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Sample records for isoflurane minimum alveolar

  1. Relationship of feline bispectral index to multiples of isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Leigh A; Greene, Stephen A; Grimm, Kurt A; Tranquilli, William J

    2005-06-01

    The study reported here was done to determine the relationship between bispectral index (BIS) values and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) multiples of isoflurane in cats. Isoflurane MAC was determined using the tail-clamp method in eight domestic cats. Ten days later, the cats were anesthetized a second time with isoflurane at each of five MAC multiples administered in random order. Ventilation was controlled and, after a 20-min equilibration period at each MAC multiple of isoflurane, BIS data were collected for 5 min and the median BIS value calculated. Data from each isoflurane MAC multiple were compared using analysis of variance for repeated measures, and statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The MAC of isoflurane (mean +/- 1 standard deviation) was 1.8% +/- 0.2%. BIS values at 0.5 MAC could not be recorded due to spontaneous movement in all eight cats. BIS values at 2.0 MAC were confounded by burst suppression in seven of the eight cats. Over the range of 0.8 to 1.5 MAC, BIS values decreased significantly with increasing end-tidal isoflurane concentrations. Mean (+/- 1 standard deviation) BIS measurements were 32 +/- 3 at 0.8 MAC, 20 +/- 4 at 1.0 MAC, and 5 +/- 3 at 1.5 MAC. Therefore, BIS values are inversely and linearly related to end-tidal isoflurane concentrations in anesthetized cats. However, the consistently low BIS values recorded in this study suggest that clinical BIS endpoints used to titrate anesthetic agents in humans may not be applicable to cats.

  2. Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine and Their Combination Reduce Isoflurane Minimum Alveolar Concentration in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Chavez, Julio R.; Gutierrez-Blanco, Eduardo; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Victoria-Mora, José M.; Tendillo-Cortijo, Francisco; Santos-González, Martín; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination delivered as a bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI) on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MACISO) in dogs were evaluated. Seven healthy adult dogs were included. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. For each dog, baseline MAC (MACISO/BASAL) was determined after a 90-minute equilibration period. Thereafter, each dog received one of the following treatments (loading dose, CRI): lidocaine 2 mg kg−1, 100 µg kg−1 minute−1; dexmedetomidine 2 µg kg−1, 2 µg kg−1 hour−1; or their combination. MAC was then determined again after 45- minutes of treatment by CRI. At the doses administered, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination significantly reduced MACISO by 27.3% (range: 12.5–39.2%), 43.4% (33.3–53.3%) and 60.9% (46.1–78.1%), respectively, when compared to MACISO/BASAL. The combination resulted in a greater MACISO reduction than the two drugs alone. Their use, at the doses studied, provides a clinically important reduction in the concentration of ISO during anaesthesia in dogs. PMID:25232737

  3. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Julio R.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). Results The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% ± 0.04%, 0.99% ± 0.009%, 0.97% ± 0.02%, and 0.99% ± 0.01%, respectively. Conclusions The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane. PMID:26605541

  4. Prior determination of baseline minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane does not influence the effect of ketamine on MAC in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Giacomo; Valverde, Alexander; Sinclair, Melissa; Dyson, Doris H; Gibson, Thomas; Johnson, Ron

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane when ketamine was administered either after or without prior determination of the baseline MAC of isoflurane in rabbits. Using a prospective randomized crossover study, 8 adult, female New Zealand rabbits were allocated to 2 treatment groups. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane. Group 1 (same-day determination) had the MAC-sparing effect of ketamine [1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI) of 40 μg/kg BW per min, given by intravenous (IV)], which was determined after the baseline MAC of isoflurane was determined beforehand. A third MAC determination was started 30 min after stopping the CRI. Group 2 (separate-day determination) had the MAC-sparing effect of ketamine determined without previous determination of the baseline MAC of isoflurane. A second MAC determination was started 30 min after stopping the CRI. In group 1, the MAC of isoflurane (2.15 ± 0.09%) was significantly decreased by ketamine (1.63 ± 0.07%). After stopping the CRI, the MAC was significantly less (2.04 ± 0.11%) than the baseline MAC of isoflurane and significantly greater than the MAC during the CRI. In group 2, ketamine decreased isoflurane MAC (1.53 ± 0.22%) and the MAC increased significantly (1.94 ± 0.25%) after stopping the CRI. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values did not differ significantly between the groups either during ketamine administration or after stopping ketamine. Under the study conditions, prior determination of the baseline isoflurane MAC did not alter the effect of ketamine on MAC. Both methods of determining MAC seemed to be valid for research purposes.

  5. Influence of prior determination of baseline minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane on the effect of ketamine on MAC in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Giacomo; Valverde, Alexander; Johnson, Ron; Sinclair, Melissa; Gibson, Thomas; Dyson, Doris H

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if prior measurement of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane influences the effect of ketamine on the MAC of isoflurane in dogs. Eight mixed-breed dogs were studied on 2 occasions. Anesthesia was induced and maintained using isoflurane. In group 1 the effect of ketamine on isoflurane MAC was determined after initially finding the baseline isoflurane MAC. In group 2, the effect of ketamine on isoflurane MAC was determined without previous measure of the baseline isoflurane MAC. In both groups, MAC was determined again 30 min after stopping the CRI of ketamine. Plasma ketamine concentrations were measured during MAC determinations. In group 1, baseline MAC (mean ± SD: 1.18 ± 0.14%) was decreased by ketamine (0.88 ± 0.14%; P < 0.05). The MAC after stopping ketamine was similar (1.09 ± 0.16%) to baseline MAC and higher than with ketamine (P < 0.05). In group 2, the MAC with ketamine (0.79 ± 0.11%) was also increased after stopping ketamine (1.10 ± 0.17%; P < 0.05). The MAC values with ketamine were different between groups (P < 0.05). Ketamine plasma concentrations were similar between groups during the events of MAC determination. The MAC of isoflurane during the CRI of ketamine yielded different results when methods of same day (group-1) versus separate days (group-2) are used, despite similar plasma ketamine concentrations with both methods. However, because the magnitude of this difference was less than 10%, either method of determining MAC is deemed acceptable for research purposes.

  6. The effect of nitrous oxide on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and MAC derivatives of isoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Voulgaris, Debra A; Egger, Christine M; Seddighi, M Reza; Rohrbach, Barton W; Love, Lydia C; Doherty, Thomas J

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of 70% nitrous oxide (N2O) on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane (ISO) that prevents purposeful movement, the MAC of ISO at which there is no motor movement (MACNM), and the MAC of ISO at which autonomic responses are blocked (MACBAR) in dogs. Six adult, healthy, mixed-breed, intact male dogs were anesthetized with ISO delivered via mask. Baseline MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR of ISO were determined for each dog using a supra-maximal electrical stimulus (50 V, 50 Hz, 10 ms). Nitrous oxide (70%) was then administered and MAC and its derivatives (N2O-MAC, N2O-MACNM, and N2O-MACBAR) were determined using the same methodology. The values for baseline MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR were 1.39 ± 0.14, 1.59 ± 0.10, and 1.72 ± 0.16, respectively. The addition of 70% N2O decreased MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR by 32%, 15%, and 25%, respectively.

  7. The effect of multimodal analgesia on minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane for skin incision at constant bispectral index

    PubMed Central

    Savitha, Keelara Shivalingaiah; Dhanpal, Radhika; Shilpa, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multimodal analgesia (MMA) by synergy with volatile anesthetics minimizes their use thus decreasing operation theater pollution and greenhouse gas emission. Aims: To estimate minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) requirement of isoflurane (ISO) for skin incision with use of MMA in the study group versus conventional regime in the control group for a constant bispectral index (BIS). To observe the side effects of analgesic drugs administered in the study. Settings and Design: Forty-two patients of American Society of Anesthesiologist Class I and II scheduled for lumbar spine surgery were included in this prospective, randomized, double-blind, clinical study. They were randomly allocated into two groups of 21 each. Materials and Methods: Group A (MMA group/study group) received injections diclofenac sodium, paracetamol, clonidine, and fentanyl and local infiltration (bupivacaine with adrenaline). Group B (conventional regime group/control group) received injections paracetamol and fentanyl and local infiltration (saline with adrenaline). Preemptive analgesia was practiced in the study. The MAC of ISO for skin incision was documented. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent sample t-test: To compare MACISO for skin incision between the two groups. One sample t-test: To compare the standard mean concentration with the means of the two groups. Chi-square test: To compare adverse effects between the groups. P < 5% was considered statistically significant. Results: The MACISO requirement was significantly lower in the study group at the time of skin incision for BIS of 50–55 compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Post extubation, 43% had nausea and 9% had vomiting in the control group. None of the patients in either group had intraoperative awareness. Conclusion: We conclude that preemptive MMA has synergistic effect with ISO. It effectively reduces MACISO to skin incision to a greater degree. PMID:27746535

  8. Intravenous clonidine decreases minimum end-tidal isoflurane for induction of electroencephalographic burst suppression.

    PubMed

    Entholzner, E K; Mielke, L L; Hargasser, S R; Droese, D; Plötz, W; Hipp, R

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the individual end-tidal isoflurane (ET ISO) threshold concentration for the induction of electroencephalographic (EEG) burst suppression with and without intravenous (I.V.) clonidine and to evaluate the EEG and cardiovascular response to skin incision during isoflurane/N2O anesthesia. Thirty-nine patients (ASA physical status I or II, 20-68 yr of age) undergoing orthopedic surgery were randomly assigned to receive I.V. saline (n = 20) or I.V. clonidine (3 microg/kg, n = 19). After detection of isoflurane-induced burst suppression, ET ISO was decreased in 0.1% ET steps until burst suppression diminished. Median minimum ET ISO for induction of burst suppression was 1.4% in the saline group and 0.9% in the clonidine group (P < 0.05). Before skin incision, EEG alpha 2 activity was significantly higher in the clonidine group compared with saline group. Fourteen patients (70%) in the saline group and 12 patients (63%) in the clonidine group showed a cardiovascular response to skin incision. After skin incision, EEG alpha 2 power was significantly decreased in both groups. A significant increase of delta activity was only found in the saline group. We conclude that the known minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration reduction of clonidine seems to be due to a direct cerebral action.

  9. Effects of Methadone on the Minimum Anesthetic Concentration of Isoflurane, and Its Effects on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Ventilation during Isoflurane Anesthesia in Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Pypendop, Bruno Henri; Zangirolami Filho, Darcio; Sousa, Samuel Santos; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal effects of intramuscular methadone administration on the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in hens, and to evaluate the effects of the isoflurane-methadone combination on heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure and ventilation. Thirteen healthy adult hens weighing 1.7 ± 0.2 kg were used. The MAC of isoflurane was determined in each individual using the bracketing method. Subsequently, the reduction in isoflurane MAC produced by methadone (3 or 6 mg kg-1, IM) was determined by the up-and-down method. Stimulation was applied at 15 and 30 minutes, and at 45 minutes if the bird had not moved at 30 minutes. Isoflurane MAC reduction was calculated at each time point using logistic regression. After a washout period, birds were anesthetized with isoflurane and methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM was administered. Heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, blood gas values and invasive blood pressure were measured at 1.0 and 0.7 isoflurane MAC, and during 45 minutes after administration of methadone once birds were anesthetized with 0.7 isoflurane MAC. Fifteen minutes after administration of 3 mg kg-1 of methadone, isoflurane MAC was reduced by 2 (-9 to 13)% [logistic regression estimate (95% Wald confidence interval)]. Administration of 6 mg kg-1 of methadone decreased isoflurane MAC by 29 (11 to 46)%, 27 (-3 to 56)% and 10 (-8 to 28)% after 15, 30 and 45 minutes, respectively. Methadone (6 mg kg-1) induced atrioventricular block in three animals and ventricular premature contractions in two. Methadone caused an increase in arterial blood pressure and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, while heart rate and pH decreased. Methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM significantly reduced isoflurane MAC by 30% in hens 15 minutes after administration. At this dose, methadone caused mild respiratory acidosis and increase in systemic blood pressure. PMID:27018890

  10. Minimum anesthetic concentration and cardiovascular dose-response relationship of isoflurane in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Young K; Lee, Scott S; Suh, Euy H; Lee, Lyon; Lee, Hee C; Lee, Hyo J; Yeon, Seong C

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) and dose-related cardiovascular effects of isoflurane during controlled ventilation in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus). The MAC was determined for 10 cinereous vultures as the midpoint between the end-tidal isoflurane concentration that allows gross purposeful movement and that which prevents the movement in response to clamping a pedal digit. Immediately after the MAC was determined, the cardiovascular effects of isoflurane at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 times the MAC were investigated in seven of the 10 birds. The MAC of isoflurane for 10 cinereous vultures during controlled ventilation was 1.06 +/- 0.07% (mean +/- SD). When the isoflurane concentration was increased to 1.5 and 2.0 times the MAC, there was significant dose-dependent decrease in the arterial blood pressure. However, the heart rate did not change over a range of 1.0 to 2.0 times the MAC.

  11. Combining isoflurane anesthesia with midazolam and butorphanol in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Uchida, Kaho; Maesato, Shizuka; Sato, Reiichiro; Kanai, Eiichi; Inomata, Tomo

    2016-07-29

    Representative inhalant anesthetic agent, isoflurane is commonly used during surgery in rats. However, isoflurane mediates relatively strong respiratory depression. In human and veterinary medicine, sedatives and analgesics are co-administered to complement the anesthetic action of inhalant anesthesia. The present study aimed to establish the novel balanced anesthesia that combines midazolam and butorphanol with isoflurane (MBI) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 2 groups, and administered either isoflurane monoanesthesia or isoflurane with midazolam (2.5 mg/kg, ip) and butorphanol (2.0 mg/kg, ip). The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in each group was evaluated. Induction and recovery times were measured in each group. Adverse reactions during induction were also recorded. In each group, vital signs were assessed for 1 h under 1.5×MAC of isoflurane. Instability of vital signs was assessed under each anesthesia by calculating coefficient of variance. Compared with isoflurane monoanesthesia, MBI anesthesia caused 32% MAC reduction (isoflurane monoanesthesia: 1.30 ± 0.09%, MBI 0.87 ± 0.08%, P<0.05). MB premedication mediated smooth sedating action with low incidence of adverse reactions such as urination and defecation. Isoflurane monoanesthsesia remarkably decreased respiratory rate and saturation O2 (SPO2). In contrast, MBI anesthesia resulted in a relatively stable respiratory rate without decreases in SPO2 during the anesthetic period. In summary, MB premedication is effective for attenuating respiratory depression induced by isoflurane, and achieving smooth induction. This anesthetic protocol serves as a novel option for appropriate anesthesia in rats. PMID:26876437

  12. Combining isoflurane anesthesia with midazolam and butorphanol in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Uchida, Kaho; Maesato, Shizuka; Sato, Reiichiro; Kanai, Eiichi; Inomata, Tomo

    2016-01-01

    Representative inhalant anesthetic agent, isoflurane is commonly used during surgery in rats. However, isoflurane mediates relatively strong respiratory depression. In human and veterinary medicine, sedatives and analgesics are co-administered to complement the anesthetic action of inhalant anesthesia. The present study aimed to establish the novel balanced anesthesia that combines midazolam and butorphanol with isoflurane (MBI) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 2 groups, and administered either isoflurane monoanesthesia or isoflurane with midazolam (2.5 mg/kg, ip) and butorphanol (2.0 mg/kg, ip). The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in each group was evaluated. Induction and recovery times were measured in each group. Adverse reactions during induction were also recorded. In each group, vital signs were assessed for 1 h under 1.5×MAC of isoflurane. Instability of vital signs was assessed under each anesthesia by calculating coefficient of variance. Compared with isoflurane monoanesthesia, MBI anesthesia caused 32% MAC reduction (isoflurane monoanesthesia: 1.30 ± 0.09%, MBI 0.87 ± 0.08%, P<0.05). MB premedication mediated smooth sedating action with low incidence of adverse reactions such as urination and defecation. Isoflurane monoanesthsesia remarkably decreased respiratory rate and saturation O2 (SPO2). In contrast, MBI anesthesia resulted in a relatively stable respiratory rate without decreases in SPO2 during the anesthetic period. In summary, MB premedication is effective for attenuating respiratory depression induced by isoflurane, and achieving smooth induction. This anesthetic protocol serves as a novel option for appropriate anesthesia in rats. PMID:26876437

  13. Cardiovascular effects of equipotent doses of isoflurane alone and isoflurane plus fentanyl in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Tearney, Caitlin C; Barter, Linda S; Pypendop, Bruno H

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of equipotent concentrations of fentanyl and isoflurane, compared with isoflurane alone, on cardiovascular variables in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). ANIMALS 6 adult female New Zealand White rabbits. PROCEDURES Rabbits were anesthetized with isoflurane, and lungs were mechanically ventilated. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane alone (baseline) and with fentanyl administered IV to achieve 3 targeted plasma concentrations was determined for each rabbit by means of an electrical stimulus. Cardiovascular variables were measured in a separate experiment at 1.3X isoflurane MAC and equipotent doses of isoflurane plus fentanyl at the same 3 targeted plasma concentrations. Blood samples were collected for measurement of blood gas variables and plasma fentanyl concentrations. Treatment effects were evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA followed by 2-tailed paired t tests with sequentially rejective Bonferroni correction. RESULTS Mean ± SD MAC of isoflurane was 1.95 ± 0.27%. Mean measured plasma fentanyl concentrations of 4.97, 8.93, and 17.19 ng/mL reduced isoflurane MAC by 17%, 37%, and 56%, respectively. Mean measured plasma fentanyl concentrations during cardiovascular measurements were 5.49, 10.26, and 18.40 ng/mL. Compared with baseline measurements, heart rate was significantly lower at all 3 plasma fentanyl concentrations, mean arterial blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance were significantly higher at mean fentanyl concentrations of 10.26 and 18.40 ng/mL, and cardiac output was significantly higher at 18.40 ng of fentanyl/mL. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of fentanyl in isoflurane-anesthetized rabbits resulted in improved mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output, compared with isoflurane alone. This balanced anesthesia technique may prove useful in the management of clinical cases in this species.

  14. Cardiovascular effects of equipotent doses of isoflurane alone and isoflurane plus fentanyl in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Tearney, Caitlin C; Barter, Linda S; Pypendop, Bruno H

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of equipotent concentrations of fentanyl and isoflurane, compared with isoflurane alone, on cardiovascular variables in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). ANIMALS 6 adult female New Zealand White rabbits. PROCEDURES Rabbits were anesthetized with isoflurane, and lungs were mechanically ventilated. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane alone (baseline) and with fentanyl administered IV to achieve 3 targeted plasma concentrations was determined for each rabbit by means of an electrical stimulus. Cardiovascular variables were measured in a separate experiment at 1.3X isoflurane MAC and equipotent doses of isoflurane plus fentanyl at the same 3 targeted plasma concentrations. Blood samples were collected for measurement of blood gas variables and plasma fentanyl concentrations. Treatment effects were evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA followed by 2-tailed paired t tests with sequentially rejective Bonferroni correction. RESULTS Mean ± SD MAC of isoflurane was 1.95 ± 0.27%. Mean measured plasma fentanyl concentrations of 4.97, 8.93, and 17.19 ng/mL reduced isoflurane MAC by 17%, 37%, and 56%, respectively. Mean measured plasma fentanyl concentrations during cardiovascular measurements were 5.49, 10.26, and 18.40 ng/mL. Compared with baseline measurements, heart rate was significantly lower at all 3 plasma fentanyl concentrations, mean arterial blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance were significantly higher at mean fentanyl concentrations of 10.26 and 18.40 ng/mL, and cardiac output was significantly higher at 18.40 ng of fentanyl/mL. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of fentanyl in isoflurane-anesthetized rabbits resulted in improved mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output, compared with isoflurane alone. This balanced anesthesia technique may prove useful in the management of clinical cases in this species. PMID:26111088

  15. Effect of midazolam and butorphanol premedication on inhalant isoflurane anesthesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Iimuro, Mami; Sato, Reiichiro; Yamazaki, Jumpei; Inomata, Tomo

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane is a representative inhalant anesthesia used in laboratory animals. However, isoflurane mediates respiratory depression and adverse clinical reactions during induction. In the present study, we established a novel balanced anesthesia method in mice that combined isoflurane anesthesia with midazolam and butorphanol (MB). Thirty-four male C57BL/6J mice received either isoflurane alone or isoflurane with an intra-peritoneal MB premedication (3 mg/kg midazolam and 4 mg/kg butorphanol). The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in each group was evaluated. Induction time and adverse clinical reactions were recorded in each group. Core body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation (SPO(2)) were assessed before and for 1 h after induction. Premedication with MB achieved a significant reduction in MAC compared with isoflurane monoanesthesia (isoflurane, 1.38 ± 0.15%; isoflurane with MB, 0.78 ± 0.10%; P<0.05). Induction time was significantly shortened with MB premedication, and adverse reactions such as excitement or incontinence were observed less frequently. Furthermore, isoflurane anesthesia with MB premedication caused increase of respiratory rates compared to isoflurane monoanesthesia. No significant decrease of SPO(2) was observed in MBI anesthesia, while a decrease in SPO(2) was apparent with isoflurane monoanesthesia (baseline, 98.3% ± 1.1; 10 min after induction, 91.8 ± 6.4%; P<0.05). In conclusion, premedication with MB was effective for the mitigation of respiratory depression induced by isoflurane in mice, with rapid induction and fewer adverse clinical reactions. PMID:25736585

  16. Isoflurane enhances the expression of cytochrome C by facilitation of NMDA receptor in developing rat hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yilin; Jin, Xiaogao; Wang, Jintao; Tan, Lei; Li, Shiyong; Luo, Ailin

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of isoflurane on the amplitude of NMDA receptor current (I(NMDA)) and the expression of cytochrome C in cultured developing rat hippocampal neurons. The hippocampi were dissected from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats. Hippocampal neurons were primarily cultured for 5 days and then treated with different concentrations of isoflurane [(0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC))]. The peak of I(NMDA) was recorded by means of the whole cell patch clamp technique. The cytochrome C level was detected by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR. Our results showed that isoflurane (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1 MAC) potentiated the amplitude of I(NMDA) by (116 ± 8.8)%, (122 ± 11.7)%, (135 ± 14.3)% and (132 ± 14.6)%, respectively, and isoflurane increased the mRNA expression of cytochrome C in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytochrome C mRNA expression reached a maximum after 0.5 MAC isoflurane stimulation for 6 h (P<0.05). It was concluded that isoflurane enhances the expression of cytochrome C in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, which may be mediated by facilitation of NMDA receptor.

  17. Anesthesia with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in the Crested Serpent Eagle (Spilornis cheela hoya): Minimum Anesthetic Concentration, Physiological Effects, Hematocrit, Plasma Chemistry and Behavioral Effects

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, Fang-Tse; CHANG, Geng-Ruei; WANG, Hsien-Chi; HSU, Tien-Huan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The initial goal of this study was to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) for the crested serpent eagle. Next, we compared the anesthetic effects of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values and behavior in spontaneously breathing captive adult crested serpent eagles. Sixteen eagles were randomly allocated to two groups for anesthesia with ISO (n=8) or SEVO (n=8). First, we measured the MAC values of ISO and SEVO, and four weeks later, we investigated the effect of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit (HCT) and plasma chemistry values. The MAC values of ISO and SEVO for crested serpent eagles were 1.46 ± 0.30 and 2.03 ± 0.32%, respectively. The results revealed no significant differences between the two anesthetics in induction time, while time of extubation to recovery was significantly shorter with SEVO. A time-related increase in end-tidal CO2 and decreases in body temperature and respiratory rates were observed during anesthesia with each anesthetic. There were no significant differences between the effect of the two anesthetics on heart rate, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values or respiration, although each caused minor respiration depression. We concluded that SEVO is a more effective inhalant agent than ISO for use in eagles, showing the most rapidest induction and recovery from anesthesia. PMID:23955396

  18. Effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in alpacas

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Doherty, Thomas J.; da Cunha, Anderson F.; Leonardi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in alpacas. Eight healthy, intact male, adult alpacas were studied on 2 separate occasions. Anesthesia was induced with SEVO, and baseline MAC (MACB) determination began 45 min after induction. After MACB determination, alpacas were randomly given either an intravenous (IV) loading dose (LD) and infusion of saline or a loading dose [ketamine = 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW); lidocaine = 2 mg/kg BW] and an infusion of ketamine (25 μg/kg BW per minute) in combination with lidocaine (50 μg/kg BW per minute), and MACSEVO was re-determined (MACT). Quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were also evaluated. Mean MACB was 1.88% ± 0.13% and 1.89% ± 0.14% for the saline and ketamine + lidocaine groups, respectively. Ketamine and lidocaine administration decreased (P < 0.05) MACB by 57% and mean MACT was 0.83% ± 0.10%. Saline administration did not change MACB. Time to determine MACB and MACT was not significantly different between the treatments. The quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were not different between groups. The infusion of ketamine combined with lidocaine significantly decreased MACSEVO by 57% and did not adversely affect time-to-standing or quality of recovery. PMID:27127341

  19. Effects of Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine or Their Combination on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Sevoflurane in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    MORAN-MUÑOZ, Rafael; IBANCOVICHI, J. A.; Gutierrez-BLANCO, Eduardo; ACEVEDO-ARCIQUE, Carlos M.; Victoria MORA, J. Mauro; TENDILLO, Francisco J.; SANTOS-GONZALEZ, Martin; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine the effects of lidocaine (LIDO) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) or their combination (LIDO–DEX), administered by constant-rate infusion (CRI), on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Seven healthy mongrel dogs were used with a 2-week washout interval between treatments in this study. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen, and MAC of sevoflurane was determined after 90 min equilibration period in the dogs (SEV-MACBASAL). Then, sevoflurane MAC was determined again in the dogs after 45 min equilibration period of one of the following treatments: an intravenous loading dose of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by 6 mg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACLIDO); an intravenous loading dose of dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg followed by 2 µg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACDEX); or their combination (SEV-MACLIDO-DEX). These SEV-MACs were determined in duplicate. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tuckey test when appropriate. The SEV-MACBASAL was 1.82 ± 0.06%, SEV-MACLIDO was 1.38 ± 0.08%, SEV-MACDEX was 1.22 ± 0.10%, and SEV-MACLIDO-DEX was 0.78 ± 0.06%. The CRI administration of lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination produced a significant reduction in the MAC of sevoflurane by 26.1 ± 9.0% (P<0.0001), 43.7 ± 11.8% (P<0.0002) and 54.4 ± 9.8% (P<0.0001), respectively. The MAC reduction was significantly greater after the CRI combination of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine when compared with lidocaine CRI (P<0.0001) or dexmedetomidine CRI treatments (P<0.025). PMID:24572631

  20. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation under different inhaled concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in pigs undergoing hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Alexandre Hideaki; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Hamaji, Marcelo Waldir M; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Ida, Keila Kazue; Fantoni, Denise T; Auler, José Otavio Costa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalant anesthesia induces dose-dependent cardiovascular depression, but whether fluid responsiveness is differentially influenced by the inhalant agent and plasma volemia remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in pigs undergoing hemorrhage. METHODS: Twenty-five pigs were randomly anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data were registered sequentially at minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M1), 1.25 (M2), and 1.00 (M3). Then, following withdrawal of 30% of the estimated blood volume, these data were registered at a minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M4) and 1.25 (M5). RESULTS: The minimum alveolar concentration increase from 1.00 to 1.25 (M2) decreased the cardiac index and increased the central venous pressure, but only modest changes in mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were observed in all groups from M1 to M2. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure was only observed with desflurane. Following blood loss (M4), pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation and central venous pressure increased (p<0.001) and mean arterial pressure decreased in all groups. Under hypovolemia, the cardiac index decreased with the increase of anesthesia depth in a similar manner in all groups. CONCLUSION: The effects of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were not different during normovolemia or hypovolemia. PMID:26735220

  1. Relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and electrocorticographic activities under sevoflurane and isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kimiko; Morioka, Takato; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Kawamura, Tadao; Irita, Kazuo; Hoka, Sumio; Sasaki, Tomio; Takahashi, Shosuke

    2010-04-01

    The aims of this study are (1) to assess the effects of volatile anesthetics on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and electrocorticography (ECoG), and (2) to investigate the relationship between rCBF and ECoG influenced by volatile anesthetics. The authors measured rCBF using laser Doppler flowmetry and ECoG simultaneously and continuously from the same cortex during craniotomy, using the specially arranged probe. Patients received intravenous anesthetics with nitrous oxide until craniotomy, and after opening of dura, volatile anesthetic, either isoflurane or sevoflurane, was started and was gradually increased for the measurement. Four of the nine cases (44.4%) of the sevoflurane group showed no change both in rCBF and ECoG. In three cases (33.3%), rCBF increased as the frequency of the paroxysmal activities increased. In two cases (22.2%), decreased rCBF was accompanied by slow waves. In 12 cases of the isoflurane group, no apparent rCBF and ECoG changes were seen, except a case with decreased rCBF and slow waves. This is the first report of simultaneous recordings of regional CBF and neuronal activity under general anesthesia. During sevoflurane and isoflurane anesthesia <2.5 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration, rCBF is affected by ECoG activities rather than pharmacologic action of inhalational anesthetics. PMID:20505374

  2. Effects of a single bolus intravenous dose of tramadol on minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Itami, Takaharu; Kawase, Kodai; Tamaru, Naomichi; Ishizuka, Tomohito; Tamura, Jun; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Umar, Mohammed A; Inoue, Hiroki; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    Tramadol is an atypical opioid analgesic widely used in small animal practice. This study was designed to determine the effect of a single intravenous (IV) dose of tramadol on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Six beagle dogs were anesthetized twice to determine the sevoflurane MAC with or without an administration of tramadol (4 mg/kg, IV) at 7 days interval. The sevoflurane MAC was determined using a tail clamp method in each dog ventilated with positive pressure ventilation. The tramadol administration produced a significant reduction in the sevoflurane MAC by 22.3 ± 12.2% (1.44 ± 0.28% with tramadol versus 1.86 ± 0.30% without tramadol, P=0.010). This MAC reduction had been determined from 122 ± 19 to 180 ± 41 min following the tramadol administration. During this period, the plasma concentrations of tramadol and its metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol (M1), decreased from 429 ± 64 to 332 ± 55 ng/ml and from 136 ± 24 to 114 ± 68 ng/ml, respectively, but these changes were not statistically significant. There was no significant difference in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure and SpO2 between the control and tramadol treatment. The dogs that received tramadol treatment sometimes breathed spontaneously. Therefore, their respiratory rates significantly increased, and PETCO2 decreased during the MAC determination. In conclusion, the single IV dose of tramadol produced a significant reduction in the sevoflurane MAC in dogs.

  3. Somatic movement and oesophageal motility during isoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mather, C; Raftery, S; Prys-Roberts, C

    1992-07-01

    The quantal responses for somatic movement, and spontaneous and provoked lower oesophageal contractions (motility) were noted at the time of incision in 72 patients aged 40-65 yr, receiving varying concentrations of isoflurane. Probit analysis of the alveolar concentration of isoflurane required to prevent somatic movement revealed an MAC or EC50 (95% confidence limits) of 1.00 (0.82-1.17)% and EC95 of 2.16 (1.69-3.89)%. The EC50 of isoflurane to suppress spontaneous lower oesophageal contractions was 1.27 (1.12-1.43)%, and the EC95 2.13 (1.78-3.22)%. The EC50 for provoked lower oesophageal contractions was 1.31 (0.93-3.48)% and the EC95 was 6.18% (unable to compute confidence limits).

  4. Effects of magnesium sulfate and propofol on the minimum alveolar concentration preventing motor movement in sevoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alanna N; Seddighi, Reza; Rohrbach, Barton W; Cox, Sherry K; Egger, Christine M; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Doherty, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of MgSO4, alone and in combination with propofol, on the minimum alveolar concentration preventing motor movement (MACNM) in sevoflurane-anesthetized dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy purpose-bred adult male Beagles (least squares mean ± SEM body weight, 12.0 ± 1.1 kg). PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized 3 times at weekly intervals. The MACNM was measured 45 minutes after induction of anesthesia (baseline; MACNM-B) and was determined each time by use of a noxious electrical stimulus. Treatments were administered as a loading dose and constant rate infusion (CRI) as follows: treatment 1, MgSO4 loading dose of 45 mg/kg and CRI of 15 mg/kg/h; treatment 2, propofol loading dose of 4 mg/kg and CRI of 9 mg/kg/h; and treatment 3, MgSO4 and propofol combination (same doses used previously for each drug). A mixed-model ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests were used to determine effects of each treatment on the percentage decrease from MACNM-B. Data were reported as least squares mean ± SEM values. RESULTS Decrease from MACNM-B was 3.4 ± 3.1%, 48.3 ± 3.1%, and 50.3 ± 3.1%, for treatments 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The decrease for treatments 2 and 3 was significantly different from that for treatment 1; however, no significant difference existed between results for treatments 2 and 3. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE MgSO4 did not affect MACNM, nor did it potentiate the effects of propofol on MACNM. Administration of MgSO4 in this study appeared to provide no clinical advantage as an anesthetic adjuvant.

  5. Effects of isoflurane, fentanyl, or thiopental anesthesia on regional cerebral blood flow and brain surface PO2 in the presence of a focal lesion in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Murr, R; Schürer, L; Berger, S; Enzenbach, R; Peter, K; Baethmann, A

    1993-11-01

    These studies were conducted to determine the effect of anesthetic drugs on tissue perfusion and O2 supply in the brain with focal cerebral edema. Using an open cranium preparation, we studied the effects of isoflurane (I; 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration), of fentanyl (F; 0.5-1 microgram.kg-1 x min-1), or of thiopental (T; 32.5 mg.kg-1 x h-1) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional brain tissue PO2 in albino rabbits (n = 6 per group) with a focal brain lesion (cold injury). The doses of anesthetics were sufficient to suppress nociception. rCBF (H2 clearance) and tissue PO2 (multiwire surface electrode) were studied adjacent to and distant from the lesion. Cerebral hyperemia developed immediately after trauma in all groups, although the flow increase did not attain statistical significance. rCBF was subsequently reduced by about 25% in the vicinity of the lesion. Distant from the trauma, a continuing hyperemia (+30%) was later observed in animals with isoflurane, whereas rCBF was decreased then by 10%-20% in animals with fentanyl, or was unchanged with thiopental. Brain tissue PO2 was increased with isoflurane in areas distant from the lesion, but decreased with fentanyl. However, with thiopental, the PO2 level had already been lowered before trauma with a subsequent tendency toward normalization. The heterogeneity of the tissue PO2 in fentanyl anesthesia, as well as the increased frequency of hypoxic PO2 values with thiopental, might have resulted from microcirculatory disturbances. Thus, although isoflurane seemed to facilitate hyperemia with an increased O2 supply to the brain, fentanyl tended to induce the opposite response. Although these properties suggest the potential to manipulate perfusion and O2 supply in cerebral ischemia or hyperemia after head injury, the effects of such measures on intracranial pressure, neurologic status, and outcome have yet to be proven.

  6. Isoflurane Favorably Modulates Guanosine Triphosphate Cyclohydrolase-1 and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase during Myocardial Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Baotic, Ines; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Procknow, Jesse; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeanette; Ge, Zhi-Dong; Sudhakaran, Shaan; Warltier, David C.; Kersten, Judy R.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated the hypothesis that isoflurane modulates NO synthesis and protection against myocardial infarction through time-dependent changes in expression of key NO regulatory proteins, guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase (GTPCH) -1, the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Methods Myocardial infarct size, NO production (ozone-mediated chemiluminescence), GTPCH-1 and eNOS expression (real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blotting), were measured in male Wistar rats with or without APC (1.0 minimum alveolar concentration isoflurane for 30 min) and in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of GTPCH-1, 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine. Results NO−2 production (158±16 and 150±13 pmol/mg protein at baseline in control and APC groups, respectively) was significantly (P<0.05) increased 1.5±0.1 and 1.4±0.1 fold by APC (n=4) at 60 and 90 min of reperfusion, concomitantly, with increased expression of GTPCH-1 (1.3±0.3 fold; n=5) and eNOS (1.3±0.2 fold; n=5). In contrast, total NO (NO−2 and NO−3) was decreased after reperfusion in control experiments. Myocardial infarct size was decreased [43±2% of the area at risk for infarction; n=6] by APC as compared to control experiments (57±1%; n=6). 2, 4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine decreased total NO production at baseline (221±25 and 175±31 pmol/mg protein at baseline in control and APC groups, respectively), abolished isoflurane-induced increases in NO at reperfusion, and prevented reductions of myocardial infarct size by APC (60±2%; n=6). Conclusions APC favorably modulated a NO biosynthetic pathway by upregulating GTPCH-1 and eNOS, and this action contributed to protection of myocardium against ischemia and reperfusion injury. PMID:26192027

  7. Mechanisms and Functional Significance of Inhibition of Neuronal T-Type Calcium Channels by Isoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Orestes, Peihan; Bojadzic, Damir; Chow, Robert M.; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous data have indicated that T-type calcium channels (low-voltage activated T-channels) are potently inhibited by volatile anesthetics. Although the interactions of T-channels with a number of anesthetics have been described, the mechanisms by which these agents modulate channel activity, and the functional consequences of such interactions, are not well studied. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings to explore the actions of a prototypical volatile anesthetic, isoflurane (Iso), on recombinant human CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 isoforms of T-channels. We also performed behavioral testing of anesthetic endpoints in mice lacking CaV3.2. Iso applied at resting channel states blocked current through both isoforms in a similar manner at clinically relevant concentrations (1 minimum alveolar concentration, MAC). Inhibition was more prominent at depolarized membrane potentials (-65 versus -100 mV) as evidenced by hyperpolarizing shifts in channel availability curves and a 2.5-fold decrease in IC50 values. Iso slowed recovery from inactivation and enhanced deactivation in both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in a comparable manner but caused a depolarizing shift in activation curves and greater use-dependent block of CaV3.2 channels. In behavioral tests, CaV3.2 knockout (KO) mice showed significantly decreased MAC in comparison with wild-type (WT) litter mates. KO and WT mice did not differ in loss of righting reflex, but mutant mice displayed a delayed onset of anesthetic induction. We conclude that state-dependent inhibition of T-channel isoforms in the central and peripheral nervous systems may contribute to isoflurane's important clinical effects. PMID:19038845

  8. Effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane on platelet function: A prospective, randomized, single-blind, in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Bozdogan, Nesrin; Madenoglu, Halit; Dogru, Kudret; Yildiz, Karamehmet; Kotanoglu, Mustafa S.; Cetin, Mustafa; Boyaci, Adem

    2005-01-01

    Background: The primary physiologic function of platelets is to facilitate hemostasisby aggregation. Volatile anesthetics have been reported to decrease platelet aggregation in vivo and in vitro. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the hematologic effectsof the anesthetics isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane on hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), platelet count, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), and platelet aggregation after minor surgery. Methods: Patients aged 20 to 60 years who were scheduled to undergominor surgery and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status P1 or P2 (healthy or mild systemic disease) were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane. None of the patients received premedication. Anesthesia was induced using IV thiopental 5 to 6 mg/kg, fentanyl 1 to 2 μg/kg, and vecuronium 0.1 mg/kg, and maintained with 1 MAC of isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in 66% nitrous oxide and 33% oxygen. Vecuronium 0.03 mg/kg was given when necessary for muscle relaxation. All patients were monitored throughout surgery; isotonic saline was given at a rate of 5 mL/kg · h. Hematologic studies were performed preoperatively, 15 minutes after intubation, and 1 hour after the end of surgery. Platelet aggregation tests were performed in a laboratory using a platelet function analyzer (PFA), collagen/epinephrine PFA test cartridges, collagen/adenosine diphosphate PFA test cartridges, and PFA trigger solution. Results: This prospective, randomized, single-blind, in vivo study was conducted at Gevher Nesibe Teaching Hospital, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey. Thirty patients (15 men, 15 women) were randomized to the 3 treatment groups (each, n = 10). Hb, Hct, platelet count, aPTT, PT, and INR were statistically similar between all 3 groups. The measured parameters were not significantly different

  9. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... inhalation: (1) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for...

  10. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... inhalation: (1) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for...

  11. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to...

  12. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to...

  13. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... inhalation: (1) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for...

  14. Isoflurane ameliorates acute lung injury by preserving epithelial tight junction integrity

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Joshua A.; Macias, Alvaro A.; Amador-Munoz, Diana; Vera, Miguel Pinilla; Isabelle, Colleen; Guan, Jiazhen; Magaoay, Brady; Velandia, Margarita Suarez; Coronata, Anna; Lee, Awapuhi; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Isoflurane may be protective in pre-clinical models of lung injury but its use in patients with lung injury remains controversial and the mechanism of its protective effects remains unclear. We hypothesized that this protection is mediated at the level of alveolar tight junctions and investigated the possibility in a two-hit model of lung injury that mirrors human acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Wild-type mice were treated with isoflurane one hour after exposure to nebulized endotoxin (n=8) or saline control (n=9) then allowed to recover for 24 hrs prior to mechanical ventilation (MV, tidal volume 15 mL/kg, 2 hrs) producing ventilator-induced lung injury. Mouse lung epithelial cells were similarly treated with isoflurane one hour after exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Cells were cyclically stretched the following day to mirror the MV protocol used in vivo. Results Mice treated with isoflurane following exposure to inhaled endotoxin and prior to MV exhibited significantly less physiologic lung dysfunction. These effects appeared to be mediated by decreased vascular leak, but not altered inflammatory indices. Mouse lung epithelial cells treated with lipopolysaccharide and cyclic stretch and lungs harvested from mice following treatment with lipopolysaccharide and MV had decreased levels of a key tight junction protein (i.e. zona occludens 1) that was rescued by isoflurane treatment. Conclusions Isoflurane rescued lung injury induced by a two-hit model of endotoxin exposure followed by MV by maintaining the integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier possibly by modulating the expression of a key tight junction protein. PMID:26068207

  15. Anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane in goats: comparison with isoflurane and halothane.

    PubMed Central

    Hikasa, Y; Okuyama, K; Kakuta, T; Takase, K; Ogasawara, S

    1998-01-01

    The anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane were compared with those of isoflurane and halothane in goats. The (mean +/- SD) minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) was 0.96 +/- 0.12% for halothane, 1.29 +/- 0.11% for isoflurane, and 2.33 +/- 0.15% for sevoflurane. Cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane were examined at end-tidal concentrations equivalent to 1, 1.5 and 2 MAC during either spontaneous or controlled ventilation (SV or CV). During SV, there were no significant differences in respiration rate, tidal volume and minute ventilation between anesthetics. Dose-dependent decreases in both tidal volume and minute ventilation induced by halothane were greater than those by either sevoflurane or isoflurane. Hypercapnia and acidosis induced by sevoflurane were not significantly different from those by either isoflurane or halothane at 1 and 1.5 MAC, but were less than those by halothane at 2 MAC. There was no significant difference in heart rate between anesthetics during SV and CV. During SV, all anesthetics induced dose-dependent decreases in arterial pressure, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and left ventricular stroke work index. Systemic vascular resistance with isoflurane at 2 MAC was lower than that with sevoflurane. During CV, sevoflurane induced dose-dependent circulatory depression (decreases in arterial pressure, cardiac index, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and right ventricular minute work index), similar to isoflurane. Halothane did not significantly alter systemic vascular resistance from 1 to 2 MAC. PMID:9798097

  16. Effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the neutrophil myeloperoxidase system of horses.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Grégory; Franck, Thierry; Joris, Jean; Ceusters, Justine; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Serteyn, Didier; Sandersen, Charlotte

    2015-05-15

    Volatile anaesthestics have shown to modulate the oxidative response of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We investigated the effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the degranulation of total and active myeloperoxidase (MPO) from horse PMNs and their direct interaction with MPO activity. Whole blood from horse was incubated in 1 and 2 minimal alveolar concentrations (MAC) of isoflurane or sevoflurane for 1h and PMNs were stimulated with cytochalasin B (CB) plus N-formyl-méthionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). After stimulation, the plasma was collected to measure total and active MPO by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and specific immunological extraction followed by enzymatic detection (SIEFED) respectively. The effects of 1 and 2 MAC of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the peroxidase and chlorination activity of pure MPO were assessed by fluorescence using Amplex red and 3'-(p-aminophenyl) fluorescein (APF) respectively and in parallel with a SIEFED assay to estimate the potential interaction of the anaesthetics with the enzyme. Although isoflurane and sevoflurane had inconsistent effects on total MPO release, both volatile agents reduced active MPO release and showed a direct inhibition on the peroxidase and the chlorination activity of the enzyme. A persistent interaction between MPO and anaesthetics was evidenced with isoflurane but not with sevoflurane.

  17. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to isoflurane by measurement of isoflurane exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Prado, C; Tortosa, J A; Ibarra, I; Luna, A; Periago, J F

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between isoflurane environmental concentrations in operating rooms and the corresponding isoflurane concentration in the exhaled air of the operating personnel at the end of the exposure has been investigated. Isoflurane was retained in an adsorbent cartridge and after thermal desorption the concentration was estimated by gas chromatography. Significant correlation between environmental and exhaled air isoflurane concentrations allowed the establishment of a biological exposure index and biological exposure limits corresponding to proposed atmospheric threshold values.

  18. Overpressure isoflurane at caesarean section: a study of arterial isoflurane concentrations.

    PubMed

    McCrirrick, A; Evans, G H; Thomas, T A

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have measured arterial concentrations of isoflurane obtained during Caesarean section in two groups of patients. Patients in group 1 received 1% isoflurane throughout operation, whilst those in group 2 received 2% isoflurane for the first 5 min, 1.5% for the next 5 min and 0.8% thereafter. We found that arterial isoflurane concentrations were significantly greater in group 2 than in group 1 (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Isoflurane concentrations greater than 30 micrograms ml-1 were achieved rapidly in most patients in both groups, but there was a large scatter of results. The isoflurane concentration at which awareness or recall may occur is not known, but an "overpressure" technique as described for patients in group 2 may result in fewer patients being at risk of awareness.

  19. Overpressure isoflurane at caesarean section: a study of arterial isoflurane concentrations.

    PubMed

    McCrirrick, A; Evans, G H; Thomas, T A

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have measured arterial concentrations of isoflurane obtained during Caesarean section in two groups of patients. Patients in group 1 received 1% isoflurane throughout operation, whilst those in group 2 received 2% isoflurane for the first 5 min, 1.5% for the next 5 min and 0.8% thereafter. We found that arterial isoflurane concentrations were significantly greater in group 2 than in group 1 (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Isoflurane concentrations greater than 30 micrograms ml-1 were achieved rapidly in most patients in both groups, but there was a large scatter of results. The isoflurane concentration at which awareness or recall may occur is not known, but an "overpressure" technique as described for patients in group 2 may result in fewer patients being at risk of awareness. PMID:8110537

  20. Absorption of isoflurane by silica gel.

    PubMed

    Lumb, A B; Landon, M J

    1991-07-01

    We have studied the capacity of the drying agent silica gel (SG) to absorb isoflurane from gas samples. When dry, SG was able to absorb 31 times its own volume of isoflurane vapour, which could be recovered almost completely from the SG by displacement with water vapour. However, we were unable to demonstrate any significant absorption of isoflurane by wet SG. Care must be taken, therefore, when using SG as a drying agent in the sampling line of an analyser during research involving volatile anaesthetic agents. PMID:1650238

  1. Carbon monoxide production from degradation of desflurane, enflurane, isoflurane, halothane, and sevoflurane by soda lime and Baralyme.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z X; Eger, E I; Laster, M J; Chortkoff, B S; Kandel, L; Ionescu, P

    1995-06-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that soda lime and Baralyme brand absorbent can degrade inhaled anesthetics to carbon monoxide (CO). We examined the factors that govern CO production and found that these include: 1) The anesthetic used: for a given minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC)-multiple, the magnitude of CO production (greatest to least) is desflurane > or = enflurane > isoflurane > halothane = sevoflurane. 2) The absorbent dryness: completely dry soda lime produces much more CO than absorbent with just 1.4% water content, and soda lime containing 4.8% or more water (standard soda lime contains 15% water) generates no CO. In contrast, both completely dry Baralyme and Baralyme with 1.6% water produce high concentrations of CO, and Baralyme containing 4.7% water produces concentrations equaling those produced by soda lime containing 1.4% water. Baralyme containing 9.7% or more water and standard Baralyme (13% water) do not generate CO.3) The type of absorbent: at a given water content, Baralyme produces more CO than does soda lime. 4) The temperature: an increased temperature increases CO production. 5) The anesthetic concentration: more CO is produced from higher anesthetic concentrations. These results suggest that CO generation can be avoided for all anesthetics by using soda lime with 4.8% (or more) water or Baralyme with 9.7% (or more) water, and by using inflow rates of less than 2-3 L/min. Such inflow rates are low enough to ensure that the absorbent does not dry out.

  2. Soda lime adsorption of isoflurane and enflurane.

    PubMed

    Grodin, W K; Epstein, M A; Epstein, R A

    1985-01-01

    The authors demonstrated that soda lime will adsorb enflurane or isoflurane as a function of the water content of the soda lime. Various volumes of liquid enflurane or isoflurane were placed in an equilibration flask containing fresh (15% water by weight) or dried soda lime and the vapor phase anesthetic concentrations plotted. When dry soda lime was used, the plot of concentration as a function of volume of liquid added was biphasic: initially flat and then rising linearly. This is qualitatively similar to data reported previously for halothane. The authors hypothesize that drying soda lime produces a molecular sieve-like structure, as adsorption is greatest for molecules with small carbon chain lengths and kinetic diameters, or with structural characteristics such as cis/trans isomerism, which effectively reduce molecular size.

  3. Discrimination of auditory stimuli during isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Manuel J; Navas, Jinna A; Greene, Stephen A; Rector, David M

    2008-10-01

    Deep isoflurane anesthesia initiates a burst suppression pattern in which high-amplitude bursts are preceded by periods of nearly silent electroencephalogram. The burst suppression ratio (BSR) is the percentage of suppression (silent electroencephalogram) during the burst suppression pattern and is one parameter used to assess anesthesia depth. We investigated cortical burst activity in rats in response to different auditory stimuli presented during the burst suppression state. We noted a rapid appearance of bursts and a significant decrease in the BSR during stimulation. The BSR changes were distinctive for the different stimuli applied, and the BSR decreased significantly more when stimulated with a voice familiar to the rat as compared with an unfamiliar voice. These results show that the cortex can show differential sensory responses during deep isoflurane anesthesia.

  4. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Traclet, J; Lazor, R; Cordier, J-F; Cottin, V

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is defined by the presence of red blood cells originating from the lung capillaries or venules within the alveoli. The diagnosis is established on clinical features, radiological pattern, and especially bronchoalveolar lavage. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage may have many immune or non-immune causes. Immune causes of DAH include vasculitides, connective tissue diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease (Goodpasture's syndrome). Treatment is both supportive and causal, often based on high dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy (especially intravenous cyclophosphamide). Plasma exchanges are performed in antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease and systemic lupus erythematosus, and are considered in systemic vasculitis. Non-immune causes of DAH mainly include heart diseases, coagulation disorders, infections, drug toxicities and idiopathic DAH. Treatment of non-immune DAH is that of its cause. Whatever the cause, DAH is an emergency requiring prompt assessment and early treatment.

  5. The effects of the general anaesthetic isoflurane on the honey bee (Apis mellifera) circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Ludin, Nicola M; Cheeseman, James F; Merry, Alan F; Millar, Craig D; Warman, Guy R

    2016-01-01

    General anaesthesia administered during the day has previously been shown to phase shift the honey bee clock. We describe a phase response curve for honey bees (n=105) to six hour isoflurane anaesthesia. The honey bee isoflurane PRC is "weak" with a delay portion (maximum shift of -1.88 hours, circadian time 0 - 3) but no advance zone. The isoflurane-induced shifts observed here are in direct opposition to those of light. Furthermore, concurrent administration of light and isoflurane abolishes the shifts that occur with isoflurane alone. Light may thus provide a means of reducing isoflurane-induced phase shifts.

  6. Dopamine uptake dynamics are preserved under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodnik, Zachary D; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-01

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is commonly used for measuring the kinetics of dopamine release and uptake. For experiments using an anesthetized preparation, urethane is preferentially used because it does not alter dopamine uptake kinetics compared to freely moving animals. Unfortunately, urethane is highly toxic, can induce premature death during experiments, and cannot be used for recovery surgeries. Isoflurane is an alternative anesthetic that is less toxic than urethane, produces a stable level of anesthesia over extended periods, and is often used for recovery surgeries. Despite these benefits, the effects of isoflurane on dopamine release and uptake have not been directly characterized. In the present studies, we assessed the utility of isoflurane for voltammetry experiments by testing dopamine signaling parameters under baseline conditions, after treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine, and after exposure to increasing concentrations of isoflurane. Our results indicate that surgical levels of isoflurane do not significantly alter terminal mechanisms of dopamine release and uptake over prolonged periods of time. Consequently, we propose that isoflurane is an acceptable anesthetic for voltammetry experiments, which in turn permits the design of studies in which dopamine signaling is examined under anesthesia prior to recovery and subsequent experimentation in the same animals. PMID:26321152

  7. Evaluation of Isoflurane Overdose for Euthanasia of Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Travis L; Nagamine, Claude M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal mice (that is, pups younger than 6 d) must be exposed to CO2 for as long as 50 min to achieve euthanasia. Alternatively, other inhalant anesthetic agents have been used to euthanize laboratory rodent species. We investigated the efficacy of isoflurane at saturated vapor pressure to euthanize neonatal mice. Neonatal mice (n = 76; age, 1 or 2 d) were exposed to isoflurane in a sealed, quart-size (0.95-L) plastic bag at room temperature. Righting and withdrawal reflexes were absent in less than 2 min. After 30 min of exposure to isoflurane, pups were removed and monitored for recovery. All pups were cyanotic and showed no detectable signs of life when they were removed from the bag. However, after 30 to 120 min after removal from the bag, 24% of isoflurane-overexposed pups began gasping and then resumed normal respiration and regained a normal pink coloration. These results demonstrate that isoflurane overexposure at saturated vapor pressure for 30 min is insufficient to euthanize neonatal mice and that isoflurane overexposure must be followed by a secondary means of euthanasia. PMID:27177567

  8. Isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane use in cane toads (Rhinella marina)

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kaleigh E.; Strahl-Heldreth, Danielle; Clark-Price, Stuart C.

    2016-01-01

    Anaesthetic chamber concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane that resulted in loss of righting reflex within 15 minutes in 50 per cent of toads (Rhinella marina) exposed (ED50-LRR<15MIN) were identified. The median and range ED50-LRR<15MIN was 1.4 (0.9–1.4) per cent for isoflurane, 1.75 (1.1–1.9) per cent for sevoflurane and 4.4 (4.3–5.5) per cent for desflurane. Subsequently, toads were exposed to 1.5 times the ED50-LRR<15MIN and times to loss and return of righting reflex were identified. All toads for all anaesthetics lost righting reflex. The median and range loss of righting reflex was 4:00 (3:00–5:30) minutes for isoflurane, 4:45 (3:30–7:00) minutes for sevoflurane, and 4:15 (4:00–5:30) minutes for desflurane and was not different between anaesthetics. Time to return of righting reflex was 175 (123–211) minutes for isoflurane, 192 (116–383) minutes for sevoflurane and 74 (52–220) minutes for desflurane. Time to return of righting reflex was significantly shorter for desflurane compared with isoflurane or sevoflurane. The use of isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane can be used to provide immobilisation to cane toads and potentially other anurans. Induction times are likely similar when using an anaesthetic chamber to provide anaesthesia. However recovery time may take twice as long when utilising isoflurane or sevoflurane over desflurane. PMID:27651914

  9. Isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane use in cane toads (Rhinella marina)

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kaleigh E.; Strahl-Heldreth, Danielle; Clark-Price, Stuart C.

    2016-01-01

    Anaesthetic chamber concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane that resulted in loss of righting reflex within 15 minutes in 50 per cent of toads (Rhinella marina) exposed (ED50-LRR<15MIN) were identified. The median and range ED50-LRR<15MIN was 1.4 (0.9–1.4) per cent for isoflurane, 1.75 (1.1–1.9) per cent for sevoflurane and 4.4 (4.3–5.5) per cent for desflurane. Subsequently, toads were exposed to 1.5 times the ED50-LRR<15MIN and times to loss and return of righting reflex were identified. All toads for all anaesthetics lost righting reflex. The median and range loss of righting reflex was 4:00 (3:00–5:30) minutes for isoflurane, 4:45 (3:30–7:00) minutes for sevoflurane, and 4:15 (4:00–5:30) minutes for desflurane and was not different between anaesthetics. Time to return of righting reflex was 175 (123–211) minutes for isoflurane, 192 (116–383) minutes for sevoflurane and 74 (52–220) minutes for desflurane. Time to return of righting reflex was significantly shorter for desflurane compared with isoflurane or sevoflurane. The use of isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane can be used to provide immobilisation to cane toads and potentially other anurans. Induction times are likely similar when using an anaesthetic chamber to provide anaesthesia. However recovery time may take twice as long when utilising isoflurane or sevoflurane over desflurane.

  10. Isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane use in cane toads (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Morrison, Kaleigh E; Strahl-Heldreth, Danielle; Clark-Price, Stuart C

    2016-01-01

    Anaesthetic chamber concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane that resulted in loss of righting reflex within 15 minutes in 50 per cent of toads (Rhinella marina) exposed (ED50-LRR<15MIN) were identified. The median and range ED50-LRR<15MIN was 1.4 (0.9-1.4) per cent for isoflurane, 1.75 (1.1-1.9) per cent for sevoflurane and 4.4 (4.3-5.5) per cent for desflurane. Subsequently, toads were exposed to 1.5 times the ED50-LRR<15MIN and times to loss and return of righting reflex were identified. All toads for all anaesthetics lost righting reflex. The median and range loss of righting reflex was 4:00 (3:00-5:30) minutes for isoflurane, 4:45 (3:30-7:00) minutes for sevoflurane, and 4:15 (4:00-5:30) minutes for desflurane and was not different between anaesthetics. Time to return of righting reflex was 175 (123-211) minutes for isoflurane, 192 (116-383) minutes for sevoflurane and 74 (52-220) minutes for desflurane. Time to return of righting reflex was significantly shorter for desflurane compared with isoflurane or sevoflurane. The use of isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane can be used to provide immobilisation to cane toads and potentially other anurans. Induction times are likely similar when using an anaesthetic chamber to provide anaesthesia. However recovery time may take twice as long when utilising isoflurane or sevoflurane over desflurane. PMID:27651914

  11. Effects of isoflurane on measurements of delayed lumininescence in Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen Li; Van Wijk, Roeland; Xing, Da

    2005-01-01

    The volatile halogenated methyl ethyl ether, isoflurane, used as an anaesthetic, inhibits actin-based dynamics directly or indirectly in animal cells. In plant cells, most intracellular movements are related to actin pathways. We have used isoflurane in a unicellular alga, Acetabularia acetabulum, to test the dynamics of choloroplast organization. By measuring the delayed luminescence, we found that isoflurane worked efficiently in the unicellular organism and showed dose- and time-course-dependent actin-inhibition patterns. When A. acetabulum was treated with saturated solutions of isoflurane in artificial seawater (defined as 100% isoflurane) for 3 or 6 min, the delayed luminescence (DL) was decreased and was never recovered. In contrast, if treated with 75% diluted isoflurane, the DL was firstly inhibited and then recovered several hours later, and if treated with 50% diluted isoflurane, the change of DL was small. Our work proved that isoflurane can affect actin-related pathways in both animals and plants.

  12. Increased mitochondrial ATP production capacity in brain of healthy mice and a mouse model of isolated complex I deficiency after isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Manjeri, Ganesh R; Rodenburg, Richard J; Blanchet, Lionel; Roelofs, Suzanne; Nijtmans, Leo G; Smeitink, Jan A; Driessen, Jacques J; Koopman, Werner J H; Willems, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    We reported before that the minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane is decreased in complex I-deficient mice lacking the NDUFS4 subunit of the respiratory chain (RC) (1.55 and 0.81% at postnatal (PN) 22-25 days and 1.68 and 0.65% at PN 31-34 days for wildtype (WT) and CI-deficient KO, respectively). A more severe respiratory depression was caused by 1.0 MAC isoflurane in KO mice (respiratory rate values of 86 and 45 at PN 22-25 days and 69 and 29 at PN 31-34 days for anesthetized WT and KO, respectively). Here, we address the idea that isoflurane anesthesia causes a much larger decrease in brain mitochondrial ATP production in KO mice thus explaining their increased sensitivity to this anesthetic. Brains from WT and KO mice of the above study were removed immediately after MAC determination at PN 31-34 days and a mitochondria-enriched fraction was prepared. Aliquots were used for measurement of maximal ATP production in the presence of pyruvate, malate, ADP and creatine and, after freeze-thawing, the maximal activity of the individual RC complexes in the presence of complex-specific substrates. CI activity was dramatically decreased in KO, whereas ATP production was decreased by only 26% (p < 0.05). The activities of CII, CIII, and CIV were the same for WT and KO. Isoflurane anesthesia decreased the activity of CI by 30% (p < 0.001) in WT. In sharp contrast, it increased the activity of CII by 37% (p < 0.001) and 50% (p < 0.001) and that of CIII by 37% (p < 0.001) and 40% (p < 0.001) in WT and KO, respectively, whereas it tended to increase that of CIV in both WT and KO. Isoflurane anesthesia increased ATP production by 52 and 69% in WT (p < 0.05) and KO (p < 0.01), respectively. Together these findings indicate that isoflurane anesthesia interferes positively rather than negatively with the ability of CI-deficient mice brain mitochondria to convert their main substrate pyruvate into ATP.

  13. Influence of Isoflurane on Immediate-Early Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bunting, Kristopher M.; Nalloor, Rebecca I.; Vazdarjanova, Almira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterograde amnesia is a hallmark effect of volatile anesthetics. Isoflurane is known to affect both the translation and transcription of plasticity-associated genes required for normal memory formation in many brain regions. What is not known is whether isoflurane anesthesia prevents the initiation of transcription or whether it halts transcription already in progress. We tested the hypothesis that general anesthesia with isoflurane prevents learning-induced initiation of transcription of several memory-associated immediate-early genes (IEGs) correlated with amnesia; we also assessed whether it stops transcription initiated prior to anesthetic administration. Methods: Using a Tone Fear Conditioning paradigm, rats were trained to associate a tone with foot-shock. Animals received either no anesthesia, anesthesia immediately after training, or anesthesia before, during, and after training. Animals were either sacrificed after training or tested 24 h later for long-term memory. Using Cellular Compartment Analysis of Temporal Activity by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (catFISH), we examined the percentage of neurons expressing the IEGs Arc/Arg3.1 and Zif268/Egr1/Ngfi-A/Krox-24 in the dorsal hippocampus, primary somatosensory cortex, and primary auditory cortex. Results: On a cellular level, isoflurane administered at high doses (general anesthesia) prevented initiation of transcription, but did not stop transcription of Arc and Zif268 mRNA initiated prior to anesthesia. On a behavioral level, the same level of isoflurane anesthesia produced anterograde amnesia for fear conditioning when administered before and during training, but did not produce retrograde amnesia when administered immediately after training. Conclusion: General anesthesia with isoflurane prevents initiation of learning-related transcription but does not stop ongoing transcription of two plasticity-related IEGs, Arc and Zif268, a pattern of disruption that parallels the effects of

  14. Stereoselectivity of Isoflurane in Adhesion Molecule Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Weiming; Pereira, Luis M.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Yuki, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Background Isoflurane in clinical use is a racemate of S- and R-isoflurane. Previous studies have demonstrated that the effects of S-isoflurane on relevant anesthetic targets might be modestly stronger (less than 2-fold) than R-isoflurane. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the immunological target, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) with racemic isoflurane suggested that only S-isoflurane bound specifically to this protein. If so, the use of specific isoflurane enantiomers may have advantage in the surgical settings where a wide range of inflammatory responses is expected to occur. Here, we have further tested the hypothesis that isoflurane enantioselectivity is apparent in solution binding and functional studies. Methods First, binding of isoflurane enantiomers to LFA-1 was studied using 1-aminoanthracene (1-AMA) displacement assays. The binding site of each enantiomer on LFA-1 was studied using the docking program GLIDE. Functional studies employed the flow-cytometry based ICAM binding assay. Results Both enantiomers decreased 1-AMA fluorescence signal (at 520 nm), indicating that both competed with 1-AMA and bound to the αL I domain. The docking simulation demonstrated that both enantiomers bound to the LFA-1 “lovastatin site.” ICAM binding assays showed that S-isoflurane inhibited more potently than R-isoflurane, consistent with the result of 1-AMA competition assay. Conclusions In contrast with the x-ray crystallography, both enantiomers bound to and inhibited LFA-1. S-isoflurane showed slight preference over R-isoflurane. PMID:24801074

  15. Postanesthetic Effects of Isoflurane on Behavioral Phenotypes of Adult Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Ayako; Kobayashi, Ayako; Takase, Kenkichi; Goto, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane was previously the major clinical anesthetic agent but is now mainly used for veterinary anesthesia. Studies have reported widespread sites of action of isoflurane, suggesting a wide array of side effects besides sedation. In the present study, we phenotyped isoflurane-treated mice to investigate the postanesthetic behavioral effects of isoflurane. We applied comprehensive behavioral test batteries comprising sensory test battery, motor test battery, anxiety test battery, depression test battery, sociability test battery, attention test battery, and learning test battery, which were started 7 days after anesthesia with 1.8% isoflurane. In addition to the control group, we included a yoked control group that was exposed to the same stress of handling as the isoflurane-treated animals before being anesthetized. Our comprehensive behavioral test batteries revealed impaired latent inhibition in the isoflurane-treated group, but the concentration of residual isoflurane in the brain was presumably negligible. The yoked control group and isoflurane-treated group exhibited higher anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test and impaired learning function in the cued fear conditioning test. No influences were observed in sensory functions, motor functions, antidepressant behaviors, and social behaviors. A number of papers have reported an effect of isoflurane on animal behaviors, but no systematic investigation has been performed. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to systematically investigate the general health, neurological reflexes, sensory functions, motor functions, and higher behavioral functions of mice exposed to isoflurane as adults. Our results suggest that the postanesthetic effect of isoflurane causes attention deficit in mice. Therefore, isoflurane must be used with great care in the clinical setting and veterinary anesthesia. PMID:25806517

  16. Mutations M287L and Q266I in the Glycine Receptor α1 Subunit Change Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics in Oocytes and Neurons, but Not the Minimal Alveolar Concentration in Knockin Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borghese, Cecilia M.; Xiong, Wei; Oh, S. Irene; Ho, Angel; Mihic, S. John; Zhang, Li; Lovinger, David M.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Eger, Edmond I; Harris, R. Adron

    2012-01-01

    Background Volatile anesthetics (VAs) alter the function of key central nervous system proteins but it is not clear which, if any, of these targets mediates the immobility produced by VAs in the face of noxious stimulation. A leading candidate is the glycine receptor, a ligand-gated ion channel important for spinal physiology. VAs variously enhance such function, and blockade of spinal GlyRs with strychnine affects the minimal alveolar concentration (an anesthetic EC50) in proportion to the degree of enhancement. Methods We produced single amino acid mutations into the glycine receptorα1 subunit that increased (M287L, third transmembrane region) or decreased (Q266I, second transmembrane region) sensitivity to isoflurane in recombinant receptors, and introduced such receptors into mice. The resulting knockin mice presented impaired glycinergic transmission, but heterozygous animals survived to adulthood, and we determined the effect of isoflurane on glycine-evoked responses of brain stem neurons from the knockin mice, and the minimal alveolar concentration for isoflurane and other VAs in the immature and mature knockin mice. Results Studies of glycine-evoked currents in brain stem neurons from knock-in mice confirmed the changes seen with recombinant receptors. No increases in the minimal alveolar concentration were found in knockin mice, but the minimal alveolar concentration for isoflurane and enflurane (but not halothane) decreased in 2-week-old Q266I mice. This change is opposite to the one expected for a mutation that decreases the sensitivity to volatile anesthetics. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that glycine receptors containing the α1 subunit are not likely to be crucial for the action of isoflurane and other VAs. PMID:22885675

  17. Isoflurane anaesthesia in an African wild dog, Lycaon pictus.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, G F

    2000-12-01

    Anaesthesia was required in a captive female African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) for surgical wound treatment. After it was immobilised with a medetomidine-ketamine combination, bradycardia, hypothermia, systolic hypertension and metabolic acidosis were observed. Surgical anaesthesia was maintained with a 1% end-tidal isoflurane concentration. A decrease in the arterial blood pressure, rectal temperature and pH occurred during maintenance of anaesthesia.

  18. Monitoring and mitigating isoflurane emissions during inhalational anesthesia of mice.

    PubMed

    Todd, Thomas E; Morse, Jennifer M; Casagni, Todd J; Engelman, Robert W

    2013-10-01

    Establishing a program to monitor waste anesthetic gas (WAG) in order to limit personnel exposure requires measuring the levels of WAG emitted and determining the effectiveness of scavenging methods to reduce such levels. In this study, the authors used infrared spectroscopy to measure levels of WAG emitted while anesthetizing mice with isoflurane for 15 min. They evaluated four different WAG scavenging conditions during induction and maintenance anesthesia: two conditions that used passive techniques and two that used active techniques. Isoflurane concentrations were measured at three different locations: in the operator's vicinity, at the mouse-facemask interface and in the room environment. Passive scavenging of WAG improved when chambers were purged with oxygen after induction and when a diaphragm-sealed facemask delivered a reduced anesthetic flow rate during maintenance anesthesia. Active scavenging of WAG improved when a relief intake opening was provided in the induction chamber's vacuum line, vacuum draw after induction was regulated and the anesthetic flow rate and vacuum scavenging draw were balanced during maintenance anesthesia using a facemask that separated the breathing space from the scavenging zone. Additionally, time-weighted average isoflurane WAG levels detected by personal dosimeters correlated with real-time measurements made using infrared spectroscopy. These observations contribute to the development of a substantiated program for monitoring WAG air quality. PMID:24051641

  19. [Isoflurane anesthesia in rabbits in a closed anesthetic system].

    PubMed

    Henke, J; Koch, M; Brill, T; Bolkart, B; Janczewski, M; Erhardt, W

    1996-12-01

    Using the Stephens anaesthetic apparatus-which is a closed system with an in-circuit, nonprecision vaporizer-and isoflurane as anaesthetic gas, 18 rabbits were anaesthetized and showed sufficient hypnosis, analgesia, and muscle relaxation during bone surgery. Induction of anaesthesia was achieved with intravenous propofol and all rabbits were intubated afterwards. During the following isoflurane inhalation anaesthesia the mean arterial blood pressure decreased considerably (compared to control measures before induction), the heart rate remained the same or showed a slight increase, and the respiratory rate decreased. The arterial pO2 decreased corresponding to the respiratory depression after propofol induction and increased again during spontaneous ventilation with 100% oxygen. The changes in arterial pCO2 and pH were representative for a rise in the CO2-stimulation threshold. A moderate metabolic acidosis could be seen due to preanaesthetic excitement of the animals. Recovery time was short (between one and 11 minutes) and no signs of excitation could be detected. The consumed volume of isoflurane was 0.80 ml/kg BW/h. PMID:9139428

  20. Monitoring and mitigating isoflurane emissions during inhalational anesthesia of mice.

    PubMed

    Todd, Thomas E; Morse, Jennifer M; Casagni, Todd J; Engelman, Robert W

    2013-10-01

    Establishing a program to monitor waste anesthetic gas (WAG) in order to limit personnel exposure requires measuring the levels of WAG emitted and determining the effectiveness of scavenging methods to reduce such levels. In this study, the authors used infrared spectroscopy to measure levels of WAG emitted while anesthetizing mice with isoflurane for 15 min. They evaluated four different WAG scavenging conditions during induction and maintenance anesthesia: two conditions that used passive techniques and two that used active techniques. Isoflurane concentrations were measured at three different locations: in the operator's vicinity, at the mouse-facemask interface and in the room environment. Passive scavenging of WAG improved when chambers were purged with oxygen after induction and when a diaphragm-sealed facemask delivered a reduced anesthetic flow rate during maintenance anesthesia. Active scavenging of WAG improved when a relief intake opening was provided in the induction chamber's vacuum line, vacuum draw after induction was regulated and the anesthetic flow rate and vacuum scavenging draw were balanced during maintenance anesthesia using a facemask that separated the breathing space from the scavenging zone. Additionally, time-weighted average isoflurane WAG levels detected by personal dosimeters correlated with real-time measurements made using infrared spectroscopy. These observations contribute to the development of a substantiated program for monitoring WAG air quality.

  1. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Surender; Mohapatra, Prasanta R.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare, chronic lung disease with bilateral intra-alveolar calcium and phosphate deposition throughout the lung parenchyma with predominance to lower and midzone. Although, etiology and pathogenesis of PAM is not fully understood, the mutation in SLC34A2 gene that encodes a sodium-phosphate co-transporter in alveolar type II cells resulting in the accumulation and forming of microliths rich in calcium phosphate (due to impaired clearance) are considered to be the cause of the disease. Chest radiograph and high-resolution CT of thorax are nearly pathognomonic for diagnosing PAM. HRCT demonstrates diffuse micronodules showing slight perilobular predominance resulting in calcification of interlobular septa. Patients with PAM are asymptomatic till development of hypoxemia and cor-pulmonale. No therapy has been proven to be beneficial except lung transplantation. PMID:23741096

  2. ANESTHETIC INDUCTION AND RECOVERY PARAMETERS IN BEARDED DRAGONS (POGONA VITTICEPS): COMPARISON OF ISOFLURANE DELIVERED IN 100% OXYGEN VERSUS 21% OXYGEN.

    PubMed

    O, Odette; Churgin, Sarah M; Sladky, Kurt K; Smith, Lesley J

    2015-09-01

    Inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps, n=6) were anesthetized for 1 hr using isoflurane in either 100% oxygen or 21% oxygen (FI 21; medical-grade room air). Parameters of anesthetic depth were recorded throughout both induction and recovery by an observer blinded to the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), including the loss and return of withdrawal and righting reflexes, muscle tone, ability to intubate or extubate, and return to spontaneous respiration. Physiologic data were recorded every 5 min throughout the anesthetic procedures, including heart rate, body temperature, end-tidal CO2, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2), and percent expired isoflurane. Lizards were subjected to application of a noxious stimulus (needle stick) at 0, 30, and 60 min, and responses recorded. Following a minimum 7-day washout period, the experiment was repeated with each lizard subjected to the other protocol in a randomized, complete crossover design. The only statistically significant difference was a lower mean SpO2 in the group inspiring 21% oxygen (P<0.0020). No statistically significant differences were detected in any parameters during induction or recovery; however, all values were uniformly shorter for the FI 21 group, indicating a possible clinically significant difference. A larger sample size may have detected statistically significant differences. Further studies are needed to evaluate these effects in other reptile species and with the concurrent use of injectable anesthetic and analgesic drugs.

  3. Quantifying the effect of isoflurane and nitrous oxide on somatosensory-evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Devadoss, Usha; Babu, S; Cherian, Vt

    2010-01-01

    Anaesthetic techniques may have a significant effect on intraoperative-evoked potentials (EP). The present study is designed to compare Propofol anaesthesia with Isoflurane (with or without nitrous oxide) during intraoperative somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring in 15 ASA Grade I and II patients undergoing surgery for intracranial tumours. SSEPs in response to median and posterior tibial nerve stimulation were recorded under four different anaesthetic conditions: 1) Propofol infusion and ventilation with air-oxygen, 2) Isoflurane, 1.0 MAC and ventilation with air-oxygen, 3) Isoflurane 1.0 MAC and ventilation with nitrous oxide-oxygen, and 4) Return to Isoflurane, 1.0 MAC and ventilation with air-oxygen. Intraoperative monitoring of somatosensory evoked potentials is best recordable using Propofol. The morphology of the EP is reproducible with Isoflurane. This effect is exaggerated when it is advisable to avoid nitrous oxide. PMID:20532071

  4. Isoflurane induced cognitive impairment in aged rats through hippocampal calcineurin/NFAT signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Qian, Min; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiangyang

    2015-05-15

    Calcineurin (CaN) over-activation constrains synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Upon CaN activation, NFAT imports into the nucleus and guides its downstream genes, which also affect neuronal and synaptic function. Aberrant CaN/NFAT signaling involves in neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, but its role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) remains uninvestigated. Inhaled anesthetic isoflurane facilitates the development of POCD, and the present study investigated the role of CaN/NFAT signaling in isoflurane induced cognitive impairment of aged rats, and the therapeutic effects of CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA). The results indicated that hippocampal CaN activity increased and peaked at 6 h after isoflurane exposure, and NFAT, especially NFATc4, imported into the nucleus following CaN activation. Furthermore, phamacological inhibition of CaN by CsA markedly attenuated isoflurane induced aberrant CaN/NFATc4 signaling in the hippocampus, and rescued relevant spatial learning and memory impairment of aged rats. Overall, the study suggests hippocampal CaN/NFAT signaling as the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced cognitive impairment, and provides potential therapeutic target and possible treatment methods for POCD. - Highlights: • Isoflurane induces hippocampal calcineurin activation. • Isoflurane induces hippocampal NFAT, especially NFATc4, nuclear import. • Cyclosporine A attenuates isoflurane induced aberrant calcineurin/NFAT signaling. • Cyclosporine A rescues isoflurane induced cognitive impairment. • Calcineurin/NFAT signaling is the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced synaptic dysfunction and cognitive impairment.

  5. The Potential Dual Effects of Anesthetic Isoflurane on Aβ-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhipeng; Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Zhang, Jun; McAuliffe, Sayre; Pan, Chuxiong; Zhang, Yiying; Ichinose, Fumito; Yue, Yun; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    β-amyloid protein (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity is the main component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathogenesis. Inhalation anesthetics have long been considered to protect against neurotoxicity. However, recent research studies have suggested that the inhalation anesthetic isoflurane may promote neurotoxicity by inducing apoptosis and increasing Aβ levels. We therefore set out to determine whether isoflurane can induce dose- and time-dependent dual effects on Aβ-induced apoptosis: protection versus promotion. H4 human neuroglioma cells, primary neurons from naïve mice, and naïve mice were treated with Aβ and/or isoflurane, and levels of caspase-3 cleavage (activation), apoptosis, Bcl-2, Bax, and cytosolic calcium were determined. Here we show for the first time that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for six hours or 30 minutes potentiated, whereas the treatment with 0.5% isoflurane for six hours or 30 minutes attenuated, the Aβ-induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, anesthesia with 1.4% isoflurane for two hours potentiated, whereas the anesthesia with 0.7% isoflurane for 30 minutes attenuated, the Aβ-induced caspase-3 activation in vivo. The high concentration isoflurane potentiated the Aβ-induced reduction in Bcl-2/Bax ratio and caused a robust elevation of cytosolic calcium levels. The low concentration isoflurane attenuated the Aβ-induced reduction in Bcl-2/Bax ratio and caused only a mild elevation of cytosolic calcium levels. These results suggest that isoflurane may have dual effects (protection or promotion) on Aβ-induced toxicity, which potentially act through the Bcl-2 family proteins and cytosolic calcium. These findings would lead to more systematic studies to determine the potential dual effects of anesthetics on AD-associated neurotoxicity. PMID:21244349

  6. Isoflurane anesthesia aggravates cognitive impairment in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Zhu, Bin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that isoflurane anesthesia would be a great risk factor for the patients undergoing surgeries to suffer from postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Additionally, diabetes is also an important pathogenic factor for the emergence of cognitive dysfunction. If patient is suffering from diabetes, the incidence of cognitive dysfunction greatly increased. We therefore aimed to investigate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on cognitive dysfunction in a diabetic rat model induced by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Wistar rats received 2 h of 2% isoflurane or oxygen exposure 1 month after a single intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg of STZ or the vehicle. The results showed that isoflurane anesthesia significantly aggravates STZ-induced an increase of the latency to the platform and a decrease of the proportion of time spent in the target quadrant of rats in Morris water maze test. In addition to the expression of amyloid-β (Aβ), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malonyldialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), isoflurane anesthesia significantly increased as compared with a single injection of STZ. However, isoflurane anesthesia had no effect on the blood glucose and leptin. In conclusion, our results suggested that isoflurane anesthesia aggravating cognitive impairment induced by STZ is probably related to the activation of oxidative stress and inflammatory response in rat hippocampus. PMID:24955160

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway mediates isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis and cognitive impairments in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hong-Wei; Hu, Wen-Wen; Ma, Lei-Lei; Kong, Fei-Juan

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is increasingly being recognized as an important clinical syndrome. Although it has been documented that volatile anesthetics induce neuronal apoptosis and cognitive deficits in several aged animal models, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is considered as an initial or early response of cells under stress and linked to neuronal death in various neurodegenerative diseases. The study was designed to explore the possible role of ERS pathway in isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis and cognitive impairments. In the present study, twenty-month-old rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4h. Two weeks later, the rats were subjected to behavioral study. Protein and mRNA expressions of ERS markers were evaluated. Meanwhile, hippocampal neuronal apoptosis was also detected. We found that isoflurane triggered ERS as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (EIF) 2α, and increased expression of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), activating transcription factor (ATF) 4 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Furthermore, the level of apoptosis in the hippocampus was significantly up-regulated after isoflurane exposure, and salubrinal (ERS inhibitor) treatment attenuated the increase. More importantly, cognitive impairments caused by isoflurane were also effectively alleviated by salubrinal pretreatment. These results indicate that ERS-mediated apoptotic pathway is involved in isoflurane neurotoxicity in aged rats. Inhibition of ERS overactivation contributes to the relief of isoflurane-induced neurohistopathologic changes. PMID:26162760

  8. Sevoflurane Induces DNA Damage Whereas Isoflurane Leads to Higher Antioxidative Status in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Thalita L. A.; Dias-Junior, Carlos A.; Possomato-Vieira, Jose S.; Gonçalves-Rizzi, Victor H.; Nogueira, Flávia R.; de Souza, Kátina M.; Braz, Leandro G.; Braz, Mariana G.

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account that there are controversial antioxidative effects of inhalational anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane and absence of comparison of genotoxicity of both anesthetics in animal model, the aim of this study was to compare DNA damage and antioxidant status in Wistar rats exposed to a single time to isoflurane or sevoflurane. The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) was performed in order to evaluate DNA damage in whole blood cells of control animals (unexposed; n = 6) and those exposed to 2% isoflurane (n = 6) or 4% sevoflurane (n = 6) for 120 min. Plasma antioxidant status was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. There was no statistically significant difference between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups regarding hemodynamic and temperature variables (P > 0.05). Sevoflurane significantly increased DNA damage compared to unexposed animals (P = 0.02). In addition, Wistar rats anesthetized with isoflurane showed higher antioxidative status (MTT) than control group (P = 0.019). There were no significant differences in DNA damage or antioxidant status between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups (P > 0.05). In conclusion, our findings suggest that, in contrast to sevoflurane exposure, isoflurane increases systemic antioxidative status, protecting cells from DNA damage in rats. PMID:26101770

  9. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of stereoselective binding of isoflurane to bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Tang, P; Firestone, L; Zhang, T T

    1996-01-01

    Whether proteins or lipids are the primary target sites for general anesthetic action has engendered considerable debate. Recent in vivo studies have shown that the S(+) and R(-) enantiomers of isoflurane are not equipotent, implying involvement of proteins. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), a soluble protein devoid of lipid, contains specific binding sites for isoflurane and other anesthetics. We therefore conducted 19F nuclear magnetic resonance measurements to determine whether binding of isoflurane to BSA was stereoselective. Isoflurane chemical shifts were measured as a function of BSA concentration to determine the chemical shift differences between the free and bound isoflurane. KD was determined by measuring the 19F transverse relaxation times (T2) as a function of isoflurane concentration. The binding duration was determined by assessing increases in 1/T2 as a result of isoflurane exchanging between the free and bound states. The S(+) and R(-) enantiomers exhibited no stereoselectivity in chemical shifts and KD values (KD = 1.3 +/- 0.2 mM, mean +/- SE, for S(+), R(-), and the racemic mixture). Nonetheless, stereoselectivity was observed in dynamic binding parameters; the S(+) enantiomer bound with slower association and dissociation rates than the R(-). Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8770230

  10. Increased extrasynaptic GluN2B expression is involved in cognitive impairment after isoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    LI, LUNXU; LI, ZHENGQIAN; CAO, YIYUN; FAN, DONGSHENG; CHUI, DEHUA; GUO, XIANGYANG

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing concern regarding the postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in the aging population, and general anesthetics are believed to be involved. Isoflurane exposure induced increased N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) GluN2B subunit expression following anesthesia, which was accompanied by alteration of the cognitive function. However, whether isoflurane affects this expression in different subcellular compartments, and is involved in the development of POCD remains to be elucidated. The aims of the study were to investigate the effects of isoflurane on the expression of the synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR subunits, GluN2A and GluN2B, as well as the associated alteration of cognitive function in aged rats. The GluN2B antagonist, Ro25–6981, was given to rats exposed to isoflurane to determine the role of GluN2B in the isoflurane-induced alteration of cognitive function. The results showed that spatial learning and memory tested in the Morris water maze (MWM) was impaired at least 7 days after isoflurane exposure, and was returned to control levels 30 days thereafter. Ro25-6981 treatment can alleviate this impairment. Extrasynaptic GluN2B protein expression, but not synaptic GluN2B or GluN2A, increased significantly after isoflurane exposure compared to non-isoflurane exposure, and returned to control levels approximately 30 days thereafter. The results of the present study indicated that isoflurane induced the prolonged upregulation of extrasynaptic GluN2B expression after anesthesia and is involved in reversible cognitive impairment. PMID:27347033

  11. TNF-α receptor antagonist attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, NENGLI; LIANG, YAFENG; YANG, PEI; WANG, WEIJIAN; ZHANG, XUEZHENG; WANG, JUNLU

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a common clinical in aged patients, is characterized by deficits in cognitive functions in patients following anesthesia and surgery. It has been demonstrated that isoflurane may lead to cognitive impairment in aged rats; however, effective clinical interventions for preventing this disorder are limited. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been suggested to be involved in neuroinflammation as well as the development of POCD. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate whether TNF-α signaling is involved in the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats, and whether TNF-α receptor antagonist are able to attenuate isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. A population of 20-month-old rats were administered TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 or an equal volume of saline by intraperitoneal injection 12 h prior to exposure to isoflurane to model cognitive impairment following anesthesia in old patients. Then the rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4 h. In the control group, rats showed impaired cognitive functions evaluated by Morris water maze assay after isoflurane exposure. Furthermore, isoflurane exposure induced marked upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in the hippocampus tissue. In the experimental group, intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 significantly attenuated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Further investigation revealed that intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 notably suppressed isoflurane-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Collectively, the present results suggest that TNF-α receptor antagonist may serve as a potential agent for the prevention of anesthesia-induced cognitive decline in aged patients. PMID:27347079

  12. Alveolar development and disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis.

  13. HIF-1α Mediates Isoflurane-Induced Vascular Protection in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Eric; Johnson, Andrew W; Nelson, James W; Harries, Michael D; Gidday, Jeffrey M; Han, Byung Hee; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) depends critically on delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) – a process driven primarily by vascular events including cerebral vasospasm, microvessel thrombosis, and microvascular dysfunction. This study sought to determine the impact of postconditioning – the phenomenon whereby endogenous protection against severe injury is enhanced by subsequent exposure to a mild stressor – on SAH-induced DCI. Methods Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to sham, SAH, or SAH plus isoflurane postconditioning. Neurological outcome was assessed daily via sensorimotor scoring. Contributors to DCI including cerebral vasospasm, microvessel thrombosis, and microvascular dysfunction were measured 3 days later. Isoflurane-induced changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1α)-dependent genes were assessed via quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HIF-1α was inhibited pharmacologically via 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) or genetically via endothelial cell HIF-1α-null mice (EC-HIF-1α-null). All experiments were performed in a randomized and blinded fashion. Results Isoflurane postconditioning initiated at clinically relevant time points after SAH significantly reduced cerebral vasospasm, microvessel thrombosis, microvascular dysfunction, and neurological deficits in wild-type (WT) mice. Isoflurane modulated HIF-1α-dependent genes – changes that were abolished in 2ME2-treated WT mice and EC-HIF-1α-null mice. Isoflurane-induced DCI protection was attenuated in 2ME2-treated WT mice and EC-HIF-1α-null mice. Interpretation Isoflurane postconditioning provides strong HIF-1α-mediated macro- and microvascular protection in SAH, leading to improved neurological outcome. These results implicate cerebral vessels as a key target for the brain protection afforded by isoflurane postconditioning, and HIF-1α as a critical mediator of this vascular protection. They also identify isoflurane postconditioning as a promising novel

  14. Effects of isoflurane and ethanol administration on c-Fos immunoreactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Li, J; Cote, D M; Ryabinin, A E

    2016-03-01

    Noninvasive functional imaging holds great promise for the future of translational research, due to the ability to directly compare between preclinical and clinical models of psychiatric disorders. Despite this potential, concerns have been raised regarding the necessity to anesthetize rodent and monkey subjects during these procedures, because anesthetics may alter neuronal activity. For example, in studies on drugs of abuse and alcohol, it is not clear to what extent anesthesia can interfere with drug-induced neural activity. Therefore, the current study investigated whole-brain c-Fos activation following isoflurane anesthesia as well as ethanol-induced activation of c-Fos in anesthetized mice. In the first experiment, we examined effects of one or three sessions of gaseous isoflurane on c-Fos activation across the brain in male C57BL/6J mice. Isoflurane administration led to c-Fos activation in several areas, including the piriform cortex and lateral septum. Lower or similar levels of activation in these areas were detected after three sessions of isoflurane, suggesting that multiple exposures may eliminate some of the enhanced neuronal activation caused by acute isoflurane. In the second experiment, we investigated the ability of ethanol injection (1.5 or 2.5g/kgi.p.) to induce c-Fos activation under anesthesia. Following three sessions of isoflurane, 1.5g/kg of ethanol induced c-Fos in the central nucleus of amygdala and the centrally-projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp). This induction was lower after 2.5g/kg of ethanol. These results demonstrate that ethanol-induced neural activation can be detected in the presence of isoflurane anesthesia. They also suggest, that while habituation to isoflurane helps reduce neuronal activation, interaction between effects of anesthesia and alcohol can occur. Studies using fMRI imaging could benefit from using habituated animals and dose-response analyses.

  15. Effects of isoflurane and ethanol administration on c-Fos immunoreactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Li, J; Cote, D M; Ryabinin, A E

    2016-03-01

    Noninvasive functional imaging holds great promise for the future of translational research, due to the ability to directly compare between preclinical and clinical models of psychiatric disorders. Despite this potential, concerns have been raised regarding the necessity to anesthetize rodent and monkey subjects during these procedures, because anesthetics may alter neuronal activity. For example, in studies on drugs of abuse and alcohol, it is not clear to what extent anesthesia can interfere with drug-induced neural activity. Therefore, the current study investigated whole-brain c-Fos activation following isoflurane anesthesia as well as ethanol-induced activation of c-Fos in anesthetized mice. In the first experiment, we examined effects of one or three sessions of gaseous isoflurane on c-Fos activation across the brain in male C57BL/6J mice. Isoflurane administration led to c-Fos activation in several areas, including the piriform cortex and lateral septum. Lower or similar levels of activation in these areas were detected after three sessions of isoflurane, suggesting that multiple exposures may eliminate some of the enhanced neuronal activation caused by acute isoflurane. In the second experiment, we investigated the ability of ethanol injection (1.5 or 2.5g/kgi.p.) to induce c-Fos activation under anesthesia. Following three sessions of isoflurane, 1.5g/kg of ethanol induced c-Fos in the central nucleus of amygdala and the centrally-projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp). This induction was lower after 2.5g/kg of ethanol. These results demonstrate that ethanol-induced neural activation can be detected in the presence of isoflurane anesthesia. They also suggest, that while habituation to isoflurane helps reduce neuronal activation, interaction between effects of anesthesia and alcohol can occur. Studies using fMRI imaging could benefit from using habituated animals and dose-response analyses. PMID:26742790

  16. The Physiologic Effects of Isoflurane, Sevoflurane, and Hypothermia Used for Anesthesia in Neonatal Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Huss, Monika K; Chum, Helen H; Chang, Angela G; Jampachairsi, Katechan; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2016-01-01

    Information regarding effective anesthetic regimens for neonatal rat pups is limited. Here we investigated whether isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia maintains physiologic parameters more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in neonatal rat pups. Rat pups (age, 4 d) were randomly assigned to receive isoflurane, sevoflurane, or hypothermia. Physiologic parameters monitored at 1, 5, 10, and 15 min included heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and oxygen saturation (%SpO2). Other parameters evaluated were loss and return of righting reflex, paw withdrawal reflex, and maternal acceptance. Corticosterone and glucose were sampled at 20 min and 24 h after anesthesia induction. Once a surgical plane of anesthesia was achieved, a skin incision was made on the right lateral thigh. After the procedure, all pups were accepted and cared for by their dam. Isoflurane- and sevoflurane-treated pups maintained higher HR, RR, %SpO2, and glucose levels than did hypothermia-treated pups. For both the isoflurane and sevoflurane groups, HR and RR were significantly lower at 10 and 15 min after anesthesia than at 1 min. Compared with hypothermia, isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia provided shorter times to loss of and return of the righting reflex. Although corticosterone did not differ among the groups, glucose levels were higher at 20 min after anesthesia induction than at 24 h in all anesthetic groups. We conclude that both isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia maintain physiologic parameters (HR, RR, %SpO2) more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in 4-d-old rat pups. PMID:26817984

  17. Isoflurane compared with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia in patients undergoing heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Che-Hao; Hsu, Yung-Chi; Huang, Go-Shine; Lu, Chih-Cherng; Ho, Shung-Tai; Liaw, Wen-Jinn; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Tso-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Inhalation anesthetics provide myocardial protection for cardiac surgery. This study was undertaken to compare the perioperative effects between isoflurane and fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia for heart transplantation. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by reviewing the medical records of heart transplantation in a single medical center from 1990 to 2013. Patients receiving isoflurane or fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia were included. Those with preoperative severe pulmonary, hepatic, or renal comorbidities were excluded. The perioperative variables and postoperative short-term outcomes were analyzed, including blood glucose levels, urine output, inotropic use, time to extubation, and length of stay in the intensive care units. After reviewing 112 heart transplantations, 18 recipients with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia, and 29 receiving isoflurane anesthesia with minimal low-flow technique were analyzed. After cessation of cardiopulmonary bypass, recipients with isoflurane anesthesia had a significantly lower mean level and a less increase of blood glucose, as compared with those receiving fentanyl-based anesthesia. In addition, there was less use of dobutamine upon arriving the intensive care unit and a shorter time to extubation after isoflurane anesthesia. Compared with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia, isoflurane minimal low-flow anesthesia maintained better perioperative homeostasis of blood glucose levels, less postoperative use of inotropics, and early extubation time among heart-transplant recipients without severe comorbidities. PMID:27583900

  18. Ventricular Arrhythmias and Mortality Associated with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in a Porcine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Regueiro-Purriños, Marta; Fernández-Vázquez, Felipe; de Prado, Armando Perez; Altónaga, Jose R; Cuellas-Ramón, Carlos; Ajenjo-Silverio, Jose M; Orden, Asuncion; Gonzalo-Orden, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia of the myocardium can lead to reversible or irreversible injury depending on the severity and duration of the preceding ischemia. Here we compared sevoflurane and isoflurane with particular reference to their hemodynamic effects and ability to modify the effects of acute severe myocardial ischemia and reperfusion on ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Female Large White pigs were premedicated with ketamine, midazolam, and atropine. Propofol was given intravenously for the anesthetic induction, and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Endovascular, fluoroscopy-guided, coronary procedures were performed to occlude the midleft anterior descending artery by using a coronary angioplasty balloon. After 75 min, the balloon catheter system was withdrawn and the presence of adequate reperfusion flow was verified. The pigs were followed for 2 mo, and overall mortality rate was calculated. The isoflurane group showed lower arterial pressure throughout the procedure, with the difference reaching statistical significance after induction of myocardial ischemia. The ventricular fibrillation rate was higher in isoflurane group (81.3%) than the sevoflurane group (51.7%; relative risk, 1.57 [1.03 to 2.4]). Overall survival was lower in the isoflurane group (75%) than the sevoflurane group (96.4%). In conclusion, in this porcine model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, sevoflurane was associated with higher hemodynamic stability and fewer ventricular arrhythmias and mortality than was isoflurane. PMID:21333167

  19. Anesthetics Isoflurane and Desflurane Differently Affect Mitochondrial Function, Learning, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiying; Xu, Zhipeng; Wang, Hui; Dong, Yuanlin; Shi, Hai Ning; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Objective There are approximately 8.5 million Alzheimer disease (AD) patients who need anesthesia and surgery care every year. The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane, but not desflurane, has been shown to induce caspase activation and apoptosis, which are part of AD neuropathogenesis, through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. However, the in vivo relevance, underlying mechanisms, and functional consequences of these findings remain largely to be determined. Methods We therefore set out to assess the effects of isoflurane and desflurane on mitochondrial function, cytotoxicity, learning, and memory using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, and the fear conditioning test. Results Here we show that isoflurane, but not desflurane, induces opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), increase in levels of reactive oxygen species, reduction in levels of mitochondrial membrane potential and adenosine-5′-triphosphate, activation of caspase 3, and impairment of learning and memory in cultured cells, mouse hippocampus neurons, mouse hippocampus, and mice. Moreover, cyclosporine A, a blocker of mPTP opening, attenuates isoflurane-induced mPTP opening, caspase 3 activation, and impairment of learning and memory. Finally, isoflurane may induce the opening of mPTP via increasing levels of reactive oxygen species. Interpretation These findings suggest that desflurane could be a safer anesthetic for AD patients as compared to isoflurane, and elucidate the potential mitochondria-associated underlying mechanisms, and therefore have implications for use of anesthetics in AD patients, pending human study confirmation. PMID:22368036

  20. Isoflurane reversibly destabilizes hippocampal dendritic spines by an actin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Platholi, Jimcy; Herold, Karl F; Hemmings, Hugh C; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    General anesthetics produce a reversible coma-like state through modulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. Recent evidence suggests that anesthetic exposure can also lead to sustained cognitive dysfunction. However, the subcellular effects of anesthetics on the structure of established synapses are not known. We investigated effects of the widely used volatile anesthetic isoflurane on the structural stability of hippocampal dendritic spines, a postsynaptic structure critical to excitatory synaptic transmission in learning and memory. Exposure to clinical concentrations of isoflurane induced rapid and non-uniform shrinkage and loss of dendritic spines in mature cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Spine shrinkage was associated with a reduction in spine F-actin concentration. Spine loss was prevented by either jasplakinolide or cytochalasin D, drugs that prevent F-actin disassembly. Isoflurane-induced spine shrinkage and loss were reversible upon isoflurane elimination. Thus, isoflurane destabilizes spine F-actin, resulting in changes to dendritic spine morphology and number. These findings support an actin-based mechanism for isoflurane-induced alterations of synaptic structure in the hippocampus. These reversible alterations in dendritic spine structure have important implications for acute anesthetic effects on excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic stability in the hippocampus, a locus for anesthetic-induced amnesia, and have important implications for anesthetic effects on synaptic plasticity. PMID:25068870

  1. Field use of isoflurane as an inhalant anesthetic in the American marten (Martes americana).

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Marion; Cheveau, Marianne; Imbeau, Louis; Lair, Stéphane

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness and practicality of using isoflurane as an inhalation anesthetic with oxygen as a gas carrier for American martens (Martes americana) in a field setting. Sixty-eight martens were trapped in the Waswanipi Cree Model Forest (Québec, Canada) from October to November 2005 and anesthetized with isoflurane in 100% oxygen (1 l/min) using a face mask. Induction setting of isoflurane was 3% for all animals. Mean (+/-SD) length of induction was 1.8+/-1.2 min. Maintenance isoflurane settings ranged from 1% to 4%. Procedures lasted an average of 16.4+/-7.1 min and were uneventful. Length of recovery, defined as the interval between the end of the procedure and animal release, was short (6.3+/-2.8 min), and well below reported lengths of recovery using injectable anesthetics (>/=70 min). As compared to open drop administration of isoflurane described in previous studies, the use of an anesthesia machine prevents the risk of potential fatal anesthetic overdose. We conclude that among anesthesia techniques currently available, isoflurane with oxygen as a gas carrier is a safe and useful field anesthetic in martens, when issues with equipment portability can be overcome.

  2. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kevan; Dell, Sharon; Birken, Catherine; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is often asymptomatic despite significant changes in chest imaging. Diagnosis is often made when patients become symptomatic in adulthood. There are still no proven treatments, but earlier diagnosis may allow for evaluation of preventative strategies that could improve outcome. It is an important diagnosis to consider in children who have marked radiographic findings with no or very mild symptoms or physical findings. Diagnosis can be made with imaging alone but may necessitate lung biopsy for definitive diagnosis. PMID:27445543

  3. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  4. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Srinivas, G Vijay; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant neoplasm of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma seen in childhood and adolescence. The most frequent site is the head and neck accounting for 40% of all cases and other involved sites are genitourinary tract, retroperitoneum, and to a lesser extent, the extremities. RMS is relatively uncommon in the oral cavity and the involvement of the jaws is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 50-year-old female with oral RMS involving maxillary alveolar region with clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:27194887

  5. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes. PMID:23678356

  6. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Park, Moo Suk

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes.

  7. Postnatal Isoflurane Exposure Induces Cognitive Impairment and Abnormal Histone Acetylation of Glutamatergic Systems in the Hippocampus of Adolescent Rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bing; Fang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Isoflurane can elicit cognitive impairment. However, the pathogenesis in the brain remains inconclusive. The present study investigated the mechanism of glutamate neurotoxicity in adolescent male rats that underwent postnatal isoflurane exposure and the role of sodium butyrate (NaB) in cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane exposure. Seven-day-old rats were exposed to 1.7 % isoflurane for 35 min every day for four consecutive days, and then glutamate neurotoxicity was examined in the hippocampus. Morris water maze analysis showed cognitive impairments in isoflurane-exposed rats. High-performance liquid chromatography found higher hippocampal glutamate concentrations following in vitro and in vivo isoflurane exposure. The percentage of early apoptotic hippocampal neurons was markedly increased after isoflurane exposure. Decreased acetylation and increased HDAC2 activity were observed in the hippocampus of isoflurane-exposed rats and hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, postnatal isoflurane exposure decreased histone acetylation of hippocampal neurons in the promoter regions of GLT-1 and mGLuR1/5, but not mGLuR2/3. Treatment with NaB not only restored the histone acetylation of the GLT-1 and mGLuR1/5 promoter regions and glutamate excitatory neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons, but also improved cognitive impairment in vivo. Moreover, NaB may be a potential therapeutic drug for cognitive impairment caused by isoflurane exposure. These results suggest that postnatal isoflurane exposure contributes to cognitive impairment via decreasing histone acetylation of glutamatergic systems in the hippocampus of adolescent rats. PMID:27307148

  8. Isoflurane compared with midazolam for sedation in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, K. L.; Willatts, S. M.; Prys-Roberts, C.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare isoflurane with midazolam for sedation of ventilated patients. DESIGN--Randomised control study. Setting--Intensive care unit in university teaching hospital. PATIENTS--Sixty patients aged 18-76 who required mechanical ventilation. INTERVENTIONS--Sedation with either 0.1-0.6% isoflurane in an air-oxygen mixture (30 patients) or a continuous intravenous infusion of midazolam 0.01-0.20 mg/kg/h (30 patients). Sedation was assessed initially and hourly thereafter on a six point scale. Incremental intravenous doses of morphine 0.05 mg/kg were given for analgesia as required. The trial sedative was stopped when the patient was judged ready for weaning from ventilatory support or at 24 hours (whichever was earlier). END POINT--Achievement of a predetermined level of sedation for as much of the time as possible. MAIN RESULTS--Isoflurane produced satisfactory sedation for a greater proportion of time (86%) than midazolam (64%), and patients sedated with isoflurane recovered more rapidly from sedation. CONCLUSION--Isoflurane is a promising alternative technique for sedation of ventilated patients in the intensive care unit. PMID:2500195

  9. Isoflurane induced cognitive impairment in aged rats through hippocampal calcineurin/NFAT signaling.

    PubMed

    Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Qian, Min; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiangyang

    2015-05-15

    Calcineurin (CaN) over-activation constrains synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Upon CaN activation, NFAT imports into the nucleus and guides its downstream genes, which also affect neuronal and synaptic function. Aberrant CaN/NFAT signaling involves in neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, but its role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) remains uninvestigated. Inhaled anesthetic isoflurane facilitates the development of POCD, and the present study investigated the role of CaN/NFAT signaling in isoflurane induced cognitive impairment of aged rats, and the therapeutic effects of CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA). The results indicated that hippocampal CaN activity increased and peaked at 6 h after isoflurane exposure, and NFAT, especially NFATc4, imported into the nucleus following CaN activation. Furthermore, phamacological inhibition of CaN by CsA markedly attenuated isoflurane induced aberrant CaN/NFATc4 signaling in the hippocampus, and rescued relevant spatial learning and memory impairment of aged rats. Overall, the study suggests hippocampal CaN/NFAT signaling as the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced cognitive impairment, and provides potential therapeutic target and possible treatment methods for POCD.

  10. Allergen challenge during halothane compared to isoflurane anesthesia induces a more potent peripheral lung response.

    PubMed

    Borges, Marcos C; Marchica, Cinzia L; Narayanan, Venkatesan; Ludwig, Mara S

    2013-10-01

    Allergen instillation in anaesthetized vs. awake animals results in increased distribution of allergen in the lung. Halothane is a more potent bronchodilator of the small airways than isoflurane. As small airways contribute to asthma pathogenesis, we questioned whether intranasal challenge under halothane vs. isoflurane anesthesia would lead to an increase in allergen deposition in the lung periphery and, consequently, an enhanced allergic response. C57Bl/6 mice were sensitized twice and repeatedly challenged with ovalbumin (OA) under halothane or isoflurane anesthesia. After OA-challenge, in vivo lung function was measured and BAL performed. Peribronchial and peripheral inflammation, cytokine mRNA production and collagen deposition were assessed. Airway hyperresponsiveness, BAL eosinophilia, peripheral lung inflammation, IL-5 mRNA production and collagen deposition were significantly increased in halothane OA-challenged compared to isoflurane OA-challenged mice. Airway challenge induced a higher level of airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation and remodeling under halothane than isoflurane anesthesia in a murine model of asthma. These differences may be due to increased allergen deposition in the small airways. PMID:23876740

  11. A Mitochondrion-Targeted Antioxidant Ameliorates Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoru; Zhang, Hui; Hao, Shuangying; Ji, Muhuo; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane possesses neurotoxicity and can induce cognitive deficits, particularly in aging mammals. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) have been linked to the early pathogenesis of this disorder. However, the role of mtROS remains to be evaluated due to a lack of targeted method to treat mtROS. Here, we determined in aging mice the effects of the mitochondrion-targeted antioxidant SS-31, on cognitive deficits induced by isoflurane, a general inhalation anesthetic. We further investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the effects of SS-31 on hippocampal neuro-inflammation and apoptosis. The results showed that isoflurane induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficit, which was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction including reduced ATP contents, increased ROS levels, and mitochondrial swelling. Treatment with SS-31 significantly ameliorated isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits through the improvement of mitochondrial integrity and function. Mechanistically, SS-31 treatment suppressed pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing the levels of NF-κB, NLRP3, caspase 1, IL-1β, and TNF-α; and inhibited the apoptotic pathway by decreasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, reducing the release of cytochrome C, and blocking the cleavage of caspase 3. Our results indicate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may be attenuated by mitochondrion-targeted antioxidants, such as SS-31. Therefore, SS-31 may have therapeutic potentials in preventing injuries from oxidative stresses that contribute to anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity.

  12. Carbon dioxide, but not isoflurane, elicits ultrasonic vocalizations in female rats.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, J; De Rantere, D; Fernandez, N J; Krajacic, A; Pang, D S J

    2013-10-01

    Gradual filling of a chamber with carbon dioxide is currently listed by the Canadian Council on Animal Care guidelines as a conditionally acceptable method of euthanasia for rats. Behavioural evidence suggests, however, that exposure to carbon dioxide gas is aversive. Isoflurane is less aversive than carbon dioxide and may be a viable alternative, though objective data are lacking for the period leading up to loss of consciousness. It has been shown that during negative states, such as pain and distress, rats produce ultrasonic vocalizations. The objective of this study was to detect ultrasonic vocalizations during exposure to carbon dioxide gas or isoflurane as an indicator of a negative state. Specialized recording equipment, with a frequency detection range of 10 to 200 kHz, was used to register these calls during administration of each agent. Nine female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to either carbon dioxide or isoflurane on two different occasions. All rats vocalized in the ultrasonic range (30 to 70 kHz) during exposure to carbon dioxide. When exposed to isoflurane, no calls were detected from any of the animals. The frequent occurrence of ultrasonic vocalizations during carbon dioxide exposure suggests that the common practice of carbon dioxide euthanasia is aversive to rats and that isoflurane may be a preferable alternative.

  13. Electrical stimulation of the parabrachial nucleus induces reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Muindi, Fanuel; Kenny, Jonathan D; Taylor, Norman E; Solt, Ken; Wilson, Matthew A; Brown, Emery N; Van Dort, Christa J

    2016-06-01

    Clinically, emergence from general anesthesia is viewed as a passive process where anesthetics are discontinued at the end of surgery and anesthesiologists wait for the drugs to wear off. The mechanisms involved in emergence are not well understood and there are currently no drugs that can actively reverse the state of general anesthesia. An emerging hypothesis states that brain regions that control arousal become active during emergence and are a key part of the return to wakefulness. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that electrical activation of the glutamatergic parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in the brainstem is sufficient to induce reanimation (active emergence) during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a marker of neural activity, we first show a selective increase in active neurons in the PBN during passive emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then electrically stimulated the PBN to assess whether it is sufficient to induce reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia. Stimulation induced behavioral arousal and restoration of the righting reflex during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. In contrast, stimulation of the nearby central inferior colliculus (CIC) did not restore the righting reflex. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed that stimulation produced a significant decrease in EEG delta power during PBN stimulation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the PBN provides critical arousal input during emergence from isoflurane anesthesia.

  14. Local Versus Global Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia on Visual Processing in the Fly Brain.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Dror; Zalucki, Oressia H; van Swinderen, Bruno; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2016-01-01

    What characteristics of neural activity distinguish the awake and anesthetized brain? Drugs such as isoflurane abolish behavioral responsiveness in all animals, implying evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether this conservation is reflected at the level of neural activity. Studies in humans have shown that anesthesia is characterized by spatially distinct spectral and coherence signatures that have also been implicated in the global impairment of cortical communication. We questioned whether anesthesia has similar effects on global and local neural processing in one of the smallest brains, that of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Using a recently developed multielectrode technique, we recorded local field potentials from different areas of the fly brain simultaneously, while manipulating the concentration of isoflurane. Flickering visual stimuli ('frequency tags') allowed us to track evoked responses in the frequency domain and measure the effects of isoflurane throughout the brain. We found that isoflurane reduced power and coherence at the tagging frequency (13 or 17 Hz) in central brain regions. Unexpectedly, isoflurane increased power and coherence at twice the tag frequency (26 or 34 Hz) in the optic lobes of the fly, but only for specific stimulus configurations. By modeling the periodic responses, we show that the increase in power in peripheral areas can be attributed to local neuroanatomy. We further show that the effects on coherence can be explained by impacted signal-to-noise ratios. Together, our results show that general anesthesia has distinct local and global effects on neuronal processing in the fruit fly brain. PMID:27517084

  15. Isoflurane abolishes spontaneous firing of serotonin neurons and masks their pH/CO₂ chemosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Massey, Cory A; Iceman, Kimberly E; Johansen, Sara L; Wu, Yuanming; Harris, Michael B; Richerson, George B

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons from the mouse and rat rostral medulla are stimulated by increased CO2 when studied in culture or brain slices. However, the response of 5-HT neurons has been variable when animals are exposed to hypercapnia in vivo. Here we examined whether halogenated inhalational anesthetics, which activate TWIK-related acid-sensitive K(+) (TASK) channels, could mask an effect of CO2 on 5-HT neurons. During in vivo plethysmography in mice, isoflurane (1%) markedly reduced the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) by 78-96% depending upon mouse strain and ambient temperature. In a perfused rat brain stem preparation, isoflurane (1%) reduced or silenced spontaneous firing of medullary 5-HT neurons in situ and abolished their responses to elevated perfusate Pco2. In dissociated cell cultures, isoflurane (1%) hyperpolarized 5-HT neurons by 6.52 ± 3.94 mV and inhibited spontaneous firing. A subsequent decrease in pH from 7.4 to 7.2 depolarized neurons by 4.07 ± 2.10 mV, but that was insufficient to reach threshold for firing. Depolarizing current restored baseline firing and the firing frequency response to acidosis, indicating that isoflurane did not block the underlying mechanisms mediating chemosensitivity. These results demonstrate that isoflurane masks 5-HT neuron chemosensitivity in vitro and in situ and markedly decreases the HCVR in vivo. The use of this class of anesthetic has a particularly potent inhibitory effect on chemosensitivity of 5-HT neurons.

  16. Local Versus Global Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia on Visual Processing in the Fly Brain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract What characteristics of neural activity distinguish the awake and anesthetized brain? Drugs such as isoflurane abolish behavioral responsiveness in all animals, implying evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether this conservation is reflected at the level of neural activity. Studies in humans have shown that anesthesia is characterized by spatially distinct spectral and coherence signatures that have also been implicated in the global impairment of cortical communication. We questioned whether anesthesia has similar effects on global and local neural processing in one of the smallest brains, that of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Using a recently developed multielectrode technique, we recorded local field potentials from different areas of the fly brain simultaneously, while manipulating the concentration of isoflurane. Flickering visual stimuli (‘frequency tags’) allowed us to track evoked responses in the frequency domain and measure the effects of isoflurane throughout the brain. We found that isoflurane reduced power and coherence at the tagging frequency (13 or 17 Hz) in central brain regions. Unexpectedly, isoflurane increased power and coherence at twice the tag frequency (26 or 34 Hz) in the optic lobes of the fly, but only for specific stimulus configurations. By modeling the periodic responses, we show that the increase in power in peripheral areas can be attributed to local neuroanatomy. We further show that the effects on coherence can be explained by impacted signal-to-noise ratios. Together, our results show that general anesthesia has distinct local and global effects on neuronal processing in the fruit fly brain. PMID:27517084

  17. Effects of isoflurane on measurement of fluorescence spectra and CLSM imaging in Acetabularia acetabulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, WenLi; Quan, Zhou; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    The volatile halogenated methyl ethyl ether is used as anesthetic to inhibit actin-based dynamics directly or indirectly in animal cells. In plant cells, most intracellular movements are related with actin pathways too. We utilized isoflurane to study the dynamic choloroplast organization in unicellular baby and adult alga Acetabularia acetabulum. Fluorescence spectra were measured and choloroplast movements were recorded by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) imaging in in Acetabularia acetabulum. Isoflurane was effective in the unicellular baby and adult organisms and showed time- dependent actin-inhibition patterns. Acetabularia acetabulum cells were treated for different times with isoflurane saturated solutions in artificial seawater (it was defined to be 100% isoflurane). The intensity of fluorescence at 680nm and 730nm were progressively decreased at 100% isoflurane. It was remarkable difference between fluorescence spectra of baby and adult Acetabularia were inhibited by isoflurance, adult Acetabularia cells showed more sensitive. Whereas the choloroplast in Acetabularia acetabulum was commendably imaged by CLSM at 20 and 40 zoom.

  18. Auditory Evoked Bursts in Mouse Visual Cortex during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Land, Rüdiger; Engler, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    General anesthesia is not a uniform state of the brain. Ongoing activity differs between light and deep anesthesia and cortical response properties are modulated in dependence of anesthetic dosage. We investigated how anesthesia level affects cross-modal interactions in primary sensory cortex. To examine this, we continuously measured the effects of visual and auditory stimulation during increasing and decreasing isoflurane level in the mouse visual cortex and the subiculum (from baseline at 0.7 to 2.5 vol % and reverse). Auditory evoked burst activity occurred in visual cortex after a transition during increase of anesthesia level. At the same time, auditory and visual evoked bursts occurred in the subiculum, even though the subiculum was unresponsive to both stimuli previous to the transition. This altered sensory excitability was linked to the presence of burst suppression activity in cortex, and to a regular slow burst suppression rhythm (∼0.2 Hz) in the subiculum. The effect disappeared during return to light anesthesia. The results show that pseudo-heteromodal sensory burst responses can appear in brain structures as an effect of an anesthesia induced state change. PMID:23185462

  19. Changes in circulating blood volume following isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hamada, H; Takaori, M; Kimura, K; Fukui, A; Fujita, Y

    1993-07-01

    Changes of circulating blood volume (CB volume) measured by the dual indicator dilution method were observed in 33 chronically instrumented mongrel dogs following either alpha-chloralose-urethane (C group), additive isoflurane (I group) or sevoflurane anesthesia (S group). These anesthetic groups were each divided into two subgroups with regard to respiratory care, namely Cp, Ip and Sp for those with intermittent positive pressure ventilation (six animals per subgroups), and Cs, Is and Ss for those with spontaneous breathing (five animals per subgroups). The CB volume under positive pressure ventilation remained unchanged in the Ip and Sp groups at both 0.5 and 1.0 MAC, and in the Cp group. The CB volume remained essentially unchanged in the Cs and Is groups at both 0.5 or 1.0 MAC, but the plasma volume tended to increase slightly in the Is group at 1.0 MAC. In the Ss group under spontaneous breathing, however, the CB volume increased from 84.4 +/- 7.0 to 91.4 +/- 7.7 at 0.5 MAC, and to 91.4 +/- 10.2 ml.kg(-1) at 1.0 MAC (0.01 < P < 0.05). These increases were caused by an increase in the plasma volume. The above data suggests that a concomitant increase in the venous pressure associated with an increase in the intrathoracic pressure produced by positive pressure ventilation would attenuate changes in the CB volume during sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:15278818

  20. Pupil Size in Relation to Cortical States during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Jeung Eun; Han, Hio-Been

    2016-01-01

    In neuronal recording studies on anesthetized animals, reliable measures for the transitional moment of consciousness are frequently required. Previous findings suggest that pupil fluctuations reflect the neuronal states during quiet wakefulness, whose correlation was unknown for the anesthetized condition. Here, we investigated the pupillary changes under isoflurane anesthesia simultaneously with the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG). The pupil was tracked by using a region-based active contour model. The dose was given to the animal in a stepwise increasing mode (simulating induction of anesthesia) or in a stepwise decreasing mode (simulating emergence of anesthesia). We found that the quickly widening pupil action (mydriasis) characterizes the transitional state in anesthesia. Mydriasis occurred only in the light dose in the emergence phase, and the events were accompanied by an increase of burst activity in the EEG followed by EMG activity in 47% of the mydriasis events. Our findings suggest that recording such pupil changes may offer a noncontact monitoring tool for indexing the transitional state of the brain, particularly when a lower threshold dose is applied. PMID:27122995

  1. The volatile anesthetic isoflurane induces ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) to protect against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mihwa; Ham, Ahrom; Kim, Joo Yun; Brown, Kevin M.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The volatile anesthetic isoflurane protects against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury by releasing renal tubular TGF-β1. Since adenosine is a powerful cytoprotective molecule, we tested whether TGF-β1 generated by isoflurane induces renal tubular ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) and adenosine to protect against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury. Isoflurane induced new CD73 synthesis and increased adenosine generation in cultured kidney proximal tubule cells and in mouse kidney. Moreover, a TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody prevented isoflurane-mediated induction of CD73 activity. Mice anesthetized with isoflurane after renal ischemia and reperfusion had significantly reduced plasma creatinine and decreased renal tubular necrosis, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis compared to pentobarbital-anesthetized mice. Isoflurane failed to protect against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury in CD73 deficient mice, in mice pretreated with a selective CD73 inhibitor or mice treated with an adenosine receptor antagonist. The TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody or the CD73 inhibitor attenuated isoflurane-mediated protection against HK-2 cell apoptosis. Thus, isoflurane causes TGF-β1-dependent induction of renal tubular CD73 and adenosine generation to protect against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury. Modulation of this pathway may have important therapeutic implications to reduce morbidity and mortality arising from ischemic acute kidney injury. PMID:23423261

  2. Comparison of isoflurane and alfaxalone (Alfaxan) for the induction of anesthesia in flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) undergoing orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Villaverde-Morcillo, Silvia; Benito, Javier; García-Sánchez, Rubén; Martín-Jurado, Olga; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2014-06-01

    Used since the 1970s as an avian anesthetic, the neurosteroid alfaxalone has been reformulated to avoid side effects from its castor oil excipient. This case report describes the clinical use of a new alfaxalone formulation (Alfaxan) as an intravenous anesthetic induction agent in wild isoflurane-anesthetized rose flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus). Twenty-five male and female rose flamingos underwent orthopedic surgery using isoflurane anesthesia. The animals were induced following one of two protocols: inhaled isoflurane by facemask (ISO; n = 9) or intravenous alfaxalone (2 mg/kg; ALF; n = 16). The time and quality of anesthetic induction (until first signs of muscle relaxation) and the time and quality of recovery (sternal recumbency) were recorded using a scoring system. Mild sedation was first observed at 18.4 +/- 3.8 min and 1.7 +/- 0.3 min, following isoflurane and alfaxalone administration, respectively (P < 0.001). Alfaxalone induction time was significantly shorter and induction quality was considered smoother than in the ISO group. Flamingos given alfaxalone induction required lower isoflurane concentrations for maintenance anesthesia than did flamingos induced with mask isoflurane (1.5-2 % vol vs. 4-5 % vol for ALF vs. ISO, respectively). Alfaxalone produced moderate cardiorespiratory effects not seen in the isoflurane induction group. Recovery times were similar with both protocols without significant differences in quality and length. The new alfaxalone formulation produces a safe and effective anesthetic induction in rose flamingos and has significant isoflurane-sparing effects during anesthesia.

  3. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  4. Isoflurane exposure during mid-adulthood attenuates age-related spatial memory impairment in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Su, Diansan; Zhao, Yanxing; Xu, Huan; Wang, Beilei; Chen, Xuemei; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xiangrui

    2012-01-01

    Many in vitro findings suggest that isoflurane exposure might accelerate the process of Alzheimer Disease (AD); however, no behavioral evidence exists to support this theory. In the present study, we hypothesized that exposure of APP/PS1 transgenic mice to isoflurane during mid-adulthood, which is the pre-symptomatic phase of amyloid beta (Abeta) deposition, would alter the progression of AD. Seven-month-old Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates were exposed to 1.1% isoflurane for 2 hours per day for 5 days. Learning and memory ability was tested 48 hours and 5 months following isoflurane exposure using the Morris Water Maze and Y maze, respectively. Abeta deposition and oligomers in the hippocampus were measured by immunohistochemistry or Elisa 5 months following isoflurane exposure. We found that the performance of both the transgenic and wild-type mice in the Morris Water Maze significantly improved 48 hours following isoflurane exposure. The transgenic mice made significantly fewer discrimination errors in the Y maze following isoflurane exposure, and no differences were found between wild-type littermates 5 months following isoflurane exposure. For the transgenic mice, the Abeta plaque and oligomers in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in the 5 months following isoflurane exposure. In summary, repeated isoflurane exposure during the pre-symptomatic phase not only improved spatial memory in both the APP/PS1 transgenic and wild-type mice shortly after the exposure but also prevented age-related decline in learning and memory and attenuated the Abeta plaque and oligomers in the hippocampus of transgenic mice.

  5. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  6. How water interacts with halogenated anesthetics: the rotational spectrum of isoflurane-water.

    PubMed

    Gou, Qian; Feng, Gang; Evangelisti, Luca; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Spada, Lorenzo; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J; Caminati, Walther

    2014-02-10

    The rotational spectra of several isotopologues of the 1:1 complex between the inhaled anesthetic isoflurane and water have been recorded and analyzed by using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The rotational spectrum showed a single rotamer, corresponding to the configuration in which the most stable conformer of isolated isoflurane is linked to the water molecule through an almost linear C-H⋅⋅⋅O weak hydrogen bond. All transitions display a hyperfine structure due to the (35)Cl (or (37)Cl) nuclear quadrupole effects.

  7. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  8. Hereditary Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Sakagami, Takuro; Young, Lisa R.; Carey, Brenna C.; Wood, Robert E.; Luisetti, Maurizio; Wert, Susan E.; Rubin, Bruce K.; Kevill, Katharine; Chalk, Claudia; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Stevens, Carrie; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Campo, Ilaria; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: We identified a 6-year-old girl with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), impaired granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor function, and increased GM-CSF. Objectives: Increased serum GM-CSF may be useful to identify individuals with PAP caused by GM-CSF receptor dysfunction. Methods: We screened 187 patients referred to us for measurement of GM-CSF autoantibodies to diagnose autoimmune PAP. Five were children with PAP and increased serum GM-CSF but without GM-CSF autoantibodies or any disease causing secondary PAP; all were studied with family members, subsequently identified patients, and controls. Measurement and Main Results: Eight children (seven female, one male) were identified with PAP caused by recessive CSF2RA mutations. Six presented with progressive dyspnea of insidious onset at 4.8 ± 1.6 years and two were asymptomatic at ages 5 and 8 years. Radiologic and histopathologic manifestations were similar to those of autoimmune PAP. Molecular analysis demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling was absent in six and severely reduced in two patients. The GM-CSF receptor β chain was detected in all patients, whereas the α chain was absent in six and abnormal in two, paralleling the GM-CSF signaling defects. Genetic analysis revealed multiple distinct CSF2RA abnormalities, including missense, duplication, frameshift, and nonsense mutations; exon and gene deletion; and cryptic alternative splicing. All symptomatic patients responded well to whole-lung lavage therapy. Conclusions: CSF2RA mutations cause a genetic form of PAP presenting as insidious, progressive dyspnea in children that can be diagnosed by a combination of characteristic radiologic findings and blood tests and treated successfully by whole-lung lavage. PMID:20622029

  9. Direct Pore Binding as a Mechanism for Isoflurane Inhibition of the Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channel ELIC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Kinde, Monica N.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wells, Marta M.; Cohen, Aina E.; Xu, Yan; Tang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are targets of general anesthetics, but molecular mechanisms underlying anesthetic action remain debatable. We found that ELIC, a pLGIC from Erwinia chrysanthemi, can be functionally inhibited by isoflurane and other anesthetics. Structures of ELIC co-crystallized with isoflurane in the absence or presence of an agonist revealed double isoflurane occupancies inside the pore near T237(6′) and A244(13′). A pore-radius contraction near the extracellular entrance was observed upon isoflurane binding. Electrophysiology measurements with a single-point mutation at position 6′ or 13′ support the notion that binding at these sites renders isoflurane inhibition. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that isoflurane binding was more stable in the resting than in a desensitized pore conformation. This study presents compelling evidence for a direct pore-binding mechanism of isoflurane inhibition, which has a general implication for inhibitory action of general anesthetics on pLGICs. PMID:26346220

  10. Anesthetic effects of isoflurane on the tonotopic map and neuronal population activity in the rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Noda, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2015-09-01

    Since its discovery nearly four decades ago, sequential microelectrode mapping using hundreds of recording sites has been able to reveal a precise tonotopic organization of the auditory cortex. Despite concerns regarding the effects that anesthesia might have on neuronal responses to tones, anesthesia was essential for these experiments because such dense mapping was elaborate and time-consuming. Here, taking an 'all-at-once' approach, we investigated how isoflurane modifies spatiotemporal activities by using a dense microelectrode array. The array covered the entire auditory cortex in rats, including the core and belt cortices. By comparing neuronal activity in the awake state with activity under isoflurane anesthesia, we made four observations. First, isoflurane anesthesia did not modify the tonotopic topography within the auditory cortex. Second, in terms of general response properties, isoflurane anesthesia decreased the number of active single units and increased their response onset latency. Third, in terms of tuning properties, isoflurane anesthesia shifted the response threshold without changing the shape of the frequency response area and decreased the response quality. Fourth, in terms of population activities, isoflurane anesthesia increased the noise correlations in discharges and phase synchrony in local field potential (LFP) oscillations, suggesting that the anesthesia made neuronal activities redundant at both single-unit and LFP levels. Thus, while isoflurane anesthesia had little effect on the tonotopic topography, its profound effects on neuronal activities decreased the encoding capacity of the auditory cortex. PMID:26118739

  11. Critical Role of Interleukin-11 in Isoflurane-mediated Protection against Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Ahrom; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Brown, Kevin M.; Yeh, James; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoflurane releases renal tubular transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and protects against ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI). Recent studies suggest that TGF-β1 can induce a cytoprotective cytokine interleukin (IL)-11. Here, we tested the hypothesis that isoflurane protects against ischemic AKI by direct induction of renal tubular IL-11 synthesis. Methods Human kidney proximal tubule (HK-2) cells were treated with 1.25-2.5% isoflurane or carrier gas (room air+5% carbon dioxide) for 0-16 h. We also anesthetized C57BL/6 mice with 1.2% isoflurane or with equi-anesthetic dose of pentobarbital for 4 h. In addition, we subjected IL-11 receptor (IL-11R) wild type, IL-11R deficient or IL-11 neutralized mice to 30-min renal ischemia followed by reperfusion under 4 h of pentobarbital or isoflurane (1.2%) anesthesia. Results Isoflurane increased IL-11 synthesis in human (~300-500% increase, N = 6) and mouse (23 ± 4 (mean ± SD) fold over carrier gas group, N = 4) proximal tubule cells that were attenuated by a TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody. Mice anesthetized with isoflurane showed significantly increased kidney IL-11 messenger RNA (13.8 ± 2 fold over carrier gas group, N = 4) and protein (31 ± 9 vs. 18±2 pg/mg protein or ~80% increase, N = 4) expression compared to pentobarbital anesthetized mice and this increase was also attenuated by a TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, isoflurane-mediated renal protection in IL-11R wild-type mice were absent in IL-11R deficient mice or in IL-11R wild-type mice treated with IL-11 neutralizing antibody (N = 4-6). Conclusions Our studies suggest that isoflurane induces renal tubular IL-11 via TGF-β1 signaling to protect against ischemic AKI. PMID:24037316

  12. A comparison of the haemodynamic effects of propofol and isoflurane in pregnant ewes.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, J S; Wertz, E M; Alvis, M; Turner, A S

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of inhaled isoflurane and a constant infusion of propofol on maternal haemodynamics and uterine arterial and umbilical venous flows in pregnant ewes. Late term pregnant ewes (n = 5) were randomly assigned to receive either inhaled isoflurane or an intravenous infusion of propofol for 1 h, each on separate occasions. Maternal systemic arterial, right atrial and pulmonary arterial blood pressures, cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, stroke volume index, heart rate, and uterine arterial and umbilical venous flows were determined over the 1 h period of each treatment. Data were analysed using an univariate analysis of variance for repeated measures performed on the ranks of the data. Propofol anaesthetized ewes had significantly higher heart rate (P = 0.0040), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.0003) and cardiac index (P = 0.0475) compared to isoflurane anaesthetized ewes. There were no significant differences in uterine arterial flows, umbilical venous flows, or other measured variables. Continuous propofol infusions maintain maternal haemodynamics at significantly higher levels than does inhaled isoflurane, while uterine arterial and umbilical venous flows do not differ significantly. PMID:9507460

  13. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine-Ketamine with Isoflurane for Anesthesia of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Fox, Lana; Snyder, Lindsey Bc; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare isoflurane with a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, administered intramuscularly, for anesthesia in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In a prospective, complete crossover study, adult chinchillas (n = 8; age, 2 to 5 y) were anesthetized with a combination of dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (4 mg/kg IM). Atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 45 min after dexmedetomidine-ketamine administration. For comparison, anesthesia also was induced and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, delivered by facemask. Anesthetic and physiologic parameters were recorded during each anesthesia, including various reflexes, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and SpO2. Food intake, fecal output, and body weight were recorded daily for 6 d after each anesthetic trial. Induction time, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature did not differ significantly between the 2 anesthetic protocols. Recovery times were shorter and SpO2 was higher in animals that received isoflurane delivered in 100% oxygen. Food intake and fecal output were reduced in the dexmedetomidine-ketamine group for as long as 3 d after anesthesia, whereas isoflurane had no signifcant effect on food intake or fecal output. Both anesthetic protocols provided effective anesthesia in chinchillas. However, when anesthetized with dexmedetomidine-ketamine, chinchillas received room air and became hypoxemic. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of oxygen supplementation on anesthetic recovery and on the recovery of food intake and fecal output in chinchillas. PMID:27177565

  14. Designer receptor manipulations reveal a role of the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system in isoflurane general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Vazey, Elena M.; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms driving emergence from general anesthesia are not well understood. The noradrenergic brain nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) modulates arousal and may have effects on general anesthetic state. Using virally delivered designer receptors to specifically control LC norepinephrine (NE) neurons, we investigated the causal relationship between LC-NE activity and general anesthetic state under isoflurane. Selective activation of LC-NE neurons produced cortical electroencephalography (EEG) activation under continuous deep isoflurane anesthesia. Specifically, LC-NE activation reduced burst suppression in EEG and drove a rightward shift in peak EEG frequency with reduced δ EEG power and increased θ EEG power, measures of cortical arousal. LC-NE activation also accelerated behavioral emergence from deep isoflurane anesthesia; this was prevented with β or α1 noradrenergic antagonists. Moreover, these adrenoreceptor antagonists alone were sufficient to markedly potentiate anesthetic duration when delivered centrally or peripherally. Induction of anesthesia also was retarded by LC-NE activation. Our results demonstrate that the LC-NE system strongly modulates the anesthetic state, and that changes in LC-NE neurotransmission alone can affect the emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. Taken together, these findings extend our understanding of mechanisms underlying general anesthesia and cortical arousal, and have significant implications for optimizing the clinical safety and management of general anesthesia. PMID:24567395

  15. Enhanced Effects of Isoflurane on the Long QT Syndrome 1 associated A341V Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Mikuni, Ikuomi; Torres, Carlos G.; Bakshi, Tania; Tampo, Akihito; Carlson, Brian E.; Bienengraeber, Martin W.; Kwok, Wai-Meng

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of volatile anesthetics on patients with inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS) is not well understood. This is further complicated by the different genotypes underlying LQTS. No studies have reported on the direct effects of volatile anesthetics on specific LQTS-associated mutations. We investigated the effects of isoflurane on a common LQTS-Type 1 mutation, A341V, with an unusually severe phenotype. Methods Whole-cell potassium currents (IKs) were recorded from HEK293 and HL-1 cells transiently expressing/co-expressing wild-type KCNQ1 (α-subunit), mutant KCNQ1, wild-type KCNE1 (β-subunit), and fusion KCNQ1+KCNE1. Current was monitored in the absence and presence of clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.54 ± 0.05 mM, 1.14 vol%). Computer simulations determined the resulting impact on the cardiac action potential. Results Isoflurane had significantly greater inhibitory effect on A341V+KCNE1 (62.2 ± 3.4%, n=8), than on wild-type KCNQ1+KCNE1 (40.7 ± 4.5%; n=9) in transfected HEK293 cells. Under heterozygous conditions, isoflurane inhibited A341V+KCNQ1+KCNE1 by 65.2 ± 3.0% (n=13), and wild-type KCNQ1+KCNE1 (2:1 ratio) by 32.0 ± 4.5% (n=11). A341V exerted a dominant negative effect on IKs. Similar differential effects of isoflurane were also observed in experiments using the cardiac HL-1 cells. Mutations of the neighboring F340 residue significantly attenuated the effects of isoflurane, and fusion proteins revealed the modulatory effect of KCNE1. Action potential simulations revealed a stimulation-frequency dependent effect of A341V. Conclusions The LQTS-associated A341V mutation rendered the IKs channel more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of isoflurane compared to wild-type IKs in transfected cell lines; F340 is a key residue for anesthetic action. PMID:25585005

  16. Isoflurane Inhibits the Tetrodotoxin-resistant Voltagegated Sodium Channel Nav1.8

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Karl F.; Nau, Carla; Ouyang, Wei; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) mediate neuronal action potentials. Tetrodotoxin inhibits all Nav isoforms, but Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are relatively tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r) compared to other isoforms. Nav1.8 is highly expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons and is functionally linked to nociception, but the sensitivity of TTX-r isoforms to inhaled anesthetics is unclear. Methods The sensitivities of heterologously expressed rat TTX-r Nav1.8 and endogenous tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-s) Nav to the prototypic inhaled anesthetic isoflurane were tested in mammalian ND7/23 cells using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Results From a holding potential of −70 mV, isoflurane (0.53±0.06 mM, ~1.8 MAC at 24°C) reduced normalized peak Na+ current (INa) of Nav1.8 to 0.55±0.03 and of endogenous TTX-s Nav to 0.56±0.06. Isoflurane minimally inhibited INa from a holding potential of −140 mV. Isoflurane did not affect voltage-dependence of activation, but significantly shifted voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation by −6 mV for Nav1.8 and by −7 mV for TTX-s Nav. IC50 values for inhibition of peak INa were 0.67±0.06 mM for Nav1.8 and 0.66±0.09 mM for TTX-s Nav; significant inhibition occurred at clinically relevant concentrations as low as 0.58 MAC. Isoflurane produced use-dependent block of Nav1.8; at a stimulation frequency of 10 Hz, 0.56±0.08 mM isoflurane reduced INa to 0.64±0.01 vs. 0.78±0.01 for control. Conclusion Isoflurane inhibited the tetrodotoxin-resistant isoform Nav1.8 with potency comparable to that for endogenous tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav isoforms, indicating that sensitivity to inhaled anesthetics is conserved across diverse Nav family members. Block of Nav1.8 in dorsal root ganglion neurons could contribute to the effects of inhaled anesthetics on peripheral nociceptive mechanisms. PMID:19672182

  17. Behavioral and Activity Assessment of Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus) after Tail Biopsy under Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Hankenson, F Claire; Braden-Weiss, Gillian C; Blendy, Julie A

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary laboratory animal guidance suggests that tail biopsy of laboratory mice can be performed before 21 d of age without anesthesia, whereas older mice must receive anesthesia before biopsy. Our objective was to determine whether administration of isoflurane anesthesia before tail biopsy produced a measurable effect on the behavior of mice (n = 196). We evaluated C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice at 21 to 24 (weaning), 28 to 31 (delayed weaning), and 42 to 45 (adult) d of age. Mice were observed at the time of biopsy and then twice within the first hour after a sham or tail biopsy. Anxiety-like responses were assessed by using an elevated plus-maze. Activity was evaluated remotely for 120 min. Isoflurane did not diminish acute responses to tail biopsy in mice 31 d or younger compared with sham-biopsied animals but had a significant effect in C57BL/6 biopsied adult mice. In addition, mice of all ages and strains that received anesthesia, regardless of biopsy, spent more time in the enclosed maze arms and had decreased activity up to 5 h after isoflurane exposure. Although tail biopsy should be performed in young mice to avoid transection of distal mature vertebrae, our experimental paradigm indicates that isoflurane anesthesia does not appreciably enhance wellbeing over that of mice biopsied without anesthesia at weaning ages. The influence of inhaled isoflurane was demonstrable and indicated that acute and prolonged alterations in anxiety and activity must be considered when interpreting the impact of anesthesia on tail biopsy across various ages and strains of laboratory mice. PMID:22330716

  18. Distribution of cerebral blood flow during halothane versus isoflurane anesthesia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T.D.; Warner, D.S.; Todd, M.M.; Vust, L.J.; Trawick, D.C.

    1988-09-01

    The effects of halothane versus isoflurane on distribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were compared using 14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 1 MAC of either halothane (n = 8) or isoflurane (n = 7) in 33% O2/balance nitrogen for 55 min prior to determination of CBF. Normoxia, normothermia, and normocapnia were maintained throughout the experiment and arterial pressures (MAP) were held within the range of 90-100 mmHg by infusion of blood. Coronal autoradiographic brain images were then digitized and optical density values converted to CBF with the use of 14C autoradiographic standards and arterial radioactivity data. Hemispheric, neocortical, subcortical, and selected local anatomical regions were defined on a cathode ray screen display by cursor outline. Mean CBF for each region was determined at each of eight standardized coronal brain sections, and area weighted average values for the whole brain were also calculated. Hemispheric CBF was identical in the two anesthetic groups: halothane = 150 +/- 16 ml.100 gm-1.min-1; isoflurane = 147 +/- 19 ml.100 gm-1.min-1. However, neocortical CBF was greater in halothane anesthetized animals (halothane = 185 +/- 16 ml.100 gm-1.min-1; isoflurane = 154 +/- 19 ml.100 gm-1.min-1, P = .004). The authors conclude that halothane and isoflurane exert regionally selective effects on CBF with halothane appearing to have a more pronounced effect on the neocortex. Previously reported discrepancies concerning the relative effects of these two agents on CBF may be due to inherent differences in the tissue regions measured by the different techniques.

  19. Effect of dexmedetomidine bolus dose on isoflurane consumption in surgical patients under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Reshma B.; Rajappa, Geetha C.; Govindswamy, Suresh; Thamanna, Prathima P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Various adjuvants have been introduced to decrease the dose of volatile agents and their side effects. Dexmedetomidine a potent alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist is one such agent. Our objective is to assess the effect of preanesthetic dexmedetomidine on isoflurane consumption and its effect on intraoperative hemodynamic stability and recovery profile. Setting and Design: This prospective, randomized controlled, double-blind study was done in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Group 1 received saline infusion and Group 2 received dexmedetomidine infusion in a dose of 1 μg/kg over 10 min given 15 min before induction. Vital parameters and bispectral index (BIS) values were noted throughout the surgery. Patients were induced and intubated as per the standard protocol and maintained with N2O: O2 = 1:1 mixture at 2 L/min and isoflurane concentration adjusted to achieve BIS values of 45–60. Demographic profile, hemodynamic variables, total isoflurane consumption, and recovery profile data were collected. Statistics: Independent t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare the average anesthetic consumption, hemodynamics, and recovery profile between two groups. Results: End-tidal concentration and total isoflurane consumption in Group 2 were 0.56 ± 0.11 and 10.69 ± 3.01 mL, respectively, with P < 0.001 which was statistically significant compared to Group 1 which were 0.76 ± 0.14 and 13.76 ± 3.84 mL. Postintubation and intraoperative mean arterial pressure values were significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group with P < 0.001. Conclusion: Preanesthetic bolus dose of dexmedetomidine is a useful adjuvant to reduce isoflurane consumption. PMID:27746567

  20. Isoflurane abolishes spontaneous firing of serotonin neurons and masks their pH/CO2 chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Johansen, Sara L.; Wu, Yuanming; Harris, Michael B.; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons from the mouse and rat rostral medulla are stimulated by increased CO2 when studied in culture or brain slices. However, the response of 5-HT neurons has been variable when animals are exposed to hypercapnia in vivo. Here we examined whether halogenated inhalational anesthetics, which activate TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels, could mask an effect of CO2 on 5-HT neurons. During in vivo plethysmography in mice, isoflurane (1%) markedly reduced the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) by 78–96% depending upon mouse strain and ambient temperature. In a perfused rat brain stem preparation, isoflurane (1%) reduced or silenced spontaneous firing of medullary 5-HT neurons in situ and abolished their responses to elevated perfusate Pco2. In dissociated cell cultures, isoflurane (1%) hyperpolarized 5-HT neurons by 6.52 ± 3.94 mV and inhibited spontaneous firing. A subsequent decrease in pH from 7.4 to 7.2 depolarized neurons by 4.07 ± 2.10 mV, but that was insufficient to reach threshold for firing. Depolarizing current restored baseline firing and the firing frequency response to acidosis, indicating that isoflurane did not block the underlying mechanisms mediating chemosensitivity. These results demonstrate that isoflurane masks 5-HT neuron chemosensitivity in vitro and in situ and markedly decreases the HCVR in vivo. The use of this class of anesthetic has a particularly potent inhibitory effect on chemosensitivity of 5-HT neurons. PMID:25695656

  1. Preferential effect of isoflurane on top-down vs. bottom-up pathways in sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Aeyal; Grady, Sean M.; Krause, Bryan M.; Uhlrich, Daniel J.; Manning, Karen A.; Banks, Matthew I.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of loss of consciousness (LOC) under anesthesia is unknown. Because consciousness depends on activity in the cortico-thalamic network, anesthetic actions on this network are likely critical for LOC. Competing theories stress the importance of anesthetic actions on bottom-up “core” thalamo-cortical (TC) vs. top-down cortico-cortical (CC) and matrix TC connections. We tested these models using laminar recordings in rat auditory cortex in vivo and murine brain slices. We selectively activated bottom-up vs. top-down afferent pathways using sensory stimuli in vivo and electrical stimulation in brain slices, and compared effects of isoflurane on responses evoked via the two pathways. Auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferent stimulation in brain slices evoked short latency current sinks in middle layers, consistent with activation of core TC afferents. By contrast, visual stimuli in vivo and stimulation of CC and matrix TC afferents in brain slices evoked responses mainly in superficial and deep layers, consistent with projection patterns of top-down afferents that carry visual information to auditory cortex. Responses to auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferents in brain slices were significantly less affected by isoflurane compared to responses triggered by visual stimuli in vivo and CC/matrix TC afferents in slices. At a just-hypnotic dose in vivo, auditory responses were enhanced by isoflurane, whereas visual responses were dramatically reduced. At a comparable concentration in slices, isoflurane suppressed both core TC and CC/matrix TC responses, but the effect on the latter responses was far greater than on core TC responses, indicating that at least part of the differential effects observed in vivo were due to local actions of isoflurane in auditory cortex. These data support a model in which disruption of top-down connectivity contributes to anesthesia-induced LOC, and have implications for understanding the neural basis of

  2. Dexmedetomidine Acts via the JAK2/STAT3 Pathway to Attenuate Isoflurane-Induced Neurocognitive Deficits in Senile Mice

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yanna; Zhang, Yuan; Han, Liu; Chen, Lihai; Xu, Yajie; Sun, Fan; Ji, Muhuo; Yang, Jianjun; Bao, Hongguang

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits could be alleviated by dexmedetomidine in young animal subjects. In the current study, we examine whether dexmedetomidine could also alleviate isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits in senile animals. Methods Senile male C57BL/6 mice (20 months) received dexmedetomidine (50 μg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 minutes prior to isoflurane exposure (1.3% for 4 h). Cognitive function was assessed 19 days later using a 5-day testing regimen with Morris water maze. Some subjects also received pretreatment with α2 adrenoreceptor antagonist atipamezole (250 μg/kg, i.p.), JAK2 inhibitor AG490 (15 mg/kg i.p.) or STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 (40 mg/kg i.p.) 30 minutes prior to dexmedetomidine. Results Isoflurane exposure increased and reduced the time spent in the quadrant containing the target platform in training sessions. The number of crossings over the original target quadrant was also decreased. Dexmedotomidine attenuated such effects. Effects of dexmedotomidine were reduced by pretreatment with atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Increased phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 in the hippocampus induced by isoflurane was augmented by dexmedetomidine. Effects of dexmedetomidine on JAK2/STAT3 phosphorylation were attenuated by atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Isoflurane promoted neuronal apoptosis and increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and BAD, and reduced Bcl-2 expression. Attenuation of such effects by dexmedotomidine was partially blocked by atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine could protect against isoflurane-induced spatial learning and memory impairment in senile mice by stimulating the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. Such findings encourage the use of dexmedetomidine in geriatric patients receiving isoflurane anesthesia. PMID:27768775

  3. The common inhaled anesthetic isoflurane increases aggregation of huntingtin and alters calcium homeostasis in a cell model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiujun; Liang Ge; Yang Hui; Wang Shouping; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Wei Huafeng

    2011-02-01

    Isoflurane is known to increase {beta}-amyloid aggregation and neuronal damage. We hypothesized that isoflurane will have similar effects on the polyglutamine huntingtin protein and will cause alterations in intracellular calcium homeostasis. We tested this hypothesis in striatal cells from the expanded glutamine huntingtin knock-in mouse (STHdh{sup Q111/Q111}) and wild type (STHdh{sup Q7/Q7}) striatal neurons. The primary cultured neurons were exposed for 24 h to equipotent concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium and with or without xestospongin C, a potent endoplasmic reticulum inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist. Aggregation of huntingtin protein, cell viability, and calcium concentrations were measured. Isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane all increased the aggregation of huntingtin in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells, with isoflurane having the largest effect. Isoflurane induced greater calcium release from the ER and relatively more cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} huntingtin cells than in the wild type STHdh{sup Q7/Q7} striatal cells. However, sevoflurane and desflurane caused less calcium release from the ER and less cell damage. Xestospongin C inhibited the isoflurane-induced calcium release from the ER, aggregation of huntingtin, and cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells. In summary, the Q111 form of huntingtin increases the vulnerability of striatal neurons to isoflurane neurotoxicity through combined actions on the ER IP{sub 3} receptors. Calcium release from the ER contributes to the anesthetic induced huntingtin aggregation in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} striatal cells.

  4. Repeated Isoflurane Exposures Impair Long-Term Potentiation and Increase Basal GABAergic Activity in the Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Long II, Robert P.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Prager, Eric M.; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I.; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Braga, Maria F. M.

    2016-01-01

    After surgery requiring general anesthesia, patients often experience emotional disturbances, but it is unclear if this is due to anesthetic exposure. In the present study, we examined whether isoflurane anesthesia produces long-term pathophysiological alterations in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region that plays a central role in emotional behavior. Ten-week-old, male rats were administered either a single, 1 h long isoflurane (1.5%) anesthesia or three, 1 h long isoflurane exposures, separated by 48 h. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and spontaneous GABAergic activity in the BLA were studied 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month later. Single isoflurane anesthesia had no significant effect on the magnitude of LTP. In contrast, after repeated isoflurane exposures, LTP was dramatically impaired at both 1 day and 1 week after the last exposure but was restored by 1 month after the exposures. Spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs were increased at 1 day and 1 week after repeated exposures but had returned to control levels by 1 month after exposure. Thus, repeated exposures to isoflurane cause a long-lasting—but not permanent—impairment of synaptic plasticity in the BLA, which could be due to increased basal GABAergic activity. These pathophysiological alterations may produce emotional disturbances and impaired fear-related learning. PMID:27313904

  5. Repeated Isoflurane Exposures Impair Long-Term Potentiation and Increase Basal GABAergic Activity in the Basolateral Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Long Ii, Robert P; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Prager, Eric M; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Braga, Maria F M

    2016-01-01

    After surgery requiring general anesthesia, patients often experience emotional disturbances, but it is unclear if this is due to anesthetic exposure. In the present study, we examined whether isoflurane anesthesia produces long-term pathophysiological alterations in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region that plays a central role in emotional behavior. Ten-week-old, male rats were administered either a single, 1 h long isoflurane (1.5%) anesthesia or three, 1 h long isoflurane exposures, separated by 48 h. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and spontaneous GABAergic activity in the BLA were studied 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month later. Single isoflurane anesthesia had no significant effect on the magnitude of LTP. In contrast, after repeated isoflurane exposures, LTP was dramatically impaired at both 1 day and 1 week after the last exposure but was restored by 1 month after the exposures. Spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs were increased at 1 day and 1 week after repeated exposures but had returned to control levels by 1 month after exposure. Thus, repeated exposures to isoflurane cause a long-lasting-but not permanent-impairment of synaptic plasticity in the BLA, which could be due to increased basal GABAergic activity. These pathophysiological alterations may produce emotional disturbances and impaired fear-related learning.

  6. Isoflurane compared with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia in patients undergoing heart transplantation: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Che-Hao; Hsu, Yung-Chi; Huang, Go-Shine; Lu, Chih-Cherng; Ho, Shung-Tai; Liaw, Wen-Jinn; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Tso-Chou

    2016-08-01

    Inhalation anesthetics provide myocardial protection for cardiac surgery. This study was undertaken to compare the perioperative effects between isoflurane and fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia for heart transplantation. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by reviewing the medical records of heart transplantation in a single medical center from 1990 to 2013. Patients receiving isoflurane or fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia were included. Those with preoperative severe pulmonary, hepatic, or renal comorbidities were excluded. The perioperative variables and postoperative short-term outcomes were analyzed, including blood glucose levels, urine output, inotropic use, time to extubation, and length of stay in the intensive care units. After reviewing 112 heart transplantations, 18 recipients with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia, and 29 receiving isoflurane anesthesia with minimal low-flow technique were analyzed. After cessation of cardiopulmonary bypass, recipients with isoflurane anesthesia had a significantly lower mean level and a less increase of blood glucose, as compared with those receiving fentanyl-based anesthesia. In addition, there was less use of dobutamine upon arriving the intensive care unit and a shorter time to extubation after isoflurane anesthesia. Compared with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia, isoflurane minimal low-flow anesthesia maintained better perioperative homeostasis of blood glucose levels, less postoperative use of inotropics, and early extubation time among heart-transplant recipients without severe comorbidities. PMID:27583900

  7. The negative effects of chronic exposure to isoflurane on spermatogenesis via breaking the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongbo; Yu, Jianhong; Qu, Pingping; Ma, Piliang; Yu, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the negative effects of chronic exposure to isoflurane on spermatogenesis and explore the underlying mechanisms. Sixty male rats were randomly allocated to two groups: control group, receiving no treatment, and anesthesia group, administrated exposure to isoflurane (2 ppm) for 25 consecutive days (1 h/day). The negative effects of chronic exposure to isoflurane were evaluated by analyzing the median eminence GnRH content, the relevant hormone levels, some sperm parameters and the mRNA expressions for some reproduction-related genes. Isoflurane significantly decreased the GnRH content and the serum gonadotrophin levels compared with the control group (p<0.01). Meanwhile, the mRNA expressions of GnRH in hypothalamus, GnRH receptor, luteinizing hormone (LH)-β and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-β in pituitary, and LH receptor and FSH receptor in testes were also significantly inhibited (p<0.01). Furthermore, the mRNA expressions of androgen receptor (AR), kisspeptin encoded gene (Kiss-1) and its receptor (GPR54) in hypothalamus were significantly diminished by isoflurane (p<0.01). The results indicated that chronic exposure to isoflurane diminished the synthesis and secretion of GnRH by inhibiting the androgen-AR-Kisspeptin-GPR54 pathway and breaking the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal equilibrium, and therefore it could inhibit spermatogenesis.

  8. Dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Binjiang; Li, Xue

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of α2 adrenergic receptor agonists, dexmedetomidine generates sedation, anti-anxiety and anesthesia effects by hyperpolarizing noradrenergic nerve cells in locus coeruleus. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment, and the possible underlying mechanism in aging rat. Firstly, we used isoflurane-induced aging rat model to analyze the therapeutical effect of dexmedetomidine on cognitive impairment. Next, commercial ELISA kits were used to analyze tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and caspase-3 levels. In addition, Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression of P38 MAPK, PTEN and phosphorylation-Akt (p-Akt) expression. Our results showed that the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine significantly attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aging rat. Moreover, dexmedetomidine significantly inhibited these TNF-α, IL-1β, MDA, SOD and caspase-3 activities in isoflurane-induced aging rat. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective effects of dexmedetomidine on isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment significantly suppressed Bcl-xL/Bad rate, P38 MAPK and PTEN protein expression and activated p-Akt protein expression in aging rat. Collectively, neuroprotective effect of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat. PMID:26770320

  9. Repeated Isoflurane Exposures Impair Long-Term Potentiation and Increase Basal GABAergic Activity in the Basolateral Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Long Ii, Robert P; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Prager, Eric M; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Braga, Maria F M

    2016-01-01

    After surgery requiring general anesthesia, patients often experience emotional disturbances, but it is unclear if this is due to anesthetic exposure. In the present study, we examined whether isoflurane anesthesia produces long-term pathophysiological alterations in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region that plays a central role in emotional behavior. Ten-week-old, male rats were administered either a single, 1 h long isoflurane (1.5%) anesthesia or three, 1 h long isoflurane exposures, separated by 48 h. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and spontaneous GABAergic activity in the BLA were studied 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month later. Single isoflurane anesthesia had no significant effect on the magnitude of LTP. In contrast, after repeated isoflurane exposures, LTP was dramatically impaired at both 1 day and 1 week after the last exposure but was restored by 1 month after the exposures. Spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs were increased at 1 day and 1 week after repeated exposures but had returned to control levels by 1 month after exposure. Thus, repeated exposures to isoflurane cause a long-lasting-but not permanent-impairment of synaptic plasticity in the BLA, which could be due to increased basal GABAergic activity. These pathophysiological alterations may produce emotional disturbances and impaired fear-related learning. PMID:27313904

  10. Effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on somatosensory evoked potentials in humans anesthetized with isoflurane and nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Andoh, T; Ohtsuka, T; Okazaki, K; Okutsu, Y; Okumura, F

    1993-08-01

    In order to examine the usefulness of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as an adjuvant to anesthesia for surgery requiring intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring, we have studied the effects of ATP on SSEPs in patients anesthetized with isoflurane and nitrous oxide (N2O). A control recording of SSEP was performed while anesthesia was maintained with 0.5% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in 60% N2O. The recordings were repeated after an ATP infusion had been added to this basal anesthesia at the rates of 100 micrograms.kg bw-1.min-1 and 200 micrograms.kg bw-1.min-1. SSEP was also studied when end-tidal isoflurane concentration was increased to 1.5% after cessation of ATP infusion. An infusion of ATP combined with 0.5% isoflurane and 60% N2O effectively inhibited an increase in blood pressure during surgery. The amplitude of the cortical component of SSEP was lowered by 1.5% isoflurane, which also increased both cortical and spinal latencies as well as central conduction time (CCT). In contrast ATP infusions at both rates induced no significant changes in latencies, amplitude and CCT. The results indicate that ATP infusion combined with 0.5% isoflurane in 60% N2O can be a useful anesthetic technique for intraoperative SSEP monitoring because adequate anesthetic depth can be maintained by a low concentration of anesthetics without further suppression of SSEPs. PMID:8213025

  11. Effects of Anesthesia with Isoflurane, Ketamine, or Propofol on Physiologic Parameters in Neonatal Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lauren D; Dissen, Gregory A; McPike, Matthew J; Brambrink, Ansgar M

    2014-01-01

    Isoflurane, ketamine, and propofol are common anesthetics in human and nonhuman primate medicine. However, scant normative data exist regarding the response of neonatal macaques to these anesthetics. We compared the effects of isoflurane, ketamine, and propofol anesthesia on physiologic parameters in neonatal rhesus macaques. Neonatal rhesus macaques (age, 5 to 7 d) were exposed to isoflurane (n = 5), ketamine (n = 4), propofol (n = 4) or no anesthesia (n = 5) for 5 h. The anesthetics were titrated to achieve a moderate anesthetic plane, and heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide, oxygen saturation, and temperature were measured every 15 min. Venous blood samples were collected to determine blood gases and metabolic status at baseline, 0.5, 2.5, and 4.5 h after induction and at 3 h after the end of anesthesia. Compared with ketamine, isoflurane caused more hypotensive events and necessitated the administration of increased volumes of intravenous fluids to support blood pressure throughout anesthesia; no significant differences were observed between the isoflurane and propofol groups for these parameters. In addition, isoflurane resulted in a significantly shorter average time to extubation, compared with both ketamine and propofol. Due to supportive care, other physiologic variables remained stable between anesthetic regimens and throughout the 5-h exposure. These data improve our understanding of the effects of these 3 anesthetics in neonatal rhesus macaques and will aid veterinarians and researchers as they consider the risks and benefits of and resources required during general anesthesia in these animals. PMID:24827572

  12. Astrocytes Protect Against Isoflurane Neurotoxicity by Buffering pro Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Stary, Creed M.; Sun, Xiaoyun; Giffard, Rona G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Isoflurane induces cell death in neurons undergoing synaptogenesis via increased production of pro-brain derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF) and activation of post-synaptic p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Astrocytes express p75NTR but their role in neuronal p75NTR mediated cell death remains unclear. We investigated whether astrocytes have the capacity to buffer increases in proBDNF and protect against isoflurane/p75NTR neurotoxicity. Methods Cell death was assessed in day-in-vitro (DIV) 7 mouse primary neuronal cultures alone or in co-culture with age-matched or DIV 21 astrocytes with propidium iodide 24 hours following 1 hour exposure to 2% isoflurane or recombinant proBDNF. Astrocyte-targeted knockdown of p75NTR in co-culture was achieved with small interfering RNA and astrocyte-specific transfection reagent and verified with immunofluorescence microscopy. proBDNF levels were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each experiment used 6–8 replicate cultures/condition, and was repeated at least three times. Results Exposure to isoflurane significantly (p<0.05) increased neuronal cell death in primary neuronal cultures (1.5±0.7 fold, mean±SD) but not in co-culture with DIV 7 (1.0±0.5 fold) or DIV 21 astrocytes (1.2±1.2 fold). Exogenous proBDNF dose dependently induced neuronal cell death in both primary neuronal and co-cultures, an effect enhanced by astrocyte p75NTR inhibition. Astrocyte-targeted p75NTR knockdown in co-cultures increased media proBDNF (1.2±0.1 fold) and augmented isoflurane induced neuronal cell death (3.8±3.1 fold). Conclusions The presence of astrocytes provides protection to growing neurons by buffering elevated levels of proBDNF induced by isoflurane. These findings may hold clinical significance for the neonatal and injured brain where elevated levels of proBDNF impair neurogenesis. PMID:26270940

  13. Comparison of propofol infusion and isoflurane for maintenance of anesthesia for dentistry in mentally retarded patients.

    PubMed Central

    Antila, H.; Valli, J.; Valtonen, M.; Kanto, J.

    1992-01-01

    A continuous infusion of propofol following an induction dose of 2 mg/kg was compared with thiopental/isoflurane for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia in 20 mentally retarded outpatients undergoing routine dental procedures. The infusion rate of propofol and the concentration of isoflurane were adjusted to maintain the heart rate and blood pressure within +/- 25% of the baseline values. Postoperative wakefulness was assessed using a 100-mm visual analogue scale at the time of extubation and at 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after extubation. Both agents provided adequate anesthesia for the treatment, and no major adverse reactions occurred. Recovery was more complete during the first hour after extubation in the propofol group, and these patients were discharged earlier. PMID:1308378

  14. Isoflurane enhances both fast and slow synaptic inhibition in the hippocampus at amnestic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors has long been considered an important target for a variety of general anesthetics. In the hippocampus, two types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition coexist: GABAA,fast, which is expressed primarily at peri-somatic sites, and GABAA,slow, which is expressed primarily in the dendrites. Their spatial segregation suggests distinct functions: GABAA,slow may control plasticity of dendritic synapses, while GABAA,fast controls action potential initiation at the soma. We examined modulation of GABAA,fast and GABAA,slow inhibition by isoflurane at amnesic concentrations, and compared it to modulation by behaviorally equivalent doses of the GABAA receptor-selective drug etomidate. Methods Whole-cell recordings were conducted at near-physiological temperature from pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal cultures obtained from C57BL/6 x 129/SvJ F1 hybrid mice. GABAA receptor-mediated currents were isolated using glutamate receptor antagonists. GABAA,slow currents were evoked by electrical stimulation in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Miniature GABAA,fast currents were recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Results 100 µM isoflurane (approximately EC50,amnesia) slowed fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic current decay by approximately 25%. Higher concentrations, up to 400 µM, produced proportionally greater effects without altering current amplitudes. The effects on GABAA,slow were approximately one-half those produced by equi-amnesic concentrations of etomidate. Conclusions Isoflurane enhances both types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition to similar degrees at amnesic concentrations. This pattern differs from etomidate, which at low concentrations selectively enhances slow inhibition. These effects of isoflurane are sufficiently large that they may contribute substantially to its suppression of hippocampal learning and memory. PMID:22343472

  15. [Degradation of halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane by dry soda lime to give carbon monoxide].

    PubMed

    Strauss, J M; Baum, J; Sümpelmann, R; Krohn, S; Callies, A

    1996-09-01

    In the presence of completely dry soda lime volatile anaesthetics will decompose to carbon monoxide (CO). In an in vitro study, the absorbent (soda lime, ICI) was dried with a constant gas flow of 11/min oxygen for 120 h. The weight loss during the drying was 17.1%. Two vol% of halothane, enflurane or isoflurane in oxygen was administered with a constant flow of 0.51/min oxygen through the completely dry absorbent. Concentrations of gases were measured before and after the absorbent using mass spectrometry (MGA 1100, Perkin-Elmer) and an electrochemical NO monitor (Mini PAC CO, Dräger). The temperature inside the soda lime was monitored continuously. Shortly after adding the anaesthetic to the oxygen passing through the absorbent, carbon monoxide appeared in the outlet of the soda lime container. The measured peak concentrations varied around 450 ppm (halothane), 3500 ppm (enflurane) and 3800 ppm (isoflurane). The temperature inside the absorbent rose from the ambient temperature (19.8 degrees C) to a maximum of 52.1 degrees C during CO production and decreased when the CO production lowered after approximately 1 h (all anaesthetics). During CO production no measurable concentration of halothane left the absorber. After passing through the absorbent the concentrations of isoflurane and enflurane were slightly lower than the corresponding concentrations in the fresh gas measured before absorption.

  16. Cavitary alveolar sarcoidosis complicated by an aspergilloma

    PubMed Central

    Gera, Kamal; Panjabi, Chandramani; Dash, Devijyoti; Shah, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation in pulmonary sarcoidosis is rather unusual and even rarer in the alveolar form of the disease. A review of the literature revealed only 13 documented patients with cavitating alveolar sarcoidosis. Of the 13 patients, clinical information was available in only eight cases. Aspergilloma complicating cavitary alveolar sarcoidosis has been documented only once before. A 38-year-old woman with progressive dyspnoea for 3 years presented owing to a bout of haemoptysis. Imaging prior to presentation demonstrated mediastinal lymphadenopathy and coalescent parenchymal alveolar opacities along with air bronchograms, suggestive of alveolar sarcoidosis. On presentation, cavitations were visible in both lungs within the consolidation along with an intracavitary mass in the left upper lobe, which on evaluation was recognised as an aspergilloma. Bronchoscopy disclosed non-caseating granulomas on histopathology confirming pulmonary sarcoidosis. Cavitary alveolar sarcoidosis with aspergilloma formation can result in a diagnostic dilemma, especially in endemic tuberculous areas. PMID:25326564

  17. [Alveolar sarcoma. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Devisme, L; Mensier, E; Bisiau, S; Bloget, F; Gosselin, B

    1996-01-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma occurs mostly in the deep soft tissues. An unusual case of primary pulmonary alveolar soft part sarcoma is reported. A 39-year-old woman presented with thoracic pain revealing the tumor. The left lower lobe was surgically resected. The microscopic features of this tumor, including characteristic alveolar pattern and the PAS-positive crystals were typical of alveolar soft part sarcoma. Immunohistochemically, granular cytoplasmic reactivities were observed with antibodies against vimentin, myoglobin, methionine-enkephalin, S100 protein and neuron-specific-enolase. Electron microscopic study demonstrated numerous crystallized structures in the tumor cell cytoplasm. This is the third case of pulmonary alveolar soft part sarcoma, one arising from the pulmonary vein. The histogenesis of alveolar soft part sarcoma is still debated. Our case does not allow distinction between myogenic or neural origin of this tumor.

  18. Isoflurane Preconditioning Induces Neuroprotection by Up-Regulation of TREK1 in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Kong, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the neuroprotection and mechanism of isoflurane on rats with spinal cord ischemic injury. Total 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the four groups (n=10). Group A was sham-operation group; group B was ischemia group; group C was isoflurane preconditioning group; group D was isoflurane preconditioning followed by ischemia treatment group. Then the expressions of TWIK-related K+ channel 1 (TREK1) in the four groups were detected by immunofluorescent assay, real time-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and western blot. The primary neurons of rats were isolated and cultured under normal and hypoxic conditions. Besides, the neurons under two conditions were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-TREK1 and lentivirual to overexpress and silence TREK1. Additionally, the neurons were treated with isoflurane or not. Then caspase-3 activity and cell cycle of neurons under normal and hypoxic conditions were detected. Furthermore, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH) was detected using NAD+/NADH quantification colorimetric kit. Results showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of TREK1 increased significantly in group C and D. In neurons, when TREK1 silenced, isoflurane treatment improved the caspase-3 activity. In hypoxic condition, the caspase-3 activity and sub-G1 cell percentage significantly increased, however, when TREK1 overexpressed the caspase-3 activity and sub-G1 cell percentage decreased significantly. Furthermore, both isoflurane treatment and overexpression of TREK1 significantly decreased NADH. In conclusion, isoflurane-induced neuroprotection in spinal cord ischemic injury may be associated with the up-regulation of TREK1. PMID:27469140

  19. Comparison of isoflurane and α-chloralose in an anesthetized swine model of acute pulmonary embolism producing right ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beam, Daren M; Neto-Neves, Evandro M; Stubblefield, William B; Alves, Nathan J; Tune, Johnathan D; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death, and a model is needed for testing potential treatments. In developing a model, we compared the hemodynamic effects of isoflurane and α-chloralose in an acute swine model of PE because the choice of anesthesia will likely affect the cardiovascular responses of an animal to PE. At baseline, swine that received α-chloralose (n = 6) had a lower heart rate and cardiac output and higher SpO2, end-tidal CO2, and mean arterial pressure than did those given isoflurane (n = 9). After PE induction, swine given α-chloralose compared with isoflurane exhibited a lower heart rate (63 ± 10 compared with 116 ± 15 bpm) and peripheral arterial pressure (52 ± 12 compared with 61 ± 12 mm Hg); higher SpO2 (98% ± 3% compared with 95% ± 1%), end-tidal CO2 (35 ± 4 compared with 32 ± 5), and systolic blood pressure (121 ± 8 compared with 104 ± 20 mm Hg); and equivalent right ventricular:left ventricular ratios (1.32 ± 0.50 compared with 1.23 ± 0.19) and troponin I mean values (0.09 ± 0.07 ng/mL compared with 0.09 ± 0.06 ng/mL). Isoflurane was associated with widely variable fibrinogen and activated partial thromboplastin time. Intraexperiment mortality was 0 of 6 animals for α-chloralose and 2 of 9 swine for isoflurane. All swine anesthetized with α-chloralose survived with sustained pulmonary hypertension, RV-dilation-associated cardiac injury without the confounding vasodilatory or coagulatory effects of isoflurane. These data demonstrate the physiologic advantages of α-chloralose over isoflurane for anesthesia in a swine model of severe submassive PE. PMID:25730758

  20. Isoflurane Preconditioning Induces Neuroprotection by Up-Regulation of TREK1 in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Kong, Xiangang

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the neuroprotection and mechanism of isoflurane on rats with spinal cord ischemic injury. Total 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the four groups (n=10). Group A was sham-operation group; group B was ischemia group; group C was isoflurane preconditioning group; group D was isoflurane preconditioning followed by ischemia treatment group. Then the expressions of TWIK-related K⁺ channel 1 (TREK1) in the four groups were detected by immunofluorescent assay, real time-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and western blot. The primary neurons of rats were isolated and cultured under normal and hypoxic conditions. Besides, the neurons under two conditions were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-TREK1 and lentivirual to overexpress and silence TREK1. Additionally, the neurons were treated with isoflurane or not. Then caspase-3 activity and cell cycle of neurons under normal and hypoxic conditions were detected. Furthermore, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH) was detected using NAD+/NADH quantification colorimetric kit. Results showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of TREK1 increased significantly in group C and D. In neurons, when TREK1 silenced, isoflurane treatment improved the caspase-3 activity. In hypoxic condition, the caspase-3 activity and sub-G1 cell percentage significantly increased, however, when TREK1 overexpressed the caspase-3 activity and sub-G1 cell percentage decreased significantly. Furthermore, both isoflurane treatment and overexpression of TREK1 significantly decreased NADH. In conclusion, isoflurane-induced neuroprotection in spinal cord ischemic injury may be associated with the up-regulation of TREK1. PMID:27469140

  1. Swimming exercise ameliorates neurocognitive impairment induced by neonatal exposure to isoflurane and enhances hippocampal histone acetylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, T; Ren, F; Huang, C S; Zou, W Y; Yang, Y; Pan, Y D; Sun, B; Wang, E; Guo, Q L

    2016-03-01

    Isoflurane-induced neurocognitive impairment in the developing rodent brain is well documented, and regular physical exercise has been demonstrated to be a viable intervention for some types of neurocognitive impairment. This study was designed to investigate the potential protective effect of swimming exercise on both neurocognitive impairment caused by repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane and the underlying molecular mechanism. Mice received 0.75% isoflurane exposures for 4h on postnatal days 7, 8, and 9. From the third month after anesthesia, the mice were subjected to regular swimming exercise for 4weeks, followed by a contextual fear condition (CFC) trial. We found that repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane reduced freezing behavior during CFC testing and deregulated hippocampal histone H4K12 acetylation. Conversely, mice subjected to regular swimming exercise showed enhanced hippocampal H3K9, H4K5, and H4K12 acetylation levels, increased numbers of c-Fos-positive cells 1h after CFC training, and less isoflurane-induced memory impairment. We also observed increases in histone acetylation and of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during the swimming exercise program. The results suggest that neonatal isoflurane exposure-induced memory impairment was associated with dysregulation of H4K12 acetylation, which may lead to less hippocampal activation following learning tasks. Swimming exercise was associated with enhanced hippocampal histone acetylation and CBP expression. Exercise most likely ameliorated isoflurane-induced memory impairment by enhancing hippocampal histone acetylation and activating more neuron cells during memory formation.

  2. Swimming exercise ameliorates neurocognitive impairment induced by neonatal exposure to isoflurane and enhances hippocampal histone acetylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, T; Ren, F; Huang, C S; Zou, W Y; Yang, Y; Pan, Y D; Sun, B; Wang, E; Guo, Q L

    2016-03-01

    Isoflurane-induced neurocognitive impairment in the developing rodent brain is well documented, and regular physical exercise has been demonstrated to be a viable intervention for some types of neurocognitive impairment. This study was designed to investigate the potential protective effect of swimming exercise on both neurocognitive impairment caused by repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane and the underlying molecular mechanism. Mice received 0.75% isoflurane exposures for 4h on postnatal days 7, 8, and 9. From the third month after anesthesia, the mice were subjected to regular swimming exercise for 4weeks, followed by a contextual fear condition (CFC) trial. We found that repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane reduced freezing behavior during CFC testing and deregulated hippocampal histone H4K12 acetylation. Conversely, mice subjected to regular swimming exercise showed enhanced hippocampal H3K9, H4K5, and H4K12 acetylation levels, increased numbers of c-Fos-positive cells 1h after CFC training, and less isoflurane-induced memory impairment. We also observed increases in histone acetylation and of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during the swimming exercise program. The results suggest that neonatal isoflurane exposure-induced memory impairment was associated with dysregulation of H4K12 acetylation, which may lead to less hippocampal activation following learning tasks. Swimming exercise was associated with enhanced hippocampal histone acetylation and CBP expression. Exercise most likely ameliorated isoflurane-induced memory impairment by enhancing hippocampal histone acetylation and activating more neuron cells during memory formation. PMID:26748054

  3. [Intra-alveolar hemorrhages in systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Bonnotte, B; Chantereau, M J; Lorcerie, B; Chauffert, B; Noblet, J F; Chalopin, J M; Martin, F

    1992-05-16

    Alveolar haemorrhage is usually, but often belatedly, diagnosed in patients presenting with haemoptysis and radiological alveolar syndrome. Its occurrence frequently marks a turn for the worst in the course of a systemic disease, since its prognosis is sombre. Recognizing its early signs might enable treatment to be instituted and prognosis to be improved. In the presence of typical alveolar haemorrhage, if high-dose corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppressants do not improve the symptoms within 48 hours plasmapheresis must be started. Alveolar haemorrhage must be considered a vital emergency justifying this therapeutic approach without waiting for the hypothetical diagnosis of the underlying systemic disease.

  4. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Fernández F, Cristina; Salinas F, Mauricio; de Grazia K, José Andrés; Díaz P, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is an extremely rare disease characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of calcified spherical particles (called microliths), due to a mutation of the gene encoding a membrane transport protein of the alveolar surface. Most patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis. The course of the disease is slowly progressive, with development of pulmonary fibrosis and respiratory failure. The "sandstorm" pattern is the characteristic finding of this disease. We report a 39-year-old female presenting with progressive dyspnea. A chest X ray showed ground-glass opacities and a high resolution CT scan showed numerous calcified lung micronodules. A surgical lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. PMID:25427025

  5. Clinicophysiological and haemodynamic effects of fentanyl with xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine in isoflurane-anaesthetised water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Singh, Gyan D; Kinjavdekar, Prakash; Amarpal; Aithal, Hari P; Pawde, Abhijeet M; Zama, Malik M S; Singh, Jasmeet; Tiwary, Ramesh

    2013-03-18

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the sedative, analgesic and clinical effects of xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine with fentanyl as pre-anaesthetics in water buffaloes and to compare the dose-sparing effect of xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine on thiopental for induction and isoflurane for maintenance of anaesthesia in water buffaloes. Six male water buffaloes randomly received intravenous fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and xylazine (0.05 mg/kg body weight), fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and medetomidine (2.5 µg/kg body weight), fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and dexmedetomidine (5.0 µg/kg body weight) at weekly intervals in groups I1, I2 and I3, respectively. After 15 min, the animals were restrained in right lateral recumbency and anaesthesia was induced by 5% thiopental sodium administered intravenously. The intubated animal was connected to the large animal anaesthesia machine and isoflurane in 100% oxygen (5 L/min) was insufflated for 60 min. The treatments were compared by clinicophysiological, haematobiochemical and haemodynamic parameters. Fentanyl-medetomidine and fentanyl-dexmedetomidine produced more cardiovascular depression during the pre-anaesthetic period but less depression of cardio-respiratory dynamics in the post induction and maintenance period. Quicker recovery was recorded in I2 and I3 groups. A lower dose of thiopental was required in group I3 (4.33 mg/kg ± 0.66 mg/kg) than in groups I2 (4.41 mg/kg ± 0.98 mg/kg) and I1 (4.83 mg/kg ± 0.79 mg/kg). The dose of isoflurane was less in group I3 (45.50 mL ± 5.45 mL) than in group I1 and I2 (48.66 mL ± 5.10 mL and 48.00 mL ± 6.38 mL). Better anaesthesia was recorded with fentanyl-dexmedetomidine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I3) than with fentanyl-medetomidine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I2) and fentanyl-xylazine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I1). Fentanyl-medetomidine and fentanyl-dexmedetomidine were better pre-anaesthetic agents in comparison to

  6. Propylthiouracil-induced alveolar hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Bünyamin; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Kacemer, Hasret; Demirkan, Halil; Altuntaş, Atilla; Dirican, Nigar; Köroğlu, Banu Kale; Şahin, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Thionamide induced vasculitis is a multisystem disease. The patients may present with different clinical signs and findings due to organ involvement. These patients are almost always perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (pANCA) or antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) positive. Clinical findings are not seen in all of the patients who are ANCA positive while using thionamide. Although symptoms usually resolve with drug discontinuation, some patients, however, require high-dose steroids, immunosuppressants, or plasmapheresis. We present here a case of alveolar hemorrhage induced by propilthiouracil (PTU) during treatment with PTU for Graves’ disease; patients completely recovered with corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis.

  7. Alveolar hypoventilation treated with medroxyprogesterone.

    PubMed Central

    Milerad, J; Lagercrantz, H; Löfgren, O

    1985-01-01

    Two children aged 1 and 20 months developed alveolar hypoventilation syndrome. They suffered severe apnoeic episodes and periodically required assisted ventilation. Their ventilatory response to carbon dioxide was lower than that of normal children and the transcutaneous oxygen tension during sleep was well below the normal range. Treatment with medroxyprogesterone acetate resulted in an improved response to carbon dioxide, and assisted ventilation was no longer needed. Oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions improved but were still slightly abnormal during sleep. There were no clinical side effects of treatment but one infant had slight pituitary suppression. PMID:3156565

  8. Effects of tail fat on recovery times of anesthesia with isoflurane in fat-tailed Iranian Lori-Bakhtiyari lambs.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Siavash; Raisi Sarteshnizi, Abbas; Sharifi, Farangis; Yousefian, Elham

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of tail fat on recovery times in intact sheep and sheep with a ligated median sacral artery following similar anesthetic exposure with isoflurane was investigated. This study was performed using seven healthy fat-tailed Iranian Lori-Bakhtiyari ewe lambs. The lambs were anesthetized twice at two week intervals (the experiment was performed in two stages). After mask induction with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, sheep were intubated and anesthesia was maintained for 4 hr using a rebreathing system. Induction and extubation times and time to sternal recumbency and attempts to stand were recorded during anesthetic induction and recovery (Stage 1). Two weeks later, prior to the second anesthesia, the median sacral artery (MSA) was ligated under epidural anesthesia in sheep. All sheep were anesthetized as mentioned above (Stage 2). No significant differences were observed for the induction time between two stages (p > 0.05) but extubation, sternal recumbency and attempts to stand times were significantly longer in intact sheep (Stage 1) after 4 hr anesthesia with isoflurane (p < 0.05). Recovery time was decreased following MSA ligation in fat-tailed sheep, which suggested that body fat had a major role in the recovery time of isoflurane in sheep. We developed an animal model to investigate fat drug solubility of isoflurane gas. Therefore, using less-soluble in fat anesthetics is better than high-soluble anesthetics for prolonged anesthesia to decrease postoperative complication in obese patient. PMID:26893809

  9. Isoflurane post-conditioning protects primary cultures of cortical neurons against oxygen and glucose deprivation injury via upregulation of Slit2/Robo1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Li-Min; Li, Qiang; Tong, Dong-Yi; Fan, Long-Chang; An, Ping; Wu, Xiu-Ying; Chen, Wei-Min; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Different mechanisms have been suggested to contribute to isoflurane-mediated neuroprotection. Previous studies have suggested that the protein Slit can abrogate neuronal death in mixed neuronal-glial cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and reperfusion (OGD/R). We hypothesized that isoflurane increases the expression of Slit and its receptor Robo when cortical neurons are exposed to OGD/R. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cortical neurons to OGD for 90 min and reperfusion for 24h and investigated how isoflurane post-conditioning affected cell survival and expression of Slit2 and receptors Robo1 and Robo4. Cell survival increased after administration of isoflurane, as assessed by the lactate dehydrogenase assay, trypan blue analysis, and propidium iodide staining. Western blot analysis showed that cleaved caspase-3 was increased after OGD/R(P<0.01) but reduced by isoflurane post-conditioning. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1, but not Robo4, were increased after OGD/R (P<0.5) and increased even further by isoflurane post-conditioning (P<0.01). Our results suggest that isoflurane post-conditioning markedly attenuates apoptosis and necrosis of cortical neurons exposed to OGD/R possibly in part via elevation of Slit2 and Robo1 expression. These findings provide a novel explanation for the pleiotropic effects of isoflurane that could benefit the central nervous system.

  10. Isoflurane unveils a critical role of glutamate transporter type 3 in regulating hippocampal GluR1 trafficking and context-related learning and memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, J; Wang, Z; Mi, W; Zuo, Z

    2014-07-11

    Glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3) may play a role in cognition. Isoflurane enhances EAAT3 trafficking to the plasma membrane. Thus, we used isoflurane to determine how EAAT3 might regulate learning and memory and the trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors, such as GluR1, to the plasma membrane, a fundamental biochemical process for learning and memory. Here, isoflurane increased EAAT3 but did not change GluR1 levels in the plasma membrane of wild-type mouse hippocampus. Isoflurane increased protein phosphatase activity in the wild-type and EAAT3(-/-) mouse hippocampus. Also, isoflurane reduced GluR1 in the plasma membrane and decreased phospho-GluR1 in EAAT3(-/-) mice. The phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid attenuated these effects. Finally, isoflurane inhibited context-related fear conditioning in EAAT3(-/-) mice but not in wild-type mice. Thus, isoflurane may increase GluR1 trafficking to the plasma membrane via EAAT3 and inhibit GluR1 trafficking via protein phosphatase. Lack of EAAT3 effects leads to decreased GluR1 trafficking and impaired cognition after isoflurane exposure in EAAT3(-/-) mice.

  11. Crystal structure of isoflurane bound to integrin LFA-1 supports a unified mechanism of volatile anesthetic action in the immune and central nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongmin; Astrof, Nathan S.; Liu, Jin-Huan; Wang, Jia-huai; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2009-09-15

    Volatile anesthetics (VAs), such as isoflurane, induce a general anesthetic state by binding to specific targets (i.e., ion channels) in the central nervous system (CNS). Simultaneously, VAs modulate immune functions, possibly via direct interaction with alternative targets on leukocytes. One such target, the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), has been shown previously to be inhibited by isoflurane. A better understanding of the mechanism by which isoflurane alters protein function requires the detailed information about the drug-protein interaction at an atomic level. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the LFA-1 ligand-binding domain (I domain) in complex with isoflurane at 1.6 {angstrom}. We discovered that isoflurane binds to an allosteric cavity previously implicated as critical for the transition of LFA-1 from the low- to the high-affinity state. The isoflurane binding site in the I domain involves an array of amphiphilic interactions, thereby resembling a 'common anesthetic binding motif' previously predicted for authentic VA binding sites. These results suggest that the allosteric modulation of protein function by isoflurane, as demonstrated for the integrin LFA-1, might represent a unified mechanism shared by the interactions of volatile anesthetics with targets in the CNS. Crystal structure of isoflurane bound to integrin LFA-1 supports a unified mechanism of volatile anesthetic action in the immune and central nervous systems.

  12. Self-tuning adaptive control of induced hypotension in humans: a comparison of isoflurane and sodium nitroprusside.

    PubMed

    Prys-Roberts, C; Millard, R K

    1990-07-01

    Induced hypotension is commonly used during surgery to decrease arterial pressure. Sodium nitroprusside and isoflurane are well-known hypotensive agents. The use of self-tuning adaptive control of induced hypotension was assessed with the use of sodium nitroprusside and isoflurane as hypotensive agents. Nineteen surgical patients were studied during closed-loop control of hypotension induced with sodium nitroprusside. This group of patients was compared with 10 similar patients in whom infusions of sodium nitroprusside were controlled manually by an anesthesiologist. Although the results of the two studies varied, no conclusion could be drawn regarding the superiority of either manual or closed-loop control. When manual versus automatic control of isoflurane-induced hypotension was assessed in a similar fashion, the two methods of induction were found to be comparable. PMID:2380754

  13. Effects of pentobarbital, isoflurane, or medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol anesthesia on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood chemistry in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Toshio; Oshima, Yutaka; Hashizume, Naoki; Nakai, Makoto; Ajimi, Shozo; Imatanaka, Nobuya

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) is commonly examined for pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. Two common means of anesthesia before euthanasia and bronchoalveolar lavage in rats are intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital and inhalation of isoflurane. Medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol is an alternative anesthesia to pentobarbital for animal welfare; however, the effect of this combination on BALF and blood chemistry is unknown. Here, we compared the effects of anesthesia by intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital or one of two combinations of medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol (dose, 0.375-2.0-2.5 or 0.15-2.0-2.5 mg/kg) or by inhalation of isoflurane on BALF and blood chemistry in rats with or without pulmonary inflammation. In BALF, we determined total protein, albumin, lactate dehydrogenase, total cell count and neutrophil count. In serum, we conducted a general chemistry screen. After anesthesia with pentobarbital or isoflurane, there were no significant differences between any of the BALF or blood chemistry parameters with or without inflammation. After anesthesia with either of the combinations of medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol, lactate dehydrogenase, total cell count, neutrophil count, and almost all of the blood chemistry parameters were comparable with those observed after pentobarbital or isoflurane; however, BALF albumin and serum glucose were significantly increased in rats without inflammation. After the combination of low-dose medetomidine in rats with inflammation, BALF parameters were comparable with those observed after pentobarbital or isoflurane. Our results show that, of the anesthetics examined, inhalation of isoflurane is the most appropriate means of anesthesia when examining BALF or serum for toxicity studies in rats. PMID:27665769

  14. Control of intraoperative hypertension with isoflurane in patients with coronary artery disease: effects on regional myocardial blood flow and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sahlman, L; Milocco, I; Appelgren, L; William-Olsson, G; Ricksten, S E

    1989-02-01

    The effect of isoflurane on regional myocardial metabolism and blood flow, when used as an adjunct to fentanyl-nitrous oxide anesthesia, to control intraoperative hypertension was investigated. Twenty-two patients with two- or three-vessel coronary artery disease with an ejection fraction greater than 0.5 and on beta-blockers up to the morning of surgery were studied during elective coronary artery by-pass grafting. Systemic and pulmonary hemodynamics, and regional (great cardiac vein, GCVF) myocardial blood flow and myocardial metabolic parameters were measured. In 10 patients, both GCVF and global (coronary sinus, CSF) myocardial blood flows were recorded. Measurements were made 1) after induction of anesthesia but prior to skin incision, 2) during sternotomy, and 3) during isoflurane administration after its use to reduce arterial pressure to the presternotomy level. The increase in systemic arterial pressure during sternotomy was due to an increase in systemic vascular resistance accompanied by increases in heart rate, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, (PCWP) regional myocardial oxygen consumption and extraction, GCVF and total coronary vascular resistance. Isoflurane reduced systemic arterial pressure but not PCWP, to presternotomy levels within 6.9 +/- 0.7 minutes at an end-tidal concentration of 1.5 +/- 0.2%. Isoflurane induced a pronounced systemic and coronary vasodilatation and increases in cardiac index, heart rate and regional myocardial oxygen extraction while the GCVF/CSF ratio remained unchanged. While mean regional--MLE% values were not effected by sternotomy, in two patients myocardial lactate production was seen during sternotomy but not during isoflurane. In another two patients, isoflurane induced lactate production.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2783640

  15. Dose-dependent effects of the clinical anesthetic isoflurane on Octopus vulgaris: a contribution to cephalopod welfare.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Winlow, William; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in animal welfare legislation relating to invertebrates has provoked interest in methods for the anesthesia of cephalopods, for which different approaches to anesthesia have been tried but in most cases without truly anesthetizing the animals. For example, several workers have used muscle relaxants or hypothermia as forms of "anesthesia." Several inhalational anesthetics are known to act in a dose-dependent manner on the great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, a pulmonate mollusk. Here we report, for the first time, on the effects of clinical doses of the well-known inhalational clinical anesthetic isoflurane on the behavioral responses of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris. In each experiment, isoflurane was equilibrated into a well-aerated seawater bath containing a single adult O. vulgaris. Using a web camera, we recorded each animal's response to touch stimuli eliciting withdrawal of the arms and siphon and observed changes in the respiratory rate and the chromatophore pattern over time (before, during, and after application of the anesthetic). We found that different animals of the same size responded with similar behavioral changes as the isoflurane concentration was gradually increased. After gradual application of 2% isoflurane for a maximum of 5 min (at which time all the responses indicated deep anesthesia), the animals recovered within 45-60 min in fresh aerated seawater. Based on previous findings in gastropods, we believe that the process of anesthesia induced by isoflurane is similar to that previously observed in Lymnaea. In this study we showed that isoflurane is a good, reversible anesthetic for O. vulgaris, and we developed a method for its use. PMID:25369208

  16. Dose-dependent effects of the clinical anesthetic isoflurane on Octopus vulgaris: a contribution to cephalopod welfare.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Winlow, William; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in animal welfare legislation relating to invertebrates has provoked interest in methods for the anesthesia of cephalopods, for which different approaches to anesthesia have been tried but in most cases without truly anesthetizing the animals. For example, several workers have used muscle relaxants or hypothermia as forms of "anesthesia." Several inhalational anesthetics are known to act in a dose-dependent manner on the great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, a pulmonate mollusk. Here we report, for the first time, on the effects of clinical doses of the well-known inhalational clinical anesthetic isoflurane on the behavioral responses of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris. In each experiment, isoflurane was equilibrated into a well-aerated seawater bath containing a single adult O. vulgaris. Using a web camera, we recorded each animal's response to touch stimuli eliciting withdrawal of the arms and siphon and observed changes in the respiratory rate and the chromatophore pattern over time (before, during, and after application of the anesthetic). We found that different animals of the same size responded with similar behavioral changes as the isoflurane concentration was gradually increased. After gradual application of 2% isoflurane for a maximum of 5 min (at which time all the responses indicated deep anesthesia), the animals recovered within 45-60 min in fresh aerated seawater. Based on previous findings in gastropods, we believe that the process of anesthesia induced by isoflurane is similar to that previously observed in Lymnaea. In this study we showed that isoflurane is a good, reversible anesthetic for O. vulgaris, and we developed a method for its use.

  17. Prostate cancer cell malignancy via modulation of HIF-1α pathway with isoflurane and propofol alone and in combination

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H; Benzonana, L L; Zhao, H; Watts, H R; Perry, N J S; Bevan, C; Brown, R; Ma, D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Surgery is considered to be the first line treatment for solid tumours. Recently, retrospective studies reported that general anaesthesia was associated with worse long-term cancer-free survival when compared with regional anaesthesia. This has important clinical implications; however, the mechanisms underlying those observations remain unclear. We aim to investigate the effect of anaesthetics isoflurane and propofol on prostate cancer malignancy. Methods: Prostate cancer (PC3) cell line was exposed to commonly used anaesthetic isoflurane and propofol. Malignant potential was assessed through evaluation of expression level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and its downstream effectors, cell proliferation and migration as well as development of chemoresistance. Results: We demonstrated that isoflurane, at a clinically relevant concentration induced upregulation of HIF-1α and its downstream effectors in PC3 cell line. Consequently, cancer cell characteristics associated with malignancy were enhanced, with an increase of proliferation and migration, as well as development of chemoresistance. Inhibition of HIF-1α neosynthesis through upper pathway blocking by a PI-3K-Akt inhibitor or HIF-1α siRNA abolished isoflurane-induced effects. In contrast, the intravenous anaesthetic propofol inhibited HIF-1α activation induced by hypoxia or CoCl2. Propofol also prevented isoflurane-induced HIF-1α activation, and partially reduced cancer cell malignant activities. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that modulation of HIF-1α activity by anaesthetics may affect cancer recurrence following surgery. If our data were to be extrapolated to the clinical setting, isoflurane but not propofol should be avoided for use in cancer surgery. Further work involving in vivo models and clinical trials is urgently needed to determine the optimal anaesthetic regimen for cancer patients. PMID:25072260

  18. The effect of isoflurane anesthesia on the electroencephalogram assessed by harmonic wavelet bicoherence-based indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duan; Li, Xiaoli; Hagihira, Satoshi; Sleigh, Jamie W.

    2011-10-01

    Bicoherence quantifies the degree of quadratic phase coupling among different frequency components within a signal. Previous studies, using Fourier-based methods of bicoherence calculation (FBIC), have demonstrated that electroencephalographic bicoherence can be related to the end-tidal concentration of inhaled anesthetic drugs. However, FBIC methods require excessively long sections of the encephalogram. This problem might be overcome by the use of wavelet-based methods. In this study, we compare FBIC and a recently developed wavelet bicoherence (WBIC) method as a tool to quantify the effect of isoflurane on the electroencephalogram. We analyzed a set of previously published electroencephalographic data, obtained from 29 patients who underwent elective abdominal surgery under isoflurane general anesthesia combined with epidural anesthesia. Nine potential indices of the electroencephalographic anesthetic effect were obtained from the WBIC and FBIC techniques. The relationship between each index and end-tidal concentrations of isoflurane was evaluated using correlation coefficients (r), the inter-individual variations (CV) of index values, the coefficient of determination (R2) of the PKPD models and the prediction probability (PK). The WBIC-based indices tracked anesthetic effects better than the traditional FBIC-based ones. The DiagBic_En index (derived from the Shannon entropy of the diagonal bicoherence values) performed best [r = 0.79 (0.66-0.92), CV = 0.08 (0.05-0.12), R2 = 0.80 (0.75-0.85), PK = 0.79 (0.75-0.83)]. Short data segments of ~10-30 s were sufficient to reliably calculate the indices of WBIC. The wavelet-based bicoherence has advantages over the traditional Fourier-based bicoherence in analyzing volatile anesthetic effects on the electroencephalogram.

  19. Labour time required for piglet castration with isoflurane-anaesthesia using shared and stationary inhaler devices.

    PubMed

    Weber, Sabrina; Das, Gürbüz; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Gauly, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Isoflurane-anaesthesia combined with an analgesic represents a welfare-friendly method of pain mitigation for castration of piglets. However, it requires an inhaler device, which is uneconomic for small farms. Sharing a device among farms may be an economical option if the shared use does not increase labour time and the resulting costs. This study aimed to investigate the amount and components of labour time required for piglet castration with isoflurane anaesthesia performed with stationary and shared devices. Piglets (N = 1579) were anaesthetised with isoflurane (using either stationary or shared devices) and castrated.The stationary devices were used in a group (n = 5) of larger farms (84 sows/farm on an average), whereas smaller farms (n = 7; 32 sows/farm on an average) shared one device. Each farm was visited four times and labour time for each process-step was recorded. The complete process included machine set-up, anaesthesia and castration by a practitioner, and preparation, collection and transport of piglets by a farmer. Labour time of the complete process was increased (P = 0.012) on farms sharing a device (266 s/piglet) compared to farms using stationary devices (177 s/ piglet), due to increased time for preparation (P = 0.055), castration (P = 0.026) and packing (P = 0.010) when sharing a device. However, components of the time budget of farms using stationary or shared devices did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Cost arising from time spent by farmers did not differ considerably between the use of stationary (0.28 Euro per piglet) and shared (0.26 Euro) devices. It is concluded that costs arising from the increased labour time due to sharing a device can be considered marginal, since the high expenses originating from purchasing an inhaler device are shared among several farms.

  20. Chaos analysis of EEG during isoflurane-induced loss of righting in rats.

    PubMed

    MacIver, M B; Bland, Brian H

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that electroencephalogram (EEG) signals generate chaotic strange attractors and the shape of these attractors correlate with depth of anesthesia. We applied chaos analysis to frontal cortical and hippocampal micro-EEG signals from implanted microelectrodes (layer 4 and CA1, respectively). Rats were taken to and from loss of righting reflex (LORR) with isoflurane and behavioral measures were compared to attractor shape. Resting EEG signals at LORR differed markedly from awake signals, more similar to slow wave sleep signals, and easily discerned in raw recordings (high amplitude slow waves), and in fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT; increased delta power), in good agreement with previous studies. EEG activation stimulated by turning rats on their side, to test righting, produced signals quite similar to awake resting state EEG signals. That is, the high amplitude slow wave activity changed to low amplitude fast activity that lasted for several seconds, before returning to slow wave activity. This occurred regardless of whether the rat was able to right itself, or not. Testing paw pinch and tail clamp responses produced similar EEG activations, even from deep anesthesia when burst suppression dominated the spontaneous EEG. Chaotic attractor shape was far better at discerning between these awake-like signals, at loss of responses, than was FFT analysis. Comparisons are provided between FFT and chaos analysis of EEG during awake walking, slow wave sleep, and isoflurane-induced effects at several depths of anesthesia. Attractors readily discriminated between natural sleep and isoflurane-induced "delta" activity. Chaotic attractor shapes changed gradually through the transition from awake to LORR, indicating that this was not an on/off like transition, but rather a point along a continuum of brain states. PMID:25360091

  1. Adenosine infusion during isoflurane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia: indications of perioperative analgesic effect.

    PubMed

    Sollevi, A

    1992-08-01

    Adenosine, an endogenous compound with a known antinociceptive effect when administered into the CNS, was applied in nine patients (21-65 years) by the peripheral intravenous route (70-130 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) as a replacement for peroperative opioids during inhalation anaesthesia for surgical procedures not requiring muscle relaxation. Lorazepam was given as premedication, thiopentone was used for induction, and succinylcholine facilitated intubation of the trachea. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane [initial surgery endtidal concentration (ET) 0.88% (range 0.7-1%)] and nitrous oxide (60-70%) in oxygen. Adenosine infusion was initiated 5-10 min prior to surgery, and stopped close to or when isoflurane was terminated at the end of surgery. The duration of anaesthesia, adenosine infusion, and surgery were 120 min (range 80-165), 90 min (range 70-145), and 90 min (range 60-135), respectively. Spontaneous unassisted ventilation was maintained in all patients. Mean heart rate increased 10 beats.min-1 (range 0-35) upon induction of surgery, while systolic blood pressure was unaffected at 105 mmHg (range 85-120) (14 kPa (range 11.3-16.0)). Spo2 and ETCO2 were in the normal range. The isoflurane concentration was gradually reduced in most cases [mid-surgery ET 0.63% (range 0.5-0.8) and end-surgery ET 0.57% (range 0.3-0.8)]. Extubation and verbal communication were rapidly achieved after anaesthesia. The mean postoperative (24 h) opioid requirement was 4 mg (range 0-10 mg). These pilot cases suggest that systemic adenosine infusion may replace opioids during inhalation anaesthesia, and that adequate spontaneous ventilation can be achieved.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Modulates Cytochrome Oxidase Activity and Oxidative Stress in the Developing Murine Brain During Isoflurane Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ying; Mitchell-Flack, Marisa J.; Wang, Aili; Levy, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Commonly used anesthetics induce widespread neuronal degeneration in the developing mammalian brain via the oxidative stress-associated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Dysregulation of cytochrome oxidase (CcOX), the terminal oxidase of the electron transport chain, can result in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and isoflurane has previously been shown to activate this enzyme. Carbon monoxide (CO), as a modulator of CcOX, is of interest because infants and children are routinely exposed to CO during low-flow anesthesia. We have recently demonstrated that low concentrations of CO limit and prevent isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity in the forebrain of newborn mice in a dose-dependent manner. However, the effect of CO on CcOX in the context of anesthetic-induced oxidative stress is unknown. Seven day old male CD-1 mice underwent 1-hour exposure to 0 ppm (air), 5 ppm, or 100 ppm CO in air with or without isoflurane. Exposure to isoflurane or CO independently increased CcOX kinetic activity and increased ROS within forebrain mitochondria. However, combined exposure to CO with isoflurane paradoxically limited CcOX activation and oxidative stress. There were no changes seen in steady-state levels of CcOX I protein indicating post-translational modification of CcOX as an etiology for changes in enzyme activity. CO exposure led to differential effects on CcOX subunit I tyrosine phosphorylation depending on concentration, while combined exposure to isoflurane with CO markedly increased enzyme phosphorylation state. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 304 of CcOX subunit I has been shown to result in strong enzyme inhibition, and the relative reduction in CcOX kinetics following combined exposure to CO with isoflurane may have been due, in part, to such phosphorylation. Taken together, the data suggest that CO modulates CcOX in the developing brain during isoflurane exposure, thereby limiting oxidative stress. These CO-mediated effects could have implications for the

  3. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  4. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  5. Alveolar epithelial integrity in athletes with exercise-induced hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M R; Hunte, G S; Belzberg, A S; Sheel, A W; Worsley, D F; McKenzie, D C

    2000-10-01

    The effect of incremental exercise to exhaustion on the change in pulmonary clearance rate (k) of aerosolized (99m)Tc-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ((99m)Tc-DTPA) and the relationship between k and arterial PO(2) (Pa(O(2))) during heavy work were investigated. Ten male cyclists (age = 25 +/- 2 yr, height = 180.9 +/- 4.0 cm, mass = 80.1 +/- 9.5 kg, maximal O(2) uptake = 5. 25 +/- 0.35 l/min, mean +/- SD) completed a pulmonary clearance test shortly (39 +/- 8 min) after a maximal O(2) uptake test. Resting pulmonary clearance was completed >/=24 h before or after the exercise test. Arterial blood was sampled at rest and at 1-min intervals during exercise. Minimum Pa(O(2)) values and maximum alveolar-arterial PO(2) difference ranged from 73 to 92 Torr and from 30 to 55 Torr, respectively. No significant difference between resting k and postexercise k for the total lung (0.55 +/- 0.20 vs. 0. 57 +/- 0.17 %/min, P > 0.05) was observed. Pearson product-moment correlation indicated no significant linear relationship between change in k for the total lung and minimum Pa(O(2)) (r = -0.26, P > 0.05). These results indicate that, averaged over subjects, pulmonary clearance of (99m)Tc-DTPA after incremental maximal exercise to exhaustion in highly trained male cyclists is unchanged, although the sampling time may have eliminated a transient effect. Lack of a linear relationship between k and minimum Pa(O(2)) during exercise suggests that exercise-induced hypoxemia occurs despite maintenance of alveolar epithelial integrity.

  6. The neurochemical profile of the hippocampus in isoflurane-treated and unanesthetized rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Akulov, Andrey E.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo study of cerebral metabolism in neonatal animals by high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is an important tool for deciphering the developmental origins of adult diseases. Up to date, all in vivo spectrum acquisition procedures have been performed in neonatal rodents under anesthesia. However, it is still unknown if the inhaled anesthetic isoflurane, which is commonly used in magnetic resonance imaging studies, could affect metabolite levels in the brain of neonatal rats. Moreover, the unanesthetized MRS preparation that uses neonatal rodent pups is still lacking. Here, a novel restraint protocol was developed for neonatal rats in accordance with the European Directive 2010/63/EU. This protocol shares the same gradation of severity as the protocol for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging of animals with appropriate sedation or anesthesia. Such immobilization of neonatal rats without anesthesia can be implemented for MRS studies when an interaction between anesthetic and target drugs is expected. Short-term isoflurane treatment did not affect the levels of key metabolites in the hippocampi of anesthetized pups and, in contrast to juvenile and adult rodents, it is suitable for MRS studies in neonatal rats when the interaction between anesthetic and target drugs is not expected. PMID:27486369

  7. Isoflurane waste anesthetic gas concentrations associated with the open-drop method.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas K; Mook, Deborah M

    2009-01-01

    The open-drop technique is used frequently for anesthetic delivery to small rodents. Operator exposure to waste anesthetic gas (WAG) is a potential occupational hazard if this method is used without WAG scavenging. This study was conducted to determine whether administration of isoflurane by the open-drop technique without exposure controls generates significant WAG concentrations. We placed 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 ml of liquid isoflurane into screw-top 500 or 1000 ml glass jars. WAG concentration was measured at the opening of the container and 20 and 40 cm from the opening, a distance at which users likely would operate, at 1, 2, or 3 min WAG was measured by using a portable infrared gas analyzer. Mean WAG concentrations at the vessel opening were as high as 662 +/- 168 ppm with a 500 ml jar and 122 +/- 87 ppm with a 1000 ml jar. At operator levels, WAG concentrations were always at or near 0 ppm. For measurements made at the vessel opening, time was the only factor that significantly affected WAG concentration when using the 500 ml jar. Neither time nor liquid volume were significant factors when using 1000 ml jar. At all liquid volumes and time points, the WAG concentration associated with using the 500 ml container was marginally to significantly greater than that for the 1000 ml jar. PMID:19245753

  8. Isoflurane and desflurane at clinically relevant concentrations induce amyloid {beta}-peptide oligomerization: An NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Pravat K Fodale, Vincenzo

    2009-02-13

    Current understanding on Alzheimer's disease (AD) reveals that soluble amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) oligomeric formation plays an important role in AD pathophysiology. A potential role for several inhaled anesthetics in promoting A{beta} oligomer formation has been suggested. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, we previously demonstrated that at a high concentration (higher than clinically relevant concentrations), the inhaled anesthetics halothane and isoflurane, interact with specific amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31) and induce A{beta} oligomerization. The present study confirms this is true at a clinically relevant concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane induce A{beta} oligomerization by inducing chemical shift changes of the critical amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31), reinforcing the evidence that perturbation of these three crucial residues indeed plays an important role in oligomerization. These findings support the emerging hypothesis that several commonly used inhaled anesthetics could be involved in neurodegeneration, as well as risk factor for accelerating the onset of AD.

  9. Adding Emulsified Isoflurane to Cardioplegia Solution Produces Cardiac Protection in a Dog Cardiopulmonary Bypass Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Jin; Song, Haibo; Qiu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether caridoplegia solution with Emulsified Isoflurane (EI) could improve cardiaoprotection in a dog CPB model of great similarity to clinical settings. Adult dogs were randomly assigned to receive one of the following cardioplegia solutions: St. Thomas with EI (group ST+EI), St. Thomas with 30% Intralipid (group ST+EL) and St. Thomas alone (group ST). The aorta was cross-clamped for two hours followed by reperfusion for another two hours, during which cardiac output was measured and dosages of positive inotropic agent to maintain normal hemodynamics were recorded. Serum level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and CK-MB were measured. Deletion of cardiac mitochondrial DNA was examined at the end of reperfusion. Compared with ST, ST+EI decreased the requirement of dopamine support while animals receiving ST+EI had a significantly larger cardiac output. ST+EI reduced post-CPB release of cTnI and CK-MB. Mitochondrial DNA loss was observed in only one of the tested animals from group ST+EI while it was seen in all the tested animals from group ST+EL and ST. Addition of emulsified isoflurane into cardioplegia solution protects against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. This protective effect might be mediated by preserving mitochondrial ultrastructure and DNA integrity. PMID:27121996

  10. Propofol compared with isoflurane inhibits mitochondrial metabolism in immature swine cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, Douglas B; Ledee, Dolena R; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G; Sedensky, Margaret M; Isern, Nancy G; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in the development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in immature swine anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon-labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared spectroscopy. Compared with isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate, and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked lactate accumulation. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype that resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations that typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may have a role in the neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain. PMID:24398942

  11. Comparing the Effects of Isoflurane and Alpha Chloralose upon Mouse Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Lucy C.; Klaunberg, Brenda A.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mice requires that the physiology of the mouse (body temperature, respiration and heart rates, blood pH level) be maintained in order to prevent changes affecting the outcomes of functional scanning, namely blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) measures and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The anesthetic used to sedate mice for scanning can have major effects on physiology. While alpha chloralose has been commonly used for functional imaging of rats, its effects on physiology are not well characterized in the literature for any species. In this study, we anesthetized or sedated mice with isoflurane or alpha chloralose for up to two hours, and monitored physiological parameters and arterial blood gasses. We found that, when normal body temperature is maintained, breathing rates for both drugs decrease over the course of two hours. In addition, alpha chloralose causes a substantial drop in heart rate and blood pH with severe hypercapnia (elevated blood CO2) that is not seen in isoflurane-treated animals. We suggest that alpha chloralose does not maintain normal mouse physiology adequately for functional brain imaging outcome measures. PMID:27148970

  12. Comparing the Effects of Isoflurane and Alpha Chloralose upon Mouse Physiology.

    PubMed

    Low, Lucie A; Bauer, Lucy C; Klaunberg, Brenda A

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mice requires that the physiology of the mouse (body temperature, respiration and heart rates, blood pH level) be maintained in order to prevent changes affecting the outcomes of functional scanning, namely blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) measures and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The anesthetic used to sedate mice for scanning can have major effects on physiology. While alpha chloralose has been commonly used for functional imaging of rats, its effects on physiology are not well characterized in the literature for any species. In this study, we anesthetized or sedated mice with isoflurane or alpha chloralose for up to two hours, and monitored physiological parameters and arterial blood gasses. We found that, when normal body temperature is maintained, breathing rates for both drugs decrease over the course of two hours. In addition, alpha chloralose causes a substantial drop in heart rate and blood pH with severe hypercapnia (elevated blood CO2) that is not seen in isoflurane-treated animals. We suggest that alpha chloralose does not maintain normal mouse physiology adequately for functional brain imaging outcome measures. PMID:27148970

  13. Propofol Compared to Isoflurane Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Immature Swine Cerebral Cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, D. B.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-08

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in an immature swine model anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery in order to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared-spectroscopy. Compared to isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol also decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked accumulation of lactate. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype which resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations which typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may play a role in neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain.

  14. Occupational exposure to isoflurane during anaesthesia induction with standard and scavenging double masks in dogs, pigs and ponies.

    PubMed

    Säre, H; Ambrisko, T D; Moens, Y

    2011-07-01

    Induction of anaesthesia using a face mask may cause workplace pollution with anaesthetics. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the use of a standard versus a scavenging double face mask on isoflurane pollution during induction of anaesthesia in experimental animals: six dogs, 12 pigs and five ponies. Pigs were anaesthetized only once using either mask type randomly (n = 6). Dogs and ponies were anaesthetized twice, using different mask types for each occasion in a random order with at least 14 days between experiments. The masks were attached to a Bain breathing system (dogs and pigs) or to a circle system (ponies) using a fresh gas flow of 300 or 50 mL/kg/min, respectively, with 5% vaporizer dial setting. Isoflurane concentrations were measured in the anaesthetist's breathing zone using an infrared photoacoustic spectrometer. The peak isoflurane concentrations (pollution) during baseline and induction periods were compared with Wilcoxon test in all species, and values between the mask types were compared with either Wilcoxon (ponies and dogs) or Mann-Whitney tests (pigs) (P < 0.05). Pollution was higher during induction when compared with baseline regardless of the mask type used but it was only statistically significant in dogs and pigs. Pollution was lower during induction with double versus single masks but it was only significant in pigs. Despite the lack of statistical significance, large and consistent differences were noted in all species, hence using scavenging masks is recommended to reduce isoflurane workplace pollution.

  15. Volatile anaesthetics and the atmosphere: atmospheric lifetimes and atmospheric effects of halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, desflurane and sevoflurane.

    PubMed

    Langbein, T; Sonntag, H; Trapp, D; Hoffmann, A; Malms, W; Röth, E P; Mörs, V; Zellner, R

    1999-01-01

    The atmospheric lifetimes of the halogenated anaesthetics halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, desflurane and sevoflurane with respect to reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH.) and UV photolysis have been determined from observations of OH. reaction kinetics and UV absorption spectra. Rate coefficients for the reaction with OH radicals for all halogenated anaesthetics investigated ranged from 0.44 to 2.7 x 10(-14) cm3 molec-1 s-1. Halothane, enflurane and isoflurane showed distinct UV absorption in the range 200-350 nm. In contrast, no absorption in this wavelength range was detected for desflurane or sevoflurane. The total atmospheric lifetimes, as derived from both OH. reactivity and photolysis, were 4.0-21.4 yr. It has been calculated that up to 20% of anaesthetics enter the stratosphere. As a result of chlorine and bromine content, the ozone depletion potential (ODP) relative to chlorofluorocarbon CFC-11 varies between 0 and 1.56, leading to a contribution to the total ozone depletion in the stratosphere of approximately 1% for halothane and 0.02% for enflurane and isoflurane. Estimates of the greenhouse warming potential (GWP) relative to CFC-12 yield values of 0.02-0.14, resulting in a relative contribution to global warming of all volatile anaesthetics of approximately 0.03%. The stratospheric impact of halothane, isoflurane and enflurane and their influence on ozone depletion is of increasing importance because of decreasing chlorofluorocarbons globally. However, the influence of volatile anaesthetics on greenhouse warming is small.

  16. Telomere dysfunction causes alveolar stem cell failure.

    PubMed

    Alder, Jonathan K; Barkauskas, Christina E; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Stanley, Susan E; Kembou, Frant; Tuder, Rubin M; Hogan, Brigid L M; Mitzner, Wayne; Armanios, Mary

    2015-04-21

    Telomere syndromes have their most common manifestation in lung disease that is recognized as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. In both conditions, there is loss of alveolar integrity, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We tested the capacity of alveolar epithelial and stromal cells from mice with short telomeres to support alveolar organoid colony formation and found that type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s), the stem cell-containing population, were limiting. When telomere dysfunction was induced in adult AEC2s by conditional deletion of the shelterin component telomeric repeat-binding factor 2, cells survived but remained dormant and showed all the hallmarks of cellular senescence. Telomere dysfunction in AEC2s triggered an immune response, and this was associated with AEC2-derived up-regulation of cytokine signaling pathways that are known to provoke inflammation in the lung. Mice uniformly died after challenge with bleomycin, underscoring an essential role for telomere function in AEC2s for alveolar repair. Our data show that alveoloar progenitor senescence is sufficient to recapitulate the regenerative defects, inflammatory responses, and susceptibility to injury that are characteristic of telomere-mediated lung disease. They suggest alveolar stem cell failure is a driver of telomere-mediated lung disease and that efforts to reverse it may be clinically beneficial. PMID:25840590

  17. Isoflurane leakage from non-rebreathing rodent anaesthesia circuits: comparison of emissions from conventional and modified ports.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Bolon, B

    2006-04-01

    Chronic exposure to low levels of fluorocarbon-based waste anaesthetic gas (WAG) has been linked to a multitude of human health problems. We have shown that isoflurane exhaust from passive gas-scavenging canisters is often quite high when using conventional rodent anaesthesia protocols and equipment. Another likely source of WAG build-up in rodent procedure rooms is leakage at the interface between the breathing circuit and the animal's face. We evaluated this possibility using three non-rebreathing circuits: traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson (type E). For the Mapleson E circuit, a conical rodent facemask was attached and used in one of two configurations: normal aperture, or aperture modified with a latex diaphragm (cut from an unpowdered surgical glove) to reduce the orifice diameter and tighten the seal. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with isoflurane (5% for induction, 2% or 3.5% for maintenance) in oxygen (2 L/min for induction, 1 L/min for maintenance). Isoflurane leakage was assessed by real-time spectrophotometry. In 94% of the trials, three configurations - traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson E with unmodified mask - permitted isoflurane leakage approaching or exceeding 100 ppm at the face/port interface. In contrast, the Mapleson circuit with diaphragm-modified mask emitted significantly (Pisoflurane (peak of 9.5+/-1.7 ppm [mean+/-standard error]). These data indicate that (1) WAG leakage from standard rodent non-rebreathing circuits is substantial, and that (2) a simple, rapid, and economical modification to a conventional rodent facemask can significantly reduce WAG exposure to workers performing many rodent anaesthesia procedures in one session. PMID:16600080

  18. Isoflurane leakage from non-rebreathing rodent anaesthesia circuits: comparison of emissions from conventional and modified ports.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Bolon, B

    2006-04-01

    Chronic exposure to low levels of fluorocarbon-based waste anaesthetic gas (WAG) has been linked to a multitude of human health problems. We have shown that isoflurane exhaust from passive gas-scavenging canisters is often quite high when using conventional rodent anaesthesia protocols and equipment. Another likely source of WAG build-up in rodent procedure rooms is leakage at the interface between the breathing circuit and the animal's face. We evaluated this possibility using three non-rebreathing circuits: traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson (type E). For the Mapleson E circuit, a conical rodent facemask was attached and used in one of two configurations: normal aperture, or aperture modified with a latex diaphragm (cut from an unpowdered surgical glove) to reduce the orifice diameter and tighten the seal. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with isoflurane (5% for induction, 2% or 3.5% for maintenance) in oxygen (2 L/min for induction, 1 L/min for maintenance). Isoflurane leakage was assessed by real-time spectrophotometry. In 94% of the trials, three configurations - traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson E with unmodified mask - permitted isoflurane leakage approaching or exceeding 100 ppm at the face/port interface. In contrast, the Mapleson circuit with diaphragm-modified mask emitted significantly (Pisoflurane (peak of 9.5+/-1.7 ppm [mean+/-standard error]). These data indicate that (1) WAG leakage from standard rodent non-rebreathing circuits is substantial, and that (2) a simple, rapid, and economical modification to a conventional rodent facemask can significantly reduce WAG exposure to workers performing many rodent anaesthesia procedures in one session.

  19. Differential effects of propofol and isoflurane on the relationship between EEG Narcotrend index and clinical stages of anaesthetic depth in sheep undergoing experimental cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Otto, Klaus A

    2016-02-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) Narcotrend index (NI) has been shown to improve anaesthetic depth monitoring in isoflurane-anaesthetised sheep. Data obtained from 13 anaesthetised juvenile female sheep were analysed retrospectively in order to assess the relationship between clinical stages of anaesthesia (CS) and NI during both propofol and isoflurane anaesthesia. Polynomial regression analysis revealed no significant association between CS and NI for propofol (R = 0.374, R(2) = 0.140, P = 0.403) but for isoflurane anaesthesia (R = 0.548, R(2) = 0.301, P = 0.010) there was a significant relationship. Furthermore, a strong correlation existed between end-tidal isoflurane concentration (ISOET) and CS (r = -0.463, P = 0.008). A combination of assessment of clinical signs and analogous EEG patterns is recommended during propofol anaesthesia.

  20. Region-specific effects of isoflurane anesthesia on Fos immunoreactivity in response to intravenous cocaine challenge in rats with a history of repeated cocaine administration

    PubMed Central

    Kufahl, Peter R.; Peartree, Natalie A.; Heintzelman, Krista L.; Chung, Maggie; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that acute intravenous (i.v.) administration of cocaine increases Fos immunoreactivity in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Given that Fos expression is a marker of neural activation, the results suggested that isoflurane is appropriate for imaging cocaine effects under anesthesia. However, most imaging research in this area utilizes subjects with a history of repeated cocaine exposure and this drug history may interact with anesthetic use differently from acute cocaine exposure. Thus, this study further examined Fos expression under isoflurane in rats with a history of repeated i.v. cocaine administration. Rats received daily injections of either saline or cocaine (2 mg/kg, i.v.) across 7 consecutive days, followed by 5 days of no drug exposure. On the test day, rats were either nonanesthetized or anesthetized under isoflurane and were given an acute challenge of cocaine (2 mg/kg, i.v.). Additional saline-exposed controls received a saline challenge. Ninety min after the drug challenge, the rats were perfused under isoflurane anesthesia and their brains were processed for Fos protein immunohistochemistry. We found that challenge injections of cocaine following a regimen of repeated cocaine exposure resulted in Fos expression in the prefrontal cortex and striatum roughly equivalent to that found in rats who had received the cocaine challenge after a history of vehicle injections. Additionally, isoflurane anesthesia resulted in a heterogeneous attenuation of cocaine-induced Fos expression, with the most robust effect in the orbital cortex but no effect in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). These results indicate that cocaine-induced Fos is preserved in the NAcC under isoflurane, suggesting that isoflurane can be used in imaging studies involving cocaine effects in this region. PMID:25451087

  1. Plasma concentration and cardiovascular effects of lidocaine during continuous epidural administration in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Sakonju, Iwao; Maeda, Kenichi; Karasawa, Koichi; Tadokoro, Toshiyuki; Kakuta, Tomoko; Takase, Katsuaki

    2011-03-01

    The cardiovascular effects of continuous epidural administration (CEA) of lidocaine were investigated in anesthetized dogs. Loading epidural injections of 2, 4, or 6 mg/kg of lidocaine were followed by CEA with 1, 2, or 3 mg/kg/hr lidocaine, respectively, for 2 hr under 2.0% isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, direct blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke volume decreased dose-dependently during CEA, whereas systemic vascular resistance did not significantly differ with dose, and no characteristic changes were observed in any groups. Plasma lidocaine concentration reached a steady state during CEA and increased in a dose-dependent manner. Circulatory suppression caused by lidocaine CEA was not attributable to peripheral vasodilation, but rather to the direct cardiac action of systemic lidocaine absorption from the peridural space. PMID:21048393

  2. Effect of alveolar macrophages on Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Ryning, F W; Remington, J S

    1977-01-01

    As pulmonary involvement can occur in disseminated toxoplasmosis in immunosuppressed patients, studies were initiated to define local mechanisms of resistance of the lung to Toxoplasma gondii. Alveolar macrophages were obtained from normal mice and mice chronically infected with T. gondii by bronchopulmonary lavage and cultured in vitro. Although normal alveolar macrophages were difficult to infect with Toxoplasma, they supported intracellular multiplication of this organism. When exposed to Toxoplasma that had been pretreated with heat-inactivated serum containing specific antibody, the number of intracellular organisms increased remarkably, and the macrophages destroyed the coated parasites. After development of chronic infections with Toxoplasma, there was a transient period during which a striking increase in numbers of alveolar macrophages was observed in lavage specimens. These macrophages differed from those of normal alveolar macrophages. There was a greater percentage of large cells, a greater tendency to spread on glass, and an increased number of intracellular Toxoplasma, and the cells were activated to kill or inhibit multiplication of the parasite. During the period when activated macrophages were demonstrable in bronchopulmonary washings, histological changes in the lungs revealed a marked mononuclear cell infiltrate. These studies support a role for the activated alveolar macrophage as an effector in resistance of the lung to infection with Toxoplasma. PMID:591065

  3. A New Device for Alveolar Bone Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Omar; Pérez, Daniel; Páramo, Viviana; Falcón, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    We present a retrospective review of a new technique for the transportation of alveolar bone using a Hyrax device modified by the principal author (O.A.V.). There were seven patients (five males and two females), including five patients with cleft palate and lip diagnosis, one patient with a high-speed gunshot wound, and one patient with facial trauma sequel due to mandibular fracture. They were all treated with an alveolar bone transportation technique (ABT) through the use of the modified Hyrax device (VEGAX). Before surgery, distraction osteogenesis of the bifocal type was performed on four patients, and the trifocal type was performed on the other three patients. However, in one case, direct dental anchorage was not used, only orthodontic appliances. In all the cases, new bone formation and gingival tissue around the defect were obtained, posterior to the alveolar distraction process; no complications were observed in any patient. In one case, two teeth involved in the disk of the ABT were extracted, due to a previous condition of periodontal disease. The alveolar bone transport with the VEGAX device is an accessible technique for almost every patient with alveolar defects due to diverse causes. In all the presented cases, predictability and success were demonstrated. PMID:22655120

  4. Isoflurane attenuates mouse microglial engulfment induced by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ possibly by inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jung-Hee; Wang, Zhi; Fan, Dan; Han, Sung-Hee; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2016-09-28

    Microglial engulfment is a basic function to clean up dead and injured cells and invaders, such as bacteria. This study was designed to assess the effects of isoflurane on the microglial engulfment induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and the involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in these effects. C8-B4 microglial cells were exposed to 1, 2, and 3% isoflurane at 2 h after the initiation of LPS (100 ng/ml) and IFN-γ (1 ng/ml) stimulation. Fluorescent immunostaining was performed to assess the percentage of cells with engulfment of fluorescent microspheres after stimulation for 24 h. P38 and phosphorylated p38 were determined by Western blotting. Isoflurane concentration dependently decreased microglial engulfment stimulated by LPS and IFN-γ. LPS and IFN-γ increased the phosphorylated p38 in microglial cells. This upregulation was decreased by isoflurane. SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, abolished the LPS-induced and IFN-γ-induced increase of engulfment activity, whereas anisomycin, a p38 MAPK activator, partly reversed the isoflurane-decreased microglial engulfment activity. These results suggest that isoflurane reduces LPS-induced and IFN-γ-induced microglial engulfment and that these effects may be mediated by inhibiting p38 MAPK. PMID:27513199

  5. [Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning in implant surgery].

    PubMed

    Ardekian, L; Salnea, J; Abu el-Naaj, I; Gutmacher, T; Peled, M

    2001-04-01

    Severe resorption of the posterior mandible possesses one of the most difficult restorative challenges to the implant surgery today. This resorption may prevent the placement of dental implants without the potentially damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. To create the opportunity of insertion dental implants of adequately length in those cases, the technique of nerve repositioning has been advocated. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of nerve repositioning combined with placement of dental implants. Both cases showed appropriate postoperative healing without damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. The inferior alveolar nerve repositioning technique seems to be an acceptable alternative to augmentation procedure prior to dental implants placement in cases exhibiting atrophic posterior mandibular ridges. PMID:11494807

  6. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  7. Increased alveolar plasminogen activator in early asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, A.; Allard, C.; Begin, R.

    1989-03-01

    Alveolar macrophage-derived plasminogen activator (PA) activity is decreased in some chronic interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis but increased in experimental models of acute alveolitis. Although asbestos fibers can stimulate alveolar macrophages (AM) to release PA in vitro, the effect of chronic asbestos exposure of the lower respiratory tract on lung PA activity remains unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate PA activity of alveolar macrophages and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in asbestos-exposed sheep and asbestos workers. Forty-three sheep were exposed to either 100 mg UICC chrysotile B asbestos in 100 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or to 100 ml PBS by tracheal infusion every 2 wk for 18 months. At Month 18, chest roentgenograms were analyzed and alveolar macrophage and extracellular fluid PA activity were measured in samples obtained by BAL. Alveolar macrophage PA activity was increased in the asbestos-exposed sheep compared to control sheep (87.2 +/- 17.3 versus 41.1 +/- 7.2 U/10(5) AM-24 h, p less than 0.05) as was the BAL fluid PA activity (674.9 +/- 168.4 versus 81.3 +/- 19.7 U/mg alb-24 h, p less than 0.01). Among the asbestos-exposed sheep, 10 had normal chest roentgenograms (Group SA) and 15 had irregular interstitial opacities (Group SB). Strikingly, whereas Group SA did not differ from the control group in BAL cellularity or PA activity, Group SB had marked increases in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.005), AM PA activity (p less than 0.02), and BAL PA activity (p less than 0.001) compared to the control group.

  8. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  9. Glucocorticoid receptors, in human alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, T; Yasuoka, S; Nakayama, T; Tsubura, E

    1982-01-01

    The numbers of glucocorticoid receptors in human alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood cells were measured with 3H-prednisolone. Alveolar macrophages, which constituted 89.0 +/- 5.9% of broncho-alveolar cells, obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage from normal volunteers had much larger numbers of specific glucocorticoid receptors than peripheral blood cells. The numbers of glucocorticoid receptors in peripheral polymorphonuclear leucocytes, lymphocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (B cells, T cells, TG cells and TnonG cells) were nearly equal. In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, in whom alveolar macrophages amounted to over 85% of the broncho-alveolar cells, the number of glucocorticoid receptors in alveolar macrophages was significantly decreased, but the numbers in their peripheral blood cells were normal. This finding suggests that the number of glucocorticoid receptors in alveolar macrophages may change specifically during disorders of the lung. PMID:7075033

  10. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  11. Osteocalcin, but not deoxypyridinoline, increases in response to isoflurane-induced anaesthesia in young female guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Negar; Rodd, Celia J; Kremer, Richard; Weiler, Hope A

    2015-05-01

    The effect of the inhaled anaesthetic isoflurane was investigated on bone biomarkers, both during maturation and on minerals and glucose postpartum. Female guinea pigs (n = 10) were anaesthetized during maturation (5 and 9 weeks) and postpartum (26 weeks of age) with isoflurane during dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning. Blood collection was performed at all ages before and after anaesthesia for measurement of plasma osteocalcin (OC), total deoxypyridinoline (tDPD), and cortisol. Postpartum measurements also included: blood ions, acid-base parameters and glucose, plasma minerals, total alkaline phosphatase (tALP), and albumin. Plasma OC concentration almost doubled after exposure to isoflurane at 5 weeks (30.1 ± 5.0-57.9 ± 11.2 nmol/L, p < 0.001) and at 9 weeks (29.1 ± 7.5-62.9 ± 15.9 nmol/L, p < 0.001), but did not change postpartum (3.7 ± 3.3-4.3 ± 3.9 nmol/L, p = 0.88). There was no effect of isoflurane exposure on plasma tDPD at any age. Plasma cortisol increased after exposure to isoflurane at 9 weeks (1859.6 ± 383.2-2748.0 ± 235.3 nmol/L, p < 0.01) and postpartum (3376.7 ± 322.2-4091.6 ± 195.6 nmol/L, p < 0.001) but not at 5 weeks (2088.3 ± 326.4-2464.1 ± 538.0 nmol/L, p > 0.05). Blood ionized Ca(2+), Na(+) and plasma total Ca did not change, whereas plasma albumin decreased, and inorganic phosphate (PO4) and Cl(-) increased upon exposure to isoflurane. Isoflurane decreased tALP (43.2 ± 6.6-40.2 ± 5.9 IU/L, p = 0.01) and increased glucose (7.5 ± 0.6-10.9 ± 1.7 mmol/L, p < 0.0001) postpartum. Isoflurane inflates the assessment of a bone-derived biomarker, OC, during rapid growth, but not following pregnancy when formation is very low. Measurements prior to anaesthesia are recommended to reflect normal metabolism.

  12. Strain differences in toxic effects of long-lasting isoflurane anaesthesia between Wistar rats and Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Siller-Matula, J M; Jilma, B

    2008-11-01

    We investigated if long-lasting (5 h) anaesthesia with isoflurane has different pharmacological effects in two different rat strains: Wistar and Sprague Dawley. The mean blood pressure was 34% higher in Sprague Dawley rats as compared to the Wistar rats (p = 0.04). In Wistar rats, the pH value decreased to 7.1, lactate increased by 53%, creatinine increased 2.7-fold, alanine amino transferase and aspartate amino transferase increased more than 4-fold and lactate dehydrogenase increased 9-fold (p < 0.05). There were no changes in laboratory parameters in Sprague Dawley rats. This indicates that the Wistar rats were more sensitive to a 5 h anaesthesia with isoflurane after a premedication with ketamin/xylazine in the described study design.

  13. Enhanced hypoxic preconditioning by isoflurane: signaling gene expression and requirement of intracellular Ca2+ and inositol triphosphate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bickler, Philip E.; Fahlman, Christian S.

    2012-01-01

    Neurons preconditioned with non-injurious hypoxia or the anesthetic isoflurane express different genes but are equally protected against severe hypoxia/ischemia. We hypothesized that neuroprotection would be augmented when preconditioning with isoflurane and hypoxic preconditioning are combined. We also tested if preconditioning requires intracellular Ca2+ and the inositol triphosphate receptor, and if gene expression is similar in single agent and combined preconditioning. Hippocampal slice cultures prepared from 9 day-old rats were preconditioned with hypoxia (95% N2, 5% CO2 for 15 min, HPC), 1% isoflurane for 15 min (APC) or their combination (CPC) for 15 min. A day later cultures were deprived of O2 and glucose (OGD) to produce neuronal injury. Cell death was assessed 48 hr after OGD. mRNA encoding 119 signal transduction genes was quantified with cDNA micro arrays. Intracellular Ca2+ in CA1 region was measured with fura-2 during preconditioning. The cell-permeable Ca2+ buffer BAPTA-AM, the IP3 receptor antagonist Xestospongin C and RNA silencing were used to investigate preconditioning mechanisms. CPC decreased CA1, CA3 and dentate region death by 64–86% following OGD, more than HPC or APC alone (P<0.01). Gene expression following CPC was an amalgam of gene expression in HPC and APC, with simultaneous increases in growth/development and survival/apoptosis regulation genes. Intracellular Ca2+ chelation and RNA silencing of IP3 receptors prevented preconditioning neuroprotection and gene responses. We conclude that combined isoflurane-hypoxia preconditioning augments neuroprotection compared to single agents in immature rat hippocampal slice cultures. The mechanism involves genes for growth, development, apoptosis regulation and cell survival as well as IP3 receptors and intracellular Ca2+. PMID:20434434

  14. Enhanced hypoxic preconditioning by isoflurane: signaling gene expression and requirement of intracellular Ca2+ and inositol triphosphate receptors.

    PubMed

    Bickler, Philip E; Fahlman, Christian S

    2010-06-22

    Neurons preconditioned with non-injurious hypoxia or the anesthetic isoflurane express different genes but are equally protected against severe hypoxia/ischemia. We hypothesized that neuroprotection would be augmented when preconditioning with isoflurane and hypoxic preconditioning are combined. We also tested if preconditioning requires intracellular Ca(2+) and the inositol triphosphate receptor, and if gene expression is similar in single agent and combined preconditioning. Hippocampal slice cultures prepared from 9 day old rats were preconditioned with hypoxia (95% N(2), 5% CO(2) for 15 min, HPC), 1% isoflurane for 15 min (APC) or their combination (CPC) for 15 min. A day later cultures were deprived of O(2) and glucose (OGD) to produce neuronal injury. Cell death was assessed 48 h after OGD. mRNA encoding 119 signal transduction genes was quantified with cDNA micro arrays. Intracellular Ca(2+) in CA1 region was measured with fura-2 during preconditioning. The cell-permeable Ca(2+) buffer BAPTA-AM, the IP(3) receptor antagonist Xestospongin C and RNA silencing were used to investigate preconditioning mechanisms. CPC decreased CA1, CA3 and dentate region death by 64-86% following OGD, more than HPC or APC alone (P<0.01). Gene expression following CPC was an amalgam of gene expression in HPC and APC, with simultaneous increases in growth/development and survival/apoptosis regulation genes. Intracellular Ca(2+) chelation and RNA silencing of IP(3) receptors prevented preconditioning neuroprotection and gene responses. We conclude that combined isoflurane-hypoxia preconditioning augments neuroprotection compared to single agents in immature rat hippocampal slice cultures. The mechanism involves genes for growth, development, apoptosis regulation and cell survival as well as IP(3) receptors and intracellular Ca(2+).

  15. Chemical immobilization and anesthesia of free-living aardvarks (Orycteropus afer) with ketamine-medetomidine-midazolam and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Costello, Mary-Ann; Fuller, Andrea; Haw, Anna; Hetem, Robyn S; Mitchell, Duncan; Meyer, Leith C R

    2014-10-01

    Abstract We evaluated the effectiveness of a ketamine-medetomidine-midazolam drug combination administered intramuscularly by remote injection followed by isoflurane anesthesia in free-living aardvarks (Orycteropus afer). Seven aardvarks weighing 33-45 kg were immobilized to perform surgical implantation of temperature loggers using 3.8 mg/kg ketamine, 0.1 mg/kg medetomidine, and 0.25 mg/kg midazolam. Immobilized aardvarks were transported to a surgical theater and received 0.5-1% isoflurane in oxygen after tracheal intubation. After surgery, medetomidine was antagonized with 0.5 mg/kg atipamezole, and aardvarks were released at the site of capture. We recorded induction and recovery times, clinical and physiologic parameters, and conducted blood gas analyses before and during isoflurane administration. Aardvarks showed initial effects within 3 min and reached lateral recumbency within 7 min after drug administration. Heart rate (50-67 beats/min), respiratory rate (10-15 breaths/min), oxygen hemoglobin saturation (SaO2; 90-97%), and rectal temperature (34.0-37.5 C) were within acceptable physiologic ranges. Mean arterial blood pressure was initially high (146 ± 12 mmHg), but the hypertension resolved over time. Rectal temperature dropped significantly during anesthesia. Four animals had to be treated to relieve apnea. Blood gas analyses revealed mild to moderate hypercapnia but no hypoxaemia. The ketamine-medetomidine-midazolam combination provided effective immobilization. Combined with a low concentration of isoflurane, it can be used for prolonged surgical procedures in wild aardvarks. However, caution is needed, and monitoring of clinical parameters is required. PMID:25014906

  16. Chemical immobilization and anesthesia of free-living aardvarks (Orycteropus afer) with ketamine-medetomidine-midazolam and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Costello, Mary-Ann; Fuller, Andrea; Haw, Anna; Hetem, Robyn S; Mitchell, Duncan; Meyer, Leith C R

    2014-10-01

    Abstract We evaluated the effectiveness of a ketamine-medetomidine-midazolam drug combination administered intramuscularly by remote injection followed by isoflurane anesthesia in free-living aardvarks (Orycteropus afer). Seven aardvarks weighing 33-45 kg were immobilized to perform surgical implantation of temperature loggers using 3.8 mg/kg ketamine, 0.1 mg/kg medetomidine, and 0.25 mg/kg midazolam. Immobilized aardvarks were transported to a surgical theater and received 0.5-1% isoflurane in oxygen after tracheal intubation. After surgery, medetomidine was antagonized with 0.5 mg/kg atipamezole, and aardvarks were released at the site of capture. We recorded induction and recovery times, clinical and physiologic parameters, and conducted blood gas analyses before and during isoflurane administration. Aardvarks showed initial effects within 3 min and reached lateral recumbency within 7 min after drug administration. Heart rate (50-67 beats/min), respiratory rate (10-15 breaths/min), oxygen hemoglobin saturation (SaO2; 90-97%), and rectal temperature (34.0-37.5 C) were within acceptable physiologic ranges. Mean arterial blood pressure was initially high (146 ± 12 mmHg), but the hypertension resolved over time. Rectal temperature dropped significantly during anesthesia. Four animals had to be treated to relieve apnea. Blood gas analyses revealed mild to moderate hypercapnia but no hypoxaemia. The ketamine-medetomidine-midazolam combination provided effective immobilization. Combined with a low concentration of isoflurane, it can be used for prolonged surgical procedures in wild aardvarks. However, caution is needed, and monitoring of clinical parameters is required.

  17. Relationship of bispectral index to hemodynamic variables and alveolar concentration multiples of sevoflurane in puppies.

    PubMed

    Morgaz, J; Granados, M M; Domínguez, J M; Navarrete, R; Galán, A; Fernández, J A; Gómez-Villamandos, R J

    2009-06-01

    The relationships between bispectral index (BIS), cardiovascular variables and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) multiples of sevoflurane in puppies were determined. Five puppies were anesthetized with sevoflurane on two occasions. First, the individual sevoflurane MAC values were determined for each puppy. Secondly, dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane at each of 5 MAC multiples, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5 and 1.75 MAC administered in random order. Hemodynamic parameters and BIS data were collected for 20min. Somatic stimulus was then applied and the same parameters and data were collected for 6min. Correlation between BIS and end tidal sevoflurane and between BIS and hemodynamic parameters were studied. We found positive significant correlation in both cases. BIS is lower in puppies that in adults at the same alveolar anesthetic concentrations and sevoflurane appears to be a safe anesthetic in puppies.

  18. Age-dependent changes in porcine alveolar macrophage function during the postnatal period of alveolarization

    PubMed Central

    Dickie, R.; Tasat, D.R.; Fernandez Alanis, E.; Delfosse, V.; Tsuda, A.

    2008-01-01

    During early postnatal ontogeny in most mammals, the lung is structurally and functionally immature. In some species with relatively altricial lung morphology, there is evidence of a coupling between functional maturity of the pulmonary cellular immune system and alveolar maturation. Herein, we examine changes in alveolar macrophage (AM) number and function occurring during alveolarization in a more precocial species, the pig, to determine if heightened oxidative metabolism and phagocytic ability is similarly delayed until completion of lung morphogenesis. We assessed cell differential in lavage fluid and evaluated two main functional parameters of AM phagocytic response, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and particle internalization. AM functional maturation occurred mainly during the first postnatal week: the proportion of AMs, ROS generation, and phagocytosis all increased significantly. These results suggest maturational improvement of the impaired AM-based pulmonary immune system of the neonate piglet occurs during the postnatal period of rapid alveolarization. PMID:18775449

  19. Evaluation of the Cerebral State Index in Cats under Isoflurane Anaesthesia: Dose-Effect Relationship and Prediction of Clinical Signs

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana R.; Ribeiro, Lénio; Ferreira, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the cerebral state index (CSI) in reflecting different levels of isoflurane anaesthesia was evaluated in ten cats subjected to four end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (EtIso), each maintained for 15 minutes (0.8%, 1.2%, 1.6%, or 2.0% EtIso). The CSI, hemodynamic data, ocular reflexes, and eye position were recorded for each EtIso concentration. Pharmacodynamic analysis of CSI with EtIso was performed, as well as prediction probability analysis with a clinical scale based on the eye reflexes. The CSI values showed great variability. Between all parameters, burst suppression ratio showed the better fitting with the sigmoidal concentration-effect model (R2 = 0.93) followed by CSI (R2 = 0.82) and electromyographic activity (R2 = 0.79). EtIso was the variable with better prediction of the clinical scale of anaesthesia (prediction probability value of 0.94). Although the CSI values decrease with increasing isoflurane concentrations, the huge variability in CSI values may be a strong limitation for its use in cats and it seems to be no better than EtIso as a predictor of clinical signs. PMID:24616823

  20. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. PMID:27099254

  1. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  2. Inter- and Intra-Subunit Butanol/Isoflurane Sites of Action in the Human Glycine Receptor.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Mandy L; Gorini, Giorgio; McCracken, Lindsay M; Mayfield, R Dayne; Harris, R Adron; Trudell, James R

    2016-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) mediate inhibitory neurotransmission and are targets for alcohols and anesthetics in brain. GlyR transmembrane (TM) domains contain critical residues for alcohol/anesthetic action: amino acid A288 in TM3 forms crosslinks with TM1 (I229) in the adjacent subunit as well as TM2 (S267) and TM4 (Y406, W407, I409, Y410) in the same subunit. We hypothesized that these residues may participate in intra-subunit and inter-subunit sites of alcohol/anesthetic action. The following double and triple mutants of GLRA1 cDNA (encoding human glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit) were injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes: I229C/A288C, I229C/A288C/C290S, A288C/Y406C, A288C/W407C, A288C/I409C, and A288C/Y410C along with the corresponding single mutants and wild-type GLRA1. Butanol (22 mM) or isoflurane (0.6 mM) potentiation of GlyR-mediated currents before and after application of the cysteine crosslinking agent HgCl2 (10 μM) was measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Crosslinking nearly abolished butanol and isoflurane potentiation in the I229C/A288C and I229C/A288C/C290S mutants but had no effect in single mutants or wild-type. Crosslinking also inhibited butanol and isoflurane potentiation in the TM3-4 mutants (A288C/Y406C, A288C/W407C, A288C/I409C, A288C/Y410C) with no effect in single mutants or wild-type. We extracted proteins from oocytes expressing I229C/288C, A288C/Y410C, or wild-type GlyRs, used mass spectrometry to verify their expression and possible inter-subunit dimerization, plus immunoblotting to investigate the biochemical features of proposed crosslinks. Wild-type GlyR subunits measured about 50 kDa; after crosslinking, the dimeric/monomeric 100:50 kDa band ratio was significantly increased in I229C/288C but not A288C/Y410C mutants or wild-type, providing support for TM1-3 inter-subunit and TM3-4 intra-subunit crosslinking. A GlyR homology model based on the GluCl template provides further evidence for a multi-site model

  3. Inter- and Intra-Subunit Butanol/Isoflurane Sites of Action in the Human Glycine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Mandy L.; Gorini, Giorgio; McCracken, Lindsay M.; Mayfield, R. Dayne; Harris, R. Adron; Trudell, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) mediate inhibitory neurotransmission and are targets for alcohols and anesthetics in brain. GlyR transmembrane (TM) domains contain critical residues for alcohol/anesthetic action: amino acid A288 in TM3 forms crosslinks with TM1 (I229) in the adjacent subunit as well as TM2 (S267) and TM4 (Y406, W407, I409, Y410) in the same subunit. We hypothesized that these residues may participate in intra-subunit and inter-subunit sites of alcohol/anesthetic action. The following double and triple mutants of GLRA1 cDNA (encoding human glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit) were injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes: I229C/A288C, I229C/A288C/C290S, A288C/Y406C, A288C/W407C, A288C/I409C, and A288C/Y410C along with the corresponding single mutants and wild-type GLRA1. Butanol (22 mM) or isoflurane (0.6 mM) potentiation of GlyR-mediated currents before and after application of the cysteine crosslinking agent HgCl2 (10 μM) was measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Crosslinking nearly abolished butanol and isoflurane potentiation in the I229C/A288C and I229C/A288C/C290S mutants but had no effect in single mutants or wild-type. Crosslinking also inhibited butanol and isoflurane potentiation in the TM3-4 mutants (A288C/Y406C, A288C/W407C, A288C/I409C, A288C/Y410C) with no effect in single mutants or wild-type. We extracted proteins from oocytes expressing I229C/288C, A288C/Y410C, or wild-type GlyRs, used mass spectrometry to verify their expression and possible inter-subunit dimerization, plus immunoblotting to investigate the biochemical features of proposed crosslinks. Wild-type GlyR subunits measured about 50 kDa; after crosslinking, the dimeric/monomeric 100:50 kDa band ratio was significantly increased in I229C/288C but not A288C/Y410C mutants or wild-type, providing support for TM1-3 inter-subunit and TM3-4 intra-subunit crosslinking. A GlyR homology model based on the GluCl template provides further evidence for a multi-site model

  4. Knockout Mice Reveal a Major Role for Alveolar Epithelial Type I Cells in Alveolar Fluid Clearance.

    PubMed

    Flodby, Per; Kim, Yong Ho; Beard, LaMonta L; Gao, Danping; Ji, Yanbin; Kage, Hidenori; Liebler, Janice M; Minoo, Parviz; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Borok, Zea; Crandall, Edward D

    2016-09-01

    Active ion transport by basolateral Na-K-ATPase (Na pump) creates an Na(+) gradient that drives fluid absorption across lung alveolar epithelium. The α1 and β1 subunits are the most highly expressed Na pump subunits in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). The specific contribution of the β1 subunit and the relative contributions of alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) versus type I (AT1) cells to alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) were investigated using two cell type-specific mouse knockout lines in which the β1 subunit was knocked out in either AT1 cells or both AT1 and AT2 cells. AFC was markedly decreased in both knockout lines, revealing, we believe for the first time, that AT1 cells play a major role in AFC and providing insights into AEC-specific roles in alveolar homeostasis. AEC monolayers derived from knockout mice demonstrated decreased short-circuit current and active Na(+) absorption, consistent with in vivo observations. Neither hyperoxia nor ventilator-induced lung injury increased wet-to-dry lung weight ratios in knockout lungs relative to control lungs. Knockout mice showed increases in Na pump β3 subunit expression and β2-adrenergic receptor expression. These results demonstrate a crucial role for the Na pump β1 subunit in alveolar ion and fluid transport and indicate that both AT1 and AT2 cells make major contributions to these processes and to AFC. Furthermore, they support the feasibility of a general approach to altering alveolar epithelial function in a cell-specific manner that allows direct insights into AT1 versus AT2 cell-specific roles in the lung. PMID:27064541

  5. 2011 Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Arctic sea ice from March 7, 2011, to Sept. 9, 2011, ending with a comparison of the 30-year average minimum extent, shown in yellow, and the Northwest Passage, in red. (no audio) ...

  6. Theoretical investigation on H abstraction reaction mechanisms and rate constants of Isoflurane with the OH radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongjiang; Li, Xiaojun

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of H abstraction reactions for Isoflurane with the OH radical was investigated using density functional theory and G3(MP2) duel theory methods. The geometrical structures of all the species were fully optimised at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Thermochemistry data were obtained by utilising the high accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2) combined with the standard statistical thermodynamic calculations. Gibbs free energies were used for the reaction channels analysis. All the reaction channels were confirmed throughout the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis. The results show that two channels were obtained, which correspond to P(1) and P(2) with the respective activation barriers of 63.03 and 54.82 kJ/mol. The rate constants for the two channels over a wide temperature range of 298.15-2000 K were predicted and the calculated data are in agreement with the experimental one. The results show that P(2) is the dominant reaction channel under 800 K and above 800 K, it can be found that P(1) will be more preferable reaction channel.

  7. Covariation of pupillary and auditory cortical activity in rats under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Tokushige, H; Shiramatsu, T I; Noda, T; Kanzaki, R

    2015-08-01

    Very slow fluctuations of spontaneous activities significantly influence not only behavioral performance in a conscious state, but also neural activities in an unconscious state. Covariation of pupil and cortical activities may lend important insights into the state-dependent modulation of stimulus encoding, yet this phenomenon has received little attention, especially with regard to non-visual cortices. In the present study, we investigated co-fluctuation of pupil size and neural activity in the auditory cortex of rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Pupil fluctuation consisted of longitudinal irregular shifts, and 1-min cyclic modulations. Both spontaneous and auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) covaried with the longitudinal fluctuation of pupil size, but not with the 1-min cycle. Pupil size exhibited a positive correlation with spontaneous activity and negative correlation with AEP amplitude, particularly when the pupil size was beyond the normal range. Stimulus-specific adaptation characterized using an oddball paradigm was less dependent on pupil size than AEP. In contrast to the cortical activity, heart rate covaried with pupil size with the 1-min oscillatory component, but not the non-oscillatory component. Furthermore, light exposure induced the pupil reflex through the autonomic system, but did not modify cortical activity, indicating that autonomic activity was not causing the cortical modulation. These results together suggest that cortical activities spontaneously covary with pupillary activity through central cholinergic modulation that triggers sympathetic nerve activation. Such a state-dependent property may be a confounding factor in cortical electrophysiology studies. PMID:25967265

  8. Hepatic steatosis prevents heme oxygenase-1 induction by isoflurane in the rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Patrick; Schwer, Christian I; Goebel, Ulrich; Buerkle, Hartmut; Hoetzel, Alexander; Schmidt, Rene

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the inductive effects of isoflurane (ISO) on hepatic heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in an animal model of hepatic steatosis. METHODS: Lean (LEAN) and obese (FAT) Zucker rats were randomized into 4 groups: 1: LEAN + pentobarbital sodium (PEN); 2: LEAN + ISO; 3: FAT + PEN; 4: FAT + ISO. The animals were mechanically ventilated for 6 h. In vitro analyses of liver tissue included determination of HO-1 mRNA and protein expression as well as measurement of HO enzyme activity and immunohistochemical analyses. RESULTS: Compared to PEN treatment, ISO administration profoundly induced hepatic HO-1 mRNA and protein expression and significantly increased HO enzyme activity in lean Zucker rats. In contrast, no difference in HO-1 gene expression was observed after ISO or PEN anesthesia in obese Zucker rats. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates that ISO is an inducer of hepatic HO-1 gene expression in non-steatotic organs but failed to upregulate HO-1 in steatotic livers. PMID:22072849

  9. Prospective Analysis of Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafting in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M Gokul Chandra; Babu, V Ramesh; Rao, V Eswar; Chaitanya, J Jaya; Allareddy, S; Reddy, C Charan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: To assess the success of the uptake of bone graft in cleft alveolus of the cleft lip and palate patients, quantitatively through computed tomography (CT) scan 6 months postoperative. To assess the successful eruption of permanent lateral incisor or canine in the bone grafted area. Materials and Methods: The children age group of 9-21 years with unilateral cleft lip and palate came to the hospital, needing secondary alveolar bone grafting. A detailed history and clinical examination of the patient was taken. A 3D CT scan was taken and the volume of the cleft was measured pre-operatively. After ambulatory period, 3D CT scan of the alveolar cleft region was taken and volume of the bone grafted was measured and patient was discharged from the hospital. After 6 months, patient was recalled and again 3D CT scan was taken and the volume of remaining bone was measured. Results: The mean volume of the defect pre-operatively is 0.80 cm3 with a standard deviation of 0.36 cm3 with minimum volume of the defect 0.44 cm3 and maximum volume of the defect 1.60 cm3. The mean volume of the bone post-operative immediately after grafting is 1.01 cm3 with a standard deviation of 0.52 cm3 with minimum of bone volume is 0.48 cm3 and maximum of 2.06 cm3. The mean volume of the bone after 6 months after bone grafting is 0.54 cm3 with a standard deviation of 0.33 cm3, minimum bone volume of 0.22 cm3 and maximum bone volume of 1.42 cm3. Conclusion: The CT scan is a valuable radiographic imaging modality to assess and follow the clinical outcome of secondary alveolar bone grafting. PMID:25954076

  10. Bilateral stony lung: pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Subhash; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep; Das, Prasenjit; Sarkar, Chitra

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old male paddy field worker was referred for exertional shortness of breath and non-productive cough for 4 years. He had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis twice. Chest radiograph showed extensive bilateral nodular opacities ("sandstorm-like") in the middle and lower lobe. Pulmonary function tests revealed a restrictive ventilatory defect. High resolution CT showed widespread nodular infiltration with "crazy paving" appearance and interrupted black pleura sign. This was confirmed as pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) by trans-bronchial lung biopsy, which showed normal respiratory lining epithelium with dilated alveolar spaces containing many calcific bodies, some of which showed concentric calcification. The possibilities of silicosis (due to exposure to husk) and tuberculosis, both of which can mimic PAM clinically and radiologically, made this case a diagnostic challenge. PMID:21686505

  11. Bilateral stony lung: pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Subhash; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep; Das, Prasenjit; Sarkar, Chitra

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old male paddy field worker was referred for exertional shortness of breath and non-productive cough for 4 years. He had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis twice. Chest radiograph showed extensive bilateral nodular opacities (“sandstorm-like”) in the middle and lower lobe. Pulmonary function tests revealed a restrictive ventilatory defect. High resolution CT showed widespread nodular infiltration with “crazy paving” appearance and interrupted black pleura sign. This was confirmed as pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) by trans-bronchial lung biopsy, which showed normal respiratory lining epithelium with dilated alveolar spaces containing many calcific bodies, some of which showed concentric calcification. The possibilities of silicosis (due to exposure to husk) and tuberculosis, both of which can mimic PAM clinically and radiologically, made this case a diagnostic challenge. PMID:21686505

  12. Rare lung diseases II: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed. PMID:18551202

  13. Bmp2 and Bmp4 accelerate alveolar bone development.

    PubMed

    Ou, Mingming; Zhao, Yibing; Zhang, Fangming; Huang, Xiaofeng

    2015-06-01

    Alveolar bone remodeling is a continuous process that takes place during development and in response to various physiological and pathological stimuli. However, detailed knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms involved in alveolar bone development is still lacking. This study aims at improving our understanding of alveolar bone formation and the role of bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmps) in this process. Mice at embryonic (E) day 13.5 to postnatal (PN) day 15.5 were selected to observe the process of alveolar bone development. Alveolar bone development was found to be morphologically observable at E14.5. Molar teeth isolated from mice at PN7.5 were pretreated with Bmp2, Bmp4, Noggin, or BSA, and grafted subcutaneously into mice. The subcutaneously implanted tooth germs formed alveolar bone indicating the role of the dental follicle in alveolar bone development. Alveolar bone formation was increased after pretreatment with Bmp2 and Bmp4, but not with Noggin. Gene expression levels in dental follicle cells from murine molars were also determined by real-time RT-PCR. The expression levels of Runx2, Bsp, and Ocn were significantly higher in dental follicle cells cultured with Bmp2 or Bmp4, and significantly lower in those cultured with Noggin when compared with that of the BSA controls. Our results suggest that the dental follicle participates in alveolar bone formation and Bmp2/4 appears to accelerate alveolar bone development.

  14. Coronectomy of the mandibular third molar: Respect for the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Kouwenberg, A J; Stroy, L P P; Rijt, E D Vree-V D; Mensink, G; Gooris, P J J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of coronectomy as an alternative surgical procedure to complete removal of the impacted mandibular third molar in patients with a suspected close relationship between the tooth root(s) and the mandibular canal. A total of 151 patients underwent coronectomy and were followed up with clinical examinations and panoramic radiographs for a minimum of 6 months after surgery. None of the patients exhibited inferior alveolar nerve injury. Eruption of the retained root(s) was more frequent in younger patients (18-35 years). Thirty-six patients (23.8%) exhibited insufficient growth of new bone in the alveolar defect, and 11.3% required a second surgical procedure to remove the root remnant(s). Our results indicate that coronectomy can be a reliable alternative to complete removal of the impacted mandibular third molar in patients exhibiting an increased risk of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve on panoramic radiographs. PMID:26976696

  15. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage.

  16. Record Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Arctic sea ice reached a record low in September 2007, below the previous record set in 2005 and substantially below the long-term average. This image shows the Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, 2007. In this image, blue indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice concentration, and turquoise indicates loosely packed sea ice. The black circle at the North Pole results from an absence of data as the satellite does not make observations that far north. Three contour lines appear on this image. The red line is the 2007 minimum, as of September 15, about the same time the record low was reached, and it almost exactly fits the sea ice observed by AMSR-E. The green line indicates the 2005 minimum, the previous record low. The yellow line indicates the median minimum from 1979 to 2000.

  17. Evaluation of the anaesthetic depth during piglet castration under an automated isoflurane-anaesthesia at farm level.

    PubMed

    Schwennen, Cornelia; Kolbaum, Nina; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Höltig, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Piglet castration under isoflurane-anaesthesia could represent an alternative to the practice of castration without anaesthesia. The objective of this study was to evaluate practicality and effectiveness of an automated isoflurane-anaesthesia for castration. A field study on three different farms in Germany (farm A, B: 200 sows; C: 540 sows) was performed. In total, 1429 (1166 anaesthetised and 263 conventionally castrated) male piglets (age: 1-8 days; bodyweight: 0.7-3.7 kg) were monitored. All piglets were treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs directly before castration. Castration and anaesthesia were performed by the farm-manager in presence of a veterinarian. All farmers used the PIGNAP Pro® (Agrosystems GmbH, CH) anaesthetic device (5 vol.% isoflurane, 30% oxygen; flow rate: 2 l/min). Vocalisation and defensive movements of 1166 anaesthetised piglets was rated using a scoring system. Presence or absence of the palpebral- and flexor-reflex was noted. Approximately every second piglet was weighed and oxygen-saturation and pulse- frequency of 231 animals were measured during treatment. Rectal temperatures before and after castration of 264 anaesthetised and 263 conventionally castrated piglets were compared. Only 77% of the anaesthetised piglets showed a sufficient anaesthetic depth based on the assessment of reflexes as well as vocalisations and defensive movements. It was found that the probability for a sufficient depth of anaesthesia decreases with increasing age and weight. The measurements of the pulse-frequency and oxygen-saturation showed an average oxygen-saturation of 98% and an average heart rate of 270/min during anaesthesia. The conventionally castrated piglets had significantly higher rectal temperatures in comparison to the anaesthetised (p < 0.0001). The result of 77% sufficiently anaesthetised piglets is not adequate for commercial application of this technology.

  18. Alveolar data in healthy, awake neonates during spontaneous ventilation: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Lagneaux, D; Mossay, C; Geubelle, F; Christiaens, G

    1988-01-01

    A computerized method for the measurement of alveolar ventilation (VA) and the mean alveolar partial pressures of CO2 and O2 is described and tested in healthy, awake fullterm (FT) newborns and preterm (PT) infants (postnatal age 40 days). This study emphasizes the technical pitfalls generally encountered when dealing with very small infants. A sensitive pneumotachograph with a small dead space volume and a low-flow sampling system for the gas analyzer are minimum requirements. Under these technical conditions, the major problem is the scanning time of the mass spectrometer (50 Hz), which fixes the time constant, as well as the digitization sampling rate of the gas signals. This rate was not sufficient when the respiratory rate was above 90 min-1. As critical visual evaluation of each breath is required, fully automatic access to mean alveolar data is not possible. The mean dead-space volume in both FT and PT infants was 2 ml.kg-1, with a VD/VT ratio of 0.3. The mean alveolar point was 2/3 VT, as found in adults. When expressed as ml.min-1.kg-1, VA appeared to be higher than in other studies, but related to the metabolic requirements. (VCO2 = 7.8 +/- 0.2 ml.min-1.kg-1 and VO2 = 8.0 +/- 0.2 ml.min-1.kg-1), in accordance with the state of vigilance of the neonates. Indeed, the PACO2 values, which depend on the ratio VCO2/VA, are in agreement with the values of PaCO2 generally considered normal in healthy newborns over 1 week of age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3237450

  19. Dynamic Causal Models and Physiological Inference: A Validation Study Using Isoflurane Anaesthesia in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Rosalyn J.; Jung, Fabienne; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Endepols, Heike; Graf, Rudolf; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl J.; Stephan, Klaas E.; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Generative models of neuroimaging and electrophysiological data present new opportunities for accessing hidden or latent brain states. Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) uses Bayesian model inversion and selection to infer the synaptic mechanisms underlying empirically observed brain responses. DCM for electrophysiological data, in particular, aims to estimate the relative strength of synaptic transmission at different cell types and via specific neurotransmitters. Here, we report a DCM validation study concerning inference on excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, using different doses of a volatile anaesthetic agent (isoflurane) to parametrically modify excitatory and inhibitory synaptic processing while recording local field potentials (LFPs) from primary auditory cortex (A1) and the posterior auditory field (PAF) in the auditory belt region in rodents. We test whether DCM can infer, from the LFP measurements, the expected drug-induced changes in synaptic transmission mediated via fast ionotropic receptors; i.e., excitatory (glutamatergic) AMPA and inhibitory GABAA receptors. Cross- and auto-spectra from the two regions were used to optimise three DCMs based on biologically plausible neural mass models and specific network architectures. Consistent with known extrinsic connectivity patterns in sensory hierarchies, we found that a model comprising forward connections from A1 to PAF and backward connections from PAF to A1 outperformed a model with forward connections from PAF to A1 and backward connections from A1 to PAF and a model with reciprocal lateral connections. The parameter estimates from the most plausible model indicated that the amplitude of fast glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) behaved as predicted by previous neurophysiological studies. Specifically, with increasing levels of anaesthesia, glutamatergic EPSPs decreased linearly, whereas fast GABAergic IPSPs displayed a

  20. Early Exposure to General Anesthesia with Isoflurane Downregulates Inhibitory Synaptic Neurotransmission in the Rat Thalamus.

    PubMed

    Joksovic, Pavle M; Lunardi, Nadia; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence supports the idea that common general anesthetics (GAs) such as isoflurane (Iso) and nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) are neurotoxic and may harm the developing mammalian brain, including the thalamus; however, to date very little is known about how developmental exposure to GAs may affect synaptic transmission in the thalamus which, in turn, controls the function of thalamocortical circuitry. To address this issue we used in vitro patch-clamp recordings of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) from intact neurons of the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRT) in brain slices from rat pups (postnatal age P10-P18) exposed at age of P7 to clinically relevant GA combinations of Iso and N2O. We found that rats exposed to a combination of 0.75 % Iso and 75 % N2O display lasting reduction in the amplitude and faster decays of eIPSCs. Exposure to sub-anesthetic concentrations of 75 % N2O alone or 0.75 % Iso alone at P7 did not affect the amplitude of eIPSCs; however, Iso alone, but not N2O, significantly accelerated decay of eIPSCs. Anesthesia with 1.5 % Iso alone decreased amplitudes, caused faster decay and decreased the paired-pulse ratio of eIPSCs. We conclude that anesthesia at P7 with Iso alone or in combination with N2O causes plasticity of eIPSCs in nRT neurons by both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We hypothesize that changes in inhibitory synaptic transmission in the thalamus induced by GAs may contribute to altered neuronal excitability and consequently abnormal thalamocortical oscillations later in life. PMID:26048671

  1. Minimum Critical Values Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.

    2005-07-11

    This report provides minimum critical values for various 30-cm water-reflected uranium and plutonium oxide and nitrate aqueous mixtures as calculated by the SCALE CSAS1X sequence using the 238-group ENDF/B-V neutron cross-section library. The minimum values were determined through parametric searches in one-dimensional geometry. The calculations have been performed to obtain the minimum values: critical volume and mass for spheres, critical radius for cylinders, critical thickness for slabs, and minimum critical concentration (infinite geometry) for the following homogeneous mixtures: (1) UO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (2) UNH for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (3) PuO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu); and (4) PuNH for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu). All bounding surfaces were fully reflected by 30 cm of H{sub 2}O.

  2. Minimum variance geographic sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, G. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Resource inventories require samples with geographical scatter, sometimes not as widely spaced as would be hoped. A simple model of correlation over distances is used to create a minimum variance unbiased estimate population means. The fitting procedure is illustrated from data used to estimate Missouri corn acreage.

  3. Mean alveolar gases and alveolar-arterial gradients in pulmonary patients.

    PubMed

    Luft, U C; Loeppky, J A; Mostyn, E M

    1979-03-01

    In view of uncertainties about the best way to estimate mean alveolar gases in patients with ventilation-perfusion inequalities, three different methods were evaluated on 54 patients. 1) O2 and CO2 were recorded by mass spectrometer on an O2 (x)-CO2 (y) diagram. The coordinates at the intersect of the expiratory record with the mixed expired R line (RE) ives the mean alveolar values (PAo2 and PAco2. 2)pa'co2 was calculated with the Bohr equation using a predicted anatomic dead space and PA'o2 was derived with the alveolar equation. 3) End-tidal (ET) P02 were averaged over 1 min at rest in steady state. Mean RET calculated from 3 was identical with RE. Mean values for PAco2, PA'CO2. and PETco2 differed by less that 1 Torr, but the variance was least with the end-tidal method. There was a highly significant correlation between delta aAPco2 using PETco2 and VD/VT, better than with either of the other methods. The end-tidal measurement appears to give the best approximation of mean alveolar gas in pulmonary patients.

  4. An estimation of mechanical stress on alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening and closure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng-Long; Song, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Zhao-Yan; Zhang, Su; Chen, Ya-Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Alveolar overdistension and mechanical stresses generated by repetitive opening and closing of small airways and alveoli have been widely recognized as two primary mechanistic factors that may contribute to the development of ventilator-induced lung injury. A long-duration exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to even small, shear stresses could lead to the changes in cytoskeleton and the production of inflammatory mediators. In this paper, we have made an attempt to estimate in situ the magnitudes of mechanical stresses exerted on the alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening by using a tape-peeling model of McEwan and Taylor (35). To this end, we first speculate the possible ranges of capillary number (Ca) ≡ μU/γ (a dimensionless combination of surface tension γ, fluid viscosity μ, and alveolar opening velocity U) during in vivo alveolar opening. Subsequent calculations show that increasing respiratory rate or inflation rate serves to increase the values of mechanical stresses. For a normal lung, the predicted maximum shear stresses are <15 dyn/cm(2) at all respiratory rates, whereas for a lung with elevated surface tension or viscosity, the maximum shear stress will notably increase, even at a slow respiratory rate. Similarly, the increased pressure gradients in the case of elevated surface or viscosity may lead to a pressure drop >300 dyn/cm(2) across a cell, possibly inducing epithelial hydraulic cracks. In addition, we have conceived of a geometrical model of alveolar opening to make a prediction of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) required to splint open a collapsed alveolus, which as shown by our results, covers a wide range of pressures, from several centimeters to dozens of centimeters of water, strongly depending on the underlying pulmonary conditions. The establishment of adequate regional ventilation-to-perfusion ratios may prevent recruited alveoli from reabsorption atelectasis and accordingly, reduce the required levels of

  5. Inferior alveolar and lingual nerve imaging.

    PubMed

    Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2011-03-01

    At present, there are no objective testing modalities available for evaluation of iatrogenic injury to the terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve, making such clinical diagnosis and management complicated for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Several imaging modalities can assist in the preoperative risk assessment of the trigeminal nerve as related to commonly performed procedures in the vicinity of the nerve, mostly third molar surgery. This article provides a review of all available imaging modalities and their clinical application relative to preoperative injury risk assessment of the inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve, and postinjury and postsurgical repair recovery status.

  6. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in a marble worker.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Berna Botan; Akgedik, Recep; Akgedik, Sukran; Nazaroglu, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rarely seen disease of the alveoli, characterized by accumulation of proteinous material, which stains positive with periodic acid Schiff, in the alveoli. Secondary PAP may develop as a result of occupational exposure to materials such as silica and indium. In the paper, together with a review of the relevant literature, we present an uncommon case of a 47-year old male, marble worker who was diagnosed with PAP associated with a 12-year history of exposure to marble dust. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5):871-876. PMID:27518894

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Gingival Tissue and Alveolar Bone during Alveolar Bone Healing*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Kwon, Joseph; Kook, Min-Suk; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun; Sohn, Sungoh; Jung, Seunggon; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is orchestrated by the surrounding supporting tissues and involves the build-up of osteogenic cells, which orchestrate remodeling/healing through the expression of numerous mediators and signaling molecules. Periodontal regeneration models have proven useful for studying the interaction and communication between alveolar bone and supporting soft tissue. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare proteins with altered expression in gingival soft tissue and alveolar bone following tooth extraction. For target identification and validation, hard and soft tissue were extracted from mini-pigs at the indicated times after tooth extraction. From triplicate experiments, 56 proteins in soft tissue and 27 proteins in alveolar bone were found to be differentially expressed before and after tooth extraction. The expression of 21 of those proteins was altered in both soft tissue and bone. Comparison of the activated networks in soft tissue and alveolar bone highlighted their distinct responsibilities in bone and tissue healing. Moreover, we found that there is crosstalk between identified proteins in soft tissue and alveolar bone with respect to cellular assembly, organization, and communication. Among these proteins, we examined in detail the expression patterns and associated networks of ATP5B and fibronectin 1. ATP5B is involved in nucleic acid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and neurological disease, and fibronectin 1 is involved in cellular assembly, organization, and maintenance. Collectively, our findings indicate that bone regeneration is accompanied by a profound interaction among networks regulating cellular resources, and they provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the healing of periodontal tissue after tooth extraction. PMID:23824910

  8. Deficiency of vitamin E in the alveolar fluid of cigarette smokers. Influence on alveolar macrophage cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Pacht, E R; Kaseki, H; Mohammed, J R; Cornwell, D G; Davis, W B

    1986-01-01

    Cigarette smoking produces oxidant-mediated changes in the lung important to the pathogenesis of emphysema. Since vitamin E can neutralize reactive oxygen species and prevent peroxidation of unsaturated lipids, it may constitute an important component of the lung's defense against oxidant injury. To better characterize the antioxidant protective role of vitamin E, young asymptomatic smokers and nonsmokers were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage before and immediately after a 3-wk course of oral vitamin E (2,400 IU/d). Smoker alveolar fluid at baseline was relatively deficient in vitamin E compared with nonsmoker fluid (3.1 +/- 0.7 ng/ml vs. 20.7 +/- 2.4 ng/ml, P less than 0.005). Although smoker alveolar fluid vitamin E levels increased to 9.3 +/- 2.3 ng/ml after supplementation, the levels remained significantly lower than nonsmoker baseline levels (P less than 0.01). This deficiency was explained, in part, by the increased oxidative metabolism of vitamin E to the quinone form in the lungs of smokers compared with nonsmokers. Although the significance of a lower concentration of alveolar fluid vitamin E is unclear, it may compromise the antioxidant protection afforded by the alveolar fluid as it coats the lung's epithelial surface. The protective role of vitamin E was assessed by cytotoxicity experiments, which demonstrated that the killing of normal rat lung parenchymal cells by smoker alveolar macrophages was inversely related to the vitamin E content of the parenchymal cells. These findings suggest that vitamin E may be an important lower respiratory tract antioxidant, and that the deficiency seen in young smokers may predispose them to an enhanced oxidant attack on their lung parenchymal cells. PMID:3949977

  9. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  10. Comparison of remifentanil versus regional anaesthesia in children anaesthetised with isoflurane/nitrous oxide. International Remifentanil Paediatric Anaesthesia Study group.

    PubMed

    Prys-Roberts, C; Lerman, J; Murat, I; Taivainen, T; Lopez, T; Lejus, C; Spahr-Schopfer, I; Splinter, W; Kirkham, A J

    2000-09-01

    We compared the efficacy and safety of a remifentanil (0.25 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)-based balanced anaesthetic technique with a bupivacaine-based regional anaesthetic technique in an open label, multicentre study in 271 ASA physical status 1 or 2 children aged 1-12 years. Subjects requiring major intra-abdominal, urological or orthopaedic surgery were randomly allocated to receive either intravenous remifentanil (group R; n = 185) or epidural bupivacaine (group B; n = 86) with isoflurane/nitrous oxide for their anaesthesia. The majority of children in both groups (85% in group R, 78% in group B) showed no defined response to skin incision, and although the mean increase in systolic blood pressure (+11 mm Hg) was significantly greater in group R than in group B, this change did not represent a serious haemodynamic disturbance. More children in group R (31%) required interventions to treat hypotension and/or bradycardia than those in group B (12%), but these were easily managed by administration of fluids or anticholinergic drugs. Adverse events, mainly nausea and/or vomiting, occurred in 45% of group R and 42% of group B (NS). The adverse event profile of remifentanil in this study was typical of a potent mu-opioid receptor agonist. Remifentanil was as effective as epidural or caudal block in providing analgesia and suppressing physiological responses to surgical stimuli in children aged between 1 and 12 years undergoing major abdominal, urological, or orthopaedic surgery under isoflurane/nitrous oxide anaesthesia.

  11. Comparison of remifentanil versus regional anaesthesia in children anaesthetised with isoflurane/nitrous oxide. International Remifentanil Paediatric Anaesthesia Study group.

    PubMed

    Prys-Roberts, C; Lerman, J; Murat, I; Taivainen, T; Lopez, T; Lejus, C; Spahr-Schopfer, I; Splinter, W; Kirkham, A J

    2000-09-01

    We compared the efficacy and safety of a remifentanil (0.25 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)-based balanced anaesthetic technique with a bupivacaine-based regional anaesthetic technique in an open label, multicentre study in 271 ASA physical status 1 or 2 children aged 1-12 years. Subjects requiring major intra-abdominal, urological or orthopaedic surgery were randomly allocated to receive either intravenous remifentanil (group R; n = 185) or epidural bupivacaine (group B; n = 86) with isoflurane/nitrous oxide for their anaesthesia. The majority of children in both groups (85% in group R, 78% in group B) showed no defined response to skin incision, and although the mean increase in systolic blood pressure (+11 mm Hg) was significantly greater in group R than in group B, this change did not represent a serious haemodynamic disturbance. More children in group R (31%) required interventions to treat hypotension and/or bradycardia than those in group B (12%), but these were easily managed by administration of fluids or anticholinergic drugs. Adverse events, mainly nausea and/or vomiting, occurred in 45% of group R and 42% of group B (NS). The adverse event profile of remifentanil in this study was typical of a potent mu-opioid receptor agonist. Remifentanil was as effective as epidural or caudal block in providing analgesia and suppressing physiological responses to surgical stimuli in children aged between 1 and 12 years undergoing major abdominal, urological, or orthopaedic surgery under isoflurane/nitrous oxide anaesthesia. PMID:10947750

  12. Activation of the canonical nuclear factor-κB pathway is involved in isoflurane-induced hippocampal interleukin-1β elevation and the resultant cognitive deficits in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng-Qian; Rong, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Ya-Jie; Ni, Cheng; Tian, Xiao-Sheng; Mo, Na; Chui, De-Hua; Guo, Xiang-Yang

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Isoflurane induces hippocampal IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits in aged rats. •Isoflurane transiently activates the canonical NF-κB pathway in aged rat hippocampus. •NF-κB inhibitor mitigates isoflurane-induced IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits. •We report a linkage between NF-κB signaling, IL-1β expression, and cognitive changes. -- Abstract: Although much recent evidence has demonstrated that neuroinflammation contributes to volatile anesthetic-induced cognitive deficits, there are few existing mechanistic explanations for this inflammatory process. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane on canonical nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling, and to explore its association with hippocampal interleukin (IL)-1β levels and anesthetic-related cognitive changes in aged rats. After a 4-h exposure to 1.5% isoflurane in 20-month-old rats, increases in IκB kinase and IκB phosphorylation, as well as a reduction in the NF-κB inhibitory protein (IκBα), were observed in the hippocampi of isoflurane-exposed rats compared with control rats. These events were accompanied by an increase in NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation at 6 h after isoflurane exposure and hippocampal IL-1β elevation from 1 to 6 h after isoflurane exposure. Nevertheless, no significant neuroglia activation was observed. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate markedly suppressed the IL-1β increase and NF-κB signaling, and also mitigated the severity of cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze task. Overall, our results demonstrate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may stem from upregulation of hippocampal IL-1β, partially via activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, in aged rats.

  13. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  14. Daily Isoflurane Exposure Increases Barbiturate Insensitivity in Medullary Respiratory and Cortical Neurons via Expression of ε-Subunit Containing GABA ARs

    PubMed Central

    Hengen, Keith B.; Nelson, Nathan R.; Stang, Kyle M.; Johnson, Stephen M.; Smith, Stephanie M.; Watters, Jyoti J.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Behan, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The parameters governing GABAA receptor subtype expression patterns are not well understood, although significant shifts in subunit expression may support key physiological events. For example, the respiratory control network in pregnant rats becomes relatively insensitive to barbiturates due to increased expression of ε-subunit-containing GABAARs in the ventral respiratory column. We hypothesized that this plasticity may be a compensatory response to a chronic increase in inhibitory tone caused by increased central neurosteroid levels. Thus, we tested whether increased inhibitory tone was sufficient to induce ε-subunit upregulation on respiratory and cortical neurons in adult rats. Chronic intermittent increases in inhibitory tone in male and female rats was induced via daily 5-min exposures to 3% isoflurane. After 7d of treatment, phrenic burst frequency was less sensitive to barbiturate in isoflurane-treated male and female rats in vivo. Neurons in the ventral respiratory group and cortex were less sensitive to pentobarbital in vitro following 7d and 30d of intermittent isoflurane-exposure in both male and female rats. The pentobarbital insensitivity in 7d isoflurane-treated rats was reversible after another 7d. We hypothesize that increased inhibitory tone in the respiratory control network and cortex causes a compensatory increase in ε-subunit-containing GABAARs. PMID:25748028

  15. Alveolar hemorrhage in vasculitis: primary and secondary.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) in primary and secondary vasculitis occurs when capillaritis is present. The diagnosis of DAH is considered in patients who develop progressive dyspnea with alveolar opacities on chest imaging (with density ranging from ground glass to consolidation) that cannot be explained otherwise. Hemoptysis, a valuable sign, is often absent. A decline of blood hemoglobin level over a few days without hemolysis or any hemorrhage elsewhere should be an alert for DAH. Bronchoalveolar lavage, retrieving bright red fluid, is the best diagnostic clue. Lung biopsy is not recommended. A search for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCAs) is mandatory. Once DAH is diagnosed and hemodynamic as well as infectious causes have been excluded, ANCA-associated vasculitis is taken into account (mainly microscopic polyangiitis or Wegener granulomatosis, and, exceptionally, Churg-Strauss syndrome). Drug-induced DAH, especially antithyroid drugs such as propylthiouracil may be coupled with ANCA. Isolated DAH with capillaritis with or without ANCA is rare. DAH in systemic lupus erythematosus is either associated or not with capillaritis. Treatment of DAH should target the underlying disorder. In the primary vasculitides, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants, especially cyclophosphamide, are the mainstay of therapy, but plasma exchange, particularly in severe DAH, is the rule, although evidence of its effectiveness is awaited.

  16. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Jeong, Daniel K; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Jeong, Katherine; Hill, Ebone D; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potentially fatal pulmonary disease syndrome that affects individuals with hematological and nonhematological malignancies. The range of inciting factors is wide for this syndrome and includes thrombocytopenia, underlying infection, coagulopathy, and the frequent use of anticoagulants, given the high incidence of venous thrombosis in this population. Dyspnea, fever, and cough are commonly presenting symptoms. However, clinical manifestations can be variable. Obvious bleeding (hemoptysis) is not always present and can pose a potential diagnostic challenge. Without prompt treatment, hypoxia that rapidly progresses to respiratory failure can occur. Diagnosis is primarily based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. This syndrome is especially common in patients with hematological malignancies, given an even greater propensity for thrombocytopenia as a result of bone marrow suppression as well as the often prolonged immunosuppression in this patient population. The syndrome also has an increased incidence in individuals with hematological malignancies who have received a bone marrow transplant. We present a case series of 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage at our institution. A comparison of clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, treatment course, and outcomes are described. A review of the literature and general overview of the diagnostic evaluation, differential diagnoses, pathophysiology, and treatment of this syndrome are discussed. PMID:27556667

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of pulmonary alveolar capillary vessels

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, I. G. S.; Ritchie, B. C.; Maloney, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The pattern of subepithelial vessels in pulmonary alveoli of rabbits has been studied using scanning electron microscopy. Alveolar capillaries form a network of interconnecting vascular rings, most of which surround the periphery of type II cells of the alveolar epithelium. Individual capillaries contributing to the formation of adjacent rings follow a corrugated course with angulations located on the sites of junction with other capillaries completing the rings; the capillaries are covered by type I epithelial cells which also extend into and form the alveolar lining at the peripheral area of the interstices of the capillary network. Single type II cells form the alveolar lining at the centre of vascular rings. The pattern of pulmonary alveolar capillaries revealed by scanning electron microscopy is thus similar to that postulated by Weibel (1963) on the basis of transmission microscopic studies. Images PMID:4731118

  18. Cocaine-induced Fos expression is detectable in the frontal cortex and striatum of rats under isoflurane but not α-chloralose anesthesia: implications for FMRI

    PubMed Central

    Kufahl, Peter R.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Heintzelman, Krista; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of intravenous cocaine to induce Fos protein expression in anesthetized rats was tested. Two anesthetic regimens commonly used for in vivo FMRI of animals, i.v. α-chloralose and gaseous isoflurane, were studied in separate cohorts. The first experiment included three groups that received the following treatments: saline i.v. and no anesthetic; 2 mg/kg cocaine i.v. and no anesthetic; and 2 mg/kg cocaine i.v. under 36 mg/kg/h α-chloralose anesthesia. The second experiment had a factorial design of four groups that were either nonanesthetized or isoflurane-treated and were either given saline or cocaine (2 mg/kg, i.v.). Anesthetized rats were maintained for 2 h under 2.5–3.5% isoflurane anesthesia, while nonanesthetized rats were kept in an alternative environment for the same time period. Rats were given 2 mg/kg cocaine or saline i.v., 30 min into the test session. Rats were perfused and their brains were processed for Fos immunohistochemistry 90 min after the i.v. treatment. In both experiments, the frontal cortex and striatum of the cocaine-treated nonanesthetized rats expressed Fos in greater amounts than the saline-treated nonanesthetized rats, as expected. The α-chloralose treatment prevented cocaine-induced Fos expression across all eight subregions of the striatum and frontal cortex that were examined. In contrast, isoflurane only partially attenuated Fos expression in the orbital and Cg2 subregions of frontal cortex. These results suggest a strong advantage for using isoflurane, as opposed to α-chloralose, when studying anesthetized rats for in vivo effects of psychostimulants. PMID:19467261

  19. Minimum fuel mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    The minimum fuel mode of the NASA F-15 research aircraft is designed to minimize fuel flow while maintaining constant net propulsive force (FNP), effectively reducing thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), during cruise flight conditions. The test maneuvers were at stabilized flight conditions. The aircraft test engine was allowed to stabilize at the cruise conditions before data collection initiated; data were then recorded with performance seeking control (PSC) not-engaged, then data were recorded with the PSC system engaged. The maneuvers were flown back-to-back to allow for direct comparisons by minimizing the effects of variations in the test day conditions. The minimum fuel mode was evaluated at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers and focused on three altitudes: 15,000; 30,000; and 45,000 feet. Flight data were collected for part, military, partial, and maximum afterburning power conditions. The TSFC savings at supersonic Mach numbers, ranging from approximately 4% to nearly 10%, are in general much larger than at subsonic Mach numbers because of PSC trims to the afterburner.

  20. Haemodynamic interactions of medetomidine and the peripheral alpha-2 antagonist MK-467 during step infusions in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Johanna; del Castillo, Jérôme R E; Salla, Kati; Troncy, Eric; Raekallio, Marja R; Vainio, Outi M

    2014-11-01

    The haemodynamic interactions of a step infusion with medetomidine (MED) and the peripherally acting alpha-2 antagonist MK-467 (MK) were compared with MED infused alone in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs. Eight purposely-bred Beagles were used in a randomised crossover study. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol intravenously (IV) and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Dogs received 1.25 µg/kg MED as a 1 min loading dose IV, along with a step-down MED infusion at rates of 8.0 µg/kg/h (step 1: 0-20 min), 5.5 µg/kg/h (step 2: 20-40 min) and 4.0 µg/kg/h (step 3: 40-95 min). Five minutes after starting the MED infusion, the dogs received MK-467 in a step-up infusion at rates of 100 µg/kg/h (step 1: 5-35 min), 200 µg/kg/h (step 2: 35-65 min) and 500 µg/kg/h (step 3: 65-95 min). Heart rate (HR), systolic (SAP) and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressures and arteriovenous oxygen content differences (a-vO2 diff) were calculated. Plasma drug concentrations were analysed. Repeated-measures general linear mixed models with Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analyses. MED infusion alone increased SAP maximally by 24.9%, MAP by 34.7% and a-vO2 diff by 222.5%, and reduced HR by 32.3%, but these changes were significantly attenuated by MK-467. Most MED effects returned to baseline during step 2 of MK-467 infusion and step 3 of MED infusion (MED/MK-467 ratio 1:18 to 1:50). Plasma concentrations of MED tended to be lower with the addition of MK-467. The use of step infusions helped to narrow down the therapeutic range for the MED/MK-467 infusion dose ratio during isoflurane anaesthesia in dogs.

  1. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  2. Modern therapy for severe alveolar ridge atrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Feng; Pan, Chin-Yun; Wang, Wen-Chen; Lan, Ting-Hsun

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report illustrates a modern method for oral rehabilitation of severe edentulous atrophic ridge. Shallow vestibule and small denture-bearing area of the maxilla provide insufficient retention, and only the symphyseal region of the mandible has obvious alveolar ridge. The surgery of deepening vestibule of the maxilla ridge was done by using tentative miniscrew combined with old denture and soft liner. The osseointegrated dental implants were installed over symphyseal region of the mandible to act as retentive devices for prostheses. In addition, functional reline with rebase material to build buccal-tongue contact over the retromolar area after denture delivery obtained high satisfaction from the patient. Many clinical conditions cannot be managed solely with implants or preprosthetic surgery alone, whereas a combination of the 2 can achieve successful outcome. PMID:24036818

  3. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  4. [Distraction osteogenesis of deficient alveolar bone prior to dental rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Shilo, D; Emodi, O; Aizenbud, D; Rachmiel, A

    2015-07-01

    Implant supported rehabilitation has become very common in treatment plans nowadays, yet many patients lack the vertical and horizontal bone dimensions required for endosseous implant insertion. Distraction osteogenesis is a technique in which bone is generated by progressive elongation of two bone fragments following an osteotomy or corticotomy. Distraction osteogenesis of the alveolar ridge as a treatment modality in implant dentistry is a very useful technique that allows for adequate bone formation suitable for implant insertion. Alveolar distraction can be unidirectional, bidirectional, multidirectional or horizontal. Alveolar distraction osteogenesis can be performed by using intraosseous distraction devices, intraosseous distraction implants or by extraosseous devices which are the most prevalent today. Distraction osteogenesis has many advantages such as gradual lengthening of the bone with no need for an autogenous bone graft and lack of the associated donor site morbidity as well as distraction of the surrounding soft tissue together with the transported bone. One of the major challenges when using alveolar distraction osteogenesis is controlling the vector of distraction, this problem should be further addressed in future researches. We describe different methods for alveolar distraction osteogenesis, including the surgical procedure, latency period, lengthening and consolidation period. We also discuss the advantages, disadvantages and complications of the method. In this manuscript a case of mandibular alveolar deficiency following mandibular fracture and loss of teeth and the alveolar bone is presented. This patient was treated by alveolar distraction osteogenesis with excellent results. This patient was later rehabilitated . using endosseous implants as demonstrated by radiographs. Alveolar distraction osteogenesis provides a method to regain both hard tissue and soft tissue without additional grafting and is an efficient modality in cases of medium

  5. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kevin T; Brokaw, Everett J; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure.

  6. Alveolar-cell carcinoma: a problem in sputum cytodiagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spriggs, A I; Cole, M; Dunnill, M S

    1982-01-01

    Cytology and histology are correlated in a series of 22 cases chosen to illustrate the differential diagnosis between clusters of benign bronchial or bronchiolar cells seen in sputum, and those of alveolar cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma with alveolar spread. Alveolar-cell carcinoma is characterised by clusters of small epithelial cells in spherical or irregular formations, none showing enough polarity to distinguish a smooth or palisaded surface. The appearances are most distinctive if vacuolation is absent. The diagnosis cannot, however, be confidently made in all cases from morphological features of cells in sputum. Images PMID:6294147

  7. Desquamative alveolar disease (desquamative interstitial pneumonia): case report 1

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Edgardo; Rodriguez, Jaime; Lisboa, Carmen; Ferretti, Ricardo

    1969-01-01

    Desquamative interstitial pneumonia is a disease characterized by massive alveolar cell proliferation and desquamation with sparse interstitial involvement. The reported case shows an unusually widespread radiographic reticulo-nodular image and abundant alveolar cells in the sputum. Functional studies reveal the expected diffusion defect with practically normal mechanical properties of the lung, in contrast with interstitial fibrosing lung diseases. On the basis of the pathological findings, especially the behaviour of alveolar cells, the individuality of this disease is discussed. We think that it is different from other diseases classed as varieties of a single disease or as different entities under the names of primary interstitial fibrosis or chronic fibrosing alveolitis. Images PMID:5822250

  8. Effects of different concentration and duration time of isoflurane on acute and long-term neurocognitve function of young adult C57BL/6 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianhui; Wang, Peijun; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a decline in cognitive performance after a surgery with anaesthesia. The exact reasons of surgery and/or anaesthesia resulting in POCD are unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different concentration and duration time of isoflurane anaesthesia on cognitive performance and cellular mechanisms involved in learning and memory function. In present work, young adult male C57BL/6 mice (age: 8 weeks) were anaesthetized by different concentration isoflurane in 100% oxygen for different duration time (Mice in group I1 received 0.7% isoflurane 0.5 h, mice in I2 received 0.7% isoflurane 2 h, mice in I3 received 1.4% isoflurane 2 h, and mice in I4 received 1.4% isoflurane 4 h). Non-anaesthetized mice served as control group (I0). Spatial learning was assessed at 10 days post-anesthesia in Morris water maze (MWM). Hippocampal protein expressions of activated caspase 3, NMDA receptor subunit NR2B, and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 were evaluated 24 hours and 2 weeks post anesthesia. Protein expression of activated caspase3 was detected acute elevated in I3 (24 h post-anesthesia) and acute and long-term elevated in I4 (24 hours and 2 weeks post-anesthesia). There was no significant difference between I1, I2 and control group. Protein expressions of NR2B showed an acute and long-term increasement in I1 and I2, decreasement in I4, and an acute decline, then returned to normal in I3 compared to control group. The ratio of phosopho-ERK1/2 to total-ERK showed an acute increasement in I1 and I2, then came to normal 2 weeks post anesthesia compared to control group, meanwhile, we detected an acute and long-term decline in I3 and I4. In MWM test, mice in I1 and I2 showed cognitive improvement, mice in I3 showed similar to control group, while mice in I4 demonstrated cognitive impairment, which were approximately corresponding to the changes of protein expression of NR2B and activation of ERK1

  9. Minimum Competency in Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Landsheere, Viviane

    1987-01-01

    Discusses issues related to the movement toward minimum competency in secondary education. Addresses the problem of defining minimum competency and the dangers of imposed standardization. Identifies three conceptualizations of minimum competency as: (1) the narrowly educational standpoint, (2) the concern with functional literacy, and (3) a more…

  10. Design for Minimum Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Design for Minimum Risk (DFMR) is a term used by NASA programs as an expansion of the general hazard reduction process where if an identified hazard cannot be eliminated, the design is modified to reduce the associated mishap risk to an acceptable level. DFMR is a set of specific requirements to minimize risk. DFMR is not well understood and there are many misconceptions concerning the meaning and use. This paper will provide insight into the use of DFMR for space applications; it s comparison to other hazard mitigation strategies and examples of how the approach has been used in the past. It will also highlight documents used by NASA on various programs to determine DFMR.

  11. Molecular and Integrative Physiological Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia: The Paradigm of Cardiovascular Studies in Rodents using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Constantinides, Christakis; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    To-this-date, the exact molecular, cellular, and integrative physiological mechanisms of anesthesia remain largely unknown. Published evidence indicates that anesthetic effects are multifocal and occur in a time-dependent and coordinated manner, mediated via central, local, and peripheral pathways. Their effects can be modulated by a range of variables, and their elicited end-effect on the integrative physiological response is highly variable. This review summarizes the major cellular and molecular sites of anesthetic action with a focus on the paradigm of isoflurane (ISO) - the most commonly used anesthetic nowadays - and its use in prolonged in vivo rodent studies using imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It also presents established evidence for normal ranges of global and regional physiological cardiac function under ISO, proposes optimal, practical methodologies relevant to the use of anesthetic protocols for MRI and outlines the beneficial effects of nitrous oxide supplementation. PMID:27525256

  12. Molecular and Integrative Physiological Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia: The Paradigm of Cardiovascular Studies in Rodents using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    To-this-date, the exact molecular, cellular, and integrative physiological mechanisms of anesthesia remain largely unknown. Published evidence indicates that anesthetic effects are multifocal and occur in a time-dependent and coordinated manner, mediated via central, local, and peripheral pathways. Their effects can be modulated by a range of variables, and their elicited end-effect on the integrative physiological response is highly variable. This review summarizes the major cellular and molecular sites of anesthetic action with a focus on the paradigm of isoflurane (ISO) – the most commonly used anesthetic nowadays – and its use in prolonged in vivo rodent studies using imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It also presents established evidence for normal ranges of global and regional physiological cardiac function under ISO, proposes optimal, practical methodologies relevant to the use of anesthetic protocols for MRI and outlines the beneficial effects of nitrous oxide supplementation. PMID:27525256

  13. The Pore Loop Domain of TRPV1 Is Required for Its Activation by the Volatile Anesthetics Chloroform and Isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Corinna; Luo, Jialie; Yin, Shijin; Hu, Hongzhen; Dhaka, Ajay

    2015-07-01

    The environmental irritant chloroform, a naturally occurring small volatile organohalogen, briefly became the world's most popular volatile general anesthetic (VGA) before being abandoned because of its low therapeutic index. When chloroform comes in contact with skin or is ingested, it causes a painful burning sensation. The molecular basis for the pain associated with chloroform remains unknown. In this study, we assessed the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family members in mediating chloroform activation and the molecular determinants of VGA activation of TRPV1. We identified the subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that are activated by chloroform. Additionally, we transiently expressed wild-type or specifically mutated TRP channels in human embryonic kidney cells and used calcium imaging or whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to assess the effects of chloroform or the VGA isoflurane on TRP channel activation. The results revealed that chloroform activates DRG neurons via TRPV1 activation. Furthermore, chloroform activates TRPV1, and it also activates TRPM8 and functions as a potent inhibitor of the noxious chemical receptor TRPA1. The results also indicate that residues in the outer pore region of TRPV1 previously thought to be required for either proton or heat activation of the channel are also required for activation by chloroform and isoflurane. In addition to identifying the molecular basis of DRG neuron activation by chloroform and the opposing effects chloroform has on different TRP channel family members, the findings of this study provide novel insights into the structural basis for the activation of TRPV1 by VGAs.

  14. Assessment of Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Dioxide/Oxygen, Isoflurane and Pentobarbital Killing Methods in Adult Female Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) gas as a killing method is aversive and exposure to high concentrations is likely to be painful. Bradycardia during exposure to CO2 is associated with nociception and pain. However, it is unclear if bradycardia occurs before loss of consciousness as definitions of loss of consciousness vary in the literature. The objectives of this study were to explore the relationship between recumbency, loss of righting reflex (LORR) and a quiescent electromyograph as measures of loss of consciousness, and identify the onset of bradycardia in relation to these measures. Our primary hypothesis was that CO2 exposure would result in bradycardia, which would precede LORR. Methods Thirty-two adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with a telemetry device and randomly assigned to one of four killing methods (concentrations of 100% CO2, CO2 (70%)/O2 (30%), isoflurane (5%) and intraperitoneal pentobarbital (200 mg/kg). Time to achieve recumbency, LORR, quiescent electromyograph, isoelectric electrocorticograph, heart rate and apnea were recorded. Results The general order of progression was recumbency, LORR, quiescent electromyograph, isoelectric electrocorticograph and apnea. Recumbency preceded LORR in the majority of animals (CO2; 7/8, CO2/O2; 8/8, isoflurane; 5/8, pentobarbital; 4/8). Bradycardia occurred before recumbency in the CO2 (p = 0.0002) and CO2/O2 (p = 0.005) groups, with a 50% reduction in heart rate compared to baseline. The slowest (time to apnea) and least consistent killing methods were CO2/O2 (1180 ± 658.1s) and pentobarbital (875 [239 to 4680]s). Conclusion Bradycardia, and consequently nociception and pain, occurs before loss of consciousness during CO2 exposure. Pentobarbital displayed an unexpected lack of consistency, questioning its classification as an acceptable euthanasia method in rats. PMID:27648836

  15. Chemical and histochemical studies of human alveolar collagen fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, W.

    1977-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies have established that the normal human alveolar argyrophilic (reticulum) fiber is collagen fiber. The silver impregnation method is highly sensitive and specific for histologic demonstration of the elaborate collagen fiber network of alveolar septa. The argyrophilic alveolar collagen fiber does not stain with the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) or periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium tetroxide (PTO) reaction. The materials positive for the PAS and PTO reactions in alveolar septa are epithelial and endothelial basal laminas, which are nonargyrophilic. Chemically, lung collagen fibers are composed of Type I and Type III collagens, which differ in amino acid composition, chain composition, and carbohydrate content. The chemical heterogeneity of lung collagen may have important biologic implications in the maintenance of normal structure and in the repair of lung injury. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:64120

  16. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  17. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER DECREASED IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGE CYTOKINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including increased hospitalizations for lung infection. Normal lung immune responses to bacterial infection include alveolar macrophage cytokine production and...

  18. Primary Cerebral Alveolar Echinococcosis: Mycology to the Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Goehringer, François; Umhang, Gérald; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Hénard, Sandrine; Boué, Franck; May, Thierry; Machouart, Marie

    2014-01-01

    A case of primary cerebral alveolar echinococcosis with a favorable outcome is reported. A universal fungal PCR enabled this diagnosis, while the initial serological analysis remained noncontributive. PMID:24478516

  19. Orbital alveolar soft part sarcoma: Histopathologic report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Alkatan, Hind; Al-Shedoukhy, Ahlam A.; Chaudhry, Imtiaz A.; Al-Ayoubi, Ayman

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma is considered as a distinct histopathological entity with rare cases reported from the orbit area. Two cases of alveolar soft part sarcomas occurring in the orbit of two patients along with their histopathologic findings are reported herewith. In both cases, the patients presented with eyelid swelling and proptosis. The diagnosis was made by incisional biopsies and histopathology. The literature is reviewed regarding occurrence of this tumor, its diagnosis and management. PMID:23960876

  20. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis as a reaction to fentanyl patch smoke.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Erin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Satkunam, Niranjala; Churg, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    We report a patient who developed shortness of breath and systemic symptoms after starting to smoke fentanyl patches. CT scan showed ground glass centrilobular nodules, and biopsy demonstrated alveolar proteinosis. Her symptoms disappeared and her chest imaging changes largely resolved when she stopped smoking the patches. Alveolar proteinosis is an uncommon drug reaction and in this case presented in a very unusual fashion as an inhalation injury.

  1. Alveolar bone healing process in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). A radiographic densitometry study

    PubMed Central

    MANRIQUE, Natalia; PEREIRA, Cassiano Costa Silva; GARCIA, Lourdes Maria Gonzáles; MICARONI, Samuel; de CARVALHO, Antonio Augusto Ferreira; PERRI, Sílvia Helena Venturoli; OKAMOTO, Roberta; SUMIDA, Doris Hissako; ANTONIALI, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important public health problems worldwide. If undiagnosed or untreated, this pathology represents a systemic risk factor and offers unfavorable conditions for dental treatments, especially those requiring bone healing. Objectives The purpose of this study was to demonstrate, by analysis of bone mineral density (BMD), that the alveolar bone healing process is altered in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Material and Methods Wistar rats and SHRs were submitted to extraction of the upper right incisor and were euthanized 7, 14, 21, 28 and 42 days after surgery. Right maxillae were collected, radiographed and analyzed using Digora software. BMD was expressed as minimum (min), middle (med) and maximum (max) in the medium (MT) and apical (AT) thirds of the dental alveolus. Results The results were compared across days and groups. Wistar showed difference in med and max BMD in the MT between 7 and 28 and also between 14 and 28 days. The AT exhibited significant difference in med and min BMD between 7 and 28 days, as well as difference in min BMD between 28 and 42 days. SHRs showed lower med BMD in the MT at 28 days when compared to 21 and 42 days. Differences were observed across groups in med and min BMD at day 28 in the MT and AT; and in max BMD at 14, 21 and 42 days in the MT. Conclusions These results suggest that the alveolar bone healing process is delayed in SHRs comparing with Wistar rats. PMID:22666841

  2. Alveolar response to experimental Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Lanken, P. N.; Minda, M.; Pietra, G. G.; Fishman, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    In order to characterize the alveolar response to Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, light and electron miscropy were used to trace the development of experimental infections with P carinii in rats treated with cortisone acetate and a low-protein diet. The first changes were found by the eighth day of treatment and consisted of the selective attachment of Pneumocystis organisms, mostly trophozoites, to alveolar Type 1 pneumocytes; the host cells were undamaged, and no inflammatory response was seen. After approximately one month of treatment, the seemingly innocuous host-parasite interaction was succeeded by focal necrosis of the Type 1 pneumocytes adjacent to organisms; hyperplasia of nearby Type 2 pneumocytes also occurred, to replace the dead Type 1 pneumocytes. Even at this stage, inflammatory reaction was conspicuously absent except for occasional alveolar macrophages in the diseased alveoli; in addition, all cells of the alveolar-capillary membrane other than Type 1 pneumocytes appeared entirely normal. Not only does the present study clarify the nature of alveolar injury caused by Pneumocystis carinii, but it also provides an experimental animal model in which selective injury of the alveolar lining cells occurs. Images Figure 5 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 10 Figure 3 Figure 7 Figure 4 Figure 8 PMID:6966893

  3. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  4. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  5. Classification of the alveolar ridge width: implant-driven treatment considerations for the horizontally deficient alveolar ridges.

    PubMed

    Tolstunov, Len

    2014-07-01

    Among many techniques advocated for the horizontally deficient alveolar ridges, ridge-split has many advantages. Here, treatment management strategies of the horizontally collapsed ridges, especially the ridge-split approach, are discussed and a clinically relevant implant-driven classification of the alveolar ridge width is proposed, with the goal to assist an operator in choosing the proper bone augmentation technique. Comparison and advantages of two commonly used techniques, ridge-split and block bone graft, are presented.

  6. Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France

    PubMed Central

    Piarroux, Martine; Piarroux, Renaud; Knapp, Jenny; Bardonnet, Karine; Dumortier, Jérôme; Watelet, Jérôme; Gerard, Alain; Beytout, Jean; Abergel, Armand; Bresson-Hadni, Solange

    2013-01-01

    During 1982–2007, alveolar echinococcosis (AE) was diagnosed in 407 patients in France, a country previously known to register half of all European patients. To better define high-risk groups in France, we conducted a national registry-based study to identify areas where persons were at risk and spatial clusters of cases. We interviewed 180 AE patients about their way of life and compared responses to those of 517 controls. We found that almost all AE patients lived in 22 départements in eastern and central France (relative risk 78.63, 95% CI 52.84–117.02). Classification and regression tree analysis showed that the main risk factor was living in AE-endemic areas. There, most at-risk populations lived in rural settings (odds ratio [OR] 66.67, 95% CI 6.21–464.51 for farmers and OR 6.98, 95% CI 2.88–18.25 for other persons) or gardened in nonrural settings (OR 4.30, 95% CI 1.82–10.91). These findings can help sensitization campaigns focus on specific groups. PMID:23647623

  7. Cardiovascular risk in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Manali, Effrosyni D; Papadaki, Georgia; Konstantonis, Dimitrios; Tsangaris, Iraklis; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Kolilekas, Likurgos; Schams, Andrea; Kagouridis, Konstantinos; Karakatsani, Anna; Orfanos, Stylianos; Griese, Matthias; Papiris, Spyros A

    2016-02-01

    We hypothesized that cardiovascular events and/or indices of cardiac dysfunction may be increased in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Systemic and pulmonary arterial hypertension, arrhythmias, pulmonary embolism, stroke and ischemic heart attack were reported. Patients underwent serum anti-GM-CSF antibodies, disease severity score (DSS), Doppler transthoracic echocardiograph, glucose, thyroid hormones, lipids, troponin and pro-Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) examination. Thirteen patients (8 female) were studied, median age of 47. Pro-BNP inversely related to DLCO% and TLC%; troponin directly related to DSS, age, P(A-a)O2, left atrium-, left ventricle-end-diastole diameter and BMI. On multiple regression analysis DSS was the only parameter significantly and strongly related with troponin (R(2) = 0.776, p = 0.007). No cardiovascular event was reported during follow-up. In PAP cardiovascular risk indices relate to lung disease severity. Therefore, PAP patients could be at increased risk for cardiovascular events. Quantitation of its magnitude and potential links to lungs' physiologic derangement will be addressed in future studies. PMID:26558331

  8. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma after treatment of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yasushi; Iwabuchi, Haruko; Takachi, Takayuki; Hosokai, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Sakiko; Imamura, Masaru; Watanabe, Akihiro; Umezu, Hajime; Hotta, Tetsuo; Ogose, Akira; Imai, Chihaya

    2013-08-01

    Secondary rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) after treatment of osteosarcoma (OS) is rare. Reported here is the case of a metachronous RMS in the nasal cavity, developing 12 years after successful treatment of non-metastatic OS. The patient was diagnosed as having OS of the femur at 2 years of age. Chemotherapy for OS included doxorubicin (cumulative dose, 488 mg/m(2) ). No radiotherapy was given. There was no family history suggestive of cancer predisposition syndrome. At 14 years of age, alveolar RMS was diagnosed on histopathology. PAX3-FKHR fusion transcripts were detected on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Germline TP53 mutation was not seen on standard DNA sequencing. The occurrence of secondary sarcomas, in the Children's Cancer Survivor study conducted in North America, has been associated with high cumulative doses of anthracyclines, which may also have played a role in the development of RMS in the present case. In the future, novel molecular technologies might uncover genetic cancer predisposition in patients with metachronous cancers. PMID:23910806

  9. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part I: a Systematic Review of Surgical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this first part of a two-part series was to review the literature concerning the indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages and surgical techniques of the lateralization and transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve, followed by the placement of an implant in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC database, academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014 and comprised English-language articles that included adult patients between 18 and 80 years old with minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal who had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) repositioning with a minimum 6 months of follow-up. Results A total of 16 studies were included in this review. Nine were related to IAN transposition, 4 to IAN lateralization and 3 to both transposition and lateralization. Implant treatment results and complications were presented. Conclusions Inferior alveolar nerve lateralization and transposition in combination with the installation of dental implants is sometimes the only possible procedure to help patients to obtain a fixed prosthesis, in edentulous atrophic posterior mandibles. With careful pre-operative surgical and prosthetic planning, imaging, and extremely precise surgical technique, this procedure can be successfully used for implant placement in edentulous posterior mandibular segments. PMID:25937873

  10. Differential effects of isoflurane and CO2 inhalation on plasma levels of inflammatory markers associated with collagen-induced arthritis in DBA mice.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher C; Lucas, Edralin A; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J; Kuvibidila, Solo

    2009-07-01

    Inhalation of CO2 or isoflurane is a commonly used method of euthanasia with mice, but information related to their effects on serum inflammatory markers in chronic models of inflammation is limited. In the current study, nineteen-week old DBA female mice with (n = 53) or without (n = 51) collagen-induced arthritis were randomly assigned to euthanization with CO2 (n = 55) or isoflurane (n = 49. Plasma was collected for the measurement of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by ELISA. When mice without and with collagen-induced arthritis were pooled, compared to CO2, administration of isoflurane was associated with lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha (pg/ml, mean +/- SEM) (26.1 +/- 2.82 versus 48.1 +/- 7.99) and IL-6 (25.18 +/- 2.73 versus 48.1 +/- 6.82) (ANOVA, p < 0.05). In contrast to TNF-alpha and IL-6, administration of CO2 decreased the plasma sICAM-1 level (1170+/- 50 versus 758 +/- 24 for CO2) (p < 0.00001). When data were analyzed as a function of collagen-induced arthritis, the differences between CO2 and isoflurane persisted. Low plasma sICAM-1 levels found in CO2 euthanasia group may be due to degradation. Since mice are the most common animal model for studying inflammation, researchers should be aware of these iatrogenic experimental variables before interpreting their data.

  11. Maternal Exposure of Rats to Isoflurane during Late Pregnancy Impairs Spatial Learning and Memory in the Offspring by Up-Regulating the Expression of Histone Deacetylase 2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Foquan; Hu, Yan; Zhao, Weilu; Zuo, Zhiyi; Yu, Qi; Liu, Zhiyi; Lin, Jiamei; Feng, Yunlin; Li, Binda; Wu, Liuqin; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that most general anesthetics can harm developing neurons and induce cognitive dysfunction in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) has been implicated in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Our previous results showed that maternal exposure to general anesthetics during late pregnancy impaired the offspring's learning and memory, but the role of HDAC2 in it is not known yet. In the present study, pregnant rats were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane in 100% oxygen for 2, 4 or 8 hours or to 100% oxygen only for 8 hours on gestation day 18 (E18). The offspring born to each rat were randomly subdivided into 2 subgroups. Thirty days after birth, the Morris water maze (MWM) was used to assess learning and memory in the offspring. Two hours before each MWM trial, an HDAC inhibitor (SAHA) was given to the offspring in one subgroup, whereas a control solvent was given to those in the other subgroup. The results showed that maternal exposure to isoflurane impaired learning and memory of the offspring, impaired the structure of the hippocampus, increased HDAC2 mRNA and downregulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) mRNA, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2 subunit B (NR2B) mRNA and NR2B protein in the hippocampus. These changes were proportional to the duration of the maternal exposure to isoflurane and were reversed by SAHA. These results suggest that exposure to isoflurane during late pregnancy can damage the learning and memory of the offspring rats via the HDAC2-CREB -NR2B pathway. This effect can be reversed by HDAC2 inhibition. PMID:27536989

  12. Maternal Exposure of Rats to Isoflurane during Late Pregnancy Impairs Spatial Learning and Memory in the Offspring by Up-Regulating the Expression of Histone Deacetylase 2

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Zhao, Weilu; Zuo, Zhiyi; Yu, Qi; Liu, Zhiyi; Lin, Jiamei; Feng, Yunlin; Li, Binda; Wu, Liuqin; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that most general anesthetics can harm developing neurons and induce cognitive dysfunction in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) has been implicated in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Our previous results showed that maternal exposure to general anesthetics during late pregnancy impaired the offspring’s learning and memory, but the role of HDAC2 in it is not known yet. In the present study, pregnant rats were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane in 100% oxygen for 2, 4 or 8 hours or to 100% oxygen only for 8 hours on gestation day 18 (E18). The offspring born to each rat were randomly subdivided into 2 subgroups. Thirty days after birth, the Morris water maze (MWM) was used to assess learning and memory in the offspring. Two hours before each MWM trial, an HDAC inhibitor (SAHA) was given to the offspring in one subgroup, whereas a control solvent was given to those in the other subgroup. The results showed that maternal exposure to isoflurane impaired learning and memory of the offspring, impaired the structure of the hippocampus, increased HDAC2 mRNA and downregulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) mRNA, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2 subunit B (NR2B) mRNA and NR2B protein in the hippocampus. These changes were proportional to the duration of the maternal exposure to isoflurane and were reversed by SAHA. These results suggest that exposure to isoflurane during late pregnancy can damage the learning and memory of the offspring rats via the HDAC2-CREB -NR2B pathway. This effect can be reversed by HDAC2 inhibition. PMID:27536989

  13. Effects of nitrogen dioxide on alveolar epithelial barrier properties. Research report, September 1983-January 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, E.D.; Cheek, J.M.; Shaw, M.E.; Postlethwait, E.M.

    1987-10-01

    This study used primary cultures of rat Type II pneumocytes to investigate if, and how, nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) alters the permeability of the alveolar epithelia. Susceptibility of cells to NO/sub 2/ appears to depend on the nutrient media of the cells, with a 10-fold difference observed between minimum essential medium (MEM) and MEM supplemented with Ham's F12 media. No protective effect was observed when the antioxidant, vitamin E, was added to the media. Bioelectric studies were conducted on cells cultured on a porous substrate. Exposure to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ caused significant reductions in tissue resistance but not in short-circuit current. It was concluded that NO/sub 2/ primarily affects epithelial active and passive transport via altered tight junctional pathways that result from damage to paracellular tight junctions or, possibly, to transcellular transport membrane pumps. The authors suggest that free-radical formation causes the damage observed.

  14. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  15. Asymmetric ( UC)albumin transport across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; LeBon, T.R.; Shinbane, J.S.; Crandall, E.D.

    1985-10-01

    Bullfrog lungs were prepared as planar sheets and bathed with Ringer solution in Ussing chambers. In the presence of a constant electrical gradient (20, 0, or -20 mV) across the tissue, UC-labeled bovine serum albumin or inulin was instilled into the upstream reservoir and the rate of appearance of the tracer in the downstream reservoir was monitored. Two lungs from the same animal were used to determine any directional difference in tracer fluxes. An apparent permeability coefficient was estimated from a relationship between normalized downstream radioactivities and time. Results showed that the apparent permeability of albumin in the alveolar to pleural direction across the alveolar epithelial barrier is 2.3 X 10(-7) cm/s, significantly greater (P less than 0.0005) than that in the pleural to alveolar direction (5.3 X 10(-8) cm/s) when the tissue was short circuited. Permeability of inulin, on the other hand, did not show any directional dependence and averaged 3.1 X 10(-8) cm/s in both directions. There was no effect on radiotracer fluxes permeabilities of different electrical gradients across the tissue. Gel electrophoretograms and corresponding radiochromatograms suggest that the large and asymmetric isotope fluxes are not primarily due to digestion or degradation of labeled molecules. Inulin appears to traverse the alveolar epithelial barrier by simple diffusion through hydrated paracellular pathways. On the other hand, ( UC)albumin crosses the alveolar epithelium more rapidly than would be expected by simple diffusion. These asymmetric and large tracer fluxes suggest that a specialized mechanism is present in alveolar epithelium that may be capable of helping to remove albumin from the alveolar space.

  16. Isoflurane suppresses the self-renewal of normal mouse neural stem cells in a p53-dependent manner by activating the Lkb1-p53-p21 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lengchen; Liu, Te; Wang, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Isoflurane is widely used in anaesthesia for surgical operations. However, whether it elicits unwanted side effects, particularly in neuronal cells, remains to be fully elucidated. The Lkb1-p53-p21 signalling pathway is able to modulate neuronal self‑renewal and proliferation. Furthermore, the suppression of Lkb1‑dependent p21 induction leads to apoptosis. In the present study, whether Lkb1‑p53‑p21 signalling is involved in the response to isoflurane was investigated. A comparison of mouse primary, wild‑type neural stem cells (WT NSCs) with the p53‑/‑ NSC cell line, NE‑4C, revealed that isoflurane inhibited proliferation in a dose‑, a time‑ and a p53‑dependent manner. However, flow cytometric analysis revealed that the concentration of isoflurane which caused 50% inhibition (the IC50 value) induced cell cycle arrest in WT NSCs. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of LKB1, p53 and p21 were increased, although those of nestin and survivin decreased, following treatment of WT NSCs with isoflurane. On the other hand, isoflurane induced the phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 in WT NSCs, which was associated with p53 binding to the p21 promoter, and consequentially, the transcriptional activation of p21. All these events were abrogated in NE‑4C cells. Taken together, the present study has demonstrated that isoflurane suppresses the self-renewal of normal mouse NSCs by activating the Lkb1-p53-p21 signalling pathway.

  17. Alveolar macrophage interaction with air pollution particulates.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, C A; Frevert, C; Imrich, A; Sioutas, C; Kobzik, L

    1997-09-01

    We applied flow cytometric analysis to characterize the in vitro response of alveolar macrophages (AM) to air pollution particulates. Normal hamster AM were incubated with varying concentrations of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or concentrated ambient air particulates (CAP). We found a dose-dependent increase in AM-associated right angle light scatter (RAS) after uptake of ROFA (e.g., mean channel number 149.4 +/- 6.5, 102.5 +/- 4.1, 75.8 +/- 3.5, and 61.0 +/- 4.6 at 200, 100, 50, and 25 mg/ml, respectively) or CAP. A role for scavenger-type receptors (SR) in AM uptake of components of ROFA and CAP was identified by marked inhibition of RAS increases in AM pretreated with the specific SR inhibitor polyinosinic acid. We combined measurement of particle uptake (RAS) with flow cytometric analysis of intracellular oxidation of dichlorofluorescin. Both ROFA and CAP caused a dose-related intracellular oxidant stress within AM, comparable to that seen with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (e.g., fold increase over control, 6.6 +/- 0.4, 3.6 +/- 0.4, 4.6 +/- 0.5, 200 mg/ml ROFA, 100 mg/ml ROFA, and 10(-7) M PMA, respectively). We conclude that flow cytometry of RAS increases provides a useful relative measurement of AM uptake of complex particulates within ROFA and CAP. Both ROFA and CAP cause substantial intracellular oxidant stress within AM, which may contribute to subsequent cell activation and production of proinflammatory mediators.

  18. The effects of convective cooling and rewarming on systemic and central nervous system physiology in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Lanier, W L; Iaizzo, P A; Murray, M J

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that small (i.e., 2-5 degrees C) reductions in temperature may protect the brain and spinal cord from ischemic injury. The present study evaluated the physiologic response of anesthetized animals to convective-based cooling and warming. Six shaved, isoflurane-anesthetized (1.50% end-expired; 1 MAC), pancuronium-paralyzed dogs were subjected to temperature manipulation. The flow of cool (13-14 degrees C) or warm (39-41 degrees C) air was uniformly applied to the the dorsal and lateral surfaces of the dog using an inflatable blanket with perforations in the interior surface. Convective cooling reduced pulmonary artery temperature (Tpa) from 37.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C (Mean +/- S.D.) to 33.0 +/- 0.0 degrees C over a 93 +/- 18 min period. Thereafter, the active cooling was discontinued and passive cooling resulted in a further reduction in Tpa to 32.4 +/- 0.3 degrees C over the next 60 min. Institution of convective warming resulted in an increase in Tpa from 32.4 +/- 0.3 to 33.0 +/- 0.0 degrees C in 23 +/- 14 min and from 33.0 to 37.0 +/- 0.0 in an additional 137 +/- 26 min. During the periods of active cooling, passive cooling and active warming, there were strong correlations between Tpa and temperature within the brain, cisterna magna, parietal epidural space, lumbar subarachnoid space and other commonly used temperature measurement sites non-invasively monitored (e.g. tympanic membrane, esophagus, rectum) r greater than or equal to 0.97; P less than 0.0001). The combination of isoflurane anesthesia (a potent EEG-suppressor) plus mild hypothermia (less than 34 degrees C) resulted in an EEG attenuation in five dogs, two of which progressed to burst suppression. The magnitude of EEG changes correlated with the degree of temperature reduction. Upon rewarming to 37 degrees C, all dogs had normal EEG activity and normal brain concentrations of high energy phosphates, glucose and lactate. Blood pressure and cardiac output did not change

  19. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature).

    PubMed

    Seifeldin, Sameh A

    2016-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CL/P) is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material. PMID:26792963

  20. Degradation of pulmonary surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholines by alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, P.R.; Ma, J.Y.; Bowman, L.

    1988-06-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether rat pulmonary surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholines (DSPC) are degraded by alveolar macrophages in vitro. When (3H)choline-labeled surfactant materials are incubated with unlabeled alveolar macrophages, approximately 40% of the labeled DSPC is broken down in 6 h. There is just a slight decrease in the specific activity of DSPC, which suggests that most products of degradation are not reincorporated into DSPC, at least during the 6-h incubation period. There is a time- and temperature-dependent association of surfactant DSPC with alveolar macrophages, and some of the cell-associated materials are released from the cell fragments after sonication. Association of surfactant with the cells precedes degradation. The breakdown of surfactant DSPC by intact alveolar macrophages lags behind that produced by sonicated cell preparations with disrupted cell membranes. These data and other information suggest that the surfactant materials are internalized by the cells, before the breakdown. The products of degradation probably include free choline and fatty acids, most of which appear in the extracellular fluid. The breakdown processes do not seem to depend on the physical form of the surfactant or on the presence of surfactant apoproteins. Incubation of the cells alone also results in disappearance of intracellular DSPC, some of which may be surfactant phospholipid taken up by the cells in vivo. These results indicate that alveolar macrophages can degrade surfactant DSPC and suggest that these cells may be involved in catabolism of pulmonary surfactant materials.

  1. Retinoic acid in alveolar development, maintenance and regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Maden, Malcolm; Hind, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Recent data suggest that exogenous retinoic acid (RA), the biologically active derivative of vitamin A, can induce alveolar regeneration in a rat model of experimental emphysema. Here, we describe a mouse model of disrupted alveolar development using dexamethasone administered postnatally. We show that the effects of dexamethasone are concentration dependent, dose dependent, long lasting and result in a severe loss of alveolar surface area. When RA is administered to these animals as adults, lung architecture and the surface area per unit of body weight are completely restored to normal. This remarkable effect may be because RA is required during normal alveolar development and administering RA re-awakens gene cascades used during development. We provide evidence that RA is required during alveologenesis in the mouse by showing that the levels of the retinoid binding proteins, the RA receptors and two RA synthesizing enzymes peak postnatally. Furthermore, an inhibitor of RA synthesis, disulphiram, disrupts alveologenesis. We also show that RA is required throughout life for the maintenance of lung alveoli because when rats are deprived of dietary retinol they lose alveoli and show the features of emphysema. Alveolar regeneration with RA may therefore be an important novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of respiratory diseases characterized by a reduced gas-exchanging surface area such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and emphysema for which there are currently no treatments. PMID:15293808

  2. A basic review on the inferior alveolar nerve block techniques

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Hesham

    2014-01-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve block is the most common injection technique used in dentistry and many modifications of the conventional nerve block have been recently described in the literature. Selecting the best technique by the dentist or surgeon depends on many factors including the success rate and complications related to the selected technique. Dentists should be aware of the available current modifications of the inferior alveolar nerve block techniques in order to effectively choose between these modifications. Some operators may encounter difficulty in identifying the anatomical landmarks which are useful in applying the inferior alveolar nerve block and rely instead on assumptions as to where the needle should be positioned. Such assumptions can lead to failure and the failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block has been reported to be 20-25% which is considered very high. In this basic review, the anatomical details of the inferior alveolar nerve will be given together with a description of its both conventional and modified blocking techniques; in addition, an overview of the complications which may result from the application of this important technique will be mentioned. PMID:25886095

  3. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  4. Integrating acute lung injury and regulation of alveolar fluid clearance.

    PubMed

    Guidot, David M; Folkesson, Hans G; Jain, Lucky; Sznajder, Jacob I; Pittet, Jean-François; Matthay, Michael A

    2006-09-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema and flooding of the alveolar air spaces with proteinaceous fluid. ARDS develops in response to inflammatory stresses including sepsis, trauma, and severe pneumonia, and despite aggressive critical care management, it still has a mortality of 30-50%. At the time of its original description in 1967, relatively little was known about the specific mechanisms by which the alveolar epithelium regulated lung fluid balance. Over the last 20 years, substantial advances in our understanding of the alveolar epithelium have provided major new insights into how molecular and cellular mechanisms regulate the active transport of solutes and fluid across the alveolar epithelium under both normal and pathological conditions. Beginning with the elucidation of active sodium transport as a major driving force for the transport of water from the air space to the interstitium, elegant work by multiple investigators has revealed a complex and integrated network of membrane channels and pumps that coordinately regulates sodium, chloride, and water flux in both a cell- and condition-specific manner. At the Experimental Biology Meeting in San Francisco on April 4, 2006, a symposium was held to discuss some of the most recent advances. Although there is still much to learn about the mechanisms that impair normal alveolar fluid clearance under pathological conditions, the compelling experimental findings presented in this symposium raise the prospect that we are now poised to test and develop therapeutic strategies to improve outcome in patients with acute lung injury. PMID:16698856

  5. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature)

    PubMed Central

    Seifeldin, Sameh A.

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CL/P) is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material. PMID:26792963

  6. Social Security's special minimum benefit.

    PubMed

    Olsen, K A; Hoffmeyer, D

    Social Security's special minimum primary insurance amount (PIA) provision was enacted in 1972 to increase the adequacy of benefits for regular long-term, low-earning covered workers and their dependents or survivors. At the time, Social Security also had a regular minimum benefit provision for persons with low lifetime average earnings and their families. Concerns were rising that the low lifetime average earnings of many regular minimum beneficiaries resulted from sporadic attachment to the covered workforce rather than from low wages. The special minimum benefit was seen as a way to reward regular, low-earning workers without providing the windfalls that would have resulted from raising the regular minimum benefit to a much higher level. The regular minimum benefit was subsequently eliminated for workers reaching age 62, becoming disabled, or dying after 1981. Under current law, the special minimum benefit will phase out over time, although it is not clear from the legislative history that this was Congress's explicit intent. The phaseout results from two factors: (1) special minimum benefits are paid only if they are higher than benefits payable under the regular PIA formula, and (2) the value of the regular PIA formula, which is indexed to wages before benefit eligibility, has increased faster than that of the special minimum PIA, which is indexed to inflation. Under the Social Security Trustees' 2000 intermediate assumptions, the special minimum benefit will cease to be payable to retired workers attaining eligibility in 2013 and later. Their benefits will always be larger under the regular benefit formula. As policymakers consider Social Security solvency initiatives--particularly proposals that would reduce benefits or introduce investment risk--interest may increase in restoring some type of special minimum benefit as a targeted protection for long-term low earners. Two of the three reform proposals offered by the President's Commission to Strengthen

  7. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence.

  8. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kevin T; Brokaw, Everett J; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure. PMID:27269666

  9. Factors connected with alveolar bone resorption among institutionalized elderly people.

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Kalk, W; van 't Hof, M

    1993-10-01

    In this socio-dental investigation among 175 institutionalized somatically disabled edentulous elderly people correlations are described between the test subjects' degree of alveolar bone resorption, their gender and age, their duration of edentulousness, and the number of complete dentures worn. All test subjects were interviewed by dental students and clinically examined by dentists. The mandibular alveolar bone resorption was significantly stronger in women than in men and stronger in people who had been edentulous longer. The longer the test subjects had been edentulous and the greater their degree of mandibular alveolar bone resorption was, the more mandibular dentures they had worn. This study among institutionalized elderly people provides for the most part the same results as a previously presented study among much younger people. Obviously, in these respects there are no differences between these groups.

  10. [Massive alveolar hemorrhage due to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Cortés, A; Peña, E; Vega, R; Reyes, G; Bautista, E

    2011-03-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage may be a complication of diseases with local and systemic manifestations. Both share the same pathophysiological concept: damage to the alveolar microcirculation. It is a clinical entity that generates a diagnostic challenge for the physician. Early recognition favors aggressive treatment, which can improve the outcome. Despite the technological advances in its diagnosis and treatment, it is still a condition having high morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 42-year old woman diagnosed of massive alveolar hemorrhage induced by cytomegalovirus (CMV) and HIV infection. Its presentation is atypical because most reported cases have occurred as a pneumonic process, episodes of massive hemorrhage being uncommon. The diagnosis was documented by bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and etiological diagnosis with molecular techniques using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

  11. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Isoflurane preconditioning provides neuroprotection against stroke by regulating the expression of the TLR4 signalling pathway to alleviate microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meiyan; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Xiaoyong; Gao, Changjun; Yang, Lu; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Daihua; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Lixian; Chen, Lei; Sun, Xude

    2015-01-01

    Excessive microglial activation often contributes to inflammation-mediated neurotoxicity in the ischemic penumbra during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to induce microglial activation via the NF-κB pathway. Isoflurane preconditioning (IP) can provide neuroprotection and inhibit microglial activation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the TLR4 signalling pathway in IP to exert neuroprotection following ischemic stroke in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that 2% IP alleviated neurological deficits, reduced the infarct volume, attenuated apoptosis and weakened microglial activation in the ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, IP down-regulated the expression of HSP 60, TLR4 and MyD88 and up-regulated inhibitor of IκB-α expression compared with I/R group in vivo. In vitro, 2% IP and a specific inhibitor of TLR4, CLI-095, down-regulated the expression of TLR4, MyD88, IL-1β, TNF-α and Bax, and up-regulated IκB-α and Bcl-2 expression compared with OGD group. Moreover, IP and CLI-095 attenuated microglial activation-induced neuronal apoptosis, and overexpression of the TLR4 gene reversed the neuroprotective effects of IP. In conclusion, IP provided neuroprotection by regulating TLR4 expression directly, alleviating microglial activation and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the activation of microglial activation via TLR4 may be a new avenue for stroke treatment. PMID:26086415

  13. Anaesthesia with medetomidine-ketamine-isoflurane with and without midazolam, in eight captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) premedicated with oral zuclopenthixol.

    PubMed

    Adami, C; Wenker, C; Hoby, S; Morath, U; Bergadano, A

    2013-08-01

    In 8 captive adult chimpanzees of various ages premedicated with oral zuclopenthixol anaesthesia was induced intramuscularly with a combination of medetomidine and ketamine (40 or 50 µg/kg and 5 mg/kg, IM, respectively), with and without midazolam (0.05 mg/kg), and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. At the end of the procedure, sedation was reversed with atipamezole (0.25 mg/kg, IM) and sarmazenil (0.005 mg/kg, IM) when midazolam had been administered. Oral zuclopenthixol resulted in tranquillization of the whole group and only one animal required a second dart injection to achieve adequately deep anaesthesia. Effective and reliable anaesthesia was achieved in all apes; the depth of hypnosis was stable and sudden arousal did not occur. Physiological parameters remained within normal ranges in the majority of the animals; however, manageable anaesthesia-related complications, namely apnoea after darting, hypotension, hypoventilation, hypoxemia and prolonged recovery, occurred in 6 out of 8 animals. The use of monitoring devices was essential to guarantee adequate management of these complications.

  14. Impaired Spatial Learning Memory after Isoflurane Anesthesia or Appendectomy in Aged Mice is Associated with Microglia Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Lin; Ma, Rui-Hua; Fang, Hao; Xue, Zhang-Gang; Liao, Qing-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) has been one of the most common problems in elderly patients following surgery. But the specific mechanism of POCD is still not clear. To further understand the reason of these postoperative behavioral deficits, we evaluated the spatial learning memory of both adult (3 months) and aged (18 months) male mice, 3 or 28 days after isoflurane (Iso) exposure for two hours or appendectomy (App). Hippocampal microglia activation and IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ expression were also evaluated at day 3, day 14 and day 28 after Iso exposure or appendectomy. Results showed that spatial learning memory of aged, but not adult, mice was impaired after Iso exposure or appendectomy, accompanied with more hippocampal microglia activation and IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ overexpression. These findings suggest that the cognitive deficits of elderly patients who have undergone surgeries are quite possibly caused by hippocampal microglia overactivation and the subsequent inflammation. PMID:26380557

  15. Alveolar Macrophage Dysregulation in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Farshid N.; Brantly, Mark L.; Markello, Thomas C.; Helip-Wooley, Amanda; O'Brien, Kevin; Hess, Richard; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A.; Gochuico, Bernadette R.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Individuals with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 1 (HPS-1), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, develop an accelerated form of progressive fibrotic lung disease. The etiology of pulmonary fibrosis associated with HPS-1 is unknown. Objectives: To investigate the potential pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in HPS-1, lung cells and proteins from individuals with HPS-1 were studied. Methods: Forty-one subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis were evaluated with pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography scan, and bronchoscopy. Bronchoalveolar lavage cells and analytes were analyzed. Measurements and Main Results: Concentrations of total bronchoalveolar lavage cells and alveolar macrophages were significantly higher in epithelial lining fluid from subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers. Concentrations of cytokines and chemokines (i.e., monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) in alveolar epithelial lining fluid were significantly higher in subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers (P < 0.001). In vitro, HPS-1 pulmonary fibrosis alveolar macrophages, which did not express HPS1 mRNA, secreted significantly higher concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) protein compared with normal cells (P = 0.001, P = 0.014, and P = 0.011, respectively). Pirfenidone suppressed HPS-1 alveolar macrophage cytokine and chemokine secretion in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions: In HPS-1, alveolar inflammation predominantly involves macrophages and is associated with high lung concentrations of cytokines and chemokines. HPS-1 alveolar macrophages

  16. The effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophage growth factor secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, E. M.; Phan, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated increased secretion of fibroblast growth factor (MDGF) activity by alveolar macrophages obtained from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The mechanism by which bleomycin promotes this increase in MDGF secretion is not clear, however. The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophages. Normal rat alveolar macrophages obtained by lavage were cultured in the presence or absence of bleomycin; conditioned media from these cultures were dialyzed to remove bleomycin and then assayed in vitro for MDGF activity. Alveolar macrophages incubated with 0.01 microgram to 1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 18 hours secreted significantly more MDGF than macrophages incubated without bleomycin. Viability of macrophages as determined by exclusion of trypan blue and release of LDH was unaffected by any dose tested. Maximal MDGF production was seen with bleomycin doses of greater than or equal to 0.1 microgram/ml. When alveolar macrophages were incubated with 0.1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 0.5-18 hours, MDGF activity was detected as early as 1 hour, with peak responses found at 4-8 hours. Macrophages stimulated with bleomycin continued to produce significant amounts of MDGF even after bleomycin was removed and replaced with fresh (bleomycin-free) media. MDGF secretion by bleomycin-stimulated alveolar macrophages was inhibited by cycloheximide, and the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors NDGA (nordihydroguairetic acid) and BW755c, indicating not only a requirement for protein synthesis but also for metabolites of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism for full expression of activity(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2464942

  17. Alveolar macrophage kinetics and function after interruption of canine marrow function

    SciTech Connect

    Springmeyer, S.C.; Altman, L.C.; Kopecky, K.J.; Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.

    1982-03-01

    To study the kinetics and function of alveolar macrophages after interruption of marrow function, we performed serial bronchoalveolar lavages in dogs. The studies were performed before and after 9.0 to 9.5 Grey total body irradiation and marrow infusion. Monocytes had disappeared from the bloodstream by Day 7 after the irradiation. Alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased at Day 21. At Days 14 and 21 myeloperoxidase-positive alveolar macrophages were also significantly decreased. Beyond Day 30 the number of circulating monocytes, myeloperoxidase-positive and total alveolar macrophages had returned. Sex chromatin stains of alveolar macrophages obtained from a male dog that received female marrow indicated that the repopulating macrophages were of marrow origin. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophage migration and phagocytosis demonstrated increased activities beyond Day 30. These studies suggest that in this model the alveolar macrophage is dependent on the bone marrow for support and that the alveolar macrophage depletion may impair lung defense mechanisms.

  18. Bronchorrhoea in a case of alveolar cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, S G; Lopez-Vidriero M-T; Charman, J; Das, I; Reid, L

    1975-01-01

    In a case of bronchorrhoea associated with alveolar cell carcinoma thf rheological and chemical features of the sputum indicated that it was bronchial fluid and not saliva and part bronchial secretion, partly serum transudate. The viscosity and chemical constituents were similar to those found in bronchorrhoea when associated with chronic bronchitis, asthma, or bronchiectasis. The surfactant studies suggested an alveolar origin for most of thf fluid, while the failure of fluid restriction, corticosteroids, atropine, or cytotoxic drugs to influence the sputum volume and properties indicated that the cells responsible are "autonomous". Images PMID:164485

  19. Case Report: Multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Jose Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    A multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma in a 68-year-old man is reported. Four different peripheral tumor nodules were identified on gross examination. A fifth central tumor corresponded to a conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that has been very recently characterized as a distinct histotype within the spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunostaining with cyclin D1 seems to be specific of this tumor subtype. This is the first reported case with multifocal presentation. PMID:27158455

  20. Mandibular osteotomies after drawing out the inferior alveolar nerve along the canal.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hoon; Kim, Byung-Gun

    2003-01-01

    In some cases, the inferior alveolar nerve runs through a lower course than usual. In such cases, osteotomy of the mandible can injure the inferior alveolar nerves. In other instances, the course of the mandibular osteotomy can meet that of the inferior alveolar nerve. In these cases, a useful method may be excavating the canal and drawing the nerve out through it. With this technique, we can make the osteotomy as initially planned with minimal damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. PMID:14629066

  1. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and ... from other foods. Cook —Cook to the right temperature. Chill —Refrigerate food promptly. Cook all food to ...

  2. Arctic Sea Ice Minimum, 2015

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the evolution of the Arctic sea ice cover from its wintertime maximum extent, which was reached on Feb. 25, 2015, and was the lowest on record, to its apparent yearly minimum, ...

  3. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  4. 2013 Arctic Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Video Gallery

    After an unusually cold summer in the northernmost latitudes, Arctic sea ice appears to have reached its annual minimum summer extent for 2013 on Sept. 13, the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice ...

  5. Minimum Principles in Motor Control.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Sascha E.

    2001-06-01

    Minimum (or minimal) principles are mathematical laws that were first used in physics: Hamilton's principle and Fermat's principle of least time are two famous example. In the past decade, a number of motor control theories have been proposed that are formally of the same kind as the minimum principles of physics, and some of these have been quite successful at predicting motor performance in a variety of tasks. The present paper provides a comprehensive review of this work. Particular attention is given to the relation between minimum theories in motor control and those used in other disciplines. Other issues around which the review is organized include: (1) the relation between minimum principles and structural models of motor planning and motor control, (2) the empirically-driven development of minimum principles and the danger of circular theorizing, and (3) the design of critical tests for minimum theories. Some perspectives for future research are discussed in the concluding section of the paper. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11401453

  6. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, K. Rennis; Vadakkan, D. Thomas; Krishnakumar, E. V.; Anas, A. Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia. PMID:25814803

  7. The volatile anesthetic isoflurane differentially suppresses the induction of erythropoietin synthesis elicited by acute anemia and systemic hypoxemia in mice in an hypoxia-inducible factor-2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kai, Shinichi; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Matsuyama, Tomonori; Suzuki, Kengo; Hirota, Kiichi

    2014-06-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein hormone essential for the regulation of erythroid homeostasis. Although EPO production is prominent in the kidney and liver, its production in the central nervous system has also been detected. Tissue hypoxia due to systemic or local hypoxemia and acute anemia due to blood loss occurs frequently during various clinical settings, leading to a high possibility of elevated plasma EPO levels. However, it is largely unknown whether volatile anesthetic agents affect EPO production elicited by acute hypoxia in vivo. Male C57BL/6N CrSlc mice were exposed to a hypoxic insult as a result of bleeding-related anemia or hypoxemia while they were under anesthetized using various concentrations of isoflurane. EPO protein concentrations were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and mRNA levels were measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Plasma EPO concentration was induced as early as 3h following acute anemic and hypoxemic hypoxia and suppressed by clinically relevant doses of isoflurane in a dose-dependent manner. Anemic hypoxia induced EPO mRNA and protein synthesis in the kidney. In the kidney, isoflurane inhibited EPO induction caused by anemia but not that caused by hypoxemia. On the other hand, in the brain hypoxemia-induced EPO production was suppressed by isoflurane. Finally, qRT-PCR studies demonstrate that isoflurane differentially inhibit HIF-1α and HIF-2α mRNA expression in brain and kidney, indicating the involvement of HIF-2 in the hypoxia-induced EPO expression and inhibition of the induction by isoflurane. PMID:24680923

  8. Antigen-Mediated Fusion of Specifically Sensitized Rabbit Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, B.

    1972-01-01

    Rabbits sensitized intravenously with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (strain H37Ra) suspended in mineral oil developed a strong pulmonary granulomatous response which reached its peak about 3 to 4 weeks after injection. Alveolar cells (4 × 106 cells/ml of tissue culture medium 199) procured 6 weeks after sensitization showed extensive development of multinucleated giant cells after 12 hr of incubation in tissue culture flasks containing heat-killed H37Ra (5 μg/ml). Giant cells measured 80 μm to 2.5 mm in length and contained between 30 and 700 nuclei. In contrast, no giant cells were observed when similar samples of the same cell populations were incubated in flasks containing: (i) no mycobacteria; (ii) heat-killed Escherichia coli; (iii) heat-killed Bacillus subtilis; (iv) latex particles; (v) ovalbumin; or (vi) phytohemagglutinin. The addition of immune (anti-H37Ra) sera potentiated the phenomenon of giant cell formation. In addition, supernatant fluids obtained from sensitive alveolar cells incubated with H37Ra were capable of inducing giant cell formation when incubated with nonsensitized alveolar cells. The results suggest that fusion of alveolar macrophages is mediated by an immunological mechanism. Images PMID:4629127

  9. SOCS-3 Regulates Alveolar Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, E; Kantarci, A; Konstantinidis, A; Gao, H; Van Dyke, T E

    2016-08-01

    The host immune response plays a key role in bacteria-induced alveolar bone resorption. Endogenous control of the magnitude and duration of inflammatory signaling is considered an important determinant of the extent of periodontal pathology. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are inhibitors of cytokine signaling pathways and may play a role in restraining periodontal inflammation. We hypothesized that SOCS-3 regulates alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. Periodontal bone loss was induced in 16-wk-old myeloid-specific SOCS-3-knockout and wild-type (WT) C57Bl6-B.129 mice by oral inoculation 9 times with 10(9) colony-forming units of Porphyromonas gingivalis A7436 through an oral gavage model for periodontitis. Sham controls for both types of mice received vehicle without bacteria. The mice were euthanized 6 wk after the last oral inoculation. Increased bone loss was demonstrated in P. gingivalis-infected SOCS-3-knockout mice as compared with P. gingivalis-infected WT mice by direct morphologic measurements, micro-computed tomography analyses, and quantitative histology. Loss of SOCS-3 function resulted in an increased number of alveolar bone osteoclasts and increased RANKL expression after P. gingivalis infection. SOCS-3 deficiency in myeloid cells also promotes a higher P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response with higher secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, and KC (IL-8) by peritoneal macrophages as compared with WT controls. Our data implicate SOCS-3 as a critical negative regulator of alveolar bone loss in periodontitis.

  10. Periodontal and alveolar bone abnormalities associated with pachydermoperiostosis.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, B G; Seçkin, T

    2001-01-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis (PDP) is an unusual syndrome manifested clinically by finger clubbing, extremity enlargement, hypertrophic skin changes, and periosteal bone formation. A rare case of pachydermoperiostosis (primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy) with oral manifestations in a 47-year-old man is presented. The possible correlation between physiological mechanisms of this disease and their influence on oral periodontal tissues and alveolar bone is discussed.

  11. Studying the Role of Alveolar Macrophages in Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Surya Kumari; Sharma, Sharad; Chintala, Navin; Patel, Jalpa; Karbowniczek, Magdalena; Markiewski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the syngeneic model of breast cancer (4T1) to the studies on a role of pulmonary alveolar macrophages in cancer metastasis. The 4T1 cells expressing GFP in combination with imaging and confocal microscopy are used to monitor tumor growth, track metastasizing tumor cells, and quantify the metastatic burden. These approaches are supplemented by digital histopathology that allows the automated and unbiased quantification of metastases. In this method the routinely prepared histological lung sections, which are stained with hematoxylin and eosin, are scanned and converted to the digital slides that are then analyzed by the self-trained pattern recognition software. In addition, we describe the flow cytometry approaches with the use of multiple cell surface markers to identify alveolar macrophages in the lungs. To determine impact of alveolar macrophages on metastases and antitumor immunity these cells are depleted with the clodronate-containing liposomes administrated intranasally to tumor-bearing mice. This approach leads to the specific and efficient depletion of this cell population as confirmed by flow cytometry. Tumor volumes and lung metastases are evaluated in mice depleted of alveolar macrophages, to determine the role of these cells in the metastatic progression of breast cancer. PMID:27403530

  12. Increased alveolar soluble annexin V promotes lung inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Susan; Shi, Wei; Xu, Wei; Frey, Mark R; Moats, Rex; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Warburton, David

    2015-11-01

    The causes underlying the self-perpetuating nature of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a progressive and usually lethal disease, remain unknown. We hypothesised that alveolar soluble annexin V contributes to lung fibrosis, based on the observation that human IPF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) containing high annexin V levels promoted fibroblast involvement in alveolar epithelial wound healing that was reduced when annexin V was depleted from the BALF. Conditioned medium from annexin V-treated alveolar epithelial type 2 cells (AEC2), but not annexin V per se, induced proliferation of human fibroblasts and contained pro-fibrotic, IPF-associated proteins, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines that were found to correlate tightly (r>0.95) with annexin V levels in human BALF. ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase in AECs was activated by annexin V, and blockade reduced the fibrotic potential of annexin V-treated AEC-conditioned medium. In vivo, aerosol delivery of annexin V to mouse lung induced inflammation, fibrosis and increased hydroxyproline, with activation of Wnt, transforming growth factor-β, mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB signalling pathways, as seen in IPF. Chronically increased alveolar annexin V levels, as reflected in increased IPF BALF levels, may contribute to the progression of IPF by inducing the release of pro-fibrotic mediators. PMID:26160872

  13. Alveolar bone measurement precision for phosphor-plate images

    PubMed Central

    HILDEBOLT, CHARLES F.; COUTURE, REX; GARCIA, NATHALIA M.; DIXON, DEBRA; SHANNON, WILLIAM DOUGLAS; LANGENWALTER, ERIC; CIVITELLI, ROBERTO

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate methods for determining measurement precision and to determine the precision of alveolar-bone measurements made with a vacuum-coupled, positioning device and phosphor-plate images. Study design Subjects were rigidly attached to the x-ray tube by means of a vacuum coupling device and custom, cross-arch, bite plates. Original and repeat radiographs (taken within minutes of each other) were obtained of the mandibular posterior teeth of 51 subjects, and cementoenamel-junction-alveolar-crest (CEJ-AC) distances were measured on both sets of images. In addition, x-ray-transmission (radiodensity) and alveolar-crest-height differences were determined by subtracting one image from the other. Image subtractions and measurements were performed twice. Based on duplicate measurements, the root-mean-square standard deviation (precision) and least-significant change (LSC) were calculated. LSC is the magnitude of change in a measurement needed to indicate that a true biological change has occurred. Results The LSCs were 4% for x-ray transmission, 0.49 mm for CEJ-AC distance, and 0.06 mm for crest-height 0.06 mm. Conclusion The LSCs for our CEJ-AC and x-ray transmission measurements are similar to what has been reported. The LSC for alveolar-crest height (determined with image subtraction) was less than 0.1 mm. Compared with findings from previous studies, this represents a highly precise measurement of alveolar crest height. The methods demonstrated for calculating LSC can be used by investigators to determine how large changes in radiographic measurements need to be before the changes can be considered (with 95% confidence) true biological changes and not noise (that is, equipment/observer error). PMID:19716499

  14. Morphofunctional and clinical study on mandibular alveolar distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zaffe, Davide; Bertoldi, Carlo; Palumbo, Carla; Consolo, Ugo

    2002-10-01

    Alveolar Distraction Osteogenesis (ADO) is a process which forms new alveolar bone to correct alveolar deformities in ridge height and width. This work aims (a). to verify the predictability of the augmentation of height of atrophic alveolar ridges using an extra-alveolar distraction device and (b). to study the bone processes in order to optimize implanto-prosthetic rehabilitation. ADO was performed on 10 patients with ridge deformities to obtain the required ridge augmentation. Clinical and radiological (OPT and CT with densitometric assay) evaluations were carried out during the following 12 weeks, before implant insertion. Biopsies at 40, 60 and 88 days were studied after general, specific and histochemical staining of slides; microradiographs were analyzed to evaluate the Trabecular Bone Volume. Forty days after the end of distraction, soft callus indicated the start of ossification. Sixty days after the end of distraction, the soft callus was largely converted into a network of trabecular woven bone; osteogenic activity was high and TBV was about 50%. Eighty-eight days after the end of distraction, the amount of bone appeared reduced, with a more ordered structure; bone formation activity and TBV also diminished, whereas osteoclast erosion was active. The densitometric assay shows values increasing from the end of distraction, particularly after implant insertion. Histological results show a regression in bone deposition processes 88 days after the end of distraction culminating in a virtual steady-state after a certain time. The results suggest that early implant insertion may be desirable to avoid bone loss due to mechanical unloading.

  15. [Anesthesia with flunitrazepam/fentanyl and isoflurane/fentanyl. Unconscious perception and mid-latency auditory evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Schwender, D; Kaiser, A; Klasing, S; Faber-Züllig, E; Golling, W; Pöppel, E; Peter, K

    1994-05-01

    There is a high incidence of intraoperative awareness during cardiac surgery. Mid-latency auditory evoked potentials (MLAEP) reflect the primary cortical processing of auditory stimuli. In the present study, we investigated MLAEP and explicit and implicit memory for information presented during cardiac anaesthesia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. Institutional approval and informed consent was obtained in 30 patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgery. Anaesthesia was induced in group I (n = 10) with flunitrazepam/fentanyl (0.01 mg/kg) and maintained with flunitrazepam/fentanyl (1.2 mg/h). The patients in group II (n = 10) received etomidate (0.25 mg/kg) and fentanyl (0.005 mg/kg) for induction and isoflurane (0.6-1.2 vol%)/fentanyl (1.2 mg/h) for maintenance of general anaesthesia. Group III (n = 10) served as a control and patients were anaesthetized as in I or II. After sternotomy an audiotape that included an implicit memory task was presented to the patients in groups I and II. The story of Robinson Crusoe was told, and it was suggested to the patients that they remember Robinson Crusoe when asked what they associated with the word Friday 3-5 days postoperatively. Auditory evoked potentials were recorded awake and during general anaesthesia before and after the audiotape presentation on vertex (positive) and mastoids on both sides (negative). Auditory clicks were presented binaurally at 70 dBnHL at a rate of 9.3 Hz. Using the electrodiagnostic system Pathfinder I (Nicolet), 1000 successive stimulus responses were averaged over a 100 ms poststimulus interval and analyzed off-line. Latencies of the peak V, Na, Pa were measured. V belongs to the brainstem-generated potentials, which demonstrates that auditory stimuli were correctly transduced. Na, Pa are generated in the primary auditory cortex of the temporal lobe and are the electrophysiological correlate of the primary cortical processing of the auditory stimuli. RESULTS. None of the patients had an explicit memory

  16. ACSB: A minimum performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lloyd Thomas; Kissick, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Amplitude companded sideband (ACSB) is a new modulation technique which uses a much smaller channel width than does conventional frequency modulation (FM). Among the requirements of a mobile communications system is adequate speech intelligibility. This paper explores this aspect of minimum required performance. First, the basic principles of ACSB are described, with emphasis on those features that affect speech quality. Second, the appropriate performance measures for ACSB are reviewed. Third, a subjective voice quality scoring method is used to determine the values of the performance measures that equate to the minimum level of intelligibility. It is assumed that the intelligibility of an FM system operating at 12 dB SINAD represents that minimum. It was determined that ACSB operating at 12 dB SINAD with an audio-to-pilot ratio of 10 dB provides approximately the same intelligibility as FM operating at 12 dB SINAD.

  17. The Maunder minimum: a revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, Nadezhda; Ponyavin, Dmitri

    2015-08-01

    One of the most enigmatic features of the solar history in the past was the Maunder minimum (1645-1715). We estimated the daily nominal sunspot counts of each observer individually from 1610 to 1720. Simultaneous comparison of textual reports, tables, and sunspot drawings reveals a significant difference between them. Some observers (among whom were Jean Picard and Giovanni Domenico Cassini, both from the Royal Observatory in Paris) systematically made gaps in reports when others noticed sunspots. Philippe de La Hire announced only fewer sunspot groups compared with the other observers. We argue that different points of view of observers of the seventeenth-century on the origin of sunspots resulted in strong underestimation of sunspot groups. Our findings suggest that the Maunder minimum was an ordinary secular minimum with reduced but non-stopped solar cyclicity.

  18. Halothane and isoflurane do not decrease PaO2 during one-lung ventilation in intravenously anesthetized patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Benumof, J L

    1985-10-01

    We examined the effect of the inhalational anesthetics halothane (H) and isoflurane (IF) on arterial oxygenation during one-lung ventilation. Twenty consenting patients who required thoracotomy and one-lung ventilation were initially anesthetized only with the intravenous agents, diazepam, fentanyl, pancuronium, metocurine, and infusions of either ketamine or methohexital. A double lumen endotracheal tube was inserted, and each patient's lungs were mechanically ventilated (two-lung ventilation, step 1) with 100% O2 while the patient was in the lateral decubitus position. After the pleura was opened, the nondependent lung was collapsed while the dependent lung continued to be ventilated with 100% O2. After serial PaO2 measurements indicated achievement of stable one-lung ventilation conditions (step 2), intravenous anesthetic agents were discontinued, and either H (n = 10) or IF (n = 10) was administered (step 3) so that PETH = 7.70 +/- 0.61 mm Hg and PETIF = 9.89 +/- 1.08 mm Hg for more than 15 min; at the end of step 3, PaH/PETH = 0.82 (n = 5), PaIF/PETIF = 0.75 (n = 5), PvH/PETH = 0.64 (n = 3), and PvIF/PETIF = 0.68 (n = 3). The inhalational anesthetics were then discontinued, and intravenous agents were reinstituted, allowing PETH and PETIF to decrease below 0.50 mm Hg (step 4). Two-lung ventilation was resumed at the end of the surgical procedure (step 5). PaO2 decreased from 441 +/- 64 to 252 +/- 70 mm Hg when one-lung ventilation was achieved (steps 1-2), and PaO2 increased from 258 +/- 72 to 395 +/- 65 mm Hg when two-lung ventilation was resumed (steps 4-5).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Three-dimensional analysis of alveolar wall destruction in the early stage of pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Uehara, Takeshi; Kawasaki, Kenji; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Matsumoto, Gou; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    The morphological mechanism of alveolar wall destruction during pulmonary emphysema has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to elucidate this process three-dimensionally. Lung specimens from five patients with pulmonary emphysema were used, and five controls with normal alveolar structure were also examined. Sections 150 μm thick were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, elastica, and silver impregnation, and immunostained with selected antibodies. We examined these sections three-dimensionally using a laser confocal microscope and a light microscope. There were only a few Kohn's pores and no fenestrae in the normal alveoli from the controls. In the lungs of the emphysema patients a small rupture appeared in the extremely thin alveolar wall among the alveolar capillaries. This rupture enlarged to form a circle surrounded by the capillaries, which was called an alveolar fenestra. Two neighboring fenestrae fused by breakdown of the collapsed or cord-like capillary between them to form a large fenestra. The large fenestrae fused repeatedly to become larger, and these were bordered by thick elastic fibers constructing an alveolar framework. Alveolar wall destruction during emphysema could start from small ruptures of the alveolar wall that become fenestrae surrounded by capillaries, which fuse repeatedly to become larger fenestrae rimmed with elastic fibers. The alveolar capillary network could initially prevent enlargement of the fenestrae, and the thick elastic fibers constituting the alveolar framework could secondarily prevent destruction of the alveolar wall structure.

  20. Minimum Library Use Skills Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Joyce L.; Mandernack, Scott

    A follow-up study was conducted in 1987 to assess the use and effectiveness of "Minimum Library Use Skills: Standards, Test, and Bibliography" (MLUS), which had been distributed to all members of the Wisconsin Association of Academic Librarians in 1985. Some copies of this publication had been sold, and it is also available in ERIC microfiche. A…

  1. Tennessee Minimum School Bus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The School Bus Specifications and Procedures adopted by the 2000 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) were used as guides by the Tennessee State Board of Education Pupil Transportation Advisory Committee in developing the revised minimum specifications for school bus chassis and school…

  2. Leukotriene B4 receptors on guinea pig alveolar eosinophils

    SciTech Connect

    Maghni, K.; de Brum-Fernandes, A.J.; Foeldes-Filep, E.G.; Gaudry, M.; Borgeat, P.; Sirois, P. )

    1991-09-01

    The existence of receptors for LTB4 on highly purified guinea pig alveolar eosinophils was investigated. Massive infiltration of eosinophils in alveolar spaces was induced in guinea pigs by i.v. injections of Sephadex beads G50 (16 mg/kg). Alveolar eosinophils (50 {times} 10(6) cells) were purified to approximately 98% by Percoll continuous density gradient centrifugation. The binding studies indicated that alveolar eosinophils bind LTB4 in a saturable, reversible and specific manner. Scatchard analysis indicated the existence of high-affinity binding sites (Kd1 = 1.00 {plus minus} 0.22 nM; Bmax1 = 966 {plus minus} 266 sites/cell) and low-affinity binding sites (Kd2 = 62.5 {plus minus} 8.9 nM; Bmax2 = 5557 {plus minus} 757 sites/cell). The metabolism of LTB4 by alveolar eosinophils in binding conditions was assessed by RP-HPLC and no significant degradation of (3H)LTB4 was observed. LTB4 dose-dependently stimulated eosinophil migration in both chemokinesis and chemotaxis assays with an EC50 value of 1.30 {plus minus} 0.14 and 18.14 {plus minus} 1.57 nM, respectively. LTB4 caused a dose-dependent increase in the production of superoxide anion with an apparent EC50 value of 50 {times} 10(-9) M in the authors experimental conditions. LTB4 also induced a dose-dependent increase in the generation of TxA2 with an EC50 value of 46.2 {times} 10(-9) M. Taken together, their results demonstrated that guinea pig alveolar eosinophils express two classes of specific receptors for LTB4. The high-affinity binding sites seem associated to chemokinesis and chemotaxis whereas the low-affinity binding sites seem associated to superoxide anion production and generation of TxA2. The existence of LTB4 receptors in eosinophils could explain the presence of these cells in hypersensitivity reactions.

  3. Alveolar bone grafting: achieving the organisational standards determined by CSAG, a baseline audit at the Birmingham Children's Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, J.; Paterson, P.; Thorburn, G.; El-Ali, K.; Richard, B.; Hammond, M.; Wake, M.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Birmingham Children's Hospital (BCH) is the centre for a regional comprehensive cleft service attempting to implement the national guidelines for minimum standards of care. A national audit of cleft management (CSAG) found that 58% of alveolar bone grafts were successful; published series suggest that success rates can be of the order of 95%. We present the results of an audit of alveolar bone grafting over a 33-month period, after implementation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective clinical process audit was taken from the hospital notes and an analysis of radiological outcome by Bergland score was obtained by two independent assessors. RESULTS: The audit highlighted the difficulties of integrating the increased clinical workload. Other difficulties included poorly standardised pre- and postoperative occlusal radiography, inconsistent orthodontic management and a lack of prospective data collection. An 81% success rate for alveolar bone grafting compares favourably to the CSAG study. Of 82 patients, 68 had sufficient data for a retrospective review; 21 were our own patients and 47 were referred into the centralised service. The success of bone grafting as defined by CSAG (including Bergland scores) is based on only two-thirds of the patients as many have their orthodontic treatment managed in more distant units and radiographs are much harder to obtain. Bone grafting later than age 11 years, was true for 28% (6/21) of our BCH patients and 46% (22/47) for those referred to our service. CONCLUSIONS: This audit demonstrates what has been achieved in a re-organised service in the context of Real Politik in the NHS and suggests the areas that require improvement. PMID:16263019

  4. The interaction of nitrous oxide and fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane blocking motor movement (MACNM) in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Seddighi, Reza; Doherty, Thomas J.; Kukanich, Butch; Egger, Christine M.; Henn, Melissa A.; Long, Whitney M.; Rohrbach, Barton W.

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the effects of 70% nitrous oxide (N2O) and fentanyl on the end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane necessary to prevent movement (MACNM) in response to noxious stimulation in dogs. Six healthy, adult, intact male, mixed-breed dogs were used on 3 occasions in a randomized crossover design. After induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane, each of the following treatments was randomly administered: fentanyl loading dose (Ld) of 15 μg/kg and infusion of 6 μg/kg per hour [treatment 1 (T1)], 70% N2O (T2), or fentanyl (Ld of 15 μg/kg and infusion of 6 μg/kg per hour) combined with 70% N2O (T3). Each dog received each of the 3 treatments once during the 3-week period. Determination of MACNM was initiated 90 min after the start of each treatment. The values were compared using the baseline MACNM, which had been determined in a previous study on the same group of dogs. Data were analyzed using a mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer tests, and expressed as least squares mean ± SEM. The baseline MACNM decreased by 36.6 ± 4.0%, 15.0 ± 4.0%, and 46.0 ± 4.0% for T1, T2, and T3, respectively (P < 0.05), and differed (P < 0.05) among treatments. Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations did not differ (P ≥ 0.05) between T1 (3.70 ± 0.56 ng/mL) and T3 (3.50 ± 0.56 ng/mL). The combination of fentanyl and N2O resulted in a greater sevoflurane MACNM sparing effect than either treatment alone. PMID:24982551

  5. Phosphoproteome Profiling of SH-SY5y Neuroblastoma Cells Treated with Anesthetics: Sevoflurane and Isoflurane Affect the Phosphorylation of Proteins Involved in Cytoskeletal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joomin; Ahn, Eunsook; Park, Wyun Kon; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used to decrease the spinal cord transmission of painful stimuli. However, the molecular or biochemical processes within cells that regulate anesthetic-induced responses at the cellular level are largely unknown. Here, we report the phosphoproteome profile of SH-SY5y human neuroblastoma cells treated with sevoflurane, a clinically used anesthetic. Phosphoproteins were isolated from cell lysates and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The phosphorylation of putative anesthetic-responsive marker proteins was validated using western blot analysis in cells treated with both sevoflurane and isoflurane. A total of 25 phosphoproteins were identified as differentially phosphorylated proteins. These included key regulators that signal cytoskeletal remodeling steps in pathways related to vesicle trafficking, axonal growth, and cell migration. These proteins included the Rho GTPase, Ras-GAP SH3 binding protein, Rho GTPase activating protein, actin-related protein, and actin. Sevoflurane and isoflurane also resulted in the dissolution of F-actin fibers in SH-SY5y cells. Our results show that anesthetics affect the phosphorylation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. PMID:27611435

  6. Phosphoproteome Profiling of SH-SY5y Neuroblastoma Cells Treated with Anesthetics: Sevoflurane and Isoflurane Affect the Phosphorylation of Proteins Involved in Cytoskeletal Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Ahn, Eunsook; Park, Wyun Kon; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used to decrease the spinal cord transmission of painful stimuli. However, the molecular or biochemical processes within cells that regulate anesthetic-induced responses at the cellular level are largely unknown. Here, we report the phosphoproteome profile of SH-SY5y human neuroblastoma cells treated with sevoflurane, a clinically used anesthetic. Phosphoproteins were isolated from cell lysates and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The phosphorylation of putative anesthetic-responsive marker proteins was validated using western blot analysis in cells treated with both sevoflurane and isoflurane. A total of 25 phosphoproteins were identified as differentially phosphorylated proteins. These included key regulators that signal cytoskeletal remodeling steps in pathways related to vesicle trafficking, axonal growth, and cell migration. These proteins included the Rho GTPase, Ras-GAP SH3 binding protein, Rho GTPase activating protein, actin-related protein, and actin. Sevoflurane and isoflurane also resulted in the dissolution of F-actin fibers in SH-SY5y cells. Our results show that anesthetics affect the phosphorylation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling pathways.

  7. Phosphoproteome Profiling of SH-SY5y Neuroblastoma Cells Treated with Anesthetics: Sevoflurane and Isoflurane Affect the Phosphorylation of Proteins Involved in Cytoskeletal Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Ahn, Eunsook; Park, Wyun Kon; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used to decrease the spinal cord transmission of painful stimuli. However, the molecular or biochemical processes within cells that regulate anesthetic-induced responses at the cellular level are largely unknown. Here, we report the phosphoproteome profile of SH-SY5y human neuroblastoma cells treated with sevoflurane, a clinically used anesthetic. Phosphoproteins were isolated from cell lysates and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The phosphorylation of putative anesthetic-responsive marker proteins was validated using western blot analysis in cells treated with both sevoflurane and isoflurane. A total of 25 phosphoproteins were identified as differentially phosphorylated proteins. These included key regulators that signal cytoskeletal remodeling steps in pathways related to vesicle trafficking, axonal growth, and cell migration. These proteins included the Rho GTPase, Ras-GAP SH3 binding protein, Rho GTPase activating protein, actin-related protein, and actin. Sevoflurane and isoflurane also resulted in the dissolution of F-actin fibers in SH-SY5y cells. Our results show that anesthetics affect the phosphorylation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. PMID:27611435

  8. Effect of alveolar pressure on pulmonary artery pressure in chronically hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Wach, R; Emery, C J; Bee, D; Barer, G R

    1987-02-01

    The effect on pulmonary artery pressure of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic rats (10% O2 for 3-5 weeks) compared with control rats. Chronically hypoxic rats have newly muscularised walls in arterioles in the alveolar region. Isolated lungs of chronically hypoxic and control rats were perfused with blood under conditions in which alveolar pressure was greater than left atrial pressure during both normoxia and hypoxia. Alveolar pressure was the effective downstream pressure. Pressure-flow lines were measured at low and high alveolar pressure (5 and 15 mmHg). During normoxia pressure-flow lines of chronically hypoxic rats had a steeper slope (higher resistance) and greater extrapolated intercept on the pressure axis (effective downstream pressure) than control rats. In both groups of rats the change from low to high alveolar pressure during normoxia caused an approximately parallel shift in the pressure-flow line similar to the change in alveolar pressure. During hypoxia, which led to an increase in slope and intercept in both groups of rats, the effect of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic from control rats. In control rats there was a small parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was much less than the increase in alveolar pressure; in chronically hypoxic rats there was a large parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was greater than the increase in alveolar pressure. Thus in chronically hypoxic rats hypoxic vasoconstriction probably occurred mainly in muscular alveolar vessels, whereas in control rats it probably occurred upstream in extra-alveolar vessels. At constant blood flow the relation between pulmonary artery pressure and alveolar pressure was measured while alveolar pressure was reduced from approximately 15 mmHg to zero during both normoxia and hypoxia. In control and chronically hypoxic rats the slope of this line was less than 1. At an alveolar pressure of 2-3 mmHg there was an inflection

  9. Alveolar bone loss in osteoporosis: a loaded and cellular affair?

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Grethe; Rythén, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary and mandibular bone mirror skeletal bone conditions. Bone remodeling happens at endosteal surfaces where the osteoclasts and osteoblasts are situated. More surfaces means more cells and remodeling. The bone turnover rate in the mandibular alveolar process is probably the fastest in the body; thus, the first signs of osteoporosis may be revealed here. Hormones, osteoporosis, and aging influence the alveolar process and the skeletal bones similarly, but differences in loading between loaded, half-loaded, and unloaded bones are important to consider. Bone mass is redistributed from one location to another where strength is needed. A sparse trabeculation in the mandibular premolar region (large intertrabecular spaces and thin trabeculae) is a reliable sign of osteopenia and a high skeletal fracture risk. Having dense trabeculation (small intertrabecular spaces and well-mineralized trabeculae) is generally advantageous to the individual because of the low fracture risk, but may imply some problems for the clinician.

  10. Rare Presentation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Causing Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Ryan R; Kumar, Sameer; Grossman, Ronald F; Price, Charles; Srigley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition characterized by dysfunctional alveolar macrophages, which ineffectively clear surfactant and typically cause mild hypoxemia. Characteristic Computed Tomography findings are septal reticulations superimposed on ground-glass opacities in a crazy paving pattern, with a clear juxtaposition between affected and unaffected parenchyma. While traditionally PAP was diagnosed via biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is usually sufficient; the fluid appears milky, and on microscopic examination there are foamy macrophages with eosinophilic granules and extracellular hyaline material that is Periodic Acid-Schiff positive. Standard therapy is whole lung lavage (WLL), although novel treatments are under development. The case presented is a 55-year-old woman with six months of progressive dyspnea, who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; she had typical findings of PAP on imaging and BAL. WLL was ultimately successful in restoring adequate oxygenation. Respiratory failure of this magnitude is a rare finding in PAP. PMID:27445536

  11. Alveolar bone loss in osteoporosis: a loaded and cellular affair?

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, Grethe; Rythén, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary and mandibular bone mirror skeletal bone conditions. Bone remodeling happens at endosteal surfaces where the osteoclasts and osteoblasts are situated. More surfaces means more cells and remodeling. The bone turnover rate in the mandibular alveolar process is probably the fastest in the body; thus, the first signs of osteoporosis may be revealed here. Hormones, osteoporosis, and aging influence the alveolar process and the skeletal bones similarly, but differences in loading between loaded, half-loaded, and unloaded bones are important to consider. Bone mass is redistributed from one location to another where strength is needed. A sparse trabeculation in the mandibular premolar region (large intertrabecular spaces and thin trabeculae) is a reliable sign of osteopenia and a high skeletal fracture risk. Having dense trabeculation (small intertrabecular spaces and well-mineralized trabeculae) is generally advantageous to the individual because of the low fracture risk, but may imply some problems for the clinician. PMID:27471408

  12. An automatic early stage alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation method on digital dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hiroki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a kind of typical dental diseases, which affects many adults. The presence of alveolar bone resorption, which can be observed from dental panoramic radiographs, is one of the most important signs of the progression of periodontal disease. Automatically evaluating alveolar-bone resorption is of important clinic meaning in dental radiology. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel system for automated alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation from digital dental panoramic radiographs for the first time. The proposed system enables visualization and quantitative evaluation of alveolar bone resorption degree surrounding the teeth. It has the following procedures: (1) pre-processing for a test image; (2) detection of tooth root apices with Gabor filter and curve fitting for the root apex line; (3) detection of features related with alveolar bone by using image phase congruency map and template matching and curving fitting for the alveolar line; (4) detection of occlusion line with selected Gabor filter; (5) finally, evaluation of the quantitative alveolar-bone-resorption degree in the area surrounding teeth by simply computing the average ratio of the height of the alveolar bone and the height of the teeth. The proposed scheme was applied to 30 patient cases of digital panoramic radiographs, with alveolar bone resorption of different stages. Our initial trial on these test cases indicates that the quantitative evaluation results are correlated with the alveolar-boneresorption degree, although the performance still needs further improvement. Therefore it has potential clinical practicability.

  13. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Aoshiba, K; Nagai, A

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke. PMID:19570263

  14. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Aoshiba, K; Nagai, A

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  15. Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cell Dysfunction in Rat Experimental Hepatopulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenli; Hu, Bingqian; Wu, Wei; Batra, Sachin; Blackburn, Michael R.; Alcorn, Joseph L.; Fallon, Michael B.; Zhang, Junlan

    2014-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2) play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D) which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL). We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064) induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25419825

  16. Alveolar type II epithelial cell dysfunction in rat experimental hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenli; Hu, Bingqian; Wu, Wei; Batra, Sachin; Blackburn, Michael R; Alcorn, Joseph L; Fallon, Michael B; Zhang, Junlan

    2014-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2) play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D) which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL). We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064) induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target.

  17. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  18. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  19. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  20. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  1. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  2. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  3. 5 CFR 630.206 - Minimum charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum charge. 630.206 Section 630.206... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.206 Minimum charge. (a) Unless an agency establishes a minimum charge of less than one hour, or establishes a different minimum charge...

  4. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  5. Respiratory gas exchange using a triaxial alveolar gas diagram.

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, J. F.; Pages, T.; Palacios, L.

    1993-01-01

    A triaxial alveolar gas diagram to depict fractional concentration of oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen is described, in which the R = 1 line is always implicit. Although it is not claimed that this representation leads to new insights into respiratory physiology, a method of plotting on a triaxial coordinate system has been found to be well suited to many applications when a direct display of fractional nitrogen concentration is required. PMID:8303637

  6. Alveolar cell carcinoma: diagnostic pitfalls in evaluating the chest roentgenogram

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, M.S.; Bailey, W.C.

    1985-02-01

    A report is given of two patients with initial symptoms of congestive heart failure who had an extensive work-up that failed to reveal any signs of pulmonary malignancy. Subsequent biopsy by fiberoptic bronchoscopy confirmed alveolar cell carcinoma in both cases, suggesting that bronchoscopy with biopsy should be considered in patients with congestive heart failure if pulmonary edema does not resolve with appropriate therapy. 11 references, 2 figures.

  7. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    PubMed Central

    Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2001-01-01

    In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, and host defence. AE2 cells proliferate, differentiate into AE1 cells, and remove apoptotic AE2 cells by phagocytosis, thus contributing to epithelial repair. AE2 cells may act as immunoregulatory cells. AE2 cells interact with resident and mobile cells, either directly by membrane contact or indirectly via cytokines/growth factors and their receptors, thus representing an integrative unit within the alveolus. Although most data support the concept, the controversy about the character of hyperplastic AE2 cells, reported to synthesise profibrotic factors, proscribes drawing a definite conclusion today. PMID:11686863

  8. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: review of the 1022 cases reported worldwide.

    PubMed

    Castellana, Giuseppe; Castellana, Giorgio; Gentile, Mattia; Castellana, Roberto; Resta, Onofrio

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterised by the widespread intra-alveolar accumulation of minute calculi called microliths. It is caused by mutation of the SLC34A2 gene encoding the type IIb sodium phosphate cotransporter in alveolar type II cells. The present study explores the epidemiological, familial, genetic, clinical, diagnostic, radiological and therapeutic aspects with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of this uncommon disease.We searched articles on PAM published up to December 2014 and 544 papers were found, accounting for 1022 cases.PAM is present in all continents and in many nations, in particular in Turkey, China, Japan, India, Italy and the USA. Familiality is frequent. The clinical course is not uniform and the causes of this clinical variability seem to be largely nongenetic. The optimal diagnostic procedure is the association of chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with bronchoalveolar lavage, but a chest radiograph may suffice in families in which a case has already been diagnosed. Moreover, chest radiography and HRCT allow the classification of the evolutionary phase of the disease and its severity. At present lung transplantation is the only effective therapy. However, better knowledge of the gene responsible offers hope for new therapies. PMID:26621975

  9. Quality assessment of systematic reviews on alveolar socket preservation.

    PubMed

    Moraschini, V; Barboza, E Dos S P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this overview was to evaluate and compare the quality of systematic reviews, with or without meta-analysis, that have evaluated studies on techniques or biomaterials used for the preservation of alveolar sockets post tooth extraction in humans. An electronic search was conducted without date restrictions using the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases up to April 2015. Eligibility criteria included systematic reviews, with or without meta-analysis, focused on the preservation of post-extraction alveolar sockets in humans. Two independent authors assessed the quality of the included reviews using AMSTAR and the checklist proposed by Glenny et al. in 2003. After the selection process, 12 systematic reviews were included. None of these reviews obtained the maximum score using the quality assessment tools implemented, and the results of the analyses were highly variable. A significant statistical correlation was observed between the scores of the two checklists. A wide structural and methodological variability was observed between the systematic reviews published on the preservation of alveolar sockets post tooth extraction. None of the reviews evaluated obtained the maximum score using the two quality assessment tools implemented.

  10. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: review of the 1022 cases reported worldwide.

    PubMed

    Castellana, Giuseppe; Castellana, Giorgio; Gentile, Mattia; Castellana, Roberto; Resta, Onofrio

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterised by the widespread intra-alveolar accumulation of minute calculi called microliths. It is caused by mutation of the SLC34A2 gene encoding the type IIb sodium phosphate cotransporter in alveolar type II cells. The present study explores the epidemiological, familial, genetic, clinical, diagnostic, radiological and therapeutic aspects with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of this uncommon disease.We searched articles on PAM published up to December 2014 and 544 papers were found, accounting for 1022 cases.PAM is present in all continents and in many nations, in particular in Turkey, China, Japan, India, Italy and the USA. Familiality is frequent. The clinical course is not uniform and the causes of this clinical variability seem to be largely nongenetic. The optimal diagnostic procedure is the association of chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with bronchoalveolar lavage, but a chest radiograph may suffice in families in which a case has already been diagnosed. Moreover, chest radiography and HRCT allow the classification of the evolutionary phase of the disease and its severity. At present lung transplantation is the only effective therapy. However, better knowledge of the gene responsible offers hope for new therapies.

  11. Chronic alcohol ingestion changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Trac, David; Brewer, Elizabeth M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2013-01-01

    Similar to effects of alcohol on the heart, liver, and brain, the effects of ethanol (EtOH) on lung injury are preventable. Unlike other vital organ systems, however, the lethal effects of alcohol on the lung are underappreciated, perhaps because there are no signs of overt pulmonary disorder until a secondary insult, such as a bacterial infection or injury, occurs in the lung. This paper provides overview of the complex changes in the alveolar environment known to occur following both chronic and acute alcohol exposures. Contemporary animal and cell culture models for alcohol-induced lung dysfunction are discussed, with emphasis on the effect of alcohol on transepithelial transport processes, namely, epithelial sodium channel activity (ENaC). The cascading effect of tissue and phagocytic Nadph oxidase (Nox) may be triggered by ethanol exposure, and as such, alcohol ingestion and exposure lead to a prooxidative environment; thus impacting alveolar macrophage (AM) function and oxidative stress. A better understanding of how alcohol changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium can lead to improvements in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which hospitalized alcoholics are at an increased risk. PMID:23509726

  12. Primary alveolar soft-part sarcoma of stomach.

    PubMed

    Yagihashi, S; Yagihashi, N; Hase, Y; Nagai, K; Alguacil-Garcia, A

    1991-04-01

    A case of primary gastric alveolar soft-part sarcoma is presented. The tumor was found in the gastric remnant of a 67-year-old male who had undergone partial gastrectomy due to hemorrhagic gastric ulcer 13 years before. It was located mostly in the submucosa arising from the muscularis propria. The large eosinophilic cells showed the characteristic alveolar compartmentalization and contained intracytoplasmic periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules and typical crystals. Numerous electron-opaque secretory granules in the tumor cell cytoplasm, in addition to crystals of 9 nm periodicity, were confirmed at the ultrastructural levels. Immunostaining failed to detect muscle-related antigens. In contrast, methionine-enkephalin and neuropeptide Y appeared positive in the tumor cells. Interstitial spindle cells showed an occasional positivity to S-100. This is the first case of such a tumor occurring in the gastrointestinal tract, and the findings suggest that gastric alveolar soft-part sarcomas may have a different origin from those arising in the skeleton.

  13. Evaluation of optical reflectance techniques for imaging of alveolar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, Carolin I.; Namati, Eman; Warger, William C.; Liu, Linbo; Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the fine structures within the lung parenchyma could advance our understanding of alveolar physiology and pathophysiology. Current knowledge has been primarily based on histology, but it is a destructive two-dimensional (2-D) technique that is limited by tissue processing artifacts. Micro-CT provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging within a limited sample size, but is not applicable to intact lungs from larger animals or humans. Optical reflectance techniques offer the promise to visualize alveolar regions of the large animal or human lung with sub-cellular resolution in three dimensions. Here, we present the capabilities of three optical reflectance techniques, namely optical frequency domain imaging, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy, and full field optical coherence microscopy, to visualize both gross architecture as well as cellular detail in fixed, phosphate buffered saline-immersed rat lung tissue. Images from all techniques were correlated to each other and then to corresponding histology. Spatial and temporal resolution, imaging depth, and suitability for in vivo probe development were compared to highlight the merits and limitations of each technology for studying respiratory physiology at the alveolar level.

  14. Theophylline improves lipopolysaccharide-induced alveolarization arrest through inflammatory regulation.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Chen, Fei; Ni, Wensi; Li, Jianhui; Zhang, Yongjun

    2014-07-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by alveolar simplification with decreased numbers of alveoli and increased airspace. BPD, frequently suffered by very low birth weight infants, has been closely associated with intrauterine infection. However, the underlying mechanisms of BPD remain unclear. In the present study, it was identified that administration of intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to pregnant rats on embryonal day 16.5 (E16.5) induced significant alveolarization arrest similar to that of BPD in neonatal pups, and theophylline injected subcutaneously into the newborns improved the pathological changes. To further investigate the underlying mechanism of the morphogenesis amelioration of theophylline, cytokine antibody arrays were performed with the lung lysates of neonatal rats. The results indicated that LPS upregulated a series of pro-inflammatory cytokines and theophylline significantly attenuated the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor‑α, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α and MIP-2, and markedly elevated the production of tumor growth factor (TGF)-β family members TGF-β1, TGF-β2 and TGF-β3, which are anti‑inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that theophylline may protect against BPD and improve chorioamnionitis‑induced alveolar arrest by regulating the balance between pro‑and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression.

  15. Alveolar ridge augmentation using distraction osteogenesis: a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anand; Singh, Saumyendra V; Kumar, Sumit; Mehrotra, Divya; Mohammad, S; Singh, Stuti

    2012-01-01

    Background Severely resorbed ridges present a great challenge to prosthodontic rehabilitation. Available reconstructive options include autologous/alloplastic augmentation with questionable results, or regeneration of new bone under gradual and controlled tension using distraction osteogenesis. This study focused on use of distraction osteogenesis for the treatment of vertically deficient alveolar ridges to assess its feasibility and outcome. Materials and Methods Alveolar distraction osteogenesis (ADO) was studied at 10 different intra-oral, partial or complete edentulous sites. After a latency period of 5 days, distraction was carried out for 6–7 days at the rate of 0.5 mm every 12 hours (1 mm/day). Distractor was removed after a consolidation period of 12 weeks. Results The mean height gained at the 10 intra-oral sites was 4.8 mm with standard deviation of ± 0.056. The mean follow-up period was 2 years. Complications of therapy included hardware failure, wound gape and extra-oral scar. The overall complication rate was 10%. Conclusion Distraction osteogenesis is a promising option to aid uneventful prosthodontic rehabilitation of severe vertically resorbed alveolar ridges. PMID:25756028

  16. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  17. A new imminent grand minimum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Rodolfo G.; Compagnucci, Rosa H.

    2012-07-01

    The planetary hypothesis of solar cycle is an old idea by which the planetary gravity acting on the Sun might have a non-negligible effect on the solar magnetic cycle. The advance of this hypothesis is based on phenomenological correlations between dynamical parameters of the Sun's movement around the barycenter of the Solar System and sunspots time series. In addition, several authors have proposed, using different methodologies that the first Grand Minima (GM) event of the new millennium is coming or has already begun. We present new fully three dimensional N-body simulations of the solar inertial motion (SIM) around the barycentre of the solar system in order to perform a phenomenological comparison between relevant SIM dynamical parameters and the occurrences of the last GM events (i.e., Maunder and Dalton). Our fundamental result is that the Sun acceleration decomposed in a co-orbital reference system shows a very particular behaviour that is common to Maunder minimum, Dalton minimum and the maximum of cycle 22 (around 1990), before the present prolonged minimum. We discuss our results in terms of a dynamical characterization of GM with relation to Sun dynamics and possible implications for a new GM event.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane anesthesia in aged rats via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects mediated by the PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yini; Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Haitang; Cai, Nan; Zhou, Shuang; Zhao, Yaoping; Chen, Xue; Zheng, Shaoqiang; Si, Qi; Zhang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is the primary active substance in ginseng, and it has multiple pharmacological actions. Investigations on the pharmacologic action of ginsenoside Rg1 have developed, with a particular focus on the regulation of metabolism. The present study hypothesized that the neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 prevent cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane anesthesia via antioxidant, anti‑inflammatory and anti‑apoptotic effects, mediated by the phosphoinositide 3‑kinase (PI3K)/AKT/glycogen synthase kinase‑3β (GSK‑3β) pathway in aged rats. Sprague‑Dawley rats were divided into isoflurane and ginsenoside Rg1 groups and were treated with 20 mg/kg ginsenoside Rg1 for 7 days. Morris water maze was performed to analyze the cognitive function of the rats. Enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assays were used to analyze the levels of malondialdehyde, glutathione, interleukin (IL)‑1β, IL‑6 and caspase 3. The protein expression levels of AKT, GSK 3β, p21WAF1/CIP1 and p53 were measured using western blot analysis. Ginsenoside Rg1 significantly improved cognitive function, and exhibited antioxidant and anti‑inflammatory effects, demonstrating the neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against the effect of isoflurane anesthesia in the rats. In addition, ginsenoside Rg1 significantly reduced caspase‑3 activity, upregulated the expression of PI3K/AKT/GSK‑3β and downregulated the mRNA expression levels of p21WAF1/CIP1 and p53 in the aged rats exposed to isoflurane anesthesia. The data obtained in the present study provided evidence that the neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 prevented the cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane anesthesia via antioxidant, anti‑inflammatory and anti‑apoptotic effects, mediated by the PI3K/AKT/GSK‑3β pathway.

  19. Elemental analysis of lung tissue particles and intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophages in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease occurred by idiopathic (autoimmune) or secondary to particle inhalation. The in-air microparticle induced X-ray emission (in-air micro-PIXE) system performs elemental analysis of materials by irradiation with a proton microbeam, and allows visualization of the spatial distribution and quantitation of various elements with very low background noise. The aim of this study was to assess the secondary PAP due to inhalation of harmful particles by employing in-air micro-PIXE analysis for particles and intracellular iron in parafin-embedded lung tissue specimens obtained from a PAP patient comparing with normal lung tissue from a non-PAP patient. The iron inside alveolar macrophages was stained with Berlin blue, and its distribution was compared with that on micro-PIXE images. Results The elements composing particles and their locations in the PAP specimens could be identified by in-air micro-PIXE analysis, with magnesium (Mg), aluminum (Al), silicon (Si), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), scandium (Sc), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), titanium (Ti), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganase (Mn), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) being detected. Si was the major component of the particles. Serial sections stained by Berlin blue revealed accumulation of sideromacrophages that had phagocytosed the particles. The intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophage from the surfactant-rich area in PAP was higher than normal lung tissue in control lung by both in-air micro-PIXE analysis and Berlin blue staining. Conclusion The present study demonstrated the efficacy of in-air micro-PIXE for analyzing the distribution and composition of lung particles. The intracellular iron content of single cells was determined by simultaneous two-dimensional and elemental analysis of paraffin-embedded lung tissue sections. The results suggest that secondary PAP is associated with exposure to inhaled particles and accumulation of iron in alveolar

  20. Alveolar bone grafting in the treatment of midline alveolar cleft and diastema in incomplete median cleft lip.

    PubMed

    Liao, H-T; Chen, C-H; Bergeron, L; Ko, E W-C; Chen, P K T; Chen, Y-R

    2008-10-01

    Median cleft lip is a rare congenital anomaly. The wide diastema with mesial tipping observed in these patients has been largely overlooked. A midline submucosal alveolar cleft prevents adequate treatment. The purpose of this article is to describe an alveolar bone grafting (ABG) technique used in the combined surgical-orthodontic approach to diastema treatment in patients presenting with incomplete median cleft lip. Patients treated for incomplete median cleft lip and diastema were identified in the clinic registry from 1981 to 2007. Six patients were identified; 4 underwent ABG before permanent maxillary incisor eruption, the other 2 were seen later when they were 11 years old. All 6 ABGs were successful. The incisors erupted through the graft or were successfully moved into it with lasting results. Follow-up ranged from 8 to 21 years. The existence of a midline submucosal alveolar cleft and subsequent diastema should be recognized and addressed in all patients who present with incomplete median cleft lip repair. This includes taking maxillary occlusal view X-rays before the age of 5 years to detect the cleft, and proceed to ABG if necessary, generally before permanent maxillary incisor eruption. PMID:18771899

  1. Lipopolysaccharide disrupts the milk-blood barrier by modulating claudins in mammary alveolar tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ken; Oyama, Shoko; Numata, Atsushi; Rahman, Md Morshedur; Kumura, Haruto

    2013-01-01

    Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary gland, is the most costly common disease in the dairy industry, and is caused by mammary pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli. The bacteria invade the mammary alveolar lumen and disrupt the blood-milk barrier. In normal mammary gland, alveolar epithelial tight junctions (TJs) contribute the blood-milk barrier of alveolar epithelium by blocking the leakage of milk components from the luminal side into the blood serum. In this study, we focused on claudin subtypes that participate in the alveolar epithelial TJs, because the composition of claudins is an important factor that affects TJ permeability. In normal mouse lactating mammary glands, alveolar TJs consist of claudin-3 without claudin-1, -4, and -7. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis, alveolar TJs showed 2-staged compositional changes in claudins. First, a qualitative change in claudin-3, presumably caused by phosphorylation and participation of claudin-7 in alveolar TJs, was recognized in parallel with the leakage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated albumin (FITC-albumin) via the alveolar epithelium. Second, claudin-4 participated in alveolar TJs with claudin-3 and claudin-7 12 h after LPS injection. The partial localization of claudin-1 was also observed by immunostaining. Coinciding with the second change of alveolar TJs, the severe disruption of the blood-milk barrier was recognized by ectopic localization of β-casein and much leakage of FITC-albumin. Furthermore, the localization of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the luminal side and NFκB activation by LPS was observed in the alveolar epithelial cells. We suggest that the weakening and disruption of the blood-milk barrier are caused by compositional changes of claudins in alveolar epithelial TJs through LPS/TLR4 signaling.

  2. [Cytologic parameters of broncho-alveolar lavage state in experimental animals exposed to mechanical rubber aerosol].

    PubMed

    Zhumabekova, B K; Sraubayev, E N; Gazalieva, M A; Akhmetova, S B

    2015-01-01

    Cytologic studies covered broncho-alveolar lavage in animals exposed to mechanical rubber aerosol in subacute (2 months) and chronic (5 months) experiments. Under exposure to mechanical rubber aerosol the experimental animals developed disorders of lung protective mechanisms. Subacute dust inhalation in the experimental animals caused higher counts of neutrophils and degeneratively changed cells with increased functional activity of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils. Chronic dust inhalation in the experimental animals proved lower functional activity alveolar macrophages and neutrophils.

  3. A Case of Alveolar Echinococcosis Presenting as Cerebral and Spinal Intradural Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Atalan, Guneri; Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Sönmez, Güner; Celik, Mahir; Simsek, Berksan

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a chronic and serious, even lethal, parasitic infection caused by the helminth Echinococcus multilocularis. The involvement of Central Nervous System is reported to be 1–3% in literature. Brain involvement is considered a sign of the terminal phase of alveolar echinococcosis. We here in reported a 67-year-old female who had liver alveolar hydatid disease with brain and spinal intradural metastases. PMID:27551181

  4. A Case of Alveolar Echinococcosis Presenting as Cerebral and Spinal Intradural Metastases.

    PubMed

    Atalan, Guneri; Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Sönmez, Güner; Celik, Mahir; Simsek, Berksan

    2016-06-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a chronic and serious, even lethal, parasitic infection caused by the helminth Echinococcus multilocularis. The involvement of Central Nervous System is reported to be 1-3% in literature. Brain involvement is considered a sign of the terminal phase of alveolar echinococcosis. We here in reported a 67-year-old female who had liver alveolar hydatid disease with brain and spinal intradural metastases. PMID:27551181

  5. Culture of fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Fraslon, C; Rolland, G; Bourbon, J R; Rieutort, M; Valenza, C

    1991-11-01

    A serum-free culture medium (defined medium = DM) was elaborated by adding to Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM), non-essential amino acids, transferrin, putrescine, tripeptide glycyl-histidyl-lysine, somatostatin, sodium selenite, ethanolamine, phosphoethanolamine, sodium pyruvate, and metal trace elements. This medium was tested for its ability to support sustained surfactant biosynthesis in fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells. For up to 8 days, ultrastructure was maintained with persistence of lamellar inclusion bodies. Thymidine incorporation into DNA was enhanced about 50% in DM as compared with MEM, whereas it was enhanced 300% in 10% fetal bovine serum. With DM, the incorporation of tritiated choline into phosphatidylcholine (PC) of isolated surfactant material was about twice that with MEM. Deletion experiments evidenced the prominent role of pyruvate, transferrin, and selenium in the stimulation of surfactant PC biosynthesis. The addition of biotin to DM enhanced surfactant PC biosynthesis slightly and nonsurfactant PC biosynthesis markedly. The presence of nucleosides seemed unfavorable to the synthesis of surfactant PC. Type II cells responded to the addition of epidermal growth factor and insulinlike growth factor-I both by increased thymidine incorporation into DNA and choline incorporation into PC. It is concluded that DM represents a useful tool for cultivating type II cells without loss of their specialized properties and for studying the regulation of cell proliferation and surfactant biosynthesis in a controlled environment. PMID:1748624

  6. Aerosol-based efficient delivery of azithromycin to alveolar macrophages for treatment of respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of aerosol-based delivery of azithromycin (AZM) for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in alveolar macrophages (AMs) was evaluated by comparison with oral administration. The aerosol formulation of AZM (0.2 mg/kg) was administered to rat lungs using a Liquid MicroSprayer(®). The oral formulation of AZM (50 mg/kg) was used for comparison. Time-courses of concentrations of AZM in AMs following administration were obtained, and then the therapeutic availability (TA) was calculated. In addition, the area under the concentrations of AZM in AMs - time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration at which 90% of isolates ratio (AUC/MIC90) were calculated to estimate the antibacterial effects in AMs. The TA of AZM in AMs following administration of aerosol formulation was markedly greater than that following administration of oral formulation. In addition, the AUC/MIC90 of AZM in AMs was markedly higher than the effective values. This indicates that the aerosol formulation could be useful for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in AMs. This study suggests that aerosolized AZM is an effective pulmonary drug delivery system for the treatment of respiratory infections.

  7. Scavenging of hydrogen peroxide by alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII) and macrophages (MAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, L.; Slater, M.; Baker, R.; Matalon, S. )

    1990-02-26

    The pulmonary epithelium is often a target of increased concentrations of extracellularly generated reactive oxygen species (PROS). In this study the authors quantified whether freshly isolated ATII and unstimulated MAC may scavenge extracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and to determine the mechanisms involved. Cells were suspended in Eagles minimum essential medium and incubated with 500 {mu}M xanthine and 10 mU/ml xanthine oxidase for 60 min at 37C. In a separate series of experiments cells were preincubated with 10 {mu}M aminotriazole (ATZ) which decreased their catalase activity 60% of their initial values. Both ATII and MAC scavenged significant amounts of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. After exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cell viabilities for the control (-ATZ) and ATZ treated cells were {ge}50%. The ability of ATII and MAC to scavenge extracellular H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may protect the alveolar epithelium from reactive oxygen species injury.

  8. Relationship of structural to functional impairment during alveolar-capillary membrane development.

    PubMed

    Ahlfeld, Shawn K; Gao, Yong; Conway, Simon J; Tepper, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease of extreme preterm infants and results in impaired gas exchange. Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is characterized histologically by alveolar-capillary simplification in animal models, it is clinically defined by impaired gas diffusion. With the use of a developmentally relevant model, we correlated alveolar-capillary structural simplification with reduced functional gas exchange as measured by the diffusing factor for carbon monoxide (DFCO). Neonatal mouse pups were exposed to >90% hyperoxia or room air during postnatal days 0 to 7, and then all pups were returned to room air from days 7 to 56. At day 56, DFCO was measured as the ratio of carbon monoxide uptake to neon dilution, and lungs were fixed for histologic assessment of alveolar-capillary development. Neonatal hyperoxia exposure inhibited alveolar-capillary septal development as evidenced by significantly increased mean linear intercept, increased airspace-to-septal ratio, decreased nodal density, and decreased pulmonary microvasculature. Importantly, alveolar-capillary structural deficits in hyperoxia-exposed pups were accompanied by a significant 28% decrease in DFCO (0.555 versus 0.400; P < 0.0001). In addition, DFCO was highly and significantly correlated with structural measures of reduced alveolar-capillary growth. Simplification of alveolar-capillary structure is highly correlated with impaired gas exchange function. Current mechanistic and therapeutic animal models of inhibited alveolar development may benefit from application of DFCO as an alternative physiologic indicator of alveolar-capillary development. PMID:25661110

  9. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure.

  10. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure. PMID:24932126

  11. Alveolar hemorrhage and kidney disease: characteristics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; El Ati, Zohra; Lamia, Rais; Aich, Dorra Ben; Madiha, Krid; Wided, Smaoui; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Somaya; Karim, Zouaghi; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Goodpasture's glomerular basement membrane disease are the most common causes of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, a life-threatening disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus and the antiphospholipid syndrome are also causes of alveolar hemorrhage. We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with renal diseases. Diagnosis of DAH was based on the presence of bloody bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. There were three men and 12 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years (extremes: 24-74 years). Proteinuria and hematuria were observed, respectively, in 15 and 14 cases. Six patients revealed arterial hypertension. Crescentic glomerulonephritis was diagnosed with kidney biopsies in ten cases. The etiology of renal disease was microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) in seven cases, Wegener disease in four cases, systemic lupus erythematous in one case, cryoglobulinemia in one case, myeloma in one case and propyl-thiouracil-induced MPA in one case. Hemoptysis occurred in 14 cases. The mean serum level of hemoglobin was 7.1 g/dL (5.1-10 g/dL). The mean serum creatinine concentration was 7.07 mg/dL (2.4-13.7 mg/dL). Gas exchange was severely compromised, with an oxygenation index <80 mmHg in 14 patients and <60 mmHg in seven patients. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 11 cases, and had positive findings for hemorrhage in all. Methylprednisolone pulses and cyclophosphamide were used in 14 patients. Plasmapheresis was performed in three cases. One patient received cycles of Dexamethasome-Melphalan. Three patients died as a result of DAH. The mortality rate in our study was 20%. PMID:23816724

  12. Alveolar Epithelial Cell Injury Due to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Ho; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Kennedy, Ian M.; Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Although inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) is known to cause systemic disease (i.e., metal fume fever), little is known about mechanisms underlying injury to alveolar epithelium. Objectives: Investigate ZnO NP–induced injury to alveolar epithelium by exposing primary cultured rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECMs) to ZnO NPs. Methods: RAECMs were exposed apically to ZnO NPs or, in some experiments, to culture fluid containing ZnCl2 or free Zn released from ZnO NPs. Transepithelial electrical resistance (RT) and equivalent short-circuit current (IEQ) were assessed as functions of concentration and time. Morphologic changes, lactate dehydrogenase release, cell membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial activity were measured. Measurements and Main Results: Apical exposure to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs decreased RT and IEQ of RAECMs by 100% over 24 hours, whereas exposure to 11 μg/ml ZnO NPs had little effect. Changes in RT and IEQ caused by 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs were irreversible. ZnO NP effects on RT yielded half-maximal concentrations of approximately 20 μg/ml. Apical exposure for 24 hours to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs induced decreases in mitochondrial activity and increases in lactate dehydrogenase release, permeability to fluorescein sulfonic acid, increased intracellular ROS, and translocation of ZnO NPs from apical to basolateral fluid (most likely across injured cells and/or damaged paracellular pathways). Conclusions: ZnO NPs cause severe injury to RAECMs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, mediated, at least in part, by free Zn released from ZnO NPs, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased intracellular ROS. PMID:20639441

  13. Albuterol Improves Alveolar-Capillary Membrane Conductance in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Natalie E.; Baker, Sarah E.; Olson, Thomas P.; Lalande, Sophie; Johnson, Bruce D.; Snyder, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Beta-2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) are located throughout the body including airway and alveolar cells. The β2ARs regulate lung fluid clearance through a variety of mechanisms including ion transport on alveolar cells and relaxation of the pulmonary lymphatics. We examined the effect of an inhaled β2-agonist (albuterol) on alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (DM) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (VC) in healthy humans. METHODS We assessed the diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and nitric oxide (DLNO) at baseline, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes following nebulized albuterol (2.5 mg, diluted in 3 mL normal saline) in 45 healthy subjects. Seventeen subjects repeated these measures following nebulized normal saline (age = 27 ± 9 years, height = 165 ± 21 cm, weight = 68 ± 12 kg, BMI = 26 ± 9 kg/m2). Cardiac output (Q), heart rate, systemic vascular resistance (SVR), blood pressure, oxygen saturation, forced expiratory volume at one-second (FEV1), and forced expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity (FEF50) were assessed at baseline, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes following the administration of albuterol or saline. RESULTS Albuterol resulted in a decrease in SVR, and an increase in Q, FEV1, and FEF50 compared to saline controls. Albuterol also resulted in a decrease in VC at 60 minutes post albuterol. Both albuterol and normal saline resulted in no change in DLCO or DM when assessed alone, but a significant increase was observed in DM when accounting for changes in VC. CONCLUSION These data suggest that nebulized albuterol improves pulmonary function in healthy humans, while nebulization of both albuterol and saline results in an increase in DM/VC. PMID:27773996

  14. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    PubMed Central

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  15. Proposal of a computed tomography classification for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Graeter, Tilmann; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Oeztuerk, Suemeyra; Haenle, Mark Martin; Mason, Richard Andrew; Hillenbrand, Andreas; Kull, Thomas; Barth, Thomas F; Kern, Peter; Gruener, Beate

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a computed tomography (CT)-morphological classification for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis was the aim of the study. METHODS: The CT morphology of hepatic lesions in 228 patients with confirmed alveolar echinococcosis (AE) drawn from the Echinococcus Databank of the University Hospital of Ulm was reviewed retrospectively. For this reason, CT datasets of combined positron emission tomography (PET)-CT examinations were evaluated. The diagnosis of AE was made in patients with unequivocal seropositivity; positive histological findings following diagnostic puncture or partial resection of the liver; and/or findings typical for AE at either ultrasonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging or PET-CT. The CT-morphological findings were grouped into the new classification scheme. RESULTS: Within the classification a lesion was dedicated to one out of five “primary morphologies” as well as to one out of six “patterns of calcification”. “primary morphology” and “pattern of calcification” are primarily focussed on separately from each other and combined, whereas the “primary morphology” V is not further characterized by a “pattern of calcification”. Based on the five primary morphologies, further descriptive sub-criteria were appended to types I-III. An analysis of the calcification pattern in relation to the primary morphology revealed the exclusive association of the central calcification with type IV primary morphology. Similarly, certain calcification patterns exhibited a clear predominance for other primary morphologies, which underscores the delimitation of the individual primary morphological types from each other. These relationships in terms of calcification patterns extend into the primary morphological sub-criteria, demonstrating the clear subordination of those criteria. CONCLUSION: The proposed CT-morphological classification (EMUC-CT) is intended to facilitate the recognition and interpretation of lesions in hepatic

  16. Metabolic shift in lung alveolar cell mitochondria following acrolein exposure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit R; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-11-15

    Acrolein, an α,β unsaturated electrophile, is an environmental pollutant released in ambient air from diesel exhausts and cooking oils. This study examines the role of acrolein in altering mitochondrial function and metabolism in lung-specific cells. RLE-6TN, H441, and primary alveolar type II (pAT2) cells were exposed to acrolein for 4 h, and its effect on mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates was studied by XF Extracellular Flux analysis. Low-dose acrolein exposure decreased mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner because of alteration in the metabolism of glucose in all the three cell types. Acrolein inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, leading to decreased substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN, H441, and pAT2 cells; the reduced GAPDH activity was compensated in pAT2 cells by an increase in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the regulatory control of the pentose phosphate pathway. The decrease in pyruvate from glucose metabolism resulted in utilization of alternative sources to support mitochondrial energy production: palmitate-BSA complex increased mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN and pAT2 cells. The presence of palmitate in alveolar cells for surfactant biosynthesis may prove to be the alternative fuel source for mitochondrial respiration. Accordingly, a decrease in phosphatidylcholine levels and an increase in phospholipase A2 activity were found in the alveolar cells after acrolein exposure. These findings have implications for understanding the decrease in surfactant levels frequently observed in pathophysiological situations with altered lung function following exposure to environmental toxicants.

  17. Alveolar bone graft with Platelet Rich Plasma in cleft alveolus

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chandan; Mehrotra, Divya; Mohammad, Shadab; Khanna, Vaibhav; Kumar Singh, Gulshan; Singh, Geeta; Chellappa, Arul A.L.; Passi, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cleft of the lip, palate and alveolus are the commonest congenital anomaly to affect the orofacial region. Currently, there is great interest in the alveolar bone grafting procedures that involve use of platelet-rich-plasma (PRP), to enhance bone formation and specifically to promote bone graft healing. Materials and methods 20 patients with residual alveolar cleft, in the age group of 9–29 years, having unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate were selected. They were randomly assigned in either group A (with PRP) or group B (without PRP). Results Primary healing was observed in 90% patients in group A. Secondary healing was seen in 30% patients in group B. There was no graft rejection in group A but was seen in one patient (10%) in group B. Pain and swelling persisted longer in group B then group A. Bone grafts with added PRP presented with increased bone density (1028.00 ± 11.30 HU) in comparison to grafts without PRP (859.50 ± 27.73 HU) at end of 6-month postoperative. However, the mean bone density (as determined by the Dentascan image analyzer software) was 1.04 times more in the PRP group than non PRP group at 3-month and 1.2 times more at 6 months. Conclusion We conclude that on preliminary investigations, PRP seems to enhance bone formation in alveolar clefts when admixed with autologous cancellous bone harvested from the iliac crest. PMID:25737872

  18. Alveolar hemorrhage and kidney disease: characteristics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; El Ati, Zohra; Lamia, Rais; Aich, Dorra Ben; Madiha, Krid; Wided, Smaoui; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Somaya; Karim, Zouaghi; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Goodpasture's glomerular basement membrane disease are the most common causes of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, a life-threatening disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus and the antiphospholipid syndrome are also causes of alveolar hemorrhage. We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with renal diseases. Diagnosis of DAH was based on the presence of bloody bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. There were three men and 12 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years (extremes: 24-74 years). Proteinuria and hematuria were observed, respectively, in 15 and 14 cases. Six patients revealed arterial hypertension. Crescentic glomerulonephritis was diagnosed with kidney biopsies in ten cases. The etiology of renal disease was microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) in seven cases, Wegener disease in four cases, systemic lupus erythematous in one case, cryoglobulinemia in one case, myeloma in one case and propyl-thiouracil-induced MPA in one case. Hemoptysis occurred in 14 cases. The mean serum level of hemoglobin was 7.1 g/dL (5.1-10 g/dL). The mean serum creatinine concentration was 7.07 mg/dL (2.4-13.7 mg/dL). Gas exchange was severely compromised, with an oxygenation index <80 mmHg in 14 patients and <60 mmHg in seven patients. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 11 cases, and had positive findings for hemorrhage in all. Methylprednisolone pulses and cyclophosphamide were used in 14 patients. Plasmapheresis was performed in three cases. One patient received cycles of Dexamethasome-Melphalan. Three patients died as a result of DAH. The mortality rate in our study was 20%.

  19. Intra-alveolar tissue factor pathway inhibitor is not sufficient to block tissue factor procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Bastarache, Julie A; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhengming; Albertine, Kurt H; Matthay, Michael A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2008-05-01

    The alveolar compartment in acute lung injury contains high levels of tissue factor (TF) procoagulant activity favoring fibrin deposition. We previously reported that the alveolar epithelium can release TF procoagulant activity in response to a proinflammatory stimulus. To test the hypothesis that the alveolar epithelium further modulates intra-alveolar fibrin deposition through secretion of an endogenous inhibitor to TF, tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), we measured TFPI levels in edema fluid (EF) from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. To determine whether the alveolar epithelium can release TFPI, both full-length TFPI and truncated TFPI were measured (ELISA) in pulmonary edema fluid from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and a control group of patients with hydrostatic pulmonary edema (HYDRO). TFPI protein was also measured in conditioned media (CM) and cell lysates (CL) from human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) after exposure to cytomix (TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma). TFPI protein levels were higher in pulmonary edema fluid from patients with ARDS vs. HYDRO. TFPI protein was increased in CM and did not change in CL after cytomix treatment; TFPI mRNA levels (RT-PCR) did not change. Despite the high levels of TFPI, both the EF and CM retained significant TF procoagulant activity as measured by plasma recalcification time. The majority of intra-alveolar TFPI was in a truncated, inactive form, whereas the majority of TFPI released from cells was full length, suggesting different mechanisms of inactivation. In summary, the alveolar epithelium releases TFPI in response to an inflammatory stimulus but does not increase TFPI gene transcription or protein production. Levels of intra-alveolar TFPI in ARDS are not sufficient to block intra-alveolar TF procoagulant activity due to truncation and inactivation of intra-alveolar TFPI. PMID:18310227

  20. Prediction of the alveolar bone level after the extraction of maxillary anterior teeth with severe periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose After extraction, the alveolar bone tends to undergo atrophy in three-dimensions. The amount of alveolar bone loss in the horizontal dimension has been reported to be greater than the amount of bone loss in the vertical dimension, and is most pronounced in the buccal aspect. The aim of this study was to monitor the predictive alveolar bone level following the extraction of anterior teeth seriously involved with advanced chronic periodontitis. Methods This study included 25 patients with advanced chronic periodontitis, whose maxillary anterior teeth had been extracted due to extensive attachment loss more than one year before the study. Periapical radiographs were analyzed to assess the vertical level of alveolar bone surrounding the edentulous area. An imaginary line connecting the mesial and the distal ends of the alveolar crest facing the adjacent tooth was arbitrarily created. Several representative coordinates were established in the horizontal direction, and the vertical distance from the imaginary line to the alveolar crest was measured at each coordinate for each patient using image analysis software. Regression functions predicting the vertical level of the alveolar bone in the maxillary anterior edentulous area were identified for each patient. Results The regression functions demonstrated a tendency to converge to parabolic shapes. The predicted maximum distance between the imaginary line and the alveolar bone calculated using the regression function was 1.43±0.65 mm. No significant differences were found between the expected and actual maximum distances. Likewise, the predicted and actual maximum horizontal distances did not show any significant differences. The distance from the alveolar bone crest to the imaginary lines was not influenced by the mesio-distal spans of the edentulous area. Conclusions After extraction, the vertical level of the alveolar ridge increased to become closer to the reference line connecting the mesial and distal

  1. Plasma cell gingivitis with severe alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek; Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh; Sinha, Jolly

    2015-01-16

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterised by sharply demarcated erythaematous and oedematous gingiva often extending up to the muco gingival junction. It is considered a hypersensitive reaction. It presents clinically as a diffuse, erythaematous and papillary lesion of the gingiva, which frequently bleeds, with minimal trauma. This paper presents a case of a 42-year-old man who was diagnosed with plasma cell gingivitis, based on the presence of plasma cells in histological sections, and severe alveolar bone loss at the affected site, which was managed by surgical intervention.

  2. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation.The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment.Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20-22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans.From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant.During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the orthodontic treatment

  3. Alveolar hemorrhage after scuba diving: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Mee-Sun; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Lien, Chi-Tun; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-07-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving.

  4. Alveolar bone exostoses subsequent to orthodontic implant placement

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Neeraj; Kallury, Amitabh; Agrawal, Kavita; Nair, Preeti P

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar bone exostoses (ABE), also known as a buttress bone formation, are not uncommon to the literature. Although, exostoses in response to the trauma from occlusion are a popular concept proposed more than 45 years ago, still the aetiological factors behind this development are unclear. Various risks and complications associated with orthodontic implants have been published, but buttress bone formation subsequent to this procedure has not been reported till date. This article describes a case of ABE, subsequent to the placement of orthodontic mini implants, where after careful evaluation, resective osseous surgery was performed. PMID:23355580

  5. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use. PMID:22254232

  6. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment. Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20–22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans. From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant. During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the

  7. Cardiopulmonary effects of thiopental versus propofol as an induction agent prior to isoflurane anesthesia in chair trained rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Lee, Yun-Jin; Jung, Kyeong-Cheon; Park, Seong-Hoe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of thiopental versus propofol on cardiopulmonary functions, when used as an induction agent prior to isoflurane anesthesia in rhesus monkeys. Eight healthy rhesus monkeys weighing 3.72 to 5.7 kg, 4-5 years old, were used in the study. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental or propofol intravenous injection, and then maintained with isoflurane in oxygen for 45 minutes. Cardiopulmonary measurements were obtained before and 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after induction. The induction doses of thiopental and propofol were 19.41±0.54 and 9.33±1.02 mg/kg, respectively. In both groups, the values of heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pH, and lactate were decreased, while the values of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, partial pressure of oxygen, total carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, oxygen saturation, and base excess in the extracellular fluid were increased, as compared with baseline. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in thiopental group compare to propofol group. Induction time was very short in both agents but not revealed a significant difference between both groups. However, recovery time was extremely faster in the propofol group. Our results demonstrated that propofol provides a minor suppression in systolic arterial blood pressure than thiopental sodium. In addition, propofol have a fast recovery effect from the anesthesia as well. Furthermore, it is suggested that thiopental sodium could also be used to induce anesthesia instead of propofol, despite slight more suppression of cardiopulmonary function compared to thiopental sodium. PMID:27051438

  8. Effects of preoperative carprofen on cardio-respiratory, hormonal and metabolic stress response in calves during umbilical surgery under isoflurane inhalation anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Schulze, I; Poos, E M; Meyer, H; List, A K; Kaestner, S B R; Rehage, J

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of preoperative carprofen on the cardiorespiratory, hormonal and metabolic stress response during umbilical surgery under isoflurane anaesthesia combined with local anaesthesia, in calves. A randomised, blinded experimental study was conducted in 24 calves. Carprofen (n = 12; 1.4 mg/kg) or physiological saline solution (controls; n = 12) was administered 1 h prior to surgery. Anaesthesia was induced with xylazine (0.1 mg/kg, IM) and, after the onset of sedation (i.e. after 5-8 min), ketamine was administered (2 mg/kg, IV). Anaesthesia was then maintained with isoflurane (ISO) in oxygen to effect and completed by infiltration of the incision line with 20 mL of 2% procaine. Cardiorespiratory, endocrine and metabolic parameters were examined before, during and after surgery at short intervals. In both groups, anaesthesia appeared adequate for the surgical intervention. Heart rate, stroke index and arterial blood pressure were significantly elevated after the onset of surgery. Oxygen partial pressure and oxygen delivery increased, while the oxygen extraction ratio decreased intraoperatively, ensuring sufficient oxygen supply. In the control group, the mean surge in serum cortisol concentrations tended to be higher (P = 0.089) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was significantly greater (P <0.05) than in the carprofen group during surgery. In conclusion, the anaesthetic protocol used in this study induced reliable analgesia in both groups. The lower serum cortisol levels and SVR may indicate a reduced surgical stress response in calves undergoing umbilical surgery under ISO anaesthesia after administering carprofen preoperatively. PMID:27687921

  9. Cardiopulmonary effects of thiopental versus propofol as an induction agent prior to isoflurane anesthesia in chair trained rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Lee, Yun-Jin; Jung, Kyeong-Cheon; Park, Seong-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Il

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of thiopental versus propofol on cardiopulmonary functions, when used as an induction agent prior to isoflurane anesthesia in rhesus monkeys. Eight healthy rhesus monkeys weighing 3.72 to 5.7 kg, 4-5 years old, were used in the study. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental or propofol intravenous injection, and then maintained with isoflurane in oxygen for 45 minutes. Cardiopulmonary measurements were obtained before and 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after induction. The induction doses of thiopental and propofol were 19.41±0.54 and 9.33±1.02 mg/kg, respectively. In both groups, the values of heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pH, and lactate were decreased, while the values of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, partial pressure of oxygen, total carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, oxygen saturation, and base excess in the extracellular fluid were increased, as compared with baseline. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in thiopental group compare to propofol group. Induction time was very short in both agents but not revealed a significant difference between both groups. However, recovery time was extremely faster in the propofol group. Our results demonstrated that propofol provides a minor suppression in systolic arterial blood pressure than thiopental sodium. In addition, propofol have a fast recovery effect from the anesthesia as well. Furthermore, it is suggested that thiopental sodium could also be used to induce anesthesia instead of propofol, despite slight more suppression of cardiopulmonary function compared to thiopental sodium. PMID:27051438

  10. Isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia induces increases in NMDA receptor subunit NR2B protein expression in the aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, Lana J; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Alonso, Ofelia F; Jimenez, Christopher A; Furones, Concepción; Moreno, W Javier; Lewis, Michael C; Dietrich, W Dalton; Bramlett, Helen M

    2012-01-11

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction, POCD, afflicts a large number of elderly surgical patients following surgery with general anesthesia. Mechanisms of POCD remain unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, critical in learning and memory, that display protein expression changes with age are modulated by inhalation anesthetics. The aim of this study was to identify protein expression changes in NMDA receptor subunits and downstream signaling pathways in aged rats that demonstrated anesthesia-induced spatial learning impairments. Three-month-old and 18-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned to receive 1.8% isoflurane/70% nitrous oxide (N(2)O) anesthesia for 4h or no anesthesia. Spatial learning was assessed at 2weeks and 3months post-anesthesia in Morris water maze. Hippocampal and cortical protein lysates of 18-month-old rats were immunoblotted for activated caspase 3, NMDA receptor subunits, and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. In a separate experiment, Ro 25-6981 (0.5mg/kg dose) was administered by I.P. injection before anesthesia to 18-month-old rats. Immunoblotting of NR2B was performed on hippocampal protein lysates. At 3months post-anesthesia, rats treated with anesthesia at 18-months-old demonstrated spatial learning impairment corresponding to acute and long-term increases in NR2B protein expression and a reduction in phospho-ERK1/2 in the hippocampus and cortex. Ro 25-6981 pretreatment attenuated the increase in acute NR2B protein expression. Our findings suggest a role for disruption of NMDA receptor mediated signaling pathways in the hippocampus and cortex of rats treated with isoflurane/ N(2)O anesthesia at 18-months-old, leading to spatial learning deficits in these animals. A potential therapeutic intervention for anesthesia associated cognitive deficits is discussed. PMID:22137658

  11. 30 CFR 202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 202.53 Section 202.53 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide for minimum...

  12. 7 CFR 4280.136 - Minimum retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum retention. 4280.136 Section 4280.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Efficiency Improvements Program Section B. Guaranteed Loans § 4280.136 Minimum retention. Minimum...

  13. 7 CFR 4280.136 - Minimum retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum retention. 4280.136 Section 4280.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Efficiency Improvements Program Section B. Guaranteed Loans § 4280.136 Minimum retention. Minimum...

  14. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those…

  15. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  16. Is there a relation between local bone quality as assessed on panoramic radiographs and alveolar bone level?

    PubMed

    Nackaerts, Olivia; Gijbels, Frieda; Sanna, Anna-Maria; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2008-03-01

    The aim was to explore the relation between radiographic bone quality on panoramic radiographs and relative alveolar bone level. Digital panoramic radiographs of 94 female patients were analysed (mean age, 44.5; range, 35-74). Radiographic density of the alveolar bone in the premolar region was determined using Agfa Musica software. Alveolar bone level and bone quality index (BQI) were also assessed. Relationships between bone density and BQI on one hand and the relative loss of alveolar bone level on the other were assessed. Mandibular bone density and loss of alveolar bone level were weakly but significantly negatively correlated for the lower premolar area (r = -.27). The BQI did not show a statistically significant relation to alveolar bone level. Radiographic mandibular bone density on panoramic radiographs shows a weak but significant relation to alveolar bone level, with more periodontal breakdown for less dense alveolar bone.

  17. Is there a relation between local bone quality as assessed on panoramic radiographs and alveolar bone level?

    PubMed

    Nackaerts, Olivia; Gijbels, Frieda; Sanna, Anna-Maria; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2008-03-01

    The aim was to explore the relation between radiographic bone quality on panoramic radiographs and relative alveolar bone level. Digital panoramic radiographs of 94 female patients were analysed (mean age, 44.5; range, 35-74). Radiographic density of the alveolar bone in the premolar region was determined using Agfa Musica software. Alveolar bone level and bone quality index (BQI) were also assessed. Relationships between bone density and BQI on one hand and the relative loss of alveolar bone level on the other were assessed. Mandibular bone density and loss of alveolar bone level were weakly but significantly negatively correlated for the lower premolar area (r = -.27). The BQI did not show a statistically significant relation to alveolar bone level. Radiographic mandibular bone density on panoramic radiographs shows a weak but significant relation to alveolar bone level, with more periodontal breakdown for less dense alveolar bone. PMID:17690924

  18. Genesis of amorphous calcium carbonate containing alveolar plates in the ciliate Coleps hirtus (Ciliophora, Prostomatea).

    PubMed

    Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Marin, Frédéric; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Schweikert, Michael; Baier, Johannes; Bill, Joachim; Brümmer, Franz

    2013-02-01

    In the protist world, the ciliate Coleps hirtus (phylum Ciliophora, class Prostomatea) synthesizes a peculiar biomineralized test made of alveolar plates, structures located within alveolar vesicles at the cell cortex. Alveolar plates are arranged by overlapping like an armor and they are thought to protect and/or stiffen the cell. Although their morphology is species-specific and of complex architecture, so far almost nothing is known about their genesis, their structure and their elemental and mineral composition. We investigated the genesis of new alveolar plates after cell division and examined cells and isolated alveolar plates by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, FTIR and X-ray diffraction. Our investigations revealed an organic mesh-like structure that guides the formation of new alveolar plates like a template and the role of vesicles transporting inorganic material. We further demonstrated that the inorganic part of the alveolar plates is composed out of amorphous calcium carbonate. For stabilization of the amorphous phase, the alveolar vesicles, the organic fraction and the element phosphorus may play a role. PMID:23228488

  19. Alveolar Antral Artery: Does its Diameter Correlate with Maxillary lateral wall Thickness in Dentate Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh; Amini, Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge of the presence of the alveolar antral artery in the lateral maxillary sinus wall is essential for surgeons who operate in this region. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between alveolar antral artery diameter and lateral maxillary bony wall thickness in dentate patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty five Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans from 35 dentate patients were selected in coronal sections in three locations; second premolar (P2), first molar (M1), and second molar (M2). The presence of the alveolar antral artery in each situation was determined and the bone thickness in the region of alveolar antral artery was measured perpendicular to the lateral wall of the maxilla. Results: The alveolar antral artery was present in 67.1% CBCTs. The difference between the alveolar antral artery diameter was only significant in the first and second molar area (P=0.039).There were significant differences between bone thickness in three locations, with the thickest bone in the first molar area followed by the second molar and second premolar, respectively. The correlation coefficient showed that there is a positive correlation between bone thickness and alveolar antral artery diameter. Conclusion: This study showed that the thicker the bones in dentate patients, the greater the chance of interference with the large caliber intra-osseous alveolar antral artery. PMID:25009806

  20. Rare case report of Traumatic neuroma of anterior superior alveolar nerve associated with high frenal attachment

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Srilekha, Namala; Guduru, Vijay Srinivas; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2015-01-01

    We present an incredible case of traumatic neuroma (TN) in the anterior superior alveolar nerve leading to the swelling in the upper labial mucosa. This paper attempts to highlight the rarity of site of occurrence of this lesion and reports the first case of TN of anterior superior alveolar nerve. PMID:25972959

  1. Changes in alveolar bone support induced by the Herbst appliance: a tomographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, João Paulo; Raveli, Taisa Boamorte; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto Osvaldo; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study evaluated alveolar bone loss around mandibular incisors, induced by the Herbst appliance. Methods: The sample consisted of 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean age of 15.76 ± 1.75 years), Class II, Division 1 malocclusion, treated with the Herbst appliance. CBCT scans were obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). Vertical alveolar bone level and alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors were assessed. Buccal (B), lingual (L) and total (T) bone thicknesses were assessed at crestal (1), midroot (2) and apical (3) levels of mandibular incisors. Student's t-test and Wilcoxon t-test were used to compare dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlation analyses were performed to determine the relationship of changes in alveolar bone thickness. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Results: Mandibular incisors showed no statistical significance for vertical alveolar bone level. Alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors significantly reduced after treatment at B1, B2, B3, T1 and significantly increased at L2. The magnitude of the statistically significant changes was less than 0.2 mm. The changes in alveolar bone thickness showed no statistical significance with incisor inclination degree. Conclusions: CBCT scans showed an association between the Herbst appliance and alveolar bone loss on the buccal surface of mandibular incisors; however, without clinical significance. PMID:27275621

  2. Genesis of amorphous calcium carbonate containing alveolar plates in the ciliate Coleps hirtus (Ciliophora, Prostomatea).

    PubMed

    Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Marin, Frédéric; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Schweikert, Michael; Baier, Johannes; Bill, Joachim; Brümmer, Franz

    2013-02-01

    In the protist world, the ciliate Coleps hirtus (phylum Ciliophora, class Prostomatea) synthesizes a peculiar biomineralized test made of alveolar plates, structures located within alveolar vesicles at the cell cortex. Alveolar plates are arranged by overlapping like an armor and they are thought to protect and/or stiffen the cell. Although their morphology is species-specific and of complex architecture, so far almost nothing is known about their genesis, their structure and their elemental and mineral composition. We investigated the genesis of new alveolar plates after cell division and examined cells and isolated alveolar plates by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, FTIR and X-ray diffraction. Our investigations revealed an organic mesh-like structure that guides the formation of new alveolar plates like a template and the role of vesicles transporting inorganic material. We further demonstrated that the inorganic part of the alveolar plates is composed out of amorphous calcium carbonate. For stabilization of the amorphous phase, the alveolar vesicles, the organic fraction and the element phosphorus may play a role.

  3. Minimum distance classification in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, A. G.; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The utilization of minimum distance classification methods in remote sensing problems, such as crop species identification, is considered. Literature concerning both minimum distance classification problems and distance measures is reviewed. Experimental results are presented for several examples. The objective of these examples is to: (a) compare the sample classification accuracy of a minimum distance classifier, with the vector classification accuracy of a maximum likelihood classifier, and (b) compare the accuracy of a parametric minimum distance classifier with that of a nonparametric one. Results show the minimum distance classifier performance is 5% to 10% better than that of the maximum likelihood classifier. The nonparametric classifier is only slightly better than the parametric version.

  4. Microtomography of the human tooth-alveolar bone complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalstra, Michel; Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Beckmann, Felix; Sakima, Maurício T.; Lemor, Carsten; Laursen, Morten G.; Melsen, Birte

    2006-08-01

    In this study the structure of the adult human dentoalveolar process is examined using conventional and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography (SRμCT). Mandibular and maxillary segments containing two to five adjacent teeth were harvested at autopsy from 49 adult donors. These segments were embedded in blocks of methylmetacrylate and scanned using a conventional table-top μCT-scanner at a pixel size and slice thickness of 35 μm. A few segments were also scanned at a synchrotron facility at an initial pixel size of 16.4 μm, which was binned by a factor 2 to result in an effective voxel size of almost 32.8 μm. The three-dimensional reconstructions revealed how intricately the teeth are supported by the alveolar bone. Furthermore, this support is highly inhomogeneous with respect to the buccal, mesial, lingual and distal quadrants. Reflecting their various degrees of mineralization, tissues like bone, dentine, enamel and cementum, could well be identified, especially in the scans made with SRμCT. Despite comparable voxel sizes, the reconstructed data-sets obtained with conventional μCT were less detailed and somewhat fuzzy in appearance compared to the data-sets of SRμCT. However, for quantification of macroscopical features like the thickness of the alveolar wall or the presence of dehiscences/fenestrations this seemed sufficient.

  5. Magnetometric evaluation for the effect of chrysotile on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Keira, T; Okada, M; Katagiri, H; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1998-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages are thought to play an important role in fibrogenesis due to asbestos exposure. In this experiment, we evaluated the effect mainly by unique magnetometry and also by conventional methods such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity measurement and morphological observations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from Syrian golden hamsters by bronchoalveolar lavages were exposed 18 hours in vitro to Fe3O4 as an indicator for magnetometry and chrysotile for experiments. A rapid decrease of the remanent magnetic field, so called "relaxation", was observed after the cessation of an external magnetic field in macrophages phagocytizing Fe3O4 alone, while relaxation was delayed in those concurrently exposed to chrysotile. Since relaxation is thought due to the cytoskeleton-driven random rotation of phagosomes containing iron oxide particles, chrysotile is considered to interfere with the cytoskeletal function of macrophages. Release of LDH from chrysotile-exposed macrophages into the medium was recognized, but it was not significantly higher than the controls. Apoptosis was negligible in macrophages exposed to chrysotile by the DNA ladder detection, the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling method and morphological observations. Electron microscopical examinations revealed early necrotic changes in macrophages exposed to chrysotile. These findings indicate that cell magnetometry detects impaired cytoskeletal function due to in vitro exposure to chrysotile. PMID:10223613

  6. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers: are your patients missing out?

    PubMed

    Hartland, Benjamin L; Newell, Timothy J; Damico, Nicole

    2014-08-01

    Awake, spontaneously breathing humans sigh on average 9 to 10 times per hour. The sigh is a normal homeostatic reflex proposed to maintain pulmonary compliance and decrease the formation of atelectasis by recruiting collapsed alveoli. The induction and maintenance of anesthesia with muscle paralysis and a fixed tidal volume abolish the sigh. Without periodic sighs, patients are left susceptible to atelectasis and its negative sequelae. The prevalence of atelectasis has been estimated to be as high as 100% in patients undergoing general anesthesia. A strong correlation between atelectasis and postoperative pulmonary complications has been demonstrated. Postoperative pulmonary complications lengthen hospital stays and increase healthcare costs. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers, which make up one component of open lung ventilation, have been described as vital capacity breaths, double tidal volume breaths, and sigh breaths. These simple maneuvers result in a sustained increase in airway pressure that serves to recruit collapsed alveoli and improve arterial oxygenation. This article examines the literature regarding the application of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in the perioperative setting. The format is a series of clinically oriented questions posed to help the reader translate available evidence into practice.

  7. Transpleural Ventilation via Spiracles in Severe Emphysema Increases Alveolar Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Mayy; Larson, Christopher D; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Reed, Robert M; Terry, Peter; Schmidt, Gregory A; Eberlein, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In emphysema airway resistance can exceed collateral airflow resistance, causing air to flow preferentially through collateral pathways. In severe emphysema ventilation through openings directly through the chest wall into the parenchyma (spiracles) could bypass airway obstruction and increase alveolar ventilation via transpleural expiration. During lung transplant operations, spiracles occasionally can occur inadvertently. We observed transpleural expiration via spiracles in three subjects undergoing lung transplant for emphysema. During transpleural spiracle ventilation, inspiratory tidal volumes (TV) were unchanged; however, expiration was entirely transpleural in two patients whereas the expired TV to the ventilator circuit was reduced to 25% of the inspired TV in one. At baseline, mean PCO2 was 61 ± 5 mm Hg, which decreased to a mean PCO2 of 49 ± 5 mm Hg (P = .05) within minutes after transpleural spiracle ventilation and further decreased at 1 to 2 h (36 ± 4 mm Hg; P = .002 compared with baseline) on unchanged ventilator settings. This observation of increased alveolar ventilation supports further studies of spiracles as a possible therapy for advanced emphysema. PMID:27287591

  8. Hemodynamic and alveolar protein studies in noncardiac pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Gelb, A F; Klein, E

    1976-11-01

    Hemodynamic data were obtained within 15 hours of admission in 11 previously healthy patients (20 to 51 years of age, 7 men and 4 women) who had developed transient, reversible pulmonary edema without cardiac dilation in association with near-death from freshwater drowning (2 cases), pentobarbital overdose, heroin overdose (2 cases), smoke inhalation, chest trauma, sepsis (2 cases), pancreatitis, or prolonged abdominal surgery with suspected sepsis. Using a balloon-tipped flow-directed catheter, the pulmonary artery systolic/diastolic pressures (in mm Hg) were 25/12, 22/9, 31/11, 26/15, 20/10, 35/15, 40/15, 32/18, 20/10, 24/10, and 20/7; the corresponding pulmonary capillary wedge pressures (in mm Hg) were 8, 9, 6, 14, 6, 6, 15, 15, 10, 10, and 5, respectively. Plasma colloidal osmotic pressures measured in the latter 5 cases were 26, 18, 18, 18, and 15 mm Hg, respectively. In addition, the protein content of the alveolar fluid was 5.1, 3.4, 4.0, and 7.1 g per 100 ml in 4 patients. The concentration and distribution of the protein in plasma and alveolar fluid were very similar. These findings provide strong efidence that altered capillary permeability is responsible for the pulmonary edema.

  9. Advanced alveolar echinococcosis disease associated with Budd–Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Soyer, Vural; Ara, Cengiz; Yaylak, Faik; Sarıcı, Barış; Ozsoy, Mustafa; Koç, Okay; Yılmaz, Sezai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alveolar echinococceal disease of the liver is rare. Echinococcus multilocularis is responsible for the development of the related clinical conditions. Advanced disease may result with serious complications such as end stage liver disease and Budd–Chiari syndrome. Presentation of case In this presentation, a 28 years-old woman who was a case with advanced alveolar echinococcosis complicated with a Budd–Chiari syndrome and was performed successful living donor liver transplantation, has been demonstrated with clinical and radiological images. Discussion Initially there may be no clinical evidence of the disease in humans for years. Severity and fatality are the significant characteristics of the natural history. Extension to the surrounding tissues and metastasis of the parasitic mass may be observed. Prevention is essential in disease control. Serologic assay may identify the parasite. However, early diagnosis is rare. Staging is based on radiologic imaging. Some patients with advanced disease may require surgery. Hepatic resection and liver transplantation are accepted procedures in selected patients. Conclusion The importance of early diagnosis to prevent advanced complications such as development of Budd–Chiari syndrome and metastasis has been underlined. PMID:25600725

  10. Alveolar Bone Housing- A Modified Wilkodontics Approach- A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Eshan; Sanjay, Kothamachu; Bhongade, M L; Shrivastav, Sunita

    2016-08-01

    Accelerated orthodontic treatment is the need of the hour in current scenario as the conventional orthodontics is time taking. Corticotomy assisted orthodontics have been used for years to reduce the treatment duration by reducing the resistance provided by alveolar bone housing. This case report describes the orthodontic treatment combined with the modification in conventional wilkodontic technique in a patient to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time with an anterior open bite and flared and spaced upper and lower incisors. Firstly plaque control was achieved with supra and subgingival scaling. A modified approach using periodontal access flap followed by vertical bone cuts in the cortical bone from the crest of the alveolar bone margin to 2mm-3mm below the apices of all the anterior teeth extending from upper left canine to upper right canine were performed. These vertical cuts were joined by horizontal cuts apically and flap repositioned. An MBT 0.018 inch appliance was bonded. Orthodontic therapy proceeded with frequent activation of the appliances to retract the incisors every two weeks. The total treatment time was four and half months with active period of two months and no adverse effects were observed at the end of active treatment. The modified decortication technique reduced the treatment time to a considerable extent. The interdental spacing closed and optimum overjet and overbite was achieved. PMID:27656577

  11. Alveolar Bone Housing- A Modified Wilkodontics Approach- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sanjay, Kothamachu; Bhongade, ML; Shrivastav, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated orthodontic treatment is the need of the hour in current scenario as the conventional orthodontics is time taking. Corticotomy assisted orthodontics have been used for years to reduce the treatment duration by reducing the resistance provided by alveolar bone housing. This case report describes the orthodontic treatment combined with the modification in conventional wilkodontic technique in a patient to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time with an anterior open bite and flared and spaced upper and lower incisors. Firstly plaque control was achieved with supra and subgingival scaling. A modified approach using periodontal access flap followed by vertical bone cuts in the cortical bone from the crest of the alveolar bone margin to 2mm-3mm below the apices of all the anterior teeth extending from upper left canine to upper right canine were performed. These vertical cuts were joined by horizontal cuts apically and flap repositioned. An MBT 0.018 inch appliance was bonded. Orthodontic therapy proceeded with frequent activation of the appliances to retract the incisors every two weeks. The total treatment time was four and half months with active period of two months and no adverse effects were observed at the end of active treatment. The modified decortication technique reduced the treatment time to a considerable extent. The interdental spacing closed and optimum overjet and overbite was achieved. PMID:27656577

  12. Alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus: a cohort review.

    PubMed

    Andrade, C; Mendonça, T; Farinha, F; Correia, J; Marinho, A; Almeida, I; Vasconcelos, C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare but potentially catastrophic manifestation with a high mortality. Among rheumatologic diseases, it occurs most frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic vasculitis. Despite new diagnostic tools and therapies, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this work was to characterize the SLE patients with an episode of alveolar hemorrhage followed in our Clinical Immunology Unit (CIU). A retrospective chart review was carried out for all patients with SLE followed in CIU between 1984 and the end of 2013. We reviewed the following data: demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory data, radiologic investigations, histologic studies, treatment, and outcome. We identified 10 episodes of DAH, corresponding to seven patients, all female. These represent 1.6% of SLE patients followed in our Unit. The age at DAH attack was 42.75 ± 18.9 years. The average time between diagnosis of SLE and the onset of DAH was 7.1 years. Three patients had the diagnosis of SLE and the DAH attack at the same time. Disease activity according to SLEDAI was high, ranging from 15 to 41. All patients were treated with methylprednisolone, 37.5% cyclophosphamide and 28.6% plasmapheresis. The overall mortality rate was 28.6%.

  13. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  14. Porous calcium phosphate cement for alveolar bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Félix Lanao, R P; Hoekstra, J W M; Wolke, J G C; Leeuwenburgh, S C G; Plachokova, A S; Boerman, O C; van den Beucken, J J J P; Jansen, J A

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to provide information on material degradation and subsequent alveolar bone formation, using composites consisting of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) with different microsphere morphology (hollow vs dense). In addition to the plain CPC-PLGA composites, loading the microspheres with the growth factors platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) was investigated. A total of four different CPC composites were applied into one-wall mandible bone defects in beagle dogs in order to evaluate them as candidates for alveolar bone regeneration. These composites consisted of CPC and hollow or dense PLGA microspheres, with or without the addition of PDGF-IGF growth factor combination (CPC-hPLGA, CPC-dPLGA, CPC-hPLGAGF , CPC-dPLGAGF ). Histological evaluation revealed significantly more bone formation in CPC-dPLGA than in CPC-hPLGA composites. The combination PDGF-IGF enhanced bone formation in CPC-hPLGA materials, but significantly more bone formation occurred when CPC-dPLGA was used, with or without the addition of growth factors. The findings demonstrated that CPC-dPLGA composite was the biologically superior material for use as an off-the-shelf material, due to its good biocompatibility, enhanced degradability and superior bone formation.

  15. Interactions between calf alveolar macrophages and parainfluenza-3 virus.

    PubMed

    Probert, M; Stott, E J; Thomas, L H

    1977-02-01

    Cells washed from the lungs of freshly killed calves (lung wash cells; LWC) were cytotoxic for calf kidney (CK) target cells infected with parainfluenzavirus type 3 (Pi-3) when assayed by chromium release. LWC collected from 25 calves, including two gnotobiotic animals that had not previously been infected with Pi-3, were all cytotoxic, giving a specific chromium release between 11 and 50%. Cytotoxicity was detected at ratios of LWC to target cell as low as 5:1. The cytotoxic reaction required viable LWC, was inhibited by Pi-3 antiserum, and was not the result of virus-induced damage to the target cells. The cytotoxic cells in the LWC population were identified as alveolar macrophages from observations on glass adherence, phagocytic activity, killing by silica and fine-structural appearance. When LWC were added to CK cells or organ cultures of bovine trachea infected with Pi-3, the yield of virus was reduced for the first 2 to 3 days. However, subsequently, Pi-3 virus replicated in the LWC. Infection of LWC with Pi-3 virus reduced their cytotoxic activity. The significance of these interactions between alveolar macrophages and Pi-3 virus is discussed.

  16. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia. PMID:18390241

  17. Alveolar Subphase pH in the Lungs of Anesthetized Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, D. W.; Goerke, J.; Clements, J. A.

    1981-11-01

    We measured the pH of the alveolar subphase fluid by puncturing the most superficial alveoli of the exposed lungs of anesthetized rabbits with H+-selective and nonselective KCl microelectrodes. In these experiments, we bathed the lung surface with paraffin oil or buffered Ringer's solutions that had a CO2 tension of 40 Torr (1 Torr = 133.3 Pa) and found an alveolar pH of 6.92± 0.01 (mean ± SEM). When the pH of the surface buffer was below 6.7 or above 7.5, alveolar pH varied with surface buffer pH. With the nonselective electrode, we did not find a significant electrical potential difference between the alveolar fluid and the pleural surface. These results are consistent with active transport of H+ (or HCO3-) across alveolar epithelium.

  18. The use of digital periapical radiographs to study the prevalence of alveolar domes

    PubMed Central

    Xambre, Pedro Augusto Oliveira Santos; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; e Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assunção; Custódio, Antônio Luís Neto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we coined the term 'alveolar dome' and aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of alveolar domes through digital periapical radiographs. Materials and Methods This study examined 800 digital periapical radiographs in regard to the presence of alveolar domes. The periapical radiographs were acquired by a digital system using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate. The χ2 test, with a significance level of 5%, was used to compare the prevalence of alveolar domes in the maxillary posterior teeth and, considering the same teeth, to verify the difference in the prevalence of dome-shaped phenomena between the roots. Results The prevalence of alveolar domes present in the first pre-molars was statistically lower as compared to the other maxillary posterior teeth (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of alveolar domes between the maxillary first and second molars. Considering the maxillary first and second molars, it was observed that the palatal root presented a lower prevalence of alveolar domes when compared to the distobuccal and mesiobuccal roots (p<0.05). Conclusion The present study coined the term 'alveolar dome', referring to the anatomical projection of the root into the floor of the maxillary sinus. The maxillary first and second molars presented a greater prevalence of alveolar domes, especially in the buccal roots, followed by the third molars and second pre-molars. Although the periapical radiograph is a two-dimensional method, it can provide dentists with the auxiliary information necessary to identify alveolar domes, thus improving diagnosis, planning, and treatment.

  19. The use of digital periapical radiographs to study the prevalence of alveolar domes

    PubMed Central

    Xambre, Pedro Augusto Oliveira Santos; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; e Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assunção; Custódio, Antônio Luís Neto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we coined the term 'alveolar dome' and aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of alveolar domes through digital periapical radiographs. Materials and Methods This study examined 800 digital periapical radiographs in regard to the presence of alveolar domes. The periapical radiographs were acquired by a digital system using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate. The χ2 test, with a significance level of 5%, was used to compare the prevalence of alveolar domes in the maxillary posterior teeth and, considering the same teeth, to verify the difference in the prevalence of dome-shaped phenomena between the roots. Results The prevalence of alveolar domes present in the first pre-molars was statistically lower as compared to the other maxillary posterior teeth (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of alveolar domes between the maxillary first and second molars. Considering the maxillary first and second molars, it was observed that the palatal root presented a lower prevalence of alveolar domes when compared to the distobuccal and mesiobuccal roots (p<0.05). Conclusion The present study coined the term 'alveolar dome', referring to the anatomical projection of the root into the floor of the maxillary sinus. The maxillary first and second molars presented a greater prevalence of alveolar domes, especially in the buccal roots, followed by the third molars and second pre-molars. Although the periapical radiograph is a two-dimensional method, it can provide dentists with the auxiliary information necessary to identify alveolar domes, thus improving diagnosis, planning, and treatment. PMID:27672614

  20. Effect on the contour of bone and soft tissue one year after harvesting chin bone for alveolar cleft repair.

    PubMed

    Dik, E A; de Ruiter, A P; van der Bilt, A; Koole, R

    2010-10-01

    In this study the authors evaluate and quantify the residual bony defect in the mandibular symphysis and its effect on the soft tissue contour a minimum of 1 year after harvesting chin bone. 59 ASA I cleft lip and palate patients, aged 8-19 years were included. In all patients an autologous bone graft from the mandibular symphysis was harvested for transplantation to the alveolar cleft. Lateral cephalograms were used to measure the donor site defects, and the effects on the soft tissue contour. An evident residual defect was measured at the donor site 1 year after harvesting chin bone. A significant relation was seen between age at time of surgery and size of the defect 1 year postoperatively. In older patients a larger defect remained. Using the current surgical technique of harvesting chin bone, complete bony repair of the defect was not achieved. This study shows postoperatively persisting defects that comprise on average 14% of the original peroperative defects. A significant increase in soft tissue thickness was seen at the mandibular symphysis at a minimum of 1 year postoperatively. These changes in the soft tissue chin contour 1 year after harvesting bone are similar to normal growth changes.

  1. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  2. Hormonal regulation of alveolarization: structure-function correlation

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Samuel J; Zhang, Huayan; Foley, Joseph P; Zhao, Hengjiang; Butler, Stephan J; Godinez, Rodolfo I; Godinez, Marye H; Gow, Andrew J; Savani, Rashmin C

    2006-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone (Dex) limits and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) promotes alveolarization. While structural changes resulting from such hormonal exposures are known, their functional consequences are unclear. Methods Neonatal rats were treated with Dex and/or RA during the first two weeks of life or were given RA after previous exposure to Dex. Morphology was assessed by light microscopy and radial alveolar counts. Function was evaluated by plethysmography at d13, pressure volume curves at d30, and exercise swim testing and arterial blood gases at both d15 and d30. Results Dex-treated animals had simplified lung architecture without secondary septation. Animals given RA alone had smaller, more numerous alveoli. Concomitant treatment with Dex + RA prevented the Dex-induced changes in septation. While the results of exposure to Dex + RA were sustained, the effects of RA alone were reversed two weeks after treatment was stopped. At d13, Dex-treated animals had increased lung volume, respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation. On d15, both RA- and Dex-treated animals had hypercarbia and low arterial pH. By d30, the RA-treated animals resolved this respiratory acidosis, but Dex-treated animals continued to demonstrate blood gas and lung volume abnormalities. Concomitant RA treatment improved respiratory acidosis, but failed to normalize Dex-induced changes in pulmonary function and lung volumes. No differences in exercise tolerance were noted at either d15 or d30. RA treatment after the period of alveolarization also corrected the effects of earlier Dex exposure, but the structural changes due to RA alone were again lost two weeks after treatment. Conclusion We conclude that both RA- and corticosteroid-treatments are associated with respiratory acidosis at d15. While RA alone-induced changes in structure andrespiratory function are reversed, Dex-treated animals continue to demonstrate increased respiratory rate, minute ventilation, tidal and total lung

  3. Virulent Coxiella burnetii pathotypes productively infect primary human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Graham, Joseph G; MacDonald, Laura J; Hussain, S Kauser; Sharma, Uma M; Kurten, Richard C; Voth, Daniel E

    2013-06-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii is a category B select agent that causes human Q fever. In vivo, C. burnetii targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a lysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV). In vitro, C. burnetii infects a variety of cultured cell lines that have collectively been used to model the pathogen's infectious cycle. However, differences in the cellular response to infection have been observed, and virulent C. burnetii isolate infection of host cells has not been well defined. Because alveolar macrophages are routinely implicated in disease, we established primary human alveolar macrophages (hAMs) as an in vitro model of C. burnetii-host cell interactions. C. burnetii pathotypes, including acute disease and endocarditis isolates, replicated in hAMs, albeit with unique PV properties. Each isolate replicated in large, typical PV and small, non-fused vacuoles, and lipid droplets were present in avirulent C. burnetii PV. Interestingly, a subset of small vacuoles harboured single organisms undergoing degradation. Prototypical PV formation and bacterial growth in hAMs required a functional type IV secretion system, indicating C. burnetii secretes effector proteins that control macrophage functions. Avirulent C. burnetii promoted sustained activation of Akt and Erk1/2 pro-survival kinases and short-termphosphorylation of stress-related p38. Avirulent organisms also triggered a robust, early pro-inflammatory response characterized by increased secretion of TNF-α and IL-6, while virulent isolates elicited substantially reduced secretion of these cytokines. A corresponding increase in pro- and mature IL-1β occurred in hAMs infected with avirulent C. burnetii, while little accumulation was observed following infection with virulent isolates. Finally, treatment of hAMs with IFN-γ controlled intracellular replication, supporting a role for this antibacterial insult in the host response to C

  4. Identification of molecular markers related to human alveolar bone cells and pathway analysis in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Ren, Q H; Bai, L; Feng, Q

    2015-10-28

    Alveolar bone osteoblasts are widely used in dental and related research. They are easily affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes. However, the mechanism of diabetes-induced alveolar bone absorption remains unclear. This study systematically explored the changes in human alveolar bone cell-related gene expression and biological pathways, which may facilitate the investigation of its mechanism. Alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from 5 male diabetics and 5 male healthy adults were cultured. Total RNA was extracted from these cells and subjected to gene microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were screened, and a gene interaction network was constructed. An enrichment pathway analysis was simultaneously performed on differentially expressed genes to identify the biological pathways associated with changes in the alveolar bone cells of diabetic humans. In total, we identified 147 mRNAs that were differentially expressed in diabetic alveolar bone cells (than in the normal cells; 91 upregulated and 36 downregulated mRNAs). The constructed co-expression network showed 3 pairs of significantly-expressed genes. High-enrichment pathway analysis identified 8 pathways that were affected by changes in gene expression; three of the significant pathways were related to metabolism (inositol phosphate metabolism, propanoate metabolism, and pyruvate metabolism). Here, we identified a few potential genes and biological pathways for the diagnosis and treatment of alveolar bone cells in diabetic patients.

  5. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, M.; Tsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17–32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  6. [Alveolar soft part sarcoma of the larynx: a case report].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hao; Yang, Hui; Wang, Huan

    2015-07-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare soft tissue sarcomas, this sarcoma occurs rarely in the larynx. Herein, we describe an unusual case of ASPS occurring in the larynx. The patient was a 46-year-old woman who presented with a more than 2-year history of right pyriform fossa mass and progressive hoarseness for three months. The endoscopic examination of the larynx revealed a mass in the right pyriform fossa with smooth surface and well-defined margin. Computed tomography demonstrated a heterogeneous tumor in the right pyriform fossa, and involving the paralaryngeal space, measuring approximately 2.1 cm x 1.7 cm x 2.6 cm, which was resected via lateral neck approach. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry revealed an ASPS. To ours knowledge, this is the first reported case of ASPS arising in pyriform fossa.

  7. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage due to Acute Mitral Valve Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Marak, Creticus P; Joy, Parijat S; Gupta, Pragya; Bukovskaya, Yana; Guddati, Achuta K

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) can be caused by several etiologies including vasculitis, drug exposure, anticoagulants, infections, mitral valve stenosis, and regurgitation. Chronic mitral valve regurgitation (MR) has been well documented as an etiological factor for DAH, but there have been only a few cases which have reported acute mitral valve regurgitation as an etiology of DAH. Acute mitral valve regurgitation can be a life-threatening condition and often requires urgent intervention. In rare cases, acute mitral regurgitation may result in a regurgitant jet which is directed towards the right upper pulmonary vein and may specifically cause right-sided pulmonary edema and right-sided DAH. Surgical repair of the mitral valve results in rapid resolution of DAH. Acute MR should be considered as a possible etiology in patients presenting with unilateral pulmonary edema, hemoptysis, and DAH.

  8. Hereditary gingivo-alveolar hyperplasia: a report of two siblings.

    PubMed

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O H; Ekaputri, Krista

    2015-02-01

    Gingival hyperplasia is characterized by fibrotic gingival overgrowth. The lesion may bury all the crown of the teeth and lead to impairment in masticatory functions and aesthetic disfigurement. This inherited disease is considered rare. We presented two cases of gingival hyperplasia in two siblings: an 11-year-old girl and an 8-year-old boy, whose mother had also suffered from the disease. The two siblings presented with generalized gingival overgrowth involving the maxillary and mandibular arches and covering almost all of the teeth. We performed surgery to reduce the excessive gingivo-alveolar tissue and disclosed most of the teeth. The patients showed functional and aesthetic improvement. The last follow-up through a phone call, which was conducted 12 months after the surgery, revealed no recurrent hyperplasia. PMID:25692435

  9. Anesthetic Efficacy of Bupivacaine Solutions in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Maria Cristina; Ranali, José; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Ambrosano, Glaúcia Maria Bovi; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2 bupivacaine solutions. Twenty-two volunteers randomly received in a crossover, double-blinded manner 2 inferior alveolar nerve blocks with 1.8 mL of racemic bupivacaine and a mixture of 75% levobupivacaine and 25% dextrobupivacaine, both 0.5% and with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine. Before and after the injection, the first mandibular pre-molar was evaluated every 2 minutes until no response to the maximal output (80 reading) of the pulp tester and then again every 20 minutes. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon paired test and the paired t test. No differences were found between the solutions for onset and duration of pulpal anesthesia and duration of soft tissue anesthesia (P > .05). It was concluded that the solutions have similar anesthetic efficacy. PMID:16596912

  10. A case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with Cor Pulmonale

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen; Gu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the formation and deposition of microliths within the alveoli and a paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. It has familial tendency and is thought to be an autosomal recessive disorder with the mutation in the SLC34A2 gene. We describe a case of PAM with Cor Pulmonale. Ultrasonic cardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension (82 mmHg). Chest radiography revealed diffuse, bilateral sandstorm-like micronodules with greater density in the lower lung fields. HRCT scans demonstrated diffuse ground-grass opacities, thickening and calcification of interlobular septa and confluent calcified nodules. A diagnosis of PAM was suggested and confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB). PMID:23256064

  11. A case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with Cor Pulmonale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Gu, Tao

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the formation and deposition of microliths within the alveoli and a paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. It has familial tendency and is thought to be an autosomal recessive disorder with the mutation in the SLC34A2 gene. We describe a case of PAM with Cor Pulmonale. Ultrasonic cardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension (82 mmHg). Chest radiography revealed diffuse, bilateral sandstorm-like micronodules with greater density in the lower lung fields. HRCT scans demonstrated diffuse ground-grass opacities, thickening and calcification of interlobular septa and confluent calcified nodules. A diagnosis of PAM was suggested and confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB). PMID:23256064

  12. Hereditary gingivo-alveolar hyperplasia: a report of two siblings.

    PubMed

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O H; Ekaputri, Krista

    2015-02-01

    Gingival hyperplasia is characterized by fibrotic gingival overgrowth. The lesion may bury all the crown of the teeth and lead to impairment in masticatory functions and aesthetic disfigurement. This inherited disease is considered rare. We presented two cases of gingival hyperplasia in two siblings: an 11-year-old girl and an 8-year-old boy, whose mother had also suffered from the disease. The two siblings presented with generalized gingival overgrowth involving the maxillary and mandibular arches and covering almost all of the teeth. We performed surgery to reduce the excessive gingivo-alveolar tissue and disclosed most of the teeth. The patients showed functional and aesthetic improvement. The last follow-up through a phone call, which was conducted 12 months after the surgery, revealed no recurrent hyperplasia.

  13. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Europe (defined to mean the following countries: Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia..., Switzerland, Wales, West Germany, Yugoslavia), or Greenland shall meet each applicable minimum requirement...

  14. Sclerostin is essential for alveolar bone loss in occlusal hypofunction

    PubMed Central

    XU, YANG; WANG, LUFEI; SUN, YAO; HAN, XIANGLONG; GAO, TIAN; XU, XIN; CHEN, TIAN; ZHAO, XUEFENG; ZENG, HUAN; WANG, YANMIN; BAI, DING

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss is caused by occlusal hypofunction and is a serious health concern. This is particularly true of tooth loss, which is common in the elderly. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying bone loss have yet to be fully elucidated. Sclerostin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling have previously been reported to serve important roles in regulating bone remodeling. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the involvement of sclerostin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in occlusal hypofunction-induced alveolar bone remodeling. The unilateral maxillary molars of 14 male Sprague-Dawley rats were extracted in order to establish a model of occlusal hypofunction. For each rat, the non-extraction side was treated as the control group for comparisons with the extraction side. At 8 weeks after tooth extraction, the rats were sacrificed and alveolar bone specimens were harvested for X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography (CT) and histological and immunohistochemical examinations. Bone loss and architecture deterioration were observed at the occlusal hypofunction side. The bone mineral density was markedly decreased and the ratio of bone volume to total volume was significantly decreased at the hypofunction side, as compared with the control side (P<0.001). In addition, the number of osteoclasts at the hypofunction side were significantly increased compared with that in the control side (P<0.001), as demonstrated using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of sclerostin and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand were increased, whereas those of β-catenin were decreased, at the hypofunction side when compared with the control side. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that occlusal hypofunction-induced bone loss may be associated with upregulated expression of sclerostin, which, in turn, may inhibit the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:27168809

  15. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  16. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Poncy, J L; Metivier, H; Dhilly, M; Verry, M; Masse, R

    1992-01-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. Macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly functional macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U3O8) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca2+. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 +/- 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 microns(sigma g = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U3O8 preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. PMID:1396447

  17. Injurious effects of lysophosphatidylcholine on barrier properties of alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Niewoehner, D E; Rice, K; Sinha, A A; Wangensteen, D

    1987-11-01

    We studied the effects of lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) on the barrier properties and the morphology of the alveolar-capillary membrane in isolated, fluid-filled hamster lungs continuously perfused. When instilled into the airspace at initial concentrations of 8-128 micrograms/ml, lysoPC causes dose-dependent increases in the permeability-surface area product of the alveolar epithelium for small (14C-sucrose, 342) and large (125I-neutral dextran, 70,000) solutes, with maximal values for each solute approximately 15 times control. Rapid whole-lung weight gains are caused by 128 micrograms lysoPC per milliliter, but each of the lower concentrations has no effect on net lung water balance. Electron-microscopic studies demonstrate that type I pneumonocytes are the lung cells most susceptible to lysoPC exposure, with cell swelling being the most prominent feature from low-dose exposure with more severe disruptive changes at the highest concentration tested. The effects of lysoPC are relatively specific, as several structurally related lipids have little or no effect at equivalent concentrations. Instillation of phospholipase A2 causes functional changes similar to those seen with lysoPC, presumably by generation of lysoPC from endogenous phospholipids. Studies employing a 14C-radiolabeled compound show that instilled lysoPC rapidly partitions into the lung lipid fraction where a major portion of the acyl group becomes incorporated into phosphatidylcholine. The amount of instilled lysoPC required to produce functional and morphological effects comprises only a few percent of total lung phospholipids. Since lysoPC is a normal component of lung phospholipids, severe lung dysfunction might result from minor abnormalities in the formation or degradation of this compound.

  18. Alveolar Ridge Augmentation with Titanium Mesh. A Retrospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Pier P; Beretta, Mario; Cicciù, Marco; Maiorana, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    An adequate amount of bone all around the implant surface is essential in order to obtain long-term success of implant restoration. Several techniques have been described to augment alveolar bone volume in critical clinical situations, including guided bone regeneration, based on the use of barrier membranes to prevent ingrowth of the epithelial and gingival connective tissue cells. To achieve this goal, the use of barriers made of titanium micromesh has been advocated. A total of 13 patients were selected for alveolar ridge reconstruction treatment prior to implant placement. Each patient underwent a tridimensional bone augmentation by means of a Ti-mesh filled with intraoral autogenous bone mixed with deproteinized anorganic bovine bone in a 1:1 ratio. Implants were placed after a healing period of 6 months. Panoramic x-rays were performed after each surgical procedure and during the follow-up recalls. Software was used to measure the mesial and the distal peri-implant bone loss around each implant. The mean peri-implant bone loss was 1.743 mm on the mesial side and 1.913 mm on the distal side, from the top of the implant head to the first visible bone-implant contact, at a mean follow-up of 88 months. The use of Ti-mesh allows the regeneration of sufficient bone volume for ideal implant placement. The clinical advantages related to this technique include the possibility of correcting severe vertical atrophies associated with considerable reductions in width and the lack of major complications if soft-tissue dehiscence and mesh exposures do occur. PMID:25317209

  19. Nitric oxide alters metabolism in isolated alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Miles, P R; Bowman, L; Huffman, L

    1996-07-01

    Alveolar type II cells may be exposed to nitric oxide (.NO) from external sources, and these cells can also generate .NO. Therefore we studied the effects of altering .NO levels on various type II cell metabolic processes. Incubation of cells with the .NO generator, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 1 mM), leads to reductions of 60-70% in the synthesis of disaturated phosphatidylcholines (DSPC) and cell ATP levels. Cellular oxygen consumption, an indirect measure of cell ATP synthesis, is also reduced by SNAP. There is no direct effect of SNAP on lung mitochondrial ATP synthesis, suggesting that .NO does not directly inhibit this process. On the other hand, incubation of cells with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for .NO synthesis, results in increases in DSPC synthesis, cell ATP content, and cellular oxygen consumption. The L-NAME effects are reversed by addition of L-arginine, the substrate for NOS. Production of .NO by type II cells is inhibited by L-NAME, a better inhibitor of constitutive NOS (cNOS) than inducible NOS (iNOS), and is reduced in the absence of external calcium. Aminoguanidine, a specific inhibitor of iNOS, has no effect on cell ATP content or on .NO production. These results indicate that alveolar type II cell lipid and energy metabolism can be affected by .NO and suggest that there may be cNOS activity in these cells. PMID:8760128

  20. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Poncy, J.L.; Dhilly, M.; Verry, M. ); Metivier, H. ); Masse, R. )

    1992-07-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly function macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca[sup 2+]. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 [+-] 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 [mu]m([sigma][sub g] = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U[sub 3]O[sub g] preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Chronic alcohol ingestion alters claudin expression in the alveolar epithelium of rats.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alberto L; Koval, Michael; Fan, Xian; Guidot, David M

    2007-08-01

    Previously we determined that chronic alcohol ingestion (6 weeks) in rats increases lung epithelial permeability in vivo approximately 5-6-fold and promotes flooding of the alveolar airspaces with proteinaceous fluid in response to stresses such as sepsis. In parallel, alveolar epithelial cells isolated from alcohol-fed rats fail to form tight monolayers in vitro, even when cultured for up to 8 days in the absence of alcohol. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced permeability are unknown. Claudins are key components of tight junctions that restrict the paracellular movement of water, proteins, and solutes across cellular barriers including the alveolar epithelium. In this study, we examined the expression of multiple members of the claudin protein family in the lungs of alcohol-fed versus control-fed rats (Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with either 36% of calories as alcohol or an isocaloric substitution with maltin-dextrin for 6 weeks). We determined that chronic alcohol ingestion affected the expression of multiple claudins; most striking were decreases in claudin-1 and claudin-7, and an increase in claudin-5, in the whole lung and in alveolar epithelial monolayers derived from alcohol-fed rats. In parallel, immunocytochemistry of alveolar epithelial monolayers from alcohol-fed rats revealed abnormal intracellular accumulation of claudin-7 protein and relatively decreased localization to cell membranes. Claudin-1 and claudin-7 are relatively specific to alveolar epithelial type I pneumocytes that form the vast majority of the alveolar epithelial barrier in vivo, and increases in claudin-5 have been associated with increased epithelial permeability in other systems. Therefore, these findings suggest that changes in claudin expression in the alveolar epithelium produce a "leakier" phenotype that renders the alcoholic lung susceptible to alveolar flooding during acute inflammatory stresses.

  2. The Role of Angiotensin II and Cyclic AMP in Alveolar Active Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ismael-Badarneh, Reem; Guetta, Julia; Klorin, Geula; Berger, Gidon; Abu-saleh, Niroz; Abassi, Zaid; Azzam, Zaher S.

    2015-01-01

    Active alveolar fluid clearance is important in keeping airspaces free of edema. Angiotensin II plays a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, heart failure and others. However, little is known about its contribution to alveolar fluid clearance. Angiotensin II effects are mediated by two specific receptors; AT1 and AT2. The localization of these two receptors in the lung, specifically in alveolar epithelial cells type II, was recently reported. We hypothesize that Angiotensin II may have a role in the regulation of alveolar fluid clearance. We investigated the effect of Angiotensin II on alveolar fluid clearance in rats using the isolated perfused lung model and isolated rat alveolar epithelial cells. The rate of alveolar fluid clearance in control rats was 8.6% ± 0.1 clearance of the initial volume and decreased by 22.5%, 28.6%, 41.6%, 48.7% and 39% in rats treated with 10-10 M, 10-9 M, 10-8 M, 10-7 M or 10-6 M of Ang II respectively (P < 0.003). The inhibitory effect of Angiotensin II was restored in losartan, an AT1 specific antagonist, pretreated rats, indicating an AT1 mediated effect of Ang II on alveolar fluid clearance. The expression of Na,K-ATPase proteins and cAMP levels in alveolar epithelial cells were down-regulated following the administration of Angiotensin II; suggesting that cAMP may be involved in AngII-induced reduced Na,K-ATPase expression, though the contribution of additional factors could not be excluded. We herein suggest a novel mechanism of clinical relevance by which angiotensin adversely impairs the ability of the lungs to clear edema. PMID:26230832

  3. Lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve with simultaneous implant placement: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Garg, A K; Morales, M J

    1998-01-01

    In the event of moderate to severe mandibular bone resorption posterior to the mental foramen, repositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve provides a greater amount of available bone for implant placement and reduces the risk of nerve injury. While neural paresthesia may initially occur, this altered sensation generally resolves spontaneously. Alveolar nerve repositioning may be possible in cases in which other procedures cannot be performed due to the extent of atrophy of the posterior mandibular alveolar crest. This article presents the surgical technique to achieve this objective. PMID:10093565

  4. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Marco Ulises; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare but potentially fatal condition. Although the pathogenesis of this condition is unknown, high disease activity is the main characteristic; moreover, histopathology in some studies showed alveolar immune complex deposits and capillaritis. Clinical features of DAH include dyspnea, a drop in hemoglobin, and diffuse radiographic alveolar images, with or without hemoptysis. Factors associated with mortality include mechanical ventilation, renal failure, and infections. Bacterial infections have been reported frequently in patients with DAH, but also invasive fungal infections including aspergillosis. DAH treatment is based on high dose methylprednisolone; other accepted therapies include cyclophosphamide (controversial), plasmapheresis, immunoglobulin and rituximab.

  5. Biological Events in Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone Associated with Application of Orthodontic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Feller, L.; Khammissa, R. A. G.; Schechter, I.; Thomadakis, G.; Fourie, J.; Lemmer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic force-induced stresses cause dynamic alterations within the extracellular matrix and within the cytoskeleton of cells in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, mediating bone remodelling, ultimately enabling orthodontic tooth movement. In the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, the mechanically induced tensile strains upregulate the expression of osteogenic genes resulting in bone formation, while mechanically induced compressive strains mediate predominantly catabolic tissue changes and bone resorption. In this review article we summarize some of the currently known biological events occurring in the periodontal ligament and in the alveolar bone in response to application of orthodontic forces and how these facilitate tooth movement. PMID:26421314

  6. Biological Events in Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone Associated with Application of Orthodontic Forces.

    PubMed

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Schechter, I; Thomadakis, G; Fourie, J; Lemmer, J

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic force-induced stresses cause dynamic alterations within the extracellular matrix and within the cytoskeleton of cells in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, mediating bone remodelling, ultimately enabling orthodontic tooth movement. In the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, the mechanically induced tensile strains upregulate the expression of osteogenic genes resulting in bone formation, while mechanically induced compressive strains mediate predominantly catabolic tissue changes and bone resorption. In this review article we summarize some of the currently known biological events occurring in the periodontal ligament and in the alveolar bone in response to application of orthodontic forces and how these facilitate tooth movement.

  7. Optimal shock isolation with minimum settling time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Lim, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how unique isolator forces and corresponding forces can be chosen by superimposing a minimum settling time onto the limiting performance of the shock isolation system. Basically, this means that the system which has reached the peak value of the performance index is settled to rest in minimum time.

  8. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum coverage. 205.5 Section 205.5... REGULATIONS AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT LIABILITY INSURANCE § 205.5 Minimum coverage. (a) Insurance contracts and self... maintain the following coverage: (1) Third-party aircraft accident liability coverage for bodily injury...

  9. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum coverage. 205.5 Section 205.5... REGULATIONS AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT LIABILITY INSURANCE § 205.5 Minimum coverage. (a) Insurance contracts and self... maintain the following coverage: (1) Third-party aircraft accident liability coverage for bodily injury...

  10. 30 CFR 202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 202.352 Section 202.352 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's annual...

  11. The minimum flux corona; theory or concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    The reply to the criticisms of the minimum flux theory is discussed. These criticisms are correct in substance, as well as in detail. Counter arguments that the minimum flux corona theory is untenable, because of errors in its formulation, are presented.

  12. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases...

  13. 30 CFR 281.30 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 281.30 Section 281.30 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations § 281.30 Minimum...

  14. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  15. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark, Wascher); and "Wage Mobility of MW Workers" (Smith,…

  16. Minimum Competency Program, Citizenship: Suggestions for Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond.

    This monograph explains the need for graduating high school seniors to demonstrate minimum competence in citizenship and suggests performance-related assessment tasks to help school authorities determine whether these competency requirements have been met. Minimum citizenship competencies are interpreted to include essential skills and concepts…

  17. 50 CFR 648.143 - Minimum sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum sizes. 648.143 Section 648.143 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.143 Minimum sizes....

  18. Minimum Conditions for Congruence of Quadrilaterals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Irvin E.

    1982-01-01

    A complete characterization of minimum conditions for congruence of quadrilaterals is presented. Convex quadrilaterals are treated first, then concave quadrilaterals are considered. A study of such minimum conditions is seen to provide some interesting and important activities for students. Only background in triangle congruence is necessary. (MP)

  19. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the...

  20. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  1. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  2. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  3. 50 CFR 648.143 - Minimum sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum sizes. 648.143 Section 648.143 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.143 Minimum...

  4. Phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from lung, isolated alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Pool, G L; Bubacz, D G; Lumb, R H; Mason, R J

    1983-01-01

    We have examined phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from rat and mouse whole lung, isolated rat alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived mouse pulmonary adenomas. We report an enrichment in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (but not phosphatidylinositol) protein-catalysed transfer in the type II cell and adenoma cytosols compared with the whole-lung cytosols. The activities from these cytosols were resolved using column chromatofocusing, which clearly demonstrated the presence of a phosphatidylcholine-specific transfer protein in each of the four tissues. In addition, two proteins (rat) or three proteins (mouse) catalysing both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol transfer were resolved from whole lung, whereas in both the rat isolated alveolar type II cells and the mouse type II cell-derived adenomas one of these less specific proteins is not present. PMID:6661189

  5. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and Libman-Sacks endocarditis as a manifestation of possible primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koolaee, Roodabeh Michelle; Moran, Anna M; Shahane, Anupama

    2013-03-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of circulating autoantibodies against phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, leading to an increased risk of thrombosis and pregnancy loss. The most common manifestation of lung disease in APS is pulmonary embolism, which may often be the presenting symptom. We present a 30-year-old man with probable primary APS (with no history of thromboses) presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, an uncommon presentation. He was also found to have severe mitral valve regurgitation and during valve replacement surgery had cardiac vegetations compatible with a presentation of Libman-Sacks endocarditis. There are only 21 other reported cases of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage occurring as a result of APS. This is the first case of Libman-Sacks endocarditis in the setting of probable APS and alveolar hemorrhage.Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage should be considered as a nonthrombotic manifestation of APS, even in the absence of known thromboses, and may be the presenting symptom.

  6. Tracheal compression delays alveolar collapse during deep diving in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Brian L; Fahlman, Andreas; Jones, David R

    2008-05-31

    Marine mammals have very compliant alveoli and stiff upper airways; an adaptation that allows air to move from the alveoli into the upper airways, during breath-hold diving. Alveolar collapse is thought occur between 30 and 100 m and studies that have attempted to estimate gas exchange at depth have used the simplifying assumption that gas exchange ceases abruptly at the alveolar collapse depth. Here we develop a mathematical model that uses compliance values for the alveoli and upper airspaces, estimated from the literature, to predict volumes of the respiratory system at depth. Any compressibility of the upper airways decreases the volume to contain alveolar air yielding lung collapse pressures 2x that calculated assuming an incompressible upper airway. A simple relationship with alveolar volume was used to predict relative pulmonary shunt at depth. The results from our model agree with empirical data on gas absorption at depth as well as the degree of tracheal compression in forced and free diving mammals.

  7. Multimodality imaging in diagnosis and management of alveolar echinococcosis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Bulakçı, Mesut; Kartal, Merve Gülbiz; Yılmaz, Sabri; Yılmaz, Erdem; Yılmaz, Ravza; Şahin, Dilek; Aşık, Murat; Erol, Oğuz Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a parasitic disease limited to the northern hemisphere. The disease occurs primarily in the liver and shows a profile mimicking slow-growing malignant tumors. Echinococcus multilocularis infection is fatal if left untreated. It can cause several complications by infiltrating the vascular structures, biliary tracts, and the hilum of the liver. As it can invade the adjacent organs or can spread to distant organs, alveolar echinococcosis can easily be confused with malignancies. We provide a brief review of epidemiologic and pathophysiologic profile of alveolar echinococcosis and clinical features of the disease. This article focuses primarily on the imaging features of alveolar echinococcosis on ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography. We also reviewed the role of radiology in diagnosis, management, and follow-up of the disease. PMID:27082120

  8. Alveolar hemorrhage as a manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma after scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Balk, M; Goldman, J M

    1990-08-01

    We present the case of a 46-year-old man who developed diffuse alveolar hemorrhage as a consequence of a scuba diving accident. The diagnosis and presumptive pathophysiological mechanism of this previously unreported complication are discussed.

  9. Alveolar system of Paramecium. I. Trapping polycationic dye as a result of membrane impairment.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1981-01-01

    The function of Paramecium alveolar system underlying the cell membrane has been studied. Permeability and structure of cell membrane, alveolar membranes and alveoli following alpha-amylase, beta-amylase, phospholipase C and hyaluronidase treatment has been examined. It is demonstrated that droplets of polycationic dye, ruthenium red, have been trapped within the alveoli whereas the dye was also bound by the outer and inner alveolar membrane. This suggest the presence of anionic sites capable to bind cationic compounds within the alveoli. It may be concluded that the alveolar system in Paramecium is functioning as a barrier protecting the cell against the chemicals added from the outside when the cell membrane separating the cytoplasm from the medium is impaired.

  10. Iron homeostatis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosi...

  11. Depletion of alveolar macrophages prolongs survival in response to acute pneumovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Rigaux, Peter; Killoran, Kristin E.; Qiu, Zhijun; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages are immunoregulatory effector cells that interact directly with respiratory virus pathogens in vivo. We examined the role of alveolar macrophages in acute infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a rodent pneumovirus that replicates the clinical sequelae of severe human respiratory syncytial virus disease. We show that PVM replicates in primary mouse macrophage culture, releasing infectious virions and proinflammatory cytokines. Alveolar macrophages isolated from PVM-infected mice express activation markers Clec43 and CD86, cytokines TNFα, IL-1, IL-6, and numerous CC and CXC chemokines. Alveolar macrophage depletion prior to PVM infection results in small but statistically significant increases in virus recovery but paradoxically prolonged survival. In parallel, macrophage depleted PVM-infected mice exhibit enhanced NK cell recruitment and increased production of IFNγ by NK, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results suggest a protective, immunomodulatory role for IFNγ, as overproduction secondary to macrophage depletion may promote survival despite increased virus recovery. PMID:22129848

  12. Marginal alveolar bone loss in flying personnel: a radiographical followup study.

    PubMed

    Carlson, O G; Zackrisson, K

    1977-09-01

    In a 10-year followup study, the alveolar marginal bone of the mandible in flying personnel has been examined on radiographs. The radiographs were obtained at 5-year intervals. The reduced height of the marginal alveolar bone was measured according to an internationally accepted standard procedure and compared with figures obtained from radiographs made 10 years earlier. Compared with similar material concerning subjects not occupationally involved in flying, this study shows that flying personnel suffer considerable alveolar, marginal bone loss. High-altitude flying, reduced partial oxygen pressure, stress, and vibrations are being discussed as suspected causes. An interesting and disturbing point is that the alveolar process usually is the first bone that reveals a generally decreased bone calcification. Further studies of the skeletal bone and the serum concentration of calcium are in progress. Subjects for these studies are flying personnel (jet, propeller, and helicopter) from the Swedish Air Force.

  13. Multimodality imaging in diagnosis and management of alveolar echinococcosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Bulakçı, Mesut; Kartal, Merve Gülbiz; Yılmaz, Sabri; Yılmaz, Erdem; Yılmaz, Ravza; Şahin, Dilek; Aşık, Murat; Erol, Oğuz Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a parasitic disease limited to the northern hemisphere. The disease occurs primarily in the liver and shows a profile mimicking slow-growing malignant tumors. Echinococcus multilocularis infection is fatal if left untreated. It can cause several complications by infiltrating the vascular structures, biliary tracts, and the hilum of the liver. As it can invade the adjacent organs or can spread to distant organs, alveolar echinococcosis can easily be confused with malignancies. We provide a brief review of epidemiologic and pathophysiologic profile of alveolar echinococcosis and clinical features of the disease. This article focuses primarily on the imaging features of alveolar echinococcosis on ultrasonogra-phy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography. We also reviewed the role of radiology in diagnosis, management, and follow-up of the disease. PMID:27082120

  14. Simultaneous Exposure to Multiple Air Pollutants Influences Alveolar Epithelial Cell Ion Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose. Air pollution sources generally release multiple pollutants simultaneously and yet, research has historically focused on the source-to-health linkages of individual air pollutants. We recently showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to a combination of particul...

  15. Deposition of Particles in the Alveolar Airways: Inhalation and Breath-Hold with Pharmaceutical Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Khajeh-Hosseini-Dalasm, Navvab; Longest, P Worth

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that factors such as airway wall motion, inhalation waveform, and geometric complexity influence the deposition of aerosols in the alveolar airways. However, deposition fraction correlations are not available that account for these factors in determining alveolar deposition. The objective of this study was to generate a new space-filling model of the pulmonary acinus region and implement this model to develop correlations of aerosol deposition that can be used to predict the alveolar dose of inhaled pharmaceutical products. A series of acinar models was constructed containing different numbers of alveolar duct generations based on space-filling 14-hedron elements. Selected ventilation waveforms were quick-and-deep and slow-and-deep inhalation consistent with the use of most pharmaceutical aerosol inhalers. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were used to predict aerosol transport and deposition in the series of acinar models across various orientations with gravity where ventilation was driven by wall motion. Primary findings indicated that increasing the number of alveolar duct generations beyond 3 had a negligible impact on total acinar deposition, and total acinar deposition was not affected by gravity orientation angle. A characteristic model containing three alveolar duct generations (D3) was then used to develop correlations of aerosol deposition in the alveolar airways as a function of particle size and particle residence time in the geometry. An alveolar deposition parameter was determined in which deposition correlated with d(2)t over the first half of inhalation followed by correlation with dt(2), where d is the aerodynamic diameter of the particles and t is the potential particle residence time in the alveolar model. Optimal breath-hold times to allow 95% deposition of inhaled 1, 2, and 3 μm particles once inside the alveolar region were approximately >10, 2.7, and 1.2 s, respectively. Coupling of the deposition

  16. Effects of anesthesia with isoflurane on plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Schott, Harold C; van der Kolk, Johannes H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of anesthesia on plasma concentrations and pulsatility of ACTH in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses. ANIMALS 6 clinically normal adult horses. PROCEDURES Catheters were placed in a jugular vein and into the cavernous sinus via a superficial facial vein. The following morning (day 1), cavernous sinus blood samples were collected every 5 minutes for 1 hour (collection of first sample = time 0) and jugular venous blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 60 minutes. On day 2, horses were sedated with xylazine hydrochloride and anesthesia was induced with propofol mixed with ketamine hydrochloride. Horses were positioned in dorsal recumbency. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and a continuous rate infusion of butorphanol tartrate. One hour after anesthesia was induced, the blood sample protocol was repeated. Plasma ACTH concentrations were quantified by use of a commercially available sandwich assay. Generalized estimating equations that controlled for horse and an expressly automated deconvolution algorithm were used to determine effects of anesthesia on plasma ACTH concentrations and pulsatility, respectively. RESULTS Anesthesia significantly reduced the plasma ACTH concentration in blood samples collected from the cavernous sinus. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Mean plasma ACTH concentrations in samples collected from the cavernous sinus of anesthetized horses were reduced. Determining the success of partial ablation of the pituitary gland in situ for treatment of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction may require that effects of anesthesia be included in interpretation of plasma ACTH concentrations in cavernous sinus blood. PMID:27347826

  17. Alveolar soft part sarcoma following radiotherapy for a spinal hemangioma. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Mirra, J.; Bhuta, S.

    1984-06-15

    A case of alveolar soft part sarcoma arising some 20 years later in a site previously irradiated as a treatment for a spinal cord hemangioma is described. This is the first known case of radiation-associated alveolar soft part sarcoma, and it fulfills the criteria for a tumor to be radiation-induced. The coincidental finding of ''viral-like'' particles within some of the tumor cells was noted.

  18. High CO2 Levels Impair Alveolar Epithelial Function Independently of pH

    PubMed Central

    Briva, Arturo; Vadász, István; Lecuona, Emilia; Welch, Lynn C.; Chen, Jiwang; Dada, Laura A.; Trejo, Humberto E.; Dumasius, Vidas; Azzam, Zaher S.; Myrianthefs, Pavlos M.; Batlle, Daniel; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with acute respiratory failure, gas exchange is impaired due to the accumulation of fluid in the lung airspaces. This life-threatening syndrome is treated with mechanical ventilation, which is adjusted to maintain gas exchange, but can be associated with the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the lung. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a by-product of cellular energy utilization and its elimination is affected via alveolar epithelial cells. Signaling pathways sensitive to changes in CO2 levels were described in plants and neuronal mammalian cells. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether non-neuronal cells sense and respond to CO2. The Na,K-ATPase consumes ∼40% of the cellular metabolism to maintain cell homeostasis. Our study examines the effects of increased pCO2 on the epithelial Na,K-ATPase a major contributor to alveolar fluid reabsorption which is a marker of alveolar epithelial function. Principal Findings We found that short-term increases in pCO2 impaired alveolar fluid reabsorption in rats. Also, we provide evidence that non-excitable, alveolar epithelial cells sense and respond to high levels of CO2, independently of extracellular and intracellular pH, by inhibiting Na,K-ATPase function, via activation of PKCζ which phosphorylates the Na,K-ATPase, causing it to endocytose from the plasma membrane into intracellular pools. Conclusions Our data suggest that alveolar epithelial cells, through which CO2 is eliminated in mammals, are highly sensitive to hypercapnia. Elevated CO2 levels impair alveolar epithelial function, independently of pH, which is relevant in patients with lung diseases and altered alveolar gas exchange. PMID:18043745

  19. Esthetic Restoration with Artificial Gingiva in an Atrophied Alveolar Ridge: Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Enríquez, Antonio; Sánchez, Eric; Guizar, J Manuel; Del Campo, Carlos Martin; Fandiño, L Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Management of the anterior maxilla is a challenge in compromised clinical situations such as loss of teeth or soft tissues, alveolar ridge defects, or loss of all three. This report shows the systematic sequence of surgical and prosthetic management in a case of Seibert Class III alveolar atrophy where the patient refused a removable prosthesis. This was resolved with a hybrid metal/porcelain prosthesis with 17-degree multiunit abutments, leading to totally satisfactory esthetic and functional results. PMID:27333015

  20. Inferior alveolar nerve injury in implant dentistry: diagnosis, causes, prevention, and management.

    PubMed

    Alhassani, Ahmed Ali; AlGhamdi, Ali Saad Thafeed

    2010-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve injury is one of the most serious complications in implant dentistry. This nerve injury can occur during local anesthesia, implant osteotomy, or implant placement. Proper understanding of anatomy, surgical procedures, and implant systems and proper treatment planning is the key to reducing such an unpleasant complication. This review discusses the causes of inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis, prevention, and management. PMID:20545547

  1. Fractal analysis of alveolarization in hyperoxia-induced rat models of bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Guidolin, Diego; Macchi, Veronica; Sarasin, Gloria; Grisafi, Davide; Tortorella, Cinzia; Dedja, Arben; Zaramella, Patrizia; De Caro, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    No papers are available about potentiality of fractal analysis in quantitative assessment of alveolarization in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Thus, we here performed a comparative analysis between fractal [fractal dimension (D) and lacunarity] and stereological [mean linear intercept (Lm), total volume of alveolar air spaces, total number of alveoli, mean alveolar volume, total volume and surface area of alveolar septa, and mean alveolar septal thickness] parameters in experimental hyperoxia-induced models of BPD. At birth, rats were distributed between the following groups: 1) rats raised in ambient air for 2 wk; 2) rats exposed to 60% oxygen for 2 wk; 3) rats raised in normoxia for 6 wk; and 4) rats exposed to 60% hyperoxia for 2 wk and to room air for further 4 wk. Normoxic 6-wk rats showed increased D and decreased lacunarity with respect to normoxic 2-wk rats, together with changes in all stereological parameters except for mean alveolar volume. Hyperoxia-exposed 2-wk rats showed significant changes only in total number of alveoli, mean alveolar volume, and lacunarity with respect to equal-in-age normoxic rats. In the comparison between 6-wk rats, the hyperoxia-exposed group showed decreased D and increased lacunarity, together with changes in all stereological parameters except for septal thickness. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves showed a comparable discriminatory power of D, lacunarity, and total number of alveoli; Lm and mean alveolar volume were less discriminative. D and lacunarity did not show significant changes when different segmentation thresholds were applied, suggesting that the fractal approach may be fit to automatic image analysis. PMID:26851258

  2. Alveolar recruitment maneuver and perioperative ventilatory support in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Forgiarini Júnior, Luiz Alberto; Rezende, Juliana Castilhos; Forgiarini, Soraia Genebra Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The development of abdominal surgery represents an alternative therapy for the morbidly obese; however, patients undergoing this surgical procedure often experience postoperative pulmonary complications. The use of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and/or perioperative ventilatory strategies is a possible alternative to reduce these complications, focusing on the reduction of postoperative pulmonary complications. In this review, the benefits of perioperative ventilatory strategies and the implementation of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery are described. PMID:24553513

  3. Fetal, but not postnatal, deletion of semaphorin-neuropilin-1 signaling affects murine alveolar development.

    PubMed

    Joza, Stephen; Wang, Jinxia; Tseu, Irene; Ackerley, Cameron; Post, Martin

    2013-10-01

    The disruption of angiogenic pathways, whether through genetic predisposition or as a consequence of life-saving interventions, may underlie many pulmonary diseases of infancy, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) is a transmembrane receptor that plays essential roles in normal and pathological vascular development and binds two distinct ligand families: vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) and class 3 semaphorins (Sema3). Although Nrp1 is critical for systemic vascular development, the importance of Nrp1 in pulmonary vascular morphogenesis is uncertain. We hypothesized that Sema3-Nrp1 and Vegf-Nrp1 interactions are important pathways in the orchestration of pulmonary vascular development during alveolarization. Complete ablation of Nrp1 signaling would therefore lead to interruption of normal angiogenic and vascular maturation processes that are relevant to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We have previously shown that congenital loss of Sema3-Nrp1 signaling in transgenic Nrp1(Sema-) mice resulted in disrupted alveolar-capillary interface formation and high neonatal mortality. Here, pathohistological examination of Nrp1(Sema-) survivors in the alveolar period revealed moderate to severe respiratory distress, alveolar hemorrhaging, abnormally dilated capillaries, and disintegrating alveolar septa, demonstrating continued instability of the alveolar-capillary interface. Moreover, consistent with a reduced capillary density and consequent increases in vascular resistance, hypertensive remodeling was observed. In contrast, conditional Nrp1 deletion beginning at postnatal day 5 had only a transient effect upon alveolar and vascular development or pneumocyte differentiation despite an increase in mortality. Our results demonstrate that although Sema3-Nrp1 signaling is critical during fetal pulmonary development, Nrp1 signaling does not appear to be essential for alveolar development or vascular function in the postnatal period.

  4. Sandstorm Appearance of Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis Incidentally Detected in a Young, Asymptomatic Male

    PubMed Central

    Bux, Shaik Ismail; Liam, Chong Kin; Rahman, Nazarina Abdul; Ho, Choon Yan

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare chronic disease with paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. We present a case of a 24-year-old Malay man having an incidental abnormal pre-employment chest radiograph of dense micronodular opacities giving the classical "sandstorm" appearance. High-resolution computed tomography of the lungs showed microcalcifications with subpleural cystic changes. Open lung biopsy showed calcospherites within the alveolar spaces. The radiological and histopathological findings were characteristic of PAM. PMID:24043987

  5. Sandstorm appearance of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis incidentally detected in a young, asymptomatic male.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, Li Shyan; Bux, Shaik Ismail; Liam, Chong Kin; Rahman, Nazarina Abdul; Ho, Choon Yan

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare chronic disease with paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. We present a case of a 24-year-old Malay man having an incidental abnormal pre-employment chest radiograph of dense micronodular opacities giving the classical "sandstorm" appearance. High-resolution computed tomography of the lungs showed microcalcifications with subpleural cystic changes. Open lung biopsy showed calcospherites within the alveolar spaces. The radiological and histopathological findings were characteristic of PAM. PMID:24043987

  6. Alveolar graft in the cleft lip and palate patient: Review of 104 cases

    PubMed Central

    Tobella-Camps, María L.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Alveolar bone grafting is a vital part of the rehabilitation of cleft patients. The factors that have been most frequently associated with the success of the graft are the age at grafting and the pre-grafting orthodontic treatment. Objectives: 1) Describe the cases of alveolar bone grafts performed at the Maxilofacial Unit of Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona (HSJD); and 2) Analyze the success/failure of alveolar grafts and related variables. Material and Methods: Descriptive retrospective study using a sample of 104 patients who underwent a secondary alveolar graft at the Craniofacial Unit of HSJD between 1998 and 2012. The graft was done by the same surgeon in all patients using bone from the iliac crest. Results: 70% of the patients underwent the procedure before the age of 15 (median 14.45 years); 70% of the graft patients underwent pre-graft maxillary expansion. A total of 100 cases were recorded as successful (median age of 14.58 years, 68 underwent pre-graft expansion) and only 4 were recorded as failures (median age of 17.62 years, 3 underwent pre-graft expansion). We did not find statistically significant differences in age at the time of grafting or pre-surgical expansion when comparing the success and failure groups. We found the success rate of the graft to be 96.2%. Conclusions: The number of failures was too small to establish a statistically significant conclusion in our sample regarding the age at grafting and pre-grafting expansion. The use of alveolar bone grafting from the iliac crest has a very high success rate with a very low incidence of complications. Existing controversies regarding secondary bone grafting and the wide range of success rates found in the literature suggest that it is necessary to establish a specific treatment protocol that ensures the success of this procedure. Key words:Alveolar graft, cleft lip and palate, alveolar cleft, alveolar defect. PMID:24880440

  7. [Domiciliary noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in chronic alveolar hypoventilation].

    PubMed

    Casas, J P; Robles, A M; Pereyra, M A; Abbona, H L; López, A M

    2000-01-01

    Effectiveness of treatment with domiciliary nocturnal noninvasive positive pressure ventilation is analyzed in a group of patients with chronic alveolar hypoventilation of different etiologies. It was applied with two levels of pressure (BiPAP) via nasal mask. Criteria for evaluation were symptomatology and improvement in gas exchange. Data were analyzed by Student t tests. A total of 13 patients were included, mean age 55.7 range 20 to 76 years (5 male 8 female). Main diagnosis was tuberculosis in 6, four of them having had surgical procedure (thoracoplasty 2, frenicectomy 1 and neumonectomy 1), myopathy 3 (myasthenia gravis 1, muscular dystrophy 1 and diaphragmatic paralysis 1), obesity-hypoventilation syndrome 1, escoliosis 1, bronchiectasis 1 and cystic fibrosis 1. These last two patients were on waiting list for lung transplantation. At the moment of consultation, the symptoms were: dysnea 13/13 (100%), astenia 13/13 (100%), hypersomnolency 10/13 (77%), cephalea 9/13 (69%), leg edema 6/13 (46%), loss of memory 6/13 (46%). Regarding gas exchange, they showed hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Mean follow up was of 2.2 years (range 6 months to 4 years). Within the year, all 13 patients became less dyspneic. Astenia, hypersomnolency, cephalea, leg edema and memory loss disappeared. Improvement in gas exchange was: PaO2/FiO2 from 269 +/- 65.4 (basal) to 336.7 +/- 75.3 post-treatment (p = 0.0018). PaCO2 from 70.77 +/- 25.48 mmHg (basal) to 46.77 +/- 8.14 mmHg (p = 0.0013). Ventilatory support was discontinued en 5 patients: three because of pneumonia requiring intubation and conventional mechanical ventilation, two of them died and one is still with tracheostomy; One patient with bronchiectasis and one with cystic fibrosis were transplanted. The remaining eight patients are stable. In conclusion, chronic alveolar hypoventilation can be effectively treated with domiciliary nocturnal noninvasive ventilation. Long term improvement in symptomatology and arterial blood gases

  8. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: an interesting case report with systematic review of Indian literature.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Nidhya; Ambroise, Marie Moses; Ramdas, Anita; Kisku, King Herald; Singh, Kulwant; Varghese, Renu G' Boy

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare disease characterized by intra-alveolar presence of microliths. This study reports an interesting case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis and provides a systematic review of cases reported from India. A 23-year-old female presented with a history of cough, wheeze, chest pain, and episodic wheeze for five months. Pulmonary function tests demonstrated an obstructive pattern, and chest Xray showed fine micronodular opacities predominantly involving the middle and lower zones of both lungs. Transbronchial lung biopsy revealed the diagnosis. She responded well to inhaled steroid therapy. A systematic review of literature was performed and identified 73 cases of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis reported from India. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 28.8 (14.9) years, with an almost equal male:female ratio. Many patients were asymptomatic at presentation. Breathlessness and cough were the most common symptoms, and the disease progressed into respiratory failure associated with cor pulmonale. About one-third of the cases were initially misdiagnosed and treated as pulmonary tuberculosis. Extra-pulmonary manifestations and comorbidities were also evident in our series. This systematic review helps to determine epidemiological and clinical characteristics of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. Further research is needed to elucidate the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options, which are beneficial in developing and identifying cost-effective treatment for pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. PMID:26024716

  9. Thrombin-induced contraction in alveolar epithelial cells probed by traction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria; Sunyer, Raimon; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Farré, Ramon; Rotger, Mar; Navajas, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    Contractile tension of alveolar epithelial cells plays a major role in the force balance that regulates the structural integrity of the alveolar barrier. The aim of this work was to study thrombin-induced contractile forces of alveolar epithelial cells. A549 alveolar epithelial cells were challenged with thrombin, and time course of contractile forces was measured by traction microscopy. The cells exhibited basal contraction with total force magnitude 55.0 +/- 12.0 nN (mean +/- SE, n = 12). Traction forces were exerted predominantly at the cell periphery and pointed to the cell center. Thrombin (1 U/ml) induced a fast and sustained 2.5-fold increase in traction forces, which maintained peripheral and centripetal distribution. Actin fluorescent staining revealed F-actin polymerization and enhancement of peripheral actin rim. Disruption of actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D (5 microM, 30 min) and inhibition of myosin light chain kinase with ML-7 (10 microM, 30 min) and Rho kinase with Y-27632 (10 microM, 30 min) markedly depressed basal contractile tone and abolished thrombin-induced cell contraction. Therefore, the contractile response of alveolar epithelial cells to the inflammatory agonist thrombin was mediated by actin cytoskeleton remodeling and actomyosin activation through myosin light chain kinase and Rho kinase signaling pathways. Thrombin-induced contractile tension might further impair alveolar epithelial barrier integrity in the injured lung. PMID:16675616

  10. Airborne Particulate Matter Inhibits Alveolar Fluid Reabsorption in Mice via Oxidant Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Gökhan M.; Snyder, Colleen; Bellmeyer, Amy; Wang, Helena; Hawkins, Keenan; Soberanes, Saul; Welch, Lynn C.; Ghio, Andrew J.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Kamp, David; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Budinger, G. R. Scott

    2006-01-01

    Ambient particulate matter is increasingly recognized as a significant contributor to human cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide. We sought to determine whether exposure to ambient particulate matter would alter alveolar fluid clearance in mice. Mice were exposed to a range of doses of a well-characterized particulate matter collected from the ambient air in Düsseldorf, Germany through a single intratracheal instillation, and alveolar fluid clearance and measurements of lung injury were made. Exposure to even very low doses of particulate matter (10 μg) resulted in a significant reduction in alveolar fluid clearance that was maximal 24 h after the exposure, with complete resolution after 7 d. This was paralleled by a decrease in lung Na,K-ATPase activity. To investigate the mechanism of this effect, we measured plasma membrane Na,K-ATPase abundance in A549 cells and Na,K-ATPase activity in primary rat alveolar type II cells after exposure to particulate matter in the presence or abscence of the combined superoxide dismutase and catalase mimetic EUK-134 (5 μM). Membrane but not total protein abundance of the Na,K-ATPase was decreased after exposure to particulate matter, as was Na,K-ATPase activity. This decrease was prevented by the combined superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-134. The intratracheal instillation of particulate matter results in alveolar epithelial injury and decreased alveolar fluid clearance, conceivably due to downregulation of the Na,K-ATPase. PMID:16439801

  11. Bone morphogenetic proteins for periodontal and alveolar indications; biological observations - clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wikesjö, U M E; Qahash, M; Huang, Y-H; Xiropaidis, A; Polimeni, G; Susin, C

    2009-08-01

    Surgical placement of endosseous oral implants is governed by the prosthetic design and by the morphology and quality of the alveolar bone. Nevertheless, often implant placement may be complexed, if at all possible, by alveolar ridge irregularities resulting from periodontal disease, and chronic and acute trauma. In consequence, implant positioning commonly necessitates bone augmentation procedures. One objective of our laboratory is to evaluate the biologic potential of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) and other candidate biologics, bone biomaterials, and devices for alveolar ridge augmentation and implant fixation using discriminating large animal models. This focused review illustrates the unique biologic potential, the clinical relevance and perspectives of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) using a variety of carrier technologies to induce local bone formation and implant osseointegration for inlay and onlay indications. Our studies demonstrate a clinically relevant potential of a purpose-designed titanium porous oxide implant surface as stand-alone technology to deliver rhBMP-2 for alveolar augmentation. In perspective, merits and shortcomings of current treatment protocol including bone biomaterials and guided bone regeneration are addressed and explained. We demonstrate that rhBMP-2 has unparalleled potential to augment alveolar bone, and support implant osseointegration and long-term functional loading. Inclusion of rhBMP-2 for alveolar augmentation and osseointegration will not only enhance predictability of existing clinical protocol but also radically change current treatment paradigms.

  12. Epithelial-mesenchymal co-culture model for studying alveolar morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Rachel M; Miller, J Davin; Okoh, Victor O; Halloran, Brian A; Prince, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    Division of large, immature alveolar structures into smaller, more numerous alveoli increases the surface area available for gas exchange. Alveolar division requires precise epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. However, few experimental models exist for studying how these cell-cell interactions produce changes in 3-dimensional structure. Here we report an epithelial-mesenchymal cell co-culture model where 3-dimensional peaks form with similar cellular orientation as alveolar structures in vivo. Co-culturing fetal mouse lung mesenchyme with A549 epithelial cells produced tall peaks of cells covered by epithelia with cores of mesenchymal cells. These structures did not form when using adult lung fibroblasts. Peak formation did not require localized areas of cell proliferation or apoptosis. Mesenchymal cells co-cultured with epithelia adopted an elongated cell morphology closely resembling myofibroblasts within alveolar septa in vivo. Because inflammation inhibits alveolar formation, we tested the effects of E. coli lipopolysaccharide on 3-dimensional peak formation. Confocal and time-lapse imaging demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide reduced mesenchymal cell migration, resulting in fewer, shorter peaks with mesenchymal cells present predominantly at the base. This epithelial-mesenchymal co-culture model may therefore prove useful in future studies of mechanisms regulating alveolar morphogenesis. PMID:25482312

  13. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  14. Hyperoxia alters the mechanical properties of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roan, Esra; Wilhelm, Kristina; Bada, Alex; Makena, Patrudu S; Gorantla, Vijay K; Sinclair, Scott E; Waters, Christopher M

    2012-06-15

    Patients with severe acute lung injury are frequently administered high concentrations of oxygen (>50%) during mechanical ventilation. Long-term exposure to high levels of oxygen can cause lung injury in the absence of mechanical ventilation, but the combination of the two accelerates and increases injury. Hyperoxia causes injury to cells through the generation of excessive reactive oxygen species. However, the precise mechanisms that lead to epithelial injury and the reasons for increased injury caused by mechanical ventilation are not well understood. We hypothesized that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may be more susceptible to injury caused by mechanical ventilation if hyperoxia alters the mechanical properties of the cells causing them to resist deformation. To test this hypothesis, we used atomic force microscopy in the indentation mode to measure the mechanical properties of cultured AECs. Exposure of AECs to hyperoxia for 24 to 48 h caused a significant increase in the elastic modulus (a measure of resistance to deformation) of both primary rat type II AECs and a cell line of mouse AECs (MLE-12). Hyperoxia also caused remodeling of both actin and microtubules. The increase in elastic modulus was blocked by treatment with cytochalasin D. Using finite element analysis, we showed that the increase in elastic modulus can lead to increased stress near the cell perimeter in the presence of stretch. We then demonstrated that cyclic stretch of hyperoxia-treated cells caused significant cell detachment. Our results suggest that exposure to hyperoxia causes structural remodeling of AECs that leads to decreased cell deformability. PMID:22467640

  15. Quantitative assessment of rabbit alveolar macrophage function by chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, P.C.; Kirchner, F.R.

    1985-08-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages (RAM) were cultured for 24 hr with concentrations ranging from 3 to 12 ..mu..g/ml of vanadium oxide (V/sub 2/O/sub 5/), a known cytotoxic agent, or with high-molecular-weight organic by-products from coal gasification processes. After culture the cells were harvested and tested for functional capacity using three types of indicators: (1) luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL), which quantitatively detects photon emission due to respiratory burst activity measured in a newly designed instrument with standardized reagents; (2) the reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium-saturated polyacrylamide beads, a semiquantitative measure of respiratory burst activity; and (3) phagocytic efficiency, defined as percentage of cells incorporating immunoglobulin-coated polyacrylamide beads. Chemiluminescence declined linearly with increasing concentrations of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ over the dose range tested. Dye reduction and phagocytic efficiency similarly decreased with increasing V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ concentration, but were less sensitive indicators of functional impairment than CL as measured by the amount required to reduce the response to 50% of untreated cells. The effect of coal gasification condensates on RAM function varied, but in general these test also indicated that the CL response was the most sensitive indicator.

  16. Toxicity of metallic ions and oxides to rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Labedzka, M.; Gulyas, H.; Schmidt, N.; Gercken, G. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of soluble compounds and oxides of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, V, and Zn on oxidative metabolism and membrane integrity of rabbit alveolar macrophages were studied by 24-hr in vitro exposure. Oxidative metabolism induced by phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan was measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and by chemiluminescence in the presence of luminol. Membrane integrity was estimated by extracellular LDH activity. Metallic ions and oxides inhibited the release of active oxygen species. Cd(II), As(III), and V(V) were the most toxic elements as measured by all investigated parameters. Cu(II) decreased O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and chemiluminescence effectively but H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and membrane integrity less. Chemiluminescence was decreased strongly by Hg(II) while O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release were depressed moderately. Zn(II) and Sb(III) compounds caused medium toxicity and the tested Sn, Ni, and Pb compounds showed only faint toxic effects.

  17. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramasinghe, Caroline M; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko; Williamson, Daniel; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet; Murai, Kasumi; Jones, Philip H

    2013-01-01

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  18. Simple and safe posterior superior alveolar nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kumar, N. Senthil; Kannan, R.; Kumar, J. Arun

    2012-01-01

    Background: The posterior superior alveolar nerve (PSAN) block is a dental nerve block used for profound anesthesia of the maxillary molars. Although it is being written in texts as a commonly used technique, but in dentistry it is rarely followed due to its nonreliable landmarks, variation in depth of insertion and frequent complications. The aim and objective are to find a technically simple method of the PSAN block without any complications. Study and Design: This study was based on the experience gained from 200 patients of 125 males and 75 female in age group of 20 to 65 years in University of Vinayaka and department of oral and maxillofacial surgery of VMS Dental College and hospital, Salem, Tamil Nadu. Results: In 200 patients’ positive anesthesia obtained within a period of 5 to 10 min. No visual complications reported in this study. There was no pain during and after extraction. Conclusion: This study shows this PSA nerve block using curved needle would avoid all complications reported in the literature. Therefore, the technique described in this study is an ideal option to anesthetize PSA nerve. PMID:25885507

  19. Antioxidant properties of taurine in rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Castranova, V.; Banks, M.A.; Porter, D.W.; Martin, W.G. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown )

    1990-02-26

    Isolated rat alveolar macrophages (RAM) which had taken-up and accumulated extracellular (0-500 {mu}M) taurine (TAU) were exposed to 0.45 {plus minus} 0.05 ppm ozone for 30 minutes in a modified tissue culture flask containing TAU-supplemented medium. Recovered cells were assayed for oxidant damage and media analyzed for leakage of intracellular components. Cell viability significantly increased, while recovery of cells decreased (possibly due to increased adherence) with increasing TAU. At 100 {mu}M (rat plasma TAU level), TAU protected against the ozone-induced increase in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence, diminished leakages of lipid peroxidation products and protein into the medium, and partially restored the ozone-inactivated Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity of RAM. Efflux of oxidized glutathione was maximized and K{sup +} leakage was minimized by the addition of 250 {mu}M TAU. At 250-500 {mu}M TAU, leakages of lipid peroxidation products and protein were enhanced, while the intracellular TAU content dramatically increased. These results indicate that TAU has both direct and indirect antioxidant properties at low levels and pro-oxidant properties at high levels in RAM.

  20. The Anesthetic Effect of Anterior Middle Superior Alveolar Technique (AMSA)

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Tolentino, Lívia; Barbisan Souza, André; Girardi, Ana Alice; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Araújo, Maurício Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia of the soft and hard tissues of the maxilla may require up to 5 injections. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of the anterior middle superior alveolar (AMSA) and supraperiosteal injection techniques during subgingival scaling and root planing (SRP). Thirty individuals with periodontitis were scheduled for SRP on the buccal aspect of teeth in the anterior maxilla. Before SRP, on a randomly chosen side of the maxilla, the supraperiosteal injection was performed in 1 session, while the AMSA injection was conducted in the contralateral side of the same patient in another session. Immediately after each SRP session, patients rated their pain perception during the procedure with a visual analog scale. No statistically significant differences in mean pain ratings during SRP were found after both anesthetic techniques (P > .05). This preliminary study demonstrated that the AMSA and supraperiosteal injection techniques provided similar anesthetic comfort during SRP. The AMSA injection could be an alternative to anesthetize the buccal aspect of maxilla, without the undesirable effects on facial structures such as the upper lip, nostrils, and lower eyelids. However, further randomized clinical trials with larger samples are necessary to confirm such results. PMID:26650493