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Sample records for isoflurane minimum alveolar

  1. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    LeDez, K M; Lerman, J

    1987-09-01

    Studies in fetal lambs suggested that the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in preterm neonates may be less than that in full-term neonates and older infants. To determine the MAC of isoflurane in preterm neonates, 20 patients less than 32 weeks gestation at birth and 16 patients 32-37 weeks gestation at birth, all less than 1 month post-natal age, were studied. Following tracheal intubation, the neonates were anesthetized with a predetermined end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in oxygen and air. The move-no move responses to skin incision were recorded, and MAC was determined using the "up-and-down" technique. Heart rate and systolic arterial pressure were recorded awake, before skin incision, and after skin incision. MAC (mean +/- SD) of isoflurane in preterm neonates less than 32 weeks gestation was 1.28 +/- 0.17%, and MAC in neonates 32-37 weeks gestation was 1.41 +/- 0.18% (P less than 0.05). Although heart rate did not decrease significantly in either group during the study, systolic arterial pressure decreased between 20 and 30% below awake values both before and after skin incision in both age groups (P less than 0.01). We conclude that the MAC of isoflurane in preterm neonates less than 32 weeks gestation is significantly less than that in preterm neonates 32-37 weeks gestation, and that systolic arterial pressure decreases to a similar extent at approximately 1 MAC isoflurane in both age groups.

  2. Determination of the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in llamas.

    PubMed

    Mama, K R; Wagner, A E; Parker, D A; Hellyer, P W; Gaynor, J S

    1999-01-01

    To determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane (ISO) in llamas. Prospective study. Eight adult neutered male llamas (9 +/- 1 years [x +/- SD], 177 +/- 29 kg). Anesthesia was induced and maintained in otherwise unmedicated llamas with a mixture of ISO in oxygen administered through a standard small-animal, semi-closed circle system using an out-of-circle, agent-specific vaporizer. The time from mask placement to intubation was recorded. Inspired and end-tidal (ET) ISO was sampled continuously. At each anesthetic concentration, a constant ET ISO was maintained for at least 20 minutes before application of a noxious electrical stimulus (50 volts, 5 Hz, 10 ms for up to 1 minute). A positive or negative response to the stimulus was recorded, and ET ISO then increased (if positive response) or decreased (if negative response) by 10% to 20%. Individual MAC was the average of multiple determinations. Body temperature was maintained at 37 +/- 1 degrees C. Selected cardiopulmonary variables (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], arterial blood pressure [ABP]) and ET ISO were recorded at hourly intervals from first ISO. Arterial blood was collected for pH, PCO2, PO2 analysis and measurement of packed cell volume (PCV) and total protein (TP) at 2 hour intervals. Following MAC determination, the anesthetic was discontinued and llamas were allowed to recover. Duration and quality of recovery were noted. The time from start of induction by mask to completion of intubation took 19.1 +/- 4.8 minutes. The MAC of ISO corrected to one atmosphere at sea level (barometric pressure 760 mm Hg) in these llamas was 1.05 +/- 0.17%. Mean ABP increased from 70 +/- 26 mm Hg at the end of the first hour of anesthesia to 102 +/- 7 mm Hg measured at the end of the sixth hour of anesthesia. ET ISO decreased from 2.06 +/- 0.10% to 1.27 +/- 0.07% over the same time period, but MAC did not change with time. The duration from first ISO to discontinuation of ISO averaged 6

  3. Corresponding minimum alveolar concentrations of isoflurane and isoflurane/nitrous oxide have divergent effects on thalamic nociceptive signalling.

    PubMed

    Vahle-Hinz, C; Detsch, O; Hackner, C; Kochs, E

    2007-02-01

    Suppression of nociceptive signalling in the thalamus is considered to contribute significantly to the anaesthetic state. Assuming additivity of anaesthetic mixtures, our study assessed the effects of corresponding minimum alveolar concentrations (MACs) of isoflurane and isoflurane/nitrous oxide on thalamic nociceptive signalling. Nociceptive response activity (elicited by controlled radiant heat stimuli applied to cutaneous receptive fields) of single thalamic neurons was compared in rats anaesthetized at approximately 1.1 and approximately 1.4 MAC isoflurane with that at approximately 1.1 and approximately 1.4 MAC isoflurane/nitrous oxide. Under baseline anaesthesia ( approximately 0.9 MAC isoflurane), noxious stimulation elicited excitatory responses in all neurons (n = 19). These responses were uniformly suppressed at approximately 1.1 and approximately 1.4 MAC isoflurane. In contrast, at approximately 1.1 and approximately 1.4 MAC isoflurane/nitrous oxide, excitatory responses no different to baseline were still present in 64 and 37% of the neurons, respectively. These data demonstrate a pronounced nitrous oxide-induced response variability. It appears that, with respect to thalamic transfer of nociceptive information, the interaction of isoflurane and nitrous oxide may not be compatible with the concept of additivity and that the antinociceptive potency of nitrous oxide is considerably less than previously reported.

  4. Effects of fentanyl on isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration and cardiovascular function in mechanically ventilated goats.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T B; Stegmann, G F; Dzikiti, L N; Hellebrekers, L J

    2011-04-23

    The effects of fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane and cardiovascular function in mechanically ventilated goats were evaluated using six healthy goats (three does and three wethers). Following induction of general anaesthesia with isoflurane delivered via a mask, endotracheal intubation was performed and anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane. The baseline MAC of isoflurane (that is, the lowest alveolar concentration required to prevent gross purposeful movement) in response to clamping a claw with a vulsellum forceps was determined. Immediately after baseline isoflurane MAC determination, the goats received, on separate occasions, one of three fentanyl treatments, administered intravenously: a bolus of 0.005 mg/kg followed by constant rate infusion (CRI) of 0.005 mg/kg/hour (treatment LFENT), a bolus of 0.015 mg/kg followed by CRI of 0.015 mg/kg/hour (treatment MFENT) or a bolus of 0.03 mg/kg followed by CRI of 0.03 mg/kg/hour (treatment HFENT). Isoflurane MAC was redetermined during the fentanyl CRI treatments. Cardiopulmonary parameters were monitored. A four-week washout period was allowed between treatments. The observed baseline isoflurane MAC was 1.32 (1.29 to 1.36) per cent. Isoflurane MAC decreased to 0.98 (0.92 to 1.01) per cent, 0.75 (0.69 to 0.79) per cent and 0.58 (0.51 to 0.65) per cent following LFENT, MFENT and HFENT respectively. Cardiovascular function was not adversely affected. The quality of recovery from general anaesthesia was good, although exaggerated tail-wagging was observed in some goats following MFENT and HFENT.

  5. Relationship of feline bispectral index to multiples of isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Leigh A; Greene, Stephen A; Grimm, Kurt A; Tranquilli, William J

    2005-06-01

    The study reported here was done to determine the relationship between bispectral index (BIS) values and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) multiples of isoflurane in cats. Isoflurane MAC was determined using the tail-clamp method in eight domestic cats. Ten days later, the cats were anesthetized a second time with isoflurane at each of five MAC multiples administered in random order. Ventilation was controlled and, after a 20-min equilibration period at each MAC multiple of isoflurane, BIS data were collected for 5 min and the median BIS value calculated. Data from each isoflurane MAC multiple were compared using analysis of variance for repeated measures, and statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The MAC of isoflurane (mean +/- 1 standard deviation) was 1.8% +/- 0.2%. BIS values at 0.5 MAC could not be recorded due to spontaneous movement in all eight cats. BIS values at 2.0 MAC were confounded by burst suppression in seven of the eight cats. Over the range of 0.8 to 1.5 MAC, BIS values decreased significantly with increasing end-tidal isoflurane concentrations. Mean (+/- 1 standard deviation) BIS measurements were 32 +/- 3 at 0.8 MAC, 20 +/- 4 at 1.0 MAC, and 5 +/- 3 at 1.5 MAC. Therefore, BIS values are inversely and linearly related to end-tidal isoflurane concentrations in anesthetized cats. However, the consistently low BIS values recorded in this study suggest that clinical BIS endpoints used to titrate anesthetic agents in humans may not be applicable to cats.

  6. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and hemodynamic effects of halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane in newborn swine.

    PubMed

    Lerman, J; Oyston, J P; Gallagher, T M; Miyasaka, K; Volgyesi, G A; Burrows, F A

    1990-10-01

    To determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and hemodynamic responses to halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane in newborn swine, 36 fasting swine 4-10 days of age were anesthetized with one of the three volatile anesthetics in 100% oxygen. MAC was determined for each swine. Carotid artery and internal jugular catheters were inserted and each swine was allowed to recover for 48 h. After recovery, heart rate (HR), systemic systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and cardiac index (CI) were measured awake and then at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 MAC of the designated anesthetic in random sequence. The (mean +/- SD) MAC for halothane was 0.90 +/- 0.12%; the MAC for isoflurane was 1.48 +/- 0.21%; and the MAC for sevoflurane was 2.12 +/- 0.39%. Awake (mean +/- SD) measurements of HR, SAP, and CI did not differ significantly among the three groups. Compared to the awake HR, the mean HR decreased 35% at 1.5 MAC halothane (P less than 0.001), 19% at 1.5 MAC isoflurane (P less than 0.005), and 31% at 1.5 MAC sevoflurane (P less than 0.005). Compared to awake SAP, mean SAP measurements decreased 46% at 1.5 MAC halothane (P less than 0.001), 43% at 1.5 MAC isoflurane (P less than 0.001), and 36% at 1.5 MAC sevoflurane (P less than 0.005). Mean SAP at 1.0 and 1.5 MAC halothane and isoflurane were significantly less than those measured at equipotent concentrations of sevoflurane (P less than 0.005). Compared to awake CI, mean CI measurements decreased 53% at 1.5 MAC halothane (P less than 0.001) and 43% at 1.5 MAC isoflurane (P less than 0.005).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Minimum Alveolar Concentration and Cardiopulmonary Effects of Isoflurane in Ring-tailed Lemurs (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Balko, Julie A; Williams, Cathy V

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and cardiopulmonary effects of isoflurane in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). The MAC of isoflurane was determined by using a tail-clamp stimulus in adult ring-tailed lemurs (6 male, 4 female). Once MAC was determined, another group of 10 adult ring-tailed lemurs (5 male, 5 female) were anesthetized and instrumented similarly as the previous group and maintained at 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 times MAC for 15 min each with no external stimulation. Five lemurs were exposed to increasing concentrations (that is, 0.5 times MAC increasing to 2 times MAC), and the other 5 animals were exposed to decreasing concentrations. MAC of isoflurane for ringtailed lemurs was 1.9%. The animals became hypotensive, but no significant differences were found in heart rate or systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressures at the different multiples of MAC examined. At 1 MAC, all lemurs developed a moderate respiratory acidosis, which became more severe at 2 MAC. Given these findings, isoflurane at 0.5 to 2 times MAC in ringtailed lemurs does not result in predictable depression of blood pressure, but hypoventilation occurs at 1 MAC or greater.

  8. Brainstem Regions Affecting Minimum Alveolar Concentration and Movement Pattern during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jinks, Steven L.; Bravo, Milo; Satter, Omar; Chan, Yuet-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Background Spinal transection or selective delivery of volatile anesthetics to the spinal cord reduces minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), whereas precollicular decerebration does not. The authors sought to determine which brainstem regions influence anesthetic requirements and movement responses with isoflurane. Methods Movement (biceps femoris electromyogram) and MAC were measured in adult rats before and after decerebration at the precollicular, mid-collicular, pontine or medullary level, or decerebellation. Additional experiments assessed the effects of lidocaine inactivation of the mesencephalic locomotor region on MAC and the effects of isoflurane on nociceptive neuronal responses in this region. Results Transections placed at the level of the mid-colliculus, rostral pons, and pontomedullary junction significantly reduced MAC by approximately 10, 40, and 45%, respectively. MAC was decreased 9% after mid-medullary transections that were placed caudal to the nucleus raphe magnus but rostral to the dorsal reticular nucleus; however, only weak, single movements occurred. Caudal medullary transections at the obex decreased MAC by 60%. Bilateral inactivation of the mesencephalic locomotor region with lidocaine caused a reversible, 32% decrease in MAC and reduced the number and amplitude of movements at sub-MAC isoflurane concentrations. Neuronal responses of mesencephalic locomotor region neurons to supramaximal noxious tail clamp were reduced by 87% by 1.2 MAC isoflurane. Conclusions The authors conclude that the mesencephalic locomotor region influences anesthetic requirements and promotes repetitive movement with sub-MAC isoflurane by facilitating ventral spinal locomotor circuits, where anesthetics seem to exert their key immobilizing effects. However, net brainstem influences on MAC seem to result from interaction among descending nociceptive and locomotor modulatory pathways. PMID:20098133

  9. Minimum alveolar concentration-awake of Xenon alone and in combination with isoflurane or sevoflurane.

    PubMed

    Goto, T; Nakata, Y; Ishiguro, Y; Niimi, Y; Suwa, K; Morita, S

    2000-11-01

    The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC)-awake is a traditional index of hypnotic potency of an inhalational anesthetic. The MAC-awake of xenon, an inert gas with anesthetic properties (MAC = 71%), has not been determined. It is also unknown how xenon interacts with isoflurane or sevoflurane on the MAC-awake. In the first part of the study, 90 female patients received xenon, nitrous oxide (N2O), isoflurane, or sevoflurane supplemented with epidural anesthesia (n = 36 for xenon and n = 18 per group for other anesthetics). In the second part, 72 additional patients received either xenon or N2O combined with the 0.5 times MAC-awake concentration of isoflurane or sevoflurane (0.2% and 0.3%, respectively, based on the results of the first part; n = 18 per group). During emergence, the concentration of an assigned anesthetic (xenon or N2O only in the second part) was decreased in 0. 1 MAC decrements every 15 min from 0.8 MAC or from 70% in the case of N2O until the patient followed the command to either open her eyes or to squeeze and release the investigator's hand. The concentration midway between the value permitting the first response to command and that just preventing it was defined as the MAC-awake. The MAC-awake were as follows: xenon, 32.6 +/- 6.1% (mean +/- SD) or 0.46 +/- 0.09 MAC; N2O, 63.3 +/- 7.1% (0.61 +/- 0.07 MAC); isoflurane, 0.40 +/- 0.07% (0.35 +/- 0.06 MAC); and sevoflurane, 0.59 +/- 0.10% (0.35 +/- 0.06 MAC). Addition of the 0.5 MAC-awake concentrations of isoflurane and sevoflurane reduced the MAC-awake of xenon to 0.50 +/- 0.15 and 0.51 +/- 0.16 times its MAC-awake as a sole agent, but that of N2O to the values significantly greater than 0.5 times its MAC-awake as a sole agent (0.68 +/- 0.12 and 0.66 +/- 0.14 times MAC-awake; P < 0.01, analysis of variance and Dunnett's test). The MAC-awake of xenon is 33% or 0.46 times its MAC. In terms of the MAC-fraction, this is smaller than that for N2O but greater than those for isoflurane and sevoflurane

  10. Effects of fentanyl on isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Barter, Linda S; Hawkins, Michelle G; Pypendop, Bruno H

    2015-02-01

    To determine effects of increasing plasma fentanyl concentrations on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in rabbits. 6 adult female New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Rabbits were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen; ventilation was controlled and body temperature maintained between 38.5° and 39.5°C. Fentanyl was administered IV by use of a computer-controlled infusion system to achieve 6 target plasma concentrations. Isoflurane MAC was determined in duplicate by use of the bracketing technique with a supramaximal electrical stimulus. Blood samples were collected for measurement of plasma fentanyl concentration at each MAC determination. The MAC values were analyzed with a repeated-measures ANOVA followed by Holm-Sidak pairwise comparisons. Mean ± SD plasma fentanyl concentrations were 0 ± 0 ng/mL (baseline), 1.2 ± 0.1 ng/mL, 2.2 ± 0.3 ng/mL, 4.4 ± 0.4 ng/mL, 9.2 ± 0.4 ng/mL, 17.5 ± 2.6 ng/mL, and 36.8 ± 2.4 ng/mL. Corresponding mean values for isoflurane MAC were 1.92 ± 0.16%, 1.80 ± 0.16%, 1.60 ± 0.23%, 1.46 ± 0.22%, 1.12 ± 0.19%, 0.89 ± 0.14%, and 0.70 ± 0.15%, respectively. Isoflurane MAC for plasma fentanyl concentrations ≥ 2.2 ng/mL differed significantly from the baseline value. In 3 rabbits, excessive spontaneous movement prevented MAC determination at the highest plasma fentanyl concentration. Fentanyl reduced isoflurane MAC by approximately 60% in New Zealand White rabbits. Further studies will be needed to investigate the cardiorespiratory effects of isoflurane and fentanyl combinations in rabbits; however, fentanyl may prove to be a useful adjunct to inhalation anesthesia in this species.

  11. Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine and Their Combination Reduce Isoflurane Minimum Alveolar Concentration in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Chavez, Julio R.; Gutierrez-Blanco, Eduardo; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Victoria-Mora, José M.; Tendillo-Cortijo, Francisco; Santos-González, Martín; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination delivered as a bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI) on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MACISO) in dogs were evaluated. Seven healthy adult dogs were included. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. For each dog, baseline MAC (MACISO/BASAL) was determined after a 90-minute equilibration period. Thereafter, each dog received one of the following treatments (loading dose, CRI): lidocaine 2 mg kg−1, 100 µg kg−1 minute−1; dexmedetomidine 2 µg kg−1, 2 µg kg−1 hour−1; or their combination. MAC was then determined again after 45- minutes of treatment by CRI. At the doses administered, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination significantly reduced MACISO by 27.3% (range: 12.5–39.2%), 43.4% (33.3–53.3%) and 60.9% (46.1–78.1%), respectively, when compared to MACISO/BASAL. The combination resulted in a greater MACISO reduction than the two drugs alone. Their use, at the doses studied, provides a clinically important reduction in the concentration of ISO during anaesthesia in dogs. PMID:25232737

  12. Effects of isoflurane upon minimum alveolar concentration and cerebral cortex depression in pigs and goats: an interspecies comparison.

    PubMed

    Haga, Henning A; Ranheim, Birgit; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2011-02-01

    This study compared the effects of isoflurane in pigs (n=10 Yorkshire-Landrace cross) and dairy goats (n=10) by evaluation of electroencephalographic (EEG) burst suppression thresholds (BST) in the cerebral cortex and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values in the spinal cord. The study also investigated whether individual MAC values can predict the effects of isoflurane on the cerebral cortex. MAC values and BST/MAC ratios were significantly different between species. Inhibition of movement by isoflurane may be less effective in pigs than in goats. No significant correlation was found between individual MAC and BST values, indicating that in single animals the individual MAC poorly reflects the cerebrocortical depressant effect of isoflurane in pigs and goats.

  13. Isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration sparing effects of fentanyl in the dog.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Allan J; Soares, Joao H N; Pavlisko, Noah D; McAlister Council-Troche, Robert; Henao-Guerrero, Natalia

    2017-02-22

    To characterize the isoflurane-sparing effects of a high and a low dose of fentanyl in dogs, and its effects on mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Prospective, randomized crossover trial. Eight healthy male Beagle dogs weighing 12.1 ± 1.6 kg [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] and approximate age 1 year. Dogs were anesthetized using isoflurane and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was determined in duplicate by the bracketing method using an electrical stimulus on the tarsus. Animals were administered fentanyl: low dose (33 μg kg(-1) loading dose, 0.2 μg kg(-1) minute(-1)) or high dose (102 μg kg(-1) loading dose, 0.8 μg kg(-1) minute(-1)) and MAC was re-determined (MACISO-F). Blood was collected for analysis of plasma fentanyl concentrations before administration and after MACISO-F determination. All values are presented as mean ± SD. Isoflurane MAC (MACISO) was 1.30 ± 0.23% in the low dose treatment, which significantly decreased to 0.75 ± 0.22% (average MAC reduction 42.3 ± 9.4%). MACISO was 1.30 ± 0.18% in the high dose treatment, which significantly decreased to 0.30 ± 0.11% (average MAC reduction 76.9 ± 7.4%). Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations were 6.2 and 29.5 ng mL(-1) for low and high dose treatments, respectively. MAP increased significantly only in the high dose treatment (from 81 ± 8 to 92 ± 9 mmHg). HR decreased significantly in both treatments from 108 ± 25 to 61 ± 14 beats minute(-1) with the low dose and from 95 ± 14 to 42 ± 4 beats minute(-1) with the high dose. Fentanyl administration resulted in a dose-dependent isoflurane MAC-sparing effect with bradycardia at both doses and an increase in MAP only at high dose. Further evaluation is needed to determine the effects of fentanyl on the overall cardiovascular function. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  14. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Julio R.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). Results The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% ± 0.04%, 0.99% ± 0.009%, 0.97% ± 0.02%, and 0.99% ± 0.01%, respectively. Conclusions The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane. PMID:26605541

  15. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Julio R; Ibancovichi, José A; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% ± 0.04%, 0.99% ± 0.009%, 0.97% ± 0.02%, and 0.99% ± 0.01%, respectively. The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane.

  16. Effect of morphine and flunixin meglumine on isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in goats.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Tom J; Will, Whitney A; Rohrbach, Barton W; Geiser, Dennis R

    2004-04-01

    To determine the effect of morphine and flunixin meglumine on isoflurane (ISO) minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in goats. Prospective, randomized experimental study. Five adult, wether goats from 1 to 3 years in age, and weighing 24-65 kg. Anesthesia was induced using ISO, which was delivered via a mask. Goats were intubated and ventilated to maintain an end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration between 25 and 30 mm Hg (3.3-4 kPa). End-tidal ISO concentration was measured using an infrared analyzer. The baseline ISO MAC that prevented purposeful movement in response to clamping a claw was determined. Following baseline MAC determination, each goat received one of the following four treatments intravenously (IV): morphine (2 mg kg(-1)), flunixin (1.5 mg kg(-1)), flunixin (1.5 mg kg(-1)) plus morphine (2 mg kg(-1)) or saline, and the MAC was re-determined. Goats were studied at weekly intervals, and each goat received each treatment in a randomized fashion. The baseline ISO MAC for the control treatment was 1.43%. Morphine reduced the MAC by 29.7%. Flunixin did not significantly decrease the MAC nor did it potentiate the effect of morphine on MAC. The quality of recovery was good in all cases. Morphine (2 mg kg(-1), IV) significantly reduced the ISO MAC in goats and did not adversely affect the quality of recovery. The use of morphine, at the dose studied, in association with ISO anesthesia, will allow a clinically significant reduction in the concentration of ISO required to maintain general anesthesia in goats.

  17. Effect of mepivacaine in an infraorbital nerve block on minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in clinically normal anesthetized dogs undergoing a modified form of dental dolorimetry.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Christopher J; Snyder, Lindsey B C

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the effects of a routinely used infraorbital nerve block, performed for dental procedures, on the anesthetic requirement for isoflurane in dogs. Prospective controlled study. 8 healthy adult Beagles. Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane, and the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane was established. A modification of a well-established method of stimulating the dental pulp, dental dolorimetry, was used to deliver a noxious stimulus (electrical stimulation) for isoflurane MAC determination. Once the isoflurane MAC was established, an infraorbital nerve block was performed with mepivacaine. The isoflurane MAC was then determined with the addition of the nerve block. Measurements of heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were obtained at specified time points (baseline and prevention and elicitation of purposeful movement) during the determination of MAC and in response to the noxious stimulus. The mean ± SD isoflurane MAC without an infraorbital nerve block was 1.12 ± 0.13%. Isoflurane MAC with the regional mepivacaine anesthesia was 0.86 ± 0.11%. A significant reduction in isoflurane MAC (23%) was seen after the infraorbital nerve block, compared with results before the nerve block. With the exception of baseline measurements, no significant differences were found between treatments (isoflurane alone vs isoflurane with regional mepivacaine anesthesia) in heart rate or mean arterial blood pressure before or after the noxious stimulus. The significant reduction in MAC of isoflurane supported the practice of the addition of regional anesthesia for painful dental procedures to reduce the dose-dependent cardiorespiratory effects of general anesthesia.

  18. Comparison of the effects of epidural or intravenous methadone on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Campagnol, Daniela; Teixeira-Neto, Francisco J; Peccinini, Rosangela G; Oliveira, Flávia A; Alvaides, Renata K; Medeiros, Luiza Q

    2012-06-01

    The effects of epidural and intravenous (IV) methadone (0.5mg/kg) on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (ISO(MAC)) were compared in dogs. Six dogs (16.5 ± 2.5 kg bodyweight) received three treatments in random order during isoflurane anaesthesia, with a 7 day washout interval between each study. Methadone was injected via a lumbosacral epidural catheter introduced 10 cm cranially into the epidural canal and the electrical stimulation for ISO(MAC) determination was applied either to the thoracic (EP(T) treatment) or to the pelvic limb (EP(P) treatment) during separate study days. In the IV treatment, ISO(MAC) was determined via electrical stimulation of the pelvic limb. Variables were recorded before (baseline), 2.5 and 5h after drug injection. The ISO(MAC) decreased significantly (P<0.05) from baseline at 2.5 and 5h after methadone in all treatments. At 2.5h, the magnitude of ISO(MAC) reduction did not differ between treatments (mean decreases from baseline: 30-33%). The ISO(MAC) reduction lasted longer following epidural methadone in the thoracic limb (decreases from baseline: 30% at 5h in the EP(T) treatment vs. 19% and 16% in the EP(P) and IV treatments, respectively). Although the isoflurane sparing effect provided by epidural methadone was not significantly greater than IV methadone during the initial stage (2.5h), it was more prolonged than the IV route in specific dermatomes (5h in the thoracic limb) with the epidural technique employed. Methadone may therefore provide a greater isoflurane sparing effect when administered epidurally, compared to IV, when noxious stimulation occurs in specific dermatomes.

  19. Prior determination of baseline minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane does not influence the effect of ketamine on MAC in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Gianotti, Giacomo; Valverde, Alexander; Sinclair, Melissa; Dyson, Doris H.; Gibson, Thomas; Johnson, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane when ketamine was administered either after or without prior determination of the baseline MAC of isoflurane in rabbits. Using a prospective randomized crossover study, 8 adult, female New Zealand rabbits were allocated to 2 treatment groups. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane. Group 1 (same-day determination) had the MAC-sparing effect of ketamine [1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI) of 40 μg/kg BW per min, given by intravenous (IV)], which was determined after the baseline MAC of isoflurane was determined beforehand. A third MAC determination was started 30 min after stopping the CRI. Group 2 (separate-day determination) had the MAC-sparing effect of ketamine determined without previous determination of the baseline MAC of isoflurane. A second MAC determination was started 30 min after stopping the CRI. In group 1, the MAC of isoflurane (2.15 ± 0.09%) was significantly decreased by ketamine (1.63 ± 0.07%). After stopping the CRI, the MAC was significantly less (2.04 ± 0.11%) than the baseline MAC of isoflurane and significantly greater than the MAC during the CRI. In group 2, ketamine decreased isoflurane MAC (1.53 ± 0.22%) and the MAC increased significantly (1.94 ± 0.25%) after stopping the CRI. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values did not differ significantly between the groups either during ketamine administration or after stopping ketamine. Under the study conditions, prior determination of the baseline isoflurane MAC did not alter the effect of ketamine on MAC. Both methods of determining MAC seemed to be valid for research purposes. PMID:23543951

  20. Prior determination of baseline minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane does not influence the effect of ketamine on MAC in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Giacomo; Valverde, Alexander; Sinclair, Melissa; Dyson, Doris H; Gibson, Thomas; Johnson, Ron

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane when ketamine was administered either after or without prior determination of the baseline MAC of isoflurane in rabbits. Using a prospective randomized crossover study, 8 adult, female New Zealand rabbits were allocated to 2 treatment groups. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane. Group 1 (same-day determination) had the MAC-sparing effect of ketamine [1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI) of 40 μg/kg BW per min, given by intravenous (IV)], which was determined after the baseline MAC of isoflurane was determined beforehand. A third MAC determination was started 30 min after stopping the CRI. Group 2 (separate-day determination) had the MAC-sparing effect of ketamine determined without previous determination of the baseline MAC of isoflurane. A second MAC determination was started 30 min after stopping the CRI. In group 1, the MAC of isoflurane (2.15 ± 0.09%) was significantly decreased by ketamine (1.63 ± 0.07%). After stopping the CRI, the MAC was significantly less (2.04 ± 0.11%) than the baseline MAC of isoflurane and significantly greater than the MAC during the CRI. In group 2, ketamine decreased isoflurane MAC (1.53 ± 0.22%) and the MAC increased significantly (1.94 ± 0.25%) after stopping the CRI. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values did not differ significantly between the groups either during ketamine administration or after stopping ketamine. Under the study conditions, prior determination of the baseline isoflurane MAC did not alter the effect of ketamine on MAC. Both methods of determining MAC seemed to be valid for research purposes.

  1. The effect of remifentanil on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ben-zhen; Chu, Qin-jun; Yu, Jing-rui; Yao, Yu-sheng; Tan, Ling

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of remifentanil on the isoflurane end-tidal concentration required to eliminate movement reaction upon surgical incision in children. Prospective, double blinded, serial study. Operating room of a university-affiliated hospital. Patients of ASA status 1 or 2, aged 4 to 7 years, scheduled for either inguinal hernia repair or orchidopexy surgery with general anesthesia. After endotracheal intubation, 108 children serially received 1 of 6 dose (nil, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, or 0.25 μg kg(-1) min(-1)) of remifentanil. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was adjusted according to a Dixon's up-and-down approach. Twenty-five minutes after starting the remifentanil infusion, the surgical incision was performed. The response of patients was classified as either "response" or "no response." Response was defined as a purposeful response in response to skin incision. The MAC of isoflurane were 1.50 ± 0.16%, 1.33 ± 0.27%, 0.93 ± 0.13%, 0.73 ± 0.27%, 0.63 ± 0.19%, and 0.60 ± 0.15% for remifentanil infusion rates of nil, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 μg kg(-1) min(-1), respectively. The MAC of isoflurane decreased with increasing infusion rate of remifentanil, showing an initial step reduction followed by a ceiling effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of nitrous oxide on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and MAC derivatives of isoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Voulgaris, Debra A; Egger, Christine M; Seddighi, M Reza; Rohrbach, Barton W; Love, Lydia C; Doherty, Thomas J

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of 70% nitrous oxide (N2O) on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane (ISO) that prevents purposeful movement, the MAC of ISO at which there is no motor movement (MACNM), and the MAC of ISO at which autonomic responses are blocked (MACBAR) in dogs. Six adult, healthy, mixed-breed, intact male dogs were anesthetized with ISO delivered via mask. Baseline MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR of ISO were determined for each dog using a supra-maximal electrical stimulus (50 V, 50 Hz, 10 ms). Nitrous oxide (70%) was then administered and MAC and its derivatives (N2O-MAC, N2O-MACNM, and N2O-MACBAR) were determined using the same methodology. The values for baseline MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR were 1.39 ± 0.14, 1.59 ± 0.10, and 1.72 ± 0.16, respectively. The addition of 70% N2O decreased MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR by 32%, 15%, and 25%, respectively.

  3. Influence of prior determination of baseline minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane on the effect of ketamine on MAC in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Giacomo; Valverde, Alexander; Johnson, Ron; Sinclair, Melissa; Gibson, Thomas; Dyson, Doris H

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if prior measurement of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane influences the effect of ketamine on the MAC of isoflurane in dogs. Eight mixed-breed dogs were studied on 2 occasions. Anesthesia was induced and maintained using isoflurane. In group 1 the effect of ketamine on isoflurane MAC was determined after initially finding the baseline isoflurane MAC. In group 2, the effect of ketamine on isoflurane MAC was determined without previous measure of the baseline isoflurane MAC. In both groups, MAC was determined again 30 min after stopping the CRI of ketamine. Plasma ketamine concentrations were measured during MAC determinations. In group 1, baseline MAC (mean ± SD: 1.18 ± 0.14%) was decreased by ketamine (0.88 ± 0.14%; P < 0.05). The MAC after stopping ketamine was similar (1.09 ± 0.16%) to baseline MAC and higher than with ketamine (P < 0.05). In group 2, the MAC with ketamine (0.79 ± 0.11%) was also increased after stopping ketamine (1.10 ± 0.17%; P < 0.05). The MAC values with ketamine were different between groups (P < 0.05). Ketamine plasma concentrations were similar between groups during the events of MAC determination. The MAC of isoflurane during the CRI of ketamine yielded different results when methods of same day (group-1) versus separate days (group-2) are used, despite similar plasma ketamine concentrations with both methods. However, because the magnitude of this difference was less than 10%, either method of determining MAC is deemed acceptable for research purposes.

  4. Influence of prior determination of baseline minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane on the effect of ketamine on MAC in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gianotti, Giacomo; Valverde, Alexander; Johnson, Ron; Sinclair, Melissa; Gibson, Thomas; Dyson, Doris H.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if prior measurement of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane influences the effect of ketamine on the MAC of isoflurane in dogs. Eight mixed-breed dogs were studied on 2 occasions. Anesthesia was induced and maintained using isoflurane. In group 1 the effect of ketamine on isoflurane MAC was determined after initially finding the baseline isoflurane MAC. In group 2, the effect of ketamine on isoflurane MAC was determined without previous measure of the baseline isoflurane MAC. In both groups, MAC was determined again 30 min after stopping the CRI of ketamine. Plasma ketamine concentrations were measured during MAC determinations. In group 1, baseline MAC (mean ± SD: 1.18 ± 0.14%) was decreased by ketamine (0.88 ± 0.14%; P < 0.05). The MAC after stopping ketamine was similar (1.09 ± 0.16%) to baseline MAC and higher than with ketamine (P < 0.05). In group 2, the MAC with ketamine (0.79 ± 0.11%) was also increased after stopping ketamine (1.10 ± 0.17%; P < 0.05). The MAC values with ketamine were different between groups (P < 0.05). Ketamine plasma concentrations were similar between groups during the events of MAC determination. The MAC of isoflurane during the CRI of ketamine yielded different results when methods of same day (group-1) versus separate days (group-2) are used, despite similar plasma ketamine concentrations with both methods. However, because the magnitude of this difference was less than 10%, either method of determining MAC is deemed acceptable for research purposes. PMID:24982552

  5. Determination of minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs and cats using the up-and-down method. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Michele; Quandt, Jane; Hofmeister, Erik

    2016-06-01

    Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) is a reliable measurement of the potency of inhaled anesthetic agents. The determination of MAC in different species has followed a fairly consistent methodology. In people, MAC is determined with the up-and-down method, whereas in animal the bracketing technique is commonly used. The objectives of this study were to determine the MAC value of isoflurane in dogs and cats using the up-and-down method and to determine the MAC value of isoflurane at extubation (MACex). General anesthesia was induced in 13 dogs and 5 cats with 5% isoflurane in oxygen. An initial end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.3% was used for the first dog and of 1.6% for the first cat and maintained constant for ≥20min. A noxious stimulus in the form of Carmalt forceps was applied to the base of the tail for no more than one minute or until movement was noticed. After stimulation, the response was recorded as positive (movement) or negative (no movement) and the animal was recovered. The end-tidal isoflurane concentration of the following animal was increased or decreased by 0.1% if the response of the previous animal to the stimulus was negative or positive, respectively. Isoflurane MAC values in dogs were 1.27% and 1.23%. Isoflurane MAC value in cats was 1.58%. MACex value was 0.45% in dogs and in cats. The up-and-down method for MAC determination achieved similar results when compared to MAC values of isoflurane in dogs and cats reported in the literature using the bracketing technique.

  6. Effects of lidocaine administration via continuous rate infusion on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Schnellbacher, Rodney W; Carpenter, James W; Mason, Diane E; KuKanich, Butch; Beaufrère, Hugues; Boysen, Courtney

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of a continuous rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in rabbits. Five 12-month-old female New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Rabbits were anesthetized with isoflurane. Baseline isoflurane MAC was determined by use of the tail clamp technique. A loading dose of lidocaine (2.0 mg/kg, IV) was administered followed by a CRI of lidocaine at 50 μg/kg/min. After 30 minutes, isoflurane MAC was determined. Another loading dose was administered, and the lidocaine CRI then was increased to 100 μg/kg/min. After 30 minutes, isoflurane MAC was determined again. Plasma samples were obtained for lidocaine analysis after each MAC determination. Baseline isoflurane MAC was 2.09%, which was similar to previously reported values in this species. Lidocaine CRI at 50 and 100 μg/kg/min induced significant reductions in MAC. The 50 μg/kg/min CRI resulted in a mean plasma lidocaine concentration of 0.654 μg/mL and reduction of MAC by 10.5%. The 100 μg/kg/min CRI of lidocaine resulted in a mean plasma concentration of 1.578 μg/mL and reduction of MAC by 21.7%. Lidocaine also induced significant decreases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate. All cardiopulmonary variables were within reference ranges for rabbits anesthetized with inhalation anesthetics. No adverse effects were detected; all rabbits had an uncomplicated recovery from anesthesia. Lidocaine administered as a CRI at 50 and 100 μg/kg/min decreased isoflurane MAC in rabbits. The IV administration of lidocaine may be a useful adjunct in anesthesia of rabbits.

  7. The effect of multimodal analgesia on minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane for skin incision at constant bispectral index.

    PubMed

    Savitha, Keelara Shivalingaiah; Dhanpal, Radhika; Shilpa, J

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal analgesia (MMA) by synergy with volatile anesthetics minimizes their use thus decreasing operation theater pollution and greenhouse gas emission. To estimate minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) requirement of isoflurane (ISO) for skin incision with use of MMA in the study group versus conventional regime in the control group for a constant bispectral index (BIS). To observe the side effects of analgesic drugs administered in the study. Forty-two patients of American Society of Anesthesiologist Class I and II scheduled for lumbar spine surgery were included in this prospective, randomized, double-blind, clinical study. They were randomly allocated into two groups of 21 each. Group A (MMA group/study group) received injections diclofenac sodium, paracetamol, clonidine, and fentanyl and local infiltration (bupivacaine with adrenaline). Group B (conventional regime group/control group) received injections paracetamol and fentanyl and local infiltration (saline with adrenaline). Preemptive analgesia was practiced in the study. The MAC of ISO for skin incision was documented. Independent sample t-test: To compare MACISO for skin incision between the two groups. One sample t-test: To compare the standard mean concentration with the means of the two groups. Chi-square test: To compare adverse effects between the groups. P < 5% was considered statistically significant. The MACISO requirement was significantly lower in the study group at the time of skin incision for BIS of 50-55 compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Post extubation, 43% had nausea and 9% had vomiting in the control group. None of the patients in either group had intraoperative awareness. We conclude that preemptive MMA has synergistic effect with ISO. It effectively reduces MACISO to skin incision to a greater degree.

  8. The effect of multimodal analgesia on minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane for skin incision at constant bispectral index

    PubMed Central

    Savitha, Keelara Shivalingaiah; Dhanpal, Radhika; Shilpa, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multimodal analgesia (MMA) by synergy with volatile anesthetics minimizes their use thus decreasing operation theater pollution and greenhouse gas emission. Aims: To estimate minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) requirement of isoflurane (ISO) for skin incision with use of MMA in the study group versus conventional regime in the control group for a constant bispectral index (BIS). To observe the side effects of analgesic drugs administered in the study. Settings and Design: Forty-two patients of American Society of Anesthesiologist Class I and II scheduled for lumbar spine surgery were included in this prospective, randomized, double-blind, clinical study. They were randomly allocated into two groups of 21 each. Materials and Methods: Group A (MMA group/study group) received injections diclofenac sodium, paracetamol, clonidine, and fentanyl and local infiltration (bupivacaine with adrenaline). Group B (conventional regime group/control group) received injections paracetamol and fentanyl and local infiltration (saline with adrenaline). Preemptive analgesia was practiced in the study. The MAC of ISO for skin incision was documented. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent sample t-test: To compare MACISO for skin incision between the two groups. One sample t-test: To compare the standard mean concentration with the means of the two groups. Chi-square test: To compare adverse effects between the groups. P < 5% was considered statistically significant. Results: The MACISO requirement was significantly lower in the study group at the time of skin incision for BIS of 50–55 compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Post extubation, 43% had nausea and 9% had vomiting in the control group. None of the patients in either group had intraoperative awareness. Conclusion: We conclude that preemptive MMA has synergistic effect with ISO. It effectively reduces MACISO to skin incision to a greater degree. PMID:27746535

  9. Comparison of equi-minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane and isoflurane on bispectral index values during both wash in and wash out phases: A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhu; Shri, Iti; Sakia, Prashant; Govil, Deepika

    2015-02-01

    At equal minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), volatile agents may produce different bispectral index (BIS) values especially at low BIS levels when the effect is volatile agent specific. The present study was performed to compare the BIS values produced by sevoflurane and isoflurane at equal MAC and thereby assessing which is a better hypnotic agent. Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologists I and II patients undergoing elective mastoidectomy were divided into groups receiving either isoflurane or sevoflurane, and at equi-MAC. BIS value was measured during both wash in and wash out phase, keeping other parameters same. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman two-way analysis and Mann-Whitney U-test. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. BIS value was significantly lower with sevoflurane at all MAC values as compared to isoflurane, except in the beginning and at MAC awake. However, both the drugs proved to be cardiostable. At equi-MAC sevoflurane produces lower BIS values during wash in as well as wash out phase as compared to isoflurane, reflecting probably an agent specific effect and a deficiency in BIS algorithm for certain agents and their interplay.

  10. Comparison of equi-minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane and isoflurane on bispectral index values during both wash in and wash out phases: A prospective randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madhu; Shri, Iti; Sakia, Prashant; Govil, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: At equal minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), volatile agents may produce different bispectral index (BIS) values especially at low BIS levels when the effect is volatile agent specific. The present study was performed to compare the BIS values produced by sevoflurane and isoflurane at equal MAC and thereby assessing which is a better hypnotic agent. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologists I and II patients undergoing elective mastoidectomy were divided into groups receiving either isoflurane or sevoflurane, and at equi-MAC. BIS value was measured during both wash in and wash out phase, keeping other parameters same. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman two-way analysis and Mann-Whitney U-test. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: BIS value was significantly lower with sevoflurane at all MAC values as compared to isoflurane, except in the beginning and at MAC awake. However, both the drugs proved to be cardiostable. Conclusion: At equi-MAC sevoflurane produces lower BIS values during wash in as well as wash out phase as compared to isoflurane, reflecting probably an agent specific effect and a deficiency in BIS algorithm for certain agents and their interplay. PMID:25788739

  11. Evaluation of administration of isoflurane at approximately the minimum alveolar concentration on depression of a nociceptive withdrawal reflex evoked by transcutaneous electrical stimulation in ponies.

    PubMed

    Spadavecchia, Claudia; Levionnois, Olivier; Kronen, Peter W; Leandri, Massimo; Spadavecchia, Luciano; Schatzmann, Urs

    2006-05-01

    To investigate effects of isoflurane at approximately the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) on the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) of the forelimb of ponies as a method for quantifying anesthetic potency. 7 healthy adult Shetland ponies. Individual MAC (iMAC) for isoflurane was determined for each pony. Then, effects of isoflurane administered at 0.85, 0.95, and 1.05 iMAC on the NWR were assessed. At each concentration, the NWR threshold was defined electromyographically for the common digital extensor and deltoid muscles by stimulating the digital nerve; additional electrical stimulations (3, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mA) were delivered, and the evoked activity was recorded and analyzed. After the end of anesthesia, the NWR threshold was assessed in standing ponies. Mean +/- SD MAC of isoflurane was 1.0 +/- 0.2%. The NWR thresholds for both muscles increased significantly in a concentration-dependent manner during anesthesia, whereas they decreased in awake ponies. Significantly higher thresholds were found for the deltoid muscle, compared with thresholds for the common digital extensor muscle, in anesthetized ponies. At each iMAC tested, amplitudes of the reflex responses from both muscles increased as stimulus intensities increased from 3 to 40 mA. A concentration-dependent depression of evoked reflexes with reduction in slopes of the stimulus-response functions was detected. Anesthetic-induced changes in sensory-motor processing in ponies anesthetized with isoflurane at concentrations of approximately 1.0 MAC can be detected by assessment of NWR. This method will permit comparison of effects of inhaled anesthetics or anesthetic combinations on spinal processing in equids.

  12. Effects of intravenous administration of perzinfotel, fentanyl, and a combination of both drugs on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Yukie; Lerche, Phillip; Eppler, C Mark; Muir, William W

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE-To determine the effects of IV administration of perzinfotel and a perzinfotel-fentanyl combination on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in dogs. ANIMALS-6 healthy sexually intact Beagles (3 males and 3 females). PROCEDURES-All dogs were instrumented with a telemetry device for continuous monitoring of heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and core body temperature (at a femoral artery). Dogs were anesthetized with propofol (6 mg/kg, IV) and isoflurane. Isoflurane MAC values were determined in 3 experiments in each dog, separated by at least 7 days, before (baseline) and after the following treatments: no treatment (anesthetic only), perzinfotel (20 mg/kg, IV), fentanyl (5 microg/kg bolus, IV, followed by a continuous IV infusion at 0.15 microg/kg/min), and a fentanyl-perzinfotel combination (20 mg of perzinfotel/kg, IV, plus the fentanyl infusion). Bispectral index and oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry were also monitored throughout anesthesia. RESULTS-Without treatment, the mean +/- SD isoflurane MAC for all 6 dogs was 1.41 +/- 0.10%. Baseline MAC was 1.42 +/- 0.08%. Intravenous administration of perzinfotel, fentanyl, and the perzinfotel-fentanyl combination significantly decreased the MAC by 39%, 35%, and 66%, respectively. Perzinfotel and perzinfotel-fentanyl administration yielded significant increases in the bispectral index. Mean, systolic, and diastolic arterial blood pressures significantly increased from baseline values when perzinfotel was administered. Systolic arterial blood pressure significantly increased from the baseline value when perzinfotel-fentanyl was administered. No adverse effects were detected. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-IV administration of perzinfotel, fentanyl, or a perzinfotel-fentanyl combination reduced isoflurane MAC in dogs and increased arterial blood pressure.

  13. Prediction of movement following noxious stimulation during 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia by means of middle latency auditory evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Leistritz, L; Kochs, E; Galicki, M; Witte, H

    2002-06-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of generalized dynamic neural networks for the design of a two-valued anesthetic depth indicator during isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia. The indicator construction is based on the processing of middle latency auditory evoked responses (MLAER) in combination with the observation of the patient's movement reaction to skin incision. The framework of generalized dynamic neural networks does not require any data preprocessing, visual data inspection or subjective feature extraction. The study is based on a data set of 106 patients scheduled for elective surgery under isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia. The processing of the measured MLAER is performed by a recurrent neural network that transforms the MLAER signals into signals having a very uncomplex structure. The evaluation of these signals is self-evident, and yields to a simple threshold classifier. Using only evoked potentials before the pain stimulus, the patient's reaction could be predicted with a probability of 81.5%. The MLAER is closely associated to the patient's reaction to skin incision following noxious stimulation during 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia. In combination with other parameters, MLAER could contribute to an objective and trustworthy movement prediction to noxious stimulation.

  14. The effect of midazolam on the recovery quality, recovery time and the minimum alveolar concentration for extubation in the isoflurane-anesthetized pig.

    PubMed

    Kleine, S A; Quandt, J E; Hofmeister, E H; Peroni, J

    2015-04-01

    There are no reported studies evaluating the effect of midazolam on recovery quality, recovery time or minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) at which extubation occurs (MAC extubation). Our hypotheses were that midazolam administered prior to recovery would decrease MAC extubation, prolong recovery time but provide a smoother recovery. Sixteen Yorkshire pigs were anesthetized with isoflurane for approximately 5 h. The end-tidal isoflurane concentration was then stabilized at 1.4% for 20 min. Pigs were randomly assigned to receive midazolam or saline. The vaporizer was decreased by 10% every 10 min until extubation. Pigs were declared awake by a blinded observer and were assigned a recovery score by the same observer. Mean MAC extubation was not significantly different for pigs receiving saline prior to recovery compared with those pigs receiving midazolam. The overall mean MAC extubation for both groups was 0.6 ± 0.4 vol%. Time to extubation was not significantly longer with midazolam (124 ± 36 min) compared with the saline group (96 ± 61 min; P = 0.09). Recovery score was not significantly different between groups (midazolam, 0.86 ± 1.1; saline 0.5 ± 0.5; P = 0.26). In conclusion, midazolam did not affect MAC extubation. There was no advantage of administering midazolam in the recovery period when performing step-down titration of isoflurane anesthesia. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Drastic decrease in isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration and limb movement forces after thoracic spinal cooling and chronic spinal transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Jinks, Steven L; Dominguez, Carmen L; Antognini, Joseph F

    2005-03-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury may undergo multiple surgical procedures; however, it is not clear how spinal cord injury affects anesthetic requirements and movement force under anesthesia during both acute and chronic stages of the injury. The authors determined the isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) necessary to block movement in response to supramaximal noxious stimulation, as well as tail-flick and hind paw withdrawal latencies, before and up to 28 days after thoracic spinal transection. Tail-flick and hind paw withdrawal latencies were measured in the awake state to test for the presence of spinal shock or hyperreflexia. The authors measured limb forces elicited by noxious mechanical stimulation of a paw or the tail at 28 days after transection. Limb force experiments were also conducted in other animals that received a reversible spinal conduction block by cooling the spinal cord at the level of the eighth thoracic vertebra. A large decrease in MAC (to isoflurane were depressed or absent. However, at 80-90% of MAC, noxious stimulation of the hind paw elicited ipsilateral limb withdrawals in all animals. Hind limb forces were reduced (by >/= 90%) in both chronic and acute cold-block spinal animals. The immobilizing potency of isoflurane increases substantially after spinal transection, despite the absence of a baseline motor depression, or "spinal shock." Therefore, isoflurane MAC is determined by a spinal depressant action, possibly counteracted by a supraspinal facilitatory action. The partial recovery in MAC at later time points suggests that neuronal plasticity after spinal cord injury influences anesthetic requirements.

  16. Changes in the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane and some cardiopulmonary measurements during three continuous infusion rates of dexmedetomidine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Peter J; Raekallio, Marja; Kuusela, Erja; McKusick, Brett; Granholm, Mikael

    2006-03-01

    To measure the change in the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane associated with three constant rate infusions of dexmedetomidine. Prospective, randomized, and blinded experimental trial. Animals Six healthy 6-year-old Beagles weighing between 13.0 and 17.7 kg. The dogs received each of four treatments; saline or dexmedetomidine at 0.1, 0.5 or 3 microg kg(-1) loading dose given intravenously (IV) over 6 minutes followed by infusions at 0.1, 0.5 or 3 microg kg(-1) hour(-1), respectively. There were 2 weeks between treatments. The dogs were mask-induced with and maintained on isoflurane in oxygen. Acetated Ringer's (5 mL kg(-1) hour(-1)) and saline or dexmedetomidine (each at 0.5 mL kg(-1) hour(-1)) were given IV. Pulse rate, blood pressure, samples for the measurement of blood gases, pH, lactate, packed cell volume (PCV), total protein (TP) and dexmedetomidine concentrations were obtained from an arterial catheter. Sixty minutes after induction minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was determined by intermittently applying supramaximal electrical stimuli to the thoracic and pelvic limbs. Cardiopulmonary measurements and arterial blood samples were collected before each set of stimuli. Statistical analyses were conducted with analysis of variance or mixed models according to the experimental design. There was a significant decrease in the MAC of isoflurane associated with 0.5 and 3 microg kg(-1) hour(-1) but not with 0.1 mg kg(-1)hour(-1). Serum concentrations of dexmedetomidine were not measurable at the 0.1 mg kg(-1) hour(-1) and averaged 0.198 +/- 0.081 and 1.903 +/-0.621 ng mL(-1) for the 0.5 and 3 microg kg(-1) hour(-1) infusion rates, respectively. Heart rate decreased with increasing doses of dexmedetomidine while blood pressure increased. Packed cell volume increased at 3 microg kg(-1) hour(-1) but not with other doses. Dexmedetomidine infusions decrease the intra-operative requirement for isoflurane and may be useful in managing dogs undergoing

  17. Reduction of the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs using a constant rate of infusion of lidocaine-ketamine in combination with either morphine or fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Delia; Benito, Javier; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a constant rate of infusion of lidocaine and ketamine in combination with either morphine or fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MAC(ISO)) during ovariohysterectomy in dogs. Female dogs (n=44) were premedicated with acepromazine and midazolam. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. Dogs received ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/h) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/h) together with morphine (0.24 mg/kg/h; MLK) or fentanyl (0.0036 mg/kg/h; FLK). The control group received Ringer's lactate solution. A skin incision was used as the noxious stimulus. The MAC(ISO) value was obtained with Dixon's up-and-down method. MAC(ISO) was 0.7±0.0 vol.% in the control group, 0.3±0.0 vol.% in the MLK group (45% MAC reduction) and 0.0±0.0 vol.% in the FLK group (97% MAC reduction). A combination of fentanyl with lidocaine and ketamine decreased the MAC(ISO) in dogs; this decrease was more pronounced than that produced by morphine, lidocaine and ketamine.

  18. Influence of 0.1 minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane, desflurane and isoflurane on dynamic ventilatory response to hypercapnia in humans.

    PubMed

    van den Elsen, M; Sarton, E; Teppema, L; Berkenbosch, A; Dahan, A

    1998-02-01

    To assess the effects and site of action of a sub-anaesthetic concentration of isoflurane, desflurane and sevoflurane (0.1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC)) on respiratory control, we measured the ventilatory response to square wave changes in PE1CO2 against a background of normoxia. Using the computer steered "end-tidal forcing system", 2 min of steady state ventilation were followed by a step increase in PE1CO2 (1-1.5 kPa). This level was maintained for 8 min, followed by a step decrease to the original value for another 8 min. Each hypercapnic response was separated into a fast, peripheral component and a slow, central component, characterized by a time constant, carbon dioxide sensitivity, time delay and off-set. We studied 25 healthy volunteers; they performed 2-3 studies without and 2-3 studies during inhalation of the anaesthetic agent. Level of sedation was scored using a subjective seven-point scale from 0 (= alert and awake) to 6 (unrousable). In the isoflurane (16 subjects, 33 control, 37 drug studies) and sevoflurane (15 subjects, 40 control, 41 drug studies) studies, peripheral carbon dioxide sensitivity was reduced by approximately 45% and approximately 27% (ANOVA, P < 0.05 vs control), respectively, without affecting central carbon dioxide sensitivity or apnoeic threshold. In the desflurane study (16 subjects, 36 control, 37 drug studies), no significant effect was observed for any of the variables measured. A significant relation was observed between sedation score and change from control in central carbon dioxide sensitivities in the isoflurane and desflurane studies and in the change in the ratio peripheral carbon dioxide sensitivity over total carbon dioxide sensitivity in the sevoflurane studies. At the highest level of sedation observed (score 3-arousal state comparable with "light sleep"--in three subjects) these latter variables differed significantly from those in the other observed sedation levels (scores 1 and 2-a state of drowsiness

  19. Cerebral awakening concentration of sevoflurane and isoflurane predicted during slow and fast alveolar washout.

    PubMed

    Katoh, T; Suguro, Y; Kimura, T; Ikeda, K

    1993-11-01

    We studied 49 patients of ASA physical status I to determine cerebral anesthetic concentration on awakening calculated with end-tidal anesthetic concentration, when the end-tidal concentration decreased spontaneously. We also attempted to explain the difference in the average of the bracketing alveolar anesthetic concentration that allows and prevents the response to verbal command during recovery from anesthesia (MAC-Awake) between slow and fast alveolar washout by comparing the cerebral anesthetic concentrations with MAC-Awake determined by fast and slow washout. Slow washout was obtained by decreasing anesthetic concentrations in predetermined steps of 15 min, assuming equilibration between brain and alveolar partial pressures. Fast alveolar washout was obtained by discontinuation of the inhaled anesthetic, which had been maintained at 0.5 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) for at least 15 min. MAC-Awake values for sevoflurane and isoflurane obtained by slow washout were 0.34 +/- 0.05 and 0.31 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- SD), respectively, when MAC-Awake was expressed as a ratio to age-adjusted MAC. MAC-Awake values obtained by fast washout (0.22 +/- 0.07 MAC for sevoflurane, 0.22 +/- 0.05 MAC for isoflurane) were significantly smaller than those obtained by slow washout. Anesthetic concentrations in the brain at first eye opening calculated with end-tidal concentrations during fast alveolar washout (0.34 +/- 0.08 MAC for sevoflurane, 0.30 +/- 0.08 MAC for isoflurane) were nearly equal to MAC-Awake obtained by slow alveolar washout. The difference in MAC-Awake between fast and slow alveolar washout could be explained by arterial-to-cerebral and end-tidal-to-arterial anesthetic differences.

  20. MAC-awake of isoflurane, enflurane and halothane evaluated by slow and fast alveolar washout.

    PubMed

    Gaumann, D M; Mustaki, J P; Tassonyi, E

    1992-01-01

    End-tidal anaesthetic concentrations at first eye opening in response to a verbal command during recovery from anaesthesia (MAC-awake), were measured for isoflurane (n = 16), enflurane (n = 16) and halothane (n = 14). MAC-awake was measured during either slow or fast alveolar washout. Slow washout was obtained by decreasing anaesthetic concentrations in predetermined steps of 15 min, assuming equilibration between brain and alveolar partial pressures. Fast alveolar washout was obtained by discontinuation of the inhalation anaesthetic, which had been maintained at 1 MAC for at least 15 min. Mean MAC-awake obtained with slow alveolar washout was similar for isoflurane (0.25 (SD 0.03) MAC), and enflurane (0.27 (0.04) MAC) and significantly greater than values obtained by fast alveolar washout (isoflurane: 0.19 (0.03) MAC; enflurane: 0.20 (0.03) MAC). The MAC-awake of isoflurane and enflurane was significantly less than that of halothane, which was 0.59 (0.10) MAC as evaluated by the slow and 0.50 (0.05) MAC as evaluated by the fast alveolar washout method. Recovery time from anaesthesia with fast alveolar washout was 8.8 (4.0) min for halothane, which was not different from isoflurane (15 (2.5) min), but significantly shorter than for enflurane (22 (10) min), reflecting differences in the anaesthetic concentration gradient between MAC and MAC-awake values. These data do not support the hypothesis of a uniform ratio between MAC and MAC-awake values.

  1. Effects of Methadone on the Minimum Anesthetic Concentration of Isoflurane, and Its Effects on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Ventilation during Isoflurane Anesthesia in Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Escobar, André; da Rocha, Rozana Wendler; Pypendop, Bruno Henri; Zangirolami Filho, Darcio; Sousa, Samuel Santos; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal effects of intramuscular methadone administration on the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in hens, and to evaluate the effects of the isoflurane-methadone combination on heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure and ventilation. Thirteen healthy adult hens weighing 1.7 ± 0.2 kg were used. The MAC of isoflurane was determined in each individual using the bracketing method. Subsequently, the reduction in isoflurane MAC produced by methadone (3 or 6 mg kg(-1), i.m.) was determined by the up-and-down method. Stimulation was applied at 15 and 30 minutes, and at 45 minutes if the bird had not moved at 30 minutes. Isoflurane MAC reduction was calculated at each time point using logistic regression. After a washout period, birds were anesthetized with isoflurane and methadone, 6 mg kg(-1) i.m. was administered. Heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, blood gas values and invasive blood pressure were measured at 1.0 and 0.7 isoflurane MAC, and during 45 minutes after administration of methadone once birds were anesthetized with 0.7 isoflurane MAC. Fifteen minutes after administration of 3 mg kg(-1) of methadone, isoflurane MAC was reduced by 2 (-9 to 13)% [logistic regression estimate (95% Wald confidence interval)]. Administration of 6 mg kg(-1) of methadone decreased isoflurane MAC by 29 (11 to 46)%, 27 (-3 to 56)% and 10 (-8 to 28)% after 15, 30 and 45 minutes, respectively. Methadone (6 mg kg(-1)) induced atrioventricular block in three animals and ventricular premature contractions in two. Methadone caused an increase in arterial blood pressure and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, while heart rate and pH decreased. Methadone, 6 mg kg(-1) i.m. significantly reduced isoflurane MAC by 30% in hens 15 minutes after administration. At this dose, methadone caused mild respiratory acidosis and increase in systemic blood pressure.

  2. Effects of Methadone on the Minimum Anesthetic Concentration of Isoflurane, and Its Effects on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Ventilation during Isoflurane Anesthesia in Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Pypendop, Bruno Henri; Zangirolami Filho, Darcio; Sousa, Samuel Santos; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal effects of intramuscular methadone administration on the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in hens, and to evaluate the effects of the isoflurane-methadone combination on heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure and ventilation. Thirteen healthy adult hens weighing 1.7 ± 0.2 kg were used. The MAC of isoflurane was determined in each individual using the bracketing method. Subsequently, the reduction in isoflurane MAC produced by methadone (3 or 6 mg kg-1, IM) was determined by the up-and-down method. Stimulation was applied at 15 and 30 minutes, and at 45 minutes if the bird had not moved at 30 minutes. Isoflurane MAC reduction was calculated at each time point using logistic regression. After a washout period, birds were anesthetized with isoflurane and methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM was administered. Heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, blood gas values and invasive blood pressure were measured at 1.0 and 0.7 isoflurane MAC, and during 45 minutes after administration of methadone once birds were anesthetized with 0.7 isoflurane MAC. Fifteen minutes after administration of 3 mg kg-1 of methadone, isoflurane MAC was reduced by 2 (-9 to 13)% [logistic regression estimate (95% Wald confidence interval)]. Administration of 6 mg kg-1 of methadone decreased isoflurane MAC by 29 (11 to 46)%, 27 (-3 to 56)% and 10 (-8 to 28)% after 15, 30 and 45 minutes, respectively. Methadone (6 mg kg-1) induced atrioventricular block in three animals and ventricular premature contractions in two. Methadone caused an increase in arterial blood pressure and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, while heart rate and pH decreased. Methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM significantly reduced isoflurane MAC by 30% in hens 15 minutes after administration. At this dose, methadone caused mild respiratory acidosis and increase in systemic blood pressure. PMID:27018890

  3. Minimum anesthetic concentration and cardiovascular dose-response relationship of isoflurane in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Young K; Lee, Scott S; Suh, Euy H; Lee, Lyon; Lee, Hee C; Lee, Hyo J; Yeon, Seong C

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) and dose-related cardiovascular effects of isoflurane during controlled ventilation in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus). The MAC was determined for 10 cinereous vultures as the midpoint between the end-tidal isoflurane concentration that allows gross purposeful movement and that which prevents the movement in response to clamping a pedal digit. Immediately after the MAC was determined, the cardiovascular effects of isoflurane at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 times the MAC were investigated in seven of the 10 birds. The MAC of isoflurane for 10 cinereous vultures during controlled ventilation was 1.06 +/- 0.07% (mean +/- SD). When the isoflurane concentration was increased to 1.5 and 2.0 times the MAC, there was significant dose-dependent decrease in the arterial blood pressure. However, the heart rate did not change over a range of 1.0 to 2.0 times the MAC.

  4. EFFECTS OF TRAMADOL ON THE MINIMUM ANESTHETIC CONCENTRATION OF ISOFLURANE IN WHITE-EYED PARAKEETS (PSITTACARA LEUCOPHTHALMUS).

    PubMed

    Escobar, André; da Rocha, Rozana Wendler; Midon, Monica; de Almeida, Ricardo Miyasaka; Filho, Darcio Zangirolami; Werther, Karin

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane, and to investigate if tramadol changes the isoflurane MAC in white-eyed parakeets (Psittacara leucophthalmus). Ten adult birds weighing 157 ± 9 g were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen under mechanical ventilation. Isoflurane concentration for the first bird was adjusted to 2.2%, and after 15 min an electrical stimulus was applied in the thigh area to observe the response (movement or nonmovement). Isoflurane concentration for the subsequent bird was increased by 10% if the previous bird moved, or decreased by 10% if the previous bird did not move. This procedure was performed serially until at least four sequential crossover events were detected. A crossover event was defined as a sequence of two birds with different responses (positive or negative) to the electrical stimulus. Isoflurane MAC was calculated as the mean isoflurane concentration value at the crossover events. After 1 wk, the same birds were reanesthetized with isoflurane and MAC was determined at 15 and 30 min after intramuscular administration of 10 mg/kg of tramadol using the same method. A paired t-test (P < 0.05%) was used to detect significant differences for MAC between treatments. Isoflurane MAC in this population of white-eyed parakeets was 2.47 ± 0.09%. Isoflurane MAC values 15 and 30 min after tramadol administration were indistinguishable from each other (pooled value was 2.50 ± 0.18%); they were also indistinguishable from isoflurane MAC without tramadol. The isoflurane MAC value in white-eyed parakeets is higher than reported for other bird species. Tramadol (10 mg/kg, i.m.) does not change isoflurane MAC in these birds.

  5. Minimum alveolar concentration of halothane: an ethnic comparison.

    PubMed

    Houghton, I T; Aun, C S; Leung, D H

    1993-10-01

    The minimum alveolar concentration (estimate of spread) of halothane which was determined in 42 Chinese, Nepalese or European patients was found to be 0.70% (0.66-0.74%) in Chinese and 0.70% (0.65-0.76%) in Nepalese and 0.68% (0.65-0.72%) in Europeans, using the Spearman Kärber method of analysis. This preliminary trial suggests that there is no ethnic difference in the minimum alveolar concentration of halothane between Asians and Europeans.

  6. Inhaled anesthetics have hyperalgesic effects at 0.1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Eger, E I; Dutton, R C; Sonner, J M

    2000-08-01

    We investigated the hyperalgesic (antianalgesic) effect of the inhaled anesthetics isoflurane, halothane, nitrous oxide, and diethyl ether, or the nonimmobilizer 1, 2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane at subanesthetic partial pressures (or, for the nonimmobilizer, subanesthetic partial pressures predicted from lipid solubility) in rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed as a decrease in the time to withdrawal of a rat hind paw exposed to heat. All four anesthetics, including nitrous oxide and diethyl ether, produced hyperalgesia at low partial pressures, with a maximal effect at 0.1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) required to prevent response to movement in 50% of animals, and analgesia (an increased time to withdrawal of the hind paw) at 0. 4 to 0.8 MAC. The nonimmobilizer had neither analgesic nor hyperalgesia effects. We propose that inhaled anesthetics with a higher MAC-Awake (the MAC-fraction that suppresses appropriate responsiveness to command), such as nitrous oxide and diethyl ether, can be used as analgesics because patients are conscious at higher anesthetic partial pressures, including those which have analgesic effects, whereas anesthetics with a lower MAC-Awake do not produce analgesic effects at concentrations that permit consciousness. The inhaled anesthetics isoflurane, halothane, nitrous oxide, and diethyl ether produce antianalgesia at subanesthetic concentrations, with a maximal effect at approximately one-tenth the concentration required for anesthesia. This effect may enhance perception of pain when such small concentrations are reached during recovery from anesthesia.

  7. The effect of adenosine triphosphate on sevoflurane requirements for minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Katoh, T; Ikeda, K

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of i.v. adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) and MAC-Awake. The study group included healthy patients 20-60 yr of age. The study groups for MAC-Awake determination included 49 patients who were scheduled for elective surgery. The study groups for MAC determination included 53 patients scheduled for elective surgery involving a skin incision. These patients were randomly assigned to two groups, an ATP group and a control group. The ATP group received 100 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ATP i.v., and the control group received no medication. The ATP group and the control group were compared with regard to MAC-Awake (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of eye opening in response to a verbal command) and MAC (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of no movement in response to skin incision). The MAC-Awake was 0.7% +/- 0.1% in the control group (mean +/- SD) and 0.7% +/- 0.1% in the ATP group. MAC was 1.9% +/- 0.1% in the control group and 2.1% +/- 0.2% in the ATP group. The differences in MAC and MAC-Awake between the two groups were not statistically significant. We conclude that ATP infusion (100 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) has no effect on sevoflurane MAC and MAC-Awake. We found that an i.v. adenosine triphosphate infusion (100 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) has no effect on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of no movement in response to skin incision) and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-Awake (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of eye opening in response to a verbal command) in humans.

  8. Determination of minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane in juvenile swine.

    PubMed

    Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T; Swanson, Cliff

    2008-04-01

    Pigs are important animal models in veterinary and medical research and have been widely used in experiments requiring surgical anesthesia. Sevoflurane is an inhalant anesthetic with unique properties that make it an ideal anesthetic for mask induction and anesthesia maintenance. However, there are relatively few studies reporting the anesthetic requirements for sevoflurane in juvenile swine, an age group that is commonly used in research experiments. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine the Minimum Alveolar Concentration (MAC) for sevoflurane in juvenile swine. Sevoflurane anesthesia was induced in six Yorkshire-cross pigs of approximately 9 weeks-of-age and MAC for sevoflurane was determined. The sevoflurane MAC value was determined to be 3.5+/-0.1% which is notably higher than values reported in the literature for pigs. This discrepancy in MAC values may represent changes in anesthetic requirements between different age groups of pigs and differences in the type of stimulus used to determine MAC.

  9. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation during sevoflurane anesthesia: a comparison with isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Summors, A C; Gupta, A K; Matta, B F

    1999-02-01

    We investigated dynamic cerebral pressure autoregulation awake and during 1.5 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) sevoflurane or isoflurane anesthesia in 16 patients undergoing nonintracranial neurosurgical procedures. All patients received a standardized anesthetic, and their lungs were ventilated with 1.5 MAC volatile anesthetic in 100% oxygen to normocapnia. Routine monitors included electrocardiogram, pulse oximetry, end-tidal capnography, and continuous noninvasive blood pressure. In addition, middle cerebral artery blood velocity (Vmca) was measured continuously using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was tested by inducing a rapid transient decrease in mean arterial pressure by deflation of large thigh cuffs, which were placed around both thighs and inflated to 100 mm Hg above systolic pressure. The Vmca response to the decrease in blood pressure was fitted to a series of curves to determine the rate of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dRoR). Awake dRoR values were similar in the isoflurane and sevoflurane groups, 32 +/- 2%/s and 29 +/- 2%/s, respectively. dRoR decreased to 5 +/- 1%/s during isoflurane anesthesia but to only 24 +/- 2%/s during sevoflurane anesthesia. We conclude that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is better preserved during sevoflurane than isoflurane anesthesia in humans. We investigated the effect of sevoflurane and isoflurane on dynamic cerebral pressure autoregulation using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. At 1.5 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration, dynamic autoregulation was better preserved during sevoflurane than isoflurane anesthesia.

  10. Minimum alveolar concentration threshold of sevoflurane for postoperative dream recall.

    PubMed

    Aceto, P; Perilli, V; Lai, C; Sacco, T; Modesti, C; Luca, E; De Santis, P; Sollazzi, L; Antonelli, M

    2015-11-01

    Many factors affect postoperative dream recall, including patient characteristics, type of anesthesia, timing of postoperative interview and stress hormone secretion. Aims of the study were to determine whether Bispectral Index (BIS)-guided anesthesia might decrease sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) when compared with hemodynamically-guided anesthesia, and to search for a MAC threshold useful for preventing arousal, dream recall and implicit memory. One hundred thirty patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were enrolled. Anesthesia was induced with propofol 2 mg kg(-1), fentanyl 3 mcg kg(-1) and cis-atracurium 0.15 mg kg(-1). For anesthesia maintenance, patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: a BIS-guided group in which sevoflurane MAC was adjusted on the basis of BIS values, and a hemodynamic parameters (HP)-guided group in which MAC was adjusted based on HP. An auditory recording was presented to patients during anesthesia maintenance. Dream recall and explicit/implicit memory were investigated upon awakening and approximately after 24 h. Mean sevoflurane MAC during auditory presentation was similar in the two groups (0.85 ± 0.16 and 0.87 ± 0.17 [P = 0.53] in BIS-guided and HP-guided groups, respectively). Frequency of dream recall was similar in the two groups: 27% (N. = 17) in BIS-guided group, 18% (N. = 12) in HP-guided group, P = 0.37. In both groups, dream recall was less probable in patients anesthetized with MAC values ≥ 0.9 (area under ROC curve = 0.83, sensitivity = 90%, and specificity = 49%). BIS-guided anesthesia was not able to generate different MAC values compared to HP-guided anesthesia. Independent of the guide used for anesthesia, a sevoflurane MAC over 0.9 was required to prevent postoperative dream recall.

  11. Effect of fentanyl target-controlled infusions on isoflurane minimum anaesthetic concentration and cardiovascular function in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Pavez, Juan C; Hawkins, Michelle G; Pascoe, Peter J; Knych, Heather K DiMaio; Kass, Philip H

    2011-07-01

    To determine the impact of three different target plasma concentrations of fentanyl on the minimum anaesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane in the red-tailed hawk and the effects on the haemodynamic profile. Experimental study. Six healthy adult red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) of unknown sex with body weights (mean ± SD) of 1.21 ± 0.15 kg. This study was undertaken in two phases. In the first phase anaesthesia was induced with isoflurane in oxygen via facemask and maintained with isoflurane delivered in oxygen via a Bain circuit. Following instrumentation baseline determination of the MAC for isoflurane was made for each animal using the bracketing method and a supramaximal electrical stimulus. End-tidal isoflurane concentration (E'Iso) was then set at 0.75 × MAC and after an appropriate equilibration period a bolus of fentanyl (20 μg kg(-1)) was administered intravenously (IV) in order to determine the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl in the isoflurane-anaesthetized red-tailed hawk. During the second phase anaesthesia was induced in a similar manner and E'Iso was set at 0.75 × MAC for each individual. Fentanyl was infused IV to achieve target plasma concentrations between 8 and 32 ng mL(-1). At each fentanyl plasma concentration, the MAC for isoflurane and cardiovascular variables were determined. Data were analyzed by use of repeated-measures anova. Mean ± SD fentanyl plasma concentrations and isoflurane MACs were 0 ± 0, 8.51 ± 4, 14.85 ± 4.82 and 29.25 ± 11.52 ng mL(-1), and 2.05 ± 0.45%, 1.42 ± 0.53%, 1.14 ± 0.31% and 0.93 ± 0.32% for the target concentrations of 0, 8, 16 and 32 ng mL(-1), respectively. At these concentrations fentanyl significantly (p = 0.0016) decreased isoflurane MAC by 31%, 44% and 55%, respectively. Dose had no significant effect on heart rate, systolic, diastolic or mean arterial blood pressure. Fentanyl produced a dose-related decrease of isoflurane MAC with minimal effects on measured cardiovascular parameters in

  12. Cardiovascular effects of equipotent doses of isoflurane alone and isoflurane plus fentanyl in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Tearney, Caitlin C; Barter, Linda S; Pypendop, Bruno H

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of equipotent concentrations of fentanyl and isoflurane, compared with isoflurane alone, on cardiovascular variables in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). ANIMALS 6 adult female New Zealand White rabbits. PROCEDURES Rabbits were anesthetized with isoflurane, and lungs were mechanically ventilated. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane alone (baseline) and with fentanyl administered IV to achieve 3 targeted plasma concentrations was determined for each rabbit by means of an electrical stimulus. Cardiovascular variables were measured in a separate experiment at 1.3X isoflurane MAC and equipotent doses of isoflurane plus fentanyl at the same 3 targeted plasma concentrations. Blood samples were collected for measurement of blood gas variables and plasma fentanyl concentrations. Treatment effects were evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA followed by 2-tailed paired t tests with sequentially rejective Bonferroni correction. RESULTS Mean ± SD MAC of isoflurane was 1.95 ± 0.27%. Mean measured plasma fentanyl concentrations of 4.97, 8.93, and 17.19 ng/mL reduced isoflurane MAC by 17%, 37%, and 56%, respectively. Mean measured plasma fentanyl concentrations during cardiovascular measurements were 5.49, 10.26, and 18.40 ng/mL. Compared with baseline measurements, heart rate was significantly lower at all 3 plasma fentanyl concentrations, mean arterial blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance were significantly higher at mean fentanyl concentrations of 10.26 and 18.40 ng/mL, and cardiac output was significantly higher at 18.40 ng of fentanyl/mL. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of fentanyl in isoflurane-anesthetized rabbits resulted in improved mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output, compared with isoflurane alone. This balanced anesthesia technique may prove useful in the management of clinical cases in this species.

  13. Effect of isoflurane on neuronal apoptosis in rats subjected to focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Drummond, John C; Cole, Daniel J; Kelly, Paul J; Spurlock, Mark P; Patel, Piyush M

    2004-03-01

    Although isoflurane can reduce ischemic neuronal injury after short postischemic recovery intervals, this neuroprotective efficacy is not sustained. Neuronal apoptosis can contribute to the gradual increase in infarct size after ischemia. This suggests that isoflurane, although capable of reducing early neuronal death, may not inhibit ischemia-induced apoptosis. We investigated the effects of isoflurane on markers of apoptosis in rats subjected to focal ischemia. Fasted Wistar-Kyoto rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and randomly allocated to awake (n = 40) or isoflurane (n = 40) groups. Animals in both groups were subjected to focal ischemia by filament occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 70 min. Pericranial temperature was servo-controlled at 37 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C throughout the experiment. In the awake group, isoflurane was discontinued and the animals were allowed to awaken. In the isoflurane group, isoflurane anesthesia was maintained at 1.5 MAC (minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration). Animals were killed 7 h, 1 day, 4 days, or 7 days after reperfusion (n = 10/group/time point). The area of cerebral infarction was measured by image analysis in a hematoxylin and eosin stained section. In three adjacent sections, apoptotic neurons were identified by TUNEL staining and immunostaining for active caspase-9 and caspase-3. Infarct size was smaller in the isoflurane group than the awake group 7 h, 1 day, and 4 days after reperfusion (P < 0.05). However, this difference was absent 7 days after reperfusion. The number of apoptotic (TUNEL, caspase-3, and caspase-9 positive) cells 1 day after ischemia was significantly more in the awake versus isoflurane group. After a recovery period of 4 or 7 days, the number of apoptotic cells in the isoflurane group was more than in the awake group. After 7 days, the number of caspase-3 and -9 positive neurons was more in the isoflurane group (P < 0.05). The data indicate that isoflurane delays but does not

  14. Isoflurane administration before ischemia and during reperfusion attenuates ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury of isolated rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Liu, R; Ishibe, Y; Ueda, M; Hang, Y

    1999-09-01

    To investigate the effects of isoflurane on ischemia/ reperfusion (IR)-induced lung injury, we administered isoflurane before ischemia or during reperfusion. Isolated rabbit lungs were divided into the following groups: control (n = 6), perfused and ventilated for 120 min without ischemia; ISO-control (n = 6), 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) isoflurane was administered for 30 min before 120 min continuous perfusion; IR (n = 6), ischemia for 60 min, followed by 60 min reperfusion; IR-ISO1 and IR-ISO2, ischemia followed by reperfusion and 1 MAC (n = 6) or 2 MAC (n = 6) isoflurane for 60 min; ISO-IR (n = 6), 1 MAC isoflurane was administered for 30 min before ischemia, followed by IR. During these maneuvers, we measured total pulmonary vascular resistance (Rt), coefficient of filtration (Kfc), and lung wet to dry ratio (W/D). The results indicated that administration of isoflurane during reperfusion inhibited an IR-induced increase in Kfc and W/D ratio. Furthermore, isoflurane at 2 MAC, but not 1 MAC, significantly inhibited an IR-induced increase in Rt. The administration of isoflurane before ischemia significantly attenuated the increase in IR-induced Kfc, W/D, and Rt. Our results suggest that the administration of isoflurane before ischemia and during reperfusion protects against ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury in isolated rabbit lungs.

  15. Cerebral autoregulation in awake versus isoflurane-anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, W E; Edelman, G; Kochs, E; Werner, C; Segil, L; Albrecht, R F

    1991-12-01

    We evaluated regional cerebral and spinal cord blood flow in rats during isoflurane anesthesia. Tissue blood flow was measured in cerebral cortex, subcortex, midbrain, and spinal cord using radioactive microspheres. Blood flow autoregulation was measured within the following arterial blood pressure ranges (mm Hg): 1 = less than 50, 2 = 50-90, 3 = 90-130, 4 = 130-170, 5 = greater than 170. Arterial blood pressure was increased using phenylephrine infusion and decreased with ganglionic blockade and hemorrhage. Three treatment groups were studied: 1 = awake control, 2 = 1.0 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) isoflurane, 3 = 2.0 MAC isoflurane. Autoregulation was seen in awake rats from 50 to 170 mm Hg in all tissues. The autoregulatory coefficient (change in blood flow/change in blood pressure) was increased in midbrain and spinal cord during 1.0 MAC isoflurane and in all tissues during 2.0 MAC isoflurane (P less than 0.05). Within the arterial blood pressure range of 90-130 mm Hg, isoflurane produced the following changes in tissue blood flow (percent of awake control): 1.0 MAC isoflurane: cortex = 87% +/- 8% (P greater than 0.30), subcortex = 124% +/- 11% (P greater than 0.05), midbrain = 263% +/- 20% (P less than 0.001), spinal cord = 278% +/- 19% (P less than 0.001); 2.0 MAC isoflurane: cortex = 137% +/- 13% (P less than 0.05), subcortex = 272% +/- 24% (P less than 0.001), midbrain = 510% +/- 53% (P less than 0.001), spinal cord = 535% +/- 50% (P less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Neonatal Repeated Exposure to Isoflurane not Sevoflurane in Mice Reversibly Impaired Spatial Cognition at Juvenile-Age.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhui; Zhao, Yanhong; Yang, Junjun; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Peijun

    2017-02-01

    Inhalation anesthetics facilitate surgical procedures in millions of children each year. However, animal studies demonstrate that exposure to the inhalation anesthetic isoflurane may cause neuronal cell death in developing brains. The long-term cytotoxic effects of sevoflurane, the most popular pediatric anesthetic, have not been compared with isoflurane. Thus, this study was designed to compare the effects of equipotent doses of these two anesthetics on neonatal long-term neurotoxicity. Postnatal 7-day-old (P7) C57/BL male mice were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane or 2.2% sevoflurane 2 h a day for 3 days. Non-anesthetized mice served as controls. The effects of anesthesia on learning and memory were assessed using the Morris Water Maze (MWM) at Postnatal days 30 (P30) and P60 respectively. The hippocampal content of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits (NMDA), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and synaptophysin (Syn) were determined by Western Blot. Neuron structure and apoptosis were assessed via Nissl and TUNEL staining, respectively. The isoflurane group exhibited cognitive impairment at P30. Repeated inhalation of isoflurane or sevoflurane caused different degrees of apoptosis and damaged hippocampal neurons in neonatal mice, particularly isoflurane. In neonatal mice, repeated exposure to isoflurane, but not sevoflurane, caused spatial cognitive impairments in juvenile mice. Our findings suggest that isoflurane induces significantly greater neurodegeneration than an equipotent minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane.

  17. The effect of sevoflurane and isoflurane anesthesia on interictal spike activity among patients with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Watts, A D; Herrick, I A; McLachlan, R S; Craen, R A; Gelb, A W

    1999-11-01

    The electrophysiologic effects of sevoflurane are not well characterized in humans. Among patients with refractory epilepsy, this study compared 1) electroencephalographic (EEG) interictal spike activity during wakefulness and sevoflurane anesthesia, and 2) electrocorticographically (ECoG) recorded interictal spike activity during sevoflurane and isoflurane anesthesia. We studied 12 patients undergoing insertion of subdural electrodes. Before commencing anesthesia, awake (baseline) EEG recordings were obtained. After inhaled induction, EEG interictal spike activity was evaluated during stable, normocapnic, and hypocapnic (Paco2 = 28-30 mm Hg), sevoflurane anesthesia administered at 1.5 times the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (1.5 MAC). Immediately after surgery, ECoG recordings were obtained from subdural electrodes during 1) 1.5 MAC isoflurane, 2) 0.3 MAC isoflurane, and 3) 1.5 MAC sevoflurane anesthesia. EEG spike frequency increased in all patients during sevoflurane anesthesia compared with awake recordings (P = 0.002). Compared with 0.3 MAC isoflurane anesthesia, ECoG interictal spike frequency was higher in all patients during 1.5 MAC sevoflurane anesthesia (P = 0.004) and in 8 of 10 patients during 1.5 MAC isoflurane anesthesia (P = 0.016). Under sufficiently rigorous conditions, both sevoflurane and isoflurane can provoke interictal spike activity at near burst-suppression doses. This property is more prominent with sevoflurane than isoflurane. The results of this study suggest that the capacity to modulate neuroexcitability is a dose-dependent feature of volatile anesthetics that is manifested most prominently at near burst-suppression doses (i.e., 1.5 times the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration) and is minimal or absent at low doses.

  18. Comparison of recovery after intermediate duration of anaesthesia with sevoflurane and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, P Y; Wodey, E; Joly, A; Carré, P; Ecoffey, C

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare recovery from anaesthesia after sevoflurane and isoflurane were administered to children for more than 90 min. After parental informed consent and ethical committee approval, children aged between 2 months and 6 years, ASA I or II, were randomly allocated to sevoflurane (n=20) or isoflurane (n=20) groups. Halogenated agents were discontinued following skin closure and patients were ventilated mechanically with 100% oxygen until minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values awake were obtained (endtidal concentrations 0.6 MAC for sevoflurane and 0.4 MAC for isoflurane). Effective perioperative analgesia was provided by a caudal block. The mean (+/- SD) duration of anaesthesia was 132 +/- 38 min and 139 +/- 49 min for sevoflurane and isoflurane, respectively. Early recovery occurred sooner in the isoflurane group (time to extubation was 16 +/- 7 min and 11 +/- 5 min, P<0.01; Aldrete's score at 0 min was 5.5 +/- 1.5 and 7.4 +/- 1.8, P<0.001, respectively). But the time to be fit for discharge from recovery room was similar at 136 +/- 18 min and 140 +/- 20 min, respectively. After intermediate duration of anaesthesia administered to children for up to 90 min, isoflurane and sevoflurane allow recovery after approximatively the same lapse of time.

  19. Excitatory and inhibitory actions of isoflurane on the cholinergic ascending arousal system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hai-Long; Fukuda, Satoru; Murata, Eri; Higuchi, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    The cholinergic arousal systems are known to critically regulate the state of consciousness. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of isoflurane on the inhibitory or excitatory neurotransmitters efflux in important nuclei within the cholinergic arousal system using in vivo intracerebral microdialysis. The efflux of glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), or acetylcholine in the posterior hypothalamus (PH), the basal forebrain (BF), and the somatosensory cortex (S1BF) of rats was detected using intracerebral microdialysis under an awake condition and at 0.5-2.0 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) isoflurane anesthesia. The intrabasalis perfusion of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate on the cortical acetylcholine effluxes was also examined under both conditions. Isoflurane had no influence on the glutamate and GABA efflux in the PH, whereas in the BF, it dose-dependently increased glutamate efflux and decreased GABA efflux. A transient increase in glutamate efflux at 1.0 MAC and a decrease in GABA at 0.5-1.5 MAC were observed in the S1BF. Isoflurane dose-dependently decreased acetylcholine efflux in the S1BF. Perfusion of the BF with AMPA increased acetylcholine efflux in the S1BF with electroencephalographic activation during 0.75 MAC isoflurane anesthesia, suggesting an inhibitory action of isoflurane on AMPA receptors in the BF. However, N-methyl-D-aspartate had no effect on these parameters. Isoflurane induces both excitatory and inhibitory actions in the cholinergic arousal system. The predominant inhibitory action of isoflurane over its excitatory action at the BF would result in the decrease in the acetylcholine efflux in the S1BF.

  20. Concentration-dependent isoflurane effects on withdrawal reflexes in pigs and the role of the stimulation paradigm.

    PubMed

    Spadavecchia, C; Haga, H A; Ranheim, B

    2012-12-01

    In this prospective two-phase experimental trial, 10 pigs were anaesthetized twice with isoflurane only. In the first phase, the individual minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was determined and in the second phase the effects on withdrawal reflexes of increasing end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (from 1.6% to 2.8%) were assessed. Single, 10 and 60 repeated electrical stimulations were used to evoke withdrawal reflexes which were recorded and quantified by electromyography. Recruitment curves for reflex amplitude for increasing stimulation intensities and isoflurane concentrations were constructed. Isoflurane MAC was 1.9 ± 0.3%. Reflexes evoked by repeated stimulation were suppressed at isoflurane concentrations significantly higher than those which suppressed complex movements during MAC determination (P=0.014 and P=0.006 for 10 and 60 repeated stimuli respectively). Isoflurane up to 2.8% was still not able to abolish reflex activity evoked by repeated stimulations in all pigs. Single stimulation reflexes were suppressed at significantly lower concentrations than repeated stimulation reflexes (P=0.008 and P=0.004 for 10 and 60 repeated stimuli, respectively). Reflex amplitude was significantly correlated with isoflurane concentration (P<0.001, r=-0.85) independent of the individual MAC. The findings indicate that the level at which isoflurane suppresses withdrawal reflexes is dependent on the stimulation paradigm (single vs. repeated electrical stimulation), and there is limited value in expressing reflex withdrawal suppression in terms of MAC as purposeful and reflex movements are independently affected by isoflurane in individual animals.

  1. Isoflurane Causes Greater Neurodegeneration than an Equivalent Exposure of Sevoflurane in the Developing Brain of Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ge; Ward, Christopher; Peng, Jun; Zhao, Yifan; Huang, Baosheng; Wei, Huafeng

    2010-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that isoflurane has a greater potency to induce neurodegeneration than sevoflurane in the developing brains of neonatal mice based on our previous studies in cell culture. Methods We treated 7-day-old mice with either 0.75% isoflurane or 1.1% sevoflurane (~0.5 Minimum Alveolar Concentration) for 6 h and then obtained blood and brain samples at 2 h after the anesthesia treatment for determination of neuroapoptosis in different brain regions and the neurodegenerative biomarker S100β in the blood. The mechanisms of neurodegeneration induced by isoflurane or sevoflurane were also compared by determining protein expressions of the cell cycle, and apoptosis related proteins. In separate groups, memory and learning ability were evaluated through the use of Morris Water Maze testing in mice at postnatal day 42 after anesthesia treatment at postnatal day 7. Results Isoflurane but not sevoflurane significantly increased the neurodegenerative biomarker S100β in the blood. Isoflurane treatments significantly increased apoptosis indicated by the activation of caspase-3 and elevation of Poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase in different brain regions. An equipotent exposure of sevoflurane tended to increase apoptosis in hippocampal and cortex areas but was significantly less potent than isoflurane. Neither isoflurane nor sevoflurane changed protein levels of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, beta-site amyloid beta precursor protein cleaving enzyme and cell cycle regulatory proteins (CDK4, cyclin D1) significantly. Isoflurane and sevoflurane at the selected exposures did not significantly alter memory and learning ability. Conclusion At equipotent exposures, isoflurane has a greater potency than sevoflurane to cause neurodegeneration in the developing brains of neonatal mice. PMID:20460994

  2. Porcine systemic and regional organ blood flow during 1.0 and 1.5 minimum alveolar concentrations of sevoflurane anesthesia without and with 50% nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Manohar, M; Parks, C M

    1984-12-01

    Effects of sevoflurane anesthesia on organ blood flow were examined in nine healthy isocapnic pigs using 15-mumol diameter radionuclide-labeled microspheres that were injected into the left atrium. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane required to prevent 50% of the pigs from responding by gross purposeful movement to a noxious stimulus was found to be 2.66 +/- 0.20%. Hemodynamic measurements were made on each pig during the following five conditions: awake (control); 1.0 MAC of sevoflurane anesthesia; 2.66% (1.0 MAC) sevoflurane + 50% N2O anesthesia; 1.5 MAC of sevoflurane anesthesia; and 3.99% (1.5 MAC) sevoflurane + 50% N2O anesthesia. Dose-related decrease in cardiac output, mean aortic pressure and left ventricular work occurred with sevoflurane anesthesia but heart rate was unchanged. Addition of 50% N2O to either of the pre-established sevoflurane concentrations did not change heart rate or the cardiac output, but with 3.99% sevoflurane mean aortic pressure decreased further. Unlike isoflurane and halothane which increase porcine brain blood flow, cerebral blood flow decreased to a similar level with both levels of sevoflurane anesthesia. Whereas cerebellar perfusion was unaltered with both levels of sevoflurane anesthesia, brain-stem blood flow decreased to a similar level from the control value. However, during 3.99% sevoflurane anesthesia, brain-stem blood flow exceeded that at 2.66% sevoflurane anesthesia. Addition of N2O to pre-established concentrations of sevoflurane increased regional brain blood flow but cerebral and brain-stem blood flow exceeded awake value only during 2.66% sevoflurane + 50% N2O anesthesia. Transmural myocardial blood flow decreased in a dose-dependent manner during sevoflurane anesthesia but the subendocardial/subepicardial perfusion ratio remained at control value.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Minimum alveolar concentrations and hemodynamic effects of two different preparations of sevoflurane in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Denise A.; Fantoni, Denise T.; Holms, Carla; Auler, Jose Otavio C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Original sevoflurane (Sevo A) is made with water, while a generic sevoflurane (Sevocris) is produced with propylene glycol as a stabilizing additive. We investigated whether the original and generic sevoflurane preparations differed in terms of their minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values and hemodynamic effects. METHODS Sixteen pigs weighing 31.6±1.8 kg were randomly assigned to the Sevo A or Sevocris groups. After anesthesia induction via mask with the appropriate sevoflurane preparation (6% in 100% oxygen), the MAC was determined for each animal. Hemodynamic and oxygenation parameters were measured at 0.5 MAC, 1 MAC and 1.5 MAC. Histopathological analyses of lung parenchyma were performed. RESULTS The MAC in the Sevo A group was 4.4±0.5%, and the MAC in the Sevocris group was 4.1±0.7%. Hemodynamic and metabolic parameters presented significant differences in a dose-dependent pattern as expected, but they did not differ between groups. Cardiac indices and arterial pressures decreased in both groups when the sevoflurane concentration increased from 0.5 to 1 and 1.5 MAC. The oxygen delivery index (DO2I) decreased significantly at 1.5 MAC. CONCLUSION Propylene glycol as an additive for sevoflurane seems to be as safe as a water additive, at least in terms of hemodynamic and pulmonary effects. PMID:20535372

  4. Effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Doherty, Thomas J; da Cunha, Anderson F; Leonardi, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in alpacas. Eight healthy, intact male, adult alpacas were studied on 2 separate occasions. Anesthesia was induced with SEVO, and baseline MAC (MACB) determination began 45 min after induction. After MACB determination, alpacas were randomly given either an intravenous (IV) loading dose (LD) and infusion of saline or a loading dose [ketamine = 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW); lidocaine = 2 mg/kg BW] and an infusion of ketamine (25 μg/kg BW per minute) in combination with lidocaine (50 μg/kg BW per minute), and MACSEVO was re-determined (MACT). Quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were also evaluated. Mean MACB was 1.88% ± 0.13% and 1.89% ± 0.14% for the saline and ketamine + lidocaine groups, respectively. Ketamine and lidocaine administration decreased (P < 0.05) MACB by 57% and mean MACT was 0.83% ± 0.10%. Saline administration did not change MACB. Time to determine MACB and MACT was not significantly different between the treatments. The quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were not different between groups. The infusion of ketamine combined with lidocaine significantly decreased MACSEVO by 57% and did not adversely affect time-to-standing or quality of recovery.

  5. Effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in alpacas

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Doherty, Thomas J.; da Cunha, Anderson F.; Leonardi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in alpacas. Eight healthy, intact male, adult alpacas were studied on 2 separate occasions. Anesthesia was induced with SEVO, and baseline MAC (MACB) determination began 45 min after induction. After MACB determination, alpacas were randomly given either an intravenous (IV) loading dose (LD) and infusion of saline or a loading dose [ketamine = 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW); lidocaine = 2 mg/kg BW] and an infusion of ketamine (25 μg/kg BW per minute) in combination with lidocaine (50 μg/kg BW per minute), and MACSEVO was re-determined (MACT). Quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were also evaluated. Mean MACB was 1.88% ± 0.13% and 1.89% ± 0.14% for the saline and ketamine + lidocaine groups, respectively. Ketamine and lidocaine administration decreased (P < 0.05) MACB by 57% and mean MACT was 0.83% ± 0.10%. Saline administration did not change MACB. Time to determine MACB and MACT was not significantly different between the treatments. The quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were not different between groups. The infusion of ketamine combined with lidocaine significantly decreased MACSEVO by 57% and did not adversely affect time-to-standing or quality of recovery. PMID:27127341

  6. Pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine in isoflurane-anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ryan S; Barter, Linda S; Pypendop, Bruno H

    2017-03-06

    To characterize the pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine when administered as a short intravenous (IV) infusion to isoflurane-anesthetized rabbits. Experimental study. A total of six healthy adult female New Zealand White rabbits. Rabbits were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. Following determination of isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), the anesthetic dose was reduced to 0.7 × MAC, and dexmedetomidine hydrochloride (20 μg kg(-1)) was infused IV over 5 minutes. Arterial blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 240 and 360 minutes following termination of the infusion. Samples were transferred into tubes containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and centrifuged immediately. The plasma was harvested and stored at -80 °C until analyzed. Concentrations of dexmedetomidine in plasma were determined by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Compartment models were fitted to the time and concentration data using nonlinear regression. A three-compartment model best fit the data set. Median volume of distribution at steady state and terminal half-life were 3169 mL kg(-1) (range, 2182-3859 mL kg(-1)) and 80 minutes (range, 72-88 minutes), respectively. The pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine in isoflurane-anesthetized, healthy, New Zealand White rabbits were characterized in this study. Data from this study can be used to determine dosing regimens for dexmedetomidine in isoflurane-anesthetized rabbits. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Distinct long-term neurocognitive outcomes after equipotent sevoflurane or isoflurane anaesthesia in immature rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, T. M.; Chang, F. L.; Shih, J.; Alvi, R. S.; Quitoriano, G. R.; Rau, V.; Barbour, K. C.; Elphick, S. A.; Kong, C. L.; Tantoco, N. K.; Ben-Tzur, D.; Kang, H.; McCreery, M. S.; Huang, P.; Park, A.; Uy, J.; Rossi, M. J.; Zhao, C.; Di Geronimo, R. T.; Stratmann, G.; Sall, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many anaesthetics when given to young animals cause cell death and learning deficits that persist until much later in life. Recent attempts to compare the relative safety or toxicity between different agents have not adequately controlled for the relative dose of anaesthetic given, thereby making direct comparisons difficult. Methods Isoflurane or sevoflurane were given at 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for 4 h to postnatal day 7 (P7) rat pups. Beginning at P75 these animals underwent fear conditioning and at P83 Morris water maze testing to assess working memory, short-term memory and early long-term memory using delays of 1 min, 1 h, and 4 h. Results No difference between groups was seen in fear conditioning experiments. Morris water maze learning was equivalent between groups, and no difference was seen in working memory. Sevoflurane-treated animals had a deficit in early long-term memory, and isoflurane-treated animals had a deficit in both short-term and early long-term memory. Conclusions Both isoflurane and sevoflurane delivered at 1 MAC for 4 h to immature rats caused a deficit in long-term memory. Isoflurane also caused a deficit in short-term memory. Isoflurane might be more detrimental than sevoflurane in very young animals. PMID:23592692

  8. Effects of ketamine on isoflurane- and sevoflurane-induced cerebral vasodilation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Kiyoshi; Iida, Hiroki; Dohi, Shuji

    2003-04-01

    Although ketamine has been reported to have little effect on the cerebral circulation when used with other anesthetics, its effect on the cerebral vascular response to volatile anesthetics, which increase cerebral blood flow in a concentration-dependent manner, remains obscure. A closed cranial window was prepared in 15 pentobarbital-anesthetized adult rabbits. The cerebral pial arteriolar alteration induced by either isoflurane (n = 8) or sevoflurane (n = 7) at 0 (before volatile anesthetic), 0.33, 0.67, and 1.0 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was measured under three consecutive conditions: intravenous infusion with saline, with ketamine, and with ketamine plus l-arginine. Ketamine reduced the vasodilation induced by 0.67 (120 +/- 9% versus 113 +/- 9%; P <.05) and 1.0 MAC isoflurane (136 +/- 11% versus 118 +/- 10%; P <.05), but l-arginine did not restore the isoflurane-induced cerebral vasodilation. In rabbits inhaling sevoflurane, the degree of cerebral vasodilator response was smaller than that by isoflurane, and the cerebral vasodilation was comparable whether in the presence or absence of ketamine (with or without l-arginine). In conclusion, ketamine reduces isoflurane-induced cerebral vasodilation, apparently independently of nitric oxide formation, while sevoflurane-induced cerebral vasodilation is not significantly affected by ketamine.

  9. Anesthesia with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in the Crested Serpent Eagle (Spilornis cheela hoya): Minimum Anesthetic Concentration, Physiological Effects, Hematocrit, Plasma Chemistry and Behavioral Effects

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, Fang-Tse; CHANG, Geng-Ruei; WANG, Hsien-Chi; HSU, Tien-Huan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The initial goal of this study was to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) for the crested serpent eagle. Next, we compared the anesthetic effects of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values and behavior in spontaneously breathing captive adult crested serpent eagles. Sixteen eagles were randomly allocated to two groups for anesthesia with ISO (n=8) or SEVO (n=8). First, we measured the MAC values of ISO and SEVO, and four weeks later, we investigated the effect of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit (HCT) and plasma chemistry values. The MAC values of ISO and SEVO for crested serpent eagles were 1.46 ± 0.30 and 2.03 ± 0.32%, respectively. The results revealed no significant differences between the two anesthetics in induction time, while time of extubation to recovery was significantly shorter with SEVO. A time-related increase in end-tidal CO2 and decreases in body temperature and respiratory rates were observed during anesthesia with each anesthetic. There were no significant differences between the effect of the two anesthetics on heart rate, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values or respiration, although each caused minor respiration depression. We concluded that SEVO is a more effective inhalant agent than ISO for use in eagles, showing the most rapidest induction and recovery from anesthesia. PMID:23955396

  10. Effects of intravenous administration of lidocaine on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane in horses.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Marlis L; Wagner, Ann E; Mama, Khursheed R; Ferreira, Tatiana H; Steffey, Eugene P

    2011-04-01

    To determine effects of a continuous rate infusion of lidocaine on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in horses. 8 healthy adult horses. Horses were anesthetized via IV administration of xylazine, ketamine, and diazepam; anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen. Approximately 1 hour after induction, sevoflurane MAC determination was initiated via standard techniques. Following sevoflurane MAC determination, lidocaine was administered as a bolus (1.3 mg/kg, IV, over 15 minutes), followed by constant rate infusion at 50 μg/kg/min. Determination of MAC for the lidocaine-sevoflurane combination was started 30 minutes after lidocaine infusion was initiated. Arterial blood samples were collected after the lidocaine bolus, at 30-minute intervals, and at the end of the infusion for measurement of plasma lidocaine concentrations. IV administration of lidocaine decreased mean ± SD sevoflurane MAC from 2.42 ± 0.24% to 1.78 ± 0.38% (mean MAC reduction, 26.7 ± 12%). Plasma lidocaine concentrations were 2,589 ± 811 ng/mL at the end of the bolus; 2,065 ± 441 ng/mL, 2,243 ± 699 ng/mL, 2,168 ± 339 ng/mL, and 2,254 ± 215 ng/mL at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes of infusion, respectively; and 2,206 ± 329 ng/mL at the end of the infusion. Plasma concentrations did not differ significantly among time points. Lidocaine could be useful for providing a more balanced anesthetic technique in horses. A detailed cardiovascular study on the effects of IV infusion of lidocaine during anesthesia with sevoflurane is required before this combination can be recommended.

  11. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for sevoflurane and xenon at normothermia and hypothermia in newborn pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Dingley, J; Elstad, M; Scull-Brown, E; Steen, P A; Thoresen, M

    2013-05-01

    Neuroprotection from therapeutic hypothermia increases when combined with the anaesthetic gas xenon in animal studies. A clinical feasibility study of the combined treatment has been successfully undertaken in asphyxiated human term newborns. It is unknown whether xenon alone would be sufficient for sedation during hypothermia eliminating or reducing the need for other sedative or analgesic infusions in ventilated sick infants. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of xenon is unknown in any neonatal species. Eight newborn pigs were anaesthetised with sevoflurane alone and then sevoflurane plus xenon at two temperatures. Pigs were randomised to start at either 38.5°C or 33.5°C. MAC for sevoflurane was determined using the claw clamp technique at the preset body temperature. For xenon MAC determination, a background of 0.5 MAC sevoflurane was used, and 60% xenon added to the gas mixture. The relationship between sevoflurane and xenon MAC is assumed to be additive. Xenon concentrations were changed in 5% steps until a positive clamp reaction was noted. Pigs' temperature was changed to the second target, and two MAC determinations for sevoflurane and 0.5 MAC sevoflurane plus xenon were repeated. MAC for sevoflurane was 4.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.65-4.50] at 38.5°C and 3.05% (CI: 2.63-3.48) at 33.5°C, a significant reduction. MAC for xenon was 120% at 38.5°C and 116% at 33.5°C, not different. In newborn swine sevoflurane, MAC was temperature dependent, while xenon MAC was independent of temperature. There was large individual variability in xenon MAC, from 60% to 120%. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  12. Effects of Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine or Their Combination on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Sevoflurane in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    MORAN-MUÑOZ, Rafael; IBANCOVICHI, J. A.; Gutierrez-BLANCO, Eduardo; ACEVEDO-ARCIQUE, Carlos M.; Victoria MORA, J. Mauro; TENDILLO, Francisco J.; SANTOS-GONZALEZ, Martin; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine the effects of lidocaine (LIDO) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) or their combination (LIDO–DEX), administered by constant-rate infusion (CRI), on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Seven healthy mongrel dogs were used with a 2-week washout interval between treatments in this study. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen, and MAC of sevoflurane was determined after 90 min equilibration period in the dogs (SEV-MACBASAL). Then, sevoflurane MAC was determined again in the dogs after 45 min equilibration period of one of the following treatments: an intravenous loading dose of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by 6 mg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACLIDO); an intravenous loading dose of dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg followed by 2 µg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACDEX); or their combination (SEV-MACLIDO-DEX). These SEV-MACs were determined in duplicate. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tuckey test when appropriate. The SEV-MACBASAL was 1.82 ± 0.06%, SEV-MACLIDO was 1.38 ± 0.08%, SEV-MACDEX was 1.22 ± 0.10%, and SEV-MACLIDO-DEX was 0.78 ± 0.06%. The CRI administration of lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination produced a significant reduction in the MAC of sevoflurane by 26.1 ± 9.0% (P<0.0001), 43.7 ± 11.8% (P<0.0002) and 54.4 ± 9.8% (P<0.0001), respectively. The MAC reduction was significantly greater after the CRI combination of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine when compared with lidocaine CRI (P<0.0001) or dexmedetomidine CRI treatments (P<0.025). PMID:24572631

  13. The comparative effects of sevoflurane versus isoflurane on cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, Yuji; Takahashi, Ken-Ichiro; Saito, Shigeru; Goto, Fumio

    2006-07-01

    The use of volatile anesthetics has been reported to alter cerebrovascular carbon dioxide (CO2) reactivity. We examined the comparative effects of sevoflurane versus isoflurane on cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity in 40 patients with diabetes mellitus. Anesthesia was maintained with either 1.0 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration of sevoflurane or 1.0 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration of isoflurane in 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide. A 2.5-MHz pulsed transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the right temporal window for continuous measurement of mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery. After establishing baseline middle cerebral artery velocity values and cardiovascular hemodynamics, we increased end-tidal CO2 by decreasing ventilatory frequency by 2-5 breaths/min and repeated the measurements. These were then used to calculate absolute and relative CO2 reactivity. Absolute CO2 reactivity was less in insulin-treated patients with either sevoflurane or isoflurane compared with those patients on oral antidiabetic drugs or dietary therapy (sevoflurane group: diet = 2.6 +/- 0.6; oral antidiabetic drug = 2.5 +/- 0.8; insulin = 1.6 +/- 0.8*; isoflurane group: diet = 3.3 +/- i0.7; oral antidiabetic drug = 3.4 +/- 0.7; insulin = 1.9 +/- 0.7* cm.s(-1).mm Hg(-1); *P < 0.05, respectively). Relative CO2 reactivity showed a similar pattern in the diet-controlled and oral antidiabetic groups, absolute and relative CO2 reactivities were lower with sevoflurane versus isoflurane. Hence, we conclude that cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity in insulin-dependent patients is impaired under both sevoflurane and isoflurane anesthesia.

  14. Effect of hypercarbia and isoflurane on brain cell death and neurocognitive dysfunction in 7-day-old rats.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, Greg; May, Laura D V; Sall, Jeffrey W; Alvi, Rehan S; Bell, Joseph S; Ormerod, Brandi K; Rau, Vinuta; Hilton, Joan F; Dai, Ran; Lee, Michael T; Visrodia, Kavel H; Ku, Ban; Zusmer, Emanuel J; Guggenheim, Jeremy; Firouzian, Atoosa

    2009-04-01

    Millions of neonates undergo anesthesia each year. Certain anesthetic agents cause brain cell death and long-term neurocognitive dysfunction in postnatal day (P)7 rats. Despite its intuitive appeal, a causal link between cell death and neurocognitive decline after anesthesia has not been established. If one existed, the degree of cell death would be expected to correlate with the degree of neurocognitive dysfunction caused by anesthesia. The authors therefore tested if cell death caused by various durations of isoflurane at 1 minimum alveolar concentration causes duration-dependent long-term neurocognitive dysfunction. Isoflurane was administered to P7 rats at 1 minimum alveolar concentration for 0, 1, 2, or 4 h. To control for the respiratory depressant effects of anesthesia, a group of rats was treated with 4 h of carbon dioxide. Cell death was assessed by FluoroJade staining 12 h after the end of each intervention, and neurocognitive outcome was assessed 8 weeks later by using fear conditioning, spatial reference memory, and spatial working memory tasks. Widespread brain cell death was caused by 2 h and 4 h of isoflurane and by 4 h of carbon dioxide. The degree and distribution of thalamic cell death was similar in 4 h isoflurane-treated and 4-h carbon dioxide-treated rats. Only 4 h of isoflurane caused a long-term neurocognitive deficit affecting both spatial reference memory and spatial working memory. Working memory was improved in carbon dioxide-treated rats. Isoflurane-induced brain cell death may be partly caused by hypercarbia. The inconsistencies between cell death and neurocognitive outcome suggest that additional or alternative mechanisms may mediate anesthesia-induced long-term neurocognitive dysfunction.

  15. Effect of flumazenil on sevoflurane requirements for minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake and recovery status.

    PubMed

    Liang, Peng; Zhou, Cheng; Li, Kai-Yu; Guo, Li-Juan; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    It is controversial that whether the GABA receptors contribute to the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics. This study was to detect the effect of GABA receptors on the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics by evaluation of the effect of intravenous flumazenil on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake (MAC-Awake) and emergence mental status. This study included two steps. Firstly, 49 healthy patients, aged 20-40 years scheduled for elective surgeries, were randomly assigned to two groups, a flumazenil group (n=24) and a saline group (n=25). The flumazenil group received 0.006 mg/Kg IV, and the control group received the same volume of saline 20 min before induction. The flumazenil group and the control group were compared with regard to MAC-Awake (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of eye opening in response to a verbal command). We used the mask inhalation to measure the MAC-Awake by up-and-down method. The second steps, 60 patients undergoing lower abdomen surgeries were randomly divided into two groups, a experimental group (n=30) and a saline group (n=30). All patients were anesthetized with sevoflurane/sulfentanil. The experimental group received flumazenil at 0.006 mg/Kg IV, and the control group received the same volume of saline at the end of surgery. We recorded the time to awake and extubation. After extubation, the patients' recovery status was scored with the Mini-Mental state examination (MMSE) system in post anesthesia care unit (PACU). The MAC-Awake was 0.65% in the control group and 0.82% in the flumazenil group (p=0.34). After extubation, the recovery time and time to extubation showed no difference between the flumazenil group and the saline group (p>0.05). But the 10 min and 15 min MMSE scores after extubation were better in the flumazenil group than those in the saline group (p<0.05). There was no difference for MMSE scores after 30 min between two groups. We found that an IV flumazenil (0.006 mg/Kg) has

  16. Effect of flumazenil on sevoflurane requirements for minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake and recovery status

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Peng; Zhou, Cheng; Li, Kai-Yu; Guo, Li-Juan; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: It is controversial that whether the GABA receptors contribute to the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics. This study was to detect the effect of GABA receptors on the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics by evaluation of the effect of intravenous flumazenil on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration–awake (MAC-Awake) and emergence mental status. Methods: This study included two steps. Firstly, 49 healthy patients, aged 20-40 years scheduled for elective surgeries, were randomly assigned to two groups, a flumazenil group (n=24) and a saline group (n=25). The flumazenil group received 0.006 mg/Kg IV, and the control group received the same volume of saline 20 min before induction. The flumazenil group and the control group were compared with regard to MAC-Awake (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of eye opening in response to a verbal command). We used the mask inhalation to measure the MAC-Awake by up-and-down method. The second steps, 60 patients undergoing lower abdomen surgeries were randomly divided into two groups, a experimental group (n=30) and a saline group (n=30). All patients were anesthetized with sevoflurane/sulfentanil. The experimental group received flumazenil at 0.006 mg/Kg IV, and the control group received the same volume of saline at the end of surgery. We recorded the time to awake and extubation. After extubation, the patients’ recovery status was scored with the Mini-Mental state examination (MMSE) system in post anesthesia care unit (PACU). Results: The MAC-Awake was 0.65% in the control group and 0.82% in the flumazenil group (p=0.34). After extubation, the recovery time and time to extubation showed no difference between the flumazenil group and the saline group (p>0.05). But the 10 min and 15 min MMSE scores after extubation were better in the flumazenil group than those in the saline group (p<0.05). There was no difference for MMSE scores after 30 min between two groups. Conclusion: We

  17. Cardiopulmonary effects of three concentrations of isoflurane with or without mechanical ventilation and supramaximal noxious stimulation in New Zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Barter, Linda S; Epstein, Steven E

    2013-10-01

    To determine the cardiopulmonary effects of 3 doses of isoflurane, with and without controlled mechanical ventilation and noxious stimulation, in healthy adult New Zealand white rabbits. 6 adult female rabbits. Each rabbit was administered isoflurane in oxygen at each of 3 anesthetic doses (1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 times the published minimum alveolar concentration of 2.07%). At each anesthetic dose, blood gas and cardiopulmonary measurements were obtained before and during application of a supramaximal noxious stimulus. Effects of spontaneous and mechanical ventilation were assessed during separate anesthetic episodes. Mean ± SEM isoflurane concentrations used were 2.11 ± 0.04%, 3.14 ± 0.07%, and 4.15 ± 0.06%. During spontaneous ventilation, the rabbits' Paco2 and mixed venous Pco2 significantly increased with concomitant reductions in both arterial and mixed venous pH as isoflurane concentration increased. Cardiac output and vascular resistance did not change significantly. Noxious stimulation minimally affected measured cardiopulmonary variables. During mechanical ventilation, significant reductions in arterial blood pressures and cardiac output occurred with increasing isoflurane dose. Systemic vascular resistance index at the highest anesthetic dose was significantly lower than the value at the lowest anesthetic dose. During noxious stimulation, systolic arterial blood pressure and cardiac output significantly increased at the 2 lower isoflurane concentrations, but not at the highest concentration. In rabbits, isoflurane-induced dose-dependent cardiopulmonary depression was attributable to vasodilation and negative inotropy. At an isoflurane concentration of 4.15% with mechanical ventilation, cardiovascular depression was severe; use of unnecessarily high isoflurane concentrations in this species should be avoided.

  18. Effects of isoflurane on echocardiographic parameters in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marlos G; Carareto, Roberta; De-Nardi, Andrigo B; Brito, Fábio L C; Nunes, Newton; Camacho, Aparecido A

    2008-05-01

    To study the echocardiographic effects of isoflurane at an end-tidal concentration approximating 1.0 times the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in healthy unpremedicated dogs. Prospective experimental trial. Sixteen mature mongrel dogs of either sex weighing 11.06 +/- 2.72 kg. After performing a baseline echocardiogram in the awake animal, anesthesia was induced with increasing inspired concentrations of isoflurane via a face mask until tracheal intubation was possible. Following intubation, the end-tidal concentration was decreased to 1.4% for the rest of the anesthetic period. Serial echocardiograms were recorded at 25, 40, and 55 minutes after the end-tidal concentration was reached. No changes were observed in heart rate. However, significant decreases were seen in left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (Mean maximal change: 13.8%), interventricular septal thickness during systole (15.2%), interventricular septal thickening fraction (72.2%), left ventricular free wall thickening fraction (63.5%), ejection fraction (39.9%), and fractional shortening (46.7%). In addition, peak flow velocities across mitral, pulmonic, and aortic valves were significantly lower than baseline values. Decreases were also observed in end-diastolic left ventricular volume index (approximately 32.1% from the awake value), stroke index (58.2%), and cardiac index (55.3%) when compared with awake measurements. and clinical relevance Our results indicate that 1 x MAC isoflurane caused significant myocardial depression in healthy dogs. These changes in myocardial function need to be considered carefully when isoflurane is to be used in dogs with poor cardiovascular reserve.

  19. Isoflurane does not affect brain cell death, hippocampal neurogenesis, or long-term neurocognitive outcome in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, Greg; Sall, Jeffrey W; Bell, Joseph S; Alvi, Rehan S; May, Laura d V; Ku, Ban; Dowlatshahi, Mitra; Dai, Ran; Bickler, Philip E; Russell, Isobel; Lee, Michael T; Hrubos, Margit W; Chiu, Cheryl

    2010-02-01

    Roughly, 10% of elderly patients develop postoperative cognitive dysfunction. General anesthesia impairs spatial memory in aged rats, but the mechanism is not known. Hippocampal neurogenesis affects spatial learning and memory in rats, and isoflurane affects neurogenesis in neonatal and young adult rats. We tested the hypothesis that isoflurane impairs neurogenesis and hippocampal function in aged rats. Isoflurane was administered to 16-month-old rats at one minimum alveolar concentration for 4 h. FluoroJade staining was performed to assess brain cell death 16 h after isoflurane administration. Dentate gyrus progenitor proliferation was assessed by bromodeoxyuridine injection 4 days after anesthesia and quantification of bromodeoxyuridine+ cells 12 h later. Neuronal differentiation was studied by determining colocalization of bromodeoxyuridine with the immature neuronal marker NeuroD 5 days after anesthesia. New neuronal survival was assessed by quantifying cells coexpressing bromodeoxyuridine and the mature neuronal marker NeuN 5 weeks after anesthesia. Four months after anesthesia, associative learning was assessed by fear conditioning. Spatial reference memory acquisition and retention was tested in the Morris Water Maze. Cell death was sporadic and not different between groups. We did not detect any differences in hippocampal progenitor proliferation, neuronal differentiation, new neuronal survival, or in any of the tests of long-term hippocampal function. In aged rats, isoflurane does not affect brain cell death, hippocampal neurogenesis, or long-term neurocognitive outcome.

  20. Effects of one minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration sevoflurane on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and CO2 reactivity in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Mielck, F; Stephan, H; Weyland, A; Sonntag, H

    1999-08-01

    We investigated the cerebral hemodynamic effects of 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) sevoflurane anesthesia in nine male patients scheduled for elective coronary bypass grafting. For measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), a modified Kety-Schmidt saturation technique was used with argon as an inert tracer gas. Measurements of CBF were performed before the induction of anesthesia and 30 min after induction under normocapnic, hypocapnic, and hypercapnic conditions. Compared with the awake state under normocapnic conditions, sevoflurane reduced the mean cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by 47% and the mean cerebral metabolic rate of glucose by 39%. Concomitantly, CBF was reduced by 38%, although mean arterial pressure was kept constant. Significant changes in jugular venous oxygen saturation were absent. Hypocapnia and hypercapnia caused a 51% decrease and a 58% increase in CBF, respectively. These changes in CBF caused by variation of Paco2 indicate that cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity persists during 1 MAC sevoflurane anesthesia. We used a modified Kety-Schmidt saturation technique to investigate the effects of 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) sevoflurane on cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and CO2 reactivity in cardiac patients. We found that the global cerebral blood flow and global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen remained coupled and that cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity is not impaired by the administration of 1 MAC sevoflurane.

  1. Disparity of isoflurane effects on left and right ventricular afterload and hydraulic power generation in swine.

    PubMed

    Heerdt, P M; Gandhi, C D; Dickstein, M L

    1998-09-01

    The interaction between myocardial and vascular effects of anesthetics has a potential impact on how these drugs influence performance of the heart. Most studies have focused on volatile anesthetic effects on the left ventricle (LV) and systemic circulation. Whether the right ventricle (RV) and pulmonary circulation respond in a similar fashion, however, is unclear. In the present study, we therefore examined the dose-related effects of isoflurane on LV and RV contractility and total afterload and related changes to simultaneous effects on the hydraulic power generated by each chamber. Two groups of swine were studied: one received no additional treatment before isoflurane (ISO, n = 6), and the other received hexamethonium, atropine, and propranolol to produce autonomic blockade before isoflurane administration (ISO+AB, n = 4). For each experiment, measurements were made of RV and LV regional segment lengths and pressures, along with proximal aortic and pulmonary arterial (PA) blood flow and pressure during the administration of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) isoflurane. Contractility was assessed by calculating the regional preload recruitable stroke work slope (PRSW). Afterload was characterized in both nonpulsatile and pulsatile terms by calculating aortic input impedance magnitude (Z). From these data, total arterial resistance (R), characteristic impedance (ZC), and vascular compliance (C) were determined with reference to a three-element Windkessel model of the circulation. Additionally, steady-state (WSS), oscillatory (WOS), and total (WT) hydraulic power output of each ventricle was calculated. In the ISO group, isoflurane produced a nearly threefold greater decrease of peak systolic pressure in the LV than in the RV, yet the dose-related decrease of regional PRSW was virtually the same in both chambers. In the aorta, isoflurane produced a maximal 25% reduction in R at 1.0 MAC and doubled C without a significant change

  2. The minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) and aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis).

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Williams, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    To determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane for ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) and aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis). Prospective experimental trial. Six adult ring-tailed lemurs, aged 1.3-11.2 years (median age: 8.26) and weighing a mean ± standard deviation (SD) of 2283 ± 254 g. Five adult aye-ayes, aged 4.4-19.3 years (median age: 8.0) and weighing 2712 ± 191 g. Minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane was determined using a tail-clamp stimulus. The end-tidal sevoflurane (Fe'Sevo) concentration was increased or decreased by approximately 10% after a positive or negative response to tail clamping, respectively. This procedure was repeated until a positive and negative result were seen on two consecutive trials (i.e. a negative result was achieved and a single 10% decrease in Fe'Sevo concentration resulted in a positive test). The MAC for that animal was determined to be the mean of the concentrations at the two consecutive trials. The mean ± SD MAC of sevoflurane for ring-tailed lemurs was 3.48 ± 0.55% and 1.84 ± 0.17 for aye-ayes. This represents a 47.1% higher MAC in ring-tailed lemurs compared to aye-ayes. The sevoflurane MAC was significantly higher in ring-tailed lemurs, compared to aye-ayes. The MAC of sevoflurane in aye-ayes is consistent with reported MAC values in other species. Extrapolation of sevoflurane anesthetic dose between different species of lemurs could lead to significant errors in anesthetic dosing. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  3. Effects of desflurane and isoflurane on hepatic and renal functions and coagulation profile during donor hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Toprak, H I; Şahin, T; Aslan, S; Karahan, K; Şanli, M; Ersoy, M Ö

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of two inhalation anesthetics desflurane and isoflurane on postoperative hepatic and renal functions as well as coagulation profiles in living donors undergoing right hepatectomy. This study was performed on 80 patients who were randomly allocated to group D (desflurane, n = 40) or group I (isoflurane, n = 40) after Faculty Ethics Committee approval. After induction, isoflurane or desflurane was used with air/oxygen for anesthetic maintenance. The isoflurane or desflurane concentration was set at one minimum alveolar concentration (MAC). Remifentanil was infused for analgesia as well as cisatracurium. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), international normalized ratio (INR), albumin, total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, platelet count, and hemoglobin levels were analyzed preoperatively at end of the operation, and on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 30. Both AST and ALT differed significantly and continually except on POD 30. AST showed significant elevations from the end of the operation to POD 2 and ALT, from the end of the operation to POD 5 in group I compared with group D. INR was significantly higher from the end of the operation to POD 3 in group I and to POD 2 in group D. At the end of the operation as well as on POD 1 and POD 2, INR was significantly increased in group I compared with group D. Albumin level was significantly lower at the end of the operation in both groups, but it was not different. No patient developed hepatic or renal failure. Our study showed better postoperative hepatic tests and INR using desflurane than isoflurane at equivalent doses of 1 MAC in living donors undergoing right hepatectomy.

  4. Inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase reduces isoflurane MAC and motor activity even in nNOS knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, T; Lowe, P R; Galley, H F; Webster, N R

    2006-03-01

    The glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway has been identified as a potential target for volatile anaesthetic agents as acute inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reduces the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in most animal studies. However, mice deficient in the type I NOS isoform (nNOS) are reported to have a similar MAC for isoflurane and are not affected by non-isoform specific inhibitors. We determined whether the nNOS specific inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), had an effect on isoflurane MAC and righting reflex (RRF) and investigated spontaneous motor activity in an open-field study in wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. 7-NI reduced isoflurane MAC and RRF in both WT and KO animals (all P<0.04). 7-NI profoundly reduced spontaneous motor activity in both the WT and KO animals in the open-field study as indicated by a reduction in the number of line crossings and rearings in both WT and KO mice (both P<0.001). We conclude that isoform specific inhibition of nNOS reduces MAC and spontaneous motor activity even in nNOS KO animals. Our results indicate that the NMDA receptor-nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway remains a credible target in modulating the effects of isoflurane.

  5. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation under different inhaled concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in pigs undergoing hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Alexandre Hideaki; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Hamaji, Marcelo Waldir M; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Ida, Keila Kazue; Fantoni, Denise T; Auler, José Otavio Costa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalant anesthesia induces dose-dependent cardiovascular depression, but whether fluid responsiveness is differentially influenced by the inhalant agent and plasma volemia remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in pigs undergoing hemorrhage. METHODS: Twenty-five pigs were randomly anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data were registered sequentially at minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M1), 1.25 (M2), and 1.00 (M3). Then, following withdrawal of 30% of the estimated blood volume, these data were registered at a minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M4) and 1.25 (M5). RESULTS: The minimum alveolar concentration increase from 1.00 to 1.25 (M2) decreased the cardiac index and increased the central venous pressure, but only modest changes in mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were observed in all groups from M1 to M2. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure was only observed with desflurane. Following blood loss (M4), pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation and central venous pressure increased (p<0.001) and mean arterial pressure decreased in all groups. Under hypovolemia, the cardiac index decreased with the increase of anesthesia depth in a similar manner in all groups. CONCLUSION: The effects of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were not different during normovolemia or hypovolemia. PMID:26735220

  6. Effects of intravenous lidocaine, ketamine, and the combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jeffrey; Doherty, Thomas J; Egger, Christine M; Fidler, Andrew; Cox, Sherry; Rohrbach, Barton

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of intravenous lidocaine (L) and ketamine (K) alone and their combination (LK) on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane (SEVO) in dogs. Prospective randomized, Latin-square experimental study. Six, healthy, adult Beagles, 2 males, 4 females, weighing 7.8 - 12.8 kg. Anesthesia was induced with SEVO in oxygen delivered by face mask. The tracheas were intubated and the lungs ventilated to maintain normocapnia. Baseline minimum alveolar concentration of SEVO (MAC(B)) was determined in duplicate for each dog using an electrical stimulus and then the treatment was initiated. Each dog received each of the following treatments, intravenously as a loading dose (LD) followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI): lidocaine (LD 2 mg kg(-1), CRI 50 microg kg(-1)minute(-1)), lidocaine (LD 2 mg kg(-1), CRI 100 microg kg(-1) minute(-1)), lidocaine (LD 2 mg kg(-1), CRI 200 microg kg(-1) minute(-1)), ketamine (LD 3 mg kg(-1), CRI 50 microg kg(-1) minute(-1)), ketamine (LD 3 mgkg(-1), CRI 100 microg kg(-1) minute(-1)), or lidocaine (LD 2 mg kg(-1), CRI 100 microg kg(-1) minute(-1)) + ketamine (LD 3 mg kg(-1), CRI 100 microg kg(-1) minute(-1)) in combination. Post-treatment MAC (MAC(T)) determination started 30 minutes after initiation of treatment. Least squares mean +/- SEM MAC(B) of all groups was 1.9 +/- 0.2%. Lidocaine infusions of 50, 100, and 200 microg kg(-1) minute(-1) significantly reduced MAC(B) by 22.6%, 29.0%, and 39.6%, respectively. Ketamine infusions of 50 and 100 microg kg(-1) minute(-1) significantly reduced MAC(B) by 40.0% and 44.7%, respectively. The combination of K and L significantly reduced MAC(B) by 62.8%. Lidocaine and K, alone and in combination, decrease SEVO MAC in dogs. Their use, at the doses studied, provides a clinically important reduction in the concentration of SEVO during anesthesia in dogs.

  7. Bidirectional modulation of isoflurane potency by intrathecal tetrodotoxin and veratridine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Guzinski, M; Eger, EI; Laster, MJ; Sharma, M; Harris, RA; Hemmings, HC

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Results from several studies point to voltage-gated Na+ channels as potential mediators of the immobility produced by inhaled anaesthetics. We hypothesized that the intrathecal administration of tetrodotoxin, a drug that blocks Na+ channels, should enhance anaesthetic potency, and that concurrent administration of veratridine, a drug that augments Na+ channel opening, should reverse the increase in potency. Experimental approach: We measured the change in isoflurane potency for reducing movement in response to a painful stimulus as defined by MAC (minimum alveolar concentration of anaesthetic required to abolish movement in 50% of subjects) caused by intrathecal infusion of various concentrations of tetrodotoxin into the lumbothoracic subarachnoid space of rats, and the change in MAC caused by the administration of a fixed dose of tetrodotoxin plus various doses of intrathecal veratridine. Key results: Intrathecal infusion of tetrodotoxin (0.078–0.63 µM) produced a reversible dose-related decrease in MAC, of more than 50% at the highest concentration. Intrathecal co-administration of veratridine (1.6–6.4 µM) reversed this decrease in a dose-related manner, with nearly complete reversal at the highest veratridine dose tested. Conclusions and implications: Intrathecal administration of tetrodotoxin increases isoflurane potency (decreases isoflurane MAC), and intrathecal administration of veratridine counteracts this effect in vivo. These findings are consistent with a role for voltage-gated Na+ channel blockade in the immobility produced by inhaled anaesthetics. PMID:20105175

  8. Effects of a single bolus intravenous dose of tramadol on minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Itami, Takaharu; Kawase, Kodai; Tamaru, Naomichi; Ishizuka, Tomohito; Tamura, Jun; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Umar, Mohammed A; Inoue, Hiroki; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    Tramadol is an atypical opioid analgesic widely used in small animal practice. This study was designed to determine the effect of a single intravenous (IV) dose of tramadol on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Six beagle dogs were anesthetized twice to determine the sevoflurane MAC with or without an administration of tramadol (4 mg/kg, IV) at 7 days interval. The sevoflurane MAC was determined using a tail clamp method in each dog ventilated with positive pressure ventilation. The tramadol administration produced a significant reduction in the sevoflurane MAC by 22.3 ± 12.2% (1.44 ± 0.28% with tramadol versus 1.86 ± 0.30% without tramadol, P=0.010). This MAC reduction had been determined from 122 ± 19 to 180 ± 41 min following the tramadol administration. During this period, the plasma concentrations of tramadol and its metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol (M1), decreased from 429 ± 64 to 332 ± 55 ng/ml and from 136 ± 24 to 114 ± 68 ng/ml, respectively, but these changes were not statistically significant. There was no significant difference in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure and SpO2 between the control and tramadol treatment. The dogs that received tramadol treatment sometimes breathed spontaneously. Therefore, their respiratory rates significantly increased, and PETCO2 decreased during the MAC determination. In conclusion, the single IV dose of tramadol produced a significant reduction in the sevoflurane MAC in dogs.

  9. A mechanical stimulator for the determination of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of halothane in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sobair, A T; Cottrell, D F; Camburn, M A

    1993-01-01

    The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of halothane was determined in New Zealand White rabbits. Tracheal anaesthetic concentrations were measured using a Siemens Servo Gas Monitor. A stimulator was used to deliver precisely controlled mechanical stimuli for the determination of MAC. Movement of the rabbit's head was recorded using a force transducer attached to the teeth. Evidence is presented that for the determination of MAC a precise nociceptive threshold is preferable to the so-called supramaximal stimulus used in clinical anaesthesia and in determination of anaesthetic potency. We conclude that techniques for the determination of MAC which disregard either sensitization of sensory mechanisms by producing tissue inflammation or the possibility of nerve compression by severe mechanical stimuli are of questionable value. The use of the mechanical stimulator described, or a similar device, would help in the standardization of the determination of MAC in all species by facilitating the application of a force of controlled amplitude, duration and velocity, thereby removing some of the variables which confound comparative studies of MAC.

  10. Minimum alveolar concentrations of noble gases, nitrogen, and sulfur hexafluoride in rats: helium and neon as nonimmobilizers (nonanesthetics)

    PubMed

    Koblin, D D; Fang, Z; Eger, E I; Laster, M J; Gong, D; Ionescu, P; Halsey, M J; Trudell, J R

    1998-08-01

    We assessed the anesthetic properties of helium and neon at hyperbaric pressures by testing their capacity to decrease anesthetic requirement for desflurane using electrical stimulation of the tail as the anesthetic endpoint (i.e., the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration [MAC]) in rats. Partial pressures of helium or neon near those predicted to produce anesthesia by the Meyer-Overton hypothesis (approximately 80-90 atm), tended to increase desflurane MAC, and these partial pressures of helium and neon produced convulsions when administered alone. In contrast, the noble gases argon, krypton, and xenon were anesthetic with mean MAC values of (+/- SD) of 27.0 +/- 2.6, 7.31 +/- 0.54, and 1.61 +/- 0.17 atm, respectively. Because the lethal partial pressures of nitrogen and sulfur hexafluoride overlapped their anesthetic partial pressures, MAC values were determined for these gases by additivity studies with desflurane. Nitrogen and sulfur hexafluoride MAC values were estimated to be 110 and 14.6 atm, respectively. Of the gases with anesthetic properties, nitrogen deviated the most from the Meyer-Overton hypothesis. It has been thought that the high pressures of helium and neon that might be needed to produce anesthesia antagonize their anesthetic properties (pressure reversal of anesthesia). We propose an alternative explanation: like other compounds with a low affinity to water, helium and neon are intrinsically without anesthetic effect.

  11. The effect of aminophylline on loss of consciousness, bispectral index, propofol requirement, and minimum alveolar concentration of desflurane in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Turan, Alparslan; Kasuya, Yusuke; Govinda, Raghavendra; Obal, Detlef; Rauch, Stefan; Dalton, Jarrod E; Akça, Ozan; Sessler, Daniel I

    2010-02-01

    Adenosine is a soporific neuromodulator; aminophylline, which is clinically used as a bronchodilator, antagonizes the action of adenosine in the central nervous system. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that aminophylline delays loss of consciousness (LOC) and speeds recovery of consciousness (ROC) with propofol anesthesia, and that aminophylline increases the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of desflurane. In this double-blind crossover study, volunteers were randomized to either aminophylline or saline on different days. Aminophylline 6 mg/kg was given IV, followed by 1.5 mg x kg(-1) x h(-1) throughout the study day. After 1 h of aminophylline or saline administration, propofol 200 mg was given at a rate of 20 mg/min. The bispectral index was continuously monitored, as were times to LOC and ROC. After recovery from propofol, general anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane and subsequently maintained with desflurane. The Dixon "up-and-down" method was used to determine MAC in each volunteer after repeated tetanic electrical stimulation. Eight volunteers completed both study days. Time to LOC was prolonged by aminophylline compared with saline (mean +/- SD) (7.7 +/- 2.03 min vs 5.1 +/- 0.75 s, respectively, P = 0.011). The total propofol dose at LOC was larger with aminophylline (2.2 +/- 0.9 vs 1.4 +/- 0.4 mg/kg, P = 0.01), and the time to ROC was shorter (6.18 +/- 3.96 vs 12.2 +/- 4.73 min, P = 0.035). The minimum bispectral index was greater with aminophylline (51 +/- 15 vs 38 +/- 9, P = 0.034). There was no difference in MAC. Aminophylline decreases the sedative effects of propofol but does not affect MAC of desflurane as determined by tetanic electrical stimulation.

  12. Evaluation of ASPAN's preoperative patient teaching videos on general, regional, and minimum alveolar concentration/conscious sedation anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Krenzischek, D A; Wilson, L; Poole, E L

    2001-06-01

    This descriptive study was undertaken as part of a clinical improvement effort by the ASPAN Research and Education Committees to evaluate adult patients' perception of and satisfaction with the ASPAN Preoperative Patient Teaching videotape on general, regional, and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC)/conscious sedation anesthesia. Research findings on the use of videotapes for preoperative education are mixed. Some studies have reported that the use of videotapes increases knowledge and decreases anxiety, whereas other studies have shown a minimal effect on knowledge and anxiety. A convenience sample of 96 adult patients was chosen from those who were scheduled for surgeries with the above anesthesia techniques in 11 US hospitals and/or surgical centers within 4 ASPAN regional boundaries. Patients viewed the videotape the day(s) before surgery and then completed ASPAN's Preoperative Anesthesia Patient Teaching Questionnaire to measure patient perception and satisfaction. Sixty percent of the patients were women, and 50% had a college degree or higher. The average age of the patients was 51 (+/-17.2). Overall satisfaction scores had a potential range of 10 to 40, with higher scores indicating greater satisfaction. The mean satisfaction score for this study was 35 (+/-6.6). No significant relationships were found between satisfaction with the videotape and age, gender, or educational level. Patients were asked to rank each of 4 teaching methods. Among the choices of individualized instruction, written materials, Internet-based instruction, and videotape, the videotape method was ranked as most preferred. The information obtained from this study will be used to modify and improve the content of the patient education videotape produced by ASPAN.

  13. Hyperalgesia and increased sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration induced by opioids in the rat: a randomised experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana; Aguado, Delia; Benito, Javier; García-Fernández, Javier; Segura, Ignacio A Gómez de

    2015-04-01

    Perioperative opioids reduce inhalational anaesthetic requirements. The initial hypoalgesia may, however, be followed by a rebound hyperalgesia. To determine whether prior opioid administration influences inhalational anaesthetic requirements, which might be associated with opioid-induced hyperalgesia. A prospective, randomised, experimental study. Experimental Surgery, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. Seventy-nine adult male Wistar rats. Sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNTs) were assessed at baseline and 7 days later following opioid treatment with remifentanil 120 μg  kg-1  h-1, buprenorphine 150 μg kg-1, methadone 8 mg  kg-1 or morphine 10 mg  kg-1 The duration of the effect of remifentanil on MAC and MNT was evaluated in addition to the preventive effect of ketamine 10 mg  kg-1 on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. The effect of different opioid treatments on MAC and MNT was evaluated using analysis of variance (ANOVA). All studied opioids produced an immediate reduction in sevoflurane MAC, followed by an increase (16%) in baseline MAC 7 days later (P < 0.05), although the immediate MAC reduction produced by these opioids at that time was not different. Remifentanil produced a decrease in MNT (P < 0.05), which was associated with an increase in the MAC (P < 0.05) that persisted at 21 days. The effect of remifentanil on MNT and MAC was blocked by ketamine. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia was associated with an increase in the MAC in normal rats who had not undergone surgery. Both effects lasted 21 days and were prevented by ketamine.

  14. Ketamine and remifentanil interactions on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration and acute opioid tolerance in the rat.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Delia; Abreu, Mariana; Benito, Javier; García-Fernández, Javier; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2011-09-01

    Ketamine is used at low doses for its analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties when combined with opioids but also when opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance appear. In this study we determined the interaction of ketamine and remifentanil on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in rats and to determine whether ketamine may block acute opioid tolerance (AOT). Male Wistar rats were anesthetized with sevoflurane, and the MAC was determined before and after ketamine administration (10, 20, 40, and 80 mg kg(-1) or saline) alone or combined with remifentanil (120 and 240 μg kg(-1) h(-1), low and high doses, respectively). One additional group received the lowest ketamine dose after starting a remifentanil infusion. Finally, naloxone was administered to determine the potential action of ketamine on opioid receptors. MAC was determined from intratracheal gas samples, and tail clamping was used as a supramaximal stimulus. End-tidal anesthetic concentrations were assayed using a side stream gas analyzer. Statistical analysis was performed with an analysis of variance. Ketamine and remifentanil dose-dependently reduced the MAC. Adding the low dose of remifentanil to ketamine did not improve the MAC reduction, whereas the high dose of remifentanil enhanced ketamine reduction in a subadditive fashion. Nevertheless, ketamine was unable to block the development of AOT to remifentanil at either dose. Finally, naloxone blocked the MAC reduction produced by ketamine. A subadditive effect between ketamine and remifentanil was found on the sevoflurane MAC reduction rats. In addition, ketamine was unable to block AOT. The clinical relevance of these findings should be elucidated in future studies to reduce anesthetic requirements.

  15. Effect of nitrous oxide on bispectral index values at equi-minimum alveolar concentrations of sevoflurane and desflurane.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rajeeb Kumar; Mahajan, Charu; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Kapoor, Indu; Bithal, Parmod Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Bispectral index (BIS) values may be anaesthetic agent-specific, depending on their ability to suppress the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. We carried out a prospective, randomised clinical trial to study the effect of nitrous oxide (N2O) on the BIS values at an equi-minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane and desflurane. Sixty adult patients undergoing spine surgery were randomised into two groups; Group S (sevoflurane; n = 30) and Group D (desflurane; n = 30) for the maintenance of anaesthesia in oxygen and air or oxygen and N2O mixture (FiO2-0.4) (Stage 1). BIS and fraction of inspired and end-tidal concentration of agents were noted at 1.0 MAC. In Stage 2, air or N2O was discontinued and the other carrier gas was introduced. At steady state of this carrier gas, values were again noted as in Stage 1. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni correction, and Student's t-test for paired data. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. With air-oxygen as the carrier gas, sevoflurane and desflurane resulted in comparable BIS values (P = 0.44). With addition of 60% N2O, there was a significant increase in BIS values at 1.0 MAC for both the agents. Furthermore, higher BIS values were observed with sevoflurane compared to desflurane (P = 0.01). Sevoflurane and desflurane at equi-MAC concentration exert similar effect on BIS values when used with air-oxygen. N2O results in higher BIS values; this effect is more pronounced in combination with sevoflurane.

  16. Insulin secretion and glucose utilization are impaired under general anesthesia with sevoflurane as well as isoflurane in a concentration-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tadashi; Nabatame, Hideki; Tanifuji, Yasumasa

    2005-01-01

    The dose-dependent effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane anesthesia on glucose tolerance were compared in humans. A prospective, randomized clinical study was conducted in 30 patients. The 30 patients were divided randomly into three sevoflurane anesthesia groups (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]) and three isoflurane anesthesia groups (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 MAC). Induction of anesthesia was accomplished by inhalation of the volatile agent and nitrous oxide. After induction, anesthesia was maintained at the designated MAC for 15 min without surgical stimulation. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed in these 30 patients while they were under general anesthesia and again several days after surgery in 5 of these patients while they were awake, as a control. The insulinogenic index (change in concentration of immunoreactive insulin/change in glucose concentration), the acute insulin response, and rates of glucose disappearance were significantly lower in all anesthesia groups than in the control group. However, the insulinogenic index, acute insulin response, and the glucose disappearance rate did not differ significantly among the six anesthesia groups. Sevoflurane anesthesia impairs glucose tolerance to the same degree as does isoflurane anesthesia. Glucose intolerance during sevoflurane or isoflurane anesthesia is independent of agent and dosage up to 1.5 MAC.

  17. The anesthetic interaction of propofol and sevoflurane on the minimum alveolar concentration preventing motor movement (MACNM) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Singsank-Coats, Jill; Seddighi, Reza; Rohrbach, Barton W; Cox, Sherry K; Egger, Christine M; Doherty, Thomas J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of propofol on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane needed to prevent motor movement (MAC(NM)) in dogs subjected to a noxious stimulus using randomized crossover design. Six, healthy, adult beagles (9.2 ± 1.3 kg) were used. Dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane on 3 occasions, at weekly intervals, and baseline MAC(NM) (MAC(NM-B)) was determined on each occasion. Propofol treatments were administered as loading dose (LD) and constant rate infusion (CRI) as follows: Treatment 1 (T1) was 2 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 4.5 mg/kg BW per hour; T2 was 4 mg/kg BW and 9 mg/kg BW per hour; T3 was 8 mg/kg BW and 18 mg/kg BW per hour, respectively. Treatment MAC(NM) (MAC(NM-T)) determination was initiated 60 min after the start of the CRI. Two venous blood samples were collected and combined at each MAC(NM-T) determination for measurement of blood propofol concentration using high-performance liquid chromatography method (HPLC). Data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA and are presented as least square means (LSM) ± standard error of means (SEM). Propofol infusions in the range of 4.5 to 18 mg/kg BW per hour resulted in mean blood concentrations between 1.3 and 4.4 μg/mL, and decreased (P < 0.05) sevoflurane MAC(NM) in a concentration-dependent manner. The percentage decrease in MAC(NM) was 20.5%, 43.0%, and 68.3%, with corresponding blood propofol concentrations of 1.3 ± 0.3 μg/mL, 2.5 ± 0.3 μg/mL, and 4.4 ± 0.3 μg/mL, for T1, T2, and T3, respectively. Venous blood propofol concentrations were strongly correlated (r = 0.855, P < 0.0001) with the decrease in MAC(NM). In dogs, propofol decreased the sevoflurane MAC(NM) in a concentration-dependent manner.

  18. Influence of nociception and stress-induced antinociception on genetic variation in isoflurane anesthetic potency among mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Mogil, Jeffrey S; Smith, Shad B; O'Reilly, Meghan K; Plourde, Gilles

    2005-10-01

    Genetic background influences anesthetic potency to suppress motor response to noxious stimulation (minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]) as well as nociceptive sensitivity in unmedicated animals. However, the influence on MAC of baseline sensitivity to the noxious stimuli used to assess MAC has virtually never been studied. The authors assessed room air nociceptive sensitivity and isoflurane MAC in multiple mouse strains. Isoflurane requirement for loss of righting response (MACLORR) was also measured. One outbred and 10 inbred mouse strains were tested for latency to respond (in room air) to a tail clip (either 500 g or 2,000 g). Naive mice of the same 11 strains were tested for isoflurane MAC and MACLORR. To assess the role of opioid-mediated stress-induced antinociception, mice were also tested for nociceptive sensitivity after injection of naloxone (10 mg/kg) or saline. Robust strain differences were observed for all measures. The authors found that tail-clip latency (using a 500-g or 2,000-g clip, respectively) correlated significantly with MAC (r = -0.76 and -0.58, respectively) but not MACLORR (r = -0.10 and -0.26). Naloxone produced strain-dependent reductions in open air tail-clip latencies, and these reductions were also strongly correlated with MAC (r = -0.67 and -0.71). The authors suggest that genetic variability in isoflurane MAC (but not MACLORR) may reflect genetic variability in the underlying sensitivity to the noxious stimulus being used to measure MAC. This variable sensitivity to nociception in the awake state is at least partially mediated by endogenous antinociceptive mechanisms activated by the tail-clip stimulus itself.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of dopamine hydrochloride and phenylephrine hydrochloride in healthy isoflurane-anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Gosliga, Jaclyn M; Barter, Linda S

    2015-02-01

    To determine the cardiopulmonary effects of progressively increasing infusion rates of dopamine hydrochloride and phenylephrine hydrochloride in healthy adult New Zealand White rabbits anesthetized with isoflurane. 6 New Zealand White rabbits. (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Each rabbit was anesthetized on 2 occasions (≥ 2 weeks apart) with isoflurane in oxygen at 1.5 times the published isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration of 2.07%. Carotid artery and pulmonary artery catheters were placed. During each anesthetic episode, each rabbit received 5 progressively increasing doses of either dopamine (5, 10, 15, 20, or 30 μg/kg/min) or phenylephrine (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μg/kg/min). Blood gas and cardiopulmonary measurements were obtained after a 20-minute equilibration period prior to administration of the first drug dose (baseline) and after each subsequent dose administration. Dopamine increased stroke index at the highest infusion rate of 30 μg/kg/min; however, cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure remained unchanged from baseline values. Administration of phenylephrine at a rate of 2 μg/kg/min increased mean arterial blood pressure to 62 mm Hg from the baseline value of 45 mm Hg. This was a result of an increase in systemic vascular resistance with a concomitant decrease in heart rate and no change in cardiac output. Blood lactate concentration increased with time when rabbits received either treatment. Within the dose range of 5 to 30 μg/kg/min, dopamine was not an effective treatment for isoflurane-induced hypotension in rabbits and phenylephrine was only minimally effective at a dose of 2 μg/kg/min.

  20. Reduced immobilizing properties of isoflurane and nitrous oxide in mutant mice lacking the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor GluR(epsilon)1 subunit are caused by the secondary effects of gene knockout.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Andrey B; Yamakura, Tomohiro; Kohno, Tatsuro; Sakimura, Kenji; Baba, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Until recently, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was considered to possibly mediate the immobility produced by inhaled anesthetics such as isoflurane and nitrous oxide. However, new evidence suggests that the role of this receptor in abolition of the movement response may be less important than previously thought. To provide further evidence supporting or challenging this view, we examined the anesthetic potencies of isoflurane and nitrous oxide in genetically modified animals with established NMDA receptor dysfunction caused by GluRepsilon1 subunit knockout. The immobilizing properties of inhaled anesthetics in mice quantitated by the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) were evaluated using the classic tail clamp method. Compared with wild-type controls, NMDA receptor GluRepsilon1 subunit knockout mice displayed larger isoflurane MAC values indicating a resistance to the immobilizing action of isoflurane. Knockout mice were previously shown to have enhanced monoaminergic tone as a result of genetic manipulation, and this increase in MAC could be abolished in our experiments by pretreatment with the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2A receptor antagonist ketanserin or with the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist droperidol at doses that did not affect MAC values in wild-type animals. Mutant mice also displayed resistance to the isoflurane MAC-sparing effect of nitrous oxide, but this resistance was similarly abolished by ketanserin and droperidol. Thus, resistance to the immobilizing action of inhaled anesthetics in knockout mice seems to be secondary to increased monoaminergic activation after knockout rather than a direct result of impaired NMDA receptor function. Our results confirm recent findings indicating no critical contribution of NMDA receptors to the immobility induced by isoflurane and nitrous oxide. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of changes secondary to genetic manipulation to affect the results obtained in global knockout

  1. Effect of epidural and intravenous use of the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist maropitant on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Alvillar, Brittany M; Boscan, Pedro; Mama, Khursheed R; Ferreira, Tatiana H; Congdon, Jonathan; Twedt, David C

    2012-03-01

    To determine the effect of maropitant, an NK-1 receptor antagonist on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane after intravenous and epidural administration to dogs. Prospective experimental study. Seven, adult, spayed-female dogs (24.8 ± 1.9 kg). Each dog was anesthetized twice with sevoflurane in oxygen, with at least 10 days separating the anesthetic events. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane was determined using the tail-clamp technique. During the first anesthetic event, the MAC of sevoflurane was determined initially and again after intravenous administration of maropitant (5 mg kg(-1)) and an infusion (150 μg kg(-1) hour(-1)). During the second anesthetic event, an epidural catheter was advanced to the 4th lumbar vertebra and MAC was determined after administration of saline and maropitant (1 mg kg(-1)) epidurally. All MAC determinations were done in duplicate. The MAC values were adjusted to sea level and compared using student's t-test. The baseline MAC for sevoflurane was 2.08 ± 0.25%. Intravenous maropitant decreased (p < 0.05) MAC by 16% (1.74 ± 0.17%). In contrast, epidural administration of either saline or maropitant did not change (p > 0.05) the MAC (2.17 ± 0.34% and 1.92 ± 0.12%, respectively). Maropitant decreased the MAC of sevoflurane when administered intravenously to dogs but not after epidural administration. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  2. Comparison of isoflurane and sevoflurane for short-term anesthesia in piglets.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, David S

    2007-03-01

    To compare isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) short-term anesthesia in piglets during castration. Prospective, randomized study. A total of 114 male piglets aged 6-10 days, body weight 1.3-5.0 kg. Piglets were randomly selected from multiple litters and randomly assigned to being anesthetized with ISO or SEVO prior to castration. To calculate appropriate doses for induction and maintenance of anesthesia, a square root of time model was used, with calculations based on metabolic size and attainment of 1.3x minimum alveolar concentration. The equipotent target alveolar concentration of ISO was 1.82% and for SEVO 4.03%. After doses were calculated, a table listing piglet weights and agent requirements was produced. Anesthetics were delivered via liquid anesthetic injection into a previously developed rebreathing inhaler that was filled with oxygen prior to use. Piglets were anesthetized, castrated and allowed to recover prior to return to the sow. Times for induction, recovery and total time to standing were recorded, and end-tidal carbon dioxide (Pe'CO2) tensions were measured by capnography immediately after mask removal. Each response variable was analyzed in sas using the Proc Mixed procedure, with piglet weight and days of age as covariates. Castration problems and mortality were assessed relative to unanesthetized littermates. There were no statistically significant differences in age, weight or total anesthetic time between the anesthetics. Induction time was shorter, recovery time longer, and Pe'CO2 lower with ISO. No morbidity or mortality was associated with either group. Isoflurane and SEVO, delivered in a novel inhaler, provided economical, safe, rapid anesthetic induction and maintenance. Optimal conditions were provided for castration and recoveries were brief and smooth. Statistically significant differences in times would be of minor clinical importance. The cost of anesthesia was much less with ISO than with SEVO.

  3. Isoflurane MAC determination in dogs using three intensities of constant-current electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Figueiró, Marivaldo R; Soares, Joao Hn; Ascoli, Fabio O; Werre, Stephen; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio Á

    2016-09-01

    To compare isoflurane minimum alveolar concentrations (MACs) in dogs determined using three intensities of constant-current electrical stimulation applied at the tail, and thoracic and pelvic limbs, and to compare isoflurane MACs obtained with all combinations of electrical stimulation and anatomic site with those obtained using the tail clamp as the noxious stimulus. Randomized trial. Six mixed-breed, adult female dogs aged 1-2 years and weighing 11.1 ± 4.4 kg. In each dog, MAC was determined by the bracketing method with the tail clamp (MACTAILCLAMP ), and three electrical currents (10 mA, 30 mA, 50 mA) at three anatomic sites (thoracic limb, pelvic limb, tail). Each MAC achieved with electrical stimulation was compared with MACTAILCLAMP using a mixed-model anova and Dunnett's procedure for multiple comparisons. The effects of current intensity and anatomic site on isoflurane MAC were tested using a mixed-model anova followed by Tukey's test for multiple comparisons (p < 0.05). Mean MACTAILCLAMP was 1.69%. MACs achieved with currents of 30 mA and 50 mA did not differ independently of anatomic site. When currents of 10 mA were applied to the tail and thoracic limb, resulting MACs were lower than those obtained using currents of 30 mA and 50 mA. Currents of 30 mA and 50 mA provided MACs that did not differ from those of MACTAILCLAMP , whereas a current of 10 mA achieved the same result only for the pelvic limb. Isoflurane MAC is affected by current intensity and anatomic site. Current intensities of 30 mA and 50 mA provided consistent results when applied to the tail, and thoracic and pelvic limbs that did not differ from those obtained using the tail clamp. Consequently, they can be used in place of the tail clamp in MAC studies in dogs. © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  4. An observational study on patient admission in the anaesthesia gas monitor and minimum alveolar concentration monitoring: A deficiency with huge impact.

    PubMed

    Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Narayan, Anilkumar; Yunus, Md; Kumar, Sanjay; Prakash, Avinash; Sahoo, Sarasa Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) monitoring is an integral part of modern-day anaesthesia. Both MAC and MAC-awake are age dependant, and age of the patient needs to be entered in the monitor. This study was aimed to assess the practice of patient birth year entry in the anaesthesia monitor and its impact on MAC monitoring. Sixty volatile anaesthetic-based general anaesthetics (GAs) were observed silently in two tertiary care teaching hospitals with regard to 'birth year' entry in the patient monitor. The impact on MAC for non-entry of age was assessed. The observed MAC reading and the MAC corrected for age (MACage) of the patients were noted. Paired t-test was used to compare the differences in observed MAC and MACage values. P <0.05 was significant. Sixty GAs of patients aged between 10 and 68 years were observed; 96.67% anaesthetics were conducted without entering 'birth year'. Thirty-four patients (mean age 35.14 ± 15.38 years) were further assessed for impact of non-entry of age. The observed MAC was similar to MACage in patients aged 40 ± 5 years (36-45 years group). Nearly 79.41% of the observed MACs were incorrect; 55.88% patients were potentially underdosed whereas 23.53% were overdosed. Omitting patient age entry in the monitor results in erroneous MAC values, exposing patients <40 years to underdosing and older patients to overdose.

  5. Interaction between maropitant and carprofen on sparing of the minimum alveolar concentration for blunting adrenergic response (MAC-BAR) of sevoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Sho; Ooyama, Norihiko; Tamura, Jun; Umar, Mohammed Ahmed; Ishizuka, Tomohito; Itami, Takaharu; Miyoshi, Kenjiro; Sano, Tadashi; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2017-03-18

    Maropitant, a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, may provide analgesic effects by blocking pharmacological action of substance P. Carprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug commonly used for pain control in dogs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a combination of maropitant and carprofen on the minimum alveolar concentration for blunting adrenergic response (MAC-BAR) of sevoflurane in dogs. Six healthy adult beagle dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane four times with a minimum of 7-day washout period. On each occasion, maropitant (1 mg/kg) alone, carprofen (4 mg/kg) alone, a combination of maropitant (1 mg/kg) and carprofen (4 mg/kg), or saline (0.1 ml/kg) was subcutaneously administered at 1 hr prior to the first electrical stimulation for the sevoflurane MAC-BAR determination. The sevoflurane MAC-BAR was significantly reduced by maropitant alone (2.88 ± 0.73%, P=0.010), carprofen alone (2.96 ± 0.38%, P=0.016) and the combination (2.81 ± 0.51%, P=0.0003), compared with saline (3.37 ± 0.56%). There was no significant difference in the percentage of MAC-BAR reductions between maropitant alone, carprofen alone and the combination. The administration of maropitant alone and carprofen alone produced clinically significant sparing effects on the sevoflurane MAC-BAR in dogs. However, the combination of maropitant and carprofen did not produce any additive effect on the sevoflurane MAC-BAR reduction. Anesthetic premedication with a combination of maropitant and carprofen may not provide any further sparing effect on anesthetic requirement in dogs.

  6. Interaction between maropitant and carprofen on sparing of the minimum alveolar concentration for blunting adrenergic response (MAC-BAR) of sevoflurane in dogs

    PubMed Central

    FUKUI, Sho; OOYAMA, Norihiko; TAMURA, Jun; UMAR, Mohammed Ahmed; ISHIZUKA, Tomohito; ITAMI, Takaharu; MIYOSHI, Kenjiro; SANO, Tadashi; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2017-01-01

    Maropitant, a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, may provide analgesic effects by blocking pharmacological action of substance P. Carprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug commonly used for pain control in dogs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a combination of maropitant and carprofen on the minimum alveolar concentration for blunting adrenergic response (MAC-BAR) of sevoflurane in dogs. Six healthy adult beagle dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane four times with a minimum of 7-day washout period. On each occasion, maropitant (1 mg/kg) alone, carprofen (4 mg/kg) alone, a combination of maropitant (1 mg/kg) and carprofen (4 mg/kg), or saline (0.1 ml/kg) was subcutaneously administered at 1 hr prior to the first electrical stimulation for the sevoflurane MAC-BAR determination. The sevoflurane MAC-BAR was significantly reduced by maropitant alone (2.88 ± 0.73%, P=0.010), carprofen alone (2.96 ± 0.38%, P=0.016) and the combination (2.81 ± 0.51%, P=0.0003), compared with saline (3.37 ± 0.56%). There was no significant difference in the percentage of MAC-BAR reductions between maropitant alone, carprofen alone and the combination. The administration of maropitant alone and carprofen alone produced clinically significant sparing effects on the sevoflurane MAC-BAR in dogs. However, the combination of maropitant and carprofen did not produce any additive effect on the sevoflurane MAC-BAR reduction. Anesthetic premedication with a combination of maropitant and carprofen may not provide any further sparing effect on anesthetic requirement in dogs. PMID:28111373

  7. An observational study on patient admission in the anaesthesia gas monitor and minimum alveolar concentration monitoring: A deficiency with huge impact

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Narayan, Anilkumar; Yunus, Md; Kumar, Sanjay; Prakash, Avinash; Sahoo, Sarasa Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) monitoring is an integral part of modern-day anaesthesia. Both MAC and MAC-awake are age dependant, and age of the patient needs to be entered in the monitor. This study was aimed to assess the practice of patient birth year entry in the anaesthesia monitor and its impact on MAC monitoring. Methods: Sixty volatile anaesthetic-based general anaesthetics (GAs) were observed silently in two tertiary care teaching hospitals with regard to ‘birth year’ entry in the patient monitor. The impact on MAC for non-entry of age was assessed. The observed MAC reading and the MAC corrected for age (MACage) of the patients were noted. Paired t-test was used to compare the differences in observed MAC and MACage values. P <0.05 was significant. Results: Sixty GAs of patients aged between 10 and 68 years were observed; 96.67% anaesthetics were conducted without entering ‘birth year’. Thirty-four patients (mean age 35.14 ± 15.38 years) were further assessed for impact of non-entry of age. The observed MAC was similar to MACage in patients aged 40 ± 5 years (36–45 years group). Nearly 79.41% of the observed MACs were incorrect; 55.88% patients were potentially underdosed whereas 23.53% were overdosed. Conclusion: Omitting patient age entry in the monitor results in erroneous MAC values, exposing patients <40 years to underdosing and older patients to overdose. PMID:28794529

  8. The effects of isoflurane and halothane on left ventricular afterload in dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hettrick, D A; Pagel, P S; Kersten, J R; Lowe, D; Warltier, D C

    1997-11-01

    The effects of volatile anesthetics, including isoflurane (ISO) and halothane (HAL), on determinants of left ventricular (LV) afterload have not been comprehensively described in experimental models of, or patients with, heart failure. We tested the hypothesis that ISO and HAL produce beneficial alterations in LV afterload when evaluated with aortic input impedance and interpreted using a three-element Windkessel model in dogs before and after development of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamics and aortic pressure and blood flow waveforms were recorded in the conscious state and during 1.1- and 1.5-minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) ISO and HAL anesthesia on separate days in chronically instrumented dogs (n = 6). Dogs were then paced at 220-240 bpm for 20 +/- 3 days (mean = SEM) to develop cardiomyopathy, and the experiments were repeated after pacing had been temporarily discontinued. ISO decreased mean arterial pressure (MAP), mean aortic blood flow (MAQ), and total arterial resistance (R) and increased total arterial compliance (C) and characteristic aortic impedance (Zc) in dogs before pacing. HAL decreased MAP and MAQ and increased C but did not alter R and Zc. Chronic rapid LV pacing increased HR and LV end-diastolic pressure and decreased MAP, LV systolic pressure, and the peak rate of increase of LV pressure. MAQ, C, R, and Zc were unchanged. ISO and HAL decreased arterial pressure but did not affect C and Zc in the presence of LV dysfunction. HAL, but not ISO, increased R at 1.1 MAC, which indicates that this drug increases resistance to LV ejection. In contrast to findings in normal dogs, these results indicate that neither ISO nor HAL reduce arterial hydraulic resistance to LV ejection or favorably improve the rectifying properties of the aorta in dogs with pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. Isoflurane and halothane produce favorable alterations in the determinants of left ventricular afterload before, but not after, the production of

  9. Effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane on platelet function: A prospective, randomized, single-blind, in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Bozdogan, Nesrin; Madenoglu, Halit; Dogru, Kudret; Yildiz, Karamehmet; Kotanoglu, Mustafa S; Cetin, Mustafa; Boyaci, Adem

    2005-07-01

    The primary physiologic function of platelets is to facilitate hemostasisby aggregation. Volatile anesthetics have been reported to decrease platelet aggregation in vivo and in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the hematologic effectsof the anesthetics isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane on hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), platelet count, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), and platelet aggregation after minor surgery. Patients aged 20 to 60 years who were scheduled to undergominor surgery and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status P1 or P2 (healthy or mild systemic disease) were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane. None of the patients received premedication. Anesthesia was induced using IV thiopental 5 to 6 mg/kg, fentanyl 1 to 2 μg/kg, and vecuronium 0.1 mg/kg, and maintained with 1 MAC of isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in 66% nitrous oxide and 33% oxygen. Vecuronium 0.03 mg/kg was given when necessary for muscle relaxation. All patients were monitored throughout surgery; isotonic saline was given at a rate of 5 mL/kg · h. Hematologic studies were performed preoperatively, 15 minutes after intubation, and 1 hour after the end of surgery. Platelet aggregation tests were performed in a laboratory using a platelet function analyzer (PFA), collagen/epinephrine PFA test cartridges, collagen/adenosine diphosphate PFA test cartridges, and PFA trigger solution. This prospective, randomized, single-blind, in vivo study was conducted at Gevher Nesibe Teaching Hospital, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey. Thirty patients (15 men, 15 women) were randomized to the 3 treatment groups (each, n = 10). Hb, Hct, platelet count, aPTT, PT, and INR were statistically similar between all 3 groups. The measured parameters were not significantly different between the isoflurane and desflurane

  10. Can determining the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration of volatile anesthetic be used as an objective tool to assess antinociception in animals?

    PubMed

    Docquier, Marie-Agnes; Lavand'homme, Patricia; Ledermann, Christian; Collet, Valérie; De Kock, Marc

    2003-10-01

    We intended to evaluate the reliability of the minimum anesthetic alveolar concentration (MAC)-sparing effect as an objective measure of the antinociceptive properties of a drug. For this purpose, we tested different variables and analyzed the significance of the results obtained. In a first set of experiments, we studied rats under mechanical ventilation and sevoflurane anesthesia. Outcome variables such as gross purposeful movements consecutive to tail clamping, paw withdrawal consecutive to increasing pressure, and cardio-circulatory reactivity (MACBAR) after these stimuli were recorded. In a second set of experiment, sevoflurane-anesthetized rats under spontaneous breathing conditions were used. Thermal stimuli were compared with pressure. The MAC-sparing effect of several doses of sufentanil and clonidine was evaluated in both anesthetized and awake rodents. When considering the stimulus applied, larger concentrations of sevoflurane were required to suppress reactivity after tail clamp than after paw pressure or radiant heat (1.81 +/- 0.28 versus 1.45 +/- 0.22 and 1.53 +/- 0.26; P < 0.05). For the two first stimuli, no significant differences were noted between the concentrations that suppress motor or cardio-circulatory reactions. All doses of sufentanil tested significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the different MAC values except the smallest one (0.005 micro g x kg(-1) x min(-1)) that significantly increased MACBAR in ventilated animals and both MAC and MACBAR in spontaneously breathing rodents (P < 0.05). Clonidine, at its optimal dose (10 micro g/kg), significantly reduced both MAC and MACBAR to the same degree. In awake animals submitted to radiant heat or pressure challenge, none of the clonidine doses nor sufentanil doses (0.005 and 0.07) were active. In conclusion, the MAC-sparing effect provides several reliable and quantifiable variables that allow comparison between different analgesic substances. However, the observations made are not simply the result

  11. Effects of continuous intravenous infusion of morphine and morphine-tramadol on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane and electroencephalographic entropy indices in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Niyom, Sirirat; Thitiyanaporn, Chaiyakorn; Suprasert, Apinun; Thengchaisri, Naris

    2015-03-01

    To compare the effects of continuous rate infusions (CRIs) of intravenous (IV) morphine and morphine-tramadol on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane, and on electroencephalographic entropy indices in dogs. Prospective study. Eight young, healthy German shepherds, weighing 26.3 ± 3.1 kg (mean ± SD). Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane. A standard tail-clamp technique was used for MAC determination. Within one anaesthetic period, MAC was first determined during sevoflurane anaesthesia alone (MACB ); then during morphine infusion (MACM ), (loading dose 0.5 mg kg(-1) IM; CRI, 0.2 mg kg(-1 ) hour(-1)) then finally during morphine-tramadol infusion (tramadol loading dose 1.5 mg kg(-1) IV; CRI, 2.6 mg kg(-1)  hour(-1) ) (MACMT ). At each change, periods of 45 minutes were allowed for equilibration. Stated entropy (SE), response entropy (RE), and RE-SE differences were measured five minutes prior to and during tail clamping. The MACB was 2.1 ± 0.3vol%. The morphine and morphine-tramadol infusions reduced MAC to 1.6 ± 0.3vol% and 1.3 ± 0.3vol%, respectively. MAC was decreased below baseline more during morphine-tramadol than during morphine alone (39 ± 9% versus 25 ± 6%, respectively; p = 0.003). All SE and RE and most RE-SE differences were increased significantly (p < 0.05) over pre-stimulation in all groups when the dogs responded purposefully to noxious stimulation. When no response to noxious stimulation occurred, the entropy indices did not change. In dogs, combined morphine-tramadol CRI decreased sevoflurane MAC more than morphine CRI alone. Entropy indices changed during nociceptive responses in anaesthetized animals, suggesting that entropy measurements may be useful in determining anaesthetic depth in dogs. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  12. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10...

  13. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... inhalation: (1) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5...

  14. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... inhalation: (1) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5...

  15. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... inhalation: (1) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5...

  16. 21 CFR 529.1186 - Isoflurane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Amount—(i) Horses: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 3 to 5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10 minutes. For maintenance of surgical anesthesia: 1.5 to 1.8 percent isoflurane (with oxygen). (ii) Dogs: For induction of surgical anesthesia: 2 to 2.5 percent isoflurane (with oxygen) for 5 to 10...

  17. Pharyngeal function and airway protection during subhypnotic concentrations of propofol, isoflurane, and sevoflurane: volunteers examined by pharyngeal videoradiography and simultaneous manometry.

    PubMed

    Sundman, E; Witt, H; Sandin, R; Kuylenstierna, R; Bodén, K; Ekberg, O; Eriksson, L I

    2001-11-01

    Anesthetic agents alter pharyngeal function with risk of impaired airway protection and aspiration. This study was performed to evaluate pharyngeal function during subhypnotic concentrations of propofol, isoflurane, and sevoflurane and to compare the drugs for possible differences in this respect. Forty-five healthy volunteers were randomized to receive propofol, isoflurane, or sevoflurane. During series of liquid contrast bolus swallowing, fluoroscopy and simultaneous solid state videomanometry was used to study the incidence of pharyngeal dysfunction, the initiation of swallowing, and the bolus transit time. Pressure changes were recorded at the back of the tongue, the pharyngeal constrictor muscles, and the upper esophageal sphincter. After control recordings, the anesthetic was delivered, and measurements were made at 0.50 and 0.25 predicted blood propotol concentration (Cp50(asleep)) for propofol and 0.50 and 0.25 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC)(awake) for the inhalational agents. Final recordings were made 20 min after the end of anesthetic delivery. All anesthetics caused an increased incidence of pharyngeal dysfunction with laryngeal bolus penetration. Propofol increased the incidence from 8 to 58%, isoflurane from 4 to 36%, and sevoflurane from 6 to 35%. Propofol in 0.50 and 0.25 Cp50(asleep) had the most extensive effect on the pharyngeal contraction patterns (P < 0.05). The upper esophageal sphincter resting tone was markedly reduced from 83 +/- 36 to 39 +/- 19 mmHg by propofol (P < 0.001), which differed from isoflurane (P = 0.03). Sevoflurane also reduced the upper esophageal sphincter resting tone from 65 +/- 16 to 45 +/- 18 mmHg at 0.50 MAC(awake)(P = 0.008). All agents caused a reduced upper esophageal sphincter peak contraction amplitude (P < 0.05), and the reduction was greatest in the propofol group (P = 0.002). Subhypnotic concentrations of propofol, isoflurane, and sevoflurane cause an increased incidence of pharyngeal dysfunction with

  18. Anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane in goats: comparison with isoflurane and halothane.

    PubMed Central

    Hikasa, Y; Okuyama, K; Kakuta, T; Takase, K; Ogasawara, S

    1998-01-01

    The anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane were compared with those of isoflurane and halothane in goats. The (mean +/- SD) minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) was 0.96 +/- 0.12% for halothane, 1.29 +/- 0.11% for isoflurane, and 2.33 +/- 0.15% for sevoflurane. Cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane were examined at end-tidal concentrations equivalent to 1, 1.5 and 2 MAC during either spontaneous or controlled ventilation (SV or CV). During SV, there were no significant differences in respiration rate, tidal volume and minute ventilation between anesthetics. Dose-dependent decreases in both tidal volume and minute ventilation induced by halothane were greater than those by either sevoflurane or isoflurane. Hypercapnia and acidosis induced by sevoflurane were not significantly different from those by either isoflurane or halothane at 1 and 1.5 MAC, but were less than those by halothane at 2 MAC. There was no significant difference in heart rate between anesthetics during SV and CV. During SV, all anesthetics induced dose-dependent decreases in arterial pressure, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and left ventricular stroke work index. Systemic vascular resistance with isoflurane at 2 MAC was lower than that with sevoflurane. During CV, sevoflurane induced dose-dependent circulatory depression (decreases in arterial pressure, cardiac index, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and right ventricular minute work index), similar to isoflurane. Halothane did not significantly alter systemic vascular resistance from 1 to 2 MAC. PMID:9798097

  19. The Influence of Isoflurane Anaesthesia on the Rat Grimace Scale

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Amy L.; Golledge, Huw D. R.; Leach, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Over 234,000 rats were used in regulated procedures in the UK in 2014, many of which may have resulted in some degree of pain. When using animals in research, there is an ethical and legal responsibility to alleviate or at least reduce pain to an absolute minimum. To do this, we must be able to effectively assess pain in an accurate and timely manner. The Rat Grimace Scale (RGS) is a pain assessment tool, which is suggested to be both accurate and rapid in pain assessment. Many procedures involve the use of general anaesthesia. To date, the effects of anaesthesia on the RGS have not been assessed, limiting its potential utility for assessing pain following anaesthesia. Forty-eight Lister hooded rats were used in this study (24 in part A and 24 in a separate part B). Rats were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups in part A; short duration isoflurane exposure, short duration control exposure (air) and one of two treatment groups in part B; surgical duration isoflurane exposure or surgical duration control exposure (oxygen). Rats were placed into an anaesthetic induction chamber and isoflurane, or control gas piped into the chamber for either 4 (short duration exposure) or 12 minutes (surgical duration exposure). Following recovery, photographs of the rats’ faces were taken and then scored blindly using the RGS. Short duration isoflurane anaesthesia had no effect on RGS scores. However, when rats are anaesthetised for a longer duration, akin to a simple routine surgical procedure, the RGS score increases significantly and this increase remains on repeated exposure to this duration of anaesthesia over a 4-day period. This should be accounted for when using the RGS to assess pain in rats in the immediate time period following procedures involving the use of isoflurane anaesthesia. PMID:27855184

  20. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to isoflurane by measurement of isoflurane exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Prado, C; Tortosa, J A; Ibarra, I; Luna, A; Periago, J F

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between isoflurane environmental concentrations in operating rooms and the corresponding isoflurane concentration in the exhaled air of the operating personnel at the end of the exposure has been investigated. Isoflurane was retained in an adsorbent cartridge and after thermal desorption the concentration was estimated by gas chromatography. Significant correlation between environmental and exhaled air isoflurane concentrations allowed the establishment of a biological exposure index and biological exposure limits corresponding to proposed atmospheric threshold values.

  1. Ambient isoflurane pollution and isoflurane consumption during intensive care unit sedation with the Anesthetic Conserving Device.

    PubMed

    Sackey, Peter V; Martling, Claes-Roland; Nise, Gun; Radell, Peter J

    2005-03-01

    To examine ambient isoflurane pollution, scavenging efficacy, and isoflurane consumption using the Anesthetic Conserving Device (ACD) for prolonged isoflurane sedation in the intensive care unit. Prospective observational study. Multidisciplinary university intensive care unit. Fifteen adult ventilator-dependent intensive care unit patients sedated with isoflurane for 12-96 hrs. Isoflurane was infused to the ACD for sedation of study subjects. Changing of the ACD, isoflurane syringe, and opening of the respiratory circuit were performed in a standardized fashion according to investigator instructions. Active scavenging of waste gas from the ventilator was performed in ten patients; in five patients no active scavenging was performed. Continuous spectrophotometric measurement of ambient isoflurane pollution in parts per million (ppm) at 0.5 m from the patient's head and passive lapel dosimeter sampling for ten staff nurses over 8-hr shifts. Isoflurane requirement and agent consumption were registered in all patients. Spectrophotometric readings (0.1 +/- 0.2 ppm) were well below internationally recommended long-term exposure limits in all cases. Isoflurane peaks during nursing procedures were brief, infrequent, and of low amplitude. There was no observed difference between isoflurane trace levels with or without an active scavenging system in use. Passive dosimeter values were also low, ranging from undetectable to 0.16 ppm. Mean isoflurane consumption was 2.1 +/- 1.0 mL/hr. This is approximately one fourth of predicted and previously reported consumption of isoflurane with vaporizer-administered sedation in the intensive care unit setting. In the present setting, isoflurane via the ACD is an environmentally safe method of sedation provided users follow instructions for standardizing procedures with potential spillage of isoflurane. This method of sedation requires considerably less isoflurane than with traditional vaporizer technique.

  2. A randomized multicenter study of remifentanil compared with alfentanil, isoflurane, or propofol in anesthetized pediatric patients undergoing elective strabismus surgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, P J; Lerman, J; Suresh, S; McGowan, F X; Coté, C J; Landsman, I; Henson, L G

    1997-05-01

    Remifentanil hydrochloride is a new, ultrashort-acting opioid metabolized by nonspecific plasma and tissue esterases. We conducted this multicenter study to examine the hemodynamic response and recovery profile of premedicated children undergoing strabismus repair who were randomly assigned to receive one of four treatment drugs (remifentanil, alfentanil, isoflurane, or propofol) along with nitrous oxide and oxygen for maintenance of anesthesia. Induction of anesthesia was by nitrous oxide, oxygen, and halothane or nitrous oxide, oxygen, and propofol. Anesthesia was then maintained with remifentanil 1.0 microgram/kg over 30-60 s, followed by a constant infusion of 1.0 microgram.kg-1.min-1, alfentanil 100 micrograms/kg bolus followed by a constant infusion of 2.5 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, propofol 2.5 mg/kg bolus followed by a constant infusion of 200 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, or isoflurane 1.0 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration. The infusions of the anesthetics and the administration of the inhaled gases were adjusted clinically by predetermined protocols. Elapsed time intervals from the end of surgery to the time the patients were tracheally extubated and displayed purposeful movement, as well as the time the patients met the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and hospital discharge times, were recorded. Heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured at fixed intervals. In addition, cardiovascular side effects (bradycardia, hypotension, and hypertension) as well as vomiting, pruritus, agitation, and postoperative hypoxemia were also noted. There were no significant differences in patient demographics among the treatment groups. There was no difference in the early recovery variables (times to extubation and purposeful movement) or the times to PACU and hospital discharge among groups. There were significant differences in side effects among the groups. Patients who received remifentanil had higher PACU objective pain-discomfort scores than those

  3. Carbon monoxide production from degradation of desflurane, enflurane, isoflurane, halothane, and sevoflurane by soda lime and Baralyme.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z X; Eger, E I; Laster, M J; Chortkoff, B S; Kandel, L; Ionescu, P

    1995-06-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that soda lime and Baralyme brand absorbent can degrade inhaled anesthetics to carbon monoxide (CO). We examined the factors that govern CO production and found that these include: 1) The anesthetic used: for a given minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC)-multiple, the magnitude of CO production (greatest to least) is desflurane > or = enflurane > isoflurane > halothane = sevoflurane. 2) The absorbent dryness: completely dry soda lime produces much more CO than absorbent with just 1.4% water content, and soda lime containing 4.8% or more water (standard soda lime contains 15% water) generates no CO. In contrast, both completely dry Baralyme and Baralyme with 1.6% water produce high concentrations of CO, and Baralyme containing 4.7% water produces concentrations equaling those produced by soda lime containing 1.4% water. Baralyme containing 9.7% or more water and standard Baralyme (13% water) do not generate CO.3) The type of absorbent: at a given water content, Baralyme produces more CO than does soda lime. 4) The temperature: an increased temperature increases CO production. 5) The anesthetic concentration: more CO is produced from higher anesthetic concentrations. These results suggest that CO generation can be avoided for all anesthetics by using soda lime with 4.8% (or more) water or Baralyme with 9.7% (or more) water, and by using inflow rates of less than 2-3 L/min. Such inflow rates are low enough to ensure that the absorbent does not dry out.

  4. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Parrot, A; Fartoukh, M; Cadranel, J

    2015-04-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage occurs relatively rarely and is a therapeutic emergency because it can quickly lead to acute respiratory failure, which can be fatal. Hemoptysis associated with anemia and pulmonary infiltrates suggest the diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage, but may be absent in one third of cases including patients in respiratory distress. The diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage is based on the findings of a bronchoalveolar lavage. The causes are numerous. It is important to identify alveolar hemorrhage due to sepsis, then separate an autoimmune cause (vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, connective tissue disease and Goodpasture's syndrome) with the search for autoantibodies and biopsies from readily accessible organs, from a non-immune cause, performing echocardiography. Lung biopsy should be necessary only in exceptional cases. If the hemorrhage has an immune cause, treatment with steroids and cyclophosphamide may be started. The indications for treatment with rituximab are beginning to be established (forms that are not severe and refractory forms). The benefit of plasma exchange is unquestionable in Goodpasture's syndrome. In patients with an immune disease that can lead to an alveolar hemorrhage, removing any source of infection is the first priority.

  5. [Desflurane--general anesthesia for cesarean section compared with isoflurane and epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Navarro, E M

    2000-04-01

    Desflurane 2.5% was compared to Isoflurane 0.5% in a randomized study in terms of maternal and newborn effect on both groups with epidural anesthesia. Fifty patients under general anesthesia were randomly designated to receive either desflurane 2.5% or isoflurane 0.5% maintained in a 50-50% nitrous oxide and oxygen mixture. Twenty-five patients were assigned to receive epidural anesthesia using 15 ml ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml with fentanyl 100 micrograms. Intraoperative hemodynamic changes, blood loss and maternal awareness were recorded. Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min., neurologic adaptive capacity scores (NACS) at 2 and 24 hours and umbilical vein blood gas analysis were done to assess the neonatal outcome. Intraoperatively, heart rate and blood pressure changes were similar in both desflurane and Isoflurane group at 0.4% MAC (minimal alveolar concentration). Blood loss and arterial blood gas analysis were not problematic and did not differ significantly between the three groups. In the desflurane group, the patients were more easily awake and cooperative compared to the isoflurane group. The patients were interviewed about intraoperative awareness 24 and 48 h after the operation. None of them reported awareness during the operation. Similarly, the level of postoperative comfort was the same in both groups. Comparing the general and epidural anesthetic groups, no differences could be detected in neonatal outcomes. Conclusion is that there is one significant difference between desflurane 2.5% and isoflurane 0.5% anesthesia for cesarean section and it is the rapid recovery characteristic with desflurane which makes it an attractive alternative to TIVA (total intravenous anesthesia) and to other inhalational anesthetics available to obstetric anesthesiologists.

  6. Influence of aortic blood flow velocity on changes of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during isoflurane and sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Holzer, A; Greher, M; Hetz, H; Standhardt, H; Donner, A; Heinzl, H; Zimpfer, M; Illievich, U M

    2001-04-01

    We studied the influence of systemic (aortic) blood flow velocity on changes of cerebral blood flow velocity under isoflurane or sevoflurane anaesthesia. Forty patients (age: isoflurane 24-62 years; sevoflurane 24-61 years; ASA I-III) requiring general anaesthesia undergoing routine spinal surgery were randomly assigned to either group. Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery by transcranial Doppler sonography (depth: 50-60 mm). Systemic blood flow velocity was determined by transthoracic Doppler sonography at the aortic valve. Heart rate, arterial pressure, arterial oxygen saturation and body temperature were monitored. After standardized anaesthesia induction (propofol, remifentanil, vecuronium) sevoflurane or isoflurane were used as single agent anaesthetics. Cerebral blood flow velocity and systemic blood flow velocity were measured in the awake patient (baseline) and repeated 5 min after reaching a steady state of inspiratory and end-expiratory concentrations of 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 mean alveolar concentrations of either anaesthetic. To calculate the influence of systemic blood flow velocity on cerebral blood flow velocity, we defined the cerebral-systemic blood flow velocity index (CSvI). CSvI of 100% indicates a 1:1 relationship of changes of cerebral blood flow velocity and systemic blood flow velocity. Isoflurane and sevoflurane reduced both cerebral blood flow velocity and systemic blood flow velocity. The CSvI decreased significantly at all three concentrations vs. 100% (isoflurane/sevoflurane: 0.75 MAC: 85 +/- 25%/81 +/- 23%, 1.0 MAC: 79 +/- 19%/74 +/- 16%, 1.25 MAC: 71 +/- 16%/79 +/- 21%; [mean +/- SD] P = 0.0001). The reduction of the CSvI vs. 100% indicates a direct reduction of cerebral blood flow velocity caused by isoflurane/sevoflurane, independently of systemic blood flow velocity.

  7. Lidocaine attenuates cognitive impairment after isoflurane anesthesia in old rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daowei; Cao, Lin; Wang, Zhi; Li, Jiejie; Washington, Jacqueline M; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2012-03-17

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a clinical phenomenon that has drawn significant attention from the public and scientific community. Age is a risk factor for POCD. However, the contribution of general anesthesia/anesthetics to POCD and the underlying neuropathology are not clear. Here, we showed that 18-month-old male Fisher 344 rats exposed to 1.2% isoflurane, a general anesthetic, for 2h had significant learning and memory impairments assessed at 2-4 weeks after isoflurane exposure. These isoflurane effects were attenuated by intravenous lidocaine (1.5mg/kg as a bolus and then 2mg/kg/h during isoflurane exposure), a local anesthetic that has neuroprotective effect. Exposure to isoflurane or isoflurane plus lidocaine did not change the neuronal and synaptic density as well as the expression of NeuN (a neuronal protein), drebrin (a dendritic spine protein), synaptophysin (a synaptic protein), activated caspase 3 and caspase-activated DNase in the hippocampus at 29 days after isoflurane exposure when cognitive impairment was present. Isoflurane and lidocaine did not affect the amount of β-amyloid peptide, total tau and phospho-tau in the cerebral cortex as well as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus at 29 days after isoflurane exposure. Thus, isoflurane induces learning and memory impairment in old rats. Lidocaine attenuates these isoflurane effects. Isoflurane may not cause long-lasting neuropathological changes.

  8. Antibacterial effect of sevoflurane and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Serrano, M; Gerónimo-Pardo, M; Martínez-Monsalve, A; Crespo-Sánchez, M D

    2017-04-01

    Multidrug resistant bacteria are increasing worldwide and therapeutic options are limited. Some anaesthetics have shown antibacterial activity before. In this study, we have investigated the antibacterial effect of the halogenated anaesthetic agents sevoflurane and isoflurane against a range of resistant pathogens. Two experiments were conducted. In the first, bacterial suspensions of both ATCC and resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were exposed to liquid sevoflurane and isoflurane during 15, 30 and 60 minutes. In the second experiment clinical resistant strains of E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, P. aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, S. aureus, and Enterococcus faecium were studied. Previously inoculated agar plates were irrigated with the halogenated anaesthetic agents and these were left to evaporate before the plates were incubated. In both experiments colony forming units were counted in resultant plates. In the first experiment, isoflurane showed faster and higher antimicrobial effect than sevoflurane against all the strains studied. Gram-negative organisms were more susceptible. In the second experiment, E. faecium was found to be resistant to both halogenated agents; only isoflurane showed statistically significant activity against the rest of the strains studied. Both halogenated agents, but particularly isoflurane, showed in vitro antibacterial activity against pathogens resistant to conventional antibiotics. Further investigation is required to determine whether or not they also exhibit this property in vivo. This might then allow these agents to be considered as rescue treatment against multidrug resistant pathogens, including a topical use in infected wounds.

  9. Charcoal as an airway isoflurane reflection filter.

    PubMed

    Dahm, S L; Steptoe, P; Luttropp, H H; Reinstrup, P

    1998-03-01

    The isoflurane-saving and CO2-retaining effects of a charcoal filter were compared with a Siemens standard heat and moisture (HME) exchanger and an emptied specimen (dummy). Isoflurane was delivered during the inspiratory phase and consumption investigated at 10, 15 and 25 cycles min-1. The investigation was performed by ventilation with humidified air with a constant end-tidal CO2 and temperature. For a comparison, isoflurane was delivered in a conventional manner via the ventilator. The arrangement with a charcoal filter reduced the isoflurane consumption by a factor of 2.0-2.6, depending on ventilatory rate. Most of the saving was a result of the method of isoflurane delivery (factor 1.4-2.0), while adding the reflector gave a further reduction (factor 1.3-1.5). One circumstance that reduced the net efficiency of the charcoal filter was that it also reflected CO2; consequently, total minute ventilation had to be increased to maintain constant end-tidal CO2.

  10. Isoflurane increases the anaerobic metabolites of halothane.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Fujii, K; Sato, N; Yuge, O

    1994-01-01

    The effect of isoflurane on the anaerobic metabolism of halothane to chlorodifluoroethene (CDE) and chlorotrifluoroethane (CTE) was studied with microsomes of guinea pig liver by gas chromatography. The reaction mixture used to measure the end products of anaerobic metabolism consisted of a microsomal suspension, 3 mM NADPH, halothane and isoflurane (except in control groups) in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). The Km values for CDE formation were 601.61 +/- 266.91, 254.22 +/- 86.58, 257.92 +/- 129.11, 268.55 +/- 125.66 and 319.22 +/- 86.76 microM (mean +/- SD, n = 5) at 0 mM (0%), 0.12 mM (0.26%), 0.29 mM (0.64%), 0.58 mM (1.30%) and 1.16 mM (2.59%) isoflurane, respectively. The Km values for CTE formation were 1204.74 +/- 551.64, 553.75 +/- 177.89, 521.14 +/- 249.77, 560.67 +/- 229.61 and 711.05 +/- 317.13 microM (n = 5) at 0 mM (0%), 0.12 mM (0.26%), 0.29 mM (0.64%), 0.58 mM (1.30%) and 1.16 mM (2.59%) isoflurane, respectively. In contrast, the Vmax values for CDE and CTE formation at these isoflurane concentrations were not significantly different than in the control groups. In this study the production of CDE and CTE was significantly (P < 0.05) increased by isoflurane, at concentrations up to 0.58 mM (1.30%).

  11. Advantages and guidelines for using isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Ludders, J W

    1992-03-01

    Isoflurane offers many advantages over other inhalational anesthetics. Its faster induction and recovery, relative sparing effect on cardiovascular function and cerebral blood flow autoregulation, and negligible metabolism make this drug particularly useful in the anesthetic management of the debilitated, aged, or unusual veterinary patient.

  12. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity. PMID:28228717

  13. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  14. Isoflurane Selectively Inhibits Distal Mitochondrial Complex I in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Suthammarak, Wichit; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC) is a possible target of volatile anesthetics (VAs). Complex I enzymatic activities are inhibited by VAs, and dysfunction of complex I can lead to hypersensitivity to VAs in worms and in people. Mutant analysis in Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans suggests that VAs may specifically interfere with complex I function at the binding site for its substrate ubiquinone. We hypothesized that isoflurane inhibits electron transport by competing with ubiquinone for binding to complex I. METHODS Wildtype and mutant C. elegans were used to study the effects of isoflurane on isolated mitochondria. Enzymatic activities of the ETC were assayed and dose-response curves determined using established techniques. Two-dimensional native gels of mitochondrial proteins were performed after exposure of mitochondria to isoflurane. RESULTS Complex I is the most sensitive component of the ETC to isoflurane inhibition; however the proximal portion of complex I (the flavoprotein) is relatively insensitive to isoflurane. Isoflurane and quinone do not compete for a common binding site on complex I. The absolute rate of complex I enzymatic activity in vitro does not predict immobilization of the animal by isoflurane. Isoflurane had no measurable effect on stability of mitochondrial supercomplexes. Reduction of ubiquinone by complex I displayed positive cooperative kinetics not disrupted by isoflurane. CONCLUSIONS Isoflurane directly inhibits complex I at a site distal to the flavoprotein subcomplex. However, we have excluded our original hypothesis that isoflurane and ubiquinone compete for a common hydrophobic binding site on complex I. In addition, immobilization of the nematode by isoflurane is not due to limiting absolute amounts of complex I electron transport as measured in isolated mitochondria. PMID:21467554

  15. Discrimination of auditory stimuli during isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Manuel J; Navas, Jinna A; Greene, Stephen A; Rector, David M

    2008-10-01

    Deep isoflurane anesthesia initiates a burst suppression pattern in which high-amplitude bursts are preceded by periods of nearly silent electroencephalogram. The burst suppression ratio (BSR) is the percentage of suppression (silent electroencephalogram) during the burst suppression pattern and is one parameter used to assess anesthesia depth. We investigated cortical burst activity in rats in response to different auditory stimuli presented during the burst suppression state. We noted a rapid appearance of bursts and a significant decrease in the BSR during stimulation. The BSR changes were distinctive for the different stimuli applied, and the BSR decreased significantly more when stimulated with a voice familiar to the rat as compared with an unfamiliar voice. These results show that the cortex can show differential sensory responses during deep isoflurane anesthesia.

  16. Discrimination of Auditory Stimuli during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Manuel J; Navas, Jinna A; Greene, Stephen A; Rector, David M

    2008-01-01

    Deep isoflurane anesthesia initiates a burst suppression pattern in which high-amplitude bursts are preceded by periods of nearly silent electroencephalogram. The burst suppression ratio (BSR) is the percentage of suppression (silent electroencephalogram) during the burst suppression pattern and is one parameter used to assess anesthesia depth. We investigated cortical burst activity in rats in response to different auditory stimuli presented during the burst suppression state. We noted a rapid appearance of bursts and a significant decrease in the BSR during stimulation. The BSR changes were distinctive for the different stimuli applied, and the BSR decreased significantly more when stimulated with a voice familiar to the rat as compared with an unfamiliar voice. These results show that the cortex can show differential sensory responses during deep isoflurane anesthesia. PMID:19004371

  17. The mitochondrial pathway of anesthetic isoflurane-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiying; Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Lu, Yan; Xu, Zhipeng; Knapp, Andrew; Yue, Yun; Xu, Tiejun; Xie, Zhongcong

    2010-02-05

    The common inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce apoptosis, which then leads to accumulation of beta-amyloid protein, the hallmark feature of Alzheimer disease neuropathogenesis. The underlying molecular mechanism of the isoflurane-induced apoptosis is largely unknown. We, therefore, set out to assess whether isoflurane can induce apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins, enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. We performed these studies in cultured cells, primary neurons, and mice. Here we show for the first time that treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h can increase pro-apoptotic factor Bax levels, decrease anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 levels, increase ROS accumulation, facilitate cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol, induce activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and finally cause apoptosis as compared with the control condition. We have further found that isoflurane can increase the mRNA levels of Bax and reduce the mRNA levels of Bcl-2. The isoflurane-induced ROS accumulation can be attenuated by the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA. Finally, the anesthetic desflurane does not induce activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. These results suggest that isoflurane may induce apoptosis through Bcl-2 family proteins- and ROS-associated mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. These findings, which have identified at least partially the molecular mechanism by which isoflurane induces apoptosis, will promote more studies aimed at studying the potential neurotoxic effects of anesthetics.

  18. Age, minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration, and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake.

    PubMed

    Eger, E I

    2001-10-01

    Two defining effects of inhaled anesthetics (immobility in the face of noxious stimulation, and absence of memory) correlate with the end-tidal concentrations of the anesthetics. Such defining effects are characterized as MAC (the concentration producing immobility in 50% of patients subjected to a noxious stimulus) and MAC-Awake (the concentration suppressing appropriate response to command in 50% of patients; memory is usually lost at MAC-Awake). If the concentrations are monitored and corrected for the effects of age and temperature, the concentrations may be displayed as multiples of MAC for a standard age, usually 40 yr. This article provides an algorithm that might be used to produce such a display, including provision of an estimate of the effect of nitrous oxide. Two defining effects of inhaled anesthetics (immobility in the face of noxious stimulation, and absence of memory) correlate with the end-tidal concentrations of the anesthetics. Thus, these defining effects may be monitored and the results displayed if the concentrations are known and corrected for the effects of age and temperature.

  19. Isoflurane versus sevoflurane with interscalene block for shoulder arthroscopic procedures: Value of process capability indices as an additional tool for data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tantry, Thrivikrama Padur; Karanth, Harish; Shenoy, Sunil P; Ayya, Shreekantha V; Shetty, Pramal K; Adappa, Karunakara K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Hypotensive anaesthesia reduces intra-articular bleed and promotes visualisation during arthroscopy. The haemodynamic effects of inhalational agents isoflurane and sevoflurane were studied extensively, and both were found to reduce mean arterial pressures (MBP) to an equivalent magnitude. We investigated the relative ability of isoflurane vis-a-vis sevoflurane to maintain the target systolic blood pressure (SBP) in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopic procedures. Methods: In a prospective randomised study, 59 patients in two groups of 30 and 29 patients each received concomitant general anaesthesia (1.2–1.5 MAC of isoflurane and sevoflurane) and interscalene brachial plexus block. Nitrous oxide was used in both groups. Intraoperatively, serial blood pressure recordings of SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), MBP and heart rates were done at every 3rd min intervals. The manipulations needed to achieve target SBP (T = 90 mmHg) for optimal arthroscopic visualisation and treat unacceptable hypotensive episodes were noted. Conventional statistical tests and process capability index (PCI) evaluation were both deployed for data analysis. Results: Lower mean SBP and DBPs were recorded for isoflurane patients as compared to sevoflurane (P < 0.05, for mean, maximum and minimum recordings). Higher mean heart rates were recorded for isoflurane (P < 0.05). PCIs indicated that isoflurane was superior to sevoflurane in the ease of achieving target SBP of 90 mmHg as well as maintaining blood pressures in the range of 80–100 mmHg. Conclusion: Isoflurane provides better intraoperative haemodynamic status vis-a-vis sevoflurane in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopic surgery with preliminary interscalene blockade. The PCI can be a useful additional medical data analysis tool. PMID:28003697

  20. TREK-1 mediates isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiyun; Peng, Zhengwu; Yang, Liu; Liu, Xue; Xie, Yaning; Cai, Yanhui; Xiong, Lize; Zeng, Yi

    2017-09-05

    There are growing concerns that anaesthetic exposure can cause extensive apoptotic degeneration of neurons and the impairment of normal synaptic development and remodelling. However, little attention has been paid to exploring the possible cytotoxicity of inhalation anaesthetics, such as isoflurane, in astrocytes. In this research, we determined that prolonged exposure to an inhalation anaesthetic caused cytotoxicity in astrocytes, and we identified the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for this process. Astrocytes were exposed to isoflurane, and astrocytic survival was then measured via LDH release assays, MTT assays, and TUNEL staining. TWIK-related potassium (K(+)) channel-1 (TREK-1) over-expression and knockdown models were also created using lentiviruses. The levels of TREK-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured via Western blot and qRT-PCR. Prolonged exposure to isoflurane decreased primary astrocytic viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, with prolonged exposure to isoflurane, the TREK-1 level increased, and the BDNF level was reduced. TREK-1 knockdown promoted the survival of astrocytes and increased BDNF expression following isoflurane exposure. Overdoses of and prolonged exposure to isoflurane induce cytotoxicity in primary astrocytes. TREK-1 plays an important role in isoflurane-induced cultured astrocytic cytotoxicity by down-regulating the expression of BDNF.

  1. Integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier and alveolar surfactant system in smokers.

    PubMed Central

    Schmekel, B; Bos, J A; Khan, A R; Wohlfart, B; Lachmann, B; Wollmer, P

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier to technetium-99m labelled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (99mTc DTPA) is known to be greatly increased in smokers, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Abnormal permeability of the alveolar epithelium as well as impaired surfactant function has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to examine transudation of urea and albumin into the alveoli and alveolar surfactant function in smokers and non-smokers and to relate these variables to the rate of alveolar-capillary transfer of 99mTc DTPA. METHODS: Standardised bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the yield of urea and albumin measured in the lavage fluid. The integrity of the alveolar surfactant system was assessed by measurement of the surface activity and of the yield of phospholipids in alveolar lavage fluid. RESULTS: The mean decay constant for the pulmonary clearance of 99mTc DTPA was 0.028/min in the smokers and 0.009/min in the non-smokers. The recovery of albumin and urea in alveolar lavage fluid was very similar in the two groups. The surface activity of alveolar lavage fluid was lower in smokers than in non-smokers (minimum surface tension 37.9 versus 28.6 mN/m) and the yield of phospholipids was reduced (2.08 versus 3.86 mg). The rate constant for the pulmonary clearance of 99mTc DTPA correlated with the yield of phospholipids at bronchoalveolar lavage. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that increased alveolar-capillary transfer of 99mTc DTPA in smokers is not accompanied by increased transudation of small or large molecules into the alveoli. The findings support the hypothesis that increased clearance of 99mTc DTPA in smokers is related to surfactant dysfunction. PMID:1412116

  2. Evaluation of Isoflurane Overdose for Euthanasia of Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Travis L; Nagamine, Claude M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal mice (that is, pups younger than 6 d) must be exposed to CO2 for as long as 50 min to achieve euthanasia. Alternatively, other inhalant anesthetic agents have been used to euthanize laboratory rodent species. We investigated the efficacy of isoflurane at saturated vapor pressure to euthanize neonatal mice. Neonatal mice (n = 76; age, 1 or 2 d) were exposed to isoflurane in a sealed, quart-size (0.95-L) plastic bag at room temperature. Righting and withdrawal reflexes were absent in less than 2 min. After 30 min of exposure to isoflurane, pups were removed and monitored for recovery. All pups were cyanotic and showed no detectable signs of life when they were removed from the bag. However, after 30 to 120 min after removal from the bag, 24% of isoflurane-overexposed pups began gasping and then resumed normal respiration and regained a normal pink coloration. These results demonstrate that isoflurane overexposure at saturated vapor pressure for 30 min is insufficient to euthanize neonatal mice and that isoflurane overexposure must be followed by a secondary means of euthanasia. PMID:27177567

  3. Dopamine uptake dynamics are preserved under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodnik, Zachary D; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-08

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is commonly used for measuring the kinetics of dopamine release and uptake. For experiments using an anesthetized preparation, urethane is preferentially used because it does not alter dopamine uptake kinetics compared to freely moving animals. Unfortunately, urethane is highly toxic, can induce premature death during experiments, and cannot be used for recovery surgeries. Isoflurane is an alternative anesthetic that is less toxic than urethane, produces a stable level of anesthesia over extended periods, and is often used for recovery surgeries. Despite these benefits, the effects of isoflurane on dopamine release and uptake have not been directly characterized. In the present studies, we assessed the utility of isoflurane for voltammetry experiments by testing dopamine signaling parameters under baseline conditions, after treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine, and after exposure to increasing concentrations of isoflurane. Our results indicate that surgical levels of isoflurane do not significantly alter terminal mechanisms of dopamine release and uptake over prolonged periods of time. Consequently, we propose that isoflurane is an acceptable anesthetic for voltammetry experiments, which in turn permits the design of studies in which dopamine signaling is examined under anesthesia prior to recovery and subsequent experimentation in the same animals.

  4. Isoflurane anesthesia in the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Stump, K C

    2000-11-01

    Isoflurane is one of the safest and most accepted anesthetic agents for reptiles, birds, and mammals. It has also been used in terrestrial amphibians. The use of inhalation agents in an entirely aquatic frog presents a new dilemma for delivery in contrast to terrestrial species. The African Clawed Frog respires by using both transcutaneous gas exchange and air breathing. These frogs remain submerged for long periods of time, thus making standard inhalation techniques impractical. We tested five methods for delivering isoflurane: 1) bubbling isoflurane and oxygen in the water, 2) intracoelomic injection, 3) subcutaneous injection, 4) intramuscular injection, and 5) topical application. For the topical application, we developed a simple technique by using an absorptive pad with a vapor-barrier backing, saturating the pad with the liquid isoflurane, and placing the pad on the back of the frog while it was confined in a plastic bowl. Although two of the three injectable routes induced anesthesia, only the topical route produced rapid induction with consistent, safe recovery. Bubbling isoflurane with oxygen into water was unsuccessful. Topical application of isoflurane was most successful and appears to be a safe and practical method that can be used as an alternative to tricaine methylsulphonate, hypothermia, or other methods for anesthetizing African Clawed Frogs.

  5. Automated, real-time fresh gas flow recommendations alter isoflurane consumption during the maintenance phase of anesthesia in a simulator-based study.

    PubMed

    Luria, Isaac; Lampotang, Samsun; Schwab, Wilhelm; Cooper, Lou Ann; Lizdas, David; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2013-11-01

    alveolar isoflurane concentration (P = 0.13 for differences <0.1%). The isoflurane consumption measurement closely matched the consumption measured via the digital scale. Our data in a simulated anesthetic suggest that enabling the display of FGF efficiency data by the LFW results in a median percent reduction in volatile liquid anesthetic consumption rate of 53.2%. Since the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval for the median is 39.4%, this finding is likely to translate into cost savings and less waste anesthetic gas generated in the clinical setting and released into the atmosphere.

  6. Single and repeated exposures to the volatile anesthetic isoflurane do not impair operant performance in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jennifer L; Chelonis, John J; Fogle, Charles M; Orser, Beverley A; Paule, Merle G

    2016-09-01

    Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction (POCD) is a complication that can occur in the elderly after anesthesia and surgery and is characterized by impairments in information processing, memory, and executive function. Currently, it is unclear whether POCD is due to the effects of surgery, anesthesia, or perhaps some interaction between these or other perioperative variables. Studies in rodents suggest that the development of POCD may be related directly to anesthesia-induced neuroactivity. Volatile anesthetics have been shown to increase cellular inflammation and apoptosis within the hippocampus of aged rodents, while producing corresponding impairments in hippocampal-dependent brain functions. However, it is unclear whether volatile anesthetics can affect additional aspects of cognition that do not primarily depend upon the hippocampus. The purpose of this study was to use established operant tests to examine the effects of isoflurane on aspects of behavioral inhibition, learning, and motivation in aged rats. Twenty-one adult Sprague-Dawley rats (11 male, 10 female) were trained to perform fixed consecutive number (FCN), incremental repeated acquisition (IRA), and progressive ratio (PR) tasks for a minimum of 15 months prior to receiving anesthesia. At 23 months of age, rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane or medical grade air for 2h. Initial results revealed that a 2h exposure to isoflurane had no effect on IRA, FCN, or PR performance. Thus, rats received 3 additional exposures to 1.3% isoflurane or medical grade air: 2, 4 and 6h exposures with 2 weeks elapsing before exposure two, 3 weeks elapsing between exposures two and three, and 2 weeks elapsing between exposures three and four. These additional exposures had no observable effects on performance of any operant task. These results suggest that single and repeated exposures to isoflurane do not impair the performance of aged rats in tasks designed to measure behavioral inhibition, learning, and motivation. This

  7. Isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane use in cane toads (Rhinella marina)

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kaleigh E.; Strahl-Heldreth, Danielle; Clark-Price, Stuart C.

    2016-01-01

    Anaesthetic chamber concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane that resulted in loss of righting reflex within 15 minutes in 50 per cent of toads (Rhinella marina) exposed (ED50-LRR<15MIN) were identified. The median and range ED50-LRR<15MIN was 1.4 (0.9–1.4) per cent for isoflurane, 1.75 (1.1–1.9) per cent for sevoflurane and 4.4 (4.3–5.5) per cent for desflurane. Subsequently, toads were exposed to 1.5 times the ED50-LRR<15MIN and times to loss and return of righting reflex were identified. All toads for all anaesthetics lost righting reflex. The median and range loss of righting reflex was 4:00 (3:00–5:30) minutes for isoflurane, 4:45 (3:30–7:00) minutes for sevoflurane, and 4:15 (4:00–5:30) minutes for desflurane and was not different between anaesthetics. Time to return of righting reflex was 175 (123–211) minutes for isoflurane, 192 (116–383) minutes for sevoflurane and 74 (52–220) minutes for desflurane. Time to return of righting reflex was significantly shorter for desflurane compared with isoflurane or sevoflurane. The use of isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane can be used to provide immobilisation to cane toads and potentially other anurans. Induction times are likely similar when using an anaesthetic chamber to provide anaesthesia. However recovery time may take twice as long when utilising isoflurane or sevoflurane over desflurane. PMID:27651914

  8. Effects of isoflurane anesthesia on cerebrovascular autoregulation in horses.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Robert J; Steffey, Eugene P; LeCouteur, Richard A; Esteller-Vico, Alejandro; Vaughan, Betsy; Liu, Irwin K M

    2011-01-01

    To test a hypothesis predicting that isoflurane would interfere with cerebrovascular autoregulation in horses and to evaluate whether increased mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) would increase cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure (ICP) during isoflurane anesthesia. 6 healthy adult horses. Horses were anesthetized with isoflurane at a constant end-tidal concentration sufficient to maintain MAP at 60 mm Hg. The facial, carotid, and dorsal metatarsal arteries were catheterized for blood sample collection and pressure measurements. A sub-arachnoid transducer was used to measure ICP Fluorescent microspheres were injected through a left ventricular catheter during MAP conditions of 60 mm Hg, and blood samples were collected. This process was repeated with different-colored microspheres at the same isoflurane concentration during MAP conditions of 80 and 100 mm Hg achieved with IV administration of dobutamine. Central nervous system tissue samples were obtained after euthanasia to quantify fluorescence and calculate blood flow. Increased MAP did not increase ICP or blood flow in any of the brain tissues examined. However, values for blood flow were low for all tested brain regions except the pons and cerebellum. Spinal cord blood flow was significantly decreased at the highest MAP. Results suggested that healthy horses autoregulate blood flow in the CNS at moderate to deep planes of isoflurane anesthesia. Nonetheless, relatively low blood flows in the brain and spinal cord of anesthetized horses may increase risks for hypoperfusion and neurologic injury.

  9. [Transcranial doppler sonography. Effect of sevoflurane in comparison to isoflurane].

    PubMed

    Thiel, A; Schindler, E; Dyckmans, D; Hempelmann, G

    1997-01-01

    Using transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD), we studied the effects of sevoflurane compared to equipotent doses of isoflurane on blood-flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) before, during, and after general anaesthesia. In random order, 30 patients received sevoflurane (n = 15) or isoflurane (n = 15) given in stepwise-increasing doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 MAC in oxygen/air (FiO2 = 0.5). Oxygen/air was then replaced by oxygen/nitrous oxide 33%/65% with decreasing doses (1.5, 1.0, 0.5 MAC) of sevoflurane or isoflurane. During each step, ventilation was controlled to provide first normocapnia (end-tidal pCO2 = 38 mmHg) and then hypocapnia (end-tidal pCO2 = 27 mmHg). MCA blood-flow velocity and pulsatility, arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature were recorded simultaneously at the end of each period. For statistical analysis, within-group comparison was made by one-way ANOVA. Differences between groups were determined by two-way analysis of variance. Age, weight, and height of the patients were compared using Student's t-test; P < 0.05 was considered significant. Groups were comparable regarding age, weight, and height. TCD parameters were not significantly changed by increasing doses of sevoflurane or isoflurane given in oxygen/air when compared to the awake data. However, increasing MCA blood-flow velocity was found with decreasing doses of sevoflurane or isoflurane given in oxygen/nitrous oxide (P < 0.05 for 0.5 MAC, normoventilation) without intergroup, differences. In both groups, hyperventilation always decreased MCA blood-flow velocity. We conclude from our TCD data that equipotent doses of sevoflurane and isoflurane comparably affect cerebral perfusion, especially when nitrous oxide is given simultaneously.

  10. Increased mitochondrial ATP production capacity in brain of healthy mice and a mouse model of isolated complex I deficiency after isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Manjeri, Ganesh R; Rodenburg, Richard J; Blanchet, Lionel; Roelofs, Suzanne; Nijtmans, Leo G; Smeitink, Jan A; Driessen, Jacques J; Koopman, Werner J H; Willems, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    We reported before that the minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane is decreased in complex I-deficient mice lacking the NDUFS4 subunit of the respiratory chain (RC) (1.55 and 0.81% at postnatal (PN) 22-25 days and 1.68 and 0.65% at PN 31-34 days for wildtype (WT) and CI-deficient KO, respectively). A more severe respiratory depression was caused by 1.0 MAC isoflurane in KO mice (respiratory rate values of 86 and 45 at PN 22-25 days and 69 and 29 at PN 31-34 days for anesthetized WT and KO, respectively). Here, we address the idea that isoflurane anesthesia causes a much larger decrease in brain mitochondrial ATP production in KO mice thus explaining their increased sensitivity to this anesthetic. Brains from WT and KO mice of the above study were removed immediately after MAC determination at PN 31-34 days and a mitochondria-enriched fraction was prepared. Aliquots were used for measurement of maximal ATP production in the presence of pyruvate, malate, ADP and creatine and, after freeze-thawing, the maximal activity of the individual RC complexes in the presence of complex-specific substrates. CI activity was dramatically decreased in KO, whereas ATP production was decreased by only 26% (p < 0.05). The activities of CII, CIII, and CIV were the same for WT and KO. Isoflurane anesthesia decreased the activity of CI by 30% (p < 0.001) in WT. In sharp contrast, it increased the activity of CII by 37% (p < 0.001) and 50% (p < 0.001) and that of CIII by 37% (p < 0.001) and 40% (p < 0.001) in WT and KO, respectively, whereas it tended to increase that of CIV in both WT and KO. Isoflurane anesthesia increased ATP production by 52 and 69% in WT (p < 0.05) and KO (p < 0.01), respectively. Together these findings indicate that isoflurane anesthesia interferes positively rather than negatively with the ability of CI-deficient mice brain mitochondria to convert their main substrate pyruvate into ATP.

  11. In vivo field recordings effectively monitor the mouse cortex and hippocampus under isoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yi-qing; Wang, Li-fang; Chen, Chao; Gao, Teng; Zhao, Zi-fang; Li, Cheng-hui

    2016-01-01

    Isoflurane is a widely used inhaled anesthetic in the clinical setting. However, the mechanism underlying its effect on consciousness is under discussion. Therefore, we investigated the effect of isoflurane on the hippocampus and cortex using an in vivo field recording approach. Our results showed that 1.3%, 0.8%, and 0.4% isoflurane exerted an inhibitory influence on the mouse hippocampus and cortex. Further, high frequency bands in the cortex and hippocampus showed greater suppression with increasing isoflurane concentration. Our findings suggest that in vivo field recordings can monitor the effect of isoflurane anesthesia on the mouse cortex and hippocampus. PMID:28197191

  12. Changes in heart rate variability during anaesthesia induction using sevoflurane or isoflurane with nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic balance using heart rate variability (HRV) during induction of anaesthesia between sevoflurane and isoflurane in combination with nitrous oxide. 40 individuals aged from 30 to 60 years, scheduled for general anaesthesia were equally divided into sevoflurane or isoflurane groups. After 100% oxygen inhalation for a few minutes, anaesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 3 L min-1, oxygen 3 L min-1 and sevoflurane or isoflurane. Sevoflurane or isoflurane concentration was increased by 0.5% every 2 to 3 breaths until 5% was attained for sevoflurane, or 3% for isoflurane. Vecuronium was administered to facilitate tracheal intubation. After intubation, sevoflurane was set to 2% while isoflurane was set to 1% with nitrous oxide with oxygen (1:1) for 5 min. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane provoked a decrease in blood pressure, total power, the low frequency component (LF), and high frequency component (HF) of HRV. Although the heart rate increased during isoflurane anaesthesia, it decreased under sevoflurane. The power of LF and HF also decreased in both groups. LF was higher in the isoflurane group while HF was higher in the sevoflurane group. The LF/HF ratio increased transiently in the isoflurane group, but decreased in the sevoflurane group. Anaesthesia induction with isoflurane-nitrous oxide transiently increased cardiac sympathetic activity, while sevoflurane-nitrous oxide decreased both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. The balance of cardiac parasympathetic/sympathetic activity was higher in sevoflurane anaesthesia.

  13. Mutations M287L and Q266I in the Glycine Receptor α1 Subunit Change Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics in Oocytes and Neurons, but Not the Minimal Alveolar Concentration in Knockin Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borghese, Cecilia M.; Xiong, Wei; Oh, S. Irene; Ho, Angel; Mihic, S. John; Zhang, Li; Lovinger, David M.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Eger, Edmond I; Harris, R. Adron

    2012-01-01

    Background Volatile anesthetics (VAs) alter the function of key central nervous system proteins but it is not clear which, if any, of these targets mediates the immobility produced by VAs in the face of noxious stimulation. A leading candidate is the glycine receptor, a ligand-gated ion channel important for spinal physiology. VAs variously enhance such function, and blockade of spinal GlyRs with strychnine affects the minimal alveolar concentration (an anesthetic EC50) in proportion to the degree of enhancement. Methods We produced single amino acid mutations into the glycine receptorα1 subunit that increased (M287L, third transmembrane region) or decreased (Q266I, second transmembrane region) sensitivity to isoflurane in recombinant receptors, and introduced such receptors into mice. The resulting knockin mice presented impaired glycinergic transmission, but heterozygous animals survived to adulthood, and we determined the effect of isoflurane on glycine-evoked responses of brain stem neurons from the knockin mice, and the minimal alveolar concentration for isoflurane and other VAs in the immature and mature knockin mice. Results Studies of glycine-evoked currents in brain stem neurons from knock-in mice confirmed the changes seen with recombinant receptors. No increases in the minimal alveolar concentration were found in knockin mice, but the minimal alveolar concentration for isoflurane and enflurane (but not halothane) decreased in 2-week-old Q266I mice. This change is opposite to the one expected for a mutation that decreases the sensitivity to volatile anesthetics. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that glycine receptors containing the α1 subunit are not likely to be crucial for the action of isoflurane and other VAs. PMID:22885675

  14. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsushi; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a genetic lung disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of calcium phosphate deposits in the alveolar spaces of the lung. Mutations in the type II sodium phosphate cotransporter, NPT2b, have been reported in patients with PAM. PAM progresses gradually, often producing incremental dyspnea on exertion, desaturation in young adulthood, and respiratory insufficiency by late middle age. Treatment remains supportive, including supplemental oxygen therapy. For patients with end-stage disease, lung transplantation is available as a last resort. The recent development of a laboratory animal model has revealed several promising treatment approaches for future trials. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Antimicrobial effects of liquid anesthetic isoflurane on Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M; Acheampong, Edward; Powell, Garry; Lobach, Ludmila; Logan, David A; Parveen, Zahida; Armstead, Valerie; Mukhtar, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that can grow in yeast morphology or hyphal form depending on the surrounding environment. This ubiquitous fungus is present in skin and mucus membranes as a potential pathogen that under opportunistic conditions causes a series of systemic and superficial infections known as candidiasis, moniliasis or simply candidiasis. There has been a steady increase in the prevalence of candidiasis that is expressed in more virulent forms of infection. Although candidiasis is commonly manifested as mucocutaneous disease, life-threatening systemic invasion by this fungus can occur in every part of the body. The severity of candidal infections is associated with its morphological shift such that the hyphal morphology of the fungus is most invasive. Of importance, aberrant multiplication of Candida yeast is also associated with the pathogenesis of certain mucosal diseases. In this study, we assessed the anti-candidal activity of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in liquid form in comparison with the anti-fungal agent amphotericin B in an in vitro culture system. Exposure of C. albicans to isoflurane (0.3% volume/volume and above) inhibited multiplication of yeast as well as formation of hyphae. These data suggest development of potential topical application of isoflurane for controlling a series of cutaneous and genital infections associated with this fungus. Elucidiation of the mechanism by which isoflurane effects fungal growth could offer therapeutic potential for certain systemic fungal infections. PMID:17094810

  16. Tracheal extubation in children: halothane versus isoflurane, anesthetized versus awake.

    PubMed

    Pounder, D R; Blackstock, D; Steward, D J

    1991-04-01

    The authors compared the incidence of respiratory complications and arterial hemoglobin desaturation during emergence from anesthesia in children whose tracheas were extubated while they were anesthetized or after they were awake and to whom halothane or isoflurane had been administered. One hundred children 1-4 yr of age undergoing minor urologic surgery were studied. After a standard induction technique, patients were randomized to receive either isoflurane or halothane. In 50 patients tracheal extubation was performed while they were breathing 2 MAC of either halothane or isoflurane in 100% oxygen. The remaining 50 patients received 2 MAC (volatile agent plus nitrous oxide) during the operation, but tracheal extubation was delayed until they were awake. A blinded observer recorded the incidence of respiratory complications and continuously measured hemoglobin saturation for 15 min after extubation. When tracheal extubation occurred in deeply anesthetized patients, no differences were found between the two volatile agents. When tracheal extubation of awake patients was performed, the use of isoflurane was associated with more episodes of coughing and airway obstruction than was halothane (P less than 0.05). Awake tracheal extubation following either agent was associated with significantly more episodes of hemoglobin desaturation than was tracheal extubation while anesthetized.

  17. Dopamine-induced bradycardia in two dogs under isoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tsompanidou, P P; Kazakos, G M; Anagnostou, T L

    2013-12-01

    Dopamine is a commonly used positive inotropic agent for the treatment of hypotension in small animals. Two dogs that had undergone surgery, under isoflurane anaesthesia, developed a sudden and profound bradycardia when a dopamine infusion was administered. Bradycardia was attributed to the activation of the Bezold-Jarisch reflex, an inhibitory reflex, characterised by bradycardia and hypotension. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  18. Postanesthetic Effects of Isoflurane on Behavioral Phenotypes of Adult Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Ayako; Kobayashi, Ayako; Takase, Kenkichi; Goto, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane was previously the major clinical anesthetic agent but is now mainly used for veterinary anesthesia. Studies have reported widespread sites of action of isoflurane, suggesting a wide array of side effects besides sedation. In the present study, we phenotyped isoflurane-treated mice to investigate the postanesthetic behavioral effects of isoflurane. We applied comprehensive behavioral test batteries comprising sensory test battery, motor test battery, anxiety test battery, depression test battery, sociability test battery, attention test battery, and learning test battery, which were started 7 days after anesthesia with 1.8% isoflurane. In addition to the control group, we included a yoked control group that was exposed to the same stress of handling as the isoflurane-treated animals before being anesthetized. Our comprehensive behavioral test batteries revealed impaired latent inhibition in the isoflurane-treated group, but the concentration of residual isoflurane in the brain was presumably negligible. The yoked control group and isoflurane-treated group exhibited higher anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test and impaired learning function in the cued fear conditioning test. No influences were observed in sensory functions, motor functions, antidepressant behaviors, and social behaviors. A number of papers have reported an effect of isoflurane on animal behaviors, but no systematic investigation has been performed. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to systematically investigate the general health, neurological reflexes, sensory functions, motor functions, and higher behavioral functions of mice exposed to isoflurane as adults. Our results suggest that the postanesthetic effect of isoflurane causes attention deficit in mice. Therefore, isoflurane must be used with great care in the clinical setting and veterinary anesthesia. PMID:25806517

  19. Alveolar bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Semb, Gunvor

    2012-01-01

    In the 1970s, Boyne and Sands published reports on a new technique for alveolar bone grafting. They recommended that only cancellous bone be used and that the procedure be undertaken in the mixed dentition prior to canine eruption. Alveolar bone grafting prior to canine eruption soon became a routine part of the protocol for 90% of European and North American cleft teams. Several uncertainties remain however, such as the specifics of the surgical and orthodontic procedures, type of bone and donor site, and the best way to manage the space in the dental arch. Probably the commonest timing of the bone graft falls between 8 and 11 years, however there has been a trend in some centres to graft earlier in the hope of better outcome for the unerupted incisors. The influence on maxillary growth of earlier grafting has not been ascertained. A wide range of donor sites has been use but iliac crest remains the most popular. Many teams perform orthodontics prior to grafting to correct severe segment displacement or align incisors to improve surgical access. Following grafting, absence of the lateral incisor may be managed with orthodontic space closure, placement of an implant or bridgework. The introduction of alveolar bone grafting probably represents one of the most significant clinical innovations in cleft care. Hopefully, advances in tissue engineering will replace the need for transplantation of autogenous bone, or will provide an in-situ biological solution to the generation of a continuous bone fill across the alveolar cleft. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion attenuates oxidative and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sosunov, Sergey A; Ameer, Xavier; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina; Ratner, Veniamin I; Ten, Vadim S

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that in mice subjected to hypoxia-ischemia (HI) brain injury isoflurane anesthesia initiated upon reperfusion limits a release of mitochondrial oxidative radicals by inhibiting a recovery of complex-I dependent mitochondrial respiration. This significantly attenuates an oxidative stress and reduces the extent of HI brain injury. Neonatal mice were subjected to HI, and at the initiation of reperfusion were exposed to isoflurane with or without mechanical ventilation. At the end of HI and isoflurane exposure cerebral mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 emission rates were measured followed by an assessment of cerebral oxidative damage and infarct volumes. At 8 weeks after HI navigational memory and brain atrophy were assessed. In vitro, direct effect of isoflurane on mitochondrial H2O2 emission was compared to that of complex-I inhibitor, rotenone. Compared to controls, 15 minutes of isoflurane anesthesia inhibited recovery of the compex I-dependent mitochondrial respiration and decreased H2O2 production in mitochondria supported with succinate. This was associated with reduced oxidative brain injury, superior navigational memory and decreased cerebral atrophy compared to the vehicle-treated HI-mice. Extended isoflurane anesthesia was associated with sluggish recovery of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the neuroprotection was lost. However, when isoflurane anesthesia was supported with mechanical ventilation the CBF recovery improved, the event associated with further reduction of infarct volume compared to HI-mice exposed to isoflurane without respiratory support. Thus, in neonatal mice brief isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion limits mitochondrial release of oxidative radicals and attenuates an oxidative stress. This novel mechanism contributes to neuroprotective action of isoflurane. The use of mechanical ventilation during isoflurane anesthesia counterbalances negative effect of isoflurane anesthesia on recovery of

  1. The effects of isoflurane on airway smooth muscle crossbridge kinetics in Fisher and Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Duracher, Caroline; Blanc, François-Xavier; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; David, Jean Stéphane; Riou, Bruno; Lecarpentier, Yves; Coirault, Catherine

    2005-07-01

    Our aim was to determine how isoflurane modified crossbridge (CB) number and kinetics in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and to compare its effects in Fisher and Lewis rats, two strains with differences in airway responsiveness. The effects of isoflurane (2 MAC) on isotonic and isometric contractility in tracheal ASM strips were investigated after methacholine (10(-6) M)-induced contraction. CB mechanics and kinetics were analyzed using the formalism of Huxley's equations adapted to ASM. After isoflurane, maximum velocity did not differ from baseline in Lewis rats, whereas it was significantly less than baseline in Fisher rats ( approximately 25%), the most reactive strain. Isoflurane totally reversed methacholine-induced increase in active CB number in Lewis rats (2.4 +/- 0.5 versus 1.8 +/- 0.4 10(9)/mm(2) after methacholine and isoflurane, respectively) whereas reversal was only partial in Fisher rats (2.7 +/- 0.4 versus 2.1 +/- 0.3 10(9)/mm(2) after methacholine and isoflurane, respectively). Isoflurane induced a 40% increase in attachment step duration in both strains and an almost twofold increase in the CB cycle duration compared with baseline in Lewis rats. The isoflurane-induced increase in detachment step duration was less in Lewis than in Fisher rats (P < 0.05). We concluded that isoflurane modulated CB number and CB cycling rates of isolated rat ASM differently depending on the level of airway responsiveness.

  2. Breakdown of local information processing may underlie isoflurane anesthesia effects

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kristin K.; Priesemann, Viola; Hutt, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The disruption of coupling between brain areas has been suggested as the mechanism underlying loss of consciousness in anesthesia. This hypothesis has been tested previously by measuring the information transfer between brain areas, and by taking reduced information transfer as a proxy for decoupling. Yet, information transfer is a function of the amount of information available in the information source—such that transfer decreases even for unchanged coupling when less source information is available. Therefore, we reconsidered past interpretations of reduced information transfer as a sign of decoupling, and asked whether impaired local information processing leads to a loss of information transfer. An important prediction of this alternative hypothesis is that changes in locally available information (signal entropy) should be at least as pronounced as changes in information transfer. We tested this prediction by recording local field potentials in two ferrets after administration of isoflurane in concentrations of 0.0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. We found strong decreases in the source entropy under isoflurane in area V1 and the prefrontal cortex (PFC)—as predicted by our alternative hypothesis. The decrease in source entropy was stronger in PFC compared to V1. Information transfer between V1 and PFC was reduced bidirectionally, but with a stronger decrease from PFC to V1. This links the stronger decrease in information transfer to the stronger decrease in source entropy—suggesting reduced source entropy reduces information transfer. This conclusion fits the observation that the synaptic targets of isoflurane are located in local cortical circuits rather than on the synapses formed by interareal axonal projections. Thus, changes in information transfer under isoflurane seem to be a consequence of changes in local processing more than of decoupling between brain areas. We suggest that source entropy changes must be considered whenever interpreting changes in

  3. Breakdown of local information processing may underlie isoflurane anesthesia effects.

    PubMed

    Wollstadt, Patricia; Sellers, Kristin K; Rudelt, Lucas; Priesemann, Viola; Hutt, Axel; Fröhlich, Flavio; Wibral, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The disruption of coupling between brain areas has been suggested as the mechanism underlying loss of consciousness in anesthesia. This hypothesis has been tested previously by measuring the information transfer between brain areas, and by taking reduced information transfer as a proxy for decoupling. Yet, information transfer is a function of the amount of information available in the information source-such that transfer decreases even for unchanged coupling when less source information is available. Therefore, we reconsidered past interpretations of reduced information transfer as a sign of decoupling, and asked whether impaired local information processing leads to a loss of information transfer. An important prediction of this alternative hypothesis is that changes in locally available information (signal entropy) should be at least as pronounced as changes in information transfer. We tested this prediction by recording local field potentials in two ferrets after administration of isoflurane in concentrations of 0.0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. We found strong decreases in the source entropy under isoflurane in area V1 and the prefrontal cortex (PFC)-as predicted by our alternative hypothesis. The decrease in source entropy was stronger in PFC compared to V1. Information transfer between V1 and PFC was reduced bidirectionally, but with a stronger decrease from PFC to V1. This links the stronger decrease in information transfer to the stronger decrease in source entropy-suggesting reduced source entropy reduces information transfer. This conclusion fits the observation that the synaptic targets of isoflurane are located in local cortical circuits rather than on the synapses formed by interareal axonal projections. Thus, changes in information transfer under isoflurane seem to be a consequence of changes in local processing more than of decoupling between brain areas. We suggest that source entropy changes must be considered whenever interpreting changes in information

  4. [Effects of halothane and isoflurane on the canine duodenal paraneurons].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Noguchi, R; Taga, K; Shimoji, K; Fujita, T

    1988-05-01

    Administration of amino acid solution (50 mM tryptophane and phenylalanine in saline) into the canine duodenum is known to cause an increase in pancreatic secretion. This response is mediated by the excitation of duodenal endocrine cells, paraneurons, which release cholecystokinin (CCK) into the systemic circulation in response to intraluminal amino acid stimuli. Pancreatic secretory cells are then evoked by the CCK in the blood to secrete the juice into the duodenum. The authors investigated the effects of two general anesthetics, halothane and isoflurane, on this response. Nine mongrel dogs were subjected to this study. Each dog underwent laparotomy under nitrous oxide (75%)-oxygen (25%) anesthesia with pancuronium (GO-Pb). The duodenal loop was exposed and two polyethylene cannulae (18Fr) were introduced into the loop. Proximal cannula was for the administration of the amino acid solution into the loop, and distal one was for drainage of the solution. The pancreatic duct was inserted with a polyethylene catheter, through which pancreatic juice was collected and measured for the volume and protein output by spectrophotometry. After these surgical procedures, the pancreatic secretory response to intraluminal amino acid stimuli was examined under GO-Pb (Control). Then halothane (1.0%) (Group 1, four dogs) or isoflurane (2.0%) (Group 2, five dogs) was administered for 30 min and the same response was tested. The pancreatic secretory response to intraluminal amino acid stimulus was suppressed by the surgical concentrations of both halothane (1.0%) and isoflurane (2.0%). Neither halothane nor isoflurane suppressed the pancreatic secretory response evoked by intravenous CCK infusion (10 Ivy Dog Units.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Monitoring and mitigating isoflurane emissions during inhalational anesthesia of mice.

    PubMed

    Todd, Thomas E; Morse, Jennifer M; Casagni, Todd J; Engelman, Robert W

    2013-10-01

    Establishing a program to monitor waste anesthetic gas (WAG) in order to limit personnel exposure requires measuring the levels of WAG emitted and determining the effectiveness of scavenging methods to reduce such levels. In this study, the authors used infrared spectroscopy to measure levels of WAG emitted while anesthetizing mice with isoflurane for 15 min. They evaluated four different WAG scavenging conditions during induction and maintenance anesthesia: two conditions that used passive techniques and two that used active techniques. Isoflurane concentrations were measured at three different locations: in the operator's vicinity, at the mouse-facemask interface and in the room environment. Passive scavenging of WAG improved when chambers were purged with oxygen after induction and when a diaphragm-sealed facemask delivered a reduced anesthetic flow rate during maintenance anesthesia. Active scavenging of WAG improved when a relief intake opening was provided in the induction chamber's vacuum line, vacuum draw after induction was regulated and the anesthetic flow rate and vacuum scavenging draw were balanced during maintenance anesthesia using a facemask that separated the breathing space from the scavenging zone. Additionally, time-weighted average isoflurane WAG levels detected by personal dosimeters correlated with real-time measurements made using infrared spectroscopy. These observations contribute to the development of a substantiated program for monitoring WAG air quality.

  6. Comparison of isoflurane and sevoflurane for anesthesia in beaver.

    PubMed

    Breck, Stewart W; Gaynor, James S

    2003-04-01

    We compared the hemodynamic and respiratory effects, recovery time, and cost of two gas inhalants (isoflurane and sevoflurane) for anesthetic induction and maintenance of beaver (Castor canadensis) during surgery to implant radio transmitters in the peritoneal cavity. Heart rate, respiratory rate, relative hemoglobin saturation with oxygen (SpO2), and body temperature were measured every 5 min for the first 45 min, and arterial blood gas was measured once, 25 min into the anesthetic procedure. Induction for either agent was smooth and rapid. Heart rate and respiratory rate both decreased during the procedure though neither was lower than baseline values reported in the literature for beaver. Relative hemoglobin saturation with oxygen, body temperature, and blood gas variables did not differ between each anesthetic regime. Both inhalants caused slight respiratory acidosis. Recovery time from anesthesia was highly variable (1-178 min) but did not differ statistically between drugs. Sevoflurane costs ($22.30/60 min) were much higher than isoflurane costs ($3.50/60 min). We recommend isoflurane or sevoflurane for anesthetic induction and maintenance of beaver because of the lack of physiologic differences.

  7. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kevan; Dell, Sharon; Birken, Catherine; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is often asymptomatic despite significant changes in chest imaging. Diagnosis is often made when patients become symptomatic in adulthood. There are still no proven treatments, but earlier diagnosis may allow for evaluation of preventative strategies that could improve outcome. It is an important diagnosis to consider in children who have marked radiographic findings with no or very mild symptoms or physical findings. Diagnosis can be made with imaging alone but may necessitate lung biopsy for definitive diagnosis. PMID:27445543

  8. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Srinivas, G Vijay; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant neoplasm of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma seen in childhood and adolescence. The most frequent site is the head and neck accounting for 40% of all cases and other involved sites are genitourinary tract, retroperitoneum, and to a lesser extent, the extremities. RMS is relatively uncommon in the oral cavity and the involvement of the jaws is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 50-year-old female with oral RMS involving maxillary alveolar region with clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:27194887

  9. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  10. Comparison of Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Impairment in Neonatal Mice Exposed to Propofol or Isoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Khojasteh, Soorena; Wu, Zhen; Yang, Wenqiong; Joseph, Donald; Wei, Huafeng

    2014-01-01

    Background While previous studies have demonstrated neuronal apoptosis and associated cognitive impairment after isoflurane or propofol exposure in neonatal rodents, the effects of these two anesthetics have not been directly compared. Here, we compare and contrast the effectiveness of isoflurane and propofol to cause neurodegeneration in the developing brain and associated cognitive dysfunction. Methods Seven-day-old mice were used. Mice in the isoflurane treatment group received 6 h of 1.5% isoflurane, while mice in propofol treatment group received one peritoneal injection (150 mg/kg), which produced persistent anesthesia with loss of righting for at least 6 h. Mice in control groups received carrying gas or a peritoneal injection of vehicle (intralipid). At 6 h after anesthetic treatment, a subset of each group was sacrificed and examined for evidence of neurodegeneration, using plasma levels of S100β, and apoptosis using caspase-3 immunohistochemistry in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and Western blot assays of the cortex. In addition, biomarkers for inflammation (interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha) were examined with Western blot analyses of the cortex. In another subset of mice, learning and memory were assessed 32 days after the anesthetic exposures using the Morris water maze. Results Isoflurane significantly increased plasma S100β levels compared to controls and propofol. Both isoflurane and propofol significantly increased caspase-3 levels in the cortex and hippocampus, though isoflurane was significantly more potent than propofol. However, there were no significant differences in the inflammatory biomarkers in the cortex or in subsequent learning and memory between the experimental groups. Conclusion Both isoflurane and propofol caused significant apoptosis in the mouse developing brain, with isoflurane being more potent. Isoflurane significantly increased levels of the plasma neurodegenerative biomarker, S100

  11. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes. PMID:23678356

  12. ANESTHETIC INDUCTION AND RECOVERY PARAMETERS IN BEARDED DRAGONS (POGONA VITTICEPS): COMPARISON OF ISOFLURANE DELIVERED IN 100% OXYGEN VERSUS 21% OXYGEN.

    PubMed

    O, Odette; Churgin, Sarah M; Sladky, Kurt K; Smith, Lesley J

    2015-09-01

    Inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps, n=6) were anesthetized for 1 hr using isoflurane in either 100% oxygen or 21% oxygen (FI 21; medical-grade room air). Parameters of anesthetic depth were recorded throughout both induction and recovery by an observer blinded to the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), including the loss and return of withdrawal and righting reflexes, muscle tone, ability to intubate or extubate, and return to spontaneous respiration. Physiologic data were recorded every 5 min throughout the anesthetic procedures, including heart rate, body temperature, end-tidal CO2, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2), and percent expired isoflurane. Lizards were subjected to application of a noxious stimulus (needle stick) at 0, 30, and 60 min, and responses recorded. Following a minimum 7-day washout period, the experiment was repeated with each lizard subjected to the other protocol in a randomized, complete crossover design. The only statistically significant difference was a lower mean SpO2 in the group inspiring 21% oxygen (P<0.0020). No statistically significant differences were detected in any parameters during induction or recovery; however, all values were uniformly shorter for the FI 21 group, indicating a possible clinically significant difference. A larger sample size may have detected statistically significant differences. Further studies are needed to evaluate these effects in other reptile species and with the concurrent use of injectable anesthetic and analgesic drugs.

  13. High fat diet reduces neuroprotection of isoflurane post-treatment: role of carboxyl-terminal modulator protein-Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Deng, Jiao; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2014-01-01

    Objective High fat diet (HFD) contributes to the increased prevalence of obesity and hyperlipidemia in young adults, a possible cause for their recent increase in stroke. Isoflurane post-treatment provides neuroprotection. We determined whether isoflurane post-treatment induced neuroprotection in HFD-fed mice. Design and Methods Six-week old CD-1 male mice were fed HFD or regular diet (RD) for 5 or 10 weeks. Their hippocampal slices (400 µm) were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Some slices were exposed to isoflurane for 30 min immediately after OGD. Some mice had a 90-min middle cerebral arterial occlusion and were post-treated with 2% isoflurane for 30 min. Results OGD time-dependently induced cell injury. This injury was dose-dependently reduced by isoflurane. The effect was apparent at 1% or 2% isoflurane in RD-fed mice but required 3% isoflurane in HFD-fed mice. HFD influenced the isoflurane effects in DG. OGD increased carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP), an Akt inhibitor, and decreased Akt signaling. Isoflurane reduced these effects. LY294002, an Akt activation inhibitor, attenuated the isoflurane effects. HFD increased CTMP and reduced Akt signaling. Isoflurane improved neurological outcome in the RD-fed mice but not in the HFD-fed mice. Conclusions HFD attenuated isoflurane post-treatment-induced neuroprotection possibly due to decreased prosurvival Akt signaling. PMID:25142024

  14. Isoflurane Prevents Acute Lung Injury Through ADP-Mediated Platelet Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Stringham, John; Wohlauer, Max V.; Fragoso, Miguel; Jones, Wilbert L.; Gamboni, Fabia; Silliman, Christopher C.; Banerjee, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests platelets are essential in post-traumatic acute lung injury (ALI). Halogenated ethers interfere with platelet-granulocyte aggregate formation. The potential benefit of halogenated ethers has not been investigated in trauma/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) models. Therefore, we hypothesized that isoflurane decreases T/HS-mediated ALI through platelet inhibition. Methods Sprauge-Dawley rats (n=47) were anesthetized by either pentobarbital or inhaled isoflurane, and placed into groups: control, trauma (laparotomy) sham shock, T/HS (MAP of 30 mmHg × 45 min), pre-treatment with an ADP receptor antagonist, or T/HS with isoflurane initiated during resuscitation. ALI was determined by BALF protein and pulmonary immunofluorescence. PlateletMapping™ specifically evaluated thrombin-independent inhibition of the ADP and AA pathways of platelet activation. Results Pre-treatment with isoflurane abrogated ALI as measured by both BAL fluid protein and pulmonary immunofluorescence (p<0.001). PlateletMapping™, revealed specific platelet ADP-pathway inhibition with isoflurane (p<0.001). Pre-treatment with an ADP receptor antagonist decreased ALI to sham levels, confirming that specific platelet ADP inhibition decreases ALI. Isoflurane initiated during resuscitation also decreased ALI (p<0.001). Conclusion Isoflurane attenuates ALI through an anti-platelet mechanism, in part, through inhibition of the platelet ADP pathway. Isoflurane given post-injury also protects against ALI, and highlights the potential applications of this therapy in various ischemia/reperfusion clinical scenarios. PMID:22828148

  15. Induction and recovery characteristics and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane in bald eagles.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Priscilla H; Jones, Michael P; Ward, Daniel; Gompf, Rebecca E; Zagaya, Nancy; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2008-01-01

    To compare induction and recovery characteristics and cardiopulmonary effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane in bald eagles. Animals-17 healthy adult bald eagles. Anesthesia was induced with isoflurane or sevoflurane delivered in oxygen via a facemask in a crossover design with 4 weeks between treatments. Eagles were intubated, allowed to breathe spontaneously, and instrumented for cardiopulmonary measurements. Time to induction, extubation, and recovery, as well as smoothness of recovery, were recorded. Administration of sevoflurane resulted in a significantly quicker recovery, compared with isoflurane. Temperature, heart rate, and respiratory rate significantly decreased over time, whereas systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) significantly increased over time with each treatment. Temperature, heart rate, SAP, DAP, and MAP were significantly higher with isoflurane. Blood pH significantly decreased, whereas PaCO(2) significantly increased over time with each treatment. Bicarbonate and total carbon dioxide concentrations significantly increased over time with each treatment; however, there was a significant time-treatment interaction. The PaO(2) and arterial oxygen saturation increased over time with isoflurane and decreased over time with sevoflurane with a significant time-treatment interaction. Six eagles developed cardiac arrhythmias with isoflurane, as did 4 with sevoflurane anesthesia. Isoflurane and sevoflurane administration resulted in smooth, rapid induction of and recovery from anesthesia similar to other species. Isoflurane administration resulted in tachycardia, hypertension, and more arrhythmias, compared with sevoflurane. Sevoflurane was associated with fewer adverse effects and may be particularly beneficial in compromised bald eagles.

  16. Isoflurane prevents acute lung injury through ADP-mediated platelet inhibition.

    PubMed

    Harr, Jeffrey N; Moore, Ernest E; Stringham, John; Wohlauer, Max V; Fragoso, Miguel; Jones, Wilbert L; Gamboni, Fabia; Silliman, Christopher C; Banerjee, Anirban

    2012-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests platelets are essential in posttraumatic, acute lung injury (ALI). Halogenated ethers interfere with the formation of platelet-granulocyte aggregates. The potential benefit of halogenated ethers has not been investigated in models of trauma/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). Therefore, we hypothesized that isoflurane decreases T/HS-mediated ALI through platelet inhibition. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 47) were anesthetized by either pentobarbital or inhaled isoflurane and placed into (1) control, (2) trauma (laparotomy) sham shock, (3) T/HS (mean arterial pressure, 30 mmHg × 45 min), (4) pretreatment with an ADP receptor antagonist, or (5) T/HS with isoflurane initiated during resuscitation groups. ALI was determined by protein and pulmonary immunofluorescence bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Platelet Mapping specifically evaluated thrombin-independent inhibition of the ADP and AA pathways of platelet activation. Pretreatment with isoflurane abrogated ALI as measured by both BAL fluid protein and pulmonary immunofluorescence (P < .001). Platelet Mapping revealed specific inhibition of the platelet ADP-pathway with isoflurane (P < .001). Pretreatment with an ADP receptor antagonist decreased ALI to sham levels, confirming that specific platelet ADP inhibition decreases ALI. Isoflurane initiated during resuscitation also decreased ALI (P < .001). Isoflurane attenuates ALI through an antiplatelet mechanism, in part, through inhibition of the platelet ADP pathway. Isoflurane given postinjury also protects against ALI, and highlights the potential applications of this therapy in various clinical scenarios of ischemia/reperfusion. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane on hepatic circulation in the chronically instrumented dog.

    PubMed

    Bernard, J M; Doursout, M F; Wouters, P; Hartley, C J; Merin, R G; Chelly, J E

    1992-09-01

    To compare the effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane on hepatic circulation, eighteen dogs were chronically instrumented for measurements of mean aortic blood pressure and cardiac output and for simultaneous measurements of hepatic and portal blood flows. Each animal was studied while awake and during 1.2 and 2 MAC of either isoflurane or sevoflurane. Both anesthetics induced tachycardia and a dose-dependent decrease in mean aortic blood pressure (isoflurane -27% and -39%; sevoflurane -22% and -37%). Cardiac output decreased only at the highest concentration (isoflurane -10%; sevoflurane -21%). During sevoflurane, portal blood flow decreased at both 1.2 and 2 MAC (-14 and -33%, respectively), whereas an increase in hepatic arterial blood flow was recorded at 2 MAC (+33%). During isoflurane, the only significant change was a decrease in portal blood flow (-16%) at 1.2 MAC. Neither anesthetic significantly changed renal blood flow. Therefore, both anesthetics led to similar systemic and hepatic vasodilation.

  18. Isoflurane induced cognitive impairment in aged rats through hippocampal calcineurin/NFAT signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Qian, Min; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiangyang

    2015-05-15

    Calcineurin (CaN) over-activation constrains synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Upon CaN activation, NFAT imports into the nucleus and guides its downstream genes, which also affect neuronal and synaptic function. Aberrant CaN/NFAT signaling involves in neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, but its role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) remains uninvestigated. Inhaled anesthetic isoflurane facilitates the development of POCD, and the present study investigated the role of CaN/NFAT signaling in isoflurane induced cognitive impairment of aged rats, and the therapeutic effects of CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA). The results indicated that hippocampal CaN activity increased and peaked at 6 h after isoflurane exposure, and NFAT, especially NFATc4, imported into the nucleus following CaN activation. Furthermore, phamacological inhibition of CaN by CsA markedly attenuated isoflurane induced aberrant CaN/NFATc4 signaling in the hippocampus, and rescued relevant spatial learning and memory impairment of aged rats. Overall, the study suggests hippocampal CaN/NFAT signaling as the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced cognitive impairment, and provides potential therapeutic target and possible treatment methods for POCD. - Highlights: • Isoflurane induces hippocampal calcineurin activation. • Isoflurane induces hippocampal NFAT, especially NFATc4, nuclear import. • Cyclosporine A attenuates isoflurane induced aberrant calcineurin/NFAT signaling. • Cyclosporine A rescues isoflurane induced cognitive impairment. • Calcineurin/NFAT signaling is the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced synaptic dysfunction and cognitive impairment.

  19. Isoflurane does not cause neuroapoptosis but reduces astroglial processes in young adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Isoflurane, a volatile anesthetic widely used clinically, has been implicated to be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic. The claim about isoflurane causing neural apoptosis remains controversial. In this study, we investigated the effects of isoflurane exposures on apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signals, cell proliferation and neurogenesis, and astroglial processes in young adult mouse brains. Methods Sixty 6-week-old mice were randomly assigned to four anesthetic concentration groups (0 as control and 0.6%, 1.3%, and 2%) with four recovery times (2 h and 1, 6, and 14 d) after 2-h isoflurane exposure. Immunohistochemistry measurements of activated caspase-3 and Bcl-xl for apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signals, respectively, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin for reactive astrocytosis, doublecortin (Dcx) for neurogenesis, and BrdU for cell proliferation were performed. Results Contrary to the previous conclusion derived from studies with neonatal rodents, we found no evidence of isoflurane-induced apoptosis in the adult mouse brain. Neurogenesis in the subgranule zone of the dentate gyrus was not affected by isoflurane. However, there is a tendency of reduced cell proliferation after 2% isoflurane exposure. VIM and GFAP staining showed that isoflurane exposure caused a delayed reduction of astroglial processes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Conclusion Two-hour exposure to isoflurane did not cause neuroapoptosis in adult brains. The delayed reduction in astroglial processes after isoflurane exposure may explain why some volatile anesthetics can confer neuroprotection after experimental stroke because reduced glial scarring facilitates better long-term neuronal recoveries. PMID:22146123

  20. The potential dual effects of anesthetic isoflurane on Aβ-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhipeng; Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Zhang, Jun; McAuliffe, Sayre; Pan, Chuxiong; Zhang, Yiying; Ichinose, Fumito; Yue, Yun; Xie, Zhongcong

    2011-11-01

    β-amyloid protein (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity is the main component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathogenesis. Inhalation anesthetics have long been considered to protect against neurotoxicity. However, recent research studies have suggested that the inhalation anesthetic isoflurane may promote neurotoxicity by inducing apoptosis and increasing Aβ levels. We therefore set out to determine whether isoflurane can induce dose- and time-dependent dual effects on Aβ-induced apoptosis: protection versus promotion. H4 human neuroglioma cells, primary neurons from naive mice, and naive mice were treated with Aβ and/or isoflurane, and levels of caspase-3 cleavage (activation), apoptosis, Bcl-2, Bax, and cytosolic calcium were determined. Here we show for the first time that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for six hours or 30 minutes potentiated, whereas the treatment with 0.5% isoflurane for six hours or 30 minutes attenuated, the Aβ-induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, anesthesia with 1.4% isoflurane for two hours potentiated, whereas the anesthesia with 0.7% isoflurane for 30 minutes attenuated, the Aβ-induced caspase-3 activation in vivo. The high concentration isoflurane potentiated the Aβ-induced reduction in Bcl-2/Bax ratio and caused a robust elevation of cytosolic calcium levels. The low concentration isoflurane attenuated the Aβ-induced reduction in Bcl-2/Bax ratio and caused only a mild elevation of cytosolic calcium levels. These results suggest that isoflurane may have dual effects (protection or promotion) on Aβ-induced toxicity, which potentially act through the Bcl-2 family proteins and cytosolic calcium. These findings would lead to more systematic studies to determine the potential dual effects of anesthetics on AD-associated neurotoxicity.

  1. Activation of D1 dopamine receptors induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Norman E.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND A recent study showed that methylphenidate induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. Methylphenidate inhibits dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake transporters. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that selective dopamine receptor activation induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. METHODS In adult rats, we tested the effects of chloro-APB (D1 agonist) and quinpirole (D2 agonist) on time to emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. We then performed a dose–response study to test for chloro-APB-induced restoration of righting during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. SCH-23390 (D1 antagonist) was used to confirm that the effects induced by chloro-APB are specifically mediated by D1 receptors. In a separate group of animals, spectral analysis was performed on surface electroencephalogram recordings to assess neurophysiological changes induced by chloro-APB and quinpirole during isoflurane general anesthesia. RESULTS Chloro-APB decreased median time to emergence from 330s to 50s. The median difference in time to emergence between the saline control group (n=6) and the chloro-APB group (n = 6) was 222s (95% CI: 77–534s, Mann-Whitney test). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0082). During continuous isoflurane anesthesia, chloro-APB dose-dependently restored righting (n = 6) and decreased electroencephalogram delta power (n = 4). These effects were inhibited by pretreatment with SCH-23390. Quinpirole did not restore righting (n = 6) and had no significant effect on the electroencephalogram (n = 4) during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. CONCLUSIONS Activation of D1 receptors by chloro-APB decreases time to emergence from isoflurane anesthesia, and produces behavioral and neurophysiological evidence of arousal during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. These findings suggest that selective activation of a D1 receptor-mediated arousal mechanism is sufficient to induce emergence from isoflurane general

  2. Anesthetic Isoflurane Increases Phosphorylated Tau Levels Mediated by Caspase Activation and Aβ Generation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2012-01-01

    Anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to promote Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathogenesis by inducing caspase activation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ). Phosphorylation of tau protein is another important feature of AD neuropathogenesis. However, the effects of isoflurane on phosphorylated tau levels remain largely to be determined. We therefore set out to determine whether isoflurane can increase phosphorylated tau levels. 5 to 8 month-old wild-type and AD transgenic mice [B6.Cg-Tg (APPswe, PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J] were treated with 1.4% isoflurane for two hours. The mice brain tissues were harvested at six, 12 and 24 hours after the anesthesia. For the in vitro studies, primary neurons from wild-type and the AD transgenic mice were exposed to 2% isoflurane for six hours, and were harvested at the end of anesthesia. The harvested brain tissues and neurons were subjected to Western blot analysis by which the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at Serine 262 (Tau-PS262) were determined. Here we show that the isoflurane anesthesia increased Tau-PS262 levels in brain tissues and primary neurons from the wild-type and AD transgenic mice. Moreover, the isoflurane anesthesia may induce a greater increase in Tau-PS262 levels in primary neurons and brain tissues from the AD transgenic mice. Finally, caspase activation inhibitor Z-VAD and Aβ generation inhibitor L-685,458 attenuated the isoflurane-induced increases in Tau-PS262 levels. In conclusion, clinically relevant isoflurane anesthesia increases phosphorylated tau levels, which may result from the isoflurane-induced caspase activation and Aβ generation. These findings will promote more studies to determine the effects of anesthetics on tau phosphorylation. PMID:22745746

  3. Cerebrovascular responsiveness to carbon dioxide in dogs with 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane.

    PubMed

    McPherson, R W; Briar, J E; Traystman, R J

    1989-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) responsiveness to alterations in arterial CO2 tensions (PaCO2) during 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane anesthesia was assessed. Dogs were initially anesthetized with thiopental (12 mg/kg, iv bolus), their tracheae intubated, after which anesthesia was maintained with 1.4% isoflurane. In eight animals three levels of PaCO2 (25, 40, and 60 mmHg) were studied during 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane. Mean arterial blood pressure, sagittal sinus pressure, and cerebrospinal fluid pressure were measured and CBF was determined using radiolabeled microspheres. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was maintained constant at approximately 80 mmHg by inflation of a balloon in the midthoracic aorta. CBF during normocapnia was 70 +/- 14 and 118 +/- 18 ml.min-1.100 g-1 with 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane, respectively. As PaCO2 was decreased and increased, CBF decreased and increased to 42 +/- 7% and 185 +/- 16% of control, respectively, during 1.4% isoflurane. During 2.8% isoflurane, hypocapnia decreased CBF to 39 +/- 6% of control, but CBF did not increase with hypercapnia. In a second group of animals (n = 8), the effects of changes in CPP during hypercapnia with 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane were assessed. Increasing CPP approximately 25 mmHg with both 1.4% and 2.8% isoflurane increased CBF but did not change CVR from control. With 1.4% isoflurane, the cerebral vasculature constricts with hypocapnia and dilates with hypercapnia, whereas with 2.8% isoflurane, vasoconstriction to hypocapnia is retained but vasodilation to hypercapnia is absent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Isocapnic hyperpnoea shortens postanesthetic care unit stay after isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, Rita; Van Rensburg, Adriaan; Friedman, Zeev; Wasowicz, Marcin; Djaiani, George N; Fedorko, Ludwik; Minkovich, Leonid; Fisher, Joseph A

    2010-08-01

    We conducted a prospective controlled clinical trial of the effect of isocapnic hyperpnoea (IH) on the times-to-recovery milestones in the operating room (OR) and postanesthetic care unit (PACU) after 1.5 to 3 hours of isoflurane anesthesia. Thirty ASA grade I-III patients undergoing elective gynecological surgery were randomized at the end of surgery to either IH or the conventional recovery (control). Six patients with duration of anesthesia of <90 minutes were excluded from the analysis. The anesthesia protocol included propofol, fentanyl, morphine, rocuronium, and isoflurane in air/O(2). Unpaired t tests and analyses of variance were used to test for differences in times-to-recovery indicators between the two groups. The durations of anesthesia in IH and control groups were 140.8 + or - 32.7 and 142 + or - 55.6 minutes, respectively (P = 0.99). The time to extubation was much shorter in the IH group than in the control group (6.6 + or - 1.6 (SD) vs. 13. 6 + or - 3.9 minutes, respectively; P < 0.01). The IH group also had shorter times to eye opening (5.8 + or - 1.3 vs. 13.7 + or - 4.5 minutes; P < 0.01), eligibility for leaving the OR (8.0 + or - 1.7 vs. 17.4 + or - 6.1 minutes; P < 0.01), and eligibility for PACU discharge (74.0 + or - 16.5 vs. 94.5 + or - 14.7 minutes; P < 0.01). There were no differences in other indicators of recovery. IH accelerates recovery after 1.5 to 3 hours of isoflurane anesthesia and shortens OR and PACU stay.

  5. Clinical effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane in lambs.

    PubMed

    Vettorato, Enzo; Schöffmann, Gudrun; Burke, John G; Gibson, Alastair J N; Clutton, Eddie R

    2012-09-01

    To compare isoflurane and sevoflurane in lambs undergoing prolonged anaesthesia for spinal surgery. Prospective randomised clinical study. Eighteen Scottish blackface lambs 3-6 weeks of age and weighing 10-17 kg. After intramuscular medetomidine, anaesthesia was induced and maintained with either isoflurane (group I) or sevoflurane (group S) delivered in oxygen. Meloxicam, morphine, a constant rate infusion of ketamine and atracurium were given intravenously (IV) during surgery. Lungs were ventilated to maintain normocapnia. with peak inspiratory pressures of 20-25 cmH(2) O. Ephedrine or dextran 40% was administered when mean arterial pressure (MAP) was <55 mmHg. Intrathecal morphine, and IV meloxicam and edrophonium were injected before recovery. Time to loss of palpebral reflex (TLPR) upon induction, cardiorespiratory variables, time at first swallowing and other movement, tracheal extubation, vocalisation, spontaneous head lifting (>1 minute), reunion with the ewe, and the number of MAP treatments were recorded. Statistical analysis utilised anova, Mann-Whitney, t-test or Pearson's correlation test as relevant. p < 0.05 was considered significant. End-tidal carbon dioxide (mean ± SD) was significantly lower in group S (5.5 ± 0.6 kPa) than in group I (5.8 ± 0.5 kPa) while MAP (70 ± 11 mmHg) and diastolic arterial blood pressure (60 ± 11 mmHg) were higher in group S than in group I (65 ± 12 and 54 ± 11 mmHg, respectively). No differences were found with TLPR and MAP treatments. Time (median, range) from end of anaesthesia to ewe-lamb reunion was briefer (p = 0.018) in group S (48, 20-63 minutes). Isoflurane and sevoflurane are both suitable for maintaining general anaesthesia in lambs although sevoflurane, as used in this study, allows a more rapid reunion with the ewe. The principal advantage of sevoflurane over isoflurane during prolonged anaesthesia in lambs is a more rapid recovery. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2012

  6. Emergency management of alveolar osteitis.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2011-12-01

    Patients with urgent dental problems who present to emergency departments (EDs) during weekday office hours are usually referred to their dentists, often after being provided with analgesia. Outside these hours, however, ED professionals may have to provide treatment before referral. One dental emergency with which patients may present but of which ED staff are unlikely to have experience is alveolar osteitis, a painful condition that occurs usually after tooth extraction. This article defines alveolar osteitis and describes management in an ED.

  7. Protective effects of salidroside against isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, L; Ma, Z; Dong, M; Ma, J; Jiang, A; Sun, X

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction, which is associated with a wide range of cognitive functions including working memory, long-term memory, information processing, attention, and cognitive flexibility, is a major clinical issue in geriatric surgical patients. The aim of the current study was to determine the protective role and possible mechanisms of salidroside against isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to five groups and were treated with or without salidroside before isoflurane exposure. Open-field and fear conditioning tests were conducted to evaluate the cognitive function of the rats. Moreover, the hippocampus tissues were obtained for biochemical analysis. The results showed that the isoflurane anesthesia decreased the freezing time to context significantly at 48 h after the isoflurane exposure in the fear conditioning test. Salidroside could ameliorate isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction. Further analysis demonstrated salidroside markedly suppressed the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Moreover, salidroside reversed the decreased activity of choline acetyltransferase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and content of acetylcholine, as well as the increased activity of acetylcholine esterase and content of malondialdehyde in hippocampal tissue of isoflurane-exposed rats. According to the results, we concluded that that salidroside has a protective effect against isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction by inhibiting excessive inflammatory responses, decreasing oxidative stress, and regulating the cholinergic system.

  8. Lower doses of isoflurane treatment has no beneficial effects in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracerebral hemorrhage is a subtype of stroke that has a poor prognosis without an adequate therapy. Recently, the use of anesthetics such as isoflurane has been shown to be protective after cerebral ischemia. However, the potential therapeutic effect of isoflurane after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has not been fully explored. Results In this study, male Sprague–Dawley rats (SD) were subjected to ICH and randomized into controls and 1.2% or 1.5% isoflurane posttreatment groups. Brain water content, neurological outcomes and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP2-MMP9) plasma levels were quantified at 24 hours. Isoflurane treatment did not reduce brain edema compared with controls in any of the applied isoflurane concentrations. Moreover, consistent with this lack of effect on brain edema, isoflurane posttreatment did not affect neurological outcomes in any of the tests used. Plasma MMP levels did not change. Conclusion Our data suggested that there is no neuroprotection after isoflurane posttreatment in a rat model of ICH. PMID:24138708

  9. Propofol and magnesium attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation via inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition pore

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and induce caspase activation and apoptosis, which may lead to learning and memory impairment. Cyclosporine A, a blocker of mPTP opening might attenuate the isoflurane-induced mPTP opening, lessening its ripple effects. Magnesium and anesthetic propofol are also mPTP blockers. We therefore set out to determine whether propofol and magnesium can attenuate the isoflurane-induced caspase activation and mPTP opening. Methods We investigated the effects of magnesium sulfate (Mg2+), propofol, and isoflurane on the opening of mPTP and caspase activation in H4 human neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express full-length human amyloid precursor protein (APP) (H4 APP cells) and in six day-old wild-type mice, employing Western blot analysis and flowcytometry. Results Here we show that Mg2+ and propofol attenuated the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in H4-APP cells and mouse brain tissue. Moreover, Mg2+ and propofol, the blockers of mPTP opening, mitigated the isoflurane-induced mPTP opening in the H4-APP cells. Conclusion These data illustrate that Mg2+ and propofol may ameliorate the isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity by inhibiting its mitochondrial dysfunction. Pending further studies, these findings may suggest the use of Mg2+ and propofol in preventing and treating anesthesia neurotoxicity. PMID:22901676

  10. Effects of halothane, isoflurane and enflurane on isolated rat heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Miralles, F S; Carceles, M D; Laorden, M L; Hernandez, J

    1989-05-01

    Since the effects in the intact organism are complicated by central as well as peripheral effects, we compared the direct cardiac effects of three commonly used inhalational anaesthetics--halothane, isoflurane and enflurane--on isolated heart muscle. Concentration-response curves for inotropic, chronotropic and ventricular automaticity effects of halothane, isoflurane and enflurane (0.1-2% v/v) on electrically stimulated left atria, right atria and right ventricles of the rat were obtained. All three inhalational anaesthetics significantly decreased contractile force; the inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) of enflurane was 0.55 +/- 0.06% v/v, significantly lower than halothane (0.96 +/- 0.08% v/v) and isoflurane (0.67 +/- 0.05% v/v). Similar results were obtained on atrial nomotopic rate. Halothane, isoflurane and enflurane produced negative chronotropic effects in this preparation. On the other hand, halothane and isoflurane significantly reduced the ventricular ectopic automaticity. However enflurane (0.3, 0.5, 1% v/v) increased ventricular rate. There were statistically significant differences between the IC50 values of atrial and ventricular rate for halothane and isoflurane. These results indicate: (a) direct negative inotropic and chronotropic effects for the three inhalational anaesthetics tested; (b) anti-dysrhythmic actions for halothane and isoflurane; and (c) dysrhythmogenic effects of enflurane.

  11. Hyperglycolysis is exacerbated after traumatic brain injury with fentanyl vs. isoflurane anesthesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Statler, Kimberly D; Janesko, Keri L; Melick, John A; Clark, Robert S B; Jenkins, Larry W; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2003-12-19

    Despite common use of narcotics in the clinical management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), in experimental models rats treated with fentanyl have exhibited worse functional outcome and more CA1 hippocampal death than rats treated with standard isoflurane anesthesia. We hypothesized that greater post-traumatic excitotoxicity, reflected by cerebral glucose utilization (CMRglu), may account for detrimental effects of fentanyl vs. isoflurane. Rats were anesthetized with either isoflurane (1% by inhalation) or fentanyl (10 mcg/kg iv bolus then 50 mcg/kg/h infusion). 14C-deoxyglucose autoradiography was performed 45 min after controlled cortical impact (CCI) to left parietal cortex (n=4 per anesthetic group) or in uninjured rats after 45 min of anesthesia (n=3 per anesthetic group). Uninjured rats treated with fentanyl vs. isoflurane showed 35-45% higher CMRglu in all brain structures (p<0.05) except CA3. After TBI in rats treated with isoflurane, CMRglu increased significantly only in ipsilateral CA1 and ipsilateral parietal cortex (p<0.05 vs. isoflurane uninjured). Conversely, after TBI in rats treated with fentanyl, CMRglu increased markedly and bilaterally in CA1 and CA3 (p<0.05 vs. fentanyl uninjured), but not ipsilateral parietal cortex. In contralateral CA1, CMRglu was nearly two times greater after TBI in fentanyl vs. isoflurane treated rats (p<0.05). Hyperglycolysis was exacerbated in CA1 and CA3 hippocampus after TBI in rats treated with fentanyl vs. isoflurane anesthesia. This post-traumatic hyperglycolysis suggests greater excitotoxicity and concurs with reports of worse functional outcome and more CA1 hippocampal death after TBI with fentanyl vs. isoflurane anesthesia.

  12. Increased extrasynaptic GluN2B expression is involved in cognitive impairment after isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Li, Lunxu; Li, Zhengqian; Cao, Yiyun; Fan, Dongsheng; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing concern regarding the postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in the aging population, and general anesthetics are believed to be involved. Isoflurane exposure induced increased N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) GluN2B subunit expression following anesthesia, which was accompanied by alteration of the cognitive function. However, whether isoflurane affects this expression in different subcellular compartments, and is involved in the development of POCD remains to be elucidated. The aims of the study were to investigate the effects of isoflurane on the expression of the synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR subunits, GluN2A and GluN2B, as well as the associated alteration of cognitive function in aged rats. The GluN2B antagonist, Ro25-6981, was given to rats exposed to isoflurane to determine the role of GluN2B in the isoflurane-induced alteration of cognitive function. The results showed that spatial learning and memory tested in the Morris water maze (MWM) was impaired at least 7 days after isoflurane exposure, and was returned to control levels 30 days thereafter. Ro25-6981 treatment can alleviate this impairment. Extrasynaptic GluN2B protein expression, but not synaptic GluN2B or GluN2A, increased significantly after isoflurane exposure compared to non-isoflurane exposure, and returned to control levels approximately 30 days thereafter. The results of the present study indicated that isoflurane induced the prolonged upregulation of extrasynaptic GluN2B expression after anesthesia and is involved in reversible cognitive impairment.

  13. High Glucose Enhances Isoflurane-Induced Neurotoxicity by Regulating TRPC-Dependent Calcium Influx.

    PubMed

    Liu, ZhongJie; Ma, ChangQing; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, QingGuo; Xu, Rui; Zhang, HongFei; Lei, HongYi; Xu, ShiYuan

    2017-01-06

    Isoflurane is a commonly used inhalational anesthetic that can induce neurotoxicity via elevating cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)). High glucose regulates the expression of a family of non-selective cation channels termed transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels that may contribute to Ca(2+) influx. In the present study, we investigated whether high glucose enhances isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity by regulating TRPC-dependent Ca(2+) influx. First, we evaluated toxic damage in mice primary cultured hippocampal neurons and human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cells) after hyperglycemia and isoflurane exposure. Next, we investigated cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, TRPC mRNA expression levels and tested the effect of the TRPC channel blocker SKF96365 on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cells treated with high glucose or/and isoflurane. Finally, we employed knocked down TRPC6 to demonstrate the role of TRPC in high glucose-mediated enhancement of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. The results showed that high glucose could enhance isoflurane-induecd toxic damage in primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose enhanced the isoflurane-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) in SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose elevated TRPC mRNA expression, especially that of TRPC6. SKF96365 and knock down of TRPC6 were able to inhibit the high glucose-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) and decrease isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells cultured with high glucose. Our findings indicate that high glucose could elevate TRPC expression, thus increasing Ca(2+) influx and enhancing isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity.

  14. Isoflurane alters proximal tubular cell susceptibility to toxic and hypoxic forms of attack.

    PubMed

    Zager, R A; Burkhart, K M; Conrad, D S

    1999-01-01

    Fluorinated anesthetics can profoundly alter plasma membrane structure and function, potentially impacting cell injury responses. Because major surgery often precipitates acute renal failure, this study assessed whether the most commonly used fluorinated anesthetic, isoflurane, alters tubular cell responses to toxic and hypoxic attack. Mouse proximal tubule segments were incubated under control conditions or with a clinically relevant isoflurane dose. Cell viability (lactate dehydrogenase release), deacylation (fatty acid, such as C20:4 levels), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were assessed under one or more of the following conditions: (a) exogenous phospholipase A2 (PLA2) or C20:4 addition, (b) Ca2+ overload (A23187 ionophore), (c) increased metabolic work (Na ionophore), and (d) hypoxia- or antimycin A-induced attack. Isoflurane's effect on NBD phosphatidylserine uptake (an index of plasma membrane aminophospholipid translocase activity) was also assessed. Isoflurane alone caused trivial deacylation and no lactate dehydrogenase release. However, it strikingly sensitized to both PLA2- and A23187-induced deacylation and cell death. Isoflurane also exacerbated C20:4's direct membrane lytic effect. Under conditions of mild ATP depletion (Na ionophore-induced increased ATP consumption; PLA2-induced mitochondrial suppression), isoflurane provoked moderate/severe ATP reductions and cell death. Conversely, under conditions of maximal ATP depletion (hypoxia, antimycin), isoflurane conferred a modest cytoprotective effect. Isoflurane blocked aminophospholipid translocase activity, which normally maintains plasma membrane lipid asymmetry (that is, preventing its "flip flop"). Isoflurane profoundly and differentially affects tubular cell responses to toxic and hypoxic attack. Direct drug-induced alterations in lipid trafficking/plasma membrane orientation and in cell energy production are likely involved. Although the in vivo relevance of these findings

  15. Glutamate transporter type 3 mediates isoflurane preconditioning-induced acute phase of neuroprotection in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liaoliao; Deng, Jiao; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-09-01

    A pre-exposure to isoflurane reduces ischemic brain injury in rodents (isoflurane preconditioning). This neuroprotection has acute and delayed phases. Our previous in vitro studies suggest that the acute phase may involve excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). We determine whether this protection involves EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. Adult male EAAT3 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates were exposed or were not exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 30 min. Sixty minutes later, they were subjected to a 90- or 60-min middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO). Their neurological outcomes were evaluated 24h after the MCAO. In another experiment, cerebral cortex was harvested for Western blotting at 30 min after animals were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 30 min. Here, we showed that isoflurane reduced brain infarct volumes and improved neurological functions of wild-type mice after a 90-min MCAO. However, isoflurane pre-exposure did not change the neurological outcome of EAAT3 knockout mice no matter whether the MCAO was for 90 min or 60 min. Isoflurane increased phospho-Akt, a survival-promoting protein, in the wild-type mice but not in the EAAT3 knockout mice. The isoflurane-induced neuroprotection in the wild-type mice was abolished by LY294004, an Akt activation inhibitor. LY294004 alone did not affect the neurological outcome of the wild-type or EAAT3 knockout mice after focal brain ischemia. These results suggest that the isoflurane preconditioning-induced acute phase of neuroprotection involves EAAT3. The downstream event includes Akt activation.

  16. JNK pathway may be involved in isoflurane-induced apoptosis in the hippocampi of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujuan; Wang, Fei; Liu, Chuiliang; Zeng, Minting; Han, Xue; Luo, Tao; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Jie; Wang, Huaqiao

    2013-06-17

    Previous studies have demonstrated that isoflurane, a commonly used volatile anesthetic, can induce widespread apoptosis in the neonatal animal brains and result in persistent cognitive impairment. Isoflurane-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) overload and activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis may be involved in this neurodegeneration. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling can regulate the expression of the Bcl-2 family members that modulates mitochondrial membrane integrity. Therefore, we hypothesize that JNK signaling pathway activation contributes to isoflurane-induced apoptosis in the brain. In this study, Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats at postnatal day 7 were exposed to 1.1% isoflurane or air for 4h. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 at 5 μg, 10 μg, 20 μg, 30 μg or the vehicle was intraventricularly administered before the exposure. Neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampi of neonatal rats was detected by TUNEL 6h after isoflurane or air exposure. The protein expression of phospho-JNK, phospho-c-Jun, and caspase-3 as well as the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL and Akt/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β pathway was detected by Western blotting. Isoflurane significantly increased apoptotic cells in the hippocampal CA1, CA3, and DG regions. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 dose-dependently inhibited isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis and increase of caspase-3 and phospho-JNK. SP600125 also attenuated isoflurane-induced down-regulation of Bcl-xL and maintained the activated Akt level to increase the phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9. Our results indicate that JNK activation contributes to isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Maintaining Bcl-xL and Akt activation may be involved in the neuroprotective effects of SP600125.

  17. Vitamin C Attenuates Isoflurane-Induced Caspase-3 Activation and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Baiqi; Zhang, Yiying; Wang, Arthur; Dong, Yuanlin; Xie, Zhongcong

    2015-12-01

    Anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce caspase-3 activation. The underlying mechanism(s) and targeted intervention(s), however, remain largely to be determined. Vitamin C (VitC) inhibits oxidative stress and apoptosis. We therefore employed VitC to further determine the up-stream mechanisms and the down-stream consequences of the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation. H4 human neuroglioma cells overexpressed human amyloid precursor protein (H4-APP cells) and rat neuroblastoma cells were treated either with (1) 2% isoflurane or (2) with the control condition, plus saline or 400 μM VitC for 3 or 6 h. Western blot analysis and fluorescence assay were utilized at the end of the experiments to determine caspase-3 activation, levels of reactive oxygen species and ATP, and mitochondrial function. The interaction of isoflurane (1.4% for 2 h) and VitC (100 mg/kg) on cognitive function in mice was also assessed in the fear conditioning system. Here, we show for the first time that the VitC treatment attenuated the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation. Moreover, VitC mitigated the isoflurane-induced increases in the levels of reactive oxygen species, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore, reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and the reduction in ATP levels in the cells. Finally, VitC ameliorated the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in the mice. Pending confirmation from future studies, these results suggested that VitC attenuated the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment by inhibiting the isoflurane-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in ATP levels. These findings would promote further research into the underlying mechanisms and targeted interventions of anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  18. TNF-α receptor antagonist attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, NENGLI; LIANG, YAFENG; YANG, PEI; WANG, WEIJIAN; ZHANG, XUEZHENG; WANG, JUNLU

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a common clinical in aged patients, is characterized by deficits in cognitive functions in patients following anesthesia and surgery. It has been demonstrated that isoflurane may lead to cognitive impairment in aged rats; however, effective clinical interventions for preventing this disorder are limited. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been suggested to be involved in neuroinflammation as well as the development of POCD. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate whether TNF-α signaling is involved in the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats, and whether TNF-α receptor antagonist are able to attenuate isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. A population of 20-month-old rats were administered TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 or an equal volume of saline by intraperitoneal injection 12 h prior to exposure to isoflurane to model cognitive impairment following anesthesia in old patients. Then the rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4 h. In the control group, rats showed impaired cognitive functions evaluated by Morris water maze assay after isoflurane exposure. Furthermore, isoflurane exposure induced marked upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in the hippocampus tissue. In the experimental group, intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 significantly attenuated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Further investigation revealed that intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 notably suppressed isoflurane-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Collectively, the present results suggest that TNF-α receptor antagonist may serve as a potential agent for the prevention of anesthesia-induced cognitive decline in aged patients. PMID:27347079

  19. Anesthetic Propofol Attenuates the Isoflurane-Induced Caspase-3 Activation and Aβ Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Xu, Zhipeng; Yue, Yun; Golde, Todd E.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Moir, Robert D.; Xie, Zhongcong

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation and deposition of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) are the hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease. The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase activation and increase Aβ accumulation. In addition, recent studies suggest that isoflurane may directly promote the formation of cytotoxic soluble Aβ oligomers, which are thought to be the key pathological species in AD. In contrast, propofol, the most commonly used intravenous anesthetic, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to compare the effects of isoflurane and propofol alone and in combination on caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization in vitro and in vivo. Naïve and stably-transfected H4 human neuroglioma cells that express human amyloid precursor protein, the precursor for Aβ; neonatal mice; and conditioned cell culture media containing secreted human Aβ40 or Aβ42 were treated with isoflurane and/or propofol. Here we show for the first time that propofol can attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in cultured cells and in the brain tissues of neonatal mice. Furthermore, propofol-mediated caspase inhibition occurred when there were elevated levels of Aβ. Finally, isoflurane alone induces Aβ42, but not Aβ40, oligomerization, and propofol can inhibit the isoflurane-mediated oligomerization of Aβ42. These data suggest that propofol may mitigate the caspase-3 activation by attenuating the isoflurane-induced Aβ42 oligomerization. Our findings provide novel insights into the possible mechanisms of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity that may aid in the development of strategies to minimize potential adverse effects associated with the administration of anesthetics to patients. PMID:22069482

  20. Subarachnoid pressures and cardiorespiratory parameters during cisternal myelography in isoflurane anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Arany-Tóth, Attila; Csébi, Péter; Reiczigel, Jenő; Sére, Viktoria; Németh, Tibor

    2013-07-01

    To measure subarachnoid pressures, systemic circulatory and respiratory effects, and to calculate cerebral perfusion pressure during cisternal myelography. Prospective clinical study. Forty-three client owned dogs with clinical signs of spinal disease, weighing 6-56 kg. Dogs were premedicated with butorphanol and diazepam intravenously (IV) and anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane vaporized in oxygen. Ventilation was spontaneous. Heart and respiratory rates, invasive mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), end tidal carbon dioxide and isoflurane concentration were measured continuously. Initial subarachnoid pressure (SaP0 ) was measured in the cisterna magna with a needle pressure gauge. Iohexol 0.3 mL kg(-1) was injected at a rate of 4.1 mL minute(-1) into the cerebellomedullary cistern. The SaP was recorded during and at 120 seconds after contrast administration. The maximum SaP (SaPmax ) and minimum calculated cerebral perfusion pressure (CPPmin ) were recorded for each case. Prior to contrast injection, mean ± SD, MAP was 73 ± 20 mmHg and SaP0 was 10 ± 3 mmHg. The cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was 64 ± 20 mmHg. The contrast injection increased the SaP0 to 73 ± 33 mmHg (SaPmax ). After injection, MAP increased to 97 ± 25 mmHg and the CPP decreased to 14 ± 34 mmHg. A negative correlation was found between the lowest CPP and body weight (ρ = -0.77, p < 0.0001). Nine dogs had bradycardia, apnoea and hypertension, 21 dogs had at least one of these signs. The number of clinical signs showed significant correlation with body weight (ρ = -0.68, p < 0.0001), SaPmax (ρ = -0.66, p < 0.0001) and CPPmin (ρ = -0.73, p < 0.0001). Cerebral perfusion can severely decrease during cisternal myelography using the standard dose of iohexol. Bradycardia, apnoea and systemic hypertension were associated with decreased CPP. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the

  1. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  2. Awakening arterial blood and end-tidal concentrations of isoflurane in female surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tso-Chou; Lu, Chih-Cherng; Hsu, Che-Hao; Pergolizz, Joseph V.; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Ho, Shung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Delayed extubation occurs after isoflurane anesthesia, especially following prolonged surgical duration. We aimed to determine the arterial blood concentrations of isoflurane and the correlation with end-tidal concentrations for predicting emergence from general anesthesia. Thirty-four American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I–II gynecologic patients were included. General anesthesia was maintained with a fixed 2% inspiratory isoflurane in 6 L/minute oxygen, which was discontinued after surgery. One milliliter of arterial blood was obtained for the determination of isoflurane concentration by gas chromatography at 20 and 10 minutes before and 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after discontinuation, in addition to the time of eye opening to verbal command, defined as awakening. Inspiratory and end-tidal concentrations were simultaneously detected by an infrared analyzer. The mean awakening arterial blood concentration of isoflurane was 0.20%, which was lower than the simultaneous end-tidal concentration 0.23%. The differences between arterial and end-tidal concentrations during emergence fell into an acceptable range (±1.96 standard deviation). After receiving a mean time of 108-minute general anesthesia, the time to eye opening after discontinuing isoflurane was 18.5 minutes (range 11–30, median 18 minutes), without statistical significance with anesthesia duration (P = 0.078) and body mass index (P = 0.170). We demonstrated the awakening arterial blood concentration of isoflurane in female patients as 0.20%. With well-assisted ventilation, the end-tidal concentration could be an indicator for the arterial blood concentration to predict emergence from shorter duration of isoflurane anesthesia. PMID:27472727

  3. Nitrous oxide plus isoflurane induces apoptosis and increases β-amyloid protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Yu; Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Xu, Zhipeng; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yiying; Norton, David; Tian, Ming; Li, Shuren; Xie, Zhongcong

    2009-01-01

    Background Some anesthetics have been suggested to induce neurotoxicity including promotion of Alzheimer’s disease neuropathogenesis. Nitrous oxide and isoflurane are common anesthetics. Here, we set out to assess effects of nitrous oxide and/or isoflurane on apoptosis and β-amyloid (Aβ) levels in H4 human neuroglioma cells and primary neurons from naïve mice. Methods The cells or neurons were exposed to 70% nitrous oxide and/or 1% isoflurane for six hours. The cells or neurons and conditioned media were harvested at the end of the treatment. Caspase-3 activation, apoptosis, processing of amyloid precursor protein, and Aβ levels were determined. Results Treatment with a combination of 70% nitrous oxide and 1% isoflurane for six hours induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in H4 naïve cells and primary neurons from naïve mice. The 70% nitrous oxide plus 1% isoflurane, but neither alone, for six hours induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis, and increased levels of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme and Aβ in H4-amyloid precursor protein cells. In addition, the nitrous oxide plus isoflurane-induced Aβ generation was reduced by a broad caspase inhibitor Z-VAD. Finally, the nitrous oxide plus isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation was attenuated by γ-secretase inhibitor L-685,458, but potentiated by exogenously added Aβ. Conclusion These results suggest that common anesthetics nitrous oxide plus isoflurane may promote neurotoxicity by inducing apoptosis and increasing Aβ levels. The generated Aβ may further potentiate apoptosis to form another round of apoptosis and Aβ generation. More studies, especially the in vivo confirmation of these in vitro findings, are needed. PMID:19741497

  4. Evaluation of Waste Isoflurane Gas Exposure During Rodent Surgery in an Australian University.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Kelly R; Lau, Cora; Whitelaw, Jane L

    2017-08-24

    Biomedical researchers use of inhalational anesthetics has increased in recent years. Use of isoflurane as an inhalational anesthetic may result in human exposure to waste anesthetic gas. Potential health effects from exposure include genotoxic and hepatotoxic effects with some evidence of teratogenic and reproductive effects. Research suggests that exposure to waste anesthetic gas within human hospital settings has improved substantially but exposures to biomedical researchers and veterinarians still requires improvement. A number of biomedical research facilities are located at The University of Queensland, Australia, where researchers and animal handlers are potentially exposed to waste isoflurane gas. There is limited published data on the exposures received by biomedical researchers performing routine procedures. This project aimed to assess isoflurane exposure received during routine rodent anesthetic protocols performed at the university. Atmospheric concentrations of isoflurane were assessed via two methods - personal active gas sampling using sorbent tubes, and direct readings using infrared spectroscopy. Total procedure and isoflurane exposure times ranged from 135 minutes to 268 minutes. Personal sorbent tube sampling detected isoflurane levels from below detectable limits (<0.01 ppm) to a Time Weighted Average for the task (TWA-Task) of 6.20 ppm (0.73 ± 9.13). Participants were not exposed to isoflurane outside of the sampling period during the remainder of the workday. TWA-8 hr adjusted levels ranged from below the limit of detection to 1.76 ppm isoflurane (0.69 ppm ± 0.61 ppm). The infrared spectroscopy readings taken in the breathing zone of participants ranged from 0.1 ppm to 68 ppm. Results indicate that if adequately controlled through good room ventilation, effective active gas scavenging and well constructed anesthetic equipment, waste anesthetic exposures are minimal. However, where industry standards are not met exposures may occur

  5. Anti-RAGE antibody attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengmei; Yi, Duan; Li, Zhengqian; Zhou, Yongde; Cao, Yiyun; Sun, Yan; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2017-03-30

    Several animal studies demonstrated that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane could influence the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which involved the cognitive impairment. Increasing evidence has also shown that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) played a major role in maintaining the integrity of BBB. The present study aimed to determine whether the RAGE-specific antibody protects against BBB disruption and cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane exposure in aged rats. 108 aged rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) control group (Control); (2) 4h of 2% isoflurane exposure group (ISO); (3) RAGE antibody (20μL, 2.5μg/μL) treated+4h of 2% isoflurane exposure group (anti-RAGE+ISO); (4) RAGE antibody (20μL, 2.5μg/μL) treated group (anti-RAGE). The isoflurane anesthesia resulted in the upregulation of hippocampal RAGE expression, disruption of BBB integrity, neuroinflammation, and beta-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in aged rats. In addition, significant cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze test was also observed. The antibody pretreatment resulted in significant improvements in BBB integrity. Furthermore, the expression of RAGE and proinflammatory mediators, as well as, Aβ accumulation were attenuated. Moreover, the antibody administration attenuated the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. These results demonstrate that RAGE signaling is involved in BBB damage after isoflurane exposure. Thus, the RAGE antibody represents a novel therapeutic intervention to prevent isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Maintenance of anaesthesia in sheep with isoflurane, desflurane or sevoflurane.

    PubMed

    Mohamadnia, A R; Hughes, G; Clarke, K W

    2008-08-16

    Rapid recovery from anaesthesia is advantageous in small ruminants, to reduce the risk of regurgitation. Theoretically, the least soluble inhalation agents should result in the fastest recoveries, but using additional injectable agents may negate this advantage. This study compared three inhalation agents for the maintenance of anaesthesia in sheep. Eighteen ewes that were to undergo orthopaedic surgery were allocated to one of three groups. Each group was premedicated with xylazine (0.1 mg/kg intramuscularly), anaesthesia was induced using ketamine (2 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.03 mg/kg) intravenously and analgesia provided by buprenorphine (0.008 mg/kg intramuscularly). Anaesthesia was then maintained with either isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Cardiopulmonary parameters were monitored throughout. All three inhalation agents provided adequate stable anaesthesia and there was no significant difference between the groups in their cardiopulmonary parameters or their recovery times. The mead (sd) postanaesthetic times to first swallow, first chewing attempts and ability to maintain their head lifted for five minutes were, respectively, 3.95 (2.53), 6.37 (3.68) and 32.8 (18.1) minutes for isoflurane, 3.62 (0.98), 7.66 (0.78) and 38.8 (16.6) minutes for sevoflurane, and 4.37 (1.65), 6.95 (1.52) and 29.8 (11.5) minutes for desflurane. Two sheep had poor quality recoveries after the use of sevoflurane, but all the other sheep recovered uneventfully. All three inhalation agents were suitable for the maintenance of anaesthesia in sheep but, as used in this study, there were no differences between them in speed of recovery.

  7. Distinct effects of isoflurane on basal BOLD signals in tissue/vascular microstructures in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tsurugizawa, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Kato, Fusao

    2016-01-01

    Isoflurane is a well-known volatile anesthetic. However, it remains equivocal whether its effects on BOLD signal differ depending on the types of intracranial structures, such as capillaries and large blood vessels. We compared dose-dependent effect of isoflurane on the basal BOLD signals in distinct cerebral structures (tissue structure or large vessels) using high resolution T2*-images at 9.4 T MRI system in rat somatosensory cortex. The local field potential (LFP) in the somatosensory cortex and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were also investigated. Isoflurane induced inverted U-shaped dose-dependent change in BOLD signal in large vessels and tissue regions: BOLD signal under 2.0% and 2.5% isoflurane significantly increased from the maintenance dose (1.5%) and that under 3.0% was similar to maintenance dose. Remarkably, BOLD signal increase in tissue regions under 2.5% was significantly smaller than that in large vessels. The MAP decreased monotonically due to the dose of isoflurane and the LFP was strongly suppressed under high dose (2.5% and 3.0%). These results indicate that isoflurane-induced alteration of MAP and neuronal activity affected BOLD signal and, especially, BOLD signal in the tissue regions was more affected by the neuronal activity. PMID:27976678

  8. Effect of intratesticular lidocaine on isoflurane requirements in dogs undergoing routine castration.

    PubMed

    McMillan, M W; Seymour, C J; Brearley, J C

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the isoflurane sparing effect of intratesticular lidocaine administration in dogs undergoing castration. Thirty dogs received a standardised anaesthetic regimen including systemic analgesia with intramuscular buprenorphine at a dose of 0·02 mg/kg and intravenous carprofen at a dose of 4 mg/kg. Dogs were randomly assigned to a lidocaine group receiving 1 mg/kg lidocaine into each testis or a control group receiving no lidocaine. Baseline physiological parameters were measured after 10 minutes at an end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1·3%. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was altered throughout surgery to maintain these parameters within 10% of baseline and recorded at five time points. T0 was baseline, T1 was the start of surgery, T2 to T3 were clamping of the testicular pedicles and T4 was skin closure. End-tidal isoflurane concentrations were compared using analysis of variance and Bonferroni tests. Fifteen healthy dogs were included in each study group. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was significantly lower in the lidocaine group compared to the control group at T2 (P<0·01), T3 (P<0·01) and T4 (P<0·01). Intratesticular lidocaine reduces isoflurane requirements in dogs undergoing castration. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  9. Effects of isoflurane anesthesia on F-waves in the sciatic nerve of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Marcin; Baum, Petra; Kosacka, Joanna; Stockinger, Maximilian; Klöting, Nora; Blüher, Matthias; Bechmann, Ingo; Toyka, Klaus V

    2014-08-01

    Nerve conduction studies provide insights into the functional consequences of axonal and myelin pathology in peripheral neuropathies. We investigated whether isoflurane inhalation anesthesia alters F-wave latencies and F-persistence in the sciatic nerve of adult rats. Ten rats were investigated at 3 different isoflurane concentrations followed by ketamine-xylazine injection anesthesia. To assess F-wave latencies, a stimulation paradigm was chosen to minimize H-reflex masking of F-waves. F-wave persistence rates were reduced with 3.5% isoflurane concentration at 4 and 10 Hz supramaximal stimulation and marginally reduced with 2.5% isoflurane when compared with ketamine-xylazine. F-wave amplitudes decreased progressively with rising stimulus frequency in all types of anesthesia and most at 3.5% isoflurane concentration. The type of anesthesia and the stimulus repetition rate have an impact on some F-wave parameters. Higher isoflurane concentrations and repetition rates are not recommended in experimental studies using rat neuropathy models where F-waves are of interest. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Isoflurane compared with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia in patients undergoing heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Che-Hao; Hsu, Yung-Chi; Huang, Go-Shine; Lu, Chih-Cherng; Ho, Shung-Tai; Liaw, Wen-Jinn; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Tso-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Inhalation anesthetics provide myocardial protection for cardiac surgery. This study was undertaken to compare the perioperative effects between isoflurane and fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia for heart transplantation. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by reviewing the medical records of heart transplantation in a single medical center from 1990 to 2013. Patients receiving isoflurane or fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia were included. Those with preoperative severe pulmonary, hepatic, or renal comorbidities were excluded. The perioperative variables and postoperative short-term outcomes were analyzed, including blood glucose levels, urine output, inotropic use, time to extubation, and length of stay in the intensive care units. After reviewing 112 heart transplantations, 18 recipients with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia, and 29 receiving isoflurane anesthesia with minimal low-flow technique were analyzed. After cessation of cardiopulmonary bypass, recipients with isoflurane anesthesia had a significantly lower mean level and a less increase of blood glucose, as compared with those receiving fentanyl-based anesthesia. In addition, there was less use of dobutamine upon arriving the intensive care unit and a shorter time to extubation after isoflurane anesthesia. Compared with fentanyl-midazolam-based anesthesia, isoflurane minimal low-flow anesthesia maintained better perioperative homeostasis of blood glucose levels, less postoperative use of inotropics, and early extubation time among heart-transplant recipients without severe comorbidities. PMID:27583900

  11. The Physiologic Effects of Isoflurane, Sevoflurane, and Hypothermia Used for Anesthesia in Neonatal Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Huss, Monika K; Chum, Helen H; Chang, Angela G; Jampachairsi, Katechan; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2016-01-01

    Information regarding effective anesthetic regimens for neonatal rat pups is limited. Here we investigated whether isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia maintains physiologic parameters more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in neonatal rat pups. Rat pups (age, 4 d) were randomly assigned to receive isoflurane, sevoflurane, or hypothermia. Physiologic parameters monitored at 1, 5, 10, and 15 min included heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and oxygen saturation (%SpO2). Other parameters evaluated were loss and return of righting reflex, paw withdrawal reflex, and maternal acceptance. Corticosterone and glucose were sampled at 20 min and 24 h after anesthesia induction. Once a surgical plane of anesthesia was achieved, a skin incision was made on the right lateral thigh. After the procedure, all pups were accepted and cared for by their dam. Isoflurane- and sevoflurane-treated pups maintained higher HR, RR, %SpO2, and glucose levels than did hypothermia-treated pups. For both the isoflurane and sevoflurane groups, HR and RR were significantly lower at 10 and 15 min after anesthesia than at 1 min. Compared with hypothermia, isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia provided shorter times to loss of and return of the righting reflex. Although corticosterone did not differ among the groups, glucose levels were higher at 20 min after anesthesia induction than at 24 h in all anesthetic groups. We conclude that both isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia maintain physiologic parameters (HR, RR, %SpO2) more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in 4-d-old rat pups. PMID:26817984

  12. The Physiologic Effects of Isoflurane, Sevoflurane, and Hypothermia Used for Anesthesia in Neonatal Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Huss, Monika K; Chum, Helen H; Chang, Angela G; Jampachairsi, Katechan; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2016-01-01

    Information regarding effective anesthetic regimens for neonatal rat pups is limited. Here we investigated whether isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia maintains physiologic parameters more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in neonatal rat pups. Rat pups (age, 4 d) were randomly assigned to receive isoflurane, sevoflurane, or hypothermia. Physiologic parameters monitored at 1, 5, 10, and 15 min included heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and oxygen saturation (%SpO2). Other parameters evaluated were loss and return of righting reflex, paw withdrawal reflex, and maternal acceptance. Corticosterone and glucose were sampled at 20 min and 24 h after anesthesia induction. Once a surgical plane of anesthesia was achieved, a skin incision was made on the right lateral thigh. After the procedure, all pups were accepted and cared for by their dam. Isoflurane- and sevoflurane-treated pups maintained higher HR, RR, %SpO2, and glucose levels than did hypothermia-treated pups. For both the isoflurane and sevoflurane groups, HR and RR were significantly lower at 10 and 15 min after anesthesia than at 1 min. Compared with hypothermia, isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia provided shorter times to loss of and return of the righting reflex. Although corticosterone did not differ among the groups, glucose levels were higher at 20 min after anesthesia induction than at 24 h in all anesthetic groups. We conclude that both isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia maintain physiologic parameters (HR, RR, %SpO2) more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in 4-d-old rat pups.

  13. A comparison of sevoflurane and isoflurane for short-term anesthesia in polecats (Mustela eversmanni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaynor, J. S.; Wimsatt, J.; Mallinckrodt, C.; Biggins, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-four Siberian polecats (Mustela eversmanni) from 12 litters were anesthetized with either inhaled sevoflurane or isoflurane. With 7% delivered sevoflurane and 5% delivered isoflurane, time to loss of righting reflex (mean +/- SE) with sevoflurane (1.9 +/- 0.1 min) was significantly shorter compared with isoflurane (2.6 +/- 0.1 min). During maintenance at a light plane of anesthesia, systolic arterial pressure was significantly higher with sevoflurane (83 +/- 2 mm Hg) compared with isoflurane (66 +/- 2 mm Hg), and heart rate was significantly lower with sevoflurane (191 +/- 3 beats/min) compared with isoflurane (204 +/- 3 beats/min). There was no difference in respiratory rate jugular venous pH, pCO3, HCO3-, base excess, or recovery of righting reflex. Induction of anesthesia is more rapid and blood pressure is better maintained with sevoflurane compared with isoflurane; therefore, sevoflurane may be less stressful and safer. Inhaled sevoflurane should be an appropriate anesthetic for black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) in laboratory and field conditions.

  14. Anesthetics Isoflurane and Desflurane Differently Affect Mitochondrial Function, Learning, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiying; Xu, Zhipeng; Wang, Hui; Dong, Yuanlin; Shi, Hai Ning; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Objective There are approximately 8.5 million Alzheimer disease (AD) patients who need anesthesia and surgery care every year. The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane, but not desflurane, has been shown to induce caspase activation and apoptosis, which are part of AD neuropathogenesis, through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. However, the in vivo relevance, underlying mechanisms, and functional consequences of these findings remain largely to be determined. Methods We therefore set out to assess the effects of isoflurane and desflurane on mitochondrial function, cytotoxicity, learning, and memory using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, and the fear conditioning test. Results Here we show that isoflurane, but not desflurane, induces opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), increase in levels of reactive oxygen species, reduction in levels of mitochondrial membrane potential and adenosine-5′-triphosphate, activation of caspase 3, and impairment of learning and memory in cultured cells, mouse hippocampus neurons, mouse hippocampus, and mice. Moreover, cyclosporine A, a blocker of mPTP opening, attenuates isoflurane-induced mPTP opening, caspase 3 activation, and impairment of learning and memory. Finally, isoflurane may induce the opening of mPTP via increasing levels of reactive oxygen species. Interpretation These findings suggest that desflurane could be a safer anesthetic for AD patients as compared to isoflurane, and elucidate the potential mitochondria-associated underlying mechanisms, and therefore have implications for use of anesthetics in AD patients, pending human study confirmation. PMID:22368036

  15. Field use of isoflurane as an inhalant anesthetic in the American marten (Martes americana).

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Marion; Cheveau, Marianne; Imbeau, Louis; Lair, Stéphane

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness and practicality of using isoflurane as an inhalation anesthetic with oxygen as a gas carrier for American martens (Martes americana) in a field setting. Sixty-eight martens were trapped in the Waswanipi Cree Model Forest (Québec, Canada) from October to November 2005 and anesthetized with isoflurane in 100% oxygen (1 l/min) using a face mask. Induction setting of isoflurane was 3% for all animals. Mean (+/-SD) length of induction was 1.8+/-1.2 min. Maintenance isoflurane settings ranged from 1% to 4%. Procedures lasted an average of 16.4+/-7.1 min and were uneventful. Length of recovery, defined as the interval between the end of the procedure and animal release, was short (6.3+/-2.8 min), and well below reported lengths of recovery using injectable anesthetics (>/=70 min). As compared to open drop administration of isoflurane described in previous studies, the use of an anesthesia machine prevents the risk of potential fatal anesthetic overdose. We conclude that among anesthesia techniques currently available, isoflurane with oxygen as a gas carrier is a safe and useful field anesthetic in martens, when issues with equipment portability can be overcome.

  16. Ventricular Arrhythmias and Mortality Associated with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in a Porcine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Regueiro-Purriños, Marta; Fernández-Vázquez, Felipe; de Prado, Armando Perez; Altónaga, Jose R; Cuellas-Ramón, Carlos; Ajenjo-Silverio, Jose M; Orden, Asuncion; Gonzalo-Orden, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia of the myocardium can lead to reversible or irreversible injury depending on the severity and duration of the preceding ischemia. Here we compared sevoflurane and isoflurane with particular reference to their hemodynamic effects and ability to modify the effects of acute severe myocardial ischemia and reperfusion on ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Female Large White pigs were premedicated with ketamine, midazolam, and atropine. Propofol was given intravenously for the anesthetic induction, and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Endovascular, fluoroscopy-guided, coronary procedures were performed to occlude the midleft anterior descending artery by using a coronary angioplasty balloon. After 75 min, the balloon catheter system was withdrawn and the presence of adequate reperfusion flow was verified. The pigs were followed for 2 mo, and overall mortality rate was calculated. The isoflurane group showed lower arterial pressure throughout the procedure, with the difference reaching statistical significance after induction of myocardial ischemia. The ventricular fibrillation rate was higher in isoflurane group (81.3%) than the sevoflurane group (51.7%; relative risk, 1.57 [1.03 to 2.4]). Overall survival was lower in the isoflurane group (75%) than the sevoflurane group (96.4%). In conclusion, in this porcine model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, sevoflurane was associated with higher hemodynamic stability and fewer ventricular arrhythmias and mortality than was isoflurane. PMID:21333167

  17. Isoflurane does not aggregate inside POPC bilayers at high pressure: Implications for pressure reversal of general anaesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieteska, J. R.; Welche, P. R. L.; Tu, K.-M.; ElGamacy, Mohammad; Csanyi, G.; Payne, M. C.; Chau, P.-L.

    2015-10-01

    We placed isoflurane, a general anaesthetic, inside palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers at clinical concentration, and performed molecular dynamics simulations at atmospheric and raised pressures, using two different thermodynamic ensembles. We also performed a simulation of this system with isoflurane at ten times the clinical concentration. We found that isoflurane did not aggregate inside POPC membranes at 20 MPa, nor at 40 MPa. The implications of these findings for pressure reversal is discussed, in light of the high-pressure neurological syndrome.

  18. The impact of the Anaesthetic Conserving Device on occupational exposure to isoflurane among intensive care healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Herzog-Niescery, Jennifer; Vogelsang, Heike; Gude, Philipp; Seipp, Hans-Martin; Bartz, Horst; Uhl, Waldemar; Weber, Thomas P; Bellgardt, Martin

    2017-06-14

    Use of Anesthetic Conserving Devices (ACD) for inhalational isoflurane sedation in intensive care units (ICU) has grown in recent years, and healthcare professionals are concerned about isoflurane pollution and exposure-related health risks. Real-time measurements to determine isoflurane exposure in ICU personnel during short-term patient care procedures and ACD handling have not yet been performed. Isoflurane concentrations in the breathing zones of ICU staff (25 cm around the nose and mouth) were measured, by photoacoustic gas monitoring, during daily practice including tracheal suctioning, oral hygiene, body care, and patient positioning. Isoflurane pollution was further determined during ACD replacement, syringe filling, and after isoflurane spillages. The average mean isoflurane concentration 25 cm above patients' tracheostoma was 0.3 ppm. Mean (mean) and maximum (max) isoflurane exposure in personnel's breathing zones during patient care ranged from 0.4 to 1.9 ppm and 0.7 to 6.6 ppm, respectively. Isoflurane exposure during ACD replacement was mean 0.5 to 17.4 ppm and max 0.8 to 114.3 ppm. Isoflurane concentrations during ACD syringe filling ranged from 2.4 to 9.1 ppm. The maximum isoflurane concentrations after spillage were dose-dependent. Use of ACDs and patient physical manipulation are accompanied by isoflurane pollution. Baseline concentrations did not exceed long-term exposure limits, but short-term limits were occasionally exceeded during patient care procedures and ACD handling. Spillages should be avoided, especially when air-conditioning and scavenging systems are unavailable.

  19. Cardiorespiratory effects of isoflurane in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) anesthetized with intramuscular medetomidine and zolazepam/tiletamine.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dong-Hyuk; Yang, Jeong-Jin; Seok, Seong-Hoon; Song, Dong-Joo; Yeon, Seong-Chan

    2017-01-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the dose-dependent effects of isoflurane on various cardiovascular parameters and the stable range of isoflurane concentrations in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus). Seven Asiatic black bears were intramuscularly injected with medetomidine, zolazepam and tiletamine (MZT) to induce anesthesia, and anesthesia was maintained by administering isoflurane in 100% oxygen (4 l/min) without mechanical ventilation. Several cardiovascular parameters were measured at five end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5%). Blood was collected from the femoral artery before administration of isoflurane and after each administration for immediate blood gas analysis. Isoflurane produced dose-dependent increases in heart rate, respiratory rate, minute volume, end-tidal carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressure and the partial pressure of arterial CO2, and dose-dependent decreases in non-invasive blood pressure and tidal volume. Rectal temperature, oxygenation and acid-base balance were unaffected by isoflurane. All parameters in this study were in a clinically acceptable range at all times. The data show that the combination of MZT and isoflurane is suitable for general anesthesia in Asiatic black bears with spontaneous breathing during prolonged procedures. End-tidal isoflurane concentrations of 0.5 to 2.5% can be used in Asiatic black bears without adverse side effects.

  20. Laser Doppler flowmetry signals to quantify effects of isoflurane on the peripheral cardiovascular system of healthy rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Fizanne, Lionel; Roux, Jérôme; Asfar, Pierre; Cales, Paul; Rousseau, David; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2007-12-01

    The optical Doppler effect resulting from interactions between laser light photons and red blood cells of the microcirculation is used to characterize the influence of isoflurane, an halogenated volatile anesthetic, on the peripheral cardiovascular system. After having recorded laser Doppler flowmetry blood perfusion signals on isoflurane-induced anesthetized healthy rats, wavelet analyses show a significant decrease of the myogenic and neurogenic activities when isoflurane dose increases from 1.5% to 3%. Moreover, the approximate entropy shows a weak decrease of signal irregularity when dose of isoflurane increases. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of the optical Doppler effect in physiological and pharmacological applications.

  1. Cardiorespiratory effects of isoflurane in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) anesthetized with intramuscular medetomidine and zolazepam/tiletamine

    PubMed Central

    JEONG, Dong-Hyuk; YANG, Jeong-Jin; SEOK, Seong-Hoon; SONG, Dong-Joo; YEON, Seong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the dose-dependent effects of isoflurane on various cardiovascular parameters and the stable range of isoflurane concentrations in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus). Seven Asiatic black bears were intramuscularly injected with medetomidine, zolazepam and tiletamine (MZT) to induce anesthesia, and anesthesia was maintained by administering isoflurane in 100% oxygen (4 l/min) without mechanical ventilation. Several cardiovascular parameters were measured at five end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5%). Blood was collected from the femoral artery before administration of isoflurane and after each administration for immediate blood gas analysis. Isoflurane produced dose-dependent increases in heart rate, respiratory rate, minute volume, end-tidal carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressure and the partial pressure of arterial CO2, and dose-dependent decreases in non-invasive blood pressure and tidal volume. Rectal temperature, oxygenation and acid-base balance were unaffected by isoflurane. All parameters in this study were in a clinically acceptable range at all times. The data show that the combination of MZT and isoflurane is suitable for general anesthesia in Asiatic black bears with spontaneous breathing during prolonged procedures. End-tidal isoflurane concentrations of 0.5 to 2.5% can be used in Asiatic black bears without adverse side effects. PMID:27725350

  2. Alveolar bone and the bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Daly, C G; Logan, R M; Stein, B; Goss, A N

    2009-09-01

    Bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ) usually commences at the alveolus. Comparison is made between the structure and function of long bones and alveolar bone and the differing susceptibilities of the bisphosphonates at these different sites are explored. Current concepts of the causation of ONJ are discussed. The clinical implications of these findings to dentists managing periodontal conditions are presented.

  3. Primary diffuse alveolar septal amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Poh, S C; Tjia, T S; Seah, H C

    1975-01-01

    The case is reported of a 61-year-old man with primary diffuse alveolar septal pulmonary amyloidosis. Amyloid infiltration of the heart and other organs was also observed. The clinical findings and laboratory investigations reveal features characteristic of defective gas transfer with pulmonary oedema due to left ventricular failure from myocardial involvement. Images PMID:1179316

  4. Cardiorespiratory parameters in the awake pigeon and during anaesthesia with isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Botman, Julie; Dugdale, Alex; Gabriel, Fabien; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    To determine baseline cardiovascular and respiratory variables in the awake pigeon, and to assess those variables during anaesthesia at the individual minimal anaesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane during spontaneous breathing. Prospective, experimental trial. Seven healthy adult pigeons weighing a mean ± standard deviation (SD) of 438 ± 38 g. Heart rate (HR), heart rhythm, respiratory rate (fR), end-expired carbon dioxide tension (Pe'CO2), indirect systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and cloacal temperature (T) were measured in birds in the awake state (after acclimatization to handling). Two weeks later, the pigeons were anaesthetized with isoflurane in order to determine their MAC and evaluate the same cardiovascular and respiratory variables during a further 40 minutes of isoflurane anaesthesia. In the awake pigeon, mean ± SD HR, SAP, fR, Pe'CO2 and T were, respectively, 155 ± 28 beats minute(-1), 155 ± 21 mmHg, 34 ± 6 breaths minute(-1), 38 ± 8 mmHg (5.1 ± 1.1 kPa) and 41.8 ± 0.5 °C. Mean isoflurane MAC was 1.8 ± 0.4%. During maintenance of anaesthesia at MAC, although no significant decreases between values obtained in the awake and anaesthetized states emerged in HR or respiratory rate, significant decreases in SAP and cloacal temperature and an increase in Pe'CO2 were observed. No arrhythmia was identified in awake pigeons, whereas second- and third-degree atrioventricular blocks occurred under isoflurane. Isoflurane MAC in pigeons appeared to be higher than in other avian species. Isoflurane anaesthesia in pigeons resulted in hypercapnia, hypotension, mild hypothermia and second- and third-degree atrioventricular blocks. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  5. The cerebrovascular effects of adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine infusions under propofol and isoflurane anaesthesia in sheep.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, J A; Upton, R N; Grant, C; Martinez, A

    2002-12-01

    Infusions of catecholamines are frequently administered to patients receiving propofol or isoflurane anaesthesia. Interactions between these drugs may affect regional circulations, such as the brain. The aim of this animal (sheep) study was to determine the effects of ramped infusions of adrenaline, noradrenaline (10, 20, 40 micrograms/min) and dopamine (10, 20, 40 micrograms/kg/min) on cerebral blood flow (CBF), intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2). These measurements were made under awake physiological conditions, and during continuous propofol (15 mg/min) or 2% isoflurane anaesthesia. All three catecholamines significantly and equivalently increased mean arterial pressure from baseline in a dose-dependent manner in the three cohorts (P < 0.001). In the awake cohort (n = 8), dopamine (P < 0.01) significantly increased CBF from baseline whilst adrenaline and noradrenaline did not (P > 0.05). Under propofol (n = 6) and isoflurane (n = 6), all three catecholamines significantly increased CBF (P < 0.001). Dopamine caused the greatest increase in CBF, and was associated with significant increases in ICP (awake: P < 0.001; propofol P < 0.05; isoflurane P < 0.001) and CVR (isoflurane P < 0.05). No significant changes in CMRO2 were demonstrated. Under propofol and isoflurane anaesthesia, the cerebrovascular effects of catecholamines were significantly different from the awake, physiological state, with dopamine demonstrating the most pronounced effects, particularly under propofol. Dopamine-induced hyperaemia was associated with other cerebrovascular changes. In the presence of an equivalent effect on mean arterial pressure, the exaggerated cerebrovascular effects under anaesthesia appear to be centrally mediated, possibly induced by propofol- or isoflurane-dependent changes in blood-brain barrier permeability, thereby causing a direct influence on the cerebral vasculature.

  6. Paradoxical Emergence: Administration of Subanesthetic Ketamine during Isoflurane Anesthesia Induces Burst Suppression but Accelerates Recovery.

    PubMed

    Hambrecht-Wiedbusch, Viviane S; Li, Duan; Mashour, George A

    2017-03-01

    Promoting arousal by manipulating certain brain regions and/or neurotransmitters has been a recent research focus, with the goal of trying to improve recovery from general anesthesia. The current study tested the hypothesis that a single subanesthetic dose of ketamine during isoflurane anesthesia would increase cholinergic tone in the prefrontal cortex and accelerate recovery. Adult male rats were implanted with electroencephalography electrodes (frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex) and a microdialysis guide cannula targeted for the prefrontal cortex. After establishing general anesthesia with isoflurane, animals were randomly assigned to receive a saline control or ketamine injection. When isoflurane was discontinued nearly 90 min after drug or saline administration, recovery from anesthesia was measured by experimenters and blinded observers. During the entire experiment, electrophysiologic signals were recorded and acetylcholine was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. A single dose of subanesthetic ketamine caused an initial 125% increase in burst suppression ratio (last isoflurane sample: 37.48 ± 24.11% vs. isoflurane after ketamine injection: 84.36 ± 8.95%; P < 0.0001), but also a significant 44% reduction in emergence time (saline: 877 ± 335 s vs. ketamine: 494 ± 108 s; P = 0.0005; n = 10 per treatment). Furthermore, ketamine caused a significant 317% increase in cortical acetylcholine release (mean after ketamine injection: 0.18 ± 0.16 pmol vs. ketamine recovery: 0.75 ± 0.41 pmol; P = 0.0002) after isoflurane anesthesia was discontinued. Administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine during isoflurane anesthesia increases anesthetic depth but-paradoxically-accelerates the recovery of consciousness, possibly through cholinergic mechanisms.

  7. Subclinical Carbon Monoxide Limits Apoptosis in the Developing Brain After Isoflurane Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ying; Levy, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Volatile anesthetics cause widespread apoptosis in the developing brain. Carbon monoxide (CO) has antiapoptotic properties, and exhaled endogenous CO is commonly rebreathed during low-flow anesthesia in infants and children, resulting in subclinical CO exposure. Thus, we aimed to determine whether CO could limit isoflurane-induced apoptosis in the developing brain. METHODS Seven-day-old male CD-1 mouse pups underwent 1-hour exposure to 0 (air), 5, or 100 ppm CO in air with or without isoflurane (2%). We assessed carboxyhemoglobin levels, cytochrome c peroxidase activity, and cytochrome c release from forebrain mitochondria after exposure and quantified the number of activated caspase-3 positive cells and TUNEL positive nuclei in neocortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus/thalamus. RESULTS Carboxyhemoglobin levels approximated those expected in humans after a similar time-weighted CO exposure. Isoflurane significantly increased cytochrome c peroxidase activity, cytochrome c release, the number of activated caspase-3 cells, and TUNEL positive nuclei in the forebrain of air-exposed mice. CO, however, abrogated isoflurane-induced cytochrome c peroxidase activation and cytochrome c release from forebrain mitochondria and decreased the number of activated caspase-3 positive cells and TUNEL positive nuclei after simultaneous exposure with isoflurane. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, the data indicate that CO can limit apoptosis after isoflurane exposure via inhibition of cytochrome c peroxidase depending on concentration. Although it is unknown whether CO directly inhibited isoflurane-induced apoptosis, it is possible that low-flow anesthesia designed to target rebreathing of specific concentrations of CO may be a desired strategy to develop in the future in an effort to prevent anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity in infants and children. PMID:24413549

  8. Overexpression cdc42 attenuates isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity in developmental brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xi; Li, Shiyong; Han, Qiang; Zhao, Yilin; Gao, Jie; Yan, Jing; Luo, Ailin

    2017-08-26

    Nowadays many children receive operations with general anesthesia. Isoflurane is a commonly-used general anesthetic. Numbers of studies demonstrated that isoflurane induced neurotoxicity and neurobehavioral deficiency in young rats, however, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Cell division cycle 42 (cdc42) played an important role in regulating synaptic vesicle trafficking and actin dynamics in neuron, which closely linked to synaptic plasticity and dendritic spine formation. Meanwhile, cdc42 also involved in many neurodegenerative diseases. However, whether cdc42 provided a protective role in isoflurane induced synaptogenesis dysfunction still unknown. As the upstream of cdc42, calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) interacts with ion channels such as VDCCs and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), which closely associated with neuroapoptosis and cognitive deficiency in developing brain. The phosphorylation of CaMKIIα at Thr 286 plays an important role in introduction and maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). Therefore, we investigated the effect of isoflurane on cdc42 and its upstream Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and its downstream p21 activated kinase 3 (PAK3), then determined whether CaMKIIα/cdc42/PAK3 signaling pathway was involved in neurotoxicity and cognitive deficiency induced by isoflurane. Our study found that isoflurane induced neurotoxicity and resulted in cognitive impairment in young rats through suppressed CaMKIIα/cdc42/PAK3 signaling pathway. Cdc42 over-expression could reverse neurotoxicity and improve cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Bispectral index as a predictor of sedation depth during isoflurane or midazolam sedation in ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Sackey, P V; Radell, P J; Granath, F; Martling, C R

    2007-06-01

    Bispectral index (BIS) is used for monitoring anaesthetic depth with inhaled anaesthetic agents in the operating room but has not been evaluated as a monitor of sedation depth in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting with these agents. If BIS could predict sedation depth in ICU patients, patient disturbances could be reduced and oversedation avoided. Twenty ventilator-dependent ICU patients aged 27 to 80 years were randomised to sedation with isoflurane via the AnaConDa or intravenous midazolam. BIS (A-2000 XP, version 3.12), electromyogram activity (EMG) and Signal Quality Index were measured continuously. Hourly clinical evaluation of sedation depth according to Bloomsbury Sedation Score (Bloomsbury) was performed. The median BIS value during a 10-minute interval prior to the clinical evaluation at the bedside was compared with Bloomsbury. Nurses performing the clinical sedation scoring were blinded to the BIS values. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was measured and compared with Bloomsbury. Correlation was poor between BIS and Bloomsbury in both groups (Spearman's rho 0.012 in the isoflurane group and -0.057 in the midazolam group). Strong correlation was found between BIS and EMG (Spearman's rho 0.74). Significant correlation was found between end-tidal isoflurane concentration and Bloomsbury (Spearman's rho 0.47). In conclusion, BIS XP does not reliably predict sedation depth as measured by clinical evaluation in non-paralysed ICU patients sedated with isoflurane or midazolam. EMG contributes significantly to BIS values in isoflurane or midazolam sedated, non-paralysed ICU patients. End-tidal isoflurane concentration appeared to be a better indicator of clinical sedation depth than BIS.

  10. Isoflurane protects against human endothelial cell apoptosis by inducing sphingosine kinase-1 via ERK MAPK.

    PubMed

    Bakar, Adnan M; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Lee, H Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a major clinical problem affecting virtually every patient requiring critical care. Volatile anesthetics are frequently used during the perioperative period and protect the heart and kidney against ischemia and reperfusion injury. We aimed to determine whether isoflurane, the most commonly used volatile anesthetic in the USA, protects against endothelial apoptosis and necrosis and the mechanisms involved in this protection. Human endothelial EA.hy926 cells were pretreated with isoflurane or carrier gas (95% room air + 5% CO(2)) then subjected to apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-α or to necrosis with hydrogen peroxide. DNA laddering and in situ Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) staining determined EA.hy926 cell apoptosis and percent LDH released determined necrosis. We also determined whether isoflurane modulates the expression and activity of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1) and induces the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK MAPK) as both enzymes are known to protect against cell death. Isoflurane pretreatment significantly decreased apoptosis in EA.hy926 cells as evidenced by reduced TUNEL staining and DNA laddering without affecting necrosis. Mechanistically, isoflurane induces the phosphorylation of ERK MAPK and increased SK1 expression and activity in EA.hy926 cells. Finally, selective blockade of SK1 (with SKI-II) or S1P(1) receptor (with W146) abolished the anti-apoptotic effects of isoflurane. Taken together, we demonstrate that isoflurane, in addition to its potent analgesic and anesthetic properties, protects against endothelial apoptosis most likely via SK1 and ERK MAPK activation. Our findings have significant clinical implication for protection of endothelial cells during the perioperative period and patients requiring critical care.

  11. Isoflurane does not mimic ischaemic preconditioning in decreasing hydroxyl radical production in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Gozal, Y; Raphael, J; Rivo, J; Berenshtein, E; Chevion, M; Drenger, B

    2005-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species are an important mediator in isoflurane-induced myocardial preconditioning. However, hydroxyl radicals are also released during reperfusion after regional ischaemia. The purpose of the present study was to test whether ischaemic preconditioning and isoflurane would influence the production of hydroxyl radicals during reperfusion. After i.v. administration of salicylate 100 mg kg(-1) and a 30 min stabilization period, New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to 40 min of regional myocardial ischaemia and 2 h of reperfusion. Ischaemic preconditioning was elicited by 5 min ischaemia followed by 10 min reperfusion (before the 40 min ischaemia). In another group, isoflurane (2.1%) was administered for 30 min, followed by 15 min washout, before the long ischaemia. Area at risk and infarct size were assessed by blue dye injection and tetrazolium chloride staining. We quantified the level of OH-mediated conversion of salicylate to its dihydrobenzoate derivatives (2,3- and 2,5-DHBAs). Normalized values of the DHBAs (ng DHBA per mg salicylate) were calculated. Mean (se) infarct size was 57 (6)% of the risk area in the untreated controls. This was significantly smaller in the ischaemic preconditioning and isoflurane groups: 22 (5) and 23 (6)% respectively. At 10 min of reperfusion, ischaemic preconditioning limited the mean increase in 2,3-DHBA to 24% from baseline, compared with 81% in control and 74% in the isoflurane group. Normalized 2,5-DHBA was maximally increased by 75% in the untreated group, 4 min after reperfusion. Ischaemic preconditioning significantly inhibited this increase (24% increase from baseline, P<0.01). However, the increase observed in the isoflurane group was not different from control (71%). As already known, ischaemic preconditioning and isoflurane markedly reduced infarct size. However, only ischaemic preconditioning decreased postischaemic production of hydroxyl radicals. These different effects suggest different protective

  12. Isoflurane anesthesia does not satisfy the homeostatic need for rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Mashour, George A; Lipinski, William J; Matlen, Lisa B; Walker, Amanda J; Turner, Ashley M; Schoen, Walter; Lee, Uncheol; Poe, Gina R

    2010-05-01

    Sleep and general anesthesia are distinct states of consciousness that share many traits. Prior studies suggest that propofol anesthesia facilitates recovery from rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep deprivation, but the effects of inhaled anesthetics have not yet been studied. We tested the hypothesis that isoflurane anesthesia would also facilitate recovery from REM sleep deprivation. Six rats were implanted with superficial cortical, deep hippocampal, and nuchal muscle electrodes. Animals were deprived of REM sleep for 24 hours and then (1) allowed to sleep ad libitum for 8 hours or (2) were immediately anesthetized with isoflurane for a 4-hour period followed by ad libitum sleep for 4 hours. The percentage of REM and NREM sleep after the protocols was compared with similar conditions without sleep deprivation. Hippocampal activity during isoflurane anesthesia was also compared with activity during REM sleep and active waking. Recovery after deprivation was associated with a 5.7-fold increase (P = 0.0005) in REM sleep in the first 2 hours and a 2.6-fold increase (P = 0.004) in the following 2 hours. Animals that underwent isoflurane anesthesia after deprivation demonstrated a 3.6-fold increase (P = 0.001) in REM sleep in the first 2 hours of recovery and a 2.2-fold increase (P = 0.003) in the second 2 hours. There were no significant differences in REM sleep rebound between the first 4 hours after deprivation and the first 4 hours after both deprivation and isoflurane anesthesia. Hippocampal activity during isoflurane anesthesia was not affected by REM sleep deprivation, and the probability distribution of events during anesthesia was more similar to that of waking than to REM sleep. Unlike propofol, isoflurane does not satisfy the homeostatic need for REM sleep. Furthermore, the regulation and organization of hippocampal events during anesthesia are unlike sleep. We conclude that different anesthetics have distinct interfaces with sleep.

  13. Effects of isoflurane on measurement of fluorescence spectra and CLSM imaging in Acetabularia acetabulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, WenLi; Quan, Zhou; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    The volatile halogenated methyl ethyl ether is used as anesthetic to inhibit actin-based dynamics directly or indirectly in animal cells. In plant cells, most intracellular movements are related with actin pathways too. We utilized isoflurane to study the dynamic choloroplast organization in unicellular baby and adult alga Acetabularia acetabulum. Fluorescence spectra were measured and choloroplast movements were recorded by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) imaging in in Acetabularia acetabulum. Isoflurane was effective in the unicellular baby and adult organisms and showed time- dependent actin-inhibition patterns. Acetabularia acetabulum cells were treated for different times with isoflurane saturated solutions in artificial seawater (it was defined to be 100% isoflurane). The intensity of fluorescence at 680nm and 730nm were progressively decreased at 100% isoflurane. It was remarkable difference between fluorescence spectra of baby and adult Acetabularia were inhibited by isoflurance, adult Acetabularia cells showed more sensitive. Whereas the choloroplast in Acetabularia acetabulum was commendably imaged by CLSM at 20 and 40 zoom.

  14. Effects of isoflurane on the actions of neuromuscular blockers on the muscle nicotine acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanxiang; Yao, Shanglong; Nie, Hui; Lü, Bin

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that volatile anesthetic enhancement of muscle relaxation is the result of combined drug effects on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The poly A m RNA from muscle by isolation were microinjected into Xenopus oocytes for receptor expression. Concentration-effect curves for the inhibition of Ach-induced currents were established for vecuronium, rocuranium, and isoflurane. Subsequently, inhibitory effects of NDMRs were studied in the presence of the isoflurane at a concentration equivalent to half the concentration producing a 50% inhibition alone. All tested drugs produced rapid and readily reversible concentration-dependent inhibition. The 50% inhibitory concentration values were 889 micromol/L (95% CI: 711-1214 micromol). 33.4 micromol (95% CI: 27.1-41.7 nmol) and 9.2 nmol (95% CI: 7.9-12.3 nmol) for isoflurane. rocuranium and vecuronium, respectively. Coapplication of isoflurane significantly enhanced the inhibitory effects of rocuranium and vecuronium, and it was especially so at low concentration of NMDRs. Isoflurane increases the potency of NDMRs, possibly by enhancing antagonist affinity at the receptor site.

  15. The cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane after premedication of healthy dogs undergoing elective surgery.

    PubMed

    Abed, Janan M; Pike, Fred S; Clare, Monica C; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    Sevoflurane and isoflurane are commonly used in veterinary anesthesia. The objective of this prospective, randomized, open-label clinical study was to compare the cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane via direct arterial blood pressure measurements and the lithium dilution cardiac output (LDCO) on premedicated healthy dogs undergoing elective tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). Nineteen client-owned dogs were included. All dogs were premedicated with hydromorphone (0.05 mg/kg IV and glycopyrrolate 0.01 mg/kg subcutaneously). Ten dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane and nine dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane. Eighteen dogs were instrumented with a dorsal pedal arterial catheter, and one dog had a femoral arterial catheter. All dogs had continuous, direct systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP), and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressure readings as well as heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), stroke volume variation (SVV), and pulse pressure variation (PPV) recorded q 5 min during the surgical procedure. There was no significant statistical difference in all parameters between the sevoflurane and isoflurane treatment groups. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane inhalant anesthetics appear to have similar hemodynamic effects when used as part of a multimodal anesthetic protocol in premedicated healthy dogs undergoing an elective surgical procedure.

  16. A Mitochondrion-Targeted Antioxidant Ameliorates Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoru; Zhang, Hui; Hao, Shuangying; Ji, Muhuo; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane possesses neurotoxicity and can induce cognitive deficits, particularly in aging mammals. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) have been linked to the early pathogenesis of this disorder. However, the role of mtROS remains to be evaluated due to a lack of targeted method to treat mtROS. Here, we determined in aging mice the effects of the mitochondrion-targeted antioxidant SS-31, on cognitive deficits induced by isoflurane, a general inhalation anesthetic. We further investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the effects of SS-31 on hippocampal neuro-inflammation and apoptosis. The results showed that isoflurane induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficit, which was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction including reduced ATP contents, increased ROS levels, and mitochondrial swelling. Treatment with SS-31 significantly ameliorated isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits through the improvement of mitochondrial integrity and function. Mechanistically, SS-31 treatment suppressed pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing the levels of NF-κB, NLRP3, caspase 1, IL-1β, and TNF-α; and inhibited the apoptotic pathway by decreasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, reducing the release of cytochrome C, and blocking the cleavage of caspase 3. Our results indicate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may be attenuated by mitochondrion-targeted antioxidants, such as SS-31. Therefore, SS-31 may have therapeutic potentials in preventing injuries from oxidative stresses that contribute to anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Measurement of motor evoked potentials following repetitive magnetic motor cortex stimulation during isoflurane or propofol anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rohde, V; Krombach, G A; Baumert, J H; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, I; Weinzierl, M; Gilsbach, J M

    2003-10-01

    Isoflurane and propofol reduce the recordability of compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) following single transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex (sTCMS). Repetition of the magnetic stimulus (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, rTCMS) might allow the inhibition caused by anaesthesia with isoflurane or propofol to be overcome. We applied rTCMS (four stimuli; inter-stimulus intervals of 3, 4, 5 ms (333, 250, 200 Hz), output 2.5 Tesla) in 27 patients and recorded CMAP from the hypothenar and anterior tibial muscle. Anaesthesia was maintained with fentanyl 0.5-1 microg kg(-1) x h(-1) and either isoflurane 1.2% (10 patients) or propofol 5 mg kg(-1) x h(-1) with nitrous oxide 60% in oxygen (17 patients). No CMAP were detected during isoflurane anaesthesia. During propofol anaesthesia 333 Hz, four-pulse magnetic stimulation evoked CMAP in the hypothenar muscle in 75%, and in the anterior tibial muscle in 65% of the patients. Less response was obtained with 250 and 200 Hz stimulation. In most patients, rTCMS can overcome suppression of CMAP during propofol/nitrous oxide anaesthesia, but not during isoflurane anaesthesia. A train of four magnetic stimuli at a frequency of 333 Hz is most effective in evoking potentials from the upper and lower limb muscles. The authors conclude that rTCMS can be used for evaluation of the descending motor pathways during anaesthesia.

  18. Isoflurane depresses glutamate release by reducing neuronal excitability at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Sandstrom, David J

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms through which volatile general anaesthetics exert their behavioural effects remain unclear. The accessibility of the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction to genetic and neurophysiological analysis has made it an attractive model system for identification of anaesthetic targets. This study provides a mechanistic basis for the genetic analysis of anaesthetic action, by analysing the neurophysiological effects of the volatile anaesthetic isoflurane on axonal and synaptic function in the Drosophila larva. The most robust effect of isoflurane was a reversible decrease in the amplitude and area of glutamatergic excitatory junctional currents (EJCs) evoked at the neuromuscular junction. Isoflurane did not affect postsynaptic glutamate receptor function detectably, in that the amplitudes, areas and decay times of spontaneous miniature EJCs were unchanged at any concentration. Therefore, decreased EJC amplitude resulted from reduction of neurotransmitter release. Reduced neurotransmitter release was associated with decreased presynaptic excitability, measured as increased delay to EJC onset and reduced axonal conduction velocity. EJC amplitude was rescued to control levels by direct electrotonic stimulation of the synapse in the presence of tetrodotoxin, indicating that isoflurane inhibits neurotransmitter release by reducing presynaptic excitability. In addition, isoflurane reduced release probability, measured as increased paired-pulse facilitation. The EC50 for suppression of larval locomotion was similar to that for reduction of transmitter release, indicating that the axonal and synaptic effects were occurring in a behaviourally relevant range. These results provide a cellular context for ongoing genetic and neurophysiological analyses of volatile anaesthetic action in Drosophila, and suggest candidate anaesthetic target molecules. PMID:15169847

  19. Cardiorespiratory dose-response relationship of isoflurane in Cinereous vulture (Aegypius monachus) during spontaneous ventilation

    PubMed Central

    SEOK, Seong-Hoon; JEONG, Dong-Hyuk; HONG, Il-Hwa; LEE, Hee-Chun; YEON, Seong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesia is an inevitably important component of diagnosis and treatments examining the health condition of wild animals. Not only does anesthesia become an essential tool in minimizing stress of the patients and providing an opportunity to deliver accurate and safe procedures, but it also ensures the safety of the medical crew members. This study was conducted to investigate the dose-response cardiorespiratory effects of isoflurane during spontaneous ventilation in ten cinereous vultures. Each bird was administered isoflurane at initial concentration of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 and then an end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (ETiso) of 1.0% for an equilibration period of 15 min in the given order. At the end of the equilibration period, the direct blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and end tidal CO2 partial pressure (PETCO2) were recorded, and blood gas analysis was performed. Increasing isoflurane concentrations during spontaneous ventilation led to dose-dependent increases in HR and PETCO2, with minimal changes in RR, decreased arterial BP and respiratory acidosis. Overall, isoflurane for anesthesia of spontaneously breathing cinereous vultures is a suitable choice for diagnostic or surgical procedures. PMID:27725351

  20. Local Versus Global Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia on Visual Processing in the Fly Brain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract What characteristics of neural activity distinguish the awake and anesthetized brain? Drugs such as isoflurane abolish behavioral responsiveness in all animals, implying evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether this conservation is reflected at the level of neural activity. Studies in humans have shown that anesthesia is characterized by spatially distinct spectral and coherence signatures that have also been implicated in the global impairment of cortical communication. We questioned whether anesthesia has similar effects on global and local neural processing in one of the smallest brains, that of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Using a recently developed multielectrode technique, we recorded local field potentials from different areas of the fly brain simultaneously, while manipulating the concentration of isoflurane. Flickering visual stimuli (‘frequency tags’) allowed us to track evoked responses in the frequency domain and measure the effects of isoflurane throughout the brain. We found that isoflurane reduced power and coherence at the tagging frequency (13 or 17 Hz) in central brain regions. Unexpectedly, isoflurane increased power and coherence at twice the tag frequency (26 or 34 Hz) in the optic lobes of the fly, but only for specific stimulus configurations. By modeling the periodic responses, we show that the increase in power in peripheral areas can be attributed to local neuroanatomy. We further show that the effects on coherence can be explained by impacted signal-to-noise ratios. Together, our results show that general anesthesia has distinct local and global effects on neuronal processing in the fruit fly brain. PMID:27517084

  1. Effect of halothane, isoflurane and desflurane on lower oesophageal sphincter tone.

    PubMed

    Chassard, D; Tournadre, J P; Berrada, K R; Bryssine, B; Bouletreau, P

    1996-12-01

    We have studied the effects of volatile anaesthetics on lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) tone in three groups of eight pigs allocated randomly to receive end-tidal concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 MAC of desflurane, isoflurane or halothane for 15 min. LOS and oesophageal barrier pressures (BrP = LOSP - gastric pressure) were measured using a manometric method. The decrease in BrP paralleled the decrease in LOS pressure and was significant at 0.5 MAC for isoflurane and at 1.0 MAC for halothane. At 1.5 MAC, BrP values were approximately 62% of baseline values for halothane, 37% for isoflurane and 83% for desflurane. Inter-group comparisons showed that BrP did not differ at baseline and at 0.5 MAC. At 1.0 MAC the effect of isoflurane on BrP was significantly different from desflurane (P < 0.001) and halothane (P < 0.02) whereas the effect of desflurane on BrP was not significantly different from halothane. At 1.5 MAC the effect of isoflurane on BrP was significantly different from desflurane (P < 0.01) and halothane (P < 0.05) whereas the effect of desflurane on BrP was not significantly different from halothane. We conclude that desflurane maintained BrP and this may be clinically important in patients at high risk of regurgitation.

  2. Isoflurane preconditioning affords functional neuroprotection in a murine model of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Paul R; Appelboom, Geoffrey; Hwang, Brian Y; Haque, Raqeeb M; Yeh, Mason L; Ducruet, Andrew F; Kellner, Christopher P; Gorski, Justin; Keesecker, Sarah E; Connolly, E Sander

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to isoflurane gas prior to neurological injury, known as anesthetic preconditioning, has been shown to provide neuroprotective benefits in animal models of ischemic stroke. Given the common mediators of cellular injury in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, we hypothesize that isoflurane preconditioning will provide neurological protection in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). 24 h prior to intracerebral hemorrhage, C57BL/6J mice were preconditioned with a 4-h exposure to 1% isoflurane gas or room air. Intracerebral hemorrhage was performed using a double infusion of 30-μL autologous whole blood. Neurological function was evaluated at 24, 48 and 72 h using the 28-point test. Mice were sacrificed at 72 h, and brain edema was measured. Mice preconditioned with isoflurane performed better than control mice on 28-point testing at 24 h, but not at 48 or 72 h. There was no significant difference in ipsilateral hemispheric edema between mice preconditioned with isoflurane and control mice. These results demonstrate the early functional neuroprotective effects of anesthetic preconditioning in ICH and suggest that methods of preconditioning that afford protection in ischemia may also provide protection in ICH.

  3. Carbon dioxide, but not isoflurane, elicits ultrasonic vocalizations in female rats.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, J; De Rantere, D; Fernandez, N J; Krajacic, A; Pang, D S J

    2013-10-01

    Gradual filling of a chamber with carbon dioxide is currently listed by the Canadian Council on Animal Care guidelines as a conditionally acceptable method of euthanasia for rats. Behavioural evidence suggests, however, that exposure to carbon dioxide gas is aversive. Isoflurane is less aversive than carbon dioxide and may be a viable alternative, though objective data are lacking for the period leading up to loss of consciousness. It has been shown that during negative states, such as pain and distress, rats produce ultrasonic vocalizations. The objective of this study was to detect ultrasonic vocalizations during exposure to carbon dioxide gas or isoflurane as an indicator of a negative state. Specialized recording equipment, with a frequency detection range of 10 to 200 kHz, was used to register these calls during administration of each agent. Nine female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to either carbon dioxide or isoflurane on two different occasions. All rats vocalized in the ultrasonic range (30 to 70 kHz) during exposure to carbon dioxide. When exposed to isoflurane, no calls were detected from any of the animals. The frequent occurrence of ultrasonic vocalizations during carbon dioxide exposure suggests that the common practice of carbon dioxide euthanasia is aversive to rats and that isoflurane may be a preferable alternative.

  4. INTRAMUSCULAR EPINEPHRINE RESULTS IN REDUCED ANESTHETIC RECOVERY TIME IN AMERICAN ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) UNDERGOING ISOFLURANE ANESTHESIA.

    PubMed

    Gatson, Bonnie J; Goe, Alexandra; Granone, Tiffany D; Wellehan, James F X

    2017-03-01

    Inhalants are commonly used to anesthetize reptiles, but volatile anesthetics have been associated with prolonged recovery times. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of intramuscular (IM) epinephrine on anesthetic recovery times following isoflurane anesthesia in a population of subadult American alligators ( Alligator mississippiensis ). In this prospective randomized crossover study, five clinically healthy alligators were anesthetized for 90 min with the use of isoflurane. Alligators were randomly assigned into one of two treatment groups: Group E received IM epinephrine (0.1 mg/kg), and Group S received an equal volume of 0.9% saline administered after isoflurane was discontinued. Time from the end of inhalant administration to return of spontaneous ventilation, return of the palpebral reflex, movement in response to a standardized toe pinch, and spontaneous movement was recorded. The time of extubation was noted and occurred following the return of spontaneous ventilation and movement. Pulse rate, surface body temperature, and airway gases including expiratory and inspiratory isoflurane concentrations and end-tidal carbon dioxide were measured every 5 min throughout the study. The time from the end of anesthesia to extubation was significantly faster in Group E (51.2 ± 16.7 min) compared to Group S (107.4 ± 43.7 min). Pulse rate was significantly higher within the first 15 min following epinephrine injection compared to the saline group at these time points. Therefore, IM epinephrine administered at the end of general anesthesia can significantly hasten anesthetic recovery from isoflurane in alligators.

  5. Isoflurane compared with midazolam for sedation in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, K. L.; Willatts, S. M.; Prys-Roberts, C.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare isoflurane with midazolam for sedation of ventilated patients. DESIGN--Randomised control study. Setting--Intensive care unit in university teaching hospital. PATIENTS--Sixty patients aged 18-76 who required mechanical ventilation. INTERVENTIONS--Sedation with either 0.1-0.6% isoflurane in an air-oxygen mixture (30 patients) or a continuous intravenous infusion of midazolam 0.01-0.20 mg/kg/h (30 patients). Sedation was assessed initially and hourly thereafter on a six point scale. Incremental intravenous doses of morphine 0.05 mg/kg were given for analgesia as required. The trial sedative was stopped when the patient was judged ready for weaning from ventilatory support or at 24 hours (whichever was earlier). END POINT--Achievement of a predetermined level of sedation for as much of the time as possible. MAIN RESULTS--Isoflurane produced satisfactory sedation for a greater proportion of time (86%) than midazolam (64%), and patients sedated with isoflurane recovered more rapidly from sedation. CONCLUSION--Isoflurane is a promising alternative technique for sedation of ventilated patients in the intensive care unit. PMID:2500195

  6. Electrical stimulation of the parabrachial nucleus induces reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Muindi, Fanuel; Kenny, Jonathan D; Taylor, Norman E; Solt, Ken; Wilson, Matthew A; Brown, Emery N; Van Dort, Christa J

    2016-06-01

    Clinically, emergence from general anesthesia is viewed as a passive process where anesthetics are discontinued at the end of surgery and anesthesiologists wait for the drugs to wear off. The mechanisms involved in emergence are not well understood and there are currently no drugs that can actively reverse the state of general anesthesia. An emerging hypothesis states that brain regions that control arousal become active during emergence and are a key part of the return to wakefulness. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that electrical activation of the glutamatergic parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in the brainstem is sufficient to induce reanimation (active emergence) during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a marker of neural activity, we first show a selective increase in active neurons in the PBN during passive emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then electrically stimulated the PBN to assess whether it is sufficient to induce reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia. Stimulation induced behavioral arousal and restoration of the righting reflex during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. In contrast, stimulation of the nearby central inferior colliculus (CIC) did not restore the righting reflex. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed that stimulation produced a significant decrease in EEG delta power during PBN stimulation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the PBN provides critical arousal input during emergence from isoflurane anesthesia.

  7. Auditory Evoked Bursts in Mouse Visual Cortex during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Land, Rüdiger; Engler, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    General anesthesia is not a uniform state of the brain. Ongoing activity differs between light and deep anesthesia and cortical response properties are modulated in dependence of anesthetic dosage. We investigated how anesthesia level affects cross-modal interactions in primary sensory cortex. To examine this, we continuously measured the effects of visual and auditory stimulation during increasing and decreasing isoflurane level in the mouse visual cortex and the subiculum (from baseline at 0.7 to 2.5 vol % and reverse). Auditory evoked burst activity occurred in visual cortex after a transition during increase of anesthesia level. At the same time, auditory and visual evoked bursts occurred in the subiculum, even though the subiculum was unresponsive to both stimuli previous to the transition. This altered sensory excitability was linked to the presence of burst suppression activity in cortex, and to a regular slow burst suppression rhythm (∼0.2 Hz) in the subiculum. The effect disappeared during return to light anesthesia. The results show that pseudo-heteromodal sensory burst responses can appear in brain structures as an effect of an anesthesia induced state change. PMID:23185462

  8. Pupil Size in Relation to Cortical States during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Jeung Eun; Han, Hio-Been

    2016-01-01

    In neuronal recording studies on anesthetized animals, reliable measures for the transitional moment of consciousness are frequently required. Previous findings suggest that pupil fluctuations reflect the neuronal states during quiet wakefulness, whose correlation was unknown for the anesthetized condition. Here, we investigated the pupillary changes under isoflurane anesthesia simultaneously with the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG). The pupil was tracked by using a region-based active contour model. The dose was given to the animal in a stepwise increasing mode (simulating induction of anesthesia) or in a stepwise decreasing mode (simulating emergence of anesthesia). We found that the quickly widening pupil action (mydriasis) characterizes the transitional state in anesthesia. Mydriasis occurred only in the light dose in the emergence phase, and the events were accompanied by an increase of burst activity in the EEG followed by EMG activity in 47% of the mydriasis events. Our findings suggest that recording such pupil changes may offer a noncontact monitoring tool for indexing the transitional state of the brain, particularly when a lower threshold dose is applied. PMID:27122995

  9. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for the Anesthetics Halothane, Isoflurane, and Desflurane in the Pig (SUS SCROFA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    swine (3-4 months old; 20 ± 2 [mean ± SD] kg) were exposed to a mixture of 3.0% desflurane, 0.5% sevoflurane , 0.4% isoflurane, and 0.2% halothane...B.H. Johnson, and R.B. Weiskopf. 1990. Pharmacokinetics of desfiurane, sevoflurane , isoflurane, and halothane in pigs. Anesth. Analg. 71:340-348. 10

  10. Comparison of isoflurane and alfaxalone (Alfaxan) for the induction of anesthesia in flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) undergoing orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Villaverde-Morcillo, Silvia; Benito, Javier; García-Sánchez, Rubén; Martín-Jurado, Olga; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2014-06-01

    Used since the 1970s as an avian anesthetic, the neurosteroid alfaxalone has been reformulated to avoid side effects from its castor oil excipient. This case report describes the clinical use of a new alfaxalone formulation (Alfaxan) as an intravenous anesthetic induction agent in wild isoflurane-anesthetized rose flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus). Twenty-five male and female rose flamingos underwent orthopedic surgery using isoflurane anesthesia. The animals were induced following one of two protocols: inhaled isoflurane by facemask (ISO; n = 9) or intravenous alfaxalone (2 mg/kg; ALF; n = 16). The time and quality of anesthetic induction (until first signs of muscle relaxation) and the time and quality of recovery (sternal recumbency) were recorded using a scoring system. Mild sedation was first observed at 18.4 +/- 3.8 min and 1.7 +/- 0.3 min, following isoflurane and alfaxalone administration, respectively (P < 0.001). Alfaxalone induction time was significantly shorter and induction quality was considered smoother than in the ISO group. Flamingos given alfaxalone induction required lower isoflurane concentrations for maintenance anesthesia than did flamingos induced with mask isoflurane (1.5-2 % vol vs. 4-5 % vol for ALF vs. ISO, respectively). Alfaxalone produced moderate cardiorespiratory effects not seen in the isoflurane induction group. Recovery times were similar with both protocols without significant differences in quality and length. The new alfaxalone formulation produces a safe and effective anesthetic induction in rose flamingos and has significant isoflurane-sparing effects during anesthesia.

  11. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation modulates hypnosis, immobility, and breathing during isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2008-12-01

    Many general anesthetics are thought to produce a loss of wakefulness, in part, by enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission. However, GABAergic neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation promotes wakefulness. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) relative to wakefulness, isoflurane decreases GABA levels in the pontine reticular formation; and (2) pontine reticular formation administration of drugs that increase or decrease GABA levels increases or decreases, respectively, isoflurane induction time. To test hypothesis 1, cats (n = 5) received a craniotomy and permanent electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram. Dialysis samples were collected from the pontine reticular formation during isoflurane anesthesia and wakefulness. GABA levels were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. For hypothesis 2, rats (n = 10) were implanted with a guide cannula aimed for the pontine reticular formation. Each rat received microinjections of Ringer's (vehicle control), the GABA uptake inhibitor nipecotic acid, and the GABA synthesis inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Rats were then anesthetized with isoflurane, and induction time was quantified as loss of righting reflex. Breathing rate was also measured. Relative to wakefulness, GABA levels were significantly decreased by isoflurane. Increased power in the electroencephalogram and decreased activity in the electromyogram caused by isoflurane covaried with pontine reticular formation GABA levels. Nipecotic acid and 3-mercaptopropionic acid significantly increased and decreased, respectively, isoflurane induction time. Nipecotic acid also increased breathing rate. Decreasing pontine reticular formation GABA levels comprises one mechanism by which isoflurane causes loss of consciousness, altered cortical excitability, muscular hypotonia, and decreased respiratory rate.

  12. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment via inhibition of isoflurane-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in ATP levels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Hou, Lengchen; Chen, Dan; Lin, Fuqing; Chang, Tao; Li, Mengzhu; Zhang, Lingling; Niu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Huiying; Fu, Shukun; Zheng, Junhua

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The inhaled general anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase-3 activation in vitro and in vivo. The underlying mechanisms and functional consequences of this activity remain unclear. Isoflurane can induce caspase-3 activation by causing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen, a novel antioxidant, against isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment. Methods: H4 human neuroglioma cells overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein were treated with saline or hydrogen-rich saline (HS, 300 μM), with or without 2% isoflurane, for 6 h or 3 h. Western blot analysis, fluorescence assays, and a mitochondrial swelling assay were used to evaluate caspase-3 activation, levels of ROS and ATP, and mitochondrial function. The effect of the interaction of isoflurane (1.4% for 2 h) and HS (5 mL/kg) on cognitive function in mice was also evaluated using a fear conditioning test. Results: We found that HS attenuated isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation. Moreover, HS treatment mitigated isoflurane-induced ROS accumulation, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores, reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduction in cellular ATP levels. Finally, HS significantly alleviated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in mice. Conclusions: Our results suggest that HS attenuates isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment via inhibition of isoflurane-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in ATP levels. These findings warrant further research into the underlying mechanisms of this activity, and indicate that HS has the potential to attenuate anesthesia neurotoxicity. PMID:28386342

  13. A simple method for evaluation of the uptake of isoflurane and its comparison with the square root of time model.

    PubMed

    Bangaari, Ashish; Panda, Nidhi Bidyut; Puri, Goverdhan Dutt

    2013-05-01

    The square root of time (SqRT) model had been used to predict the uptake of volatile agents. We studied the rate of uptake of isoflurane in 10 patients using liquid isoflurane infusion through syringe pump into the closed circuit. The infusion rates were titrated to maintain a constant end tidal concentration of isoflurane of 1.5%. The predicted uptake values were also calculated from the square root principle and compared with the derived uptake. The observed rate of uptake was higher than predicted from the Lowe and Ernst equation (P<0.001). There exists considerable inter-individual variability in uptake pharmacokinetics and it showed statistically significant correlation with ideal body weight, body weight (P<0.01), body surface area, and body weight¾ from 30 min of start of isoflurane infusion (P<0.05). SqRT model is inaccurate in predicting isoflurane uptake and underestimates it during closed circuit anaesthesia.

  14. Isoflurane Use in the Treatment of Super-Refractory Status Epilepticus is Associated with Hippocampal Changes on MRI.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kristin M; Connors, Robert; Lee, Donald H; Khandji, Alexander G; Claassen, Jan; Young, G Bryan

    2017-06-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Experts recommend aggressive management with continuous intravenous infusions or inhaled anesthetics such as isoflurane. However, there is concern that MRI changes in RSE reflect isoflurane neurotoxicity. We performed a case-control study to determine whether isoflurane is neurotoxic, based on MRI signal changes. We performed a retrospective case-control study of the incidence of MRI changes in RSE treated with and without isoflurane. Charts were reviewed for demographic and treatment information. T1, T2, and FLAIR sequences of MRIs were reviewed independently by two neuroradiologists blinded to treatment group for presence or absence of signal change or atrophy in the meninges, cortex, white matter, basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, brainstem, and cerebellum. Eight cases of RSE receiving treatment with isoflurane were identified and double-matched with 15 controls who received only intravenous anesthetics. Baseline characteristics were similar. Hippocampal signal change was observed more frequently in cases receiving isoflurane (p = 0.026). Hippocampal signal changes were associated with isoflurane use in patients with RSE. They were also associated with number of seizure days prior to MRI and the use of multiple anesthetic agents. Similar changes have been seen as a result of RSE itself, and one cannot rule out the possibility these changes represent seizure-related effects. If isoflurane-related, these hippocampal signal changes may be the result of a direct neurotoxic effect of prolonged isoflurane use or failure of isoflurane to protect the hippocampus from seizure-induced injury despite achieving electrographic burst-suppression.

  15. Isoflurane Inhibits Embryonic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Neural Differentiation Through miR-9/E-cadherin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Rong; Yan, Jia; Huang, Yan; Jiang, Jue; Yang, Yaqiong

    2015-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic, isoflurane, can permeate rapidly through the placental barrier and thus cause toxicity to the central nervous system of the developing fetus. In this study, we treated pregnant mice with clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane early on in development (days 3.5–6.5), and then found that the fetus growth was inhibited by isoflurane. We further used the mouse embryonic stem cell (mES cell) to be the early development model to investigate the mechanism of the embryotoxicity of isoflurane and found that isoflurane inhibited self-renewal of mES cells. In addition, neuronal differentiation from the mES cells treated with isoflurane was also inhibited. Overexpression of E-cadherin attenuated the effects of isoflurane on self-renewal and the subsequent neuronal differentiation. We also found that miR-9 can be upregulated by isoflurane. Overexpression of miR-9 inhibited the self-renewal and subsequent neuronal differentiation. E-cadherin was directly targeted by miR-9. Overexpression of E-cadherin can abolish the function of miR-9 or isoflurane on self-renewal and subsequent neuronal differentiation. These data suggested that isoflurane inhibits self-renewal and neuronal differentiation of mES cells, possibly by regulating the miR-9-E-cadherin signaling. The result of the current study may provide a novel idea for preventing the toxicity of inhalation anesthetics in the developing fetal brain in clinical practice when pregnant women accept nonobstetric surgery under inhalation general anesthesia. PMID:25892252

  16. Comparison of isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia after premedication with butorphanol in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Divers, Sonia M; Schumacher, Juergen; Stahl, Scott; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen J

    2005-06-01

    The anesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects of butorphanol followed by sevoflurane or isoflurane were compared in 23 male green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Heart and respiratory rates were recorded before administration of butorphanol (2 mg/kg i.m.) and at 30 min after premedication. Anesthesia was induced in 12 iguanas (group 1) with isoflurane (5%) and in 11 iguanas (group 2) with sevoflurane (7%). Heart rate, relative arterial oxygen hemoglobin saturation (SpO2), and end-tidal CO2 concentrations (EtCO2) were measured every minute for the first 5 min and every 5 min thereafter. Arterial blood gas parameters were determined at 10 and 40 min after induction. Thirty minutes after butorphanol administration, no significant changes in heart and respiratory rate were seen as compared with baseline values. Quality and time to induction were superior with butorphanol-sevoflurane (6 +/- 3 min) than with butorphanol-isoflurane (9 +/- 4 min). Vaporizer settings during maintenance ranged between 1-3% and 2-4%, respectively. No significant differences in heart rate were noted between groups. In the sevoflurane group, SpO2 values were > 90% throughout. Although SpO2, values were < 90% at 20, 25, and 30 min in the isoflurane group, no significant differences in SpO2 values were seen over time and between groups. A significant decrease in EtCO2 with time was present in both groups, with no significant differences between the groups. At 10 and 40 min, arterial blood oxygen saturation values were > 90% in both groups and no significant differences were noted with time and between groups. Recovery time was significantly longer in the butorphanol-isoflurane group (35 +/- 27 min) than in the butorphanol-sevoflurane group (7 +/- 4 min). The cardiopulmonary effects of butorphanol-isoflurane and butorphanol-sevoflurane assessed in this study are similar, and both inhalants appear to be safe and effective for induction and maintenance in the green iguana.

  17. Neonatal Isoflurane Exposure Induces Neurocognitive Impairment and Abnormal Hippocampal Histone Acetylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Tao; Guo, Qulian; Zou, Wangyuan; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Song, Zongbin; Sun, Bei; He, Xin; Yang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal exposure to isoflurane may induce long-term memory impairment in mice. Histone acetylation is an important form of chromatin modification that regulates the transcription of genes required for memory formation. This study investigated whether neonatal isoflurane exposure-induced neurocognitive impairment is related to dysregulated histone acetylation in the hippocampus and whether it can be attenuated by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). Methods C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0.75% isoflurane three times (each for 4 h) at postnatal days 7, 8, and 9. Contextual fear conditioning (CFC) was tested at 3 months after anesthesia administration. TSA was intraperitoneally injected 2 h before CFC training. Hippocampal histone acetylation levels were analyzed following CFC training. Levels of the neuronal activation and synaptic plasticity marker c-Fos were investigated at the same time point. Results Mice that were neonatally exposed to isoflurane showed significant memory impairment on CFC testing. These mice also exhibited dysregulated hippocampal H4K12 acetylation and decreased c-Fos expression following CFC training. TSA attenuated isoflurane-induced memory impairment and simultaneously increased histone acetylation and c-Fos levels in the hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA)1 area 1 h after CFC training. Conclusions Memory impairment induced by repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane is associated with dysregulated histone H4K12 acetylation in the hippocampus, which probably affects downstream c-Fos gene expression following CFC training. The HDAC inhibitor TSA successfully rescued impaired contextual fear memory, presumably by promoting histone acetylation and histone acetylation-mediated gene expression. PMID:25928815

  18. Isoflurane impairs odour discrimination learning in rats: differential effects on short- and long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, R. A.; Duscher, P.; Van Dyke, K.; Lee, M.; Andrei, A. C.; Perouansky, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Anaesthetics suppress the formation of lasting memories at concentrations that do not suppress perception, but it is unclear which elements of the complex cascade leading from a conscious experience to a lasting memory trace are disrupted. Experiments in conscious humans suggest that subhypnotic concentrations of anaesthetics impair consolidation or maintenance rather than acquisition of a representation (long-term more than short-term memory). We sought to test whether these agents similarly impair learning in rats. Methods We used operant conditioning in rats to examine the effect of isoflurane on acquisition compared with long-term (24 h) memory of non-aversive olfactory memories using two different odour discrimination tasks. Rats learned the ‘valences’ of odour pairs presented either separately (task A) or simultaneously (task B), under control conditions and under isoflurane inhalation. In a separate set of experiments, we tested the ability of the animals to recall a learning set that had been acquired 24 h previously. Results Under 0.4% isoflurane inhalation, the average number of trials required to reach criterion performance (18 correct responses in 20 successive trials) increased from 21.9 to 43.5 (P<0.05) and 24.2 to 54.4 (P<0.05) for tasks A and B, respectively. Under 0.3% isoflurane inhalation, only task B was impaired (from 24.2 to 31.5 trials, P<0.05). Recall at 24 h was dose-dependently impaired or prevented by isoflurane for both tasks. Conclusions Isoflurane interfered with long-term memory of odour valence without preventing its acquisition. This paradigm may serve as a non-aversive animal model of conscious amnesia. PMID:22258200

  19. Temporal and concentration effects of isoflurane anaesthesia on intestinal tissue oxygenation and perfusion in horses.

    PubMed

    Hopster, K; Hopster-Iversen, C; Geburek, F; Rohn, K; Kästner, S B R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of duration of anaesthesia and concentration of isoflurane on global perfusion as well as intestinal microperfusion and oxygenation. Nine Warmblood horses were premedicated with xylazine; anaesthesia was induced with midazolam and ketamine, and maintained with isoflurane. Horses were ventilated to normocapnia. During 7 h of anaesthesia, mean arterial blood pressures (MAP), heart rate, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, expiratory isoflurane concentration (ETIso) and cardiac output using lithium dilution were measured; cardiac index (CI) was calculated. Intestinal microperfusion and oxygenation were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry and white-light spectrophotometry. Surface probes were placed via median laparotomy on the serosal and mucosal site of the jejunum and the pelvic flexion of the colon. After 3 h of constant ETIso (1.4%), ETIso was increased in 0.2% increments up to 2.4%, followed by a decrease to 1.2% and an increase to 1.4%. The CI and MAP decreased continuously with increasing ETIso to 40 ± 5 mL/kg/min and 52 ± 8 mmHg, respectively. Microperfusion and oxygenation remained unchanged until an ETIso of 2.0% resulted in CI and MAP of 48 ± 5 mL/kg/min and 62 ± 6 mmHg, respectively, and then decreased rapidly. When ETIso decreased back to baseline, CI, MAP, microperfusion and oxygenation recovered to baseline. Isoflurane concentration but not duration of isoflurane anaesthesia influenced central and intestinal oxygenation and perfusion in healthy horses. Under isoflurane, intestinal perfusion appeared to be preserved until a threshold MAP or blood flow was reached.

  20. [Comparative study of the behavior of isoflurane and halothane in pediatric anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, F; Castilla, M; Fernández, M I; Caballero, J E

    1992-01-01

    This study involves 60 patients below the age of 14 years who were subjected to short duration surgical procedures under inhalation anesthesia with halothane and isoflurane at equivalent CAM in 50% protoxide. The objectives of the study were: a) to establish which of the two inhalational agents produced the more rapid anesthetic induction; b) to determine which exerted the more marked potentiation of the neuromuscular blockade induced by succinylcholine, and c) to compare the anesthetic quality during the induction and recovery periods of both halogenated agents. Induction was more rapid after halothane (mean induction time of 2.91 +/- 0.97 min) than after isoflurane (mean induction time of 6.24 +/- 2.88 min; p less than 0.001). Potentiation of succinylcholine induced neuromuscular blockade was greater after isoflurane than after halothane: the mean time of apnea was 4.56 +/- 1.82 min for isoflurane and 3.41 +/- 1.63 min for halothane (p less than 0.05). Undesirable effects were larger in patients treated with isoflurane than in patients anesthetized with halothane (mean score: 12.60 +/- 3.53 points vs 14.41 +/- 2.33 points; p less than 0.001). The analysis of anesthetic quality during the recovery period gave a mean punctuation of 16.62 +/- 2.21 to patients treated with halothane, whereas patients anesthetized with isoflurane showed a lower score of 14.25 +/- 1.99 points (p less than 0.001). The higher scores corresponded to the most well tolerated anesthetic induction and recovery. The highest attainable score in this study was 18.

  1. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. Study of pulmonary circulation].

    PubMed

    Orea Tejeda, A; Atencio, C; Sandoval, J; Lupi Herrera, E

    1982-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare disease of unknown etiology which consists of alveolar deposit of calcium microspheres. We report the procedures for the diagnosis of this disease, as well as the hemodynamic features of the pulmonary circulation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and cor pulmonale were documented. The active and passive factors involved in PAH are analyzed. We conclude that alveolar hypoxia and estructural vascular changes play a major role in the genesis of PAH.

  2. Mechanisms of force inhibition by halothane and isoflurane in intact rat cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Peter J; Loiselle, Denis S

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms underlying the negative inotropic effect of the volatile anaesthetics halothane and isoflurane using twenty-two intact, right ventricular trabeculae of rat. [Ca2+]i was measured qualitatively using either fluo-3 or fura-2, loaded into the cytosol via the acetoxymethyl (AM) ester form. Diastolic sarcomere length was adjusted to 2.1-2.2 μm and experiments were performed at 21-23°C. Halothane (02.5-3 %) and isoflurane (0.48-4 %) produced dose-dependent decreases in the amplitudes of the intracellular Ca2+ transients and twitch force. When the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator signals were corrected for changes in autofluorescence, neither volatile anaesthetic significantly changed diastolic [Ca2+]i. The ability of halothane and isoflurane to induce Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of quiescent trabeculae was examined. When the superfusate was Ca2+ and Na+ free (thereby preventing Na+- Ca2+ exchange and Ca2+ influx), 2 % halothane, but not 4 % isoflurane, evoked a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Halothane and isoflurane produced reversible, dose-dependent changes in cellular autofluorescence, the pattern of which was consistent with an increase in concentration of the reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine nucleotides and flavoproteins. This observation supports the putative inhibitory action of volatile anaesthetics at the site of Complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Addition of the fatty acid hexanoate, a substrate that can be metabolized in the face of Complex I inhibition, did not appreciably attenuate the anaesthetic-induced negative inotropy; however, it greatly diminished autofluorescence changes. To determine whether direct actions of the volatile anaesthetics on the contractile system contributed to the negative inotropy, external [Ca2+] was varied to modulate the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient. In the presence of 2 % halothane or 4 % isoflurane, restoration of the peak Ca2+ transient to control levels

  3. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of augmentation effect of isoflurane on mivacurium.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Pandey, Mamta

    2009-06-01

    This study evaluated the augmentation effect of isoflurane (ISO) given before or after the mivacurium (MIV) injection. Consented 33 adults (18-58 years), ASA I patients of both sexes were randomly assigned into three groups. In group 1 (no ISO) patients--IV propofol (0.5-1 mg/kg) for induction and (25-50 mg) aliquots every 2-5 minutes, N2O (60%) in O2 by mask, was followed by IV MIV (0.04 mg/kg). In group 2 (ISO before MIV) patients-IV propofol as in group 1 and ISO in N2O (60%) and O2 to achiever end tidal level 1% for 10 minutes was followed by same dose of IV MIV. In group 3 (ISO after MIV) patients-after propofol and IV MIV as above, ISO in N2O (60%) and O2 was given to get end tidal level 1% for 10 minutes. All patients were breathing spontaneously using tight fitting facemask and respiration was assisted to keep ETCO2 (35-40 mmHg), SaO2 100%. To monitor MIV effect, ulnar nerve was stimulated at wrist using supramaximal double burst stimuli (DBS). Adductor pollicis response was recorded on myograph-2000 (Biometer, Denmark). Twitch amplitude (D1) and tetanic fade DBSr (D2/D1) were calculated for each stimulus and recorded. Peak MIV effect (D1 suppression by approximately equal to 90% and abolished D2) was significantly (p < 0.05) more in group 2 patients (ISO before MIV) than in group 1 (control) or group 3 (ISO after MIV) patients. ISO given prior of MIV administration significantly augmented the effect of MIV. When ISO was started after MIV injection probably the quick hydrolysis of MIV limited the augmentation effect to tetanic fade only as compared to the patients, who did not get ISO at any point of study. Prior administration of ISO causes intense MIV block at adductor pollicis.

  4. Anesthetic effects of isoflurane on the tonotopic map and neuronal population activity in the rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Noda, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2015-09-01

    Since its discovery nearly four decades ago, sequential microelectrode mapping using hundreds of recording sites has been able to reveal a precise tonotopic organization of the auditory cortex. Despite concerns regarding the effects that anesthesia might have on neuronal responses to tones, anesthesia was essential for these experiments because such dense mapping was elaborate and time-consuming. Here, taking an 'all-at-once' approach, we investigated how isoflurane modifies spatiotemporal activities by using a dense microelectrode array. The array covered the entire auditory cortex in rats, including the core and belt cortices. By comparing neuronal activity in the awake state with activity under isoflurane anesthesia, we made four observations. First, isoflurane anesthesia did not modify the tonotopic topography within the auditory cortex. Second, in terms of general response properties, isoflurane anesthesia decreased the number of active single units and increased their response onset latency. Third, in terms of tuning properties, isoflurane anesthesia shifted the response threshold without changing the shape of the frequency response area and decreased the response quality. Fourth, in terms of population activities, isoflurane anesthesia increased the noise correlations in discharges and phase synchrony in local field potential (LFP) oscillations, suggesting that the anesthesia made neuronal activities redundant at both single-unit and LFP levels. Thus, while isoflurane anesthesia had little effect on the tonotopic topography, its profound effects on neuronal activities decreased the encoding capacity of the auditory cortex.

  5. The Systemic Inflammation of Alveolar Hypoxia Is Initiated by Alveolar Macrophage–Borne Mediator(s)

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jie; Wood, John G.; Blanco, Victor Gustavo; Gonzalez, Norberto C.

    2009-01-01

    Alveolar hypoxia produces widespread systemic inflammation in rats. The inflammation appears to be triggered by activation of mast cells by a mediator released from alveolar macrophages, not by the reduced systemic partial pressure of oxygen (PO2). If this is correct, the following should apply: (1) neither mast cells nor tissue macrophages should be directly activated by hypoxia; and (2) mast cells should be activated when in contact with hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not with hypoxic tissue macrophages. We sought here to determine whether hypoxia activates isolated alveolar macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and peritoneal mast cells, and to study the response of the microcirculation to supernatants of these cultures. Rat mesenteric microcirculation intravital microscopy was combined with primary cultures of alveolar macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and peritoneal mast cells. Supernatant of hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not of hypoxic peritoneal macrophages, produced inflammation in mesentery. Hypoxia induced a respiratory burst in alveolar, but not peritoneal macrophages. Cultured peritoneal mast cells did not degranulate with hypoxia. Immersion of mast cells in supernatant of hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not in supernatant of hypoxic peritoneal macrophages, induced mast cell degranulation. Hypoxia induced release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a mast cell secretagogue, from alveolar, but not peritoneal macrophages or mast cells. We conclude that a mediator released by hypoxic alveolar macrophages activates mast cells and triggers systemic inflammation. Reduced systemic PO2 and activation of tissue macrophages do not play a role in this phenomenon. The inflammation could contribute to systemic effects of diseases featuring alveolar hypoxia. PMID:19244200

  6. METASTATIC ANGIOSARCOMA PRESENTING AS DIFFUSE ALVEOLAR HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rai, SP; Barthwal, MS; Bhattacharya, P; Bhargava, S; Pethe, M

    2008-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of the vascular or lymphatic endothelium. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a rare presenting manifestation of angiosarcoma. We describe a case of pulmonary metastasis of angiosarcoma who presented with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage as initial manifestation. PMID:20396655

  7. Isoflurane and sevoflurane increase interleukin-6 levels through the nuclear factor-kappa B pathway in neuroglioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, J.; Yang, L.; Dong, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoflurane can increase pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 levels. However, the up-stream mechanism remains unknown. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) promotes the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We examined the effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the NF-κB signalling pathway and its association with IL-6 levels in cultured cells. Methods H4 human neuroglioma cells (H4 cells), and mouse primary neurones and microglia were treated with 2% isoflurane or 4.1% sevoflurane for 6 h, for analysis of IL-6 and NF-κB. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (an NF-κB inhibitor) or 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) (an inhibitor of glucose glycolysis) was applied 1 h before anaesthetic treatment. Results Isoflurane or sevoflurane treatment increased the levels of IL-6 [isoflurane: 410% (54); sevoflurane: 290% (24)], the nuclear levels of NF-κB [isoflurane: 170% (36); sevoflurane: 320% (30)], and the transcription activity of NF-κB in H4 cells. Moreover, isoflurane enhanced the transcription activity of NF-κB in mouse microglia, but not primary neurones. Finally, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and 2-DG attenuated isoflurane-induced increases in IL-6 and NF-κB, and the transcription activity of NF-κB. Conclusions These studies in H4 cells suggest that the NF-κB signalling pathway could contribute to isoflurane or sevoflurane-induced neuroinflammation. This could lead to the targeted intervention of anaesthetic-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:23604542

  8. Isoflurane anesthesia exacerbates learning and memory impairment in zinc-deficient APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunsheng; Liu, Ya; Yuan, Ye; Cui, Weiwei; Zheng, Feng; Ma, Yuan; Piao, Meihua

    2016-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) is known to play crucial roles in numerous brain functions including learning and memory. Zn deficiency is believed to be widespread throughout the world, particularly in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of studies have shown that volatile anesthetics, such as isoflurane, might be potential risk factors for the development of AD. However, whether isoflurane exposure accelerates the process of AD and cognitive impairment in AD patients with Zn deficiency is yet to be documented. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of 1.4% isoflurane exposure for 2 h on learning and memory function, and neuropathogenesis in 10-month-old Zn-adequate, Zn-deficient, and Zn-treated APP/PS1 mice with the following parameters: behavioral tests, neuronal apoptosis, Aβ, and tau pathology. The results demonstrated that isoflurane exposure showed no impact on learning and memory function, but induced transient elevation of neuroapoptosis in Zn-adequate APP/PS1 mice. Exposure of isoflurane exhibited significant neuroapoptosis, Aβ generation, tau phosphorylation, and learning and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice in the presence of Zn deficiency. Appropriate Zn treatment improved learning and memory function, and prevented isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis in APP/PS1 mice. Isoflurane exposure may cause potential neurotoxicity, which is tolerated to some extent in Zn-adequate APP/PS1 mice. When this tolerance is limited, like in AD with Zn deficiency, isoflurane exposure markedly exacerbated learning and memory impairment, and neuropathology, indicating that AD patients with certain conditions such as Zn deficiency may be vulnerable to volatile anesthetic isoflurane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Comparative study between propofol and isoflurane as a maintenance anesthetic in ambulatory surgery].

    PubMed

    Moriano, E; Espinel, C; Díaz-Alvarez, A; Barrientos, M T; Frayle, E; el Busto, J J

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate postanesthetic recovery and complications in outpatient surgery for which anesthetic maintenance was achieved with either isoflurane or propofol. Eighty patients were randomly divided into two groups for prospective study according to anesthetic used: isoflurane (group A) or propofol (group B). The patients were undergoing short surgery and in both groups induction was with 2-2.5 mg/kg propofol, 0.4-0.5 mg/kg atracurium, 20 microgram/kg alfentanil and 20 microgram/kg droperidol. In 40 patients maintenance was with 0.5-1% isoflurane (group A) and in the remaining 40 0.1-1.15 mg/kg/min propofol (group B) was used; in both groups 50% N2O-O2 was used. We found no statistically significant differences in time until eye opening after a verbal command (3.8 +/- 2 in group A and 4.1 +/- 2.8 min in group B), in time until the patient was able to answer five questions (6.5 +/- 3 in group A and 6 +/- 2.9 min in group B) or in Aldrete test scores upon awakening (9 +/- 1 in group A and 8.7 +/- 0.9 in group B). Nor were there differences in frequency of nausea reported (2 in each group) or in level of pain after surgery. Recovery and incidence of complications after out-patient anesthesia were similar when anesthetic maintenance was achieved with propofol or isoflurane.

  10. Comparison of the effects of sevoflurane, isoflurane and halothane on indocyanine green clearance.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, N; Nakayama, M; Fujita, S; Namiki, A

    1995-02-01

    We have examined the effects of inhalation anaesthetics on indocyanine green (ICG) clearance, as an index of hepatic function, in patients undergoing elective surgery. Recently, a new method has been developed to measure in real-time the disappearance rate of ICG from plasma. This method eliminates the multiple sampling and delay of the conventional ICG test. ICG clearance is displayed as two indices: K (ICG disappearance rate) and R15 (ICG retention rate 15 min after injection of ICG 0.5 mg kg-1). This measurement was performed in patients before and after 1 MAC of sevoflurane (n = 6), 2 MAC of sevoflurane (n = 6), 1 MAC of isoflurane (n = 6), 2 MAC of isoflurane (n = 6), 1 MAC of halothane (n = 6) or 2 MAC of halothane (n = 6) without surgical stress. Although mean arterial pressure decreased significantly at 1 and 2 MAC of sevoflurane, 2 MAC of halothane, and 1 and 2 MAC of isoflurane, ICG clearance was maintained at awake levels, except at 2 MAC of halothane (K = mean-33 (sem 3)%, R15 = +90 (3)% from awake values). We conclude that sevoflurane and isoflurane have a more favourable effect on liver circulation than halothane.

  11. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Joel P.; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C.; Hoppa, Michael B.; Ryan, Timothy A.; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ influx without significantly altering the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca2+]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e). Lowering external Ca2+ to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca2+ entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca2+ entry without significant direct effects on Ca2+-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca2+ influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system. PMID:26351670

  12. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine–Ketamine with Isoflurane for Anesthesia of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera)

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Lana; Snyder, Lindsey BC; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare isoflurane with a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, administered intramuscularly, for anesthesia in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In a prospective, complete crossover study, adult chinchillas (n = 8; age, 2 to 5 y) were anesthetized with a combination of dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (4 mg/kg IM). Atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 45 min after dexmedetomidine–ketamine administration. For comparison, anesthesia also was induced and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, delivered by facemask. Anesthetic and physiologic parameters were recorded during each anesthesia, including various reflexes, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and SpO2. Food intake, fecal output, and body weight were recorded daily for 6 d after each anesthetic trial. Induction time, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature did not differ significantly between the 2 anesthetic protocols. Recovery times were shorter and SpO2 was higher in animals that received isoflurane delivered in 100% oxygen. Food intake and fecal output were reduced in the dexmedetomidine–ketamine group for as long as 3 d after anesthesia, whereas isoflurane had no signifcant effect on food intake or fecal output. Both anesthetic protocols provided effective anesthesia in chinchillas. However, when anesthetized with dexmedetomidine–ketamine, chinchillas received room air and became hypoxemic. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of oxygen supplementation on anesthetic recovery and on the recovery of food intake and fecal output in chinchillas. PMID:27177565

  13. Comparison of recovery from anesthesia with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Luis A; Hofmeister, Erik H; Pavez, Juan C; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2009-11-01

    To determine the quality and speed of recovery from anesthesia with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane and determine end-tidal inhalant concentration at certain events during recovery in healthy dogs. 11 healthy dogs. Anesthesia was induced with propofol (IV), and dogs were assigned by use of a crossover design to receive isoflurane at 2.0%, sevoflurane at 3.2%, or desflurane at 11% end-tidal concentrations. Direct blood pressure was monitored throughout the 120 minutes of anesthesia. At the end of anesthesia, the circuit was flushed with oxygen, and the time to specific events in recovery and overall quality of recovery were assessed. Blood gas concentrations were measured prior to anesthesia and after recovery. Dogs in the desflurane group had the shortest time to standing (11.7 +/- 5.1 minutes), followed by dogs in the sevoflurane group (18.6 +/- 7.5 minutes) and dogs in the isoflurane group (26.3 +/- 7.2 minutes). There was no difference for recovery quality among groups. Arterial blood pressure was higher in the sevoflurane group than in the desflurane group at 10 and 15 minutes and in the isoflurane group at 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 105, and 120 minutes. There were no significant differences among groups with respect to blood gas concentrations. Results suggested that in dogs for which a short interval to standing is desired, desflurane is the best selection, followed by sevoflurane.

  14. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine-Ketamine with Isoflurane for Anesthesia of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Fox, Lana; Snyder, Lindsey Bc; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare isoflurane with a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, administered intramuscularly, for anesthesia in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In a prospective, complete crossover study, adult chinchillas (n = 8; age, 2 to 5 y) were anesthetized with a combination of dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (4 mg/kg IM). Atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 45 min after dexmedetomidine-ketamine administration. For comparison, anesthesia also was induced and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, delivered by facemask. Anesthetic and physiologic parameters were recorded during each anesthesia, including various reflexes, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and SpO2. Food intake, fecal output, and body weight were recorded daily for 6 d after each anesthetic trial. Induction time, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature did not differ significantly between the 2 anesthetic protocols. Recovery times were shorter and SpO2 was higher in animals that received isoflurane delivered in 100% oxygen. Food intake and fecal output were reduced in the dexmedetomidine-ketamine group for as long as 3 d after anesthesia, whereas isoflurane had no signifcant effect on food intake or fecal output. Both anesthetic protocols provided effective anesthesia in chinchillas. However, when anesthetized with dexmedetomidine-ketamine, chinchillas received room air and became hypoxemic. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of oxygen supplementation on anesthetic recovery and on the recovery of food intake and fecal output in chinchillas.

  15. Preliminary investigation into the ventilatory effects of midazolam in isoflurane-anaesthetised goats.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, George F; Bester, Lynette

    2012-05-30

    The ventilatory effects of intravenous midazolam (MDZ) were evaluated in isoflurane- anaesthetised goats. Eight female goats aged 2-3 years were fasted from food and water for 12 h. Anaesthesia was then induced using a face mask with isoflurane in oxygen, whilst the trachea was intubated with a cuffed tracheal tube and anaesthesia maintained with isoflurane at 1.5% end-tidal concentration. Ventilation was spontaneous. The goats were treated with either a saline placebo (PLC) or MDZ intravenously at 0.2 mg/kg. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used for the analysis of data. Significance was taken at the 0.05 level. Differences between treatments were not statistically significant (p > 0.05) for tidal volume, ventilation rate, tidal volume/kg (VT/kg) and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure. Within treatments, VT and VT/kg differed 5 min after MDZ administration; this was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The occurrence of apnoea in the MDZ-treated goats was statistically significant (p = 0.04) compared with the PLC treated goats. Intravenous MDZ at 0.2 mg/kg administered to isoflurane-anaesthetised goats may result in transient apnoea and a mild decrease in VT and VT/kg.

  16. Pulmonary vascular effects of isoflurane anesthesia after left lung autotransplantation in chronically instrumented dogs.

    PubMed

    Lennon, P F; Murray, P A

    1996-09-01

    Single lung transplantation has become a viable therapy for treatment of end-stage pulmonary disease. We previously observed that left lung autotransplantation (LLA) results in a chronic increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and enhanced pulmonary vascular reactivity to sympathetic alpha adrenoreceptor activation. The effects of inhalational anesthetics on the pulmonary circulation after lung transplantation have not been investigated. In the current study, the authors tested the hypothesis that isoflurane anesthesia, known to cause systemic vasodilation, would exert a vasodilator influence on the baseline pulmonary circulation after LLA. In addition, they tested the hypothesis that isoflurane anesthesia, known to attenuate the systemic vasoconstrictor response to sympathetic alpha adrenoreceptor agonists, would reduce the magnitude of the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to sympathetic alpha adrenoreceptor activation after LLA. Left pulmonary vascular pressure-flow (LPQ) plots were generated in chronically instrumented dogs by measuring the pulmonary vascular pressure gradient (pulmonary arterial pressure-left atrial pressure) and left pulmonary blood flow during inflation of a hydraulic occluder implanted around the right main pulmonary artery. Left pulmonary vascular pressure-flow plots were generated in 8 dogs 2-5 weeks after LLA in the conscious and isoflurane-anesthetized states at baseline, after beta adrenoreceptor block with propranolol, and during the cumulative administration of the alpha agonist, phenylephrine. Left pulmonary vascular pressure-flow plots also were generated in eight conscious, sham-operated control dogs at baseline, after beta block, and during phenylephrine administration. Compared with conscious control dogs, LLA resulted in a leftward shift (P < 0.01) in the baseline left pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relation, indicating chronic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Despite the enhanced level of pulmonary vasomotor tone after LLA

  17. Isoflurane Inhibits the Tetrodotoxin-resistant Voltagegated Sodium Channel Nav1.8

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Karl F.; Nau, Carla; Ouyang, Wei; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) mediate neuronal action potentials. Tetrodotoxin inhibits all Nav isoforms, but Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are relatively tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r) compared to other isoforms. Nav1.8 is highly expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons and is functionally linked to nociception, but the sensitivity of TTX-r isoforms to inhaled anesthetics is unclear. Methods The sensitivities of heterologously expressed rat TTX-r Nav1.8 and endogenous tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-s) Nav to the prototypic inhaled anesthetic isoflurane were tested in mammalian ND7/23 cells using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Results From a holding potential of −70 mV, isoflurane (0.53±0.06 mM, ~1.8 MAC at 24°C) reduced normalized peak Na+ current (INa) of Nav1.8 to 0.55±0.03 and of endogenous TTX-s Nav to 0.56±0.06. Isoflurane minimally inhibited INa from a holding potential of −140 mV. Isoflurane did not affect voltage-dependence of activation, but significantly shifted voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation by −6 mV for Nav1.8 and by −7 mV for TTX-s Nav. IC50 values for inhibition of peak INa were 0.67±0.06 mM for Nav1.8 and 0.66±0.09 mM for TTX-s Nav; significant inhibition occurred at clinically relevant concentrations as low as 0.58 MAC. Isoflurane produced use-dependent block of Nav1.8; at a stimulation frequency of 10 Hz, 0.56±0.08 mM isoflurane reduced INa to 0.64±0.01 vs. 0.78±0.01 for control. Conclusion Isoflurane inhibited the tetrodotoxin-resistant isoform Nav1.8 with potency comparable to that for endogenous tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav isoforms, indicating that sensitivity to inhaled anesthetics is conserved across diverse Nav family members. Block of Nav1.8 in dorsal root ganglion neurons could contribute to the effects of inhaled anesthetics on peripheral nociceptive mechanisms. PMID:19672182

  18. Inhibition of T-type calcium current in rat thalamocortical neurons by isoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, Veit-Simon; DiGruccio, Michael R.; Uebele, Victor N.; Renger, John J.; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2012-01-01

    Thalamocortical (TC) neurons provide the major sensory input to the mammalian somatosensory cortex. Decreased activity of these cells may be pivotal in the ability of general anesthetics to induce loss of consciousness and promote sleep (hypnosis). T-type voltage-gated calcium currents (T-currents) have a key function regulating the cellular excitability of TC neurons and previous studies have indicated that volatile general anesthetics may alter the excitability of these neurons. Using a patch-clamp technique, we investigated the mechanisms whereby isoflurane, a common volatile anesthetic, modulates isolated T-currents and T-current-dependent excitability of native TC neurons in acute brain slices of the rat. In voltage-clamp experiments, we found that isoflurane strongly inhibited peak amplitude of T-current, yielding an IC50 of 1.1% at physiological membrane potentials. Ensuing biophysical studies demonstrated that inhibition was more prominent at depolarized membrane potentials as evidenced by hyperpolarizing shifts in channel availability curves. In current-clamp experiments we found that isoflurane decreased the rate of depolarization of low-threshold-calcium spikes (LTCSs) and consequently increased the latency of rebound spike firing at the same concentrations that inhibited isolated T-currents. This effect was mimicked by a novel selective T-channel blocker 3,5-dichloro-N-[1-(2,2-dimethyl-tetrahydro-pyran-4-ylmethyl)-4-fluoro-piperidin-4-ylmethyl]-benzamide (TTA-P2). In contrast, isoflurane and TTA-P2 had minimal effect on resting membrane potential and cell input resistance. We propose that depression of thalamic T-currents may contribute to some clinical properties of isoflurane. PMID:22491022

  19. Venous blood gas analytes during isoflurane anesthesia in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    PubMed

    Gardhouse, Sara M; Eshar, David; Bello, Nora; Mason, Diane

    2015-08-15

    To describe changes in venous blood gas analytes during isoflurane anesthesia in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Prospective study. 16 black-tailed prairie dogs. Black-tailed prairie dogs were placed in an anesthesia chamber for induction of general anesthesia, which was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen delivered via mask. Immediately following anesthetic induction, a venous blood sample was obtained from the medial saphenous vein; a second venous blood sample was obtained just prior to anesthetic gas shutoff. An evaluation of venous blood gas analytes was performed on each sample. General linear mixed models with repeated measures were used for data analyses. Median anesthetic time was 90 minutes (range, 60 to 111 minutes). A significant increase from immediately after induction to completion of anesthesia was observed in Pco2 and mean blood chloride ion, BUN, and creatinine concentrations. A decrease in Po2, mean blood pH, and anion gap was observed from induction of anesthesia to completion. No significant differences during anesthesia were observed in mean base excess or blood bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, blood glucose, lactate, and total CO2 concentrations. No complications occurred during or after anesthesia for any animal. Examination of prairie dogs often requires general anesthesia, with isoflurane currently the inhalation agent of choice. Results suggested respiratory acidosis and relative azotemia may occur during isoflurane anesthesia of prairie dogs. Given the increased risk associated with anesthesia in small mammals and the propensity for respiratory disease in prairie dogs, insight into physiologic changes associated with isoflurane anesthesia in healthy prairie dogs can aid in perioperative evaluation and anesthetic monitoring in this rodent species.

  20. Physiological Disturbance May Contribute to Neurodegeneration Induced by Isoflurane or Sevoflurane in 14 Day Old Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Binbin; Yu, Zipu; You, Shan; Zheng, Yihu; Liu, Jin; Gao, Yajing; Lin, Han; Lian, Qingquan

    2014-01-01

    Background Volatile anesthetics are widely used in pediatric anesthesia but their potential neurotoxicity raise significant concerns regarding sequelae after anesthesia. However, whether physiological disturbance during anesthetic exposure contributes to such side effects remains unknown. The aim of the current study is to compare the neurotoxic effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane in 14 day old rat pups under spontaneous breathing or ventilated conditions. Methods Postnatal 14 day rats were assigned to one of five groups: 1) spontaneous breathing (SB) + room air (control, n = 17); 2) SB + isoflurane (n = 35); 3) SB + sevoflurane (n = 37); 4) mechanical ventilation (MV) + isoflurane (n = 29); 5) MV + sevoflurane (n = 32). Anesthetized animal received either 1.7% isoflurane or 2.4% seveoflurane for 4 hours. Arterial blood gases and blood pressure were monitored in the anesthetized groups. Neurodegeneration in the CA3 region of hippocampus was assessed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated DNA nick-end labeling immediately after exposure. Spatial learning and memory were evaluated with the Morris water maze in other cohorts 14 days after experiments. Results Most rats in the SB groups developed physiological disturbance whereas ventilated rats did not but become hyperglycemic. Mortality from anesthesia in the SB groups was significantly higher than that in the MV groups. Cell death in the SB but not MV groups was significantly higher than controls. SB + anesthesia groups performed worse on the Morris water maze behavioral test, but no deficits were found in the MV group compared with the controls. Conclusions These findings could suggest that physiological disturbance induced by isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia may also contribute to their neurotoxicity. PMID:24400105

  1. Effect of dexmedetomidine bolus dose on isoflurane consumption in surgical patients under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Reshma B.; Rajappa, Geetha C.; Govindswamy, Suresh; Thamanna, Prathima P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Various adjuvants have been introduced to decrease the dose of volatile agents and their side effects. Dexmedetomidine a potent alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist is one such agent. Our objective is to assess the effect of preanesthetic dexmedetomidine on isoflurane consumption and its effect on intraoperative hemodynamic stability and recovery profile. Setting and Design: This prospective, randomized controlled, double-blind study was done in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Group 1 received saline infusion and Group 2 received dexmedetomidine infusion in a dose of 1 μg/kg over 10 min given 15 min before induction. Vital parameters and bispectral index (BIS) values were noted throughout the surgery. Patients were induced and intubated as per the standard protocol and maintained with N2O: O2 = 1:1 mixture at 2 L/min and isoflurane concentration adjusted to achieve BIS values of 45–60. Demographic profile, hemodynamic variables, total isoflurane consumption, and recovery profile data were collected. Statistics: Independent t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare the average anesthetic consumption, hemodynamics, and recovery profile between two groups. Results: End-tidal concentration and total isoflurane consumption in Group 2 were 0.56 ± 0.11 and 10.69 ± 3.01 mL, respectively, with P < 0.001 which was statistically significant compared to Group 1 which were 0.76 ± 0.14 and 13.76 ± 3.84 mL. Postintubation and intraoperative mean arterial pressure values were significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group with P < 0.001. Conclusion: Preanesthetic bolus dose of dexmedetomidine is a useful adjuvant to reduce isoflurane consumption. PMID:27746567

  2. Melatonin pretreatment prevents isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction by modulating sleep-wake rhythm in mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tianjiao; Cui, Yin; Chu, Shuaishuai; Song, Jia; Qian, Yue; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory processing. However, its role in anesthesia-induced cognitive dysfunction was not revealed. Our study sought to investigate the connection between the cognition decline and sleep-wake rhythm disorders after long-term isoflurane anesthesia in mice. Also, we examined the effect of exogenous melatonin pretreatment on both cognitive function and circadian rhythm. Furthermore, we discussed whether NR2B (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit)-CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein) signaling pathway was involved in this course. 2-month-old male C57/BL-6J mice were submitted to long-term anesthesia using 1% isoflurane from CT (Circadian Time) 14 to CT20. Melatonin pretreatment were conducted before anesthesia for 7 Days. Intellicage for mice and Mini-Mitter were applied to monitor spatial memory and gross motor activity which can reflect cognition and sleep-wake rhythm. Messenger RNA and protein expression of right hippocampus NR2B and CREB were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. 6h isoflurane anesthesia led to impaired spatial memory from Day 3 to Day 10 in mice accompanied by the disruption of sleep-wake rhythm. Meanwhile, the hippocampus CREB and NR2B expression declined in step. Melatonin pretreatment ameliorated disturbed sleep-wake cycle, improved isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction, and reversed the down-regulation of CREB and NR2B expression. Our data demonstrate that sleep-wake rhythm is involved in the isoflurane-induced cognition impairment and pretreatment of melatonin has a positive effect on circadian normalization and cognition reversal. Also, NR2B-CREB signaling pathway has a critical role in this process. This study provides us a new strategy for anesthesia-induced cognitive dysfunction therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ciproxifan, an H3 receptor antagonist, improves short-term recognition memory impaired by isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fang; Zheng, Limin; Liu, Min; Chen, Rongfa; Leung, L Stan; Luo, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to volatile anesthetics has been reported to cause temporary or sustained impairments in learning and memory in pre-clinical studies. The selective antagonists of the histamine H3 receptors (H3R) are considered to be a promising group of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of cognitive disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of H3R antagonist ciproxifan on isoflurane-induced deficits in an object recognition task. Adult C57BL/6 J mice were exposed to isoflurane (1.3 %) or vehicle gas for 2 h. The object recognition tests were carried at 24 h or 7 days after exposure to anesthesia to exploit the tendency of mice to prefer exploring novel objects in an environment when a familiar object is also present. During the training phase, two identical objects were placed in two defined sites of the chamber. During the test phase, performed 1 or 24 h after the training phase, one of the objects was replaced by a new object with a different shape. The time spent exploring each object was recorded. A robust deficit in object recognition memory occurred 1 day after exposure to isoflurane anesthesia. Isoflurane-treated mice spent significantly less time exploring a novel object at 1 h but not at 24 h after the training phase. The deficit in short-term memory was reversed by the administration of ciproxifan 30 min before behavioral training. Isoflurane exposure induces reversible deficits in object recognition memory. Ciproxifan appears to be a potential therapeutic agent for improving post-anesthesia cognitive memory performance.

  4. Isoflurane abolishes spontaneous firing of serotonin neurons and masks their pH/CO2 chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Johansen, Sara L.; Wu, Yuanming; Harris, Michael B.; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons from the mouse and rat rostral medulla are stimulated by increased CO2 when studied in culture or brain slices. However, the response of 5-HT neurons has been variable when animals are exposed to hypercapnia in vivo. Here we examined whether halogenated inhalational anesthetics, which activate TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels, could mask an effect of CO2 on 5-HT neurons. During in vivo plethysmography in mice, isoflurane (1%) markedly reduced the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) by 78–96% depending upon mouse strain and ambient temperature. In a perfused rat brain stem preparation, isoflurane (1%) reduced or silenced spontaneous firing of medullary 5-HT neurons in situ and abolished their responses to elevated perfusate Pco2. In dissociated cell cultures, isoflurane (1%) hyperpolarized 5-HT neurons by 6.52 ± 3.94 mV and inhibited spontaneous firing. A subsequent decrease in pH from 7.4 to 7.2 depolarized neurons by 4.07 ± 2.10 mV, but that was insufficient to reach threshold for firing. Depolarizing current restored baseline firing and the firing frequency response to acidosis, indicating that isoflurane did not block the underlying mechanisms mediating chemosensitivity. These results demonstrate that isoflurane masks 5-HT neuron chemosensitivity in vitro and in situ and markedly decreases the HCVR in vivo. The use of this class of anesthetic has a particularly potent inhibitory effect on chemosensitivity of 5-HT neurons. PMID:25695656

  5. Preferential effect of isoflurane on top-down vs. bottom-up pathways in sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Aeyal; Grady, Sean M.; Krause, Bryan M.; Uhlrich, Daniel J.; Manning, Karen A.; Banks, Matthew I.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of loss of consciousness (LOC) under anesthesia is unknown. Because consciousness depends on activity in the cortico-thalamic network, anesthetic actions on this network are likely critical for LOC. Competing theories stress the importance of anesthetic actions on bottom-up “core” thalamo-cortical (TC) vs. top-down cortico-cortical (CC) and matrix TC connections. We tested these models using laminar recordings in rat auditory cortex in vivo and murine brain slices. We selectively activated bottom-up vs. top-down afferent pathways using sensory stimuli in vivo and electrical stimulation in brain slices, and compared effects of isoflurane on responses evoked via the two pathways. Auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferent stimulation in brain slices evoked short latency current sinks in middle layers, consistent with activation of core TC afferents. By contrast, visual stimuli in vivo and stimulation of CC and matrix TC afferents in brain slices evoked responses mainly in superficial and deep layers, consistent with projection patterns of top-down afferents that carry visual information to auditory cortex. Responses to auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferents in brain slices were significantly less affected by isoflurane compared to responses triggered by visual stimuli in vivo and CC/matrix TC afferents in slices. At a just-hypnotic dose in vivo, auditory responses were enhanced by isoflurane, whereas visual responses were dramatically reduced. At a comparable concentration in slices, isoflurane suppressed both core TC and CC/matrix TC responses, but the effect on the latter responses was far greater than on core TC responses, indicating that at least part of the differential effects observed in vivo were due to local actions of isoflurane in auditory cortex. These data support a model in which disruption of top-down connectivity contributes to anesthesia-induced LOC, and have implications for understanding the neural basis of

  6. Evaluation of the isoflurane-sparing effects of lidocaine infusion during umbilical surgery in calves.

    PubMed

    Vesal, Nasser; Spadavecchia, Claudia; Steiner, Adrian; Kirscher, Franziska; Levionnois, Olivier L

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the isoflurane-sparing effects of lidocaine administered by constant rate infusion (CRI) during umbilical surgery in calves. Randomized 'blinded' prospective clinical study. Thirty calves (mean 4.7 ± SD 2.5 weeks old) undergoing umbilical surgery. After premedication with xylazine (0.1 mg kg(-1) , IM), anaesthesia was induced with ketamine (4 mg kg(-1) , IV) and maintained with isoflurane in O(2) administered through a circle breathing system. The calves were assigned randomly to receive a bolus of 2 mg kg(-1) lidocaine IV after induction of anaesthesia, followed by CRI of 50 μg kg(-1) minute(-1) (group L, n=15) or a bolus and CRI of 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl, group S, n=15). End-tidal isoflurane was adjusted to achieve adequate depth of anaesthesia. Heart rate, direct arterial blood pressure and body temperature were measured intraoperatively. Groups were compared by t- tests, anova or Mann-Whitney rank sum test as appropriate. The end-tidal concentration of isoflurane (median, IQR) was significantly lower in group L [1.0% (0.94-1.1)] compared to group S [1.2% (1.1-1.5)], indicating a 16.7% reduction in anaesthetic requirement during lidocaine CRI. Cardiopulmonary parameters and recovery times did not differ significantly between groups. Lidocaine CRI may be used as a supplement to inhalation anaesthesia during umbilical surgery in calves in countries where such a protocol would be within the legal requirements for veterinary use in food animals. This study did not show any measurable benefit to the calves other than a reduction in isoflurane requirement. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  7. Effects of isoflurane on somatosensory-evoked potentials in calves: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Truchetti, Geoffrey; Burns, Patrick; Nichols, Sylvain; Parent, Joane

    2015-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) are used to monitor sensory function and are often recorded under general anesthesia. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of isoflurane on SSEPs in calves as it has not been reported. Eight calves (mean age: 40 days), were included in the study. Calves were anesthetized with a randomized sequence of four different isoflurane partial pressures. Blood gas analysis was performed before each measurement. SSEP were induced by repeated stimulation of the common dorsal digital nerve III. SSEPs were recorded from the lumbo-sacral junction (s-SSEP) and the head (c-SSEP). Latency and inter-amplitude of each peak were measured. For s-SSEP: One negative (Nsp1) and two positive (Psp1 and Psp2) peaks were identified in all tracings except for two calves. There was a significant effect of isoflurane on the latency of Psp2 (P = 0.01). Inter-amplitude decreased significantly with PaO2, PaCO2 and temperature (P < 0.05). Psp2 latency decreased with PaO2 (P = 0.01). For c-SSEP: two positive (Pc1 and Pc2) and two negative (Nc1 and Nc2) peaks were identified. There were identifiable peaks for the analysis of Pc1 latencies only. There was a significant positive linear relation between end-tidal isoflurane partial pressure (ETiso) and Pc1 latency (P = 0.04). None of the co-variables had a significant effect on the latency of Pc1 (P > 0.1). Isoflurane has a major impact on the recording of c-SSEP. Recording should be done at the lowest ETiso as possible, and anesthesia parameters should be kept constant.

  8. Minimum weight structural sandwich

    Treesearch

    Edward W. Kuenzi

    1965-01-01

    This note presents theoretical analyses for determination of dimensions of structural sandwich of minimum weight that will have certain stiffness and load-carrying capabilities. Included is a brief discussion of the resultant minimum weight configurations.

  9. Minimum weight structural sandwich

    Treesearch

    Edward W. Kuenzi

    1970-01-01

    This note presents theoretical analyses for determination of dimensions of structural sandwich of minimum weight that will have certain stiffness and load-carrying capabilities. Included is a brief discussion of the resultant minimum weight configurations.

  10. Predictors of alveolar air leaks.

    PubMed

    Loran, David B; Woodside, Kenneth J; Cerfolio, Robert J; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2002-08-01

    Persistent air leaks are caused by the failure of the postoperative lung to achieve a configuration that is physiologically amenable to healing. The raw pulmonary surface caused by the dissection of the fissure often is separated from the pleura, and the air leak fails to close. Additionally, higher air flow thorough an alveolar-pleural fistula seems to keep the fistula open. Other factors that interfere with wound healing, such as steroid use, diabetes, or malnutrition, can result in persistence of the leak. A thoracic surgeon can minimize the incidence of air leak through meticulous surgical technique and can identify patients in whom the balance of risks (Table 1) and benefits warrant operative intervention based on an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology.

  11. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  12. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Rajat; Kumar, N Nanda; Ravindran, C

    2015-12-01

    Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas.

  13. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  14. Monitoring cerebral oxygenation and local field potential with a variation of isoflurane concentration in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Hyuk; Shin, Teo Jeon; Kim, Seonghyun; Bae, Jayyoung; Cho, Dongrae; Ham, Jinsil; Park, Ji-Young; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Jeong, Seongwook; Lee, Boreom; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate experimentally how anesthetic levels affect cerebral metabolism measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and to identify a robust marker among NIRS parameters to discriminate various stages of anesthetic depth in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. In order to record the hemodynamic changes and local field potential (LFP) in the brain, fiber-optic cannulae and custom-made microelectrodes were implanted in the frontal cortex of the skull. The NIRS and LFP signals were continuously monitored before, during and after isoflurane anesthesia. As isoflurane concentration is reduced, the level of oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin concentrations of the frontal cortex decreased gradually, while deoxyhemoglobin increased. The reflectance ratio between 730nm and 850nm and burst suppression ratio (BSR) correspond similarly with the change of oxyhemoglobin during the variation of isoflurane concentration. These results suggest that NIRS signals in addition to EEG may provide a possibility of developing a new anesthetic depth index. PMID:27867719

  15. Effects of dose-dependent levels of isoflurane on cerebral blood flow in healthy subjects studied using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Schlünzen, L; Cold, G E; Rasmussen, M; Vafaee, M S

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that escalating drug concentrations of isoflurane are associated with a significant decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in regions sub-serving conscious brain activity, including specifically the thalamus. Nine human volunteers received three escalating drug concentrations: 0.2, 0.4 and 1.0 MAC end-tidal inhalation. During waking, baseline and the three levels of sedation, aO PET scan was performed. Isoflurane decreased the bispectral index (BIS) values dose-dependently. Cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were maintained constant over time. No significant change in global CBF was observed. Throughout all three MAC levels of sedation, isoflurane caused an increased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the anterior cingulate and decreased rCBF in the cerebellum. Initially, isoflurane (0 vs. 0.2 MAC) significantly increased relative rCBF in the medial frontal gyrus and in the nucleus accumbens. At the next level (0.2 vs. 0.4 MAC), relative rCBF was significantly increased in the caudate nucleus and decreased in the lingual gyrus and cuneus. At the last level (0.4 vs. 1 MAC), relative rCBF was significantly increased in the insula and decreased in the thalamus, the cuneus and lingual gyrus. Compared with flow distribution in awake volunteers, 1 MAC of isoflurane significantly raised relative activity in the anterior cingulate and insula regions. In contrast, a significant relative flow reduction was identified in the thalamus, the cerebellum and lingual gyrus. Isoflurane, like sevoflurane, induced characteristic flow redistribution at doses of 0.2-1.0 MAC. At 1 MAC of isoflurane, rCBF decreased in the thalamus. Specific areas affected by both isoflurane and sevoflurane included the anterior cingulate, insula regions, cerebellum, lingual gyrus and thalamus.

  16. Dexmedetomidine Acts via the JAK2/STAT3 Pathway to Attenuate Isoflurane-Induced Neurocognitive Deficits in Senile Mice

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yanna; Zhang, Yuan; Han, Liu; Chen, Lihai; Xu, Yajie; Sun, Fan; Ji, Muhuo; Yang, Jianjun; Bao, Hongguang

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits could be alleviated by dexmedetomidine in young animal subjects. In the current study, we examine whether dexmedetomidine could also alleviate isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits in senile animals. Methods Senile male C57BL/6 mice (20 months) received dexmedetomidine (50 μg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 minutes prior to isoflurane exposure (1.3% for 4 h). Cognitive function was assessed 19 days later using a 5-day testing regimen with Morris water maze. Some subjects also received pretreatment with α2 adrenoreceptor antagonist atipamezole (250 μg/kg, i.p.), JAK2 inhibitor AG490 (15 mg/kg i.p.) or STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 (40 mg/kg i.p.) 30 minutes prior to dexmedetomidine. Results Isoflurane exposure increased and reduced the time spent in the quadrant containing the target platform in training sessions. The number of crossings over the original target quadrant was also decreased. Dexmedotomidine attenuated such effects. Effects of dexmedotomidine were reduced by pretreatment with atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Increased phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 in the hippocampus induced by isoflurane was augmented by dexmedetomidine. Effects of dexmedetomidine on JAK2/STAT3 phosphorylation were attenuated by atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Isoflurane promoted neuronal apoptosis and increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and BAD, and reduced Bcl-2 expression. Attenuation of such effects by dexmedotomidine was partially blocked by atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine could protect against isoflurane-induced spatial learning and memory impairment in senile mice by stimulating the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. Such findings encourage the use of dexmedetomidine in geriatric patients receiving isoflurane anesthesia. PMID:27768775

  17. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout mice have a decreased isoflurane requirement to induce loss of righting reflex.

    PubMed

    Lee, S N; Li, L; Zuo, Z

    2010-12-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) uptake extracellular glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. EAAT type 3 (EAAT3), the main neuronal EAAT, is expressed widely in the CNS. We have shown that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity and trafficking to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that EAAT3 mediates isoflurane-induced anesthesia. To test this hypothesis, the potency of isoflurane to induce immobility and hypnosis, two major components of general anesthesia, was compared in the CD-1 wild-type mice and EAAT knockout mice that had a CD-1 strain gene background. Hypnosis was assessed by loss of righting reflex in this study. The expression of EAAT1 and EAAT2, two widely expressed EAATs in the CNS, in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord was not different between the EAAT3 knockout mice and wild-type mice. The concentration required for isoflurane to cause immobility to painful stimuli, a response involving primarily reflex loops in the spinal cord, was not changed by EAAT3 knockout. However, the EAAT3 knockout mice were more sensitive to isoflurane-induced hypnotic effects, which may be mediated by hypothalamic sleep neural circuits. Interestingly, the EAAT3 knockout mice did not have an altered sensitivity to the hypnotic effects caused by ketamine, an i.v. anesthetic that is a glutamate receptor antagonist and does not affect EAAT3 activity. These results suggest that EAAT3 modulates the sensitivity of neural circuits to isoflurane. These results, along with our previous findings which suggests that isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity, indicate that EAAT3 may regulate isoflurane-induced behavioral changes, including anesthesia.

  18. The common inhaled anesthetic isoflurane increases aggregation of huntingtin and alters calcium homeostasis in a cell model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiujun; Liang Ge; Yang Hui; Wang Shouping; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Wei Huafeng

    2011-02-01

    Isoflurane is known to increase {beta}-amyloid aggregation and neuronal damage. We hypothesized that isoflurane will have similar effects on the polyglutamine huntingtin protein and will cause alterations in intracellular calcium homeostasis. We tested this hypothesis in striatal cells from the expanded glutamine huntingtin knock-in mouse (STHdh{sup Q111/Q111}) and wild type (STHdh{sup Q7/Q7}) striatal neurons. The primary cultured neurons were exposed for 24 h to equipotent concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium and with or without xestospongin C, a potent endoplasmic reticulum inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist. Aggregation of huntingtin protein, cell viability, and calcium concentrations were measured. Isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane all increased the aggregation of huntingtin in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells, with isoflurane having the largest effect. Isoflurane induced greater calcium release from the ER and relatively more cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} huntingtin cells than in the wild type STHdh{sup Q7/Q7} striatal cells. However, sevoflurane and desflurane caused less calcium release from the ER and less cell damage. Xestospongin C inhibited the isoflurane-induced calcium release from the ER, aggregation of huntingtin, and cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells. In summary, the Q111 form of huntingtin increases the vulnerability of striatal neurons to isoflurane neurotoxicity through combined actions on the ER IP{sub 3} receptors. Calcium release from the ER contributes to the anesthetic induced huntingtin aggregation in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} striatal cells.

  19. Cardiovascular function during maintenance of anaesthesia with isoflurane or alfaxalone infusion in greyhounds experiencing blood loss.

    PubMed

    Raisis, Anthea L; Smart, Lisa; Drynan, Eleanor; Hosgood, Giselle

    2015-03-01

    To compare adequacy of oxygen delivery and severity of shock during maintenance of anaesthesia with isoflurane or alfaxalone infusion in greyhounds experiencing blood loss. Prospective, randomised study. Twenty-four greyhounds (ASA I). All greyhounds were premedicated with methadone (0.2 mg kg(-1) ) intramuscularly. Anaesthesia was induced with alfaxalone 2.5 mg kg(-1) intravenously. Following endotracheal intubation, the dogs were connected to an anaesthetic circle circuit delivering oxygen. Dogs were allocated to receive inhaled isoflurane or an intravenous infusion of alfaxalone for maintenance of anaesthesia. Isoflurane was initially administered to achieve an end-tidal concentration of 1.4% and alfaxalone was initially administered at 0.13 mg kg(-1)  minute(-1) . The dose of isoflurane or alfaxalone was adjusted during instrumentation to produce a clinically equivalent depth of anaesthesia. All dogs were mechanically ventilated to normocapnia (Pa CO2 35-40 mmHg; 4.67-5.33 kPa). Passive warming maintained core body temperature between 37 and 38 °C. Measured and calculated indices of cardiovascular function, including mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), oxygen delivery index (D˙O2I), oxygen consumption index (V˙O2I) and oxygen extraction ratio (OER), were determined at baseline (60 minutes after start of anaesthesia) and after removal of 32 mL kg(-1) and 48 mL kg(-1) of blood. In all dogs, blood loss resulted in a significant decrease in MAP, CI, D˙O2 , and a significant increase in SVRI, V˙O2I , and OER. The changes in each of the indices did not differ significantly between dogs receiving isoflurane and dogs receiving alfaxalone. No difference in oxygen delivery or severity of shock was observed when either inhaled isoflurane or intravenous alfaxalone infusion was used for maintenance of anaesthesia in greyhounds experiencing blood loss. There appears to be no clinical advantage to

  20. Dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Binjiang; Li, Xue

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of α2 adrenergic receptor agonists, dexmedetomidine generates sedation, anti-anxiety and anesthesia effects by hyperpolarizing noradrenergic nerve cells in locus coeruleus. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment, and the possible underlying mechanism in aging rat. Firstly, we used isoflurane-induced aging rat model to analyze the therapeutical effect of dexmedetomidine on cognitive impairment. Next, commercial ELISA kits were used to analyze tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and caspase-3 levels. In addition, Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression of P38 MAPK, PTEN and phosphorylation-Akt (p-Akt) expression. Our results showed that the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine significantly attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aging rat. Moreover, dexmedetomidine significantly inhibited these TNF-α, IL-1β, MDA, SOD and caspase-3 activities in isoflurane-induced aging rat. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective effects of dexmedetomidine on isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment significantly suppressed Bcl-xL/Bad rate, P38 MAPK and PTEN protein expression and activated p-Akt protein expression in aging rat. Collectively, neuroprotective effect of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat. PMID:26770320

  1. Intraoperative end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in cats undergoing ovariectomy that received tramadol, buprenorphine or a combination of both.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Luca; Mollo, Antonio; Contiero, Barbara; Busetto, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the end-tidal concentration of isoflurane required to maintain heart and respiratory rate within ± 20% of basal measurement in cats undergoing ovariectomy that received buprenorphine, tramadol or a combination of both. Methods Thirty cats, divided into three groups, were enrolled in a simple operator-blinded, randomised study. Cats received acepromazine (0.03 mg/kg) and one of the following treatments: buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg), tramadol (2 mg/kg) or a combination of both. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane titrated in order to maintain heart and respiratory rate within the target values recorded before premedication. Results Groups were similar for age, weight, dose of propofol administered, sedation and recovery scores. Cats receiving tramadol with buprenorphine were extubated earlier after isoflurane discontinuation. No statistical differences were detected in end-tidal fraction of isoflurane between buprenorphine alone or with tramadol. In cats that received tramadol or buprenorphine alone, ovarian pedicle traction caused a statistical increase in end-tidal isoflurane concentration compared with that measured during incision and suture of the skin. In cats that received the combination of tramadol plus buprenorphine no differences among surgical time points were observed. Conclusions and relevance Tramadol added to buprenorphine did not provide any advantage in decreasing the end-tidal fraction of isoflurane compared with buprenorphine alone, although it is speculated there may be an infra-additive interaction between tramadol and buprenorphine in cats.

  2. Effects of Anesthesia with Isoflurane, Ketamine, or Propofol on Physiologic Parameters in Neonatal Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lauren D; Dissen, Gregory A; McPike, Matthew J; Brambrink, Ansgar M

    2014-01-01

    Isoflurane, ketamine, and propofol are common anesthetics in human and nonhuman primate medicine. However, scant normative data exist regarding the response of neonatal macaques to these anesthetics. We compared the effects of isoflurane, ketamine, and propofol anesthesia on physiologic parameters in neonatal rhesus macaques. Neonatal rhesus macaques (age, 5 to 7 d) were exposed to isoflurane (n = 5), ketamine (n = 4), propofol (n = 4) or no anesthesia (n = 5) for 5 h. The anesthetics were titrated to achieve a moderate anesthetic plane, and heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide, oxygen saturation, and temperature were measured every 15 min. Venous blood samples were collected to determine blood gases and metabolic status at baseline, 0.5, 2.5, and 4.5 h after induction and at 3 h after the end of anesthesia. Compared with ketamine, isoflurane caused more hypotensive events and necessitated the administration of increased volumes of intravenous fluids to support blood pressure throughout anesthesia; no significant differences were observed between the isoflurane and propofol groups for these parameters. In addition, isoflurane resulted in a significantly shorter average time to extubation, compared with both ketamine and propofol. Due to supportive care, other physiologic variables remained stable between anesthetic regimens and throughout the 5-h exposure. These data improve our understanding of the effects of these 3 anesthetics in neonatal rhesus macaques and will aid veterinarians and researchers as they consider the risks and benefits of and resources required during general anesthesia in these animals. PMID:24827572

  3. Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 by isoflurane preconditioning during tolerance against neuronal injury induced by oxygen glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qifang; Zhu, Yesen; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Hui; Liu, Heping

    2008-09-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. The HO-1 isozyme is induced by a variety of factors such as heat, heme, ischemia, and hydrogen peroxide. In recent years, mounting findings have suggested that HO-1 has a neuroprotective activity against ischemic injury. The neuroprotective role of isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, has been well documented, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms involved. Recently, isoflurane has been shown to up-regulate HO-1 in the liver. In this study, we show that isoflurane preconditioning promotes the survival of cultured ischemic hippocampal neurons by increasing the number of surviving neurons and their viability. Further study by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that isoflurane preconditioning significantly increases HO-1 expression in oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury. Furthermore, inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin partially abolishes isoflurane preconditioning's protective effect as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in OGD neurons. These findings indicated that the neuroprotective role of isoflurane preconditioning against OGD-induced injury might be associated with its role in up-regulating HO-1 in ischemic neurons.

  4. Fluorine-19 NMR and computational quantification of isoflurane binding to the voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Bondarenko, Vasyl; Granata, Daniele; Bu, Weiming; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Loll, Patrick J.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) play an important role in general anesthesia. Electrophysiology measurements suggest that volatile anesthetics such as isoflurane inhibit NaV by stabilizing the inactivated state or altering the inactivation kinetics. Recent computational studies suggested the existence of multiple isoflurane binding sites in NaV, but experimental binding data are lacking. Here we use site-directed placement of 19F probes in NMR experiments to quantify isoflurane binding to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac. 19F probes were introduced individually to S129 and L150 near the S4–S5 linker, L179 and S208 at the extracellular surface, T189 in the ion selectivity filter, and all phenylalanine residues. Quantitative analyses of 19F NMR saturation transfer difference (STD) spectroscopy showed a strong interaction of isoflurane with S129, T189, and S208; relatively weakly with L150; and almost undetectable with L179 and phenylalanine residues. An orientation preference was observed for isoflurane bound to T189 and S208, but not to S129 and L150. We conclude that isoflurane inhibits NaChBac by two distinct mechanisms: (i) as a channel blocker at the base of the selectivity filter, and (ii) as a modulator to restrict the pivot motion at the S4–S5 linker and at a critical hinge that controls the gating and inactivation motion of S6. PMID:27856739

  5. Lung alveolar epithelium and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Flamein, Florence; Epaud, Ralph; Clement, Annick; Guillot, Loic

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a group of lung disorders characterized by various levels of inflammation and fibrosis. The current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of ILD strongly suggests a central role of the alveolar epithelium. Following injury, alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may actively participate in the restoration of a normal alveolar architecture through a coordinated process of re-epithelialization, or in the development of fibrosis through a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Complex networks orchestrate EMT leading to changes in cell architecture and behaviour, loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal properties. In the lung, AECs themselves may serve as a source of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by acquiring a mesenchymal phenotype. This review covers recent knowledge on the role of alveolar epithelium in the pathogenesis of ILD. The mechanisms underlying disease progression are discussed, with a main focus on the apoptotic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and the developmental pathway.

  6. Toward therapeutic pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria Decarlo

    2006-11-01

    In humans, age results in loss of pulmonary alveoli; menopause accelerates loss of diffusing capacity, an index of alveolar surface area; and disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) results in loss of alveoli. Thus, an important goal for investigators is to generate knowledge that allows induction of pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans. Our enthusiasm for this goal and our assessment of its feasibility are based on work in several laboratories over the last decade that has disproved the notion that pulmonary alveoli are incapable of regeneration, and on the growing evidence that signals that regulate programs of alveolar turnover (loss and regeneration) are conserved from rodents to humans. We review animal models of alveolar loss and regeneration and their conservation during evolution, and hence their relevance to humans.

  7. Alveolarization Continues during Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Owers-Bradley, John; Beardsmore, Caroline S.; Mada, Marius; Ball, Iain; Garipov, Ruslan; Panesar, Kuldeep S.; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Spycher, Ben D.; Williams, Sian E.; Silverman, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The current hypothesis that human pulmonary alveolarization is complete by 3 years is contradicted by new evidence of alveolarization throughout adolescence in mammals. Objectives: We reexamined the current hypothesis using helium-3 (3He) magnetic resonance (MR) to assess alveolar size noninvasively between 7 and 21 years, during which lung volume nearly quadruples. If new alveolarization does not occur, alveolar size should increase to the same extent. Methods: Lung volumes were measured by spirometry and plethysmography in 109 healthy subjects aged 7–21 years. Using 3HeMR we determined two independent measures of peripheral airspace dimensions: apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of 3He at FRC (n = 109), and average diffusion distance of helium (Xrms¯) by q-space analysis (n = 46). We compared the change in these parameters with lung growth against a model of lung expansion with no new alveolarization. Measurements and Main Results: ADC increased by 0.19% for every 1% increment in FRC (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.13–0.25), whereas the expected change in the absence of neoalveolarization is 0.41% (95% CI, 0.31–0.52). Similarly, increase of (Xrms¯) with FRC was significantly less than the predicted increase in the absence of neoalveolarization. The number of alveoli is estimated to increase 1.94-fold (95% CI, 1.64–2.30) across the age range studied. Conclusions: Our observations are best explained by postulating that the lungs grow partly by neoalveolarization throughout childhood and adolescence. This has important implications: developing lungs have the potential to recover from early life insults and respond to emerging alveolar therapies. Conversely, drugs, diseases, or environmental exposures could adversely affect alveolarization throughout childhood. PMID:22071328

  8. Are Panoramic Radiographs Reliable to Diagnose Mild Alveolar Bone Resorption?

    PubMed Central

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated. PMID:21991470

  9. Are panoramic radiographs reliable to diagnose mild alveolar bone resorption?

    PubMed

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated.

  10. The Molecular Basis of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Brenna; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) comprises a heterogenous group of diseases characterized by abnormal surfactant accumulation resulting in respiratory insufficiency, and defects in alveolar macrophage- and neutrophil-mediated host defense. Basic, clinical and translational research over the past two decades have raised PAP from obscurity, identifying the molecular pathogenesis in over 90% of cases as a spectrum of diseases involving the disruption of GM-CSF signaling. Autoimmune PAP represents the vast majority of cases and is caused by neutralizing GM-CSF autoantibodies. Genetic mutations that disrupt GM-CSF receptor signaling comprise a rare form of hereditary PAP. In both autoimmune and hereditary PAP, loss of GM-CSF signaling blocks the terminal differentiation of alveolar macrophages in the lungs impairing the ability of alveolar macrophages to catabolize surfactant and to perform many host defense functions. Secondary PAP occurs in a variety of clinical diseases that presumedly cause the syndrome by reducing the numbers or functions of alveolar macrophages, thereby impairing alveolar macrophage-mediated pulmonary surfactant clearance. A similar phenotype occurs in mice deficient in the production of GM-CSF or GM-CSF receptors. PAP and related research has uncovered a critical and emerging role for GM-CSF in the regulation of pulmonary surfactant homeostasis, lung host defense, and systemic immunity. PMID:20338813

  11. Lung epithelial branching program antagonizes alveolar differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Daniel R; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Miller, Rachel K; Ji, Hong; Akiyama, Haruhiko; McCrea, Pierre D; Chen, Jichao

    2013-11-05

    Mammalian organs, including the lung and kidney, often adopt a branched structure to achieve high efficiency and capacity of their physiological functions. Formation of a functional lung requires two developmental processes: branching morphogenesis, which builds a tree-like tubular network, and alveolar differentiation, which generates specialized epithelial cells for gas exchange. Much progress has been made to understand each of the two processes individually; however, it is not clear whether the two processes are coordinated and how they are deployed at the correct time and location. Here we show that an epithelial branching morphogenesis program antagonizes alveolar differentiation in the mouse lung. We find a negative correlation between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation temporally, spatially, and evolutionarily. Gain-of-function experiments show that hyperactive small GTPase Kras expands the branching program and also suppresses molecular and cellular differentiation of alveolar cells. Loss-of-function experiments show that SRY-box containing gene 9 (Sox9) functions downstream of Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)/Kras to promote branching and also suppresses premature initiation of alveolar differentiation. We thus propose that lung epithelial progenitors continuously balance between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation, and such a balance is mediated by dual-function regulators, including Kras and Sox9. The resulting temporal delay of differentiation by the branching program may provide new insights to lung immaturity in preterm neonates and the increase in organ complexity during evolution.

  12. Maternal anesthesia via isoflurane or ether differentially affects pre-and postnatal behavior in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Ronca, April E; Abel, Regina A; Alberts, Jeffrey R

    2007-11-01

    Our understanding of prenatal behavior has been significantly advanced by techniques for direct observation and manipulation of unanesthetized, behaving rodent fetuses with intact umbilical connections to the mother. These techniques involve brief administration of an inhalant anesthesic, enabling spinal transection of the rat or mouse dam, after which procedures can continue with unanesthetized dams and fetuses. Because anesthetics administered to the mother can cross the placental barrier, it is possible that fetuses are anesthetized to varying degrees. We compared in perinatal rats the effects of prenatal maternal exposure to two inhalant anesthetics: ether and isoflurane. Fewer spontaneous fetal movements and first postpartum nipple attachments were observed following maternal exposure to ether as compared to isoflurane. Neonatal breathing frequencies and oxygenation did not account for group differences in nipple attachment. Our results provide evidence that the particular inhalant anesthetic employed in prenatal manipulation studies determines frequencies of perinatal behavior. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Recovery characteristics following maintenance of anaesthesia with sevoflurane or isoflurane in dogs premedicated with acepromazine.

    PubMed

    Love, E J; Holt, P E; Murison, P J

    2007-08-18

    A standard anaesthetic protocol was used to anaesthetise 40 dogs for intravenous urography and a retrograde urethrogram or vaginourethrogram. The dogs were allocated by blocked randomisation to receive either isoflurane or sevoflurane for maintenance of anaesthesia after they had been premedicated with acepromazine and pethidine, and anaesthesia induced with propofol. An observer who was unaware of which agent had been used assessed ataxia 30 and 60 minutes after discontinuation of administration of the anaesthetic and assigned an overall recovery score. No complications occurred during anaesthesia of either group of dogs. The scores for ataxia were significantly lower after 60 minutes than after 30 minutes, but there was no significant difference between the groups. The quality of recovery was significantly better in the dogs that received sevoflurane than in those that received isoflurane, but the recovery times were similar.

  14. Isoflurane enhances both fast and slow synaptic inhibition in the hippocampus at amnestic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors has long been considered an important target for a variety of general anesthetics. In the hippocampus, two types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition coexist: GABAA,fast, which is expressed primarily at peri-somatic sites, and GABAA,slow, which is expressed primarily in the dendrites. Their spatial segregation suggests distinct functions: GABAA,slow may control plasticity of dendritic synapses, while GABAA,fast controls action potential initiation at the soma. We examined modulation of GABAA,fast and GABAA,slow inhibition by isoflurane at amnesic concentrations, and compared it to modulation by behaviorally equivalent doses of the GABAA receptor-selective drug etomidate. Methods Whole-cell recordings were conducted at near-physiological temperature from pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal cultures obtained from C57BL/6 x 129/SvJ F1 hybrid mice. GABAA receptor-mediated currents were isolated using glutamate receptor antagonists. GABAA,slow currents were evoked by electrical stimulation in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Miniature GABAA,fast currents were recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Results 100 µM isoflurane (approximately EC50,amnesia) slowed fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic current decay by approximately 25%. Higher concentrations, up to 400 µM, produced proportionally greater effects without altering current amplitudes. The effects on GABAA,slow were approximately one-half those produced by equi-amnesic concentrations of etomidate. Conclusions Isoflurane enhances both types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition to similar degrees at amnesic concentrations. This pattern differs from etomidate, which at low concentrations selectively enhances slow inhibition. These effects of isoflurane are sufficiently large that they may contribute substantially to its suppression of hippocampal learning and memory. PMID:22343472

  15. Effects of isoflurane or propofol on postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Erasso, Diana M; Camporesi, Enrico M; Mangar, Devanand; Saporta, Samuel

    2013-09-12

    An increasing number of in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that anesthesia and surgery could be risk factors for later cognitive impairment in the young and aged brain. General anesthesia has been shown to impair spatial memory in rats and this performance is dependent on hippocampal function and postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis. Anesthetic induced alteration of one or more stages of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis may in part explain this cognitive impairment following anesthesia. Three different populations of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) were labeled with different thymidine analogs (EdU, IdU, and CldU) at 4, 8, and 21 days, respectively, in young (3-month-old) and aged (20-month-old) rats prior to a 3h exposure to isoflurane, control, propofol, or 10% intralipid. 24h following general anesthesia, brains were collected for analysis. The number of cells co-localized with neuronal differentiation and maturation labels with each of the thymidine analogs was quantified. In addition, new cell proliferation 24hr following anesthesia was assessed with anti-Ki67. The effect of anesthesia on astrocytes was also assessed with anti-S100β. Isoflurane or propofol did not affect new cell proliferation, as assessed by Ki67, in the DG of young or aged rats. However, propofol significantly decreased the number of differentiating neurons and increased the number of astrocytes in the DG of young, but not aged, rats. Isoflurane significantly decreased the number of maturing neurons and increased the number of astrocytes in the DG of aged, but not young, rats. Isoflurane and propofol anesthesia altered postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in an age and agent dependent matter.

  16. Effects of remifentanil/propofol in comparison with isoflurane on dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Engelhard, K; Werner, C; Möllenberg, O; Kochs, E

    2001-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of remifentanil and propofol in comparison to isoflurane on dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation in humans. In 16 awake patients dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation was measured using transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD). Thereafter patients were intubated, ventilated with O2/air (FiO2=0.33) and randomly assigned to one of the following anesthetic protocols: group 1 (n=8): 0.5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) remifentanil combined with a propofol-target plasma concentration of 1.5 microg x ml(-1) group 2 (n=8): 1.8 % isoflurane (1.5 MAC). Following 20 min of equilibration the autoregulatory challenge was repeated. Arterial blood gases and body temperature were maintained constant over time. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Dynamic autoregulation was intact in all patients prior to induction of anesthesia expressed by an autoregulatory index (ARI) of 5.4+/-1.21 (mean+/-SD, group 1) and 5.9+/-0.98 (mean+/-SD, group 2). With remifentanil/propofol anesthesia dynamic autoregulation was similar to the awake state (group 1: ARI=4.9+/-0.88). In contrast, autoregulatory response was delayed with 1.5 MAC isoflurane (group 2, ARI=2.1+/-0.92) (P<0.05). These data show that dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation is maintained with remifentanil-based total intravenous anesthesia. This is consistent with the view that narcotics (and hypnotics) do not alter the physiologic cerebrovascular responses to changes in MAP. In contrast, 1.5 MAC isoflurane delays cerebrovascular autoregulation compared to the awake state.

  17. Effects of xenon and isoflurane on apoptosis and inflammation in a porcine myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Sopka, Sasa; Mertens, Christine; Roehl, Anna Bettina; Schiffl, Katharina; Rossaint, Rolf; Classen-Linke, Irmgard

    2013-03-01

    Volatile anaesthetics can reduce the infarction size in myocardial tissue when administered before and during experimentally induced ischaemia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether xenon is beneficial compared to isoflurane in limiting myocardial tissue apoptosis and inflammation induced by experimental ischaemia-reperfusion injury in a porcine right ventricular infarction model. Twenty-one animals used for this study randomly received isoflurane, xenon or thiopental, (n=6-8 per group). Myocardial infarction was induced for 90min, followed by reperfusion for 120min. Tissues from the left and right ventricles were removed from the sites of infarction, reperfusion and remote areas, and processed for immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis (caspase-3 staining) and neutrophilic infiltration (naphthol AS-D chloroacetate-specific esterase) were assessed and evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using an ANOVA of repeated measures. Density of apoptotic cells were higher in tissues from animals that were anesthetized with xenon. This effect was significant in comparison to isoflurane (p=0.0177). Neutrophilic infiltration was significantly higher in the right compared to the left ventricle (p<0.001), whereas no significant differences in the number of granulocytes based on the anaesthetic regime or the different tissue areas were found. We conclude that xenon, in the early phase of ischaemia and reperfusion, induces a significant increase in apoptosis compared to isoflurane. Therefore, clinical use of this anaesthetic in cardiocompromised patients should be taken with care until more long-term studies have been carried out. The increased neutrophilic infiltration in the right vs. the left ventricle indicates the right ventricle being more susceptible to ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

  18. Effect of morphine on the bispectral index during isoflurane anesthesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Henao-Guerrero, Piedad N; McMurphy, Rose; Kukanich, Butch; Hodgson, Dave S

    2009-03-01

    To assess the effect of morphine on the bispectral index (BIS) in dogs during isoflurane anesthesia maintained at a constant end-tidal concentration. Prospective, randomized, experimental trial. Eight adult Beagle dogs, weighing between 7.1 and 9.8 kg. Anesthesia was induced with isoflurane via a face mask. Dog's tracheas were intubated and anesthesia maintained with isoflurane at a constant end-tidal concentration (e'Iso) of 1.81% for a 30-minute equilibration period. Pulmonary ventilation was controlled to normocapnia. After equilibration, baseline values were recorded prior to intravenous administration of morphine sulfate (0.5 mg kg(-1)) (MT) or an equal volume of saline (CT). Measurements for heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure (SAP, DAP and MAP) were recorded at 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120 minutes after treatment. Bispectral index was recorded every 10 seconds for 3 minutes for each time measurement. Venous blood samples were collected at baseline, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60 and 120 minutes for determination of morphine serum concentrations. Anesthesia was discontinued after the last measurement and dogs were allowed to recover. Baseline BIS for MT and CT at 1.81%e'Iso were 63 +/- 10 and 58 +/- 9, respectively. Bispectral index in MT was 4-8% lower at 20, 75, 90 and 105 minutes compared with CT. There were no differences in BIS between baseline and any subsequent measurement within either MT or CT. Heart rate, SAP, MAP, and DAP decreased after morphine administration. Intravenous administration of 0.5 mg kg(-1) morphine sulfate did not cause clinically significant changes in the BIS of unstimulated dogs during isoflurane anesthesia at an e'Iso of 1.81%.

  19. Absorption and degradation of sevoflurane and isoflurane in a conventional anesthetic circuit.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Laster, M J; Eger, E I; Taheri, S

    1991-06-01

    Soda lime and Baralyme degrade sevoflurane, the rate of degradation being a direct function of temperature. We tested whether this degradation would impede the development of an anesthetizing concentration of sevoflurane (compared with isoflurane, a compound that is not degraded) in a circle-absorption system having an increased temperature consequent to (a) carbon dioxide production (200 mL/min) and absorption; and (b) a low inflow rate (70 mL/min). We also measured the temperatures reached in various parts of the absorption system when used in clinical practice, finding that peak temperatures usually reached 37 degrees - 46 degrees C when low inflow rates (500 mL/min) were applied. The tests in the model system demonstrated that soda lime and Baralyme absorbed both sevoflurane and isoflurane, and that both absorbants degraded sevoflurane but not isoflurane. Baralyme produced a fourfold greater degradation of sevoflurane vapor than did soda lime (0.66 mL/min compared with 0.17 mL/min). However, except for a slight delay at the start of anesthesia, neither absorption nor degradation should noticeably affect the requirement for anesthetic delivery in clinical practice, even in low-flow systems.

  20. Expression of anion exchanger 3 influences respiratory rate in awake and isoflurane anesthetized mice.

    PubMed

    Meier, S; Hübner, C A; Groeben, H; Peters, J; Bingmann, D; Wiemann, M

    2007-11-01

    The anion exchanger 3 (AE3) is involved in neuronal pH regulation of which may include chemosensitive neurons. Here we examined the effect of AE3 expression on respiratory rate (RR) in vivo. AE3 knockout (KO, n=5) and wild type (WT, n=6) mice were subjected to body plethysmography, both while awake and during isoflurane anesthesia. RR was significantly lower in awake AE3 KO (162+/-7SE min(-1)) than in WT mice (212+/-20 min(-1), P=0.036). The same was found during isoflurane anesthesia at 0.5 MAC (KO: 123+/-9 min(-1), WT: 168+/-15 min(-1), P=0.026) and 1.0 MAC (KO: 51+/-6 min(-1), WT: 94+/-6 min(-1), P=0.001). Hypercapnia (5% CO2) increased RR in awake and decreased RR in nesthetized (1.0 MAC) mice, whereby relative changes were larger in AE3 KO mice. Recovery from isoflurane anesthesia in respect to RR regaining baseline values was more pronounced in AE3 KO. Results show that AE3 expression profoundly influences control of breathing in mice.

  1. Astaxanthin reduces isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis via the PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Mei; Cai, Xiao-Lan; Wen, Qing-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Astaxanthin is an oxygen-containing derivative of carotenoids that effectively suppresses reactive oxygen and has nutritional and medicinal value. The mechanisms underlying the effects of astaxanthin on isoflurane‑induced neuroapoptosis remain to be fully understood. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of astaxanthin to reduce isoflurane‑induced neuroapoptosis and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The results demonstrated that isoflurane induced brain damage, increased caspase‑3 activity and suppressed the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway in an in vivo model. However, treatment with astaxanthin significantly inhibited brain damage, suppressed caspase‑3 activity and upregulated the PI3K/Akt pathway in the isoflurane‑induced rats. Furthermore, isoflurane suppressed cell growth, induced cell apoptosis, enhanced caspase‑3 activity and downregulated the PI3K/Akt pathway in organotypic hippocampal slice culture. Administration of astaxanthin significantly promoted cell growth, reduced cell apoptosis and caspase‑3 activity, and upregulated the PI3K/Akt pathway and isoflurane‑induced neuroapoptosis. The present study demonstrated that downregulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway reduced the effect of astaxanthin to protect against isoflurane‑induced neuroapoptosis in the in vitro model. The results of the current study suggested that the protective effect of astaxanthin reduces the isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis via activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  2. Effect of isoflurane on somatosensory evoked potentials in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kortelainen, Jukka; Vipin, Ashwati; Thow Xin Yuan; Mir, Hasan; Thakor, Nitish; Al-Nashash, Hasan; All, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) are widely used in the clinic as well as research to study the functional integrity of the different parts of sensory pathways. However, most general anesthetics, such as isoflurane, are known to suppress SEPs, which might affect the interpretation of the signals. In animal studies, the usage of anesthetics during SEP measurements is inevitable due to which detailed effect of these drugs on the recordings should be known. In this paper, the effect of isoflurane on SEPs was studied in a rat model. Both time and frequency properties of the cortical recordings generated by stimulating the tibial nerve of rat's hindlimb were investigated at three different isoflurane levels. While the anesthetic agent is shown to generally suppress the amplitude of the SEP, the effect was found to be nonlinear influencing more substantially the latter part of waveform. This finding will potentially help us in future work aiming at separating the effects of anesthetics on SEP from those due to injury in the ascending neural pathways.

  3. The direction dependence of thermoregulatory vasoconstriction during isoflurane/epidural anesthesia in humans.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, M; Sessler, D I; McGuire, J; Blanchard, D; Schroeder, M; Moayeri, A

    1993-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that once thermoregulatory vasoconstriction is triggered at a given core temperature during isoflurane anesthesia, redilation starts at a substantially higher core temperature. To avoid direct perception of cutaneous cooling and warming, we used epidural anesthesia and limited our thermal manipulations to the blocked area. Seven volunteers were anesthetized with isoflurane/epidural anesthesia (approximately T9 dermatomal level). Core hypothermia was induced by surface cooling restricted to the legs. Cooling was continued until fingertip blood flow suddenly decreased (vasoconstriction threshold). The core was then rewarmed by heating the legs until fingertip flow suddenly increased toward initial values (redilation threshold). The difference between the two thresholds defined the direction-dependent hysteresis. Vasoconstriction occurred at 35.2 +/- 0.6 degrees C and vasodilation at 36.2 +/- 0.5 degrees C (P < 0.01, paired t-test); consequently, the hysteresis was 1.0 +/- 0.6 degrees C. The observed hysteresis suggests that thermoregulatory responses during combined isoflurane/epidural anesthesia are not determined simply by instantaneous thermal input to central controllers, but may also depend on the direction of core temperature change.

  4. Influence of halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane on gastroesophageal reflux during anesthesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deborah V; Boruta, Daniel T; Evans, A Tom

    2006-11-01

    To determine whether maintenance of anesthesia with halothane or sevoflurane is associated with a lower incidence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) than the use of isoflurane in dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery. 90 dogs. Dogs were evaluated during elective orthopedic surgery. Dogs with a history of vomiting or that had received any drugs that would alter gastrointestinal tract function were excluded from the study. The anesthetic protocol used was standardized to include administration of acepromazine maleate and morphine prior to induction of anesthesia with thiopental. Dogs were allocated to receive halothane, isoflurane, or sevoflurane to maintain anesthesia. A sensor-tipped catheter was placed to measure esophageal pH during anesthesia. Gastroesophageal reflux was defined as an esophageal pH < 4 or > 7.5. 51 dogs had 1 or more episodes of acidic GER during anesthesia. Reflux was detected in 14 dogs receiving isoflurane, 19 dogs receiving halothane, and 18 dogs receiving sevoflurane. In dogs with GER, mean +/- SD time from probe placement to onset of GER was 36 +/- 65 minutes and esophageal pH remained < 4 for a mean of 64% of the measurement period. There was no significant association between GER and start of surgery or moving a dog on or off the surgery table. Dogs that developed GER soon after induction of anesthesia were more likely to regurgitate. Maintenance of anesthesia with any of the 3 commonly used inhalant agents is associated with a similar risk for development of GER in dogs.

  5. Temperature-dependent effects of halothane and isoflurane on the isolated left atrium.

    PubMed

    Laorden, M L; Miralles, F S; Cárceles, M D; Hernández, J; Puig, M M

    1990-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether changes in temperature alter the effects of halothane and isoflurane on isolated left atria. Concentration-response curves for inotropic effects at different temperatures (30 degrees C, 37 degrees C, 40 degrees C) on electrically stimulated left atria of the rat were obtained. The change of temperature modified the maximal negative inotropic response to halothane. The maximal decrease induced by halothane was 12 +/- 2.3 per cent at 37 degrees C and 18 +/- 2.5 per cent at 30 degrees C. When the temperature increased up to 40 degrees C the maximal decrease of atrial inotropism was 46 +/- 2.1 per cent--significantly higher than obtained at 37 degrees C. However, the maximal effect obtained by isoflurane was not significantly affected by temperature (30 degrees C = 7 +/- 1.6 per cent; 37 degrees C = 8 +/- 1.8 per cent; 40 degrees C = 2 +/- 0.8 per cent). Furthermore the potency of halothane (expressed as the concentration which produced 50 per cent inhibition - IC 50 per cent), decreased significantly at 30 degrees C (IC 50 = 1.34 +/- 0.18) and increased at 40 degrees C (IC 50 = 0.44 +/- 0.17) when compared with its potency at 37 degrees C (IC 50 = 0.96 +/- 0.08). On the other hand changes in temperature did not significantly modify the IC 50 for isoflurane obtained at 37 degrees C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. The metabolomic profile during isoflurane anesthesia differs from propofol anesthesia in the live rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Makaryus, Rany; Lee, Hedok; Yu, Mei; Zhang, Shaonan; Smith, S David; Rebecchi, Mario; Glass, Peter S; Benveniste, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Development of noninvasive techniques to discover new biomarkers in the live brain is important to further understand the underlying metabolic pathways of significance for processes such as anesthesia-induced apoptosis and cognitive dysfunction observed in the undeveloped brain. We used in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and two different signal processing approaches to test the hypothesis that volatile (isoflurane) and intravenous (propofol) anesthetics at equipotent doses produce distinct metabolomic profiles in the hippocampus and parietal cortex of the live rodent. For both brain regions, prolonged isoflurane anesthesia was characterized by higher levels of lactate (Lac) and glutamate compared with long-lasting propofol. In contrast, propofol anesthesia was characterized by very low concentrations of Lac ([lac]) as well as glucose. Quantitative analysis revealed that the [lac] was fivefold higher with isoflurane compared with propofol anesthesia and independent of [lac] in blood. The metabolomic profiling further demonstrated that for both brain regions, Lac was the most important metabolite for the observed differences, suggesting activation of distinct metabolic pathways that may impact mechanisms of action, background cellular functions, and possible agent-specific neurotoxicity. PMID:21266982

  7. Isoflurane anaesthetic depth in goats monitored using the bispectral index of the electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Antognini, J F; Wang, X W; Carstens, E

    2000-09-01

    The bispectral index (BIS) of the electroencephalogram has recently been used to monitor the depth of anaesthesia in humans. The BIS is a dimensionless number that varies between 0 and 100. We hypothesized that the BIS could also be used to monitor depth of isoflurane anaesthesia in goats. Needle electrodes were placed over the frontal region of the scalp of goats and 5%, isoflurane was administered via a mask. The BIS number was determined at clinically relevant end-points. The BIS number did not change when the animals became recumbent (95 +/- 5 to 94 +/- 7, n = 15), but decreased to 65 +/- 13 and 64 +/- 15 when the corneal reflex and withdrawal response to a noxious stimulus, respectively, were lost (p < 0.001, n = 12). Direct laryngoscopy and intubation increased the BIS (56 +/- 7 to 83 +/- 11; p < 0.05, n = 10), as did a noxious pinch to the dew-claw (57 +/- 9; to 76 +/- 9; p < 0.05, n = 10). The spectral edge (frequency below which 95% of the total power resided) paralleled the change in BIS. We conclude that the depth of isoflurane anaesthesia in goats can be monitored using the BIS, although further work is needed to determine its sensitivity and specificity.

  8. [Cleft lip, alveolar and palate sequelae. Proposal of new alveolar score by the Alveolar Cleft Score (ACS) classification].

    PubMed

    Molé, C; Simon, E

    2015-06-01

    The management of cleft lip, alveolar and palate sequelae remains problematic today. To optimize it, we tried to establish a new clinical index for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Seven tissue indicators, that we consider to be important in the management of alveolar sequelae, are listed by assigning them individual scores. The final score, obtained by adding together the individual scores, can take a low, high or maximum value. We propose a new classification (ACS: Alveolar Cleft Score) that guides the therapeutic team to a prognosis approach, in terms of the recommended surgical and prosthetic reconstruction, the type of medical care required, and the preventive and supportive therapy to establish. Current studies are often only based on a standard radiological evaluation of the alveolar bone height at the cleft site. However, the gingival, the osseous and the cellular areas bordering the alveolar cleft sequelae induce many clinical parameters, which should be reflected in the morphological diagnosis, to better direct the surgical indications and the future prosthetic requirements, and to best maintain successful long term aesthetic and functional results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Swimming exercise ameliorates neurocognitive impairment induced by neonatal exposure to isoflurane and enhances hippocampal histone acetylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, T; Ren, F; Huang, C S; Zou, W Y; Yang, Y; Pan, Y D; Sun, B; Wang, E; Guo, Q L

    2016-03-01

    Isoflurane-induced neurocognitive impairment in the developing rodent brain is well documented, and regular physical exercise has been demonstrated to be a viable intervention for some types of neurocognitive impairment. This study was designed to investigate the potential protective effect of swimming exercise on both neurocognitive impairment caused by repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane and the underlying molecular mechanism. Mice received 0.75% isoflurane exposures for 4h on postnatal days 7, 8, and 9. From the third month after anesthesia, the mice were subjected to regular swimming exercise for 4weeks, followed by a contextual fear condition (CFC) trial. We found that repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane reduced freezing behavior during CFC testing and deregulated hippocampal histone H4K12 acetylation. Conversely, mice subjected to regular swimming exercise showed enhanced hippocampal H3K9, H4K5, and H4K12 acetylation levels, increased numbers of c-Fos-positive cells 1h after CFC training, and less isoflurane-induced memory impairment. We also observed increases in histone acetylation and of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during the swimming exercise program. The results suggest that neonatal isoflurane exposure-induced memory impairment was associated with dysregulation of H4K12 acetylation, which may lead to less hippocampal activation following learning tasks. Swimming exercise was associated with enhanced hippocampal histone acetylation and CBP expression. Exercise most likely ameliorated isoflurane-induced memory impairment by enhancing hippocampal histone acetylation and activating more neuron cells during memory formation. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Orexin-A facilitates emergence of the rat from isoflurane anesthesia via mediation of the basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Na; Yang, Cen; Ouyang, Peng-Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Ran, Ming-Zi; Tong, Li; Dong, Hai-Long; Liu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that orexinergic neurons involve in promoting emergence from anesthesia of propofol, an intravenous anesthetics, while whether both of orexin-A and orexin-B have promotive action on emergence via mediation of basal forebrain (BF) in isoflurane anesthesia has not been elucidated. In this study, we observed c-Fos expressions in orexinergic neurons following isoflurane inhalation (for 0, 30, 60, and 120min) and at the time when the righting reflex returned after the cessation of anesthesia. The plasma concentrations of orexin-A and -B in anesthesia-arousal process were measured by radioimmunoassay. Orexin-A and -B (30 or 100pmol) or the orexin receptor-1 and -2 antagonist SB-334867A and TCS-OX2-29 (5 or 20μg) were microinjected into the basal forebrain respectively. The effects of them on the induction (loss of the righting reflex) and the emergence time (return of the righting reflex) under isoflurane anesthesia were observed. The results showed that the numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive orexinergic neurons in the hypothalamus decreased over time with continued isoflurane inhalation, but restored at emergence. Similar alterations were observed in changes of plasma orexin-A concentrations but not in orexin-B during emergence. Administration of orexins had no effect on the induction time, but orexin-A facilitated the emergence of rats from isoflurane anesthesia while orexin-B didn't. Conversely, microinjection of the orexin receptor-1 antagonist SB-334867A delayed emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. The results indicate that orexin-A plays a promotive role in the emergence of isoflurane anesthesia and this effect is mediated by the basal forebrain.

  11. Benefits of 21% Oxygen Compared with 100% Oxygen for Delivery of Isoflurane to Mice (Mus musculus) and Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Wilding, Laura A; Hampel, Joe A; Khoury, Basma M; Kang, Stacey; Machado-Aranda, David; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Nemzek, Jean A

    2017-03-01

    At research institutions, isoflurane delivered by precision vaporizer to a face mask is the standard for rodent surgery and for procedures with durations that exceed a few minutes. Pure oxygen is often used as the carrier gas for isoflurane anesthesia, despite documented complications from long-term 100% oxygen use in humans and known occupational safety risks. We therefore examined the effect of anesthetic delivery gas on physiologic variables in mice and rats. Rodents were anesthetized for 60 min with isoflurane delivered in either 21% or 100% oxygen by means of a nose cone. We noted no difference between carrier gasses in physiologic variables in mice, including body temperature, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, surgical recovery time, pH, or PaCO2. However, blood gas analysis revealed evidence of a ventilation-perfusion mismatch in the 100% oxygen group. Pressure-volume hysteresis and histomorphometric analyses confirmed the presence of increased atelectasis in mice that received 100% oxygen. Unlike mice, rats that received isoflurane in 100% oxygen had acute respiratory acidosis and elevated mean arterial pressure, but atelectasis was similar between carrier gasses. Our data suggest that both 100% and 21% oxygen are acceptable for the delivery of isoflurane to mice. However, mice anesthetized for studies focused on lung physiology or architecture would benefit from the delivery of isoflurane in 21% oxygen to reduce absorption atelectasis and the potential associated downstream inflammatory effects. For rats, delivery of isoflurane in 21% and 100% oxygen both caused perturbations in physiologic variables, and choosing a carrier gas is not straightforward.

  12. Benefits of 21% Oxygen Compared with 100% Oxygen for Delivery of Isoflurane to Mice (Mus musculus) and Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Laura A; Hampel, Joe A; Khoury, Basma M; Kang, Stacey; Machado‑Aranda, David; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Nemzek, Jean A

    2017-01-01

    At research institutions, isoflurane delivered by precision vaporizer to a face mask is the standard for rodent surgery and for procedures with durations that exceed a few minutes. Pure oxygen is often used as the carrier gas for isoflurane anesthesia, despite documented complications from long-term 100% oxygen use in humans and known occupational safety risks. We therefore examined the effect of anesthetic delivery gas on physiologic variables in mice and rats. Rodents were anesthetized for 60 min with isoflurane delivered in either 21% or 100% oxygen by means of a nose cone. We noted no difference between carrier gasses in physiologic variables in mice, including body temperature, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, surgical recovery time, pH, or PaCO2.However, blood gas analysis revealed evidence of a ventilation–perfusion mismatch in the 100% oxygen group. Pressure–volume hysteresis and histomorphometric analyses confirmed the presence of increased atelectasis in mice that received 100% oxygen. Unlike mice, rats that received isoflurane in 100% oxygen had acute respiratory acidosis and elevated mean arterial pressure, but atelectasis was similar between carrier gasses. Our data suggest that both 100% and 21% oxygen are acceptable for the delivery of isoflurane to mice. However, mice anesthetized for studies focused on lung physiology or architecture would benefit from the delivery of isoflurane in 21% oxygen to reduce absorption atelectasis and the potential associated downstream inflammatory effects. For rats, delivery of isoflurane in 21% and 100% oxygen both caused perturbations in physiologic variables, and choosing a carrier gas is not straightforward. PMID:28315643

  13. Repeated anaesthesia with isoflurane and xylazine/levomethadone/fenpipramide premedication in female Beagle dogs: influence on general health and wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Bert, B; Hartje, I; Voigt, J-P; Arndt, G; Ulbrich, H-F; Fink, H; Hauff, P

    2008-10-01

    Beagle dogs continue to be used in experimental studies and preclinical and clinical trials, many of which address the usage of anaesthesia. In order to reduce the number of animals, researchers tend to conduct several experiments on a single animal. The question arises, however, as to whether or not this frequent usage involves more than simply additional stress and discomfort for the individual animal. Within the framework of an existing study involving six female Beagle dogs, we investigated the effects of repeated (5) isoflurane anaesthesia with xylazine/levomethadone/fenpipramide premedication carried out at short intervals (2 weeks) and compared these with the effects of two treatments intermitted by a longer resting period (8 weeks). To verify our hypothesis that frequent anaesthesia affects the dog's wellbeing more than the occasional anaesthesia, the following parameters were measured at regular intervals: body weight, body temperature, respiratory rate, blood pressure, reflexes and heart rate, both at rest and during a treadmill exercise. In addition, recovery behaviour subsequent to anaesthesia was monitored for one hour. Our observations indicate that the anaesthetic effects are most prominent 24 h after the anaesthetic treatment. However, crossover analysis of our data cannot show that there is no statistical difference of whether dogs were anaesthetized occasionally or frequently. In our study, it appears that frequent anaesthesia within a two-week period did not affect the wellbeing and general health of Beagle dogs in a super-additive manner and that a minimum of two-week testing-free period is sufficient to ensure complete recovery from the unwanted effects induced by anaesthesia.

  14. Systemic distribution of blood flow in swine while awake and during 1.0 and 1.5 MAC isoflurane anesthesia with or without 50% nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Lundeen, G; Manohar, M; Parks, C

    1983-05-01

    To examine the effects of isoflurane on systemic distribution of cardiac output, organ/tissue blood flow was measured in 11 isocapnic pigs using 15-micrometer diameter radionuclide-labeled microspheres injected into the left atrium. Measurements were made on each pig during five of the following six conditions; awake (control); 1.0 MAC (1.45% end-tidal)isoflurane anesthesia; 1.5 MAC (2.18% end-tidal) isoflurane anesthesia; 0.95% end-tidal isoflurane and 50% N2O anesthesia equivalent to 1.0 MAC; 1.68% end-tidal isoflurane and 50% N2O anesthesia equivalent to 1.5 MAC; and 50% N2O administration. The order of anesthetized steps was randomized. A period of 60 min was interposed between anesthetized steps to allow pigs to recover towards control values. Mean aortic pressure decreased in a dose-related manner during isoflurane anesthesia, whereas cardiac output decreased only during 1.5 MAC isoflurane anesthesia and heart rate remained unchanged. The addition of N2O attenuated the hypotensive effects of isoflurane and cardiac output was maintained near control values because of increased heart rate. Brain blood flow increased in a dose-dependent manner with isoflurane anesthesia, but myocardial blood flow exhibited a dose-related decrease. The addition of 50% N2O to maintain the same total MAC anesthesia resulted in a larger increase in brain blood flow especially at 1.5 MAC, while myocardial blood flow was maintained near control value. Rate-pressure product and myocardial blood flow at 1.5 MAC anesthesia were higher when N2O was used with isoflurane. While blood flow and fraction of cardiac output going to the adrenal glands were unaltered during isoflurane-N2O anesthesia, blood flow increased at 1.5 MAC isoflurane anesthesia. Splenic blood flow and splenic fraction of cardiac output were increased at both MAC levels of isoflurane as well as isoflurane-N2O anesthesia whereas blood flow to the stomach, small intestine, diaphragm, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue

  15. The effects of age, isoflurane and sevoflurane on atracurium in lambs.

    PubMed

    Schöffmann, Gudrun; Vettorato, Enzo; Burke, John G; Gibson, Alastair J N; Clutton, Eddie R

    2012-05-01

    To determine the effects of age, sevoflurane and isoflurane on atracurium-induced neuromuscular blockade in 3-16 week-old lambs. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Twenty-six Scottish blackface ewe-lambs were anaesthetized for spinal surgery when either 3-6 (mean age 4.6 weeks; n = 18) or 12-16 weeks (mean age 13.7 weeks; n = 15) of age; seven animals were anaesthetized at both ages. After intramuscular injection of medetomidine (10 μg kg(-1)) anaesthesia was induced in the younger lambs either with isoflurane or sevoflurane in oxygen delivered by mask, and in the older lambs with ketamine (4 mg kg(-1)), and midazolam (0.2 mg kg(-1) ) administered intravenously (IV). In both groups anaesthesia was maintained with fixed end-tidal concentrations of either sevoflurane (2.8%) or isoflurane (1.8%) delivered in oxygen. Before surgery meloxicam (0.6 mg kg(-1)), morphine (0.5 mg kg(-1)) and ketamine (1 mg kg(-1) followed by 10 μg kg(-1) minute(-1) ) were administered IV. The lungs were ventilated mechanically to maintain normocapnia. Neuromuscular block was achieved with a loading dose (LD) of atracurium (0.5 mg kg(-1) IV). The peroneal nerve was stimulated (train-of-four every 12 seconds). Evoked responses in the digital extensor muscles were evaluated by palpation and observation. Maintenance doses (MD) of atracurium (0.17 mg kg(-1) IV) were administered when the first twitch (T1) returned. The onset and duration of LD action (T1 absent) and the duration of MD were recorded. Data were analysed using Student's t test, Mann-Whitney U test, repeated-measures anova, Wilcoxon's matched pairs test or Pearson correlation coefficient as relevant (p < 0.05). Onset of LD action developed significantly (p < 0.05) more rapidly in isoflurane compared with sevoflurane-anaesthetized lambs (55 ± 18 cf. 80 ± 37 seconds). Duration of action of LDs and MDs was longer (p < 0.05) in lambs aged 12-16 than 3-6 weeks (33 ± 5.4 cf. 25 ± 6.4 and 26 ± 4.2 cf. 18 ± 5.5 minutes) but

  16. Blood/Gas partition coefficients for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in a clinically relevant patient population.

    PubMed

    Esper, Tobias; Wehner, Markus; Meinecke, Claus-Dieter; Rueffert, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The blood/gas partition coefficient of a certain volatile anesthetic is of clinical importance because it determines its velocity of uptake into and elimination from the body of a patient and thus its pharmacokinetic behavior. To date, the blood/gas partition coefficients of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane have been measured in small numbers of subjects or in particular study groups, for example, healthy volunteers, patients experiencing a common kind of disease, or mothers immediately after giving birth. The objective of this study was to determine the blood/gas partition coefficients of these volatile anesthetics at 37°C in a larger clinically relevant and adult patient population. Furthermore, we tested whether age, gender, body mass index, hemoglobin concentration, or hematocrit had an influence on the coefficients. Blood samples were taken from 120 fasting operative patients with ASA physical status I to III and aged 19 to 86 years. All subjects were randomly enrolled in study groups for the separate determinations of the blood/gas partition coefficients of isoflurane (n = 41), sevoflurane (n = 41), and desflurane (n = 38) by headspace gas chromatography. To check the quality of the measurements, we determined the distilled water/gas partition coefficients of those anesthetics and compared them with previously published values. We found a blood/gas partition coefficient of 1.45 ± 0.12 (mean ± SD) for isoflurane, 0.74 ± 0.06 for sevoflurane, and 0.57 ± 0.04 for desflurane. Values of this study are 5.07%, 12.12%, and 7.55% higher for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, respectively, than the previously published mean values (all P ≤ 0.001). There were only trends for small correlations between the blood/gas partition coefficient of isoflurane and hemoglobin concentration (Pearson r = 0.32; P = 0.041) and hematocrit (r = 0.37; P = 0.016). We found no other potentially significant correlations of the partition coefficients with patient age

  17. A New Device for Alveolar Bone Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Omar; Pérez, Daniel; Páramo, Viviana; Falcón, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    We present a retrospective review of a new technique for the transportation of alveolar bone using a Hyrax device modified by the principal author (O.A.V.). There were seven patients (five males and two females), including five patients with cleft palate and lip diagnosis, one patient with a high-speed gunshot wound, and one patient with facial trauma sequel due to mandibular fracture. They were all treated with an alveolar bone transportation technique (ABT) through the use of the modified Hyrax device (VEGAX). Before surgery, distraction osteogenesis of the bifocal type was performed on four patients, and the trifocal type was performed on the other three patients. However, in one case, direct dental anchorage was not used, only orthodontic appliances. In all the cases, new bone formation and gingival tissue around the defect were obtained, posterior to the alveolar distraction process; no complications were observed in any patient. In one case, two teeth involved in the disk of the ABT were extracted, due to a previous condition of periodontal disease. The alveolar bone transport with the VEGAX device is an accessible technique for almost every patient with alveolar defects due to diverse causes. In all the presented cases, predictability and success were demonstrated. PMID:22655120

  18. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injury after Mandibular Third Molar Extraction: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to systematically review the comprehensive overview of literature data about injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction to discover the prevalence of injury, the risk factors, recovery rates, and alternative methods of treatment. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic databases. Articles from January 2009 to June 2014 were searched. English language articles with a minimum of 6 months patient follow-up and injury analysis by patient’s reporting, radiographic, and neurosensory testing were selected. Results In total, 84 literature sources were reviewed, and 14 of the most relevant articles that are suitable to the criteria were selected. Articles were analyzed on men and women. The influence of lower third molar extraction (especially impacted) on the inferior alveolar nerve was clearly seen. Conclusions The incidence of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction was about 0.35 - 8.4%. The injury of the inferior alveolar nerve can be predicted by various radiological signs. There are few risk factors that may increase the risk of injury to the nerve such as patients over the age of 24 years old, with horizontal impactions, and extraction by trainee surgeons. Recovery is preferable and permanent injury is very rare. PMID:25635208

  19. Clinicophysiological and haemodynamic effects of fentanyl with xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine in isoflurane-anaesthetised water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Singh, Gyan D; Kinjavdekar, Prakash; Amarpal; Aithal, Hari P; Pawde, Abhijeet M; Zama, Malik M S; Singh, Jasmeet; Tiwary, Ramesh

    2013-03-18

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the sedative, analgesic and clinical effects of xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine with fentanyl as pre-anaesthetics in water buffaloes and to compare the dose-sparing effect of xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine on thiopental for induction and isoflurane for maintenance of anaesthesia in water buffaloes. Six male water buffaloes randomly received intravenous fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and xylazine (0.05 mg/kg body weight), fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and medetomidine (2.5 µg/kg body weight), fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and dexmedetomidine (5.0 µg/kg body weight) at weekly intervals in groups I1, I2 and I3, respectively. After 15 min, the animals were restrained in right lateral recumbency and anaesthesia was induced by 5% thiopental sodium administered intravenously. The intubated animal was connected to the large animal anaesthesia machine and isoflurane in 100% oxygen (5 L/min) was insufflated for 60 min. The treatments were compared by clinicophysiological, haematobiochemical and haemodynamic parameters. Fentanyl-medetomidine and fentanyl-dexmedetomidine produced more cardiovascular depression during the pre-anaesthetic period but less depression of cardio-respiratory dynamics in the post induction and maintenance period. Quicker recovery was recorded in I2 and I3 groups. A lower dose of thiopental was required in group I3 (4.33 mg/kg ± 0.66 mg/kg) than in groups I2 (4.41 mg/kg ± 0.98 mg/kg) and I1 (4.83 mg/kg ± 0.79 mg/kg). The dose of isoflurane was less in group I3 (45.50 mL ± 5.45 mL) than in group I1 and I2 (48.66 mL ± 5.10 mL and 48.00 mL ± 6.38 mL). Better anaesthesia was recorded with fentanyl-dexmedetomidine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I3) than with fentanyl-medetomidine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I2) and fentanyl-xylazine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I1). Fentanyl-medetomidine and fentanyl-dexmedetomidine were better pre-anaesthetic agents in comparison to

  20. Plasma corticosterone, insulin and glucose changes induced by brief exposure to isoflurane, diethyl ether and CO2 in male rats.

    PubMed

    Zardooz, H; Rostamkhani, F; Zaringhalam, J; Faraji Shahrivar, F

    2010-01-01

    The impact of anesthetic agents on endocrine and metabolic factors is an important issue. The present study has compared the effects of a short-term exposure to diethyl ether, isoflurane, or CO2 on plasma corticosterone, insulin and glucose concentrations since the duration of anesthetic exposure may have an effect on those factors. Male rats were divided into fed and fasted groups. The experimental rats were briefly exposed to diethyl ether, isoflurane, or CO2 (the degree of anesthesia was identical), while a control group was not exposed to the anesthetics. In the fed rats, diethyl ether exposure increased the levels of plasma glucose. CO2 exposure decreased plasma corticosterone and increased plasma glucose levels. Isoflurane exposure caused no changes in plasma corticosterone, glucose, or insulin levels. In the fasted rats, diethyl ether exposure increased plasma corticosterone and reduced plasma insulin levels. The plasma corticosterone and insulin levels were significantly increased by CO2) exposure. Isoflurane exposure decreased plasma insulin levels. A brief exposure to either diethyl ether or CO2 changed the plasma corticosterone, glucose, and insulin levels in fed and/or fasted rats. However, isoflurane exposure had the least effect on the concentration of these factors in both the fed and fasted states.

  1. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  2. Prolonged duration of isoflurane anesthesia impairs spatial recognition memory through the activation of JNK1/2 in the hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Miao, Bei; Chen, Ying

    2017-02-24

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a frequent complication with surgery and anesthesia, and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Our aim was to investigate the effect of different durations of isoflurane anesthesia on spatial recognition memory and activation of JNK1/2 in the hippocampus of mice. In the present study, adult male mice were anesthetized with isoflurane for different durations (1.5% isoflurane for 1, 2, and 4 h). Spatial recognition memory was determined using spontaneous alternation and two-trial recognition memory in Y-maze at 24 h after anesthesia. The activation of JNK1/2 in the hippocampus was tested using western blot. Mice treated with isoflurane for 4 h showed significantly decreased spontaneous alternations and decreased exploration parameters compared with the no anesthesia group, but this was not observed in mice treated with isoflurane for 1 or 2 h. The protein levels of p-JNK1/2 in the hippocampus were significantly increased at 10 min after isoflurane anesthesia for 1, 2, and 4 h compared with no anesthesia. However, only isoflurane anesthesia for 4 h still increased JNK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 levels at 24 h after anesthesia. We concluded that prolonged duration of isoflurane anesthesia maintained the activation of JNK1/2, which led to memory impairment at 24 h after anesthesia.

  3. Isoflurane unveils a critical role of glutamate transporter type 3 in regulating hippocampal GluR1 trafficking and context-related learning and memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, J; Wang, Z; Mi, W; Zuo, Z

    2014-07-11

    Glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3) may play a role in cognition. Isoflurane enhances EAAT3 trafficking to the plasma membrane. Thus, we used isoflurane to determine how EAAT3 might regulate learning and memory and the trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors, such as GluR1, to the plasma membrane, a fundamental biochemical process for learning and memory. Here, isoflurane increased EAAT3 but did not change GluR1 levels in the plasma membrane of wild-type mouse hippocampus. Isoflurane increased protein phosphatase activity in the wild-type and EAAT3(-/-) mouse hippocampus. Also, isoflurane reduced GluR1 in the plasma membrane and decreased phospho-GluR1 in EAAT3(-/-) mice. The phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid attenuated these effects. Finally, isoflurane inhibited context-related fear conditioning in EAAT3(-/-) mice but not in wild-type mice. Thus, isoflurane may increase GluR1 trafficking to the plasma membrane via EAAT3 and inhibit GluR1 trafficking via protein phosphatase. Lack of EAAT3 effects leads to decreased GluR1 trafficking and impaired cognition after isoflurane exposure in EAAT3(-/-) mice.

  4. Crystal structure of isoflurane bound to integrin LFA-1 supports a unified mechanism of volatile anesthetic action in the immune and central nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongmin; Astrof, Nathan S.; Liu, Jin-Huan; Wang, Jia-huai; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2009-09-15

    Volatile anesthetics (VAs), such as isoflurane, induce a general anesthetic state by binding to specific targets (i.e., ion channels) in the central nervous system (CNS). Simultaneously, VAs modulate immune functions, possibly via direct interaction with alternative targets on leukocytes. One such target, the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), has been shown previously to be inhibited by isoflurane. A better understanding of the mechanism by which isoflurane alters protein function requires the detailed information about the drug-protein interaction at an atomic level. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the LFA-1 ligand-binding domain (I domain) in complex with isoflurane at 1.6 {angstrom}. We discovered that isoflurane binds to an allosteric cavity previously implicated as critical for the transition of LFA-1 from the low- to the high-affinity state. The isoflurane binding site in the I domain involves an array of amphiphilic interactions, thereby resembling a 'common anesthetic binding motif' previously predicted for authentic VA binding sites. These results suggest that the allosteric modulation of protein function by isoflurane, as demonstrated for the integrin LFA-1, might represent a unified mechanism shared by the interactions of volatile anesthetics with targets in the CNS. Crystal structure of isoflurane bound to integrin LFA-1 supports a unified mechanism of volatile anesthetic action in the immune and central nervous systems.

  5. 2011 Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video shows Arctic sea ice from March 7, 2011, to Sept. 9, 2011, ending with a comparison of the 30-year average minimum extent, shown in yellow, and the Northwest Passage, in red. (no audio) ...

  6. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  7. Increased alveolar plasminogen activator in early asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, A.; Allard, C.; Begin, R.

    1989-03-01

    Alveolar macrophage-derived plasminogen activator (PA) activity is decreased in some chronic interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis but increased in experimental models of acute alveolitis. Although asbestos fibers can stimulate alveolar macrophages (AM) to release PA in vitro, the effect of chronic asbestos exposure of the lower respiratory tract on lung PA activity remains unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate PA activity of alveolar macrophages and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in asbestos-exposed sheep and asbestos workers. Forty-three sheep were exposed to either 100 mg UICC chrysotile B asbestos in 100 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or to 100 ml PBS by tracheal infusion every 2 wk for 18 months. At Month 18, chest roentgenograms were analyzed and alveolar macrophage and extracellular fluid PA activity were measured in samples obtained by BAL. Alveolar macrophage PA activity was increased in the asbestos-exposed sheep compared to control sheep (87.2 +/- 17.3 versus 41.1 +/- 7.2 U/10(5) AM-24 h, p less than 0.05) as was the BAL fluid PA activity (674.9 +/- 168.4 versus 81.3 +/- 19.7 U/mg alb-24 h, p less than 0.01). Among the asbestos-exposed sheep, 10 had normal chest roentgenograms (Group SA) and 15 had irregular interstitial opacities (Group SB). Strikingly, whereas Group SA did not differ from the control group in BAL cellularity or PA activity, Group SB had marked increases in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.005), AM PA activity (p less than 0.02), and BAL PA activity (p less than 0.001) compared to the control group.

  8. Bone graft healing in alveolar osteoplasty in patients with unilateral lip, alveolar process, and palate clefts.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Dariusz; Wójcicki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Secondary osteoplasty by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting is the most common procedure used in the reconstruction of the continuity of the maxillary alveolar process. The aim of the study was to analyze retrospectively the effect of certain factors on the course of the bone graft healing process in patients with unilateral complete clefts of the lip, alveolar process, and palate. The investigations involved 62 children aged 8 to 14 years (mean age, 11 years) with unilateral complete cleft of the lip, alveolar process, and palate operated on at the Clinic of Plastic Surgery in Polanica Zdrój from November 2007 to April 2009. All the procedures consisted in the reconstruction of the maxillary alveolar process by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting from the iliac bone. The analysis was performed on the basis of computed tomography scans presenting maxillary alveolar processes in the horizontal cross-sectional planes performed on the second or third postoperative day and after 6 months. They were used as the basis for the measurement of the volume and density (condensation) of the bone graft, the surface of its adhesion to the maxillary alveolar bone, and the volume and density of the healed bone. The following correlation coefficients were determined: between the adhesion surface of the bone to the alveolar bone and the volume of the healed bone, between the adhesion surface of the bone to the alveolar bone and the density of the healed bone, and between the density of the graft and the volume of the healed bone. Increasing the surface of the graft adhesion to the bone ridges of the alveolar cleft contributes to increased volume of the healed bone and slows down the increase in its density (on 6-month follow-up). Crushing of the bone graft increases its resorption and reduces volume of the healed bone.

  9. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  10. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  11. Isoflurane and the pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relation at baseline and during sympathetic alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor activation in chronically instrumented dogs.

    PubMed

    Lennon, P F; Murray, P A

    1995-03-01

    The extent to which isoflurane anesthesia alters systemic vascular regulation has received considerable attention. In contrast, the pulmonary vascular effects of isoflurane have not been elucidated. Our initial objective was to investigate the net effect of isoflurane on the baseline left pulmonary vascular pressure-flow (LPQ) relation compared with values measured in the conscious state. In addition, we assessed the extent to which isoflurane alters the pulmonary vascular responses to sympathetic alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor activation. Twelve conditioned mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented to measure the LPQ relation. LPQ plots were generated by continuously measuring the pulmonary vascular pressure gradient (pulmonary arterial pressure--left atrial pressure) and left pulmonary blood flow during gradual (approximately 1 min) inflation of a hydraulic occluder implanted around the right main pulmonary artery. LPQ plots were generated at baseline in the conscious and isoflurane-anesthetized states (n = 12). The pulmonary vascular dose-response relation to the sympathetic alpha-adrenoreceptor agonist phenylephrine also was investigated in conscious and isoflurane-anesthetized dogs (n = 6). Finally, after preconstriction with the thromboxane analogue U46619, the dose-response relation to the sympathetic beta-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol was assessed in the conscious and isoflurane-anesthetized states (n = 8). Compared with values measured in the conscious state, isoflurane anesthesia had no net effect on the baseline LPQ relation. The magnitude of the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine observed in conscious dogs was not altered during isoflurane anesthesia. In contrast, the pulmonary vasodilator response to isoproterenol was markedly potentiated (P < 0.01) during isoflurane anesthesia compared with that in the conscious state. These results indicate that isoflurane does not exert a net vasodilator influence on the pulmonary

  12. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: review of Turkish reports.

    PubMed Central

    Ucan, E S; Keyf, A I; Aydilek, R; Yalcin, Z; Sebit, S; Kudu, M; Ok, U

    1993-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare disorder, only 173 cases having been reported worldwide. Fifty two cases from Turkey are reported, 49 of which have previously been described only in Turkish publications. The mean age of the patients was 27 (SD 12) years, 34 were male, and 10 were symptomless. In 40 of the 52 cases diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically. Nineteen cases were diagnosed in siblings. This high rate suggests that pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a familial disease, which, though rare, is for unknown reasons most common in Turkey. Images PMID:8493634

  13. Idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with diffuse alveolar damage.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-S; Chen, T-L; Tzen, C-Y; Lin, F-J; Peng, M-J; Wu, C-L; Chen, P-J

    2002-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with myositis is defined by the presence of interstitial changes on radiographic examination. The reported prevalence of ILD varies from 0% to nearly 50%. However, only rarely has the pathological pattern of diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) associated with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) been reported. We report five patients with IIM (one with dermatomyositis, one with polymyositis, and three with amyopathic dermatomyositis) and respiratory failure. Four underwent open lung biopsy with pathological proof of diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Despite intensive immunosuppressive therapy, all of them died. In addition to the case reports, we discuss DAD in patients with IIM.

  14. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, M. Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Patel, Vipul J.; Walia, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  15. Evidence for the Use of Isoflurane as a Replacement for Chloral Hydrate Anesthesia in Experimental Stroke: An Ethical Issue

    PubMed Central

    Maud, Pétrault; Thavarak, Ouk; Cédrick, Lachaud; Michèle, Bastide; Vincent, Bérézowski; Olivier, Pétrault; Régis, Bordet

    2014-01-01

    Since an ethical issue has been raised regarding the use of the well-known anesthetic agent chloral hydrate, owing to its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in animals, attention of neuroscientists has turned to finding out an alternative agent able to meet not only potency, safety, and analgesic efficacy, but also reduced neuroprotective effect for stroke research. The aim of this study was to compare the potential of chloral hydrate and isoflurane for both modulating the action of the experimental neuroprotectant MK801 and exerting analgesia. After middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, no difference was observed in 24 h survival rate, success of ischemia, or infarct volume reduction between both anesthetics. However, isoflurane exerted a more pronounced analgesic effect than chloral hydrate as evidenced by formalin test 3 hours after anesthesia onset, thus encouraging the use of isoflurane in experimental stroke models. PMID:24719888

  16. Taurine Pretreatment Prevents Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Impairment by Inhibiting ER Stress-Mediated Activation of Apoptosis Pathways in the Hippocampus in Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Li, Dongliang; Li, Haiou; Hou, Dailiang; Hou, Jingdong

    2016-10-01

    Isoflurane, a commonly used inhalation anesthetic, may induce neurocognitive deficits, especially in elderly patients after surgery. Recent study demonstrated that isoflurane caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and subsequent neuronal apoptosis in the brain, contributing to cognitive deficits. Taurine, a major intracellular free amino acid, has been shown to inhibit ER stress and neuronal apoptosis in several neurological disorders. Here, we examined whether taurine can prevent isoflurane-induced ER stress and cognitive impairment in aged rats. Thirty minutes prior to a 4-h 1.3 % isoflurane exposure, aged rats were treated with vehicle or taurine at low, middle and high doses. Aged rats without any treatment served as control. The brains were harvested 6 h after isoflurane exposure for molecular measurements, and behavioral study was performed 2 weeks later. Compared with control, isoflurane increased expression of hippocampal ER stress biomarkers including glucose-regulated protein 78, phosphorylated (P-) inositol-requiring enzyme 1, P-eukaryotic initiation factor 2-α (EIF2α), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4), cleaved ATF-6 and C/EBP homologous protein, along with activation of apoptosis pathways as indicated by decreased B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2)/BCL2-associated X protein, increased expressions of cytochrome-c and cleaved caspase-3. Taurine pretreatment dose-dependently inhibited isoflurane-induced increase in expression of ER stress biomarkers except for P-EIF2α and ATF-4, and reversed isoflurane-induced changes in apoptosis-related proteins. Moreover, isoflurane caused spatial working memory deficits in aged rats, which were prevented by taurine pretreatment. The results indicate that taurine pretreatment prevents anesthetic isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment by inhibiting ER stress-mediated activation of apoptosis pathways in the hippocampus in aged rats.

  17. Isoflurane anesthesia promotes cognitive impairment by inducing expression of β-amyloid protein-related factors in the hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Hu, Xueyuan; Guan, Wei; Luan, Li; Li, Bei; Tang, Qichao; Fan, Honggang

    2017-01-01

    Isoflurane anesthesia has been shown to be responsible for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and development of AD in the older age groups. However, the pathogenesis of AD-related cognitive impairments induced by isoflurane anesthesia remains elusive. Thus, this study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which isoflurane anesthesia caused AD-related cognitive impairments. Aged Wistar rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 12), 1 control group (CONT) and 5 isoflurane treated (ISO) groups (ISO 0, ISO 0.5D, ISO 1D, ISO 3D and ISO 7D). The CONT group inhaled 30% O2 for 2 h without any anesthesia. ISO groups were placed under anesthesia with 3% isoflurane and then exposed to 1.5% isoflurane delivered in 30% O2 for 2 h. Rats in each ISO group were then analyzed immediately (ISO 0) or at various time points (0.5, 1, 3 or 7 day) after this exposure. Cognitive function was assessed using the Morris water maze test. Protein levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-site APP cleavage enzyme-1 (BACE-1) and Aβ42 peptide were analyzed in hippocampal samples by Western blot. β-Amyloid (Abeta) plaques were detected in hippocampal sections by Congo red staining. Compared with controls, all ISO groups showed increased escape latency and impaired spatial memory. Isoflurane increased APP mRNA expression and APP protein depletion, promoting Aβ42 overproduction, oligomerization and accumulation. However, isoflurane did not affect BACE-1 expression. Abeta plaques were observed only in those ISO groups sacrificed at 3 or 7 d. Our data indicate that aged rats exposed to isoflurane had increased APP mRNA expression and APP protein depletion, with Aβ42 peptide overproduction and oligomerization, resulting in formation of Abeta plaques in the hippocampus. Such effects might have contributed to cognitive impairments, including in spatial memory, observed in these rats after isoflurane anesthesia.

  18. Physiological alteration, quality of anesthesia and economy of isoflurane in domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Deori, Parag; Sarma, Kushal Konwar; Nath, Parsha Jyoti; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Nath, Rita

    2017-05-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of isoflurane anesthesia on physiological parameters, assessment of anesthetic qualities, and economy of use of isoflurane in domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus). In this study, 18 apparently healthy adult domestic chickens were selected randomly and divided into three groups. The birds were anesthetized by masked induction with isoflurane at a dose rate of 3.5%, 4%, and 5% and were maintained with 1.5%, 2%, and 2.5% isoflurane with oxygen by endotracheal intubation in Groups I, II, and III, respectively. Physiological parameters, viz., cloacal temperature, heart rate, and respiration rate were recorded at 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min. The quality of anesthesia was assessed on the basis of induction time, induction behavior, quality of sedation, production of analgesia, degree of muscle relaxation, palpebral reflex, recovery time, and recovery behavior. The economy of anesthesia was calculated in terms of quantity of isoflurane utilized during 60 min of study. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance, Duncan's multiple range tests. There was significant decrease (p<0.01) in physiological parameters such as in cloacal temperature, heart rate and respiration rate in the birds of all the groups from 0 to 60 min. The induction time was 5.83±0.33, 2.37±0.18, and 0.87±0.15 min, respectively, in Groups I, II, and III. Induction behavior was smooth in Group III, whereas mildly stormy in Group II and I. Quality of sedation was excellent in Group III, better in Group II as compared to Group I. Analgesia was moderate in Group III whereas poor in Group II and I. Degree of muscle relaxation was excellent in Group III, whereas good in Group I and II. Palpebral reflexes were absent in all the groups. Recovery time was 15.33±0.84, 18.83±0.94, and 26.50±0.85 in Groups I, II, and III respectively. Recovery behavior was smooth in birds of all the groups. The cost of the anesthesia was 158.22±1.04, 194.27

  19. Cardiopulmonary effects of administration of a combination solution of xylazine, guaifenesin, and ketamine or inhaled isoflurane in mechanically ventilated calves.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Carolyn L; Windeyer, Claire; Bouré, Ludovic P; Mirakhur, Kuldip K; McDonell, Wayne

    2007-12-01

    To compare the cardiopulmonary effects of administration of a solution of xylazine, guaifenesin, and ketamine (XGK) or inhaled isoflurane in mechanically ventilated calves undergoing surgery. 13 male calves 2 to 26 days of age. Procedures-In calves in the XGK group, anesthesia was induced (0.5 mL/kg) and maintained (2.5 mL/kg/h) with a combination solution of xylazine (0.1 mg/mL), guaifenesin (50 mg/mL), and ketamine (1.0 mg/mL). For calves in the isoflurane group, anesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. The rates of XGK infusion and isoflurane administration were adjusted to achieve suitable anesthetic depth. All calves received 100% oxygen and were mechanically ventilated to maintain end-tidal carbon dioxide concentrations from 35 to 40 mm Hg and underwent laparoscopic bladder surgery through an abdominal approach. Cardiopulmonary variables were measured before induction and at intervals up to 90 minutes after anesthetic induction. The quality of induction was excellent in all calves. The XGK requirements were 0.57 +/- 0.18 mL/kg and 2.70 +/- 0.40 mL/kg/h to induce and maintain anesthesia, respectively. Heart rate was significantly lower than baseline throughout the anesthetic period in the XGK group. Systolic arterial blood pressure was significantly higher in the XGK group, compared with the isoflurane group, from 5 to 90 minutes. Cardiac index was lower than baseline in both groups. Differences between groups in cardiac index and arterial blood gas values were not significant. Administration of XGK resulted in excellent anesthetic induction and maintenance with cardiopulmonary alterations similar to those associated with isoflurane in mechanically ventilated calves.

  20. Dose-dependent effects of the clinical anesthetic isoflurane on Octopus vulgaris: a contribution to cephalopod welfare.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Winlow, William; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in animal welfare legislation relating to invertebrates has provoked interest in methods for the anesthesia of cephalopods, for which different approaches to anesthesia have been tried but in most cases without truly anesthetizing the animals. For example, several workers have used muscle relaxants or hypothermia as forms of "anesthesia." Several inhalational anesthetics are known to act in a dose-dependent manner on the great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, a pulmonate mollusk. Here we report, for the first time, on the effects of clinical doses of the well-known inhalational clinical anesthetic isoflurane on the behavioral responses of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris. In each experiment, isoflurane was equilibrated into a well-aerated seawater bath containing a single adult O. vulgaris. Using a web camera, we recorded each animal's response to touch stimuli eliciting withdrawal of the arms and siphon and observed changes in the respiratory rate and the chromatophore pattern over time (before, during, and after application of the anesthetic). We found that different animals of the same size responded with similar behavioral changes as the isoflurane concentration was gradually increased. After gradual application of 2% isoflurane for a maximum of 5 min (at which time all the responses indicated deep anesthesia), the animals recovered within 45-60 min in fresh aerated seawater. Based on previous findings in gastropods, we believe that the process of anesthesia induced by isoflurane is similar to that previously observed in Lymnaea. In this study we showed that isoflurane is a good, reversible anesthetic for O. vulgaris, and we developed a method for its use.

  1. Isoflurane-induced inactivation of CREB through histone deacetylase 4 is responsible for cognitive impairment in developing brain.

    PubMed

    Sen, Tanusree; Sen, Nilkantha

    2016-12-01

    Anesthetics including isoflurane are known to induce neuronal dysfunction in the developing brain, however, the underlying mechanism is mostly unknown. The transcriptional activation of CREB (cyclic AMP response element binding protein) and the alterations in acetylation of histones modulated by several histone deacetylases such as HDAC4 (histone deacetylase 4) are known to contribute to synaptic plasticity in the brain. Here we have shown that administration of isoflurane (1.4%) for 2h leads to transcriptional inactivation of CREB which results in loss of dendritic outgrowth and decreased expression level of proteins essential for memory and cognitive functions, such as BDNF, and c-fos in the developing brain of mice at postnatal day 7 (PND7). To elucidate the molecular mechanism, we found that exposure to isoflurane leads to an increase in nuclear translocation of HDAC4, which interacts with CREB in the nucleus. This event, in turn, results in a decrease in interaction between an acetyltransferase, CBP, and CREB that ultimately leads to transcriptional inactivation of CREB. As a result, the expression level of BDNF, and c-fos were significantly down-regulated after administration of isoflurane in PND7 brain. Depletion of HDAC4 in PND7 brain rescues the transcriptional activation of CREB along with augmentation in the level of the expression level of BDNF and c-fos. Moreover, administration of lentiviral particles of HDAC4 RNAi in primary neurons rescues neurite outgrowth following isoflurane treatment. Taken together, our study suggests that HDAC4-induced transcriptional inactivation of CREB is responsible for isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction in the brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of propofol, sevoflurane, and isoflurane on postoperative cognitive dysfunction following laparoscopic cholecystectomy in elderly patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ying-Jie; Wu, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2017-05-01

    To compare the incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in elderly surgical patients (>60years) receiving different anesthetics (propofol, sevoflurane, or isoflurane) and to identify potential biomarkers of POCD in this patient population. Prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. University-affiliated teaching hospital. One hundred and fifty elderly patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned to receive propofol, sevoflurane, or isoflurane anesthesia. Cognitive function was assessed using neuropsychological tests at baseline (1day before surgery [D0]), and on postoperative day 1 (D1) and day 3 (D3). Plasma S-100β and Aβ1-40 protein, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were assessed before induction of anesthesia (T0), after extubation (T1), and 1h (T2) and 24h (T3) postoperatively. The incidence of POCD was significantly lower in the propofol group compared to the isoflurane group and the sevoflurane group at D1 and D3 (propofol vs. isoflurane: D1 and D3, P<0.001; propofol vs. sevoflurane: D1, P=0.012; D3, P=0.013). The incidence of POCD was significantly lower in the sevoflurane group compared to the isoflurane group at D1 (P=0.041), but not at D3. Postoperatively, plasma S-100β and Aβ1-40 protein, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations were significantly decreased in the propofol group compared to the isoflurane group. Propofol anesthesia may be an option for elderly surgical patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiovascular tolerance of intravenous bupivacaine in broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) anesthetized with isoflurane.

    PubMed

    DiGeronimo, Peter M; da Cunha, Anderson F; Pypendop, Bruno; Brandão, João; Stout, Rhett; Rinaldi, Max; Tully, Thomas N

    2017-03-01

    To determine the median effective dose (ED50) of intravenous (IV) bupivacaine associated with a 50% probability of causing clinically relevant cardiovascular effects [defined as 30% change in heart rate (HR) or mean arterial pressure (MAP)] in chickens anesthetized with isoflurane. Randomized up-and-down study. A total of 14 Ross-708 broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) weighing 1.70-2.75 kg. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane. Monitoring included the electrocardiogram and invasive arterial pressures. Chickens were administered bupivacaine IV over 2 minutes using a dose based on the response of the previous animal. Dose was decreased when HR and/or MAP in the previous animal increased or decreased ≥30% after bupivacaine administration, or increased when HR or MAP changed <30%. The ED50 was defined as the dose resulting in ≥30% variation in HR or MAP in 50% of the population studied. The IV ED50 of bupivacaine was 1.94 mg kg(-1) using Dixon's up-and-down method and 1.96 mg kg(-1) by logistic regression. These results suggest that 1.33 and 1.96 mg kg(-1) of IV bupivacaine are associated with a respective 1 or 50% probability of a clinically significant change in MAP in isoflurane-anesthetized chickens. Identification of the cardiovascular changes associated with different doses of bupivacaine can be used as the basis for studies of therapeutic applications in the domestic chicken. Further studies are required to determine interspecies variation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Labour time required for piglet castration with isoflurane-anaesthesia using shared and stationary inhaler devices.

    PubMed

    Weber, Sabrina; Das, Gürbüz; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Gauly, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Isoflurane-anaesthesia combined with an analgesic represents a welfare-friendly method of pain mitigation for castration of piglets. However, it requires an inhaler device, which is uneconomic for small farms. Sharing a device among farms may be an economical option if the shared use does not increase labour time and the resulting costs. This study aimed to investigate the amount and components of labour time required for piglet castration with isoflurane anaesthesia performed with stationary and shared devices. Piglets (N = 1579) were anaesthetised with isoflurane (using either stationary or shared devices) and castrated.The stationary devices were used in a group (n = 5) of larger farms (84 sows/farm on an average), whereas smaller farms (n = 7; 32 sows/farm on an average) shared one device. Each farm was visited four times and labour time for each process-step was recorded. The complete process included machine set-up, anaesthesia and castration by a practitioner, and preparation, collection and transport of piglets by a farmer. Labour time of the complete process was increased (P = 0.012) on farms sharing a device (266 s/piglet) compared to farms using stationary devices (177 s/ piglet), due to increased time for preparation (P = 0.055), castration (P = 0.026) and packing (P = 0.010) when sharing a device. However, components of the time budget of farms using stationary or shared devices did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Cost arising from time spent by farmers did not differ considerably between the use of stationary (0.28 Euro per piglet) and shared (0.26 Euro) devices. It is concluded that costs arising from the increased labour time due to sharing a device can be considered marginal, since the high expenses originating from purchasing an inhaler device are shared among several farms.

  5. The effect of isoflurane anesthesia on the electroencephalogram assessed by harmonic wavelet bicoherence-based indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duan; Li, Xiaoli; Hagihira, Satoshi; Sleigh, Jamie W.

    2011-10-01

    Bicoherence quantifies the degree of quadratic phase coupling among different frequency components within a signal. Previous studies, using Fourier-based methods of bicoherence calculation (FBIC), have demonstrated that electroencephalographic bicoherence can be related to the end-tidal concentration of inhaled anesthetic drugs. However, FBIC methods require excessively long sections of the encephalogram. This problem might be overcome by the use of wavelet-based methods. In this study, we compare FBIC and a recently developed wavelet bicoherence (WBIC) method as a tool to quantify the effect of isoflurane on the electroencephalogram. We analyzed a set of previously published electroencephalographic data, obtained from 29 patients who underwent elective abdominal surgery under isoflurane general anesthesia combined with epidural anesthesia. Nine potential indices of the electroencephalographic anesthetic effect were obtained from the WBIC and FBIC techniques. The relationship between each index and end-tidal concentrations of isoflurane was evaluated using correlation coefficients (r), the inter-individual variations (CV) of index values, the coefficient of determination (R2) of the PKPD models and the prediction probability (PK). The WBIC-based indices tracked anesthetic effects better than the traditional FBIC-based ones. The DiagBic_En index (derived from the Shannon entropy of the diagonal bicoherence values) performed best [r = 0.79 (0.66-0.92), CV = 0.08 (0.05-0.12), R2 = 0.80 (0.75-0.85), PK = 0.79 (0.75-0.83)]. Short data segments of ~10-30 s were sufficient to reliably calculate the indices of WBIC. The wavelet-based bicoherence has advantages over the traditional Fourier-based bicoherence in analyzing volatile anesthetic effects on the electroencephalogram.

  6. Effects of dopamine and dobutamine on isoflurane-induced hypotension in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    PubMed

    Schnellbacher, Rodney W; da Cunha, Anderson F; Beaufrère, Hugues; Queiroz, Patricia; Nevarez, Javier G; Tully, Thomas N

    2012-07-01

    To assess the effects of dopamine and dobutamine on the blood pressure of isoflurane-anesthetized Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis). 8 Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. A randomized crossover study was conducted. Each bird was anesthetized (anesthesia maintained by administration of 2.5% isoflurane in oxygen) and received 3 doses of each drug during a treatment period of 20 min/dose. Treatments were constant rate infusions (CRIs) of dobutamine (5, 10, and 15 μg/kg/min) and dopamine (5, 7, and 10 μg/kg/min). Direct systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure measurements, heart rate, esophageal temperature, and end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2) were recorded throughout the treatment periods. Mean ± SD of the systolic, mean, and diastolic arterial blood pressures at time 0 (initiation of a CRI) were 132.9 ± 22.1 mm Hg, 116.9 ± 20.5 mm Hg, and 101.9 ± 22.0 mm Hg, respectively. Dopamine resulted in significantly higher values than did dobutamine for the measured variables, except for end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2). Post hoc multiple comparisons revealed that the changes in arterial blood pressure were significantly different 4 to 7 minutes after initiation of a CRI. Overall, dopamine at rates of 7 and 10 μg/kg/min and dobutamine at a rate of 15 μg/kg/min caused the greatest increases in arterial blood pressure. Dobutamine CRI at 5, 10, and 15 μg/kg/min and dopamine CRI at 5, 7, and 10 μg/kg/min may be useful in correcting severe hypotension in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots caused by anesthesia maintained with 2.5% isoflurane.

  7. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Pulmonary sarcoidosis with an alveolar radiographic pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Battesti, J P; Saumon, G; Valeyre, D; Amouroux, J; Pechnick, B; Sandron, D; Georges, R

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-three cases of sarcoidosis (4.4% of 746 patients) showed an alveolar radiological pattern. A study of pulmonary function was carried out in 25 patients and compared with that of 46 patients with the interstitial radiological type of sarcoidosis. Twenty-two cases have been followed up from one to six years after the initial examination. The radiographic lesions were most often bilateral and included nodules greater than 15 mm with ill-defined margins or diffuse, infiltrative, non-retractile opacities with fluffy margins. Bilateral mediastinal lymph nodes were present in 27 patients. In 20 patients an associated reticulation was found on radiography. In four patients an open lung biopsy was done. The granulomatous nodules were identical to those found in other forms of sarcoidosis, although they were more confluent in the affected areas. Clinical and functional findings did not differ from those in the more common forms of sarcoidosis. Alveolar sarcoidosis has a sudden course. The alveolar radiological patterns always disappeared, with or without steroid treatment, while reticular patterns persisted in four patients. Rapid radiological changes were observed. Some functional abnormalities persisted in cases that were followed. It is concluded that alveolar sarcoidosis is a distinct acute form of sarcoidosis. Images PMID:7135279

  9. Tirofiban-Induced Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jincheng; Xu, Min; Xi, Yutao

    2012-01-01

    Platelets play an important role in the development of acute coronary syndromes. Evidence indicates that platelet-inhibiting drugs, such as glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, can be beneficial when they are administered at the time of primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. However, an associated increase in the risk of bleeding is well documented. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a rare but life-threatening and underdiagnosed complication of therapy with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage can easily be mistaken for acute pulmonary edema, a condition commonly seen in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Physicians need to be aware of this diagnostic dilemma, because early treatment increases the chance that the patients will survive. Herein, we report the fatal outcome of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a 73-year-old man who presented with acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and was treated with tirofiban in conjunction with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. In addition, we review the medical literature pertaining to the sequelae of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor therapy in the presence of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. PMID:22412240

  10. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  11. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  12. Alveolar mechanics using realistic acinar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Haribalan; Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate modeling of the mechanics in terminal airspaces of the lung is desirable for study of particle transport and pathology. The flow in the acinar region is traditionally studied by employing prescribed boundary conditions to represent rhythmic breathing and volumetric expansion. Conventional models utilize simplified spherical or polygonal units to represent the alveolar duct and sac. Accurate prediction of flow and transport characteristics may require geometries reconstructed from CT-based images and serve to understand the importance of physiologically realistic representation of the acinus. In this effort, we present a stabilized finite element framework, supplemented with appropriate boundary conditions at the alveolar mouth and septal borders for simulation of the alveolar mechanics and the resulting airflow. Results of material advection based on Lagrangian tracking are presented to complete the study of transport and compare the results with simplified acinar models. The current formulation provides improved understanding and realization of a dynamic framework for parenchymal mechanics with incorporation of alveolar pressure and traction stresses.

  13. Isoflurane to prolong medetomidine/ ketamine anaesthesia in six adult female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Adams, W A; Robinson, K J; Jones, R S; Sanderson, S

    2003-01-04

    Six adult female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) were anaesthetised for the placement of intrauterine contraceptive devices, microchips for identification, routine blood sampling, and physical measurements. Anaesthesia was induced with medetomidine in combination with ketamine administered by intramuscular injection with a projectile syringe. Induction was smooth and rapid, but five of the animals were insufficiently relaxed for orotracheal intubation. The plane of anaesthesia was deepened by administering isoflurane delivered in oxygen and nitrous oxide, and general anaesthesia was maintained for up to 74 minutes. The action of medetomidine was reversed at the end of each procedure with atipamezole, and the animals recovered smoothly and uneventfully.

  14. Effects of acepromazine or dexmedetomidine on fentanyl disposition in dogs during recovery from isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Keating, Stephanie; Kerr, Carolyn; McDonell, Wayne; Valverde, Alexander; Johnson, Ron; Knych, Heather; Edginton, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To describe fentanyl pharmacokinetics during isoflurane anesthesia and on recovery from anesthesia with concurrent administration of acepromazine, dexmedetomidine or saline in dogs. Experimental blinded, randomized, crossover study. Seven adult hound dogs. Dogs were administered intravenous (IV) fentanyl as a bolus (5 μg kg(-1)) followed by an infusion (5 μg kg(-1) hour(-1)) for 120 minutes during isoflurane anesthesia and emergence from anesthesia, and for 60 minutes after extubation during recovery from anesthesia. At the time of extubation, dexmedetomidine (2.5 μg kg(-1)), acepromazine (0.05 mg kg(-1)) or saline were administered IV. Venous blood was sampled during the maintenance and recovery periods. Fentanyl plasma concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations were 1.6-4.5 ng mL(-1) during isoflurane anesthesia and 1.6-2.0 ng mL(-1) during recovery from anesthesia. Recovery from isoflurane anesthesia without sedation was associated with an increase in the volume of the central compartment from 0.80 to 1.02 L kg(-1). After administration of acepromazine, systemic clearance of fentanyl increased from 31.5 to 40.3 mL minute(-1) kg(-1) and the volume of the central compartment increased from 0.70 to 0.94 L kg(-1). Administration of dexmedetomidine did not significantly change fentanyl pharmacokinetics. Inter-individual variability for fentanyl parameter estimates in all treatments ranged from 2.2% to 54.5%, and residual error ranged from 6.3% to 13.4%. The dose rates of fentanyl used in this study achieved previously established analgesic plasma concentrations for the duration of the infusion. Despite alterations in fentanyl pharmacokinetics, differences in fentanyl plasma concentrations among treatments during recovery from anesthesia were small and were unlikely to be of clinical significance. © 2015 Association of

  15. The cardiopulmonary effects of dexmedetomidine infusions in dogs during isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    To determine the cardiopulmonary changes associated with intravenous (IV) infusions of dexmedetomidine at equipotent isoflurane-dexmedetomidine concentrations compared with isoflurane alone. Prospective, randomized, crossover experiment. Six adult intact female mixed-breed dogs weighing (mean ± SD [range]) 23.3 ± 3.8 (17.8-29.4) kg. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Measurements of respiratory rate (fR), heart rate (HR), systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures (SAP, DAP, MAP, MPAP), central venous pressure (CVP), pulmonary arterial occlusion pressure (PAOP), cardiac index (CI), left and right ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI, RVSWI), systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance index (SVRI, PVRI), arteriovenous shunt (Q˙s/Q˙t), oxygen delivery (D˙O2), oxygen extraction ratio (O2 ER), oxygen consumption, arterial and mixed venous blood gases, and arterial packed cell volume (PCV) were obtained 30 minutes after instrumentation at an end-tidal isoflurane concentration (Fe'Iso) of 1.73 ± 0.02% (1.3 MAC). Dexmedetomidine was administered IV at 0.5 or 3 μg kg(-1) over 6 minutes followed by an infusion at 0.5 (LD) or 3 μg kg(-1) hour(-1) (HD), respectively, with Fe'Iso at 1.41 ± 0.02 (LD) or 0.72 ± 0.09% (HD). Measurements were taken at 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 minutes after the start of the infusion. The low dose produced significant decreases in HR, increases in SAP, DAP, CVP, MPAP, PAOP and LVSWI, but no change in CI. HD produced significant increases in SAP, MAP, DAP, CVP, PAOP, SVRI, LVSWI, O2 ER and PCV and significant decreases in CI and D˙O2. There were significant differences between treatments in HR, MAP, DAP, CVP, MPAP, PAOP, CI, SVRI, HCO3-, SBE, D˙O2, O2 ER and Q˙s/Q˙t. Cardiopulmonary changes associated with LD were within clinically accepted normal ranges whereas HD produced clinically significant changes. The LD may be useful as an anesthetic adjunct in healthy dogs. © 2014 Association of Veterinary

  16. Record Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Arctic sea ice reached a record low in September 2007, below the previous record set in 2005 and substantially below the long-term average. This image shows the Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, 2007. In this image, blue indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice concentration, and turquoise indicates loosely packed sea ice. The black circle at the North Pole results from an absence of data as the satellite does not make observations that far north. Three contour lines appear on this image. The red line is the 2007 minimum, as of September 15, about the same time the record low was reached, and it almost exactly fits the sea ice observed by AMSR-E. The green line indicates the 2005 minimum, the previous record low. The yellow line indicates the median minimum from 1979 to 2000.

  17. Record Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Arctic sea ice reached a record low in September 2007, below the previous record set in 2005 and substantially below the long-term average. This image shows the Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, 2007. In this image, blue indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice concentration, and turquoise indicates loosely packed sea ice. The black circle at the North Pole results from an absence of data as the satellite does not make observations that far north. Three contour lines appear on this image. The red line is the 2007 minimum, as of September 15, about the same time the record low was reached, and it almost exactly fits the sea ice observed by AMSR-E. The green line indicates the 2005 minimum, the previous record low. The yellow line indicates the median minimum from 1979 to 2000.

  18. Alveolar Bone Fracture: Pathognomonic Sign for Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Peled, Eli; Norman, Doron; Lin, Shaul

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Dental injuries, especially luxation and avulsion, are common. Dental trauma can cause alveolar bone fracture that can lead to tooth loss and malocclusion. Single tooth alveolar bone fractures are difficult to identify unless it protrudes through the overlying mucosa and can be visualized. Pain, malocclusion, and tooth mobility provide signs of suspected alveolar bone fractures. Integrity of the proximate alveolar bone should be examined for fractures where avulsion, luxation, or other tooth trauma is detected. Any suggestion of alveolar fractures should be further investigated with an appropriate radiograph. Summary: This case report shows a pathognomonic sign that detects and diagnosis single tooth alveolar bone fractures, i.e., a localized hematoma crossing the attached gingiva from the free gingival margin to the vestibular mucosa. This should serve as a warning for localized alveolar bone fracture. A visualized hematoma and gentle, careful palpation may help detect covered fractures when the overlying mucosa is not perforated. PMID:28400864

  19. Minimum Critical Values Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.

    2005-07-11

    This report provides minimum critical values for various 30-cm water-reflected uranium and plutonium oxide and nitrate aqueous mixtures as calculated by the SCALE CSAS1X sequence using the 238-group ENDF/B-V neutron cross-section library. The minimum values were determined through parametric searches in one-dimensional geometry. The calculations have been performed to obtain the minimum values: critical volume and mass for spheres, critical radius for cylinders, critical thickness for slabs, and minimum critical concentration (infinite geometry) for the following homogeneous mixtures: (1) UO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (2) UNH for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (3) PuO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu); and (4) PuNH for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu). All bounding surfaces were fully reflected by 30 cm of H{sub 2}O.

  20. Minimum Conflict Mainstreaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awen, Ed; And Others

    Computer technology is discussed as a tool for facilitating the implementation of the mainstreaming process. Minimum conflict mainstreaming/merging (MCM) is defined as an approach which utilizes computer technology to circumvent such structural obstacles to mainstreaming as transportation scheduling, screening and assignment of students, testing,…

  1. Minimum variance geographic sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, G. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Resource inventories require samples with geographical scatter, sometimes not as widely spaced as would be hoped. A simple model of correlation over distances is used to create a minimum variance unbiased estimate population means. The fitting procedure is illustrated from data used to estimate Missouri corn acreage.

  2. Propofol Compared to Isoflurane Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Immature Swine Cerebral Cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, D. B.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-08

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in an immature swine model anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery in order to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared-spectroscopy. Compared to isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol also decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked accumulation of lactate. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype which resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations which typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may play a role in neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain.

  3. Isoflurane and desflurane at clinically relevant concentrations induce amyloid {beta}-peptide oligomerization: An NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Pravat K Fodale, Vincenzo

    2009-02-13

    Current understanding on Alzheimer's disease (AD) reveals that soluble amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) oligomeric formation plays an important role in AD pathophysiology. A potential role for several inhaled anesthetics in promoting A{beta} oligomer formation has been suggested. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, we previously demonstrated that at a high concentration (higher than clinically relevant concentrations), the inhaled anesthetics halothane and isoflurane, interact with specific amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31) and induce A{beta} oligomerization. The present study confirms this is true at a clinically relevant concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane induce A{beta} oligomerization by inducing chemical shift changes of the critical amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31), reinforcing the evidence that perturbation of these three crucial residues indeed plays an important role in oligomerization. These findings support the emerging hypothesis that several commonly used inhaled anesthetics could be involved in neurodegeneration, as well as risk factor for accelerating the onset of AD.

  4. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after exposure to sevoflurane and isoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Mijatović, Vilena Vrbanović; Šerman, Ljiljana; Gamulin, Ozren

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, consisting primarily of phospholipids and four surfactant-specific proteins, is among the first structures that is exposed to inhalation anesthetics. Consequently, changes of pulmonary surfactant due to this exposure could cause respiratory complications after long anesthetic procedures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to explore the effects of two inhalation anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, on a commercially available pulmonary surfactant. The research was primarily focused on the effect of anesthetics on the lipid component of the surfactant. Four different concentrations of anesthetics were added, and the doses were higher from the low clinical doses typically used. Recorded spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis, and the Student’s t-test was performed to confirm the results. The exposure to both anesthetics induced similar changes, consistent with the increase of the anesthetic concentration. The most pronounced effect was on the hydrophilic head group of phospholipids, which is in agreement with the disruption of the hydrogen bond, caused by the anesthetics. A change in the band intensities of CH2 stretching vibrations, indicative of a disordering effect of anesthetics on the hydrophobic tails of phospholipids, was also observed. Changes induced by isoflurane appear to be more pronounced than those induced by sevoflurane. Furthermore, our results suggest that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool in studying anesthetic effects on pulmonary surfactant. PMID:28027455

  5. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after exposure to sevoflurane and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Vrbanović Mijatović, Vilena; Šerman, Ljiljana; Gamulin, Ozren

    2017-02-21

    Pulmonary surfactant, consisting primarily of phospholipids and four surfactant-specific proteins, is among the first structures that is exposed to inhalation anesthetics. Consequently, changes of pulmonary surfactant due to this exposure could cause respiratory complications after long anesthetic procedures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to explore the effects of two inhalation anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, on a commercially available pulmonary surfactant. The research was primarily focused on the effect of anesthetics on the lipid component of the surfactant. Four different concentrations of anesthetics were added, and the doses were higher from the low clinical doses typically used. Recorded spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis, and the Student's t-test was performed to confirm the results. The exposure to both anesthetics induced similar changes, consistent with the increase of the anesthetic concentration. The most pronounced effect was on the hydrophilic head group of phospholipids, which is in agreement with the disruption of the hydrogen bond, caused by the anesthetics. A change in the band intensities of CH2 stretching vibrations, indicative of a disordering effect of anesthetics on the hydrophobic tails of phospholipids, was also observed. Changes induced by isoflurane appear to be more pronounced than those induced by sevoflurane. Furthermore, our results suggest that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool in studying anesthetic effects on pulmonary surfactant.

  6. Propofol compared with isoflurane inhibits mitochondrial metabolism in immature swine cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, Douglas B; Ledee, Dolena R; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G; Sedensky, Margaret M; Isern, Nancy G; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in the development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in immature swine anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon-labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared spectroscopy. Compared with isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate, and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked lactate accumulation. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype that resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations that typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may have a role in the neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain. PMID:24398942

  7. Isoflurane waste anesthetic gas concentrations associated with the open-drop method.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas K; Mook, Deborah M

    2009-01-01

    The open-drop technique is used frequently for anesthetic delivery to small rodents. Operator exposure to waste anesthetic gas (WAG) is a potential occupational hazard if this method is used without WAG scavenging. This study was conducted to determine whether administration of isoflurane by the open-drop technique without exposure controls generates significant WAG concentrations. We placed 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 ml of liquid isoflurane into screw-top 500 or 1000 ml glass jars. WAG concentration was measured at the opening of the container and 20 and 40 cm from the opening, a distance at which users likely would operate, at 1, 2, or 3 min WAG was measured by using a portable infrared gas analyzer. Mean WAG concentrations at the vessel opening were as high as 662 +/- 168 ppm with a 500 ml jar and 122 +/- 87 ppm with a 1000 ml jar. At operator levels, WAG concentrations were always at or near 0 ppm. For measurements made at the vessel opening, time was the only factor that significantly affected WAG concentration when using the 500 ml jar. Neither time nor liquid volume were significant factors when using 1000 ml jar. At all liquid volumes and time points, the WAG concentration associated with using the 500 ml container was marginally to significantly greater than that for the 1000 ml jar.

  8. Acute pulmonary hemorrhage during isoflurane anesthesia in two cats exposed to toxic black mold (Stachybotrys chartarum).

    PubMed

    Mader, Douglas R; Yike, Iwona; Distler, Anne M; Dearborn, Dorr G

    2007-09-01

    Acute pulmonary hemorrhage developed during isoflurane anesthesia in 2 Himalayan cats undergoing routine dental cleaning and prophylaxis. The cats were siblings and lived together. In both cats, results of pre-operative physical examinations and laboratory testing were unremarkable. Blood pressure and oxygen saturation were within reference ranges throughout the dental procedure. Approximately 15 to 20 minutes after administration of isoflurane was begun, frothy blood was noticed within the endotracheal tube. Blood was suctioned from the endotracheal tube, and the cats were allowed to recover from anesthesia. 1 cat initially responded to supportive care but developed a second episode of spontaneous pulmonary hemorrhage approximately 30 hours later and died. The other cat responded to supportive care and was discharged after 4 days, but its condition deteriorated, and the cat died 10 days later. Subsequently, it was discovered that the home was severely contaminated with mold as a result of storm damage that had occurred approximately 7 months previously. Retrospective analysis of banked serum from the cats revealed satratoxin G, a biomarker for Stachybotrys chartarum, commonly referred to as "toxic black mold." Findings highlight the potential risk of acute pulmonary hemorrhage in animals living in an environment contaminated with mold following flood damage.

  9. Knockout Mice Reveal a Major Role for Alveolar Epithelial Type I Cells in Alveolar Fluid Clearance.

    PubMed

    Flodby, Per; Kim, Yong Ho; Beard, LaMonta L; Gao, Danping; Ji, Yanbin; Kage, Hidenori; Liebler, Janice M; Minoo, Parviz; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Borok, Zea; Crandall, Edward D

    2016-09-01

    Active ion transport by basolateral Na-K-ATPase (Na pump) creates an Na(+) gradient that drives fluid absorption across lung alveolar epithelium. The α1 and β1 subunits are the most highly expressed Na pump subunits in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). The specific contribution of the β1 subunit and the relative contributions of alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) versus type I (AT1) cells to alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) were investigated using two cell type-specific mouse knockout lines in which the β1 subunit was knocked out in either AT1 cells or both AT1 and AT2 cells. AFC was markedly decreased in both knockout lines, revealing, we believe for the first time, that AT1 cells play a major role in AFC and providing insights into AEC-specific roles in alveolar homeostasis. AEC monolayers derived from knockout mice demonstrated decreased short-circuit current and active Na(+) absorption, consistent with in vivo observations. Neither hyperoxia nor ventilator-induced lung injury increased wet-to-dry lung weight ratios in knockout lungs relative to control lungs. Knockout mice showed increases in Na pump β3 subunit expression and β2-adrenergic receptor expression. These results demonstrate a crucial role for the Na pump β1 subunit in alveolar ion and fluid transport and indicate that both AT1 and AT2 cells make major contributions to these processes and to AFC. Furthermore, they support the feasibility of a general approach to altering alveolar epithelial function in a cell-specific manner that allows direct insights into AT1 versus AT2 cell-specific roles in the lung.

  10. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of two partial intravenous anesthetic protocols, compared with isoflurane alone, to maintain general anesthesia in horses.

    PubMed

    Nannarone, Sara; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2012-07-01

    To compare the ability of 2 partial IV anesthesia (PIVA) techniques to maintain anesthesia, compared with isoflurane alone, in horses. 45 horses. Client-owned horses requiring general anesthesia for a variety of procedures of at least 1 hour's duration were randomly allocated to 3 groups (n = 15/group) that differed for the maintenance protocol. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane with a starting end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.3% (isoflurane group) or a concentration of 1% supplemented with an adjustable continuous infusion of guaifenesin-ketamine (IGK group) or romifidine-ketamine (IRK group). A predefined scoring system was used to assess anesthetic depth and to adjust anesthetic delivery. The need for rescue anesthetics and recovery quality were compared. A mean ± SD end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.36 ± 0.16% was necessary to maintain a surgical plane of anesthesia in the isoflurane group. Mean infusion rates of 5.0 ± 1.3 μL/kg/min and 5.1 ± 0.8 μL/kg/min were necessary to maintain a surgical plane of anesthesia in the IRK and IGK groups, respectively. A lower need for ketamine as a rescue anesthetic was observed in the IGK group, compared with the isoflurane group. Higher blood pressure and lower heart rates were found at selected time points for the IRK group, compared with the IGK and isoflurane groups. Both PIVA protocols were satisfactory to maintain smooth and stable surgical anesthesia in horses. The present study supports previous findings in which PIVA has isoflurane-sparing effects. Furthermore, PIVA did not impair recovery quality.

  11. Blood -brain barrier disruption was less under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia via a PI3K/Akt pathway in early cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Mellender, Scott J; Kiss, Geza K; Liu, Xia; Weiss, Harvey R

    2017-02-24

    One of the important factors altering the degree of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in cerebral ischemia is the anesthetic used. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway has been reported to be involved in modulating BBB permeability and in isoflurane induced neuroprotection. This study was performed to compare the degree of BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia under isoflurane vs pentobarbital anesthesia and to determine whether inhibition of PI3K/Akt would affect the disruption in the early stage of focal cerebral ischemia. Permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion was performed in rats under 1.4% isoflurane or pentobarbital (50mg/kg i.p.) anesthesia with controlled ventilation. In half of each group LY294002, which is a PI3K/Akt inhibitor, was applied on the ischemic cortex immediately after MCA occlusion. After one hour of MCA occlusion, the transfer coefficient (Ki) of (14)C-α-aminoisobutyric acid ((14)C-AIB) was determined to quantify the degree of BBB disruption. MCA occlusion increased the Ki both in the isoflurane and pentobarbital anesthetized rats. However, the value of Ki was lower under isoflurane (11.5±6.0μL/g/min) than under pentobarbital (18.3±7.1μL/g/min) anesthesia. The Ki of the contralateral cortex of the pentobarbital group was higher (+74%) than that of the isoflurane group. Application of LY294002 on the ischemic cortex increased the Ki (+99%) only in the isoflurane group. The degree of BBB disruption by MCA occlusion was significantly lower under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. Our data demonstrated the importance of choice of anesthetics and suggest that PI3K/Akt signaling pathway plays a significant role in altering BBB disruption in cerebral ischemia during isoflurane but not during pentobarbital anesthesia.

  12. Isoflurane induces a protein kinase C alpha-dependent increase in cell-surface protein level and activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2005-05-01

    Glutamate transporters regulate extracellular concentrations of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. We have shown that the commonly used anesthetic isoflurane increased the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 (excitatory amino acid transporter 3, EAAT3) possibly via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. In this study, we showed that isoflurane induced a time- and concentration-dependent redistribution of EAAT3 to the cell membrane in C6 glioma cells. This redistribution was inhibited by staurosporine, a pan PKC inhibitor, or by 12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12,13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Go6976) at a concentration that selectively inhibits conventional PKC isozymes (PKC alpha, -beta, and -gamma). This isoflurane-induced EAAT3 redistribution was also blocked when the expression of PKC alpha but not PKC beta proteins was down-regulated by the respective antisense oligonucleotides. The isoflurane-induced increase of glutamate uptake by EAAT3 was abolished by the down-regulation of PKC alpha expression. Immunoprecipitation with an anti-EAAT3 antibody pulled down more PKC alpha in cells exposed to isoflurane than in control cells. Isoflurane also increased the phosphorylated EAAT3 and the redistribution of PKC alpha to the particulate fraction of cells. Consistent with the results in C6 cells, isoflurane also increased EAAT3 cell-surface expression and enhanced the association of PKC alpha with EAAT3 in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Our results suggest that the isoflurane-induced increase in EAAT3 activity requires an increased amount of EAAT3 protein in the plasma membrane. These effects are PKC alpha-dependent and may rely on the formation of an EAAT3-PKC alpha complex. Together, these results suggest an important mechanism for the regulation of glutamate transporter functions and expand our understanding of isoflurane pharmacology at cellular and molecular levels.

  13. Different effects of anesthetic isoflurane on caspase-3 activation and cytosol cytochrome c levels between mice neural progenitor cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiying; Pan, Chuxiong; Wu, Xu; Dong, Yuanlin; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Li, Tianzuo; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Commonly used anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to promote Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathogenesis by inducing caspase-3 activation. However, the up-stream mechanisms of isoflurane’s effects remain largely to be determined. Specifically, there is a lack of a good model/system to elucidate the underlying mechanism of the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation. We therefore set out to assess and compare the effects of isoflurane on caspase-3 activation in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and in primary neurons from wild-type (WT) and AD transgenic (Tg) mice. The NPCs and neurons were obtained, cultured and then treated with either 2% isoflurane or under control condition for 6 h. The NPCs or neurons were harvested at the end of the treatment and were subjected to Western blot analysis. Here we showed for the first time that the isoflurane treatment induced caspase-3 activation in neurons, but not in NPCs, from either WT or AD Tg mice. Consistently, the isoflurane treatment increased cytosol levels of cytochrome c, a potential up-stream mechanism of isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in the mice neurons, but not NPCs. Finally, the isoflurane treatment induced a greater casapse-3 activation in the neurons, but not the NPCs, from AD Tg mice as compared to the WT mice. These data demonstrated that investigation and comparison of isoflurane’s effects between mice NPCs and neurons would serve as a model/system to determine the underlying mechanism by which isoflurane induces caspase-3 activation. These findings would promote more research to investigate the effects of anesthetics on AD neuropathogenesis and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:24523673

  14. Comparison of the isoflurane concentration of using dexketoprofen or methadone at premedication during orthopedic surgery in dogs.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Calvo, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Bautista, Álvaro J; Granados, María M; Domínguez, Juan M; Fernández-Sarmiento, J Andrés; Quirós-Carmona, Setefilla; Morgaz, J

    2016-04-01

    Thirty-two dogs were used in this prospective, randomized, clinical and double-blinded study. Dexmedetomidine was administered at 1 μg/kg IV, and randomly each dog received dexketoprofen 1 mg/kg IV (group DK) or methadone 0.2 mg/kg IV (group M). Dogs were induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen. During surgery, the isoflurane concentration was changed depending on clinical signs of depth of anesthesia. Fentanyl and propofol could be used as required. Qualities of sedation and recovery were evaluated. A generalized linear mixed model or Mann-Whiney U test was used, and P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. No significant differences were observed between groups in the qualities of sedation and recovery, isoflurane concentration and in the total amount of fentanyl and propofol used intraoperatively. This study shows that the administration of dexketoprofen at 1 mg/kg IV at premedication required a similar isoflurane concentration to maintain anesthesia as methadone at 0.2 mg/kg IV during orthopedic surgery in dogs. Further analgesia is recommended intraoperatively, because of the need of fentanyl and propofol in same animals in both groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Occupational exposure to isoflurane during anaesthesia induction with standard and scavenging double masks in dogs, pigs and ponies.

    PubMed

    Säre, H; Ambrisko, T D; Moens, Y

    2011-07-01

    Induction of anaesthesia using a face mask may cause workplace pollution with anaesthetics. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the use of a standard versus a scavenging double face mask on isoflurane pollution during induction of anaesthesia in experimental animals: six dogs, 12 pigs and five ponies. Pigs were anaesthetized only once using either mask type randomly (n = 6). Dogs and ponies were anaesthetized twice, using different mask types for each occasion in a random order with at least 14 days between experiments. The masks were attached to a Bain breathing system (dogs and pigs) or to a circle system (ponies) using a fresh gas flow of 300 or 50 mL/kg/min, respectively, with 5% vaporizer dial setting. Isoflurane concentrations were measured in the anaesthetist's breathing zone using an infrared photoacoustic spectrometer. The peak isoflurane concentrations (pollution) during baseline and induction periods were compared with Wilcoxon test in all species, and values between the mask types were compared with either Wilcoxon (ponies and dogs) or Mann-Whitney tests (pigs) (P < 0.05). Pollution was higher during induction when compared with baseline regardless of the mask type used but it was only statistically significant in dogs and pigs. Pollution was lower during induction with double versus single masks but it was only significant in pigs. Despite the lack of statistical significance, large and consistent differences were noted in all species, hence using scavenging masks is recommended to reduce isoflurane workplace pollution.

  16. Effect of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the magnitude and time course of neuromuscular block produced by vecuronium, pancuronium and atracurium.

    PubMed

    Vanlinthout, L E; Booij, L H; van Egmond, J; Robertson, E N

    1996-03-01

    We have compared the ability of equipotent concentrations of isoflurane and sevoflurane to enhance the effect of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs. Ninety ASA I and II patients of both sexes, aged 18-50 yr, were stratified into three blocker groups (Vec, Pan and Atr), to undergo neuromuscular block with vecuronium (n = 30), pancuronium (n = 30) or atracurium (n = 30), respectively. Within each group, patients were allocated randomly to one of three anaesthetic subgroups to undergo maintenance of anaesthesia with: (1) alfentanil-nitrous oxide-oxygen (n = 10); (2) alfentanil-nitrous oxide-oxygen-isoflurane (n = 10); or (3) alfentanil-nitrous oxide-oxygen-sevoflurane (n = 10) anaesthesia. During maintenance of anaesthesia, end-tidal concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and nitrous oxide were 0.95, 1.70 and 70%, respectively. Both the evoked integrated electromyogram and mechanomyogram of the adductor pollicis brevis muscle were measured simultaneously. In the Vec and Pan groups, a total dose of 40 micrograms kg-1 of vecuronium or pancuronium, respectively, was given, and in the Atr group a total dose of atracurium 100 micrograms kg-1. Each blocker was given in four equal doses and administered cumulatively. We showed that 0.95% isoflurane and 1.70% sevoflurane (corresponding to 0.8 MAC of each inhalation anaesthetic, omitting the MAC contribution of nitrous oxide) augmented and prolonged the neuromuscular block produced by vecuronium, pancuronium and atracurium to a similar degree.

  17. Time Course of Isoflurane-Induced Vasodilation: A Doppler Ultrasound Study of the Left Coronary Artery in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lenzarini, Francesca; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Faita, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Isoflurane is widely used as vasodilator in studies of coronary flow reserve (CFR) in small animals, but the protocols have not been standardized. This study assessed the time course of the increase in isoflurane-induced flow in the mouse coronary artery by pulsed-wave Doppler measurements at 1% isoflurane concentration maintained for 6 min and then increased to 2.5% for 30 min. Velocity-time integral and velocity peak values were best fitted by the sigmoid model, which allowed derivation of the mean time (Tt90 = 14 min) of high-isoflurane needed to reach 90% of the hyperemic plateau value. In subsequent experiments, CFR was measured at 4 min (mean time of literature data) and 14 min of hyperemic response. The 4-min CFR was significantly lower than the 14 -min CFR, and the Bland-Altman plot revealed significant bias of the 4-min CFR against the 14-min CFR. This result suggests that measurements of flow velocity at times shorter than 14 min may be inappropriate for expressing the effective value of CFR.

  18. Short-Term Effects of Ketamine and Isoflurane on Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction in an Experimental Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wessler, Benjamin; Madias, Christopher; Pandian, Natesa; Link, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Background. General anesthesia is an essential element of experimental medical procedures. Ketamine and isoflurane are agents commonly used to induce and maintain anesthesia in animals. The cardiovascular effects of these anesthetic agents are diverse, and the response of global myocardial function is unknown. Methods. In a series of 15 swine, echocardiography measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were obtained before the animals received anesthesia (baseline), after an intramuscular injection of ketamine (postketamine) and after inhaled isoflurane (postisoflurane). Results. The mean LVEF of an unanesthetized swine was 47 ± 3%. There was a significant decrease in the mean LVEF after administration of ketamine to 41 + 6.5% (P = 0.003). The addition of inhaled isoflurane did not result in further decrease in mean LVEF (mean LVEF 38 ± 7.2%, P = 0.22). Eight of the swine had an increase in their LVEF with sympathetic stimulation. Conclusions. In our experimental model the administration of ketamine was associated with decreased LV function. The decrease may be largely secondary to a blunting of sympathetic tone. The addition of isoflurane to ketamine did not significantly change LV function. A significant number of animals had returned to preanesthesia LV function with sympathetic stimulation. PMID:22347646

  19. Comparison of respiratory function during TIVA (romifidine, ketamine, midazolam) and isoflurane anaesthesia in spontaneously breathing ponies Part I: blood gas analysis and cardiorespiratory variables.

    PubMed

    Steblaj, Barbara; Schauvliege, Stijn; Pavlidou, Kiriaki; Gasthuys, Frank; Savvas, Ioannis; Duchateau, Luc; Kowalczyk, Lidia; Kowalczk, Lidia; Moens, Yves

    2014-11-01

    To compare pulmonary function and gas exchange in ponies during maintenance of anaesthesia with isoflurane or by a total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) technique. Experimental, cross-over study. Six healthy ponies weighing mean 286 (range 233-388) ± SD 61 kg, age 13 (9-16) ± 3 years. The ponies were anaesthetized twice, a minimum of two weeks apart. Following sedation with romifidine [80 μg kg(-1) intravenously (IV)], anaesthesia was induced IV with midazolam (0.06 mg kg(-1)) and ketamine (2.5 mg kg(-1), then maintained either with inhaled isoflurane (Fe'Iso = 1.1 vol%) (T-ISO) or an IV infusion of romifidine (120 μg kg(-1) hour(-1)), midazolam (0.09 mg kg(-1) hour(-1) IV) and ketamine (3.3 mg kg(-1) hour(-1)) (T-TIVA). Ponies were placed in lateral recumbency. Breathing was spontaneous and Fi'O(2) 60%. After an instrumentation/stabilisation period of 30 minutes, arterial and mixed venous blood samples were taken simultaneously every 10 minutes for 60 minutes and analysed immediately. Oxygen extraction ratio (O(2)ER) and venous admixture were calculated. Tidal volume (TV), minute volume (MV), respiratory rate (f(R)), packed cell volume (PCV), arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were measured and recorded. Data were analysed with mixed model anova (α = 0.05). Treatments were compared overall and at two selected time points (T30 and T60) using Bonferroni correction. Arterial and mixed venous partial pressures of O(2) and CO(2), and TV were significantly lower and MV and f(R) were higher in T-TIVA compared to T-ISO. Venous admixture did not differ between treatments. O(2) R was significantly higher in T-TIVA. Mean arterial pressure was higher and HR was lower in T-TIVA compared to T-ISO. Whilst arterial CO(2) was within an acceptable range during both protocols, the impairment of oxygenation was more pronounced with the T-TIVA evidenced by lower arterial and venous oxygen partial pressures. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American

  20. Comparison of isoflurane and propofol for maintenance of anesthesia in dogs with intracranial disease undergoing magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Caines, Deanne; Sinclair, Melissa; Valverde, Alexander; Dyson, Doris; Gaitero, Luis; Wood, Darren

    2014-09-01

    To compare isoflurane and propofol for maintenance of anesthesia and quality of recovery in client-owned dogs with intracranial disease undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prospective, randomized, clinical trial. Twenty-five client-owned dogs with intracranial pathology, 13 females and 12 males, ages 11 months to 13 years, weighing between 3.0 and 48.0 kg. Each dog was randomly assigned to receive propofol or isoflurane for maintenance of anesthesia. All dogs were not premedicated, were administered propofol intravenously to effect for induction, intubated and mechanically ventilated to maintain an end-tidal carbon dioxide tension 30-35 mmHg (4.0-4.7 kPa). Temperature and cardiac output were measured pre- and post-MRI. Scores for mentation, neurological status, ease of maintenance, and recovery were obtained pre- and post-anesthesia. Pulse oximetry, end-tidal gases, arterial blood pressure, heart rate (HR) and requirements for dopamine administration to maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP) >60 mmHg were recorded throughout anesthesia. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was 0.73 ± 0.35% and propofol infusion rate was 292 ± 119 μg kg(-1)  minute(-1) . Cardiac index was higher, while HR was lower, with propofol than isoflurane in dogs younger than 5 years, but not in older dogs. Dogs maintained with isoflurane were 14.7 times more likely to require dopamine than propofol dogs. Mentation and maintenance scores and temperature were not different. MAP and diastolic arterial pressure were higher in the propofol group. Recovery scores were better with propofol, although times to extubation were similar. Change in neurological score from pre- to post-anesthesia was not different between treatments. Dogs maintained with propofol during MRI had higher arterial pressures, decreased requirements for dopamine, and better recovery scores, compared to dogs maintained with isoflurane. Propofol anesthesia offered cardiovascular and recovery advantages over

  1. Endoscopic sensing of alveolar pH

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, D.; Tanner, M. G.; McAughtrie, S.; Yu, F.; Mills, B.; Choudhary, T. R.; Seth, S.; Craven, T. H.; Stone, J. M.; Mati, I. K.; Campbell, C. J.; Bradley, M.; Williams, C. K. I.; Dhaliwal, K.; Birks, T. A.; Thomson, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Previously unobtainable measurements of alveolar pH were obtained using an endoscope-deployable optrode. The pH sensing was achieved using functionalized gold nanoshell sensors and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The optrode consisted of an asymmetric dual-core optical fiber designed for spatially separating the optical pump delivery and signal collection, in order to circumvent the unwanted Raman signal generated within the fiber. Using this approach, we demonstrate a ~100-fold increase in SERS signal-to-fiber background ratio, and demonstrate multiple site pH sensing with a measurement accuracy of ± 0.07 pH units in the respiratory acini of an ex vivo ovine lung model. We also demonstrate that alveolar pH changes in response to ventilation. PMID:28101415

  2. Endoscopic sensing of alveolar pH.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, D; Tanner, M G; McAughtrie, S; Yu, F; Mills, B; Choudhary, T R; Seth, S; Craven, T H; Stone, J M; Mati, I K; Campbell, C J; Bradley, M; Williams, C K I; Dhaliwal, K; Birks, T A; Thomson, R R

    2017-01-01

    Previously unobtainable measurements of alveolar pH were obtained using an endoscope-deployable optrode. The pH sensing was achieved using functionalized gold nanoshell sensors and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The optrode consisted of an asymmetric dual-core optical fiber designed for spatially separating the optical pump delivery and signal collection, in order to circumvent the unwanted Raman signal generated within the fiber. Using this approach, we demonstrate a ~100-fold increase in SERS signal-to-fiber background ratio, and demonstrate multiple site pH sensing with a measurement accuracy of ± 0.07 pH units in the respiratory acini of an ex vivo ovine lung model. We also demonstrate that alveolar pH changes in response to ventilation.

  3. Alveolar distraction osteogenesis for implant site development.

    PubMed

    Batal, Hussam S; Cottrell, David A

    2004-02-01

    Alveolar distraction osteogenesis can be a valuable tool for implant site development. Simultaneous regeneration of hard and soft tissue and an overall decrease in treatment time compared with other methods of site preparation can be an advantage. The authors advocate the concept of "prosthetically driven alveolar distraction." Surgical planning should begin with visualization of the final restoration to determine the volume and position of the soft and hard tissue deficiency. Surgical guides will help the surgeon determine the vector of distraction. Adherence to surgical principles to avoid damage to adjacent vital structures and maintain vascular supply to the transport segment is necessary for success. Bone grafting may be necessary before or after distraction to increase the surgical success of the procedure. Close follow-up is needed to verify the appropriate distraction vector and volume. Patient management and acceptance should be considered in distractor design and placement.

  4. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Marco Ulises; Oostdam, David Alejandro Herrera-van; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    The present paper establishes a narrative and analytical review of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) in ANCA-associated vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Recent studies found a frequent association between DAH and infections and systemic lupus erythematosus and its associated factors. Biological therapies like rituximab have demonstrated benefit mainly in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. Main clinical manifestations of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in these three diseases include dyspnea, pulmonary infiltrates, cough, and hypoxemia. The presence of hemorrhagic bronchoalveolar lavage, hemosiderin containing macrophages, or an increase of carbon monoxide diffusing capacity have been described in some series as helpful findings for the diagnosis. Hemoptysis has been seen mainly in systemic lupus erythematosus. The cornerstone of therapy includes glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, and recent findings in ANCA-associated vasculitis suggest the similar benefit of rituximab. Future evaluations and systematic reviews will help to define the real benefit for therapies that appeared to be controversial at the moment.

  5. Treatment of Adult Primary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the distal air spaces and terminal bronchi, which may lead to impaired gas exchange. This accumulation of surfactant is due to decreased clearance by the alveolar macrophages. Its primary, most common form, is currently considered an autoimmune disease. Better knowledge of the causes of PAP have led to the emergence of alternatives to whole lung lavage, although this is still considered the treatment of choice. Most studies are case series, often with limited patient numbers, so the level of evidence is low. Since the severity of presentation and clinical course are variable, not all patients will require treatment. Due to the low level of evidence, some objective criteria based on expert opinion have been arbitrarily proposed in an attempt to define in which patients it is best to initiate treatment.

  6. Rare lung diseases II: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed. PMID:18551202

  7. Dephasing and diffusion on the alveolar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschle, L. R.; Kurz, F. T.; Kampf, T.; Wagner, W. L.; Duerr, J.; Stiller, W.; Konietzke, P.; Wünnemann, F.; Mall, M. A.; Wielpütz, M. O.; Schlemmer, H. P.; Ziener, C. H.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a surface model of spin dephasing in lung tissue that includes both susceptibility and diffusion effects to provide a closed-form solution of the Bloch-Torrey equation on the alveolar surface. The nonlocal susceptibility effects of the model are validated against numerical simulations of spin dephasing in a realistic lung tissue geometry acquired from synchotron-based μ CT data sets of mouse lung tissue, and against simulations in the well-known Wigner-Seitz model geometry. The free induction decay is obtained in dependence on microscopic tissue parameters and agrees very well with in vivo lung measurements at 1.5 Tesla to allow a quantification of the local mean alveolar radius. Our results are therefore potentially relevant for the clinical diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases.

  8. [Alveolar haemorrhage following a cannabis water pipe].

    PubMed

    Moatemri, Z; Zaibi, H; Dabboussi, S; Mhamedi, S; Aichaouia, C; Khadhraoui, M; Cheikh, R

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory toxicity of cannabis is well-known today particularly with the new consumption patterns. We report the case of a 25-year-old man admitted for haemoptysis, with unfavourable outcome and acute respiratory failure. Various explorations concluded to acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. Etiological assessment was initially negative. Outcome was favourable during hospitalization, authorizing the discharge of our patient. Two days later, alveolar haemorrhage recur, with positive toxicological tests for cannabis and the patient admits smoking cannabis by plastic "bang". We illustrate, through this case, the severity of respiratory complications caused by new methods of using cannabis, particularly with plastic 'bang', hence the need to insist of the importance of supported withdrawal and to inform young people how these techniques are serious.ssss.

  9. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  10. Minimum Drag Circulation Profile.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    turbulent flow region is followed by a region of minimum skin friction which has a concave surface. The chord trailing edge is a coanda profile. A...tangential jet slot is placed at the trailing edge to blow over and around the coanda profile preventing flow separation and moving the stagnation region aft on the wing. The under surface is cambered to reduce the flow velocity.

  11. Differential effects of hyperventilation on cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation during sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hinohara, Hiroshi; Kadoi, Yuji; Ide, Masanobu; Kuroda, Masataka; Saito, Shigeru; Mizutani, Akio

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of increase in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation when modulating hyperventilation during orthopedic surgery under sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol anesthesia. Twenty-four patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery were randomly divided into sevoflurane, isoflurane, and propofol groups. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol administration with 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide at anesthetic drug concentrations adequate to maintain bispectral values between 45 and 50. A 2.0-MHz transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the temporal window, and mean blood flow velocity in the MCA (V (mca)) was continuously measured. The extremity was exsanguinated with an Esmarch bandage, and the pneumatic tourniquet was inflated to a pressure of 450 mmHg. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, V (mca) and arterial blood gases were measured every minute for 10 min after release of the tourniquet in all three groups. Immediately after tourniquet release, the patients' respiratory rates were increased to tightly maintain end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO(2)) at 35 mmHg. No change in partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO(2)) was observed pre- and posttourniquet deflation in any of the three groups. Increase in V (mca) in the isoflurane group was greater than that in the other two groups after tourniquet deflation. In addition, during the study period, no difference in V (mca) after tourniquet deflation was observed between the propofol and sevoflurane groups. Hyperventilation could prevent an increase in V (mca) in the propofol and sevoflurane groups after tourniquet deflation. However, hyperventilation could not prevent an increase in V (mca) in the isoflurane group.

  12. Differential increases in blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery after tourniquet deflation during sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, Y; Kawauchi, C H; Ide, M; Saito, S; Mizutani, A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the comparative effects of sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol on cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation during orthopaedic surgery. Thirty patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery were randomly divided into sevoflurane, isoflurane and propofol groups. Anaesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol infusion in 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide, in whatever concentrations were necessary to keep bispectral index values between 45 and 50. Ventilatory rate or tidal volume was adjusted to target PaCO2 of 35 mmHg. A 2.0 MHz transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the temporal window and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery was continuously measured. The extremity was exsanguinated with an Esmarch bandage and the pneumatic tourniquet was inflated to a pressure of 450 mmHg. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, velocity in the middle cerebral artery and arterial blood gas analysis were measured every minute for 10 minutes after release of the tourniquet in all three groups. Velocity in the middle cerebral artery in the three groups increased for five minutes after tourniquet deflation. Because of the different cerebrovascular effects of the three agents, the degree of increase in flow velocity in the isoflurane group was greater than in the other two groups, the change in flow velocity in the propofol group being the lowest (at three minutes after deflation 40 +/- 7%, 32 +/- 6% and 28 +/- 10% in the isoflurane, sevoflurane and propofol groups respectively, P < 0.05).

  13. Isoflurane leakage from non-rebreathing rodent anaesthesia circuits: comparison of emissions from conventional and modified ports.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Bolon, B

    2006-04-01

    Chronic exposure to low levels of fluorocarbon-based waste anaesthetic gas (WAG) has been linked to a multitude of human health problems. We have shown that isoflurane exhaust from passive gas-scavenging canisters is often quite high when using conventional rodent anaesthesia protocols and equipment. Another likely source of WAG build-up in rodent procedure rooms is leakage at the interface between the breathing circuit and the animal's face. We evaluated this possibility using three non-rebreathing circuits: traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson (type E). For the Mapleson E circuit, a conical rodent facemask was attached and used in one of two configurations: normal aperture, or aperture modified with a latex diaphragm (cut from an unpowdered surgical glove) to reduce the orifice diameter and tighten the seal. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with isoflurane (5% for induction, 2% or 3.5% for maintenance) in oxygen (2 L/min for induction, 1 L/min for maintenance). Isoflurane leakage was assessed by real-time spectrophotometry. In 94% of the trials, three configurations - traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson E with unmodified mask - permitted isoflurane leakage approaching or exceeding 100 ppm at the face/port interface. In contrast, the Mapleson circuit with diaphragm-modified mask emitted significantly (Pisoflurane (peak of 9.5+/-1.7 ppm [mean+/-standard error]). These data indicate that (1) WAG leakage from standard rodent non-rebreathing circuits is substantial, and that (2) a simple, rapid, and economical modification to a conventional rodent facemask can significantly reduce WAG exposure to workers performing many rodent anaesthesia procedures in one session.

  14. Comparison of three different inhalant anesthetic agents (isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane) in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Granone, Tiffany D; de Francisco, Olga N; Killos, Maria B; Quandt, Jane E; Mandsager, Ron E; Graham, Lynelle F

    2012-01-01

    To compare isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane for inhalant anesthesia in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) in terms of the speed and characteristics of induction; cardiovascular and respiratory parameters while anesthetized; and speed and quality of recovery. Prospective, cross over, randomized experimental study. 12 healthy adult red-tailed hawks. Anesthesia was induced with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane in oxygen via face mask in a crossover, randomized design with a 1 week washout period between each treatment. Hawks were tracheally intubated, allowed to breathe spontaneously, and instrumented for cardiopulmonary monitoring. Data collected included heart rate, respiratory rate, end-tidal CO(2) , inspired and expired agent, SpO(2,) temperature, systolic blood pressure, time to intubation and time to recovery (tracking). Recovery was subjectively scored on a 4 point scale as well as a summary evaluation, by a single blinded observer. No significant difference in time to induction and time to extubation was noted with the administration of isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Time to the ability of the bird to follow a moving object with its eyes (tracking) was significantly faster with the administration of sevoflurane and desflurane. All recoveries were scored 1 or 2 and were assessed as good to excellent. No significant difference was noted in heart rate, blood pressure and temperature among the three inhalants. Administration of isoflurane resulted in lower respiratory rates. Overall, although isoflurane remains the most common inhaled anesthetic in avian practice, sevoflurane and desflurane both offer faster time to tracking, while similar changes in cardiopulmonary function were observed with each agent during anesthesia of healthy red-tailed hawks. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  15. Effects of a constant rate infusion of detomidine on cardiovascular function, isoflurane requirements and recovery quality in horses.

    PubMed

    Schauvliege, Stijn; Marcilla, Miguel Gozalo; Verryken, Kirsten; Duchateau, Luc; Devisscher, Lindsey; Gasthuys, Frank

    2011-11-01

    To examine the influence of a detomidine constant rate infusion (CRI) on cardiovascular function, isoflurane requirements and recovery quality in horses undergoing elective surgery. Prospective, randomized, blinded, clinical trial. Twenty adult healthy horses. After sedation (detomidine, 10 μg kg(-1) intravenously [IV]) and induction of anaesthesia (midazolam 0.06 mg kg(-1) , ketamine 2.2 mg kg(-1) IV), anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen/air (inspiratory oxygen fraction 55%). When indicated, the lungs were mechanically ventilated. Dobutamine was administered when MAP<70 mmHg. The horses were randomly allocated to one of two groups and throughout anaesthesia, received either a detomidine (5 μg kg(-1)  hour(-1) ) (D) or saline (S) CRI, with the anaesthetist unaware of the treatment. Monitoring included end-tidal isoflurane concentration, arterial pH, PaCO(2) , PaO(2) , dobutamine administration rate, heart rate (HR), arterial pressure, cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), stroke index and oxygen delivery index (ḊO(2) I). For recovery from anaesthesia, all horses received 2.5 μg kg(-1) detomidine IV. Recovery quality and duration were recorded in each horse. For statistical analysis, anova, Pearson chi-square and Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used as relevant. Heart rate (p=0.0176) and ḊO(2) I (p= 0.0084) were lower and SVR higher (p=0.0126) in group D, compared to group S. Heart rate (p=0.0011) and pH (p=0.0187) increased over time. Significant differences in isoflurane requirements were not detected. Recovery quality and duration were comparable between treatments. A detomidine CRI produced cardiovascular effects typical for α(2) -agonists, without affecting isoflurane requirements, recovery duration or recovery quality. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  16. Osteoplasty of the alveolar cleft defect.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Dariusz; Wójcicki, Piotr; Koźlik, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Cleft of lip, alveolar process and palate is the most common congenital defect affecting the face. It occurs at the time of early embryogenesis as a result of disturbed differentiation of the primordial cell layer and is associated with genetic and environmental factors. The most severe type of the defect is complete cleft of the lip, alveolar process and palate, unilateral or bilateral, which is accompanied by impaired breathing, sucking, swallowing, chewing, hearing and speaking. The treatment consists in the surgical reconnection (reconstruction) of the cleft anatomical structures and their formation to gain proper appearance, occlusal conditions and speech. The part of the surgical treatment is reconstruction of alveolar bone by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting (osteoplasty). The surgery performed at the stage of mixed dentition following an orthodontic treatment is a recognized standard management modality. Its effects provide stabilization of the dental arches fixed in the orthodontic treatment, possibility of growth of permanent teeth adjoining the cleft as well as separation of the nasal and oral cavities. The grafted bone becomes a platform for the collapsed base of the ala nasi and facilitates restoration of teeth loss. In the graft healing process the volume of the regenerated bone tissue is lower than the graft volume. Methods to augment the healed bone volume are being searched for, as this factor decides substantially on successful outcome of the surgery.

  17. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage.

  18. Alveolar air volatile organic compound extractor for clinical breath sampling.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Geethanga; Beyette, Fred R

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar air Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) extractor is a handheld breath-sampling device for clinical breath analysis. The device consists two main components: (1) An alveolar air separator, (2) A VOC extractor. The alveolar air separator splits exhaled air based on total exhaled air volume directing alveolar air towards the VOC extractor and dead space air to into an exhaust channel. The VOC extractor collects the VOCs from alveolar air into a modified Sold Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) filament. Feasibility of using the SPME filament to collect a quantifiable breath sample directly from exhaled breath is experimentally validated. Exhaled breath acetone is quantified using alveolar air VOC extractor and a GC/MS system.

  19. Mast cells in the human alveolar wall: an electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Guz, A

    1981-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by electronmicroscopy in the alveolar wall of the lung in 20 subjects (10 normal, 10 abnormal). A quantitative and qualitative study was made of the mast cells. In the normal lung there was an average concentration of 350 mast cells/mm2 of alveolar wall and in the abnormal 523/mm2. Mast cells occupied approximately 1.6-2.1% of the area of the alveolar wall. There was marked variation in the structure of the mast cell granules but no differences between those in the normal and abnormal lungs. There was evidence that constant degranulation of mast cells may be occurring in the lung. The role that alveolar mast cells may play in the vasoconstrictor response to alveolar hypoxia is discussed. It is suggested that the tachypnoea present in asthma may partly be due to release of mediators from sensitised mast cells within the alveolar wall. Images PMID:7328180

  20. Recent advances in alveolar biology: some new looks at the alveolar interface.

    PubMed

    Possmayer, Fred; Hall, Stephen B; Haller, Thomas; Petersen, Nils O; Zuo, Yi Y; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Postle, Anthony D; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Orgeig, Sandra

    2010-08-31

    This article examines the manner in which some new methodologies and novel concepts have contributed to our understanding of how pulmonary surfactant reduces alveolar surface tension. Investigations utilizing small angle X-ray diffraction, inverted interface fluorescence microscopy, time of flight-secondary ion mass spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-photon fluorescence microscopy and electrospray mass spectroscopy are highlighted and a new model of ventilation-induced acute lung injury described. This contribution attempts to emphasize how these new approaches have resulted in a fuller appreciation of events presumably occurring at the alveolar interface. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intranasal Fentanyl Intoxication Leading to Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ruzycki, Shannon; Yarema, Mark; Dunham, Michael; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Tremblay, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Increasing rates of opioid abuse, particularly fentanyl, may lead to more presentations of unusual effects of opioid toxicity. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a rare complication of fentanyl overdose. A 45-year-old male presented in hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage requiring intubation. Comprehensive drug screening detected fentanyl without exposure to cocaine. Further history upon the patient's recovery revealed exposure to snorted fentanyl powder immediately prior to presentation. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potential, though rare, presentation of opioid intoxication. Recognition of less common complications of opioid abuse such as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is important in proper management of overdoses.

  2. Alveolar haemorrhage in a case of high altitude pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Grissom, C K; Albertine, K H; Elstad, M R

    2000-02-01

    A case of high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) in a climber who made a rapid ascent on Mt McKinley (Denali), Alaska is described. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid contained increased numbers of red blood cells and an abundance of haemosiderin laden macrophages consistent with alveolar haemorrhage. The timing of this finding indicates that alveolar haemorrhage began early during the ascent, well before the onset of symptoms. Although evidence of alveolar haemorrhage has been reported at necropsy in individuals dying of HAPE, previous reports have not shown the same abundance of haemosiderin laden macrophages in the BAL fluid. These findings suggest that alveolar haemorrhage is an early event in HAPE.

  3. Use of orally administered carfentanil prior to isoflurane-induced anesthesia in a Kodiak brown bear.

    PubMed

    Mama, K R; Steffey, E P; Withrow, S J

    2000-08-15

    A captive 590-kg (1,298-lb) 22-year-old castrated male Kodiak brown bear was evaluated because of a soft tissue mass in the right carpal and antebrachial regions. General anesthesia was deemed necessary on 3 occasions for various procedures including radiographic evaluation and biopsy, excision, and radiation treatment. The bear was given carfentanil orally to induce sedation, followed by i.m. administration of tiletamine-zolazepam (on 1 occasion) and atropine. Anesthesia was maintained by administration of isoflurane in oxygen. After each procedure, effects of carfentanil were reversed by administration of naltrexone. Although there was some variability, blood pressure, nasal temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, PO2, and PCO2 remained within a clinically acceptable ranges.

  4. Critical role of serine 465 in isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Feng, Xiaorong; Sando, Julianne J; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-12-15

    Glutamate transporters (also called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs) bind extracellular glutamate and transport it to intracellular space to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. We previously showed that isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, enhanced the activity of EAAT3, a major neuronal EAAT. This effect required a protein kinase C (PKC) alpha-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. In this study, we prepared COS7 cells stably expressing EAAT3 with or without mutations of potential PKC phosphorylation sites in the putative intracellular domains. Here we report that mutation of threonine 5 or threonine 498 to alanine did not affect the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. However, the mutation of serine 465 to alanine abolished isoflurane-induced increase of EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane. The mutation of serine 465 to aspartic acid increased the expression of EAAT3 in the plasma membrane and also abolished the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. These results suggest an essential role of serine 465 in the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution and a direct effect of PKC on EAAT3. Consistent with these results, isoflurane induced an increase in phosphorylation of wild type, T5A, and T498A EAAT3, and this increase was absent in S465A and S465D. Our current results, together with our previous data that showed the involvement of PKCalpha in the isoflurane effects on EAAT3, suggest that the phosphorylation of serine 465 in EAAT3 by PKCalpha mediates the increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to plasma membrane after isoflurane exposure.

  5. Region-specific effects of isoflurane anesthesia on Fos immunoreactivity in response to intravenous cocaine challenge in rats with a history of repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Kufahl, Peter R; Peartree, Natalie A; Heintzelman, Krista L; Chung, Maggie; Neisewander, Janet L

    2015-01-12

    We have previously shown that acute intravenous (i.v.) administration of cocaine increases Fos immunoreactivity in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Given that Fos expression is a marker of neural activation, the results suggested that isoflurane is appropriate for imaging cocaine effects under anesthesia. However, most imaging research in this area utilizes subjects with a history of repeated cocaine exposure and this drug history may interact with anesthetic use differently from acute cocaine exposure. Thus, this study further examined Fos expression under isoflurane in rats with a history of repeated i.v. cocaine administration. Rats received daily injections of either saline or cocaine (2mg/kg, i.v.) across 7 consecutive days, followed by 5 days of no drug exposure. On the test day, rats were either nonanesthetized or anesthetized under isoflurane and were given an acute challenge of cocaine (2mg/kg, i.v.). Additional saline-exposed controls received a saline challenge. Ninety min after the drug challenge, the rats were perfused under isoflurane anesthesia and their brains were processed for Fos protein immunohistochemistry. We found that challenge injections of cocaine following a regimen of repeated cocaine exposure resulted in Fos expression in the prefrontal cortex and striatum roughly equivalent to that found in rats who had received the cocaine challenge after a history of vehicle injections. Additionally, isoflurane anesthesia resulted in a heterogeneous attenuation of cocaine-induced Fos expression, with the most robust effect in the orbital cortex but no effect in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). These results indicate that cocaine-induced Fos is preserved in the NAcC under isoflurane, suggesting that isoflurane can be used in imaging studies involving cocaine effects in this region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Minimum fuel mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    The minimum fuel mode of the NASA F-15 research aircraft is designed to minimize fuel flow while maintaining constant net propulsive force (FNP), effectively reducing thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), during cruise flight conditions. The test maneuvers were at stabilized flight conditions. The aircraft test engine was allowed to stabilize at the cruise conditions before data collection initiated; data were then recorded with performance seeking control (PSC) not-engaged, then data were recorded with the PSC system engaged. The maneuvers were flown back-to-back to allow for direct comparisons by minimizing the effects of variations in the test day conditions. The minimum fuel mode was evaluated at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers and focused on three altitudes: 15,000; 30,000; and 45,000 feet. Flight data were collected for part, military, partial, and maximum afterburning power conditions. The TSFC savings at supersonic Mach numbers, ranging from approximately 4% to nearly 10%, are in general much larger than at subsonic Mach numbers because of PSC trims to the afterburner.

  7. Poikilocapnic hypoxic ventilatory response in humans during 0.85 MAC isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, D; Sollevi, A; Ebberyd, A; Lindahl, S G

    1994-02-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia (HVR) were investigated using poikilocapnic conditions (i.e. end-tidal CO2's allowed to seek it's own level) in 15 cardio-pulmonary healthy patients who were first studied awake and then at 0.85 MAC isoflurane. The influence of hypercapnia (HyperCapnic Ventilatory Response, HCVR) was also elucidated. Pneumotachography, capnography and airway occlusion pressures at 0.1 s (P degree 0.1) were used before and during both mild hypoxia (end-tidal O2 tension 8.7 kPa) and hypercapnia achieved by an inspired CO2 concentration of 5%. HCVR was attenuated by 60% during anesthesia (P < 0.01). In the awake state, five of the 15 patients decreased HVR during hypoxia as compared with during normoxia. This resulted in a VE that on average increased by 0.6 l.min-1 (P < 0.05) whereas P degree 0.1 was unchanged. In the anesthetized state, no case of decreased HVR was seen and hypoxia induced a mean VE increase (+/- s.d.) by 1.0 +/- 0.2 l.min-1 (P < 0.001) and a P degree 0.1 that on average was improved by 0.63 +/- 0.27 cm H2O (P < 0.01). It is suggested that when the aim is to evaluate the influence of volatile anesthetic agents on HVR and to quantitate its clinical relevance during and immediately after anesthesia, a poikilocapnic technique should be used. It is concluded that the poikilocapnic HVR to PEO2's of 8.7 kPa was maintained during 0.85 MAC isoflurane.

  8. Isoflurane anaesthesia (0.6 MAC) and hypoxic ventilatory responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, D; Sollevi, A; Ebberyd, A; Lindahl, S G

    1995-01-01

    In order to evaluate the difference between poikilo-capnic (no CO2 added to inspired gas) and iso-capnic (CO2 added to keep end-tidal CO2 constant) hypoxic ventilatory responses (HVR) awake and during 0.6 MAC isoflurane anaesthesia, seven cardio-pulmonary healthy patients were investigated. Pneumotachography and capnography were used before and during hypoxia (end-tidal O2 tension approx. 7 kPa). In the awake state, poikilo-capnic hypoxic challenges resulted in an increased HVR as indicated by a VE that on average increased by 1.4 +/- 1.0 (mean +/- s.d.) l.min-1, whereas the iso-capnic hypoxic challenges resulted in a VE increase that was 4.7 +/- 2.3 l.min-1 on average. In the anaesthetized state, the corresponding value during poikilocapnia was 1.3 +/- 0.8 l.min-1 (88% of the awake responses, n.s.) and during iso-capnia 2.3 +/- 1.4 l.min-1 (49% of the awake, P < 0.02). Awake HVR was achieved by greater tidal volumes during poikilocapnia as well as during isocapnic challenges, while respiratory rates were unchanged. In the anaesthetized state, during poikilocapnia, however, HVR was mediated by an increased respiratory rate, (from 17.5 +/- 1.7 breath.min-1 to 20.2 +/- 2.2) and during isocapnia by a combination of increased rate (from 17.1 +/- 1.9 breath.min-1 to 19.1 +/- 1.8) and tidal volume (from 496 +/- 80 to 560 +/- 83 ml). It is concluded that poikilocapnic HVR is maintained at 0.6 MAC isoflurane whereas iso-capnic HVR is depressed by 50%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. EFFECTS OF LIVE-TRAPPING AND ISOFLURANE ANESTHESIA ON FREE-RANGING AMERICAN MARTENS (MARTES AMERICANA).

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Maria C; Muller, Lisa I; Keenlance, Paul; Sanders, Robert L; Witt, Jill C; Miller, Debra L

    2017-07-01

    Seventy-two free-ranging American martens ( Martes americana ) in Michigan, US were immobilized using isoflurane from 2011 to 2015. In total, 129 anesthetic procedures were performed with no mortalities. Hypothermia and hyperthermia were the most common anesthetic complications, and the mean rectal temperatures were significantly higher during summer than in winter. Dental abnormalities were common; the majority of abnormal findings were broken or discolored teeth attributed to previous dental trauma and were not trap-induced. Blood (n=72) was analyzed from 53 martens for venous blood gas, lactate, hematocrit, and/or selected serum biochemistry analytes. Lactate concentration was measured by two different devices (VetScan i-STAT 1 and Lactate Plus) and compared for clinical agreement for 26 samples. Both methods for lactate measurement provided statistically similar results. Using domestic feline reference ranges, the acid-base status and relative arterial oxygen saturation of anesthetized martens in this study were normal as determined by blood pH and pulse oximetry, respectively. Serum biochemistry parameters, multiple environmental parameters, and marten-specific attributes were evaluated for their influence on lactate in American martens using linear regression and an information-theoretic approach with model averaging. Blood urea nitrogen was in all of the top models and was positively related to lactate (β=0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.00-0.04). Initial body temperature, ambient temperature, and time from trap discovery until immobilization of martens were informative predictors for lactate level. Recommendations for the live-trapping and isoflurane anesthesia of free-ranging martens include using caution during warmer summer months, minimizing disturbance prior to induction, monitoring lactate in addition to vital rates, and being prepared to prevent or treat both hypothermia and hyperthermia during any time of year.

  10. Long-term surgical anaesthesia with isoflurane in human habituated Nile Crocodiles.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, George F; Williams, Catherine J A; Franklin, Craig; Wang, Tobias; Axelsson, Michael

    2017-02-24

    A suitable long-term anaesthetic technique was required for implantation of physiological sensors and telemetric devices in sub-adult Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) to allow the collection of physiological data. Five Nile crocodiles with a median body mass of 24 kg were used. After manual capture, they were blindfolded and 0.2 mL (1 mg/mL) medetomidine was administered intramuscularly in four of the animals which had an estimated body mass between 20 kg and 30 kg. One crocodile with an estimated body mass of 50 kg received 0.5 mL. For induction, 5 mL propofol (10 mg/mL) was injected intravenously into the occipital sinus. Additional doses were given when required to ensure adequate anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was maintained with 1.5% isoflurane. Ventilation was controlled. Local anaesthesia was administered for surgical incision and external placement of the radio transmitter. Medetomidine was antagonised with atipamezole at the end of surgery. Median heart rate during surgery was 22 beats/min, at extubation 32 beats per min and 30 beats per min the following day at the same body temperature as under anaesthesia. Median body temperature of the animals increased from 27.3 °C to 27.9 °C during anaesthesia, as room temperature increased from 24.5 °C to 29.0 °C during surgery. Anaesthesia was successfully induced with intramuscular medetomidine and intravenous propofol and was maintained with isoflurane for the placement of telemetric implants. Intraoperative analgesia was supplemented with lidocaine infiltration. Perioperative physiological parameters remained stable and within acceptable clinical limits. Multiple factors appear to influence these variables during the recovery period, including residual anaesthetic effects, environmental temperature and physical activity.

  11. Influence of isoflurane on the diastolic pressure-flow relationship and critical occlusion pressure during arterial CABG surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hinz, José; Mansur, Ashham; Hanekop, Gerd G; Weyland, Andreas; Popov,