and two RA synthesizing enzymes peak postnatally. Furthermore, an inhibitor of RA synthesis, disulphiram, disrupts alveologenesis. We also show that RA is required throughout life for the maintenance of lung alveoli because when rats are deprived of dietary retinol they lose alveoli and show the features of emphysema. Alveolar regeneration with RA may therefore be an important novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of respiratory diseases characterized by a reduced gas-exchanging surface area such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and emphysema for which there are currently no treatments. PMID:15293808

  10. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  11. Alveolar edema fluid clearance and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, Yves; Matthay, Michael A

    2007-12-15

    Although lung-protective ventilation strategies have substantially reduced mortality of acute lung injury patients there is still a need for new therapies that can further decrease mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Studies of epithelial ion and fluid transport across the distal pulmonary epithelia have provided important new concepts regarding potential new therapies for acute lung injury. Overall, there is convincing evidence that the alveolar epithelium is not only a tight epithelial barrier that resists the movement of edema fluid into the alveoli, but it is also actively involved in the transport of ions and solutes, a process that is essential for edema fluid clearance and the resolution of acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to consider some areas of recent progress in the field of alveolar fluid transport under normal and pathologic conditions. Vectorial ion transport across the alveolar and distal airway epithelia is the primary determinant of alveolar fluid clearance. The general paradigm is that active Na(+) and Cl(-) transport drives net alveolar fluid clearance, as demonstrated in several different species, including the human lung. Although these transport processes can be impaired in severe lung injury, multiple experimental studies suggest that upregulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport might be an effective therapy in acute lung injury. We will review mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of ion transport in lung injury with a special focus on the use of beta-adrenergic agonists which has generated considerable interest and is a promising therapy for clinical acute lung injury.

  12. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage caused by exposure to organic dust.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuzo; Imokawa, Shiro; Nihashi, Fumiya; Uto, Tomohiro; Sato, Jun; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, a life-threatening disease, can complicate various conditions. We herein describe, for the first time, a patient with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage caused by exposure to organic dust. A 49-year-old woman who worked as a cantaloupe farmer in a greenhouse was referred to our hospital for sudden onset of dyspnea 3 h after exposure to organic dust. A chest X-ray and computed tomography scan performed on admission showed diffuse ground-glass opacities in both lung fields. Suspecting hypersensitivity pneumonitis, fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed. Mucopurulent sputum was present in the trachea and both bronchi, and bronchoalveolar lavage revealed a progressively bloody return, typical of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Based on the history and bronchoscopy findings, she was diagnosed with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage following exposure to organic dust and was treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage should be considered in the differential diagnosis of diffuse ground-glass opacities observed on radiographs in farmers following exposure to organic dust.

  13. Differentiation of Club Cells to Alveolar Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dahai; Soh, Boon-Seng; Yin, Lu; Hu, Guangan; Chen, Qingfeng; Choi, Hyungwon; Han, Jongyoon; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Jianzhu

    2017-01-01

    Club cells are known to function as regional progenitor cells to repair the bronchiolar epithelium in response to lung damage. By lineage tracing in mice, we have shown recently that club cells also give rise to alveolar type 2 cells (AT2s) and alveolar type 1 cells (AT1s) during the repair of the damaged alveolar epithelium. Here, we show that when highly purified, anatomically and phenotypically confirmed club cells are seeded in 3-dimensional culture either in bulk or individually, they proliferate and differentiate into both AT2- and AT1-like cells and form alveolar-like structures. This differentiation was further confirmed by transcriptomic analysis of freshly isolated club cells and their cultured progeny. Freshly isolated club cells express Sca-1 and integrin α6, markers commonly used to characterize lung stem/progenitor cells. Together, current study for the first time isolated highly purified club cells for in vitro study and demonstrated club cells’ capacity to differentiate into alveolar epithelial cells at the single-cell level. PMID:28128362

  14. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature)

    PubMed Central

    Seifeldin, Sameh A.

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CL/P) is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material. PMID:26792963

  15. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  16. The Safety of Desiccated Baralyme(TM) in the Narkomed-M Anesthesia Machine: The Effect of Isoflurane and Sevoflurane at Low and High Flow O2 on Absorbent Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    5. FUNDING NUMBERS THE SAFETY OF DESSICATED BARALYME IN THE NARKOMED-M ANESTHESIA MACHINE: THE EFFECT OF ISOFLURANE AND SEVOFLURANE AT LOW AND HIGH...Safety Of Desiccated Baralymel In The Narkomed-M Anesthesia Machine: The Effect of Isoflurane and Sevoflurane at Low And High Flow 02 on Absorbent...within the absorbent and time to maximum temperature under standard OR conditions. Methods: Four experimental conditions were set using sevoflurane

  17. Neutrophil-induced injury of rat pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R H; DeHart, P D; Todd, R F

    1986-01-01

    The damage to pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells that occurs in many inflammatory conditions is thought to be caused in part by phagocytic neutrophils. To investigate this process, we exposed monolayers of purified rat alveolar epithelial cells to stimulated human neutrophils and measured cytotoxicity using a 51Cr-release assay. We found that stimulated neutrophils killed epithelial cells by a process that did not require neutrophil-generated reactive oxygen metabolites. Pretreatment of neutrophils with an antibody (anti-Mo1) that reduced neutrophil adherence to epithelial cells limited killing. Although a variety of serine protease inhibitors partially inhibited cytotoxicity, we found that neutrophil cytoplasts, neutrophil lysates, neutrophil-conditioned medium, purified azurophilic or specific granule contents, and purified human neutrophil elastase did not duplicate the injury. We conclude that stimulated neutrophils can kill alveolar epithelial cells in an oxygen metabolite-independent manner. Tight adherence of stimulated neutrophils to epithelial cell monolayers appears to promote epithelial cell killing. Images PMID:3771800

  18. Alveolar Osteitis: A Comprehensive Review of Concepts and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Kolokythas, Antonia; Olech, Eliza; Miloro, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar osteitis, “dry socket”, remains amongst the most commonly encountered complications following extraction of teeth by general dentists and specialists. A great body of literature is devoted to alveolar osteitis addressing the etiology and pathophysiology of this condition. In addition numerous studies are available discussing methods and techniques to prevent this condition. To this date though great controversy still exists regarding the appropriate terminology used for this condition as well as the actual etiology, pathophysiology, and best methods of prevention and treatment. This article is a comprehensive critical review of the available literature addressing the concepts and controversies surrounding alveolar osteitis. We aim to assist the dental health care professional with patient preparation and management of this commonly encountered postoperative condition should be encountered. PMID:20652078

  19. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence.

  20. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Kevin T.; Brokaw, Everett J.; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure. PMID:27269666

  1. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  2. 2013 Arctic Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Video Gallery

    After an unusually cold summer in the northernmost latitudes, Arctic sea ice appears to have reached its annual minimum summer extent for 2013 on Sept. 13, the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice ...

  3. Arctic Sea Ice Minimum, 2015

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the evolution of the Arctic sea ice cover from its wintertime maximum extent, which was reached on Feb. 25, 2015, and was the lowest on record, to its apparent yearly minimum, ...

  4. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Using a short-term parameter of heart rate variability to distinguish awake from isoflurane anesthetic states.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Hsun; Lee, Yi-Hui; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Wang, Yong-Ping; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Fan, Shou-Zen

    2008-10-01

    The measurement of anesthetic depth is important in anesthesiology. Although heart rate variability (HRV) is profoundly affected by general anesthesia, it has not yet been commonly used in this field. One of the reasons is the lack of suitable parameters of HRV for short-term observations. In this study, we designed a time domain parameter of HRV named the similarity index. It was based on observing the trend of the distribution of instantaneous heart rates as time moved. Taking epochs of ECG data as short as 64 s can derive the index. We observed the values of this index of 30 patients when they were awake and under isoflurane anesthesia. The values had very little overlapping between the two states and the prediction probability to distinguish the two states was 0.91. We suggest that HRV, if suitably treated, can play more roles in the monitoring of anesthetic depth.

  6. Molecular and Integrative Physiological Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia: The Paradigm of Cardiovascular Studies in Rodents using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    To-this-date, the exact molecular, cellular, and integrative physiological mechanisms of anesthesia remain largely unknown. Published evidence indicates that anesthetic effects are multifocal and occur in a time-dependent and coordinated manner, mediated via central, local, and peripheral pathways. Their effects can be modulated by a range of variables, and their elicited end-effect on the integrative physiological response is highly variable. This review summarizes the major cellular and molecular sites of anesthetic action with a focus on the paradigm of isoflurane (ISO) – the most commonly used anesthetic nowadays – and its use in prolonged in vivo rodent studies using imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It also presents established evidence for normal ranges of global and regional physiological cardiac function under ISO, proposes optimal, practical methodologies relevant to the use of anesthetic protocols for MRI and outlines the beneficial effects of nitrous oxide supplementation. PMID:27525256

  7. The Pore Loop Domain of TRPV1 Is Required for Its Activation by the Volatile Anesthetics Chloroform and Isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Corinna; Luo, Jialie; Yin, Shijin; Hu, Hongzhen; Dhaka, Ajay

    2015-07-01

    The environmental irritant chloroform, a naturally occurring small volatile organohalogen, briefly became the world's most popular volatile general anesthetic (VGA) before being abandoned because of its low therapeutic index. When chloroform comes in contact with skin or is ingested, it causes a painful burning sensation. The molecular basis for the pain associated with chloroform remains unknown. In this study, we assessed the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family members in mediating chloroform activation and the molecular determinants of VGA activation of TRPV1. We identified the subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that are activated by chloroform. Additionally, we transiently expressed wild-type or specifically mutated TRP channels in human embryonic kidney cells and used calcium imaging or whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to assess the effects of chloroform or the VGA isoflurane on TRP channel activation. The results revealed that chloroform activates DRG neurons via TRPV1 activation. Furthermore, chloroform activates TRPV1, and it also activates TRPM8 and functions as a potent inhibitor of the noxious chemical receptor TRPA1. The results also indicate that residues in the outer pore region of TRPV1 previously thought to be required for either proton or heat activation of the channel are also required for activation by chloroform and isoflurane. In addition to identifying the molecular basis of DRG neuron activation by chloroform and the opposing effects chloroform has on different TRP channel family members, the findings of this study provide novel insights into the structural basis for the activation of TRPV1 by VGAs.

  8. Secretion of alpha 1-antitrypsin by alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Venembre, P; Boutten, A; Seta, N; Dehoux, M S; Crestani, B; Aubier, M; Durand, G

    1994-06-13

    We have investigated the ability of alveolar epithelial cells (human A549 cell line and rat type-II pneumocytes) to produce alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT). Northern blot analysis demonstrated the presence of an AAT-specific mRNA transcript in A549 cells. Unstimulated A549 cells secreted immunoreactive AAT at a rate of 0.51 +/- 0.04 ng/10(6) cells/h, with a modified glycosylation compared to serum AAT. AAT formed a complex with neutrophil elastase. Rat type-II pneumocytes secreted immunoreactive AAT. Our results suggest that alveolar epithelial cells could participate in antiprotease defense within the lung through local AAT production.

  9. Alveolar hemorrhage as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    de Holanda, Bruna A.; Barreto, Isabela G. Menna; de Araujo, Isadora S. Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage (AH) is a rare syndrome that can often occur in autoimmune diseases, blood clotting disorders, infection or by acute inhalation injury, presenting rapid evolution and high mortality, especially with late diagnosis and treatment. Among the autoimmune diseases, there are reported cases in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An early diagnosis is an essential tool in the successful management of this complication, requiring aggressive treatment based on vigorous immunosuppression and broad-spectrum antibiotic. We describe here a case of alveolar hemorrhage associated with glomerulonephritis as the open presentation in a patient with SLE. PMID:27994272

  10. Alveolar hemorrhage as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    de Holanda, Bruna A; Barreto, Isabela G Menna; de Araujo, Isadora S Gomes; de Araujo, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage (AH) is a rare syndrome that can often occur in autoimmune diseases, blood clotting disorders, infection or by acute inhalation injury, presenting rapid evolution and high mortality, especially with late diagnosis and treatment. Among the autoimmune diseases, there are reported cases in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An early diagnosis is an essential tool in the successful management of this complication, requiring aggressive treatment based on vigorous immunosuppression and broad-spectrum antibiotic. We describe here a case of alveolar hemorrhage associated with glomerulonephritis as the open presentation in a patient with SLE.

  11. Case Report: Multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Jose Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    A multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma in a 68-year-old man is reported. Four different peripheral tumor nodules were identified on gross examination. A fifth central tumor corresponded to a conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that has been very recently characterized as a distinct histotype within the spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunostaining with cyclin D1 seems to be specific of this tumor subtype. This is the first reported case with multifocal presentation. PMID:27158455

  12. From alveolar diffuse atrophy to aggressive periodontitis: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Guzeldemir, Esra; Toygar, Hilal Uslu

    2006-01-01

    Technologic advances in mechanics, electronics, physics, chemistry, and computer science have contributed to advances in dental medicine. Periodontology is not only a clinical science but is also directly related to the basic sciences. Research is conducted in laboratories rather than in clinics now. During the last century, aggressive periodontitis has received attention from numerous researchers because of its multifactorial features. This paper explores the long scientific journey of aggressive periodontitis, beginning with its first definition as alveolar diffuse atrophy. Perhaps in the future, "alveolar diffuse atrophy" will be referred to by another name or term. However, this journey will never end.

  13. Breast metastasis in an adult woman with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of the ethmoid sinus

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sean D.; Raj, Karuna M.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Brahmaroutu, Ashrita; Whitman, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    A new breast mass was identified in an adult woman undergoing treatment for a known ethmoid sinus alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Histopathological evaluation revealed alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma metastatic to the breast. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, primarily described in adolescents and especially rare in adults, can uncommonly metastasize to the breast. PMID:27186248

  14. A Novel Murine Model for Chronic Inflammatory Alveolar Bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2009-01-01

    Objective Chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) demonstrates some similarities of dysregulated chronic immunoinflammatory lesion of periodontitis. Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) administered to rodents have been shown to elicit inflammatory responses that undermine the integrity of the gut epithelium similar to IBD in humans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of these chemicals to elicit periodontal inflammation as a novel model for alveolar bone loss. Methods Mice were treated by oral application of TNBS 2 times/week, or with DSS in the diet over a period of 18 weeks. Alveolar bone loss was assessed on defleshed skull using morphometric measures for area of bone resorption. Results TNBS-treated animals tolerated oral administration with no clinical symptoms and gained weight similar to normal controls. In contrast, DSS exerted a systemic response including shortening of colonic tissue and liver enzyme changes. Both TNBS and DSS caused a localized action on periodontal tissues with alveolar bone loss observed in both maxilla and mandibles with progression in a time dependent manner. Bone loss was detected as early as week 7, with more severe periodontitis increasing over the 18 weeks (p<0.001). Young (7 month) and old (12 month) SCID mice were treated with TNBS for a period of 7 weeks and did not develop significant bone loss. Conclusions These data show that oral administration of TNBS and DSS provoke alveolar bone loss in concert with the autochthonous oral microbiota. PMID:19602109

  15. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage

  16. Alveolar Ridge Split Technique Using Piezosurgery with Specially Designed Tips

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Alessandro; Foresta, Enrico; Falchi, Marco; De Angelis, Paolo; D'Amato, Giuseppe; Pelo, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of patients with atrophic ridge who need prosthetic rehabilitation is a common problem in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Among the various techniques introduced for the expansion of alveolar ridges with a horizontal bone deficit is the alveolar ridge split technique. The aim of this article is to give a description of some new tips that have been specifically designed for the treatment of atrophic ridges with transversal bone deficit. A two-step piezosurgical split technique is also described, based on specific osteotomies of the vestibular cortex and the use of a mandibular ramus graft as interpositional graft. A total of 15 patients were treated with the proposed new tips by our department. All the expanded areas were successful in providing an adequate width and height to insert implants according to the prosthetic plan and the proposed tips allowed obtaining the most from the alveolar ridge split technique and piezosurgery. These tips have made alveolar ridge split technique simple, safe, and effective for the treatment of horizontal and vertical bone defects. Furthermore the proposed piezosurgical split technique allows obtaining horizontal and vertical bone augmentation. PMID:28246596

  17. Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage secondary to propylthiouracil-induced vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Catarina; Costa, Teresa; Marques, Ana Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Propylthiouracil is a drug used to treat hyperthyroidism. It can cause several side effects including pulmonary disorders that, although rare, can be severe. The authors describe the case of a woman treated with propylthiouracil who developed diffuse alveolar haemorrhage with severe respiratory failure and anaemia, which improved with discontinuation of the antithyroid drug and on starting systemic corticosteroid therapy. PMID:25661751

  18. Shock lung and diffuse alveolar damage pathological and pathogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Blennerhassett, J B

    1985-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar damage may be caused by any one or more of a large number of injurious agents. While the etiology may be diverse, the pathology is relatively uniform ranging from an acute exudative phase characterized by protein-rich interstitial and alveolar edema, through to a reactive subacute proliferative phase characterized by interstitial fibroplasia and collagenization together with granular pneumocyte hyperplasia. Interstitial inflammation is a variable feature and of course mixed exudative and proliferative features are common. In the clinically overt adult respiratory distress syndrome, the mortality is formidable. The pathogenesis is damage to endothelial cells and membranous pneumocytes. This may be caused by direct chemical action or indirectly through the mediation of oxidizing free radicles or leukotrienes. In diffuse alveolar damage associated with shock, recent work suggests mediation of the cellular injury via complement activation following tissue injury, with the major pathology being due to lysosomal enzyme damage from phagocytes chemotactically attracted to the lung. Etiological factors in diffuse alveolar damage are numerous and details of appropriate primary therapy are therefore diverse. The pathogenesis and pathology are however relatively uniform, calling for uniform supportive therapeutic measures of the clinical adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  19. Endodontic-related inferior alveolar nerve and mental foramen paresthesia.

    PubMed

    Morse, D R

    1997-10-01

    Paresthesia is a condition that involves perverted sensations of pain, touch, or temperature. It has a variety of possible causes. This article presents a literature review and case reports of endodontically related inferior alveolar nerve and mental foramen paresthesia. Nondrug prevention methods and the dental uses of dexamethasone are also discussed.

  20. The development and plasticity of alveolar type 1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Hernandez, Belinda J.; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Narvaez del Pilar, Odemaris; Vila-Ellis, Lisandra; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Evans, Scott E.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Chen, Jichao

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type 1 (AT1) cells cover >95% of the gas exchange surface and are extremely thin to facilitate passive gas diffusion. The development of these highly specialized cells and its coordination with the formation of the honeycomb-like alveolar structure are poorly understood. Using new marker-based stereology and single-cell imaging methods, we show that AT1 cells in the mouse lung form expansive thin cellular extensions via a non-proliferative two-step process while retaining cellular plasticity. In the flattening step, AT1 cells undergo molecular specification and remodel cell junctions while remaining connected to their epithelial neighbors. In the folding step, AT1 cells increase in size by more than 10-fold and undergo cellular morphogenesis that matches capillary and secondary septa formation, resulting in a single AT1 cell spanning multiple alveoli. Furthermore, AT1 cells are an unexpected source of VEGFA and their normal development is required for alveolar angiogenesis. Notably, a majority of AT1 cells proliferate upon ectopic SOX2 expression and undergo stage-dependent cell fate reprogramming. These results provide evidence that AT1 cells have both structural and signaling roles in alveolar maturation and can exit their terminally differentiated non-proliferative state. Our findings suggest that AT1 cells might be a new target in the pathogenesis and treatment of lung diseases associated with premature birth. PMID:26586225

  1. ACSB: A minimum performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lloyd Thomas; Kissick, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Amplitude companded sideband (ACSB) is a new modulation technique which uses a much smaller channel width than does conventional frequency modulation (FM). Among the requirements of a mobile communications system is adequate speech intelligibility. This paper explores this aspect of minimum required performance. First, the basic principles of ACSB are described, with emphasis on those features that affect speech quality. Second, the appropriate performance measures for ACSB are reviewed. Third, a subjective voice quality scoring method is used to determine the values of the performance measures that equate to the minimum level of intelligibility. It is assumed that the intelligibility of an FM system operating at 12 dB SINAD represents that minimum. It was determined that ACSB operating at 12 dB SINAD with an audio-to-pilot ratio of 10 dB provides approximately the same intelligibility as FM operating at 12 dB SINAD.

  2. The Maunder minimum: a revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, Nadezhda; Ponyavin, Dmitri

    2015-08-01

    One of the most enigmatic features of the solar history in the past was the Maunder minimum (1645-1715). We estimated the daily nominal sunspot counts of each observer individually from 1610 to 1720. Simultaneous comparison of textual reports, tables, and sunspot drawings reveals a significant difference between them. Some observers (among whom were Jean Picard and Giovanni Domenico Cassini, both from the Royal Observatory in Paris) systematically made gaps in reports when others noticed sunspots. Philippe de La Hire announced only fewer sunspot groups compared with the other observers. We argue that different points of view of observers of the seventeenth-century on the origin of sunspots resulted in strong underestimation of sunspot groups. Our findings suggest that the Maunder minimum was an ordinary secular minimum with reduced but non-stopped solar cyclicity.

  3. Differential effects of isoflurane and CO2 inhalation on plasma levels of inflammatory markers associated with collagen-induced arthritis in DBA mice.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher C; Lucas, Edralin A; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J; Kuvibidila, Solo

    2009-07-01

    Inhalation of CO2 or isoflurane is a commonly used method of euthanasia with mice, but information related to their effects on serum inflammatory markers in chronic models of inflammation is limited. In the current study, nineteen-week old DBA female mice with (n = 53) or without (n = 51) collagen-induced arthritis were randomly assigned to euthanization with CO2 (n = 55) or isoflurane (n = 49. Plasma was collected for the measurement of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by ELISA. When mice without and with collagen-induced arthritis were pooled, compared to CO2, administration of isoflurane was associated with lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha (pg/ml, mean +/- SEM) (26.1 +/- 2.82 versus 48.1 +/- 7.99) and IL-6 (25.18 +/- 2.73 versus 48.1 +/- 6.82) (ANOVA, p < 0.05). In contrast to TNF-alpha and IL-6, administration of CO2 decreased the plasma sICAM-1 level (1170+/- 50 versus 758 +/- 24 for CO2) (p < 0.00001). When data were analyzed as a function of collagen-induced arthritis, the differences between CO2 and isoflurane persisted. Low plasma sICAM-1 levels found in CO2 euthanasia group may be due to degradation. Since mice are the most common animal model for studying inflammation, researchers should be aware of these iatrogenic experimental variables before interpreting their data.

  4. Maternal Exposure of Rats to Isoflurane during Late Pregnancy Impairs Spatial Learning and Memory in the Offspring by Up-Regulating the Expression of Histone Deacetylase 2

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Zhao, Weilu; Zuo, Zhiyi; Yu, Qi; Liu, Zhiyi; Lin, Jiamei; Feng, Yunlin; Li, Binda; Wu, Liuqin; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that most general anesthetics can harm developing neurons and induce cognitive dysfunction in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) has been implicated in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Our previous results showed that maternal exposure to general anesthetics during late pregnancy impaired the offspring’s learning and memory, but the role of HDAC2 in it is not known yet. In the present study, pregnant rats were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane in 100% oxygen for 2, 4 or 8 hours or to 100% oxygen only for 8 hours on gestation day 18 (E18). The offspring born to each rat were randomly subdivided into 2 subgroups. Thirty days after birth, the Morris water maze (MWM) was used to assess learning and memory in the offspring. Two hours before each MWM trial, an HDAC inhibitor (SAHA) was given to the offspring in one subgroup, whereas a control solvent was given to those in the other subgroup. The results showed that maternal exposure to isoflurane impaired learning and memory of the offspring, impaired the structure of the hippocampus, increased HDAC2 mRNA and downregulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) mRNA, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2 subunit B (NR2B) mRNA and NR2B protein in the hippocampus. These changes were proportional to the duration of the maternal exposure to isoflurane and were reversed by SAHA. These results suggest that exposure to isoflurane during late pregnancy can damage the learning and memory of the offspring rats via the HDAC2-CREB -NR2B pathway. This effect can be reversed by HDAC2 inhibition. PMID:27536989

  5. The outcome of intraoral onlay block bone grafts on alveolar ridge augmentations: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Aloy-Prósper, Amparo; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to systematically review clinical studies examining the survival and success rates of implants placed with intraoral onlay autogenous bone grafts to answer the following question: do ridge augmentations procedures with intraoral onlay block bone grafts in conjunction with or prior to implant placement influence implant outcome when compared with a control group (guided bone regeneration, alveolar distraction, native bone or short dental implants.)? Material and Method: An electronic data banks and hand searching were used to find relevant articles on vertical and lateral augmentation procedures performed with intraoral onlay block bone grafts for dental implant therapy published up to October 2013. Publications in English, on human subjects, with a controlled study design –involving at least one group with defects treated with intraoral onlay block bone grafts, more than five patients and a minimum follow-up of 12 months after prosthetic loading were included. Two reviewers extracted the data. Results: A total of 6 studies met the inclusion criteria: 4 studies on horizontal augmentation and 2 studies on vertical augmentation. Intraoperative complications were not reported. Most common postsurgical complications included mainly mucosal dehiscences (4 studies), bone graft or membrane exposures (3 studies), complete failures of block grafts (2 studies) and neurosensory alterations (4 studies). For lateral augmentation procedures, implant survival rates ranged from 96.9% to 100%, while for vertical augmentation they ranged from 89.5% to 100%. None article studied the soft tissues healing. Conclusions: Survival and success rates of implants placed in horizontally and vertically resorbed edentulous ridges reconstructed with block bone grafts are similar to those of implants placed in native bone, in distracted sites or with guided bone regeneration. More surgical challenges and morbidity arise from vertical augmentations, thus short

  6. Remodeling dynamics in the alveolar process in skeletally mature dogs.

    PubMed

    Huja, Sarandeep S; Fernandez, Soledad A; Hill, Kara J; Li, Yan

    2006-12-01

    Bone turnover rates can be altered by metabolic and mechanical demands. Due to the difference in the pattern of loading, we hypothesized that there are differences in bone remodeling rates between the maxillary and mandibular alveolar processes. Furthermore, in a canine model, the alveolar process of teeth that lack contact (e.g., second premolars) would have a different turnover rate than bone supporting teeth with functional contact (e.g., first molars). Six skeletally mature male dogs were given a pair of calcein labels. After sacrifice, specimens representing the anterior and posterior locations of both jaws were prepared for examination by histomorphometric methods to evaluate the bone volume/total volume (BV/TV; %), bone volume (mm2), mineral apposition rate (MAR; microm/day), and bone formation rate (BFR; %/year) in the alveolar process. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in the BV/TV within the jaws. The bone volume within the alveolar process of the mandible was 2.8-fold greater than in the maxilla. The MAR was not significantly different between the jaws and anteroposterior locations. However, the BFR was significantly (P<0.0001) greater in the mandible than in the maxilla. The anterior location had higher (P=0.002) remodeling than the posterior location in the maxilla but not in the mandible. While there was a greater bone mass and increased remodeling in the mandible, no remodeling gradient in the coronal-apical direction was apparent in the alveolar process. Bone adaptation probably involves a complex interplay of bone turnover, mass, and architecture.

  7. Morphofunctional and clinical study on mandibular alveolar distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zaffe, Davide; Bertoldi, Carlo; Palumbo, Carla; Consolo, Ugo

    2002-10-01

    Alveolar Distraction Osteogenesis (ADO) is a process which forms new alveolar bone to correct alveolar deformities in ridge height and width. This work aims (a). to verify the predictability of the augmentation of height of atrophic alveolar ridges using an extra-alveolar distraction device and (b). to study the bone processes in order to optimize implanto-prosthetic rehabilitation. ADO was performed on 10 patients with ridge deformities to obtain the required ridge augmentation. Clinical and radiological (OPT and CT with densitometric assay) evaluations were carried out during the following 12 weeks, before implant insertion. Biopsies at 40, 60 and 88 days were studied after general, specific and histochemical staining of slides; microradiographs were analyzed to evaluate the Trabecular Bone Volume. Forty days after the end of distraction, soft callus indicated the start of ossification. Sixty days after the end of distraction, the soft callus was largely converted into a network of trabecular woven bone; osteogenic activity was high and TBV was about 50%. Eighty-eight days after the end of distraction, the amount of bone appeared reduced, with a more ordered structure; bone formation activity and TBV also diminished, whereas osteoclast erosion was active. The densitometric assay shows values increasing from the end of distraction, particularly after implant insertion. Histological results show a regression in bone deposition processes 88 days after the end of distraction culminating in a virtual steady-state after a certain time. The results suggest that early implant insertion may be desirable to avoid bone loss due to mechanical unloading.

  8. Comparison of the influence of two different constant-rate infusions (dexmedetomidine versus morphine) on anaesthetic requirements, cardiopulmonary function and recovery quality in isoflurane anaesthetized horses.

    PubMed

    Gozalo-Marcilla, Miguel; Steblaj, Barbara; Schauvliege, Stijn; Duchateau, Luc; Gasthuys, Frank

    2013-12-01

    Twenty adult healthy horses undergoing elective surgery were involved in this prospective, blinded, clinical study. Horses were randomly allocated to receive a constant rate infusion (CRI) of morphine or dexmedetomidine. After induction, anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen/air and mechanical ventilation applied. The end-tidal isoflurane concentration (FÉISO) was initially set at 0.9% and adjusted by the anaesthetist, to maintain a light surgical plane of anaesthesia, according to an objective flow-chart. The cardiopulmonary function was only minimally different between groups and maintained within clinically normal ranges. Less ketamine was required, FÉISO was lower after 1h and fewer alterations in the anaesthetic depth were needed in horses receiving dexmedetomidine, with better recoveries. One horse receiving morphine developed post-operative colic and pulmonary oedema and two showed box-walking behaviour. This study showed that a dexmedetomidine CRI produced a more stable anaesthetic depth, reduced isoflurane requirements and better recoveries, without post-operative complications compared with a morphine CRI.

  9. DA-Raf-dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells controls alveolar formation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Takano, Kazunori; Sakamoto, Akemi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Endo, Takeshi; Hatano, Masahiko

    2014-06-03

    Alveolar formation is coupled to the spatiotemporally regulated differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts (AMYFs), which contribute to the morphological changes of interalveolar walls. Although the Ras-ERK signaling pathway is one of the key regulators for alveolar formation in developing lungs, the intrinsic molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying its role remain largely unknown. By analyzing the Ras-ERK signaling pathway during postnatal development of lungs, we have identified a critical role of DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf)-a dominant-negative antagonist for the Ras-ERK signaling pathway-in alveolar formation. DA-Raf-deficient mice displayed alveolar dysgenesis as a result of the blockade of AMYF differentiation. DA-Raf is predominantly expressed in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) in developing lungs, and DA-Raf-dependent MEK1/2 inhibition in AEC2s suppresses expression of tissue inhibitor of matalloprotienase 4 (TIMP4), which prevents a subsequent proteolytic cascade matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)14-MMP2. Furthermore, MMP14-MMP2 proteolytic cascade regulates AMYF differentiation and alveolar formation. Therefore, DA-Raf-dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in AEC2s is required for alveolar formation via triggering MMP2 activation followed by AMYF differentiation. These findings reveal a pivotal role of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in the dynamic regulation of alveolar development.

  10. The Rho pathway mediates transition to an alveolar type I cell phenotype during static stretch of alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Cherie D; Varghese, Linda S; Gonzales, Linda W.; Margulies, Susan S.; Guttentag, Susan H.

    2011-01-01

    Stretch is an essential mechanism for lung growth and development. Animal models in which fetal lungs have been chronically over- or under-distended demonstrate a disrupted mix of type II and type I cells, with static overdistention typically promoting a type I cell phenotype. The Rho GTPase family, key regulators of cytoskeletal signaling, are known to mediate cellular differentiation in response to stretch in other organs. Using a well-described model of alveolar epithelial cell differentiation and a validated stretch device, we investigated the effects of supraphysiologic stretch on human fetal lung (HFL) alveolar epithelial cell phenotype. Static stretch applied to epithelial cells suppressed type II cell markers (SP-B and Pepsinogen C, PGC), and induced type I cell markers (Caveolin-1, Claudin 7 and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1, PAI-1) as predicted. Static stretch was also associated with Rho A activation. Furthermore, the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 decreased Rho A activation, and blunted the stretch-induced changes in alveolar epithelial cell marker expression. Together these data provide further evidence that mechanical stimulation of the cytoskeleton and Rho activation are key upstream events in mechanotransduction-associated alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. PMID:20220547

  11. Three-dimensional analysis of alveolar wall destruction in the early stage of pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Uehara, Takeshi; Kawasaki, Kenji; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Matsumoto, Gou; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    The morphological mechanism of alveolar wall destruction during pulmonary emphysema has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to elucidate this process three-dimensionally. Lung specimens from five patients with pulmonary emphysema were used, and five controls with normal alveolar structure were also examined. Sections 150 μm thick were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, elastica, and silver impregnation, and immunostained with selected antibodies. We examined these sections three-dimensionally using a laser confocal microscope and a light microscope. There were only a few Kohn's pores and no fenestrae in the normal alveoli from the controls. In the lungs of the emphysema patients a small rupture appeared in the extremely thin alveolar wall among the alveolar capillaries. This rupture enlarged to form a circle surrounded by the capillaries, which was called an alveolar fenestra. Two neighboring fenestrae fused by breakdown of the collapsed or cord-like capillary between them to form a large fenestra. The large fenestrae fused repeatedly to become larger, and these were bordered by thick elastic fibers constructing an alveolar framework. Alveolar wall destruction during emphysema could start from small ruptures of the alveolar wall that become fenestrae surrounded by capillaries, which fuse repeatedly to become larger fenestrae rimmed with elastic fibers. The alveolar capillary network could initially prevent enlargement of the fenestrae, and the thick elastic fibers constituting the alveolar framework could secondarily prevent destruction of the alveolar wall structure.

  12. 75 FR 6151 - Minimum Capital

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... comment on a proposed rule to effect a provision of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and..., for rescinding such an increase and a time frame for review of such an increase. DATES: Comments on... effect the higher temporary minimum capital level, the Director must issue regulations setting...

  13. Tennessee Minimum School Bus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The School Bus Specifications and Procedures adopted by the 2000 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) were used as guides by the Tennessee State Board of Education Pupil Transportation Advisory Committee in developing the revised minimum specifications for school bus chassis and school…

  14. General Requirements and Minimum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This publication provides the General Requirements and Minimum Standards developed by the National Court Reporters Association's Council on Approved Student Education (CASE). They are the same for all court reporter education programs, whether an institution is applying for approval for the first time or for a new grant of approval. The first…

  15. The interaction of nitrous oxide and fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane blocking motor movement (MACNM) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Seddighi, Reza; Doherty, Thomas J; Kukanich, Butch; Egger, Christine M; Henn, Melissa A; Long, Whitney M; Rohrbach, Barton W

    2014-07-01

    The study objective was to determine the effects of 70% nitrous oxide (N2O) and fentanyl on the end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane necessary to prevent movement (MACNM) in response to noxious stimulation in dogs. Six healthy, adult, intact male, mixed-breed dogs were used on 3 occasions in a randomized crossover design. After induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane, each of the following treatments was randomly administered: fentanyl loading dose (Ld) of 15 μg/kg and infusion of 6 μg/kg per hour [treatment 1 (T1)], 70% N2O (T2), or fentanyl (Ld of 15 μg/kg and infusion of 6 μg/kg per hour) combined with 70% N2O (T3). Each dog received each of the 3 treatments once during the 3-week period. Determination of MACNM was initiated 90 min after the start of each treatment. The values were compared using the baseline MACNM, which had been determined in a previous study on the same group of dogs. Data were analyzed using a mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer tests, and expressed as least squares mean ± SEM. The baseline MACNM decreased by 36.6 ± 4.0%, 15.0 ± 4.0%, and 46.0 ± 4.0% for T1, T2, and T3, respectively (P < 0.05), and differed (P < 0.05) among treatments. Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations did not differ (P ≥ 0.05) between T1 (3.70 ± 0.56 ng/mL) and T3 (3.50 ± 0.56 ng/mL). The combination of fentanyl and N2O resulted in a greater sevoflurane MACNM sparing effect than either treatment alone.

  16. [A functional approach in the primary treatment of labial-alveolar-velopalatine clefts for a minimum of sequels].

    PubMed

    Talmant, J-C; Talmant, J-Ch; Lumineau, J-P

    2007-09-01

    Is the poor potential of growth an ineluctable consequence of mesodermal deficiency? Should we agree with the idea that all protocols are equivalent? Actually, these opinions reflect the empiricism of previous generations. We must now become rational and develop a project without compromise to achieve good functions at primary surgery. 'The normal structures are present on either side of the cleft, only modified by the fact of the cleft...' Victor Veau's hypothesis is the conclusion of rigorous anatomical and embryological research. Our current knowledge of the pathological anatomy allows for a better restoration of the normal anatomy. Anatomy is nothing if it is not functional. Every thing should be done to control the healing process to allow the best expression and interaction of the various functions, especially for those concerning nasal ventilation and masticatory efficiency. To correct the deformity, the cleft surgeon must perform a wide subperiosteal and subperichondrial elevation and must learn the skills of this accurate work to preserve the integrity of very fragile structures. The primary treatment must take into account a rational and uncompromising selection of the age of the first operation, of the successive procedures, and their chronology to benefit from the growth spurt of the maxilla, and to avoid the worse scars resulting from secondary epithelialization. Finally, if nasal breathing is the most important function concerning facial growth, it is essential to restore this normal function at the time of the first operation. The oral breathing pattern set at the time of the first operation leaves a cortical imprint that is very difficult to erase, even after clearing the nasal airways. The results of the functional approach we have used in the last decade are particularly consistent and very convincing. In this ambitious and demanding program, the patient comes first; we decrease the burden for him and his family, and give them the benefit of a good social life before school age.

  17. Solar Effects on Climate and the Maunder Minimum: Minimum Certainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    2003-01-01

    The current state of our understanding of solar effects on climate is reviewed. As an example of the relevant issues, the climate during the Maunder Minimum is compared with current conditions in GCM simulations that include a full stratosphere and parameterized ozone response to solar spectral irradiance variability and trace gas changes. The GISS Global Climate/Middle Atmosphere Model coupled to a q-flux/mixed layer model is used for the simulations, which begin in 1500 and extend to the present. Experiments were made to investigate the effect of total versus spectrally-varying solar irradiance changes; spectrally-varying solar irradiance changes on the stratospheric ozone/climate response with both pre-industrial and present trace gases; and the impact on climate and stratospheric ozone of the preindustrial trace gases and aerosols by themselves. The results showed that: (1) the Maunder Minimum cooling relative to today was primarily associated with reduced anthropogenic radiative forcing, although the solar reduction added 40% to the overall cooling. There is no obvious distinguishing surface climate pattern between the two forcings. (2)The global and tropical response was greater than 1 C, in a model with a sensitivity of 1.2 C per W m-2. To reproduce recent low-end estimates would require a sensitivity 1/4 as large. (3) The global surface temperature change was similar when using the total and spectral irradiance prescriptions, although the tropical response was somewhat greater with the former, and the stratospheric response greater with the latter. (4) Most experiments produce a relative negative phase of the NAO/AO during the Maunder Minimum, with both solar and anthropogenic forcing equally capable, associated with the tropical cooling and relative poleward EP flux refraction. (5) A full stratosphere appeared to be necessary for the negative AO/NAO phase, as was the case with this model for global warming experiments, unless the cooling was very large

  18. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  19. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  20. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  1. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  2. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  3. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  4. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Chart / Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  5. Law of the Minimum paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Gorban, Alexander N; Pokidysheva, Lyudmila I; Smirnova, Elena V; Tyukina, Tatiana A

    2011-09-01

    The "Law of the Minimum" states that growth is controlled by the scarcest resource (limiting factor). This concept was originally applied to plant or crop growth (Justus von Liebig, 1840, Salisbury, Plant physiology, 4th edn., Wadsworth, Belmont, 1992) and quantitatively supported by many experiments. Some generalizations based on more complicated "dose-response" curves were proposed. Violations of this law in natural and experimental ecosystems were also reported. We study models of adaptation in ensembles of similar organisms under load of environmental factors and prove that violation of Liebig's law follows from adaptation effects. If the fitness of an organism in a fixed environment satisfies the Law of the Minimum then adaptation equalizes the pressure of essential factors and, therefore, acts against the Liebig's law. This is the the Law of the Minimum paradox: if for a randomly chosen pair "organism-environment" the Law of the Minimum typically holds, then in a well-adapted system, we have to expect violations of this law.For the opposite interaction of factors (a synergistic system of factors which amplify each other), adaptation leads from factor equivalence to limitations by a smaller number of factors.For analysis of adaptation, we develop a system of models based on Selye's idea of the universal adaptation resource (adaptation energy). These models predict that under the load of an environmental factor a population separates into two groups (phases): a less correlated, well adapted group and a highly correlated group with a larger variance of attributes, which experiences problems with adaptation. Some empirical data are presented and evidences of interdisciplinary applications to econometrics are discussed.

  6. Minimum thickness anterior porcelain restorations.

    PubMed

    Radz, Gary M

    2011-04-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) provide the dentist and the patient with an opportunity to enhance the patient's smile in a minimally to virtually noninvasive manner. Today's PLV demonstrates excellent clinical performance and as materials and techniques have evolved, the PLV has become one of the most predictable, most esthetic, and least invasive modalities of treatment. This article explores the latest porcelain materials and their use in minimum thickness restoration.

  7. Alveolar bone loss in osteoporosis: a loaded and cellular affair?

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, Grethe; Rythén, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary and mandibular bone mirror skeletal bone conditions. Bone remodeling happens at endosteal surfaces where the osteoclasts and osteoblasts are situated. More surfaces means more cells and remodeling. The bone turnover rate in the mandibular alveolar process is probably the fastest in the body; thus, the first signs of osteoporosis may be revealed here. Hormones, osteoporosis, and aging influence the alveolar process and the skeletal bones similarly, but differences in loading between loaded, half-loaded, and unloaded bones are important to consider. Bone mass is redistributed from one location to another where strength is needed. A sparse trabeculation in the mandibular premolar region (large intertrabecular spaces and thin trabeculae) is a reliable sign of osteopenia and a high skeletal fracture risk. Having dense trabeculation (small intertrabecular spaces and well-mineralized trabeculae) is generally advantageous to the individual because of the low fracture risk, but may imply some problems for the clinician. PMID:27471408

  8. Retinoid induction of alveolar regeneration: from mice to man?

    PubMed

    Hind, M; Gilthorpe, A; Stinchcombe, S; Maden, M

    2009-05-01

    The use of retinoids to induce human lung regeneration is under investigation in a number of studies in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Retinoic acid (RA) has complex pleiotropic functions during vertebrate patterning and development and can induce regeneration in a number of different organ systems. Studies of retinoid signalling during lung development might provide a molecular basis to explain pharmacological induction of alveolar regeneration in adult models of lung disease. In this review the role of endogenous RA signalling during alveologenesis is explored and data suggesting that a number of exogenous retinoids can induce regeneration in the adult lung are discussed. Current controversies in this area are highlighted and a hypothesis of lung regeneration is put forward. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of induction of regeneration will be central for effective translation into patients with lung disease and may reveal novel insights into the pathogenesis of alveolar disease and senescence.

  9. Rudolf Virchow and the recognition of alveolar echinococcosis, 1850s.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Frosch, Matthias

    2007-05-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis, which is caused by the larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the most dangerous parasitic diseases. It is endemic in many parts of the Northern Hemisphere and an emerging health problem in the People's Republic of China. In Europe and North America, human cases are rare, but concomitant with an increase in the population of the final host, the red fox, an increase of human infections is expected. Rudolf Virchow, the father of the concept of cellular pathology, determined in the 1850s that an Echinococcus sp. was the causative agent of this enigmatic emerging disease. In his famous publication in 1855, he described the clinical course of the disease, its macroscopic aspects, and histopathologic findings in detail. He also identified the disease formerly known as alveolar colloid of the liver to be an infection with the larval stage of an Echinococcus sp.

  10. An automatic early stage alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation method on digital dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hiroki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a kind of typical dental diseases, which affects many adults. The presence of alveolar bone resorption, which can be observed from dental panoramic radiographs, is one of the most important signs of the progression of periodontal disease. Automatically evaluating alveolar-bone resorption is of important clinic meaning in dental radiology. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel system for automated alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation from digital dental panoramic radiographs for the first time. The proposed system enables visualization and quantitative evaluation of alveolar bone resorption degree surrounding the teeth. It has the following procedures: (1) pre-processing for a test image; (2) detection of tooth root apices with Gabor filter and curve fitting for the root apex line; (3) detection of features related with alveolar bone by using image phase congruency map and template matching and curving fitting for the alveolar line; (4) detection of occlusion line with selected Gabor filter; (5) finally, evaluation of the quantitative alveolar-bone-resorption degree in the area surrounding teeth by simply computing the average ratio of the height of the alveolar bone and the height of the teeth. The proposed scheme was applied to 30 patient cases of digital panoramic radiographs, with alveolar bone resorption of different stages. Our initial trial on these test cases indicates that the quantitative evaluation results are correlated with the alveolar-boneresorption degree, although the performance still needs further improvement. Therefore it has potential clinical practicability.

  11. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review aetiological factors, mechanism, clinical symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as to create treatment guidelines for the management of inferior alveolar nerve injury during dental implant placement. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were inferior alveolar nerve injury, inferior alveolar nerve injuries, inferior alveolar nerve injury implant, inferior alveolar nerve damage, inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia and inferior alveolar nerve repair. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to November 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, periodontal and oral surgery journals and books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical, human anatomy and physiology studies. Results In total 136 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. Aetiological factors of inferior alveolar nerve injury, risk factors, mechanism, clinical sensory nerve examination methods, clinical symptoms and treatment were discussed. Guidelines were created to illustrate the methods used to prevent and manage inferior alveolar nerve injury before or after dental implant placement. Conclusions The damage of inferior alveolar nerve during the dental implant placement can be a serious complication. Clinician should recognise and exclude aetiological factors leading to nerve injury. Proper presurgery planning, timely diagnosis and treatment are the key to avoid nerve sensory disturbances management. PMID:24421983

  12. Relationship of Anterior Alveolar Dimensions with Mandibular Divergence in Class I Malocclusion – A Cephalometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Korath, Vinoth Abraham; Nagachandran; Vijayalakshmi, Devaki; Parameswaran, Ratna; Raman, Priya; Sunitha, Catherine; Khan, Nayeemullah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the major limiting factors in retraction of proclined teeth is the width of the alveolus both in maxilla and mandible. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the maxillary and mandibular anterior alveolar dimensions and to correlate with mandibular divergence in Class I bi-dento-alveolar protrusion patients. Materials and Methods Pretreatment lateral cephalograms (n=88) were analysed using a composite analysis with cephalometric software. Both maxillary and mandibular anterior alveolar widths and heights were measured and correlated with mandibular divergence. One-way analysis (ANOVA) and Pearson correlation test were used to compare and establish the significance between groups. Results Segregation of the data based on variation in the bi-cortical widths and heights showed that lesser alveolar widths and greater alveolar heights were associated with the high angled subjects and greater alveolar widths and lesser heights were associated with low angled subjects. Conclusion Patients with hyperdivergent mandible exhibited thin anterior alveolar width and greater alveolar height whereas low angled subjects had wider alveolar width and lesser alveolar height. Orthodontic treatment plan for retraction of anterior teeth must be based on these differences caused by variations in mandibular divergence. PMID:27437356

  13. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use.

  14. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  15. Chloride transport-driven alveolar fluid secretion is a major contributor to cardiogenic lung edema.

    PubMed

    Solymosi, Esther A; Kaestle-Gembardt, Stefanie M; Vadász, István; Wang, Liming; Neye, Nils; Chupin, Cécile Julie Adrienne; Rozowsky, Simon; Ruehl, Ramona; Tabuchi, Arata; Schulz, Holger; Kapus, Andras; Morty, Rory E; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2013-06-18

    Alveolar fluid clearance driven by active epithelial Na(+) and secondary Cl(-) absorption counteracts edema formation in the intact lung. Recently, we showed that impairment of alveolar fluid clearance because of inhibition of epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaCs) promotes cardiogenic lung edema. Concomitantly, we observed a reversal of alveolar fluid clearance, suggesting that reversed transepithelial ion transport may promote lung edema by driving active alveolar fluid secretion. We, therefore, hypothesized that alveolar ion and fluid secretion may constitute a pathomechanism in lung edema and aimed to identify underlying molecular pathways. In isolated perfused lungs, alveolar fluid clearance and secretion were determined by a double-indicator dilution technique. Transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and alveolar Cl(-) influx were quantified by radionuclide tracing and alveolar Cl(-) imaging, respectively. Elevated hydrostatic pressure induced ouabain-sensitive alveolar fluid secretion that coincided with transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and alveolar Cl(-) influx. Inhibition of either cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters (NKCC) blocked alveolar fluid secretion, and lungs of CFTR(-/-) mice were protected from hydrostatic edema. Inhibition of ENaC by amiloride reproduced alveolar fluid and Cl(-) secretion that were again CFTR-, NKCC-, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-dependent. Our findings show a reversal of transepithelial Cl(-) and fluid flux from absorptive to secretory mode at hydrostatic stress. Alveolar Cl(-) and fluid secretion are triggered by ENaC inhibition and mediated by NKCC and CFTR. Our results characterize an innovative mechanism of cardiogenic edema formation and identify NKCC1 as a unique therapeutic target in cardiogenic lung edema.

  16. Effect of the inhaled anesthetics isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on the neuropathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, JUE; JIANG, HONG

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in individuals >65 years of age is 13% and ~66 million individuals in this age group undergo surgery annually under anesthesia. It is therefore important to determine whether commonly used inhaled anesthetics induce cytotoxicity, which may lead to neurodegeneration. Findings from several studies suggest that the anesthetics, isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane, may activate caspases, increase the synthesis and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) protein, and induce hyperphosphorylation of tau proteins, all of which are cellular responses consistent with the neuropathogenesis of AD. Other studies have arrived at different and occasionally contradictory conclusions. The present review attempts to resolve this discrepancy by reviewing previous studies, which have investigated the effects of commonly used inhaled anesthetics on the synthesis and accumulation of Aβ, tau pathology and cognitive function. The possible underlying mechanism was also reviewed. However, several aspects of this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. Further studies are required to fully examine anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity and elucidate the effect of inhaled anesthetics on the onset and progression of AD. PMID:25738734

  17. Isoflurane preconditioning provides neuroprotection against stroke by regulating the expression of the TLR4 signalling pathway to alleviate microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meiyan; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Xiaoyong; Gao, Changjun; Yang, Lu; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Daihua; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Lixian; Chen, Lei; Sun, Xude

    2015-01-01

    Excessive microglial activation often contributes to inflammation-mediated neurotoxicity in the ischemic penumbra during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to induce microglial activation via the NF-κB pathway. Isoflurane preconditioning (IP) can provide neuroprotection and inhibit microglial activation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the TLR4 signalling pathway in IP to exert neuroprotection following ischemic stroke in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that 2% IP alleviated neurological deficits, reduced the infarct volume, attenuated apoptosis and weakened microglial activation in the ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, IP down-regulated the expression of HSP 60, TLR4 and MyD88 and up-regulated inhibitor of IκB-α expression compared with I/R group in vivo. In vitro, 2% IP and a specific inhibitor of TLR4, CLI-095, down-regulated the expression of TLR4, MyD88, IL-1β, TNF-α and Bax, and up-regulated IκB-α and Bcl-2 expression compared with OGD group. Moreover, IP and CLI-095 attenuated microglial activation-induced neuronal apoptosis, and overexpression of the TLR4 gene reversed the neuroprotective effects of IP. In conclusion, IP provided neuroprotection by regulating TLR4 expression directly, alleviating microglial activation and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the activation of microglial activation via TLR4 may be a new avenue for stroke treatment. PMID:26086415

  18. Anaesthesia with medetomidine-ketamine-isoflurane with and without midazolam, in eight captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) premedicated with oral zuclopenthixol.

    PubMed

    Adami, C; Wenker, C; Hoby, S; Morath, U; Bergadano, A

    2013-08-01

    In 8 captive adult chimpanzees of various ages premedicated with oral zuclopenthixol anaesthesia was induced intramuscularly with a combination of medetomidine and ketamine (40 or 50 µg/kg and 5 mg/kg, IM, respectively), with and without midazolam (0.05 mg/kg), and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. At the end of the procedure, sedation was reversed with atipamezole (0.25 mg/kg, IM) and sarmazenil (0.005 mg/kg, IM) when midazolam had been administered. Oral zuclopenthixol resulted in tranquillization of the whole group and only one animal required a second dart injection to achieve adequately deep anaesthesia. Effective and reliable anaesthesia was achieved in all apes; the depth of hypnosis was stable and sudden arousal did not occur. Physiological parameters remained within normal ranges in the majority of the animals; however, manageable anaesthesia-related complications, namely apnoea after darting, hypotension, hypoventilation, hypoxemia and prolonged recovery, occurred in 6 out of 8 animals. The use of monitoring devices was essential to guarantee adequate management of these complications.

  19. Evaluation of optical reflectance techniques for imaging of alveolar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, Carolin I.; Namati, Eman; Warger, William C.; Liu, Linbo; Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the fine structures within the lung parenchyma could advance our understanding of alveolar physiology and pathophysiology. Current knowledge has been primarily based on histology, but it is a destructive two-dimensional (2-D) technique that is limited by tissue processing artifacts. Micro-CT provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging within a limited sample size, but is not applicable to intact lungs from larger animals or humans. Optical reflectance techniques offer the promise to visualize alveolar regions of the large animal or human lung with sub-cellular resolution in three dimensions. Here, we present the capabilities of three optical reflectance techniques, namely optical frequency domain imaging, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy, and full field optical coherence microscopy, to visualize both gross architecture as well as cellular detail in fixed, phosphate buffered saline-immersed rat lung tissue. Images from all techniques were correlated to each other and then to corresponding histology. Spatial and temporal resolution, imaging depth, and suitability for in vivo probe development were compared to highlight the merits and limitations of each technology for studying respiratory physiology at the alveolar level.

  20. Chronic alcohol ingestion changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Trac, David; Brewer, Elizabeth M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2013-01-01

    Similar to effects of alcohol on the heart, liver, and brain, the effects of ethanol (EtOH) on lung injury are preventable. Unlike other vital organ systems, however, the lethal effects of alcohol on the lung are underappreciated, perhaps because there are no signs of overt pulmonary disorder until a secondary insult, such as a bacterial infection or injury, occurs in the lung. This paper provides overview of the complex changes in the alveolar environment known to occur following both chronic and acute alcohol exposures. Contemporary animal and cell culture models for alcohol-induced lung dysfunction are discussed, with emphasis on the effect of alcohol on transepithelial transport processes, namely, epithelial sodium channel activity (ENaC). The cascading effect of tissue and phagocytic Nadph oxidase (Nox) may be triggered by ethanol exposure, and as such, alcohol ingestion and exposure lead to a prooxidative environment; thus impacting alveolar macrophage (AM) function and oxidative stress. A better understanding of how alcohol changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium can lead to improvements in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which hospitalized alcoholics are at an increased risk.

  1. Dento-alveolar characteristics in adolescents born extremely preterm.

    PubMed

    Rythén, Marianne; Thilander, Birgit; Robertson, Agneta

    2013-08-01

    It has been shown that children born extremely preterm (EPT) often suffer from medical complications and growth restrictions in early childhood. Catchup growth diminishes these effects but the children are known to have lower weight, height, and head circumference as school children. Effects on enamel development have been shown. How this affects the dento-alveolar outcome during adolescence is not known. Forty EPT children with a gestational age (GA) of less than 29 weeks, at 12-16 years of age, and matched healthy controls born at term, with a GA of 37-43 weeks, were examined. Data from the clinical examination, dental casts, and bitewing radiographs were collected and compared. Malocclusion was noted, and dento-alveolar length, width, palatal height, and mesio-distal tooth width were measured. Medical diagnoses, neurological, and neuropsychiatric disturbances were noted at the time of the survey. The two groups were compared with an epidemiological normal reference material. The results showed no differences between the controls and reference material. Angle Class II was the most frequent malocclusion associated with morbidity, neurological, and neuropsychiatric disturbances, followed by deep bite and overjet. Three or more malocclusions were almost twice as common among the EPT children compared with the controls. Significantly smaller incisors, canines, and first molars were found. In summary, the EPT children, during adolescence, had medical aberrations as well as dento-alveolar effects opposed to the healthy children born at term. Dentists should be aware of this and treatment plans should be made in due time.

  2. Intraosseous schwannoma originating in inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kenichiro; Ogane, Satoru; Muramatsu, Kyotaro; Ohata, Hitoshi; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Takano, Nobuo; Shibahara, Takahiko; Eguchi, Jun; Murakami, Satoshi; Matsuzaka, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign neoplasms derived from Schwann cells of the neurilemma and appear most frequently on the auditory nerve or peripheral nerves of the skin. They arise in the oral and maxillofacial region infrequently, and very rarely in the center of the jaw. We herein present a case of a rare mandibular intraosseous schwannoma derived from the main trunk of the inferior alveolar nerve in a 33-year-old man. Fusiform expansion in the mandibular canal was observed and a mass showing the target sign in the mandibular canal was confirmed on T2-weighted and Gd contrastenhanced T1-weighted MRI. Based on these findings, an inferior alveolar nerve-derived schwannoma or other benign nervous system neoplasm was diagnosed. A buccal side cortical bone flap in the mandibular molar region was removed to expose the mass, which was then peeled away from the nerve fibers and completely removed. Some inferior alveolar nerve fibers that were connected to the mass were removed at the same time, but the remaining nerve fiber bundle was preserved. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a schwannoma with Antoni type A and Antoni type B regions. Although the patient experienced extremely mild paresthesia in the skin over the mental region and mental foramen at immediately after surgery, this had almost entirely disappeared at 7 years and 4 months later, and there has been no tumor recurrence.

  3. Three Dimensional Alveolar Flow Phenomena Using a CFD Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznitman, Josue

    2005-11-01

    Respiratory flows in the lung periphery are characterized by low Reynolds numbers (typically Re<1) in sub-millimeter airways marked by the presence of alveoli (gas exchange units). We present for realistic breathing conditions using CFD simulations (CFX-5.7.1), 3D velocity fields and flow patterns induced by the expansion/contraction of alveoli and acinar ducts during oscillatory flow. Based on anatomical data, the alveolus and airway are modeled as a spherical cap connected to a cylindrical duct, both subject to moving wall boundary conditions simulating respiration. The resulting 3D flow patterns are complex and governed by the ratio of the alveolar to ductal flow rates. This ratio describes the interplay between alveolar recirculation, induced by the ductal shear flow over the alveolus opening, and alveolar radial flow, induced by the expansion/contraction motion. Our 3D results are in good agreement with 2D simulations reported in the literature. Although convection mechanisms may transport gas along acinar ducts and deeper into the acinus, velocity fields within alveoli predict that upon gas entering them, transport is then solely dominated by diffusion mechanisms.

  4. Influence of the Alveolar Cleft Type on Preoperative Estimation Using 3D CT Assessment for Alveolar Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hang Suk; Choi, Hyun Gon; Kim, Soon Heum; Park, Hyung Jun; Shin, Dong Hyeok; Jo, Dong In; Kim, Cheol Keun

    2012-01-01

    Background The bone graft for the alveolar cleft has been accepted as one of the essential treatments for cleft lip patients. Precise preoperative measurement of the architecture and size of the bone defect in alveolar cleft has been considered helpful for increasing the success rate of bone grafting because those features may vary with the cleft type. Recently, some studies have reported on the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) assessment of alveolar bone defect; however, no study on the possible implication of the cleft type on the difference between the presumed and actual value has been conducted yet. We aimed to evaluate the clinical predictability of such measurement using 3D CT assessment according to the cleft type. Methods The study consisted of 47 pediatric patients. The subjects were divided according to the cleft type. CT was performed before the graft operation and assessed using image analysis software. The statistical significance of the difference between the preoperative estimation and intraoperative measurement was analyzed. Results The difference between the preoperative and intraoperative values were -0.1±0.3 cm3 (P=0.084). There was no significant intergroup difference, but the groups with a cleft palate showed a significant difference of -0.2±0.3 cm3 (P<0.05). Conclusions Assessment of the alveolar cleft volume using 3D CT scan data and image analysis software can help in selecting the optimal graft procedure and extracting the correct volume of cancellous bone for grafting. Considering the cleft type, it would be helpful to extract an additional volume of 0.2 cm3 in the presence of a cleft palate. PMID:23094242

  5. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure.

  6. Minimum Bayes risk image correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

  7. Resistance minimum and heavy fermions

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kondo

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon of the resistance minimum in dilute magnetic alloys is explained in terms of the s-d interaction which takes account of scattering of the conduction electron off the magnetic impurities in metals. Some of the intermetallic compounds which involve rare earth elements or uranium show a very large electronic specific heat and remain non-magnetic even though they show a Curie-like susceptibility at higher temperatures. These phenomena are also explained based on the s-d interaction model. PMID:25792794

  8. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure. PMID:24932126

  9. Differential influence of propofol and isoflurane anesthesia in a non-human primate on the brain kinetics and binding of [(18)F]DPA-714, a positron emission tomography imaging marker of glial activation.

    PubMed

    Saba, Wadad; Goutal, Sébastien; Kuhnast, Bertrand; Dollé, Frédéric; Auvity, Sylvain; Fontyn, Yoan; Cayla, Jérôme; Peyronneau, Marie-Anne; Valette, Héric; Tournier, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) expression at the mitochondrial membrane of glial cells is related to glial activation. TSPO radioligands such as [(18)F]DPA-714 are useful for the non-invasive study of neuroimmune processes using positron emission tomography (PET). Anesthetic agents were shown to impact mitochondrial function and may influence [(18)F]DPA-714 binding parameters and PET kinetics. [(18) F]DPA-714 PET imaging was performed in Papio anubis baboons anesthetized using either intravenous propofol (n = 3) or inhaled isoflurane (n = 3). Brain kinetics and metabolite-corrected input function were measured to estimate [(18) F]DPA-714 brain distribution (VT). Displacement experiments were performed using PK11195 (1.5 mg/kg). In vitro [(18)F]DPA-714 binding experiments were performed using baboon brain tissue in the absence and presence of tested anesthetics. Brain radioactivity peaked higher in isoflurane-anesthetized animals compared with propofol (SUVmax = 2.7 ± 0.5 vs. 1.3 ± 0.2, respectively) but was not different after 30 min. Brain VT was not different under propofol and isoflurane. Displacement resulted in a 35.8 ± 8.4% decrease of brain radioactivity under propofol but not under isoflurane (0.1 ± 7.0%). In vitro, the presence of propofol increased TSPO density and dramatically reduced its affinity for [(18)F]DPA-714 compared with control. This in vitro effect was not significant with isoflurane. Exposure to propofol and isoflurane differentially influences TSPO interaction with its specific radioligand [(18)F]DPA-714 with subsequent impact on its tissue kinetics and specific binding estimated in vivo using PET. Therefore, the choice of anesthetics and their potential influence on PET data should be considered for the design of imaging studies using TSPO radioligands, especially in a translational research context.

  10. Scavenging of hydrogen peroxide by alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII) and macrophages (MAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, L.; Slater, M.; Baker, R.; Matalon, S. )

    1990-02-26

    The pulmonary epithelium is often a target of increased concentrations of extracellularly generated reactive oxygen species (PROS). In this study the authors quantified whether freshly isolated ATII and unstimulated MAC may scavenge extracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and to determine the mechanisms involved. Cells were suspended in Eagles minimum essential medium and incubated with 500 {mu}M xanthine and 10 mU/ml xanthine oxidase for 60 min at 37C. In a separate series of experiments cells were preincubated with 10 {mu}M aminotriazole (ATZ) which decreased their catalase activity 60% of their initial values. Both ATII and MAC scavenged significant amounts of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. After exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cell viabilities for the control (-ATZ) and ATZ treated cells were {ge}50%. The ability of ATII and MAC to scavenge extracellular H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may protect the alveolar epithelium from reactive oxygen species injury.

  11. Minimum cut and shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Cramer, Andrew; Walker, David M.

    2013-06-01

    We explore the efficacy of network optimisation theory for minimum cut to quantify the evolution of granular fabric and its functionality as a transmission medium in deforming dense granular media. Our focus here is on force transmission in a sheared assembly of polydisperse particles, in a biaxial compression test under constant confining pressure. The granular fabric is examined with respect to the material's force-bearing contact network over that regime when the material has reached its residual strength, and is deforming under a near constant volume in the presence of a fully developed shear band. The structural evolution of the fabric is quantitatively characterized using a representative weighted-directed network that is similarly evolving as the sample deforms. The edges or links, representing the interparticle contacts, are each weighted by the capacity of the contact to transmit force: a scalar that depends solely on the relative motion of the contacting grains. In the large strain failure regime, the minimum cut which represents the bottleneck in force transmission is found to lie in the persistent shear band. This study paves the way for the future analysis of flows and force transmission through an evolving contact network and, in turn, the characterisation of the relationship between the material's contact topology and its capacity to transmit forces through its contact network.

  12. Role of nitric oxide-containing factors in the ventilatory and cardiovascular responses elicited by hypoxic challenge in isoflurane-anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, James P.; Passafaro, Rachael J.; Baby, Santhosh M.; Young, Alex P.; Bates, James N.; Gaston, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to hypoxia elicits changes in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate, and frequency of breathing (fr). The objective of this study was to determine the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses elicited by brief exposures to hypoxia in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. The rats were instrumented to record MAP, heart rate, and fr and then exposed to 90 s episodes of hypoxia (10% O2, 90% N2) before and after injection of vehicle, the NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), or the inactive enantiomer d-NAME (both at 50 μmol/kg iv). Each episode of hypoxia elicited a decrease in MAP, bidirectional changes in heart rate (initial increase and then a decrease), and an increase in fr. These responses were similar before and after injection of vehicle or d-NAME. In contrast, the hypoxia-induced decreases in MAP were attenuated after administration of l-NAME. The initial increases in heart rate during hypoxia were amplified whereas the subsequent decreases in heart rate were attenuated in l-NAME-treated rats. Finally, the hypoxia-induced increases in fr were virtually identical before and after administration of l-NAME. These findings suggest that NO factors play a vital role in the expression of the cardiovascular but not the ventilatory responses elicited by brief episodes of hypoxia in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Based on existing evidence that NO factors play a vital role in carotid body and central responses to hypoxia in conscious rats, our findings raise the novel possibility that isoflurane blunts this NO-dependent signaling. PMID:24744389

  13. Awareness and apgar score in elective Cesarean section under general anesthesia with propofol or Isoflurane: A prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical trial study

    PubMed Central

    Khanjani, Somayeh; Naghibi, Khosrou; Azarnoush, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Awareness is a postoperative recall of events experienced under general anesthesia. In this study, we compared the incidence of awareness between two routine methods used, inhalation (Isoflurane) and intravenous protocol (Propofol), in elective Cesarean section, and also evaluated the effect of these two different methods on the apgar score of newborns. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, clinical trial study, 90 pregnant women candidates for elective Cesarean section were randomly enrolled, after taking written consent. Induction of anesthesia in both groups was provided by propofol and succinylcholine in the same manner, and maintenance of anesthesia in Group 1 was provided by propofol 100 μg/kg/minute and in Group 2 with isoflurane 1 MAC, to maintain the bispectral index (BIS) between 45 and 60. Blood pressure, heart rate, electrocardiography (ECG), and also Etco2 and o2sat were recorded throughout the surgery and finally analyzed and compared. Results: From 90 patients, four cases of confirmed awareness were found in the propofol group and three cases in the Isoflurane group (8/9% vs. 6/7%), but the apgar scores were comparable between the two groups. Meanwhile there were no significant differences between the two groups in basic information, neonatal apgar scores, hemodynamic changes, and BIS, Electromyography (EMG), and signal quality index (SQI) values. Conclusion: According to the patient's state, diagnosis of the anesthesiologist, and other criteria like price and its availability, we could use these drugs in general anesthesia during Cesarean section, although it is recommended that more studies be done to compare the effect of these two drugs in larger groups. PMID:25538920

  14. When is an Alveolar Type 2 Cell an Alveolar Type 2 Cell? A Conundrum for Lung Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Beers, Michael F; Moodley, Yuben

    2017-03-22

    Generating mature, differentiated, adult lung cells from pluripotent cells such as induced pluripotent cells (iPS) and embryonic stem cells (ES) offers the hope of both generating disease specific in vitro models and creating definitive and personalized therapies for a host of debilitating lung parenchymal and airway diseases. With the goal of advancing lung regenerative medicine, several groups have developed and reported on protocols utilizing either defined media, co-culture with mesenchymal components, or sequential treatments mimicking lung development, to obtain distal lung epithelial cells from stem cell precursors. However, there remains significant controversy about the degree of differentiation of these cells compared to their primary counterparts coupled with a lack of consistency or uniformity in assessing the resultant phenotypes. Given the inevitable, exponential expansion of these approaches and the probable but yet to emerge 2nd and higher generation techniques to create such assets, we were prompted to pose the question: "What makes a lung epithelial cell a lung epithelial cell?" and more specifically for this Perspective "What are the minimum features that constitute an alveolar type II epithelial cell (AT2)". In addressing this, we summarize a body of work spanning nearly five decades amassed by a series of "lung epithelial cell biology pioneers" which carefully describes well characterized molecular, functional, and morphological features critical for discriminate assessment of an AT2 phenotype. Armed with this we propose a series of core criteria to assist the field in confirming that cells obtained following a differentiating protocol are indeed mature and functional AT2 epithelial cells.

  15. Effects of Isoflurane on Coronary Blood Flow Velocity in Young, Old, and ApoE−/− Mice Measured by Doppler Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Craig J.; Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Michael, Lloyd H.; Entman, Mark L.; Taffet, George E.

    2007-01-01

    The commonly used anesthetic agent, isoflurane (ISO), is a potent coronary vasodilator which could potentially be used in the assessment of coronary reserve, but its effects on coronary blood flow in mice are unknown. Coronary reserve is reduced by age, coronary artery disease, and other cardiac pathologies in man, and some of these conditions can now be modeled in mice. Accordingly, we used Doppler ultrasound to measure coronary flow velocity in mice anesthetized at low (1%) and at high (2.5%) levels of ISO to generate baseline (B) and elevated hyperemic (H) coronary flows respectively. A 20 MHz Doppler probe was mounted in a micromanipulator and pointed transthoracically toward the origin of the left main coronary arteries of 10 6-wk (Y), 10 2-yr (O), and 20 2-yr apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE−/−) atherosclerotic (A) mice. In each mouse we measured (B) and (H) peak diastolic velocities. B was 35.4 +/− 1.4 cm/s (Y), 24.8 +/− 1.6 (O), and 51.7 +/− 6.4 (A); H was 83.5 +/− 1.3 (Y), 86.5 +/− 1.9 (O), and 120 +/− 16.9 (A); and H/B was 2.4 +/− 0.1 (Y), 3.6 +/− 0.2 (O), and 2.5 +/− 0.2 (A). The differences in baseline velocities and H/B between O and Y and between A and O were significant (P < 0.01), while the differences in hyperemic velocities were not (P > 0.05). H/B was higher in old mice due to decreased baseline flow rather than increased hyperemic flow velocity. In contrast ApoE−/− mice have increased baseline and hyperemic velocities perhaps due to coronary lesions. The differences in baseline velocities between young and old mice could be due to age-related changes in basal metabolism or to differential sensitivity to isoflurane. We conclude that Doppler ultrasound combined with coronary vasodilation via isoflurane could provide a convenient and noninvasive method to estimate coronary reserve in mice, but also that care must be taken when assessing coronary flow in mice under isoflurane anesthesia because of its potent coronary vasodilator

  16. Effect of Isoflurane on Myocardial Energetic and Oxidative Stress in Cardiac Muscle from Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoxu; Bhatt, Niraj; Xu, Jianhong; Meng, Tao; Aon, Miguel A.; O’Rourke, Brian; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Cortassa, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The effect of inhalational anesthetics on myocardial contraction and energetics in type 2 diabetes mellitus is unknown. We investigated the effect of isoflurane (ISO) on force and intracellular Ca2+ transient (iCa), myocardial oxygen consumption (MVo2), and energetics/redox behavior in trabecular muscles from Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. At baseline, force and corresponding iCa were lower in ZDF trabeculae than in controls. ISO decreased force in both groups in a dose-dependent manner. ISO did not affect iCa amplitude in controls, but ISO > 1.5% significantly reduced iCa amplitude in ZDF trabeculae. ISO-induced force depression fully recovered as a result of increased iCa when external Ca2+ was raised in controls. However, both force and iCa remained low in ZDF muscle at elevated external Ca2+. In controls, force, iCa, and MVo2 increased when stimulation frequency was increased from 0.5 to 1.5 Hz. ZDF muscles, however, exhibited blunted responses in force and iCa and decreased MVo2. Oxidative stress levels were unchanged in control muscles but increased significantly in ZDF muscles after exposure to ISO. Finally, the depressive effect of ISO was prevented by 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (Tempol) in ZDF muscles. These findings suggest that ISO dose-dependently attenuates force in control and ZDF muscles with differential effect on iCa. The mechanism of force depression by ISO in controls is mainly decreased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, whereas in ZDF muscles the ISO-induced decrease in contraction is due to worsening oxidative stress, which inhibits iCa and force development. PMID:24431470

  17. Mouse current vocalization threshold measured with a neurospecific nociception assay: The effect of sex, morphine, and isoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Spornick, Nicholas; Guptill, Virginia; Koziol, Deloris; Wesley, Robert; Finkel, Julia; Quezado, Zenaide M.N.

    2012-01-01

    Sine-wave electrical stimulation at frequencies 2000, 250, and 5 Hz to respectively evaluate Aβ, Aδ, and C sensory neurons has recently been added to the armamentarium used to evaluate sensory neurons. We developed an automated nociception assay using sine-wave stimulation methodology to determine current vocalization threshold in response to 2000, 250, and 5 Hz and examine the effects of sex, analgesics, and anesthetics in mice. At baseline, males had significantly higher mean current vocalization thresholds compared with female mice at 2000, 250, and 5 Hz (p ≤ 0.019). By 1 h after intrathecal injections of morphine there were significant increases in current vocalization threshold percent changes from baseline that varied with doses (p = 0.0001) and frequency used (p < 0.0001). Specifically, with increasing doses of morphine, there were significantly greater increases in current vocalization threshold percent changes from baseline in response to 5 Hz compared with 250 and 2000 Hz stimulation in a significantly ordered pattern: 5 Hz > 250 Hz (p < 0.0001) and 250 Hz > 2000 Hz (p = 0.0002). Forty-five minutes after exposure, there were no effects of isoflurane on current vocalization thresholds at any frequency. Therefore, our findings suggest that this automated nociception assay using sine-wave stimulation in mice, can be valuable for measurements of the effects of sex, opioids, and anesthetics on the response to electrical stimuli that preferentially stimulate Aβ, Aδ, and C-sensory fibers in vivo. This investigation suggests the validation of this assay and supports its use to examine mechanisms of nociception in mice. PMID:21864576

  18. Repeated anaesthesia with isoflurane and medetomidine-midazolam-fentanyl in guinea pigs and its influence on physiological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Tacke, Sabine; Guth, Brian; Henke, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Repeated anaesthesia may be required in experimental protocols and in daily veterinary practice, but anaesthesia is known to alter physiological parameters in GPs (Cavia porcellus, GPs). This study investigated the effects of repeated anaesthesia with either medetomidine-midazolam-fentanyl (MMF) or isoflurane (Iso) on physiological parameters in the GP. Twelve GPs were repeatedly administered with MMF or Iso in two anaesthesia sets. One set consisted of six 40-min anaesthesias, performed over 3 weeks (2 per week); the anaesthetic used first was randomized. Prior to Iso anaesthesia, atropine was injected. MMF anaesthesia was antagonized with AFN (atipamezole-flumazenil-naloxone). Abdominally implanted radio-telemetry devices recorded the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and core body temperature continuously. Additionally, respiratory rate, blood glucose and body weight were assessed. An operable state could be achieved and maintained for 40 min in all GPs. During the surgical tolerance with MMF, the GPs showed a large MAP range between the individuals. In the MMF wake- up phase, the time was shortened until the righting reflex (RR) returned and that occurred at lower MAP and HR values. Repeated Iso anaesthesia led to an increasing HR during induction (anaesthesias 2–6), non-surgical tolerance (anaesthesias 3–6) and surgical tolerance (anaesthesias 4, 6). Both anaesthetics may be used repeatedly, as repeating the anaesthesias resulted in only slightly different physiological parameters, compared to those seen with single anaesthesias. The regular atropine premedication induced HR increases and repeated MMF anaesthesia resulted in a metabolism increase which led to the faster return of RR. Nevertheless, Iso’s anaesthesia effects of strong respiratory depression and severe hypotension remained. Based on this increased anaesthesia risk with Iso, MMF anaesthesia is preferable for repeated use in GPs. PMID:28328950

  19. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  20. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those…

  1. 78 FR 63873 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 543 RIN 3141-AA27 Minimum Internal Control Standards AGENCY... Commission (NIGC) amends its minimum internal control standards for Class II gaming under the Indian Gaming... NIGC published a final rule in the Federal Register called Minimum Internal Control Standards. 64...

  2. Minimum Competency Testing and the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    This brief overview of minimum competency testing and disabled high school students discusses: the inclusion or exclusion of handicapped students in minimum competency testing programs; approaches to accommodating the individual needs of handicapped students; and legal issues. Surveys of states that have mandated minimum competency tests indicate…

  3. 30 CFR 202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 202.53 Section 202.53 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide for minimum...

  4. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum...

  5. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum...

  6. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum bid....

  7. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum...

  8. 7 CFR 4280.136 - Minimum retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum retention. 4280.136 Section 4280.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Efficiency Improvements Program Section B. Guaranteed Loans § 4280.136 Minimum retention. Minimum...

  9. Alveolar hemorrhage and kidney disease: characteristics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; El Ati, Zohra; Lamia, Rais; Aich, Dorra Ben; Madiha, Krid; Wided, Smaoui; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Somaya; Karim, Zouaghi; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Goodpasture's glomerular basement membrane disease are the most common causes of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, a life-threatening disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus and the antiphospholipid syndrome are also causes of alveolar hemorrhage. We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with renal diseases. Diagnosis of DAH was based on the presence of bloody bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. There were three men and 12 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years (extremes: 24-74 years). Proteinuria and hematuria were observed, respectively, in 15 and 14 cases. Six patients revealed arterial hypertension. Crescentic glomerulonephritis was diagnosed with kidney biopsies in ten cases. The etiology of renal disease was microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) in seven cases, Wegener disease in four cases, systemic lupus erythematous in one case, cryoglobulinemia in one case, myeloma in one case and propyl-thiouracil-induced MPA in one case. Hemoptysis occurred in 14 cases. The mean serum level of hemoglobin was 7.1 g/dL (5.1-10 g/dL). The mean serum creatinine concentration was 7.07 mg/dL (2.4-13.7 mg/dL). Gas exchange was severely compromised, with an oxygenation index <80 mmHg in 14 patients and <60 mmHg in seven patients. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 11 cases, and had positive findings for hemorrhage in all. Methylprednisolone pulses and cyclophosphamide were used in 14 patients. Plasmapheresis was performed in three cases. One patient received cycles of Dexamethasome-Melphalan. Three patients died as a result of DAH. The mortality rate in our study was 20%.

  10. Effects of alveolar ridge preservation on delayed implant osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan; Li, Bin; Xue, Hui-Min; Huang, Hai-Yun; Liu, Gang-Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of alveolar ridge preservation with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma) on delayed implant osseointegration. The 3rd and 4th left and right mandibular premolars were extracted from four adult healthy male and female dogs. For the experimental group, we randomly selected two extraction sockets in each dog to be filled with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma). The two remaining extraction sockets remained untreated and served as the control group. Three months after Bio-Oss placement, dental implants were inserted into the alveolar bone of the experimental group and the control group. The osteogenic activity of the bone around the implants was assessed by evaluating the histological morphology and by estimating histomorphometric parameters at 3 and 6 months after delayed implantation. At 3 months, Goldner’s trichrome staining analysis showed that the bone-implant contact rate and mineralised bone area around the implant were significantly higher in the experimental group (75.98% ± 8.97% and 69.52% ± 9.63%, respectively) than in the control group (56.13% ± 8.18% and 52.82% ± 7.25%, respectively; P < 0.05). However, at 6 months, the two groups showed no significant difference. Fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed that the average mineralisation apposition rate of the bone tissue around the dental implant in the experimental group at 3 and 6 months was 6.80 ± 0.43 μm and 8.38 ± 0.84 μm, respectively, which was significantly higher than the rate in the control group (P < 0.05). These data indicated that alveolar ridge preservation by using Bio-Oss placement can promote osseointegration of delayed implantation. This may be a promising option for clinical use. PMID:26379871

  11. Albuterol Improves Alveolar-Capillary Membrane Conductance in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Natalie E.; Baker, Sarah E.; Olson, Thomas P.; Lalande, Sophie; Johnson, Bruce D.; Snyder, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Beta-2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) are located throughout the body including airway and alveolar cells. The β2ARs regulate lung fluid clearance through a variety of mechanisms including ion transport on alveolar cells and relaxation of the pulmonary lymphatics. We examined the effect of an inhaled β2-agonist (albuterol) on alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (DM) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (VC) in healthy humans. METHODS We assessed the diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and nitric oxide (DLNO) at baseline, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes following nebulized albuterol (2.5 mg, diluted in 3 mL normal saline) in 45 healthy subjects. Seventeen subjects repeated these measures following nebulized normal saline (age = 27 ± 9 years, height = 165 ± 21 cm, weight = 68 ± 12 kg, BMI = 26 ± 9 kg/m2). Cardiac output (Q), heart rate, systemic vascular resistance (SVR), blood pressure, oxygen saturation, forced expiratory volume at one-second (FEV1), and forced expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity (FEF50) were assessed at baseline, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes following the administration of albuterol or saline. RESULTS Albuterol resulted in a decrease in SVR, and an increase in Q, FEV1, and FEF50 compared to saline controls. Albuterol also resulted in a decrease in VC at 60 minutes post albuterol. Both albuterol and normal saline resulted in no change in DLCO or DM when assessed alone, but a significant increase was observed in DM when accounting for changes in VC. CONCLUSION These data suggest that nebulized albuterol improves pulmonary function in healthy humans, while nebulization of both albuterol and saline results in an increase in DM/VC. PMID:27773996

  12. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    PubMed Central

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  13. Alveolar Epithelial Cell Injury Due to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Ho; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Kennedy, Ian M.; Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Although inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) is known to cause systemic disease (i.e., metal fume fever), little is known about mechanisms underlying injury to alveolar epithelium. Objectives: Investigate ZnO NP–induced injury to alveolar epithelium by exposing primary cultured rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECMs) to ZnO NPs. Methods: RAECMs were exposed apically to ZnO NPs or, in some experiments, to culture fluid containing ZnCl2 or free Zn released from ZnO NPs. Transepithelial electrical resistance (RT) and equivalent short-circuit current (IEQ) were assessed as functions of concentration and time. Morphologic changes, lactate dehydrogenase release, cell membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial activity were measured. Measurements and Main Results: Apical exposure to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs decreased RT and IEQ of RAECMs by 100% over 24 hours, whereas exposure to 11 μg/ml ZnO NPs had little effect. Changes in RT and IEQ caused by 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs were irreversible. ZnO NP effects on RT yielded half-maximal concentrations of approximately 20 μg/ml. Apical exposure for 24 hours to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs induced decreases in mitochondrial activity and increases in lactate dehydrogenase release, permeability to fluorescein sulfonic acid, increased intracellular ROS, and translocation of ZnO NPs from apical to basolateral fluid (most likely across injured cells and/or damaged paracellular pathways). Conclusions: ZnO NPs cause severe injury to RAECMs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, mediated, at least in part, by free Zn released from ZnO NPs, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased intracellular ROS. PMID:20639441

  14. Enhanced rifampicin delivery to alveolar macrophages by solid lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Junlan; Li, Yanzhen; Yang, Likai; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2013-05-01

    The present study aimed at developing a drug delivery system targeting the densest site of tuberculosis infection, the alveolar macrophages (AMs). Rifampicin (RFP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (RFP-SLNs) with an average size of 829.6 ± 16.1 nm were prepared by a modified lipid film hydration method. The cytotoxicity of RFP-SLNs to AMs and alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECs) was examined using MTT assays. The viability of AMs and AECs was above 80 % after treatment with RFP-SLNs, which showed low toxicity to both AMs and AECs. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy was employed to observe the interaction between RFP-SLNs and both AMs and AECs. After incubating the cells with RFP-SLNs for 2 h, the fluorescent intensity in AMs was more and remained longer (from 0.5 to 12 h) when compared with that in AECs (from 0.5 to 8 h). In vitro uptake characteristics of RFP-SLNs in AMs and AECs were also investigated by detection of intracellular RFP by High performance liquid chromatography. Results showed that RFP-SLNs delivered markedly higher RFP into AMs (691.7 ng/mg in cultured AMs, 662.6 ng/mg in primary AMs) than that into AECs (319.2 ng/mg in cultured AECs, 287.2 ng/mg in primary AECs). Subsequently, in vivo delivery efficiency and the selectivity of RFP-SLNs were further verified in Sprague-Dawley rats. Under pulmonary administration of RFP-SLNs, the amount of RFP in AMs was significantly higher than that in AECs at each time point. Our results demonstrated that solid lipid nanoparticles are a promising strategy for the delivery of rifampicin to alveolar macrophages selectively.

  15. Alveolar hemorrhage after scuba diving: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Mee-Sun; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Lien, Chi-Tun; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-07-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving.

  16. Alveolar osteitis (dry socket) in a dog: a case report.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwelaert de Wyels, S

    1998-06-01

    Following extraction of a maxillary left first molar tooth in an eight year-old retriever, the dog re-presented five days later because of oral pain, which did not respond to analgesic therapy. The extraction site contained a foul-smelling fluid, but did not contain a clot or granulation tissue. Alveolar osteitis (dry socket) was diagnosed. The alveolus was curetted and flushed, and the dog was given cefalexine and prednisolone. The alveolus was filling with healthy granulation tissue one week later and the dog was no longer in pain.

  17. Diffuse alveolar damage syndrome associated with amiodarone therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Jirik, F. R.; Henning, H.; Huckell, V. F.; Ostrow, D. V.

    1983-01-01

    Amiodarone is an effective antiarrhythmic that has been used in Europe for over a decade and has been available for investigational use in North America for a shorter time. It has several well recognized side effects. Recent reports have related pulmonary disorders to the use of this drug; fibrosing alveolitis has been found by lung biopsy. Amiodarone's toxicity to the lung does not appear to be dose-related. Besides cessation of amiodarone administration, management of this complication includes steroid therapy. A case is described of nonspecific diffuse alveolar damage syndrome in a patient who had received amiodarone. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:6839242

  18. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment. Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20–22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans. From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant. During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the

  19. [Modern approaches to dental implants placement in deficient alveolar bone].

    PubMed

    Kulakov, A A; Gvetadze, R Sh; Brailovskaya, T V; Khar'kova, A A; Dzikovitskaya, L S

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents statistical data on implant placement procedures in Central Research Institute of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery (Moscow, Russia) in 2010-2015. In 64% of cases inadequate bone volume was attributed to alveolar bone atrophy. Bone deficiency was equally often in upper and lower jaws (in 49.3 and 50.7%, correspondently) but varied in forms with complex configurations to be more specific for maxilla. The study also includes a series of clinical cases illustrating implant placement procedures in anatomically unfavorable settings.

  20. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation.The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment.Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20-22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans.From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant.During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the orthodontic treatment

  1. Inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia relieved by microscopic endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Yatsuhashi, Takaaki; Nakagawa, Kan-Ichi; Matsumoto, Miho; Kasahara, Masataka; Igarashi, Tomoko; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2003-11-01

    We experienced two cases of inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia caused by root canal medicaments, which were successfully relieved by microscopic endodontic treatment. In the first case, the paresthesia might have been attributable to infiltration of calcium hydroxide into the mandibular canal through the root canals of the mandibular left second molar tooth. In the second case, the paresthesia might have been attributable to infiltration of paraformaldehyde through the root canals of the mandibular right second molar tooth. The paresthesia was relieved in both cases by repetitive microscopic endodontic irrigation using physiological saline solution in combination with oral vitamin B12 and adenosine triphosphate.

  2. Healing of extraction sockets and augmented alveolar defects following 1-year treatment with bisphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Khojasteh, Arash; Behnia, Hossein; Morad, Golnaz; Dashti, Seyedeh Ghazaleh; Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Shahab, Shahriyar; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effect of bisphosphonates on healing of extraction sockets and augmented alveolar defects, 12 adult female mongrel dogs were assigned to 2 experimental groups and a control group. The experimental groups received oral alendronate (ALN, 3.5 mg/kg/wk) or IV pamidronate (PAM, 1 mg/kg/wk) for 12 months. Animals were randomly tested for serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen I (CTx). The right first and second premolars were extracted. After 8 weeks, extraction sites were evaluated for healing. Subsequently, 3-wall defects were created in ridges and filled with human mineralized cortical particulate bone. Two months post-augmentation, animals were sacrificed and mandibles were collected for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and histomorphometric appraisal. The obtained data were compared using 1-way ANOVA test. CTx test results in both experimental groups were comparable (<10 pg/mL) but lower than that of the control group (minimum 159.2 pg/mL). Two months post-extraction, bone sequestra were noticed in extraction sites in BP-treated groups, involving the entire alveolar bone in the PAM group and the upper rim of the alveoli in the ALN group. Histologically, bone sequestra from the PAM group demonstrated empty osteocyte lacunae, while in the ALN group areas of necrotic bone along with evidence of active bone remodeling was distinguished. Eight weeks post-augmentation, the experimental groups showed no evidence of bone formation in the augmented area, while bone formation ratio was measured to be 18.32% in the control group. The mean amount of pixel intensity calculated from the CBCT images of the ALN, PAM, and control group was 113.69 ± 11.04, 124.94 ± 4.72, and 113.69 ± 6.63, respectively. Pixel intensity in PAM-treated group was significantly higher than both other groups. This study demonstrated that 1-year treatment with ALN/PAM was associated with impairment of post-extraction and post-augmentation bone healing in dogs.

  3. Minimum distance classification in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, A. G.; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The utilization of minimum distance classification methods in remote sensing problems, such as crop species identification, is considered. Literature concerning both minimum distance classification problems and distance measures is reviewed. Experimental results are presented for several examples. The objective of these examples is to: (a) compare the sample classification accuracy of a minimum distance classifier, with the vector classification accuracy of a maximum likelihood classifier, and (b) compare the accuracy of a parametric minimum distance classifier with that of a nonparametric one. Results show the minimum distance classifier performance is 5% to 10% better than that of the maximum likelihood classifier. The nonparametric classifier is only slightly better than the parametric version.

  4. Is there a relation between local bone quality as assessed on panoramic radiographs and alveolar bone level?

    PubMed

    Nackaerts, Olivia; Gijbels, Frieda; Sanna, Anna-Maria; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2008-03-01

    The aim was to explore the relation between radiographic bone quality on panoramic radiographs and relative alveolar bone level. Digital panoramic radiographs of 94 female patients were analysed (mean age, 44.5; range, 35-74). Radiographic density of the alveolar bone in the premolar region was determined using Agfa Musica software. Alveolar bone level and bone quality index (BQI) were also assessed. Relationships between bone density and BQI on one hand and the relative loss of alveolar bone level on the other were assessed. Mandibular bone density and loss of alveolar bone level were weakly but significantly negatively correlated for the lower premolar area (r = -.27). The BQI did not show a statistically significant relation to alveolar bone level. Radiographic mandibular bone density on panoramic radiographs shows a weak but significant relation to alveolar bone level, with more periodontal breakdown for less dense alveolar bone.

  5. A novel SLC34A2 mutation in a patient with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Hiroki; Kurai, Jun; Kodani, Masahiro; Watanabe, Masanari; Yamamoto, Akihiro; Nanba, Eiji; Adachi, Kaori; Igishi, Tadashi; Shimizu, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in SLC34A2 and characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of microliths. We diagnosed a case of PAM in a 27-year-old Japanese female and identified a novel mutation in SLC34A2 (c.1390 G>C [G464R] in exon 12). PMID:28144448

  6. Changes in alveolar bone support induced by the Herbst appliance: a tomographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, João Paulo; Raveli, Taisa Boamorte; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto Osvaldo; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study evaluated alveolar bone loss around mandibular incisors, induced by the Herbst appliance. Methods: The sample consisted of 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean age of 15.76 ± 1.75 years), Class II, Division 1 malocclusion, treated with the Herbst appliance. CBCT scans were obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). Vertical alveolar bone level and alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors were assessed. Buccal (B), lingual (L) and total (T) bone thicknesses were assessed at crestal (1), midroot (2) and apical (3) levels of mandibular incisors. Student's t-test and Wilcoxon t-test were used to compare dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlation analyses were performed to determine the relationship of changes in alveolar bone thickness. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Results: Mandibular incisors showed no statistical significance for vertical alveolar bone level. Alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors significantly reduced after treatment at B1, B2, B3, T1 and significantly increased at L2. The magnitude of the statistically significant changes was less than 0.2 mm. The changes in alveolar bone thickness showed no statistical significance with incisor inclination degree. Conclusions: CBCT scans showed an association between the Herbst appliance and alveolar bone loss on the buccal surface of mandibular incisors; however, without clinical significance. PMID:27275621

  7. Fas ligand-expressing lymphocytes enhance alveolar macrophage apoptosis in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Lea; Bednarek, Joseph M.; Yunt, Zulma X.; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and their subsequent clearance by neighboring phagocytes are necessary steps in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation. We have recently identified that activation of the Fas death receptor on the cell surface of macrophages drives macrophage apoptosis. However, the source of the cognate ligand for Fas (FasL) responsible for induction of alveolar macrophage apoptosis is not defined. Given their known role in the resolution of inflammation and ability to induce macrophage apoptosis ex vivo, we hypothesized that T lymphocytes represented a critical source of FasL. To address this hypothesis, C57BL/6J and lymphocyte-deficient (Rag-1−/−) mice were exposed to intratracheal lipopolysaccharide to induce pulmonary inflammation. Furthermore, utilizing mice expressing nonfunctional FasL, we adoptively transferred donor lymphocytes into inflamed lymphocyte-deficient mice to characterize the effect of lymphocyte-derived FasL on alveolar macrophage apoptosis in the resolution of inflammation. Herein, evidence is presented that lymphocytes expressing FasL enhance alveolar macrophage apoptosis during the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation. Moreover, lymphocyte induction of alveolar macrophage apoptosis results in contraction of the alveolar macrophage pool, which occurs in a FasL-dependent manner. Specifically, FasL-expressing CD8+ T lymphocytes potently induce alveolar macrophage apoptosis and contraction of the alveolar macrophage pool. Together, these studies identify a novel role for CD8+ T lymphocytes in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation. PMID:24838751

  8. A Therapeutic Technique for the Improvement of Lingua-Alveolar Valving Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, James Paul

    1978-01-01

    The study was designed to determine if a remedial program using a bite-block device could inhibit hypermandibular activity and thereby improve the lingua-alveolar valving abilities of four boys (mean age 7.2 years-old) who demonstrated multiple lingua-alveolar phonemic errors. (Author/PHR)

  9. Regional differences in alveolar density in the human lung are related to lung height.

    PubMed

    McDonough, John E; Knudsen, Lars; Wright, Alexander C; Elliott, W Mark; Ochs, Matthias; Hogg, James C

    2015-06-01

    The gravity-dependent pleural pressure gradient within the thorax produces regional differences in lung inflation that have a profound effect on the distribution of ventilation within the lung. This study examines the hypothesis that gravitationally induced differences in stress within the thorax also influence alveolar density in terms of the number of alveoli contained per unit volume of lung. To test this hypothesis, we measured the number of alveoli within known volumes of lung located at regular intervals between the apex and base of four normal adult human lungs that were rapidly frozen at a constant transpulmonary pressure, and used microcomputed tomographic imaging to measure alveolar density (number alveoli/mm3) at regular intervals between the lung apex and base. These results show that at total lung capacity, alveolar density in the lung apex is 31.6 ± 3.4 alveoli/mm3, with 15 ± 6% of parenchymal tissue consisting of alveolar duct. The base of the lung had an alveolar density of 21.2 ± 1.6 alveoli/mm3 and alveolar duct volume fraction of 29 ± 6%. The difference in alveolar density can be negated by factoring in the effects of alveolar compression due to the pleural pressure gradient at the base of the lung in vivo and at functional residual capacity.

  10. Simultaneous paresthesia of the lingual nerve and inferior alveolar nerve caused by a radicular cyst.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshiki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Akiko; Kondoh, Toshirou; Suzuki, Mami; Noguchi, Kazuhide; Ito, Ko; Seto, Kanichi

    2005-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve is sometimes affected by periapical pathoses and mandibular cysts. However, mandibular intraosseous lesions have not been reported to disturb the lingual nerve. A case of simultaneous paresthesia of the right lingual nerve and the right inferior alveolar nerve is presented. The possible mechanisms of this extremely uncommon condition are discussed.

  11. Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) with intra-alveolar syngnathia: a discussion of anesthetic and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Gahm, Caroline; Kuylenstierna, Richard; Papatziamos, Georgios

    2007-10-01

    Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) is a rare genetic disorder that involves the association of a popliteal web with a combination of craniofacial, genitourinary and extremity malformations. In this article, we describe a patient with PPS complicated with multiple intra-alveolar syngnathia. We discuss the anesthetic and the surgical management of this case and review the literature regarding PPS and intra-alveolar syngnathia.

  12. Phosphoproteome Profiling of SH-SY5y Neuroblastoma Cells Treated with Anesthetics: Sevoflurane and Isoflurane Affect the Phosphorylation of Proteins Involved in Cytoskeletal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joomin; Ahn, Eunsook; Park, Wyun Kon; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used to decrease the spinal cord transmission of painful stimuli. However, the molecular or biochemical processes within cells that regulate anesthetic-induced responses at the cellular level are largely unknown. Here, we report the phosphoproteome profile of SH-SY5y human neuroblastoma cells treated with sevoflurane, a clinically used anesthetic. Phosphoproteins were isolated from cell lysates and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The phosphorylation of putative anesthetic-responsive marker proteins was validated using western blot analysis in cells treated with both sevoflurane and isoflurane. A total of 25 phosphoproteins were identified as differentially phosphorylated proteins. These included key regulators that signal cytoskeletal remodeling steps in pathways related to vesicle trafficking, axonal growth, and cell migration. These proteins included the Rho GTPase, Ras-GAP SH3 binding protein, Rho GTPase activating protein, actin-related protein, and actin. Sevoflurane and isoflurane also resulted in the dissolution of F-actin fibers in SH-SY5y cells. Our results show that anesthetics affect the phosphorylation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. PMID:27611435

  13. Reaction of alveolar macrophages to inhaled metal aerosols.

    PubMed Central

    Camner, P; Johansson, A

    1992-01-01

    For more than a decade we have exposed rabbits to different metals, usually in soluble form, and investigated the effects on the lungs. The metal concentrations have been around 1 mg/m3,i.e., not more than a factor of 10 above occupational threshold limit values. The exposure periods have been 1-8 months (6 hr/day, 5 days/week). We have studied especially the morphology and function of alveolar macrophages (AM), the morphology of alveolar type I and type II epithelial cells, and analyzed lung phospholipids. Several metals produce specific, complex effects. For example, metallic and soluble nickel (NiCl2) increase both number and size of the type II cells, increase the production of surfactant, and affect morphology and function of AM. Cobalt (CoCl2) induces a different effect on type II cells from nickel, causing the formation of nodules in these cells. Trivalent chromium [Cr(NO3)3] does not affect either type II cells or the amount of surfactant significantly, but markedly affects AM. The administered metals affect AM both directly and indirectly. For example, nickel induces an increased production of surfactant, resulting in overfed AM with an increased metabolic activity. However, nickel also induces a direct decrease in the release of lysozyme activity by AM. Our results emphasize the complexity of the effects on the lungs of inhaled agents, which can act both directly and indirectly on AM. PMID:1396456

  14. Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: clinical report from an endemic region

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Kamil Y.; Balik, Ahmet A.; Celebi, Fehmi

    2002-01-01

    Objective To review the clinical management of alveolar echinococcosis. Design A retrospective analysis. Setting A university-affiliated hospital in Turkey. Patients Forty patients treated for alveolar echinococcosis between 1987 and 2000. Interventions Curative resection followed by chemotherapy, or medical palliation with chemotherapy only. Palliative procedures such as bilioenteric or external drainage were done for cholestatic jaundice and liver abscess. Outcome measures Results of medical and surgical treatment. Results Seventeen patients had a resectable tumour and all underwent curative resection. Of the other 23 patients with nonresectable tumour, 11 underwent palliative surgical procedures such as bilioenteric or external drainage for cholestatic jaundice or liver abscess. All patients received long-term albendazole therapy. Four patients with nonresectable tumour died because of chronic liver failure. In a 6.5-year follow-up, there was no recurrence in patients who underwent curative resection. The efficacy of chemotherapy is limited in nonresectable disease. Conclusions To increase the rate of early detection and curative resection, screening programs are essential. Research on new chemotherapeutic approaches should be made to improve survival in patients with nonresectable disease. PMID:12500915

  15. Microtomography of the human tooth-alveolar bone complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalstra, Michel; Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Beckmann, Felix; Sakima, Maurício T.; Lemor, Carsten; Laursen, Morten G.; Melsen, Birte

    2006-08-01

    In this study the structure of the adult human dentoalveolar process is examined using conventional and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography (SRμCT). Mandibular and maxillary segments containing two to five adjacent teeth were harvested at autopsy from 49 adult donors. These segments were embedded in blocks of methylmetacrylate and scanned using a conventional table-top μCT-scanner at a pixel size and slice thickness of 35 μm. A few segments were also scanned at a synchrotron facility at an initial pixel size of 16.4 μm, which was binned by a factor 2 to result in an effective voxel size of almost 32.8 μm. The three-dimensional reconstructions revealed how intricately the teeth are supported by the alveolar bone. Furthermore, this support is highly inhomogeneous with respect to the buccal, mesial, lingual and distal quadrants. Reflecting their various degrees of mineralization, tissues like bone, dentine, enamel and cementum, could well be identified, especially in the scans made with SRμCT. Despite comparable voxel sizes, the reconstructed data-sets obtained with conventional μCT were less detailed and somewhat fuzzy in appearance compared to the data-sets of SRμCT. However, for quantification of macroscopical features like the thickness of the alveolar wall or the presence of dehiscences/fenestrations this seemed sufficient.

  16. Alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus: a cohort review.

    PubMed

    Andrade, C; Mendonça, T; Farinha, F; Correia, J; Marinho, A; Almeida, I; Vasconcelos, C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare but potentially catastrophic manifestation with a high mortality. Among rheumatologic diseases, it occurs most frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic vasculitis. Despite new diagnostic tools and therapies, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this work was to characterize the SLE patients with an episode of alveolar hemorrhage followed in our Clinical Immunology Unit (CIU). A retrospective chart review was carried out for all patients with SLE followed in CIU between 1984 and the end of 2013. We reviewed the following data: demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory data, radiologic investigations, histologic studies, treatment, and outcome. We identified 10 episodes of DAH, corresponding to seven patients, all female. These represent 1.6% of SLE patients followed in our Unit. The age at DAH attack was 42.75 ± 18.9 years. The average time between diagnosis of SLE and the onset of DAH was 7.1 years. Three patients had the diagnosis of SLE and the DAH attack at the same time. Disease activity according to SLEDAI was high, ranging from 15 to 41. All patients were treated with methylprednisolone, 37.5% cyclophosphamide and 28.6% plasmapheresis. The overall mortality rate was 28.6%.

  17. Transport Mechanism of Nicotine in Primary Cultured Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Nagahiro, Machi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is absorbed from the lungs into the systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, there is little information concerning the transport mechanism of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized the uptake of nicotine in rat primary cultured type II (TII) and transdifferentiated type I-like (TIL) epithelial cells. In both TIL and TII cells, [(3)H]nicotine uptake was time and temperature-dependent, and showed saturation kinetics. [(3)H]Nicotine uptake in these cells was not affected by Na(+), but was sensitive to extracellular and intracellular pH, suggesting the involvement of a nicotine/proton antiport system. The uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in these cells was potently inhibited by organic cations such as clonidine, diphenhydramine, and pyrilamine, but was not affected by substrates and/or inhibitors of known organic cation transporters such as carnitine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and tetraethylammonium. In addition, the uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in TIL cells was stimulated by preloading the cells with unlabeled nicotine, pyrilamine, and diphenhydramine, but not with tetraethylammonium. These results suggest that a novel proton-coupled antiporter is involved in the uptake of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells and its absorption from the lungs into the systemic circulation.

  18. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  19. Proteomic analysis of human dental cementum and alveolar bone

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Cristiane R.; Tomazela, Daniela M.; Ruiz, Karina Gonzales Silvério; Foster, Brian L.; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Somerman, Martha J.; Nociti, Francisco H.

    2013-01-01

    Dental cementum (DC) is a bone-like tissue covering the tooth root and responsible for attaching the tooth to the alveolar bone (AB) via the periodontal ligament (PDL). Studies have unsuccessfully tried to identify factors specific to DC versus AB, in an effort to better understand DC development and regeneration. The present study aimed to use matched human DC and AB samples (n=7) to generate their proteomes for comparative analysis. Bone samples were harvested from tooth extraction sites, whereas DC samples were obtained from the apical root portion of extracted third molars. Samples were denatured, followed by protein extraction reduction, alkylation and digestion for analysis by nanoAcquity HPLC system and LTQ-FT Ultra. Data analysis demonstrated that a total of 318 proteins were identified in AB and DC. In addition to shared proteins between these tissues, 105 and 83 proteins exclusive to AB or DC were identified, respectively. This is the first report analyzing the proteomic composition of human DC matrix and identifying putative unique and enriched proteins in comparison to alveolar bone. These findings may provide novel insights into developmental differences between DC and AB, and identify candidate biomarkers that may lead to more efficient and predictable therapies for periodontal regeneration. PMID:24007660

  20. Myogenic potential of human alveolar mucosa derived cells.

    PubMed

    Zorin, Vadim L; Pulin, Andrey A; Eremin, Ilya I; Korsakov, Ivan N; Zorina, Alla I; Khromova, Natalia V; Sokova, Olga I; Kotenko, Konstantin V; Kopnin, Pavel B

    2017-03-19

    Difficulties related to the obtainment of stem/progenitor cells from skeletal muscle tissue make the search for new sources of myogenic cells highly relevant. Alveolar mucosa might be considered as a perspective candidate due to availability and high proliferative capacity of its cells. Human alveolar mucosa cells (AMC) were obtained from gingival biopsy samples collected from 10 healthy donors and cultured up to 10 passages. AMC matched the generally accepted multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells criteria and possess population doubling time, caryotype and immunophenotype stability during long-term cultivation. The single myogenic induction of primary cell cultures resulted in differentiation of AMC into multinucleated myotubes. The myogenic differentiation was associated with expression of skeletal muscle markers: skeletal myosin, skeletal actin, myogenin and MyoD1. Efficiency of myogenic differentiation in AMC cultures was similar to that in skeletal muscle cells. Furthermore, some of differentiated myotubes exhibited contractions in vitro. Our data confirms the sufficiently high myogenic potential and proliferative capacity of AMC and their ability to maintain in vitro proliferation-competent myogenic precursor cells regardless of the passage number.

  1. Genetic engineering alveolar macrophages for host resistance to PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Prather, Randall S; Whitworth, Kristin M; Schommer, Susan K; Wells, Kevin D

    2017-02-10

    Standard strategies for control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have not been effective, as vaccines have not reduced the prevalence of disease and many producers depopulate after an outbreak. Another method of control would be to prevent the virus from infecting the pig. The virus was thought to infect alveolar macrophages by interaction with a variety of cell surface molecules. One popular model had PRRSV first interacting with heparin sulfate followed by binding to sialoadhesin and then being internalized into an endosome. Within the endosome, PRRSV was thought to interact with CD163 to uncoat the virus so the viral genome could be released into the cytosol and infect the cell. Other candidate receptors have included vimentin, CD151 and CD209. By using genetic engineering, it is possible to test the importance of individual entry mediators by knocking them out. Pigs engineered by knockout of sialoadhesin were still susceptible to infection, while CD163 knockout resulted in pigs that were resistant to infection. Genetic engineering is not only a valuable tool to determine the role of specific proteins in infection by PRRSV (in this case), but also provides a means to create animals resistant to disease. Genetic engineering of alveolar macrophages can also illuminate the role of other proteins in response to infection. We suggest that strategies to prevent infection be pursued to reduce the reservoir of virus.

  2. Type II alveolar epithelial cell in vitro culture in aerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1988-08-01

    A method of Type II alveolar epithelial cell culture in aerobiosis has been developed. Isolation of Type II cells was performed by digesting guinea-pig lung tissue with crude trypsin and elastase and using discontinuous Percoll density gradients. The Type II cells, as identified by light and electron microscopy, were cultured in aerobiosis for up to six days, in direct contact with the atmosphere in conditions mimicking those present in the lower respiratory tract. Significant activities of cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), manganese dependent superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were found at the time of isolation. In contrast, cell glutathione content varied widely from one experiment to another. Changes of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated during cell culture in aerobiosis. SOD, Mn-SOD and catalase were significantly decreased after three days but were not significantly different between a three day and six day culture. Antioxidant changes did not influence the cell culture. In marked contrast, decrease in cell glutathione was associated with rapid cell death, whereas good cell survival was obtained at high levels of cell glutathione. Cell culture in aerobiosis will permit a precise evaluation of the effects of gases, particularly oxidant gases, on a primary culture of Type II alveolar epithelial cells.

  3. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the alveolar mucosa of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Johann, A C B R; Caldeira, P C; Abdo, E N; Sousa, S O M; Aguiar, M C F; Mesquita, R A

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a rare lesion composed of myofibroblastic spindle cells accompanied by inflammatory infiltrate. The objective of this paper is to report an uncommon case of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor located in the alveolar mucosa of the mandible. A 33-year-old male presented an asymptomatic tumoral lesion, firm, pedunculated, pink-colored, covered by smooth mucosa, with focal ulceration, measuring 30x20x20 mm, located in the left posterior alveolar mucosa. Clinical diagnosis was soft tissue tumor. An excisional biopsy was made. Microscopic examination showed compact fascicular spindle cells proliferation with a diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of plasma cells, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. Large ganglion-like cells were observed. The lesional cells were immunopos-itive to vimentin, a-smooth muscle actin, muscle specific actin, and CD68. Negative immunostain was observed to S-100, Bcl-2, Ki-67, desmin, CD34, and cytokeratin. A diagnosis of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor was performed. After 28 months of follow-up there was no recurrence. Although no evidence of oral inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor recurrence or malignant transformation has been reported, it has been observed that in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of other regions a prolonged follow-up is necessary after surgical excision.

  4. Alveolar type II cell-fibroblast interactions, synthesis and secretion of surfactant and type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M; Bhandari, R; Hamilton, G; Chan, Y C; Powell, J T

    1993-06-01

    During alveolar development and alveolar repair close contacts are established between fibroblasts and lung epithelial cells through gaps in the basement membrane. Using co-culture systems we have investigated whether these close contacts influence synthesis and secretion of the principal surfactant apoprotein (SP-A) by cultured rat lung alveolar type II cells and the synthesis and secretion of type I collagen by fibroblasts. The alveolar type II cells remained cuboidal and grew in colonies on fibroblast feeder layers and on Matrigel-coated cell culture inserts but were progressively more flattened on fixed fibroblast monolayers and plastic. Alveolar type II cells cultured on plastic released almost all their SP-A into the medium by 4 days. Alveolar type II cells cultured on viable fibroblasts or Matrigel-coated inserts above fibroblasts accumulated SP-A in the medium at a constant rate for the first 4 days, and probably recycle SP-A by endocytosis. The amount of mRNA for SP-A was very low after 4 days of culture of alveolar type II cells on plastic, Matrigel-coated inserts or fixed fibroblast monolayers: relatively, the amount of mRNA for SP-A was increased 4-fold after culture of alveolar type II cells on viable fibroblasts. Co-culture of alveolar type II cells with confluent human dermal fibroblasts stimulated by 2- to 3-fold the secretion of collagen type I into the culture medium, even after the fibroblasts' growth had been arrested with mitomycin C. Collagen secretion, by fibroblasts, also was stimulated 2-fold by conditioned medium from alveolar type II cells cultured on Matrigel. The amount of mRNA for type I collagen increased only modestly when fibroblasts were cultured in this conditioned medium. This stimulation of type I collagen secretion diminished as the conditioned medium was diluted out, but at high dilutions further stimulation occurred, indicating that a factor that inhibited collagen secretion also was being diluted out. The conditioned medium

  5. Alveolar Subphase pH in the Lungs of Anesthetized Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, D. W.; Goerke, J.; Clements, J. A.

    1981-11-01

    We measured the pH of the alveolar subphase fluid by puncturing the most superficial alveoli of the exposed lungs of anesthetized rabbits with H+-selective and nonselective KCl microelectrodes. In these experiments, we bathed the lung surface with paraffin oil or buffered Ringer's solutions that had a CO2 tension of 40 Torr (1 Torr = 133.3 Pa) and found an alveolar pH of 6.92± 0.01 (mean ± SEM). When the pH of the surface buffer was below 6.7 or above 7.5, alveolar pH varied with surface buffer pH. With the nonselective electrode, we did not find a significant electrical potential difference between the alveolar fluid and the pleural surface. These results are consistent with active transport of H+ (or HCO3-) across alveolar epithelium.

  6. A contemporary perspective on techniques for the clinical assessment of alveolar bone

    SciTech Connect

    Hausmann, E. )

    1990-03-01

    Radiographic techniques, traditional ones as well as newer ones under development, for clinically assessing alveolar bone are critically assessed. Traditional intraoral radiography is reexamined, in particular with regard to the accuracy with which the alveolar crest is seen. Evidence is presented for a more accurate representation of the alveolar crest on bitewings rather than periapical films. Application in periodontics of newer radiographic techniques, subtraction radiography, and single and dual photon aborptiometry presently under clinical development are discussed in regard to their potential and limitations. Similarly, radiopharmaceuticals to evaluate the metabolic status of alveolar bone are discussed as well as the potential for using analyses of gingival crevice fluid as a window for assessment of alveolar crest metabolism. 46 references.

  7. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia.

  8. MCP-1 antibody treatment enhances damage and impedes repair of the alveolar epithelium in influenza pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Narasaraju, T; Ng, H H; Phoon, M C; Chow, Vincent T K

    2010-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated an essential role of alveolar macrophages during influenza virus infection. Enhanced mortalities were observed in macrophage-depleted mice and pigs after influenza virus infection, but the basis for the enhanced pathogenesis is unclear. This study revealed that blocking macrophage recruitment into the lungs in a mouse model of influenza pneumonitis resulted in enhanced alveolar epithelial damage and apoptosis, as evaluated by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, Western blot, RT-PCR, and TUNEL assays. Abrogation of macrophage recruitment was achieved by treatment with monoclonal antibody against monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) after sub-lethal challenge with mouse-adapted human influenza A/Aichi/2/68 virus. Interestingly, elevated levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a mitogen for alveolar epithelium, were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage samples and in lung homogenates of control untreated and nonimmune immunoglobulin (Ig)G-treated mice after infection compared with anti-MCP-1-treated infected mice. The lungs of control animals also displayed strongly positive HGF staining in alveolar macrophages as well as alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia. Co-culture of influenza virus-infected alveolar epithelial cells with freshly isolated alveolar macrophages induced HGF production and phagocytic activity of macrophages. Recombinant HGF added to mouse lung explants after influenza virus infection resulted in enhanced BrdU labeling of alveolar type II epithelial cells, indicating their proliferation, in contrast with anti-HGF treatment showing significantly reduced epithelial regeneration. Our data indicate that inhibition of macrophage recruitment augmented alveolar epithelial damage and apoptosis during influenza pneumonitis, and that HGF produced by macrophages in response to influenza participates in the resolution of alveolar epithelium.

  9. The use of digital periapical radiographs to study the prevalence of alveolar domes

    PubMed Central

    Xambre, Pedro Augusto Oliveira Santos; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; e Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assunção; Custódio, Antônio Luís Neto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we coined the term 'alveolar dome' and aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of alveolar domes through digital periapical radiographs. Materials and Methods This study examined 800 digital periapical radiographs in regard to the presence of alveolar domes. The periapical radiographs were acquired by a digital system using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate. The χ2 test, with a significance level of 5%, was used to compare the prevalence of alveolar domes in the maxillary posterior teeth and, considering the same teeth, to verify the difference in the prevalence of dome-shaped phenomena between the roots. Results The prevalence of alveolar domes present in the first pre-molars was statistically lower as compared to the other maxillary posterior teeth (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of alveolar domes between the maxillary first and second molars. Considering the maxillary first and second molars, it was observed that the palatal root presented a lower prevalence of alveolar domes when compared to the distobuccal and mesiobuccal roots (p<0.05). Conclusion The present study coined the term 'alveolar dome', referring to the anatomical projection of the root into the floor of the maxillary sinus. The maxillary first and second molars presented a greater prevalence of alveolar domes, especially in the buccal roots, followed by the third molars and second pre-molars. Although the periapical radiograph is a two-dimensional method, it can provide dentists with the auxiliary information necessary to identify alveolar domes, thus improving diagnosis, planning, and treatment. PMID:27672614

  10. Presurgical orthodontic decompensation alters alveolar bone condition around mandibular incisors in adults with skeletal Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Boyang; Tang, Jun; Xiao, Ping; Ding, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study is to use cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to acquire accurate radiographic images for alveolar bone in lower incisors and the change after presurgical orthodontic treatment. Seventeen patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion, ten normal occlusion subjects, and fifteen patients treated with orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery were included. CBCT images were obtained. The labial and lingual inclinations of mandibular incisors, the thickness of alveolar bone, the vertical alveolar height and root length were measured. Alveolar bone thickness at the apex in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion was thinner than normal subjects. The vertical alveolar bone heights at labial and lingual sides in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were both reduced compared with normal subjects, especially at the labial side. There were statistically significant correlations between lower incisor inclination and alveolar bone morphology. After orthodontics, the incisors root apex was closer to the lingual side of alveolar bone. The alveolar bone thickness at apex was not statistically changed. The vertical alveolar bone heights at the labial and lingual sides were both significantly reduced especially the lingual side after presurgical orthodontic treatment. The root length was not significantly changed. In conclusion, the alveolar bone thickness at apex is thinner and the vertical alveolar height is reduced at the labial side. Forward movement of lower incisors during presurgical orthodontic treatment can render the lower incisors root apex closer to the lingual side and the vertical alveolar height is reduced. PMID:26550202

  11. Presurgical orthodontic decompensation alters alveolar bone condition around mandibular incisors in adults with skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boyang; Tang, Jun; Xiao, Ping; Ding, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study is to use cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to acquire accurate radiographic images for alveolar bone in lower incisors and the change after presurgical orthodontic treatment. Seventeen patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion, ten normal occlusion subjects, and fifteen patients treated with orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery were included. CBCT images were obtained. The labial and lingual inclinations of mandibular incisors, the thickness of alveolar bone, the vertical alveolar height and root length were measured. Alveolar bone thickness at the apex in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion was thinner than normal subjects. The vertical alveolar bone heights at labial and lingual sides in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were both reduced compared with normal subjects, especially at the labial side. There were statistically significant correlations between lower incisor inclination and alveolar bone morphology. After orthodontics, the incisors root apex was closer to the lingual side of alveolar bone. The alveolar bone thickness at apex was not statistically changed. The vertical alveolar bone heights at the labial and lingual sides were both significantly reduced especially the lingual side after presurgical orthodontic treatment. The root length was not significantly changed. In conclusion, the alveolar bone thickness at apex is thinner and the vertical alveolar height is reduced at the labial side. Forward movement of lower incisors during presurgical orthodontic treatment can render the lower incisors root apex closer to the lingual side and the vertical alveolar height is reduced.

  12. Lung alveolar proteomics of bronchoalveolar lavage from a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis patient using high-resolution FTICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Galetskiy, Dmitry; Damoc, Eugen; Ripper, Jan; Woischnik, Markus; Griese, Matthias; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying; Przybylski, Michael

    2007-10-01

    High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry was developed and applied to the proteome analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. With use of 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis, surfactant protein A (SP-A) and other surfactant-related lung alveolar proteins were efficiently separated and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization FTICR mass spectrometry . Low molecular mass BALF proteins were separated using a gradient 2-D gel. An efficient extraction/precipitation system was developed and used for the enrichment of surfactant proteins. The result of the BALF proteome analysis show the presence of several isoforms of SP-A, in which an N-non-glycosylierte form and several proline hydroxylations were identified. Furthermore, a number of protein spots were found to contain a mixture of proteins unresolved by 2-D gel electrophoresis, illustrating the feasibility of high-resolution mass spectrometry to provide identifications of proteins that remain unseparated in 2-D gels even upon extended pH gradients.

  13. Enhanced alveolar clearance with chest percussion therapy and positional changes during whole-lung lavage for alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Perez, Andrew; Rogers, Robert M

    2004-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis has traditionally been treated with whole-lung lavage (WLL). The literature describes a variety of techniques used in performing the WLL, including mechanical vs manual chest percussion, use of prone positioning, and variances in lavage volume. We have quantified and compared the effective alveolar clearance for each component of the lavage by measuring the dry weight of material in the lavage effluent. We measured this in five patients who underwent six consecutive WLLs at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. We performed the lavage in the following three stages: stage I, passive drainage; stage II, assisted clearance; and stage III, positional clearance. Aliquots of lavage effluent were centrifuged to determine the dry weight of material present in sequentially recorded bottles within each stage. At the initiation of each augmentation, there was a statistically significant improvement in the clearance of material (stage II, p = 0.009; stage III, p = 0.012). Furthermore, we show that lipoproteinaceous material is present in the lavage effluent in all stages of latter portions of the lavage. The effective removal of material would be expected to have an impact on the physiologic and clinical response to WLL. This finding emphasizes the importance of performing an adequate and standardized lavage.

  14. 50 CFR 648.143 - Minimum sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum sizes. 648.143 Section 648.143... Fishery § 648.143 Minimum sizes. (a) The minimum size for black sea bass is 11 inches (27.94 cm) total length for all vessels issued a moratorium permit under § 648.4 (a)(7) that fish for, possess, land...

  15. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  16. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order..., may establish, for any or all portions of the production area, minimum quantities below which...

  17. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order..., may establish, for any or all portions of the production area, minimum quantities below which...

  18. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order..., may establish, for any or all portions of the production area, minimum quantities below which...

  19. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order..., may establish, for any or all portions of the production area, minimum quantities below which...

  20. [Alveolar soft part sarcoma of the larynx: a case report].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hao; Yang, Hui; Wang, Huan

    2015-07-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare soft tissue sarcomas, this sarcoma occurs rarely in the larynx. Herein, we describe an unusual case of ASPS occurring in the larynx. The patient was a 46-year-old woman who presented with a more than 2-year history of right pyriform fossa mass and progressive hoarseness for three months. The endoscopic examination of the larynx revealed a mass in the right pyriform fossa with smooth surface and well-defined margin. Computed tomography demonstrated a heterogeneous tumor in the right pyriform fossa, and involving the paralaryngeal space, measuring approximately 2.1 cm x 1.7 cm x 2.6 cm, which was resected via lateral neck approach. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry revealed an ASPS. To ours knowledge, this is the first reported case of ASPS arising in pyriform fossa.

  1. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Makyo-kanseki-to Administration

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Yuko; Takano, Yuki; Ishiwatari, Yusaku; Yoshida, Akiko; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Ito, Reiko; Hattori, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Shu

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the first known case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with the administration of Makyo-kanseki-to, a Chinese herbal drug. A 64-year-old man with bronchial asthma presented with persistent cough. Makyo-kanseki-to was prescribed as an adjunctive treatment for bronchial asthma. Immediately after drug ingestion, the patient expectorated bloody sputum. DAH was diagnosed based on the presence of bilateral ground-glass opacity which was identified on chest computed tomography and bloody bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We diagnosed that the administration of Makyo-kanseki-to was the responsible medication because the hemorrhage developed immediately after drug ingestion and resolved after the cessation of such medication with no subsequent recurrence. PMID:27853076

  2. The mechanical behavior of a mammalian lung alveolar duct model.

    PubMed

    Denny, E; Schroter, R C

    1995-08-01

    A model for the mechanical properties of an alveolar duct is analyzed using the finite element method. Its geometry comprises an assemblage of truncated octahedral alveoli surrounding a longitudinal air duct. The amounts and distributions of elastin and collagen fiber bundles, modeled by separate stress-strain laws, are based upon published data for dogs. The surface tension of the air-liquid interface is modeled using an area-dependent relationship. Pressure-volume curves are computed that compare well with experimental data for both saline-filled and air-filled lungs. Pressure-volume curves of the separate elastin and collagen fiber contributions are similar in form to the behavior of saline-filled lungs treated with either elastase or collagenase. A comparison with our earlier model, based upon a single alveolus, shows the duct to have a behavior closer to reported experimental data.

  3. Altered sialylation of alveolar macrophages in HIV-1-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    PERRIN, C; GIORDANENGO, V; BANNWARTH, S; BLAIVE, B; LEFEBVRE, J-C

    1997-01-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that O-glycans at the surface of HIV-1-infected cell lines were hyposialylated. Moreover, we and others have shown that HIV+ individuals produced autoantibodies that react with hyposialylated CD43, on T cell lines. Since the autoantigen responsible for this abnormal immune response was not easily found in the peripheral blood cells of corresponding patients, we searched for its possible presence in other sites. Using fluorescence staining of alveolar macrophages with various lectins, we show that the binding of the PNA lectin specific for asialo O-glycans is much more efficient on cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, the degree of reactivity of PNA is correlated with the clinical stage of the illness. PMID:9353144

  4. Altered sialylation of alveolar macrophages in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Giordanengo, V; Bannwarth, S; Blaive, B; Lefebvre, J C

    1997-10-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that O-glycans at the surface of HIV-1-infected cell lines were hyposialylated. Moreover, we and others have shown that HIV+ individuals produced autoantibodies that react with hyposialylated CD43, on T cell lines. Since the autoantigen responsible for this abnormal immune response was not easily found in the peripheral blood cells of corresponding patients, we searched for its possible presence in other sites. Using fluorescence staining of alveolar macrophages with various lectins, we show that the binding of the PNA lectin specific for asialo O-glycans is much more efficient on cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, the degree of reactivity of PNA is correlated with the clinical stage of the illness.

  5. Anesthetic Efficacy of Bupivacaine Solutions in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Maria Cristina; Ranali, José; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Ambrosano, Glaúcia Maria Bovi; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2 bupivacaine solutions. Twenty-two volunteers randomly received in a crossover, double-blinded manner 2 inferior alveolar nerve blocks with 1.8 mL of racemic bupivacaine and a mixture of 75% levobupivacaine and 25% dextrobupivacaine, both 0.5% and with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine. Before and after the injection, the first mandibular pre-molar was evaluated every 2 minutes until no response to the maximal output (80 reading) of the pulp tester and then again every 20 minutes. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon paired test and the paired t test. No differences were found between the solutions for onset and duration of pulpal anesthesia and duration of soft tissue anesthesia (P > .05). It was concluded that the solutions have similar anesthetic efficacy. PMID:16596912

  6. Comparative damage to alveolar macrophages after phagocytosis of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.; Gray, R.H.; DeNee, P.B.; Newton, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Backscatter electron and secondary electron imaging were used in a scanning electron microscope study of the in vitro toxic effects of particles ingested by alveolar macrophages. Relatively nontoxic aluminosilicate fly ash particles from the Mount St. Helens eruption and from a coal-fired power plant as well as toxic quartz particles from the Westphalia (Germany) mine deposits were readily taken up by macrophages. The presence of fly ash particles inside the cells was not associated with any changes in surface morphology. The presence of intracellular quartz particles, on the other hand, was correlated with damage to the cell membrane as determined by alterations in surface morphology, uptake of trypan blue, and release of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. The use of backscatter electron imaging is useful in scanning electron microscope studies which attempt to establish cause and effect relationships between exposure to respirable particles and the morphological and cytotoxic response.

  7. Repeated Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in a Patient with Hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Hajime; Terada, Jiro; Hoshi, Hiromasa; Urushibara, Takashi; Kato, Fumiaki; Nishimura, Rintaro; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening complication that occurs in association with various diseases including coagulation disorders. In rare cases, it is caused by hemophilia. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for a third time due to DAH. Although the cause of DAH could not be identified by bronchoscopy or laboratory tests, a good response to corticosteroids suggested idiopathic DAH with pulmonary capillaritis. The patient was diagnosed with hemophilia B based on the results of a detailed inquiry, a mildly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, and low factor IX activity. Hemophilia may be an underlying factor that exacerbates the bleeding of patients with DAH, even when they show a good response to corticosteroids. PMID:28202865

  8. A case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with Cor Pulmonale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Gu, Tao

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the formation and deposition of microliths within the alveoli and a paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. It has familial tendency and is thought to be an autosomal recessive disorder with the mutation in the SLC34A2 gene. We describe a case of PAM with Cor Pulmonale. Ultrasonic cardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension (82 mmHg). Chest radiography revealed diffuse, bilateral sandstorm-like micronodules with greater density in the lower lung fields. HRCT scans demonstrated diffuse ground-grass opacities, thickening and calcification of interlobular septa and confluent calcified nodules. A diagnosis of PAM was suggested and confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB).

  9. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  10. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Poncy, J.L.; Dhilly, M.; Verry, M. ); Metivier, H. ); Masse, R. )

    1992-07-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly function macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca[sup 2+]. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 [+-] 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 [mu]m([sigma][sub g] = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U[sub 3]O[sub g] preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Liver transplantation for alveolar echinococcosis in an endemic region.

    PubMed

    Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Arslan, Sukru; Kantarci, Mecit; Tan, Onder; Ahıskalioglu, Ali; Özden, Kemalettin; Colak, Abdurrahim

    2015-08-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a chronic disease caused by ingestion of the eggs of the parasitic cestode Echinococcosis multilocularis (EM). In severe cases, liver transplantation (LT) may represent the only possibility of survival and cure. Patients undergoing LT associated with hepatic AE at our institution between April 2011 and October 2014 were investigated retrospectively. The clinical findings of the 27 patients who participated in the study were noted. Kaplan-Meier and chi-square tests were used to investigate the effect of these characteristics on survival and mortality. Living donor LT was performed on 20 patients (74.1%), and deceased donor LT was performed on 7 patients (25.9%). Hilar invasion was the most common indication (14 patients, 51.9%) for transplantation. The patient follow-up was 16.1 ± 11.4 months, and the overall survival rate was 77.8%. Primary nonfunction developed only in 2 patients in the posttransplantation period. Six patients died during monitoring, the most common cause of death being sepsis (3 patients). The relationship between the mortality rate of the patients and the invasion of the bile duct and/or portal vein by alveolar lesions was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.024 and P = 0.043, respectively). According to PNM staging, when the AE disease exceeds the resectability limits, the only alternative for the treatment of the disease is LT. However, different from LT due to cirrhosis, it is extremely difficult to perform a transplantation for AE disease because of the invasive characteristics of it. In order to decrease the difficulty of the operation and the postoperative mortality, the intracystic abscess and cholangitis which occur because of AE must be treated via medical and percutaneous methods before transplantation.

  12. Three-dimensional convective alveolar flow induced by rhythmic breathing motion of the pulmonary acinus.

    PubMed

    Sznitman, Josué; Heimsch, Fabian; Heimsch, Thomas; Rusch, Daniel; Rösgen, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Low Reynolds number flows (Re<1) in the human pulmonary acinus are often difficult to assess due to the submillimeter dimensions and accessibility of the region. In the present computational study, we simulated three-dimensional alveolar flows in an alveolated duct at each generation of the pulmonary acinar tree using recent morphometric data. Rhythmic lung expansion and contraction motion was modeled using moving wall boundary conditions to simulate realistic sedentary tidal breathing. The resulting alveolar flow patterns are largely time independent and governed by the ratio of the alveolar to ductal flow rates, Qa/Qd. This ratio depends uniquely on geometrical configuration such that alveolar flow patterns may be entirely determined by the location of the alveoli along the acinar tree. Although flows within alveoli travel very slowly relative to those in acinar ducts, 0.021%alveolar opening and radial flows induced by wall displacement. Furthermore, alveolar flow patterns under rhythmic wall motion contrast sharply with results obtained in a rigid alveolus, further confirming the importance of including inherent wall motion to understand realistic acinar flow phenomena. The present findings may give further insight into the role of convective alveolar flows in determining aerosol kinematics and deposition in the pulmonary acinus.

  13. The clinical application of rhBMP-7 for the reconstruction of alveolar cleft.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Ashraf; Roshan, Cherian P; Gillgrass, Toby; Naudi, Kurt; Ray, Arup

    2016-01-01

    In this study, radiographic assessment was performed to find out the effectiveness of bone regeneration following the application of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 (rhBMP-7) for the reconstruction of alveolar cleft defects in 11 cases: nine unilateral and two bilateral alveolar clefs. Reconstruction of the alveolar cleft was performed by using 3.5 mg of rhBMP-7 (Osigraft OP1) on a type I collagen carrier. Radiographs were taken 6 months post operation using a Gendex Intraoral Unit with Agfa Dentus M2 Comfort occlusal film. The amount of bony infill was graded on a Kindelan four-point scale. The patients were followed up for an average of 6.6 years. Based on the radiographic analysis, eight out of the nine unilateral alveolar cleft cases received a score of grade I and one patient had a grade II score, using the Kindelan scale. In the two bilateral alveolar clefts, only one side had bone formation. The radiographic appearance showed a normal trabecular pattern similar to the adjacent bone. Thus, rhBMP-7 was radiographically and clinically successful in regenerating the bone at the alveolar cleft which resulted in shortening of the operation time, absence of donor-site morbidity and a shorter hospital stay. The promising results of this preliminary study should encourage a phase II trial to compare bone grafts with BMP for the reconstruction of alveolar defects.

  14. Similar matrix alterations in alveolar and small airway walls of COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Remodelling in COPD has at least two dimensions: small airway wall thickening and destruction of alveolar walls. Recent studies indicate that there is some similarity between alveolar and small airway wall matrix remodelling. The aim of this study was to characterise and assess similarities in alveolar and small airway wall matrix remodelling, and TGF-β signalling in COPD patients of different GOLD stages. Methods Lung tissue sections of 14 smoking controls, 16 GOLD II and 19 GOLD IV patients were included and stained for elastin and collagens as well as hyaluronan, a glycosaminoglycan matrix component and pSMAD2. Results Elastin was significantly decreased in COPD patients not only in alveolar, but also in small airway walls. Interestingly, both collagen and hyaluronan were increased in alveolar as well as small airway walls. The matrix changes were highly comparable between GOLD stages, with collagen content in the alveolar wall increasing further in GOLD IV. A calculated remodelling index, defined as elastin divided over collagen and hyaluronan, was decreased significantly in GOLD II and further lowered in GOLD IV patients, suggesting that matrix component alterations are involved in progressive airflow limitation. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation present between the alveolar and small airway wall stainings of the matrix components, as well as for pSMAD2. No differences in pSMAD2 staining between controls and COPD patients were found. Conclusions In conclusion, remodelling in the alveolar and small airway wall in COPD is markedly similar and already present in moderate COPD. Notably, alveolar collagen and a remodelling index relate to lung function. PMID:24886452

  15. Effects of ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener on potassium transport and alveolar fluid clearance in the resected human lung.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, T; Takahashi, K; Ohya, N; Nakada, T; Matthay, M A

    1998-07-01

    Since the effect of an ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) opener on the function of alveolar epithelial cells is unknown, the effect of YM934, a newly synthesized KATP channel opener, on potassium influx into the alveolar spaces and alveolar fluid clearance was determined in the resected human lung. An isosmolar albumin solution with a low potassium concentration was instilled into the distal airspaces of resected human lungs. Alveolar fluid clearance was measured by the progressive increase in alveolar protein concentration. Net potassium transport was measured by the change in potassium concentration and alveolar fluid volume. YM934 (10(-4) M) increased net influx of potassium by 140% into the alveolar spaces and also increased alveolar fluid clearance by 60% in the experiments with a potassium concentration of 0.3 mEq/1. Glibenclamide (10(-4) M), a KATP channel blocker, inhibited the YM934-increased influx of potassium transport and the increase in alveolar fluid clearance. Also amiloride (10(-5) M), an inhibitors of apical sodium uptake, blocked the YM934 stimulated increase in net alveolar fluid clearance. These results indicate that a KATP channel opener can effect potassium transport and net vectorial fluid movement across the human alveolar epithelium.

  16. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the...

  17. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  18. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  19. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  20. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  1. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  2. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  3. 78 FR 11793 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 543 RIN 3141-AA27 Minimum Internal Control Standards AGENCY... (NIGC) proposes to amend its minimum internal control standards for Class II gaming under the Indian... Internal Control Standards. 64 FR 590. The rule added a new part to the Commission's...

  4. 30 CFR 202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 202.352 Section 202.352 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's annual...

  5. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  6. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  7. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  8. 24 CFR 280.35 - Minimum participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum participation. 280.35 Section 280.35 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Minimum participation. Except as provided in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, the recipient may...

  9. 24 CFR 280.35 - Minimum participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Minimum participation. 280.35 Section 280.35 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Minimum participation. Except as provided in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, the recipient may...

  10. 24 CFR 280.35 - Minimum participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Minimum participation. 280.35 Section 280.35 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Minimum participation. Except as provided in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, the recipient may...

  11. 24 CFR 280.35 - Minimum participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Minimum participation. 280.35 Section 280.35 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Minimum participation. Except as provided in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, the recipient may...

  12. Optimal shock isolation with minimum settling time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Lim, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how unique isolator forces and corresponding forces can be chosen by superimposing a minimum settling time onto the limiting performance of the shock isolation system. Basically, this means that the system which has reached the peak value of the performance index is settled to rest in minimum time.

  13. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark,…

  14. 30 CFR 281.30 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 281.30 Section 281.30 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations § 281.30 Minimum...

  15. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases...

  16. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide...

  17. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide...

  18. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide...

  19. Biological Events in Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone Associated with Application of Orthodontic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Feller, L.; Khammissa, R. A. G.; Schechter, I.; Thomadakis, G.; Fourie, J.; Lemmer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic force-induced stresses cause dynamic alterations within the extracellular matrix and within the cytoskeleton of cells in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, mediating bone remodelling, ultimately enabling orthodontic tooth movement. In the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, the mechanically induced tensile strains upregulate the expression of osteogenic genes resulting in bone formation, while mechanically induced compressive strains mediate predominantly catabolic tissue changes and bone resorption. In this review article we summarize some of the currently known biological events occurring in the periodontal ligament and in the alveolar bone in response to application of orthodontic forces and how these facilitate tooth movement. PMID:26421314

  20. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Marco Ulises; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare but potentially fatal condition. Although the pathogenesis of this condition is unknown, high disease activity is the main characteristic; moreover, histopathology in some studies showed alveolar immune complex deposits and capillaritis. Clinical features of DAH include dyspnea, a drop in hemoglobin, and diffuse radiographic alveolar images, with or without hemoptysis. Factors associated with mortality include mechanical ventilation, renal failure, and infections. Bacterial infections have been reported frequently in patients with DAH, but also invasive fungal infections including aspergillosis. DAH treatment is based on high dose methylprednisolone; other accepted therapies include cyclophosphamide (controversial), plasmapheresis, immunoglobulin and rituximab.

  1. Alveolar macrophage count as an indicator of lung reaction to industrial air pollution.

    PubMed

    Mylius, E A; Gullvåg, B

    1986-01-01

    The major proportion of the cellular components found in most of the sputa from persons working in polluted atmospheres are alveolar macrophages, and counts of the alveolar macrophages present in smears made from sputa from exposed workers probably reflect the lung reaction to air pollution. An investigation of this phenomenon was undertaken using the sputa of workers in different types of industries: a coke plant, two different aluminum reduction plants, a ship-building yard and asphalt work on a road. The results showed that the alveolar macrophage count increases with a higher level of particulate pollution in the workplace. A synergistic effect of occupational air pollution and smoking habits was also recorded.

  2. Injurious mechanical ventilation in the normal lung causes a progressive pathologic change in dynamic alveolar mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, Lucio A; Albert, Scott; Carney, David; Gatto, Louis A; Halter, Jeffrey M; Nieman, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory distress syndrome causes a heterogeneous lung injury, and without protective mechanical ventilation a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury can occur. To ventilate noncompliant lung regions, high inflation pressures are required to 'pop open' the injured alveoli. The temporal impact, however, of these elevated pressures on normal alveolar mechanics (that is, the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during ventilation) is unknown. In the present study we found that ventilating the normal lung with high peak pressure (45 cmH20) and low positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP of 3 cmH2O) did not initially result in altered alveolar mechanics, but alveolar instability developed over time. Methods Anesthetized rats underwent tracheostomy, were placed on pressure control ventilation, and underwent sternotomy. Rats were then assigned to one of three ventilation strategies: control group (n = 3, Pcontrol = 14 cmH2O, PEEP = 3 cmH2O), high pressure/low PEEP group (n = 6, Pcontrol = 45 cmH2O, PEEP = 3 cmH2O), and high pressure/high PEEP group (n = 5, Pcontrol = 45 cmH2O, PEEP = 10 cmH2O). In vivo microscopic footage of subpleural alveolar stability (that is, recruitment/derecruitment) was taken at baseline and than every 15 minutes for 90 minutes following ventilator adjustments. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was determined by measuring the area of individual alveoli at peak inspiration (I) and end expiration (E) by computer image analysis. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was quantified by the percentage change in alveolar area during tidal ventilation (%I – EΔ). Results Alveoli were stable in the control group for the entire experiment (low %I – EΔ). Alveoli in the high pressure/low PEEP group were initially stable (low %I – EΔ), but with time alveolar recruitment/derecruitment developed. The development of alveolar instability in the high pressure/low PEEP group was associated with histologic lung injury. Conclusion A

  3. Lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve with simultaneous implant placement: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Garg, A K; Morales, M J

    1998-01-01

    In the event of moderate to severe mandibular bone resorption posterior to the mental foramen, repositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve provides a greater amount of available bone for implant placement and reduces the risk of nerve injury. While neural paresthesia may initially occur, this altered sensation generally resolves spontaneously. Alveolar nerve repositioning may be possible in cases in which other procedures cannot be performed due to the extent of atrophy of the posterior mandibular alveolar crest. This article presents the surgical technique to achieve this objective.

  4. Alveolar recruitment maneuver in refractory hypoxemia and lobar atelectasis after cardiac surgery: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective This case report describes an unusual presentation of right upper lobe atelectasis associated with refractory hypoxemia to conventional alveolar recruitment maneuvers in a patient soon after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Method Case-report. Results The alveolar recruitment with PEEP = 40cmH2O improved the patient’s atelectasis and hypoxemia. Conclusion In the present report, the unusual alveolar recruitment maneuver with PEEP 40cmH2O showed to be safe and efficient to reverse refractory hypoxemia and uncommon atelectasis in a patient after cardiac surgery. PMID:22726992

  5. Distance of the alveolar antral artery from the alveolar crest. Related factors and surgical considerations in sinus floor elevation

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Centelles, Pablo; Loira-Gago, María; Gonzalez-Mosquera, Antonio; Seoane-Romero, Juan M.; Garcia-Martin, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In a variable proportion of maxillary sinuses alveolar antral artery is located close to the residual ridge, increasing the chances for haemorrhagic complications during sinus floor elevation procedures. Material and Methods Retrospective observational study of CBCT explorations performed for implant-treatment planning. The upper first molar area was selected for this study. The relative uncertainty (standard deviation of the measurement divided by its mean and expressed as a percentage from 0% to 100%) was chosen for determining the observational errors. For modeling the chances of AAA detection, the generalized additive models (GAM) approach was chosen. Results A total of 240 maxillary sinuses were studied (46.25% males) whose median median age was 58 years old (IQR: 52-66). Univariate models showed that the chances for an AAA-alvelar crest distance ≤15mm increase in wider sinuses with lower, subsinusally edentulous crests. When distance is considered as a continuous variable, the best mutivariate model showed an explained deviance of 67% and included AAA diameter, distance AAA-sinus floor, sinus width, and shape, height and width of the residual ridge. Thinner AAAs are found closer to the crest (within the ≤15mm safe distance). Conclusions Bearing in mind the inclusion criteria and the limitations of this investigation, it is concluded that there is a high proportion of maxillary sinuses where AAA describes a course close to the alveolar crest (≤15mm), which was classically considered a safe distance for SFE. This position is related to the presence of atrophic crests (depressed ridge form) and wide maxillary sinuses where the distance of the vessel to the floor of the sinus is small. This information may permit a better surgical planning of SFE procedures. Key words:Cone-beam computed tomography, blood vessels, sinus floor augmentation, intraoperative complications. PMID:27694790

  6. Halothane, isoflurane and enflurane potentiate the effect of noradrenaline on ventricular automaticity in the rat heart: evidence of the involvement of both alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Cárceles, M D; Laorden, M L; Hernandez, J; Miralles, F S; Campos, M

    1990-03-01

    Direct evidence has been sought as to what extent the sensitization of heart to the arrhythmogenic action of sympathomimetic drugs in the presence of the inhalatory anaesthetics, halothane, isoflurane and enflurane, is mediated by either alpha- or beta-adrenoceptors. For this purpose, the effects of isoprenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine on ventricular automaticity induced by local injury have been studied in the isolated right ventricle of the rat. Isoprenaline was more potent in increasing ventricular automaticity than either phenylephrine or noradrenaline. The anaesthetic potentiated the effects of noradrenaline, as well as that of higher concentrations of phenylephrine, but not those of isoprenaline. These results support the contention that increases in ventricular automaticity induced by sympathomimetic drugs are mainly mediated by adrenoceptors of the beta-type. However, the simultaneous activation of both alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors seems to be necessary for the effect of the anaesthetics in sensitizing the heart to sympathomimetic drugs.

  7. [Topographic-quantitative EEG-analysis of the paradoxical arousal reaction. EEG changes during urologic surgery using isoflurane/ N2O anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Bischoff, P; Kochs, E; Droese, D; Meyer-Moldenhauer, W H; Schulte am Esch, J

    1993-03-01

    Increases in slow-wave (delta) activity in the EEG may reflect increased depth of anaesthesia provided that hypoxia, haemodynamic instability and drug overdose have been excluded. In contrast, similar intraoperative EEG responses have been described as paradoxical arousal reactions. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of surgical stimulation on spatial EEG changes during anaesthesia with 0.6% isoflurane/66% nitrous oxide. METHODS. The present study investigated changes in EEG power and frequencies in 20 patients (mean age 36 +/- 8 years; ASA I or II) scheduled for elective urological surgery during steady-state anaesthesia with 0.6% isoflurane and 66% nitrous oxide. The following variables were measured: heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), end-tidal isoflurane (PetISO) and carbon dioxide concentrations (PetCO2), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2%) and body temperature (degree C). Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: group 1 (n = 10; without surgery) and group 2 (n = 10; with surgical procedure). The EEG was recorded over 20 min. The first 5 min were taken as baseline. In group 2 surgical stimulation (skin incision with subsequent surgical preparation) was started 1-2 min after recording of baseline values. Topographical distribution of EEG output was recorded from 17 electrodes (international 10-20 system), digitized and stored on disk (CATEEM) after establishment of steady-state anaesthesia (PetISO: 0.6%; PetCO2: 35-37 mmHg). Data are given as medium (microV2/Hz) and relative changes (%) +/- SD with respect to baseline. Statistical significance was tested for F4 versus C4 for the delta- and alpha-1-frequency bands using Wilcoxon's test (P < 0.05). RESULTS. In group 1 (without surgical stimulation) all parameters did not change over time. EEG slowing with an increase in power (> 100%) was noted in 8 patients of group 2 (n = 10; during surgical stimulation). By visual inspection of the original EEG tracings paradoxical

  8. Wide-dynamic-range neurons are heterogeneous in windup responsiveness to changes in stimulus intensity and isoflurane anesthesia level in mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yun; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2010-08-01

    The windup phenomenon in wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neurons represents a short-term neuronal sensitization to repetitive noxious inputs that may share similar mechanisms with those that trigger the development of persistent pain and hyperalgesia. Some WDR cells are readily sensitized and express prominent windup (windup(+)), whereas others do not (windup(-)). We recorded extracellular single-unit activity of deep laminae WDR neurons (350-700 microm) in C57BL/6 mice to determine how changes in stimulus intensity (1x and >2x C-component threshold, n = 53) and concentrations of isoflurane anesthesia (2.0% and 1.0%, n = 30) might differently modulate windup responsiveness in windup(+) and windup(-) cells. Two principally different analysis methods [absolute windup (the number of action potentials) and relative windup (the percentage of action potentials evoked by the first stimulus of the train)] were used to interpret windup data. We observed that increasing the stimulus intensity and decreasing the isoflurane concentration: 1) facilitated windup generation at 0.2-Hz stimulation and significantly enhanced absolute windup at both 0.2-Hz and 0.5-Hz stimulation predominantly in windup(+) cells but did not confer windup capability on windup(-) cells and 2) significantly increased relative windup at 0.2-Hz, but not 0.5-Hz, stimulation in windup(+) cells. Our findings advance our understanding of the neurobiology of deep WDR neurons in mice and demonstrate that two populations of cells differ in their windup responsiveness to changes in experimental conditions. We also elucidate the usefulness and potential limitations of two widely used methods for calculating and presenting windup data.

  9. TASK-1 (KCNK3) and TASK-3 (KCNK9) Tandem Pore Potassium Channel Antagonists Stimulate Breathing in Isoflurane Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    TASK-1 and TASK-3 tandem pore potassium channel subunits provide a constitutive acidic pH- and hypoxia-inhibited potassium conductance. TASK channels are expressed in a number of tissues in involved in regulation of breathing, and the TASK-1/TASK-3 heterodimer provides the predominant hypoxia-sensitive potassium conductance in carotid body Type I glomus chemosensing cells. The carotid bodies have an important role in regulation of breathing. Doxapram is a potent TASK-1 and TASK-3 potassium channel antagonist and a carotid body and breathing stimulant. PK-THPP and A1899 are potent and selective TASK-1 and TASK-3 antagonists. We hypothesized PK-THPP and A1899 are, like doxapram, breathing stimulants. Methods We studied rat TASK-3 (rTASK-3) potassium channel function by Ussing chamber using Fisher rat thyroid (FRT) monolayers. To quantify breathing effects, we studied male Sprague Dawley rats spontaneously breathing 1.5% isoflurane in room air by non-invasive plethysmography and by arterial blood gas analysis. Results PK-THPP, A1899, and doxapram inhibit rat TASK-3 potassium channel function with IC50s of 42 nM (33 to 52), 1.6 μM (0.8 to 3.3), and 22 μM (18 to 28) (n = 4 to 6; 95% confidence limits). Intravenous PK-THPP, A1899, and doxapram stimulated breathing by plethysmography with a peak change in minute ventilation relative to baseline of 84±19% and 226±56% (for PK-THPP at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg; mean±S.E.M.; n = 3 to 4; P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively, relative to vehicle); 46±2% and 236±48% (for A1899 at 5 and 25 mg/kg; n=3 to 4; P>0.05 and P<0.001, respectively); 103±20% (for doxapram at 25 mg/kg; n = 4), and 33±9% (for DMSO vehicle at 1 ml/kg; n = 4). PK-THPP and A1899, unlike doxapram, induced a profound and lasting respiratory alkalosis by arterial blood gas analysis. Thirty minutes following intravenous drug administration, we observed an arterial pH and carbon dioxide partial pressure of 7.62±0.02 and 23±0.8 mmHg (for PK-THPP after 5 mg/kg; n = 4; P

  10. Phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from lung, isolated alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Pool, G L; Bubacz, D G; Lumb, R H; Mason, R J

    1983-01-01

    We have examined phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from rat and mouse whole lung, isolated rat alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived mouse pulmonary adenomas. We report an enrichment in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (but not phosphatidylinositol) protein-catalysed transfer in the type II cell and adenoma cytosols compared with the whole-lung cytosols. The activities from these cytosols were resolved using column chromatofocusing, which clearly demonstrated the presence of a phosphatidylcholine-specific transfer protein in each of the four tissues. In addition, two proteins (rat) or three proteins (mouse) catalysing both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol transfer were resolved from whole lung, whereas in both the rat isolated alveolar type II cells and the mouse type II cell-derived adenomas one of these less specific proteins is not present. PMID:6661189

  11. Iron homeostatis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosi...

  12. Association of misoprostol, Moebius syndrome and congenital central alveolar hypoventilation. Case report.

    PubMed

    Nunes, M L; Friedrich, M A; Loch, L F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case showing the association of Moebius syndrome, the use of misoprostol during pregnancy and the development of central congenital alveolar hypoventilation. Pathophysiological aspects of these three diseases are discussed and also the unfavorable prognosis of this association.

  13. Reveromycin A Administration Prevents Alveolar Bone Loss in Osteoprotegerin Knockout Mice with Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Manami; Miyazawa, Ken; Tabuchi, Masako; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yoshizako, Mamoru; Minamoto, Chisato; Torii, Yasuyoshi; Tamaoka, Yusuke; Kawatani, Makoto; Osada, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Goto, Shigemi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontal disease is characterized by alveolar bone loss and inflammatory changes. Reveromycin A (RMA) was recently developed and is a unique agent for inhibiting osteoclast activity. This study analysed the effects of RMA in an experimental mouse model of periodontitis involving osteoprotegerin (OPG)-knockout mice, specifically, whether it could control osteoclasts and reduce inflammation in periodontal tissue. We examined wild-type (WT) and OPG knockout mice (OPG KO) ligated with wire around contact points on the left first and second molars. RMA was administered twice a day to half of the mice. Using micro-computed tomography, we measured the volume of alveolar bone loss between the first and second molars, and also performed histological analysis. The OPG KO RMA+ group had significantly decreased osteoclast counts, alveolar bone loss, attachment loss, and inflammatory cytokine expression 8 weeks after ligation. Thus, RMA may reduce alveolar bone loss and inflamed periodontal tissues in patients with periodontitis. PMID:26561427

  14. Simultaneous Exposure to Multiple Air Pollutants Influences Alveolar Epithelial Cell Ion Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose. Air pollution sources generally release multiple pollutants simultaneously and yet, research has historically focused on the source-to-health linkages of individual air pollutants. We recently showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to a combination of particul...

  15. Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone in Health and Adaptation: Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Guo, Weihua; Chen, Mo; Zheng, Ying; Zhou, Jian; Kim, Sahng Gyoon; Embree, Mildred C; Songhee Song, Karen; Marao, Heloisa F; Mao, Jeremy J

    2016-01-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone are two critical tissues for understanding orthodontic tooth movement. The current literature is replete with descriptive studies of multiple cell types and their matrices in the PDL and alveolar bone, but is deficient with how stem/progenitor cells differentiate into PDL and alveolar bone cells. Can one type of orthodontic force with a specific magnitude and frequency activate osteoblasts, whereas another force type activates osteoclasts? This chapter will discuss the biology of not only mature cells and their matrices in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, but also stem/progenitor cells that differentiate into fibroblasts, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Key advances in tooth movement rely on further understanding of osteoblast and fibroblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, and osteoclastogenesis from the hematopoietic/monocyte lineage.

  16. Reveromycin A Administration Prevents Alveolar Bone Loss in Osteoprotegerin Knockout Mice with Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Manami; Miyazawa, Ken; Tabuchi, Masako; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yoshizako, Mamoru; Minamoto, Chisato; Torii, Yasuyoshi; Tamaoka, Yusuke; Kawatani, Makoto; Osada, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Goto, Shigemi

    2015-11-12

    Chronic periodontal disease is characterized by alveolar bone loss and inflammatory changes. Reveromycin A (RMA) was recently developed and is a unique agent for inhibiting osteoclast activity. This study analysed the effects of RMA in an experimental mouse model of periodontitis involving osteoprotegerin (OPG)-knockout mice, specifically, whether it could control osteoclasts and reduce inflammation in periodontal tissue. We examined wild-type (WT) and OPG knockout mice (OPG KO) ligated with wire around contact points on the left first and second molars. RMA was administered twice a day to half of the mice. Using micro-computed tomography, we measured the volume of alveolar bone loss between the first and second molars, and also performed histological analysis. The OPG KO RMA+ group had significantly decreased osteoclast counts, alveolar bone loss, attachment loss, and inflammatory cytokine expression 8 weeks after ligation. Thus, RMA may reduce alveolar bone loss and inflamed periodontal tissues in patients with periodontitis.

  17. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits the spontaneous release of superoxide radical by alveolar macrophages in vitro in asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Harkin, T. )

    1991-08-01

    Asbestosis is characterized by an alveolar macrophage alveolitis with injury and fibrosis of the lower respiratory tract. Alveolar macrophages recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage spontaneously release exaggerated amounts of oxidants including superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide that may mediate alveolar epithelial cell injury. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a normally occurring adrenal androgen that inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the initial enzyme in the pentose phosphate shunt necessary for NADPH generation and superoxide anion formation. In this regard, the authors hypothesized that DHEA may reduce asbestos-induced oxidant release. DHEA added in vitro to alveolar macrophages lavaged from 11 nonsmoking asbestos workers significantly reduced superoxide anion release. DHEA is an antioxidant and potential anticarcinogenic agent that may have a therapeutic role in reducing the increased oxidant burden in asbestos-induced alveolitis of the lower respiratory tract.

  18. [Study of the in vivo penetration of cotrimoxazole in alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Lopez, I; Dubar, V; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1990-04-01

    Kinetic of cotrimoxazole was studied in serum, alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid from guinea pigs receiving sulfamethoxazole (SMX, 100 mg/kg) and trimethoprim (TMP, 20 mg/kg). Guinea pigs were killed by cervical dislocation 30 min, 1 h, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h after intraperitoneal injection. Lung lavage was performed to obtain alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid. TMP and SMX levels were assayed using high-performance-liquid chromatography. Highest SMX levels were obtained in serum at 30 min, in BAL fluid at 1 h and in alveolar macrophages at 3 h. Mean SMX/TMP ratios (30 min, 1 h, 3 h) was 26.5 +/- 0.8 in serum, 3.76 +/- 1.8 in BAL fluid and 1.15 +/- 0.02 in alveolar macrophages.

  19. Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone in Health and Adaptation: Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Guo, Weihua; Chen, Mo; Zheng, Ying; Zhou, Jian; Kim, Sahng Gyoon; Embree, Mildred C.; Song, Karen Songhee; Marao, Heloisa F.; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone are two critical tissues for understanding orthodontic tooth movement. The current literature is replete with descriptive studies of multiple cell types and their matrices in the PDL and alveolar bone, but is deficient with how stem/progenitor cells differentiate into PDL and alveolar bone cells. Can one type of orthodontic force with a specific magnitude and frequency preferably activate osteoblasts, whereas another force type activates osteoclasts? This chapter will discuss the biology of not only mature cells and their matrices in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, but also stem/progenitor cells that differentiate into fibroblasts, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Key advances in tooth movement rely on further understanding of osteoblast and fibroblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, and osteoclastogenesis from the hematopoietic/monocyte lineage. PMID:26599112

  20. Segmental maxillary distraction with a novel device for closure of a wide alveolar cleft

    PubMed Central

    Bousdras, Vasilios A.; Liyanage, Chandra; Mars, Michael; Ayliffe, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of a wide alveolar cleft with initial application of segmental distraction osteogenesis is reported, in order to minimise cleft size prior to secondary alveolar bone grafting. The lesser maxillary segment was mobilised with osteotomy at Le Fort I level and, a novel distractor, facilitated horizontal movement of the dental/alveolar segment along the curvature of the maxillary dental arch. Following a latency period of 4 days distraction was applied for 7 days at a rate of 0.5 mm twice daily. Radiographic, ultrasonographic and clinical assessment revealed new bone and soft tissue formation 8 weeks after completion of the distraction phase. Overall the maxillary segment did move minimising the width of the cleft, which allowed successful closure with a secondary alveolar bone graft. PMID:24987601

  1. Testable scenario for relativity with minimum length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, G.

    2001-06-01

    I propose a general class of spacetimes whose structure is governed by observer-independent scales of both velocity (/c) and length (Planck length), and I observe that these spacetimes can naturally host a modification of FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction such that lengths which in their inertial rest frame are bigger than a ``minimum length'' are also bigger than the minimum length in all other inertial frames. With an analysis in leading order in the minimum length, I show that this is the case in a specific illustrative example of postulates for relativity with velocity and length observer-independent scales.

  2. An Investigation of Minimum Buy Policies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    Remaining are 2393 items for which we make a minimum buy . We also converted the quarterly data into a series of requisitions more appropriate for our...AO80 399 ARMY INVENTORY RESEARCH OFFICE PHILADELPHIA PA F/B 5/3 AN INVESTIGATION OF MINIMUM BUY POLICIES.(U) AUG 79 S FRAZZA. A J KAPLAN...UNCLASSIFIED IRO-269 NL EEEEEEEEE///EEEflfllflfflfllflf EN AD- FINAL REPORT F0 REPORt NO269 AN INVESTIGATION OF o MINIMUM BUY POLICIES l.5S ARMY U.S. CUSTOM

  3. Deposition of Particles in the Alveolar Airways: Inhalation and Breath-Hold with Pharmaceutical Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Khajeh-Hosseini-Dalasm, Navvab; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that factors such as airway wall motion, inhalation waveform, and geometric complexity influence the deposition of aerosols in the alveolar airways. However, deposition fraction correlations are not available that account for these factors in determining alveolar deposition. The objective of this study was to generate a new space-filling model of the pulmonary acinus region and implement this model to develop correlations of aerosol deposition that can be used to predict the alveolar dose of inhaled pharmaceutical products. A series of acinar models was constructed containing different numbers of alveolar duct generations based on space-filling 14-hedron elements. Selected ventilation waveforms were quick-and-deep and slow-and-deep inhalation consistent with the use of most pharmaceutical aerosol inhalers. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were used to predict aerosol transport and deposition in the series of acinar models across various orientations with gravity where ventilation was driven by wall motion. Primary findings indicated that increasing the number of alveolar duct generations beyond 3 had a negligible impact on total acinar deposition, and total acinar deposition was not affected by gravity orientation angle. A characteristic model containing three alveolar duct generations (D3) was then used to develop correlations of aerosol deposition in the alveolar airways as a function of particle size and particle residence time in the geometry. An alveolar deposition parameter was determined in which deposition correlated with d2t over the first half of inhalation followed by correlation with dt2, where d is the aerodynamic diameter of the particles and t is the potential particle residence time in the alveolar model. Optimal breath-hold times to allow 95% deposition of inhaled 1, 2, and 3 μm particles once inside the alveolar region were approximately >10, 2.7, and 1.2 s, respectively. Coupling of the deposition

  4. Contour changes in human alveolar bone following tooth extraction of the maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei; Wang, Yao

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to observe contour changes in human alveolar bone after tooth extraction of the maxillary central incisor and to provide original morphological evidence for aesthetic implant treatment in the maxillary anterior area. Forty patients were recruited into the study. Each patient had two CBCT scans (CBCT I and CBCT II), one taken before and one taken three months after tooth extraction of maxillary central incisor (test tooth T). A fixed anatomic reference point was used to orient the starting axial slice of the two scans. On three CBCT I axial slices, which represented the deep, middle, and shallow layers of the socket, labial and palatal alveolar bone widths of T were measured. The number of sagittal slices from the start point to the pulp centre of T was recorded. On three CBCT II axial slices, the pulp centres of extracted T were oriented according to the number of moved sagittal slices recorded in CBCT I. Labial and palatal alveolar bone widths at the oriented sites were measured. On the CBCT I axial slice which represented the middle layer of the socket, sagittal slices were reconstructed. Relevant distances of T on the sagittal slice were measured, as were the alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor. On the CBCT II axial slice, which represented the middle layer of the socket, relevant distances recorded in CBCT I were transferred on the sagittal slice. The height reduction of alveolar bone on labial and palatal sides was measured, as were the alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor at the oriented site. Intraobserver reliability assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) was high. Paired sample t-tests were performed. The alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor showed no statistical differences (P<0.05). The labial alveolar bone widths of T at the deep, middle, and shallow layers all showed

  5. Contour changes in human alveolar bone following tooth extraction of the maxillary central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Wang, Yao

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to observe contour changes in human alveolar bone after tooth extraction of the maxillary central incisor and to provide original morphological evidence for aesthetic implant treatment in the maxillary anterior area. Forty patients were recruited into the study. Each patient had two CBCT scans (CBCT I and CBCT II), one taken before and one taken three months after tooth extraction of maxillary central incisor (test tooth T). A fixed anatomic reference point was used to orient the starting axial slice of the two scans. On three CBCT I axial slices, which represented the deep, middle, and shallow layers of the socket, labial and palatal alveolar bone widths of T were measured. The number of sagittal slices from the start point to the pulp centre of T was recorded. On three CBCT II axial slices, the pulp centres of extracted T were oriented according to the number of moved sagittal slices recorded in CBCT I. Labial and palatal alveolar bone widths at the oriented sites were measured. On the CBCT I axial slice which represented the middle layer of the socket, sagittal slices were reconstructed. Relevant distances of T on the sagittal slice were measured, as were the alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor. On the CBCT II axial slice, which represented the middle layer of the socket, relevant distances recorded in CBCT I were transferred on the sagittal slice. The height reduction of alveolar bone on labial and palatal sides was measured, as were the alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor at the oriented site. Intraobserver reliability assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) was high. Paired sample t-tests were performed. The alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor showed no statistical differences (P<0.05). The labial alveolar bone widths of T at the deep, middle, and shallow layers all showed

  6. Cigarette smoke exposure aggravates air space enlargement and alveolar cell apoptosis in Smad3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Laszlo; Farkas, Daniela; Warburton, David; Gauldie, Jack; Shi, Wei; Stampfli, Martin R; Voelkel, Norbert F; Kolb, Martin

    2011-10-01

    The concept of genetic susceptibility factors predisposing cigarette smokers to develop emphysema stems from the clinical observation that only a fraction of smokers develop clinically significant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We investigated whether Smad3 knockout mice, which develop spontaneous air space enlargement after birth because of a defect in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, develop enhanced alveolar cell apoptosis and air space enlargement following cigarette smoke exposure. We investigated Smad3(-/-) and Smad3(+/+) mice at different adult ages and determined air space enlargement, alveolar cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Furthermore, laser-capture microdissection and real-time PCR were used to measure compartment-specific gene expression. We then compared the effects of cigarette smoke exposure on Smad3(-/-) and littermate controls. Smad3 knockout resulted in the development of air space enlargement in the adult mouse and was associated with decreased alveolar VEGF levels and activity and increased alveolar cell apoptosis. Cigarette smoke exposure aggravated air space enlargement and alveolar cell apoptosis. We also found increased Smad2 protein expression and phosphorylation, which was enhanced following cigarette smoke exposure, in Smad3-knockout animals. Double immunofluorescence analysis revealed that endothelial apoptosis started before epithelial apoptosis. Our data indicate that balanced TGF-β signaling is not only important for regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, but also for alveolar cell homeostasis. Impaired signaling via the Smad3 pathway results in alveolar cell apoptosis and alveolar destruction, likely via increased Smad2 and reduced VEGF expression and might represent a predisposition for accelerated development of emphysema due to cigarette smoke exposure.

  7. Megalin mediates transepithelial albumin clearance from the alveolar space of intact rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Buchäckert, Yasmin; Rummel, Sebastian; Vohwinkel, Christine U; Gabrielli, Nieves M; Grzesik, Benno A; Mayer, Konstantin; Herold, Susanne; Morty, Rory E; Seeger, Werner; Vadász, István

    2012-10-15

    The alveolo-capillary barrier is effectively impermeable to large solutes such as proteins. A hallmark of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome is the accumulation of protein-rich oedema fluid in the distal airspaces. Excess protein must be cleared from the alveolar space for recovery; however, the mechanisms of protein clearance remain incompletely understood. In intact rabbit lungs 29.8 ± 2.2% of the radio-labelled alveolar albumin was transported to the vascular compartment at 37°C within 120 min, as assessed by real-time measurement of 125I-albumin clearance from the alveolar space. At 4°C or 22°C significantly lower albumin clearance (3.7 ± 0.4 or 16.2 ± 1.1%, respectively) was observed. Deposition of a 1000-fold molar excess of unlabelled albumin into the alveolar space or inhibition of cytoskeletal rearrangement or clathrin-dependent endocytosis largely inhibited the transport of 125I-albumin to the vasculature, while administration of unlabelled albumin to the vascular space had no effect on albumin clearance. Furthermore, albumin uptake capacity was measured as about 0.37 mg ml−1 in cultured rat lung epithelial monolayers, further highlighting the (patho)physiological relevance of active alveolar epithelial protein transport. Moreover, gene silencing and pharmacological inhibition of the multi-ligand receptor megalin resulted in significantly decreased albumin binding and uptake in monolayers of primary alveolar type II and type I-like and cultured lung epithelial cells. Our data indicate that clearance of albumin from the distal air spaces is facilitated by an active, high-capacity, megalin-mediated transport process across the alveolar epithelium. Further understanding of this mechanism is of clinical importance, since an inability to clear excess protein from the alveolar space is associated with poor outcome in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  8. AB038. Isolated pauci-immune pulmonary capillaritis: rare case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Athanasopoulou, Athanasia; Kavvada, Aikaterini; Labrakis, Charilaos; Karageorgas, Theofanis; Tzimopoulos, Konstantinos; Sougles, Filippos; Rapti, Aggeliki

    2016-01-01

    As diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is defined the clinical pathological syndrome characterized by hemoptysis, diffuse alveolar infiltrates, acute respiratory failure and anemia. It is a life-threatening condition and a medical emergency. Causes are multiple and variable. A 75-year-old male, ex-smoker, with known coronary artery disease and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation treated with aspirin, presents due to low grade fever and bloody sputum. Hemodynamically stable, without respiratory failure, but with multiple alveolar infiltrates on chest imaging and anemia. Initially treated as lower respiratory tract infection with intravenous antibiotics while anticoagulant treatment was interrupted. Full laboratory testing for anemia, collagen vascular diseases and specific and nonspecific infections was performed. Anemia was normochromic, normocytic, without findings of hemolysis. Diffuse bilateral alveolar infiltrates were revealed on thorax computer tomography. Diagnostic bronchoscopy was performed with negative results for either infection or malignancy, while bronchoalveolar lavage analysis revealed siderophages 81% of alveolar macrophages. The patient underwent full pulmonary function testing, which revealed obstructive respiratory disease with a low diffusion capacity. Due to continuing life threatening anemia, despite blood transfusions, in combination with the results of the laboratory tests, the patient was started on high dose intravenous corticosteroids, followed by intravenous cyclophosphamide every 28 days for five cycles. Rapid improvement was achieved with elimination of chest CT infiltrates and normalization of blood tests and pulmonary function tests. At present peros treatment with azathioprine and low dose corticosteroids is given. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a clinical pathological syndrome caused by different pathophysiological mechanisms, including capillary failure stress, diffuse alveolar damage and capillaritis. The most common cause is capillaritis

  9. Pathogenic role of B-cells in the development of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage induced by pristane

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Tolga; Lee, Pui Y.; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra; Weinstein, Jason; Nacionales, Dina C.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Akira, Shizuo; Croker, Byron P.; Sobel, Eric S.; Reeves, Westley H.; Satoh, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an uncommon yet often fatal complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Advances in the treatment of alveolar hemorrhage have been hampered due to the heterogeneity of clinical findings and the lack of suitable animal models. A single intraperitoneal injection of pristane induces a lupus-like syndrome characterized by lupus-related autoantibodies and glomerulonephritis in non-autoimmune prone strains of mice. In addition, C57BL/6 (B6) mice frequently develop alveolar hemorrhage within a few weeks of pristane injection. Immunopathogenesis of pristane-induced alveolar hemorrhage was investigated in the present study. Early (2-4 weeks after injection) mortality due to hemorrhage was unique to C57BL/6 and C57BL/10 strains of mice. Recruitment of the macrophages and neutrophils preceded the hemorrhage by several days and hemorrhage started 3-7 days after pristane injection in some mice, peaked at 2 weeks (84% in B6) and then resolved by 4 weeks in a majority of mice. Alveolar hemorrhage was independent of MyD88-, or TLR7 pathways, in contrast to autoantibody production and glomerulonephritis, and also was independent of FcγR or Fas. Rag1-/- mice had a reduced prevalence of alveolar hemorrhage compared to B6 (P = 0.01) congenics. However, T-cell receptor deficient mice developed alveolar hemorrhage at a rate comparable to wild type controls, while B6 Igμ-/- mice surprisingly had a strikingly reduced prevalence (7% vs 84% in B6, P < 0.0001). Reconstitution of B6 Igμ-/- mice with wild type B cells increased the prevalence to 50% (P = 0.028). Pristane-induced alveolar hemorrhage is a useful model to study the pathogenesis and develop new therapy for this underappreciated and often life-threatening complication of SLE. PMID:21808234

  10. Alveolar graft in the cleft lip and palate patient: Review of 104 cases

    PubMed Central

    Tobella-Camps, María L.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Alveolar bone grafting is a vital part of the rehabilitation of cleft patients. The factors that have been most frequently associated with the success of the graft are the age at grafting and the pre-grafting orthodontic treatment. Objectives: 1) Describe the cases of alveolar bone grafts performed at the Maxilofacial Unit of Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona (HSJD); and 2) Analyze the success/failure of alveolar grafts and related variables. Material and Methods: Descriptive retrospective study using a sample of 104 patients who underwent a secondary alveolar graft at the Craniofacial Unit of HSJD between 1998 and 2012. The graft was done by the same surgeon in all patients using bone from the iliac crest. Results: 70% of the patients underwent the procedure before the age of 15 (median 14.45 years); 70% of the graft patients underwent pre-graft maxillary expansion. A total of 100 cases were recorded as successful (median age of 14.58 years, 68 underwent pre-graft expansion) and only 4 were recorded as failures (median age of 17.62 years, 3 underwent pre-graft expansion). We did not find statistically significant differences in age at the time of grafting or pre-surgical expansion when comparing the success and failure groups. We found the success rate of the graft to be 96.2%. Conclusions: The number of failures was too small to establish a statistically significant conclusion in our sample regarding the age at grafting and pre-grafting expansion. The use of alveolar bone grafting from the iliac crest has a very high success rate with a very low incidence of complications. Existing controversies regarding secondary bone grafting and the wide range of success rates found in the literature suggest that it is necessary to establish a specific treatment protocol that ensures the success of this procedure. Key words:Alveolar graft, cleft lip and palate, alveolar cleft, alveolar defect. PMID:24880440

  11. Exposed inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle during surgical removal of a residual cyst.

    PubMed

    Boffano, Paolo; Gallesio, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Iatrogenic neurodeficiency is one of the most distressing complications to any surgical procedure. The prediction of close proximity of the oral lesions to the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle is extremely important. Furthermore, iatrogenic neurosensory dysfunctions of the facial region involve important medicolegal issues. In this report, we describe the case of a patient who did not show either paresthesia or anesthesia after the surgical removal of a mandibular residual cyst that exhibited adherence to the inferior alveolar nerve bundle.

  12. Permanent nerve damage from inferior alveolar nerve blocks: a current update.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M Anthony

    2012-10-01

    Permanent nerve involvement has been reported following inferior alveolar nerve blocks. This study provides an update on cases reported to one unit in the preceding six years. Lidocaine was associated with 25 percent of cases, articaine with 33 percent of cases, and prilocaine with 34 percent of cases. It does appear that inferior alveolar nerve blocks can cause permanent nerve damage with any local anesthetic, but the incidences may vary.

  13. Alveolar soft part sarcoma following radiotherapy for a spinal hemangioma. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Mirra, J.; Bhuta, S.

    1984-06-15

    A case of alveolar soft part sarcoma arising some 20 years later in a site previously irradiated as a treatment for a spinal cord hemangioma is described. This is the first known case of radiation-associated alveolar soft part sarcoma, and it fulfills the criteria for a tumor to be radiation-induced. The coincidental finding of ''viral-like'' particles within some of the tumor cells was noted.

  14. [Domiciliary noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in chronic alveolar hypoventilation].

    PubMed

    Casas, J P; Robles, A M; Pereyra, M A; Abbona, H L; López, A M

    2000-0