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Sample records for isogenic yeast dna

  1. Yeast DNA plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gunge, N

    1983-01-01

    The study of yeast DNA plasmids has been initiated with the discovery of the 2-micron DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This multiple copy plasmid, organized into chromatin structure in vivo, probably exists in the nucleus and provides a good system to obtain information on eukaryotic DNA replication. Yeast transformation with the 2-micron DNA or artificially constructed chimeric plasmids had contributed significantly to the study of the molecular biology of yeast and eukaryotes, allowing the isolation and characterization of various genes, ars, centromeres, and telomeres, and also serving as a tool to study the expression of various heterologous genes. Encouraged by these fruitful results, new yeast plasmids have been screened among phylogenetically distant yeasts. The linear DNA plasmids (pGKl1 and pGKl2) from Kluyveromyces lactis are the first case of yeast plasmids associated with biological function (killer phenotype). This plasmid system would be ideal as a model to study the structure and function of eukaryotic linear chromosomes. The extracellular secretion of protein toxin suggests the plasmids to be an excellent candidate for a secretion vector. The importance of yeasts as suitable materials for the study of eukaryotic cell biology would be much enhanced by the advent of new transformation systems with diverse host yeasts of genetically and phylogenetically distinct properties.

  2. Generation of an isogenic collection of yeast actin mutants and identification of three interrelated phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Whitacre, J; Davis, D; Toenjes, K; Brower, S; Adams, A

    2001-01-01

    A large collection of yeast actin mutations has been previously isolated and used in numerous studies of actin cytoskeletal function. However, the various mutations have been in congenic, rather than isogenic, backgrounds, making it difficult to compare the subtle phenotypes that are characteristic of these mutants. We have therefore placed 27 mutations in an isogenic background. We used a subset of these mutants to compare the degree to which different actin alleles are defective in sporulation, endocytosis, and growth on NaCl-containing media. We found that the three phenotypes are highly correlated. The correlations are specific and not merely a reflection of general growth defects, because the phenotypes are not correlated with growth rates under normal conditions. Significantly, those actin mutants exhibiting the most severe phenotypes in all three processes have altered residues that cluster to a small region of the actin crystal structure previously defined as the fimbrin (Sac6p)-binding site. We examined the relationship between endocytosis and growth on salt and found that shifting wild-type or actin mutant cells to high salt reduces the rate of alpha-factor internalization. These results suggest that actin mutants may be unable to grow on salt because of additive endocytic defects (due to mutation and salt). PMID:11156976

  3. Inheritance patterns and stability of DNA methylation variation in maize near-isogenic lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Eichten, Steven R; Hermanson, Peter J; Springer, Nathan M

    2014-03-01

    DNA methylation is a chromatin modification that contributes to epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The inheritance patterns and trans-generational stability of 962 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were assessed in a panel of 71 near-isogenic lines (NILs) derived from maize (Zea mays) inbred lines B73 and Mo17. The majority of DMRs exhibit inheritance patterns that would be expected for local (cis) inheritance of DNA methylation variation such that DNA methylation level was coupled to local genotype. There are few examples of DNA methylation that exhibit trans-acting control or paramutation-like patterns. The cis-inherited DMRs provide an opportunity to study the stability of inheritance for DNA methylation variation. There was very little evidence for alterations of DNA methylation levels at these DMRs during the generations of the NIL population development. DNA methylation level was associated with local genotypes in nearly all of the >30,000 potential cases of inheritance. The majority of the DMRs were not associated with small RNAs. Together, our results suggest that a significant portion of DNA methylation variation in maize exhibits locally (cis) inherited patterns, is highly stable, and does not require active programming by small RNAs for maintenance. DNA methylation may contribute to heritable epigenetic information in many eukaryotic genomes. In this study, we have documented the inheritance patterns and trans-generational stability for nearly 1000 DNA methylation variants in a segregating maize population. At most loci studied, the DNA methylation differences are locally inherited and are not influenced by the other allele or other genomic regions. The inheritance of DNA methylation levels across generations is quite robust with almost no examples of unstable inheritance, suggesting that DNA methylation differences can be quite stably inherited, even in segregating populations.

  4. Slow-growing cells within isogenic populations have increased RNA polymerase error rates and DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, David; Dhar, Riddhiman; Missarova, Alsu M.; Espinar, Lorena; Blevins, William R.; Lehner, Ben; Carey, Lucas B.

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic cells show a large degree of variability in growth rate, even when cultured in the same environment. Such cell-to-cell variability in growth can alter sensitivity to antibiotics, chemotherapy and environmental stress. To characterize transcriptional differences associated with this variability, we have developed a method—FitFlow—that enables the sorting of subpopulations by growth rate. The slow-growing subpopulation shows a transcriptional stress response, but, more surprisingly, these cells have reduced RNA polymerase fidelity and exhibit a DNA damage response. As DNA damage is often caused by oxidative stress, we test the addition of an antioxidant, and find that it reduces the size of the slow-growing population. More generally, we find a significantly altered transcriptome in the slow-growing subpopulation that only partially resembles that of cells growing slowly due to environmental and culture conditions. Slow-growing cells upregulate transposons and express more chromosomal, viral and plasmid-borne transcripts, and thus explore a larger genotypic—and so phenotypic — space. PMID:26268986

  5. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R

    2011-08-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the US Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in seven isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis.

  6. Identification of genotoxic compounds using isogenic DNA repair deficient DT40 cell lines on a quantitative high throughput screening platform

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Kana; Huang, Ruili; Zhao, Jinghua; Shahane, Sampada A.; Witt, Kristine L.; Smith-Roe, Stephanie L.; Tice, Raymond R.; Takeda, Shunichi; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair pathways play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis by repairing DNA damage induced by endogenous processes and xenobiotics, including environmental chemicals. Induction of DNA damage may lead to genomic instability, disruption of cellular homeostasis and potentially tumours. Isogenic chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways can be used to identify genotoxic compounds and aid in characterising the nature of the induced DNA damage. As part of the US Tox21 program, we previously optimised several different DT40 isogenic clones on a high-throughput screening platform and confirmed the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxicants by measuring differential cytotoxicity in wild-type and DNA repair-deficient clones following chemical exposure. In the study reported here, we screened the Tox21 10K compound library against two isogenic DNA repair-deficient DT40 cell lines (KU70 −/−/RAD54 −/− and REV3 −/−) and the wild-type cell line using a cell viability assay that measures intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels. KU70 and RAD54 are genes associated with DNA double-strand break repair processes, and REV3 is associated with translesion DNA synthesis pathways. Active compounds identified in the primary screening included many well-known genotoxicants (e.g. adriamycin, melphalan) and several compounds previously untested for genotoxicity. A subset of compounds was further evaluated by assessing their ability to induce micronuclei and phosphorylated H2AX. Using this comprehensive approach, three compounds with previously undefined genotoxicity—2-oxiranemethanamine, AD-67 and tetraphenylolethane glycidyl ether—were identified as genotoxic. These results demonstrate the utility of this approach for identifying and prioritising compounds that may damage DNA. PMID:26243743

  7. Enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Plevani, P; Chang, L M

    1977-01-01

    Partially purified yeast RNA polymerases (RNA nucleotidyltransferases) initiate DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase (DNA nucleotidyltransferase) I and to a lesser extent yeast DNA polymerase II in the replication of single-stranded DNA. The enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis on phage fd DNA template occurs with dNTPs alone and is further stimulated by the presence of rNTPs in DNA polymerase I reactions. The presence of rNTPs has no effect on the RNA polymerase initiation of the DNA polymerase II reaction. RNA polymerases I and III are more efficient in initiation of DNA synthesis than RNA polymerase II. Analyses of the products of fd DNA replication show noncovalent linkage between the newly synthesized DNA and the template DNA, and covalent linkage between the newly synthesized RNA and DNA. PMID:325562

  8. Visualization of yeast chromosomal DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubega, Seth

    1990-01-01

    The DNA molecule is the most significant life molecule since it codes the blue print for other structural and functional molecules of all living organisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis is now being widely used to separate DNA of virus, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. The task was undertaken of reviewing the existing methods of DNA fractionation and microscopic visualization of individual chromosonal DNA molecules by gel electrophoresis as a basis for a proposed study to investigate the feasibility of separating DNA molecules in free fluids as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. Various techniques were studied. On the molecular level, agarose gel electrophoresis is being widely used to separate chromosomal DNA according to molecular weight. Carl and Olson separate and characterized the entire karyotype of a lab strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smith et al. and Schwartz and Koval independently reported the visualization of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose gel matrix during electrophoresis. The techniques used by these researchers are being reviewed in the lab as a basis for the proposed studies.

  9. DNA replication in yeast is stochastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Hsin Yang, Scott; Rhind, Nicholas; Bechhoefer, John

    2010-03-01

    Largely on the basis of a simple --- perhaps too simple --- analysis of microarray-chip experiments, people have concluded that DNA replication in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) is a nearly deterministic process, in which the position and activation time of each origin of replication is pre-determined. In this talk, we introduce a more quantitative approach to the analysis of microarray data. Applying our new methods to budding yeast, we show that the microarray data imply a picture of replication where the timing of origin activation is highly stochastic. We then propose a physical model (the ``multiple-initiator model") to account for the observed probability distributions of origin- activation timing.

  10. Functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in isogenic settings using zinc finger nuclease-driven transgenesis into a safe harbor locus in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    DeKelver, Russell C.; Choi, Vivian M.; Moehle, Erica A.; Paschon, David E.; Hockemeyer, Dirk; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.; Sancak, Yasemin; Cui, Xiaoxia; Steine, Eveline J.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Tam, Phillip; Bartsevich, Victor V.; Meng, Xiangdong; Rupniewski, Igor; Gopalan, Sunita M.; Sun, Helena C.; Pitz, Kathleen J.; Rock, Jeremy M.; Zhang, Lei; Davis, Gregory D.; Rebar, Edward J.; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Yamamoto, Keith R.; Sabatini, David M.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.

    2010-01-01

    Isogenic settings are routine in model organisms, yet remain elusive for genetic experiments on human cells. We describe the use of designed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for efficient transgenesis without drug selection into the PPP1R12C gene, a “safe harbor” locus known as AAVS1. ZFNs enable targeted transgenesis at a frequency of up to 15% following transient transfection of both transformed and primary human cells, including fibroblasts and hES cells. When added to this locus, transgenes such as expression cassettes for shRNAs, small-molecule-responsive cDNA expression cassettes, and reporter constructs, exhibit consistent expression and sustained function over 50 cell generations. By avoiding random integration and drug selection, this method allows bona fide isogenic settings for high-throughput functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in essentially any transformed human cell type and in primary cells. PMID:20508142

  11. Functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in isogenic settings using zinc finger nuclease-driven transgenesis into a safe harbor locus in the human genome.

    PubMed

    DeKelver, Russell C; Choi, Vivian M; Moehle, Erica A; Paschon, David E; Hockemeyer, Dirk; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sancak, Yasemin; Cui, Xiaoxia; Steine, Eveline J; Miller, Jeffrey C; Tam, Phillip; Bartsevich, Victor V; Meng, Xiangdong; Rupniewski, Igor; Gopalan, Sunita M; Sun, Helena C; Pitz, Kathleen J; Rock, Jeremy M; Zhang, Lei; Davis, Gregory D; Rebar, Edward J; Cheeseman, Iain M; Yamamoto, Keith R; Sabatini, David M; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D

    2010-08-01

    Isogenic settings are routine in model organisms, yet remain elusive for genetic experiments on human cells. We describe the use of designed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for efficient transgenesis without drug selection into the PPP1R12C gene, a "safe harbor" locus known as AAVS1. ZFNs enable targeted transgenesis at a frequency of up to 15% following transient transfection of both transformed and primary human cells, including fibroblasts and hES cells. When added to this locus, transgenes such as expression cassettes for shRNAs, small-molecule-responsive cDNA expression cassettes, and reporter constructs, exhibit consistent expression and sustained function over 50 cell generations. By avoiding random integration and drug selection, this method allows bona fide isogenic settings for high-throughput functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in essentially any transformed human cell type and in primary cells.

  12. Preparation of yeast mitochondrial DNA for direct sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Valach, Matus; Tomaska, Lubomir; Nosek, Jozef

    2008-08-01

    We describe two simple protocols for preparation of templates for direct sequencing of yeast mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by automatic DNA analyzers. The protocols work with a range of yeast species and yield a sufficient quantity and quality of the template DNA. In combination with primer-walking strategy, they can be used either as an alternative or a complementary approach to shot-gun sequencing of random fragment DNA libraries. We demonstrate that the templates are suitable for re-sequencing of the mtDNA for comparative analyses of intraspecific variability of yeast strains as well as for primary determination of the complete mitochondrial genome sequence.

  13. Mechanism for priming DNA synthesis by yeast DNA Polymerase α

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Rajika L; Torella, Rubben; Klinge, Sebastian; Kilkenny, Mairi L; Maman, Joseph D; Pellegrini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The DNA Polymerase α (Pol α)/primase complex initiates DNA synthesis in eukaryotic replication. In the complex, Pol α and primase cooperate in the production of RNA-DNA oligonucleotides that prime synthesis of new DNA. Here we report crystal structures of the catalytic core of yeast Pol α in unliganded form, bound to an RNA primer/DNA template and extending an RNA primer with deoxynucleotides. We combine the structural analysis with biochemical and computational data to demonstrate that Pol α specifically recognizes the A-form RNA/DNA helix and that the ensuing synthesis of B-form DNA terminates primer synthesis. The spontaneous release of the completed RNA-DNA primer by the Pol α/primase complex simplifies current models of primer transfer to leading- and lagging strand polymerases. The proposed mechanism of nucleotide polymerization by Pol α might contribute to genomic stability by limiting the amount of inaccurate DNA to be corrected at the start of each Okazaki fragment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00482.001 PMID:23599895

  14. Repair of plasmid and genomic DNA in a rad7 delta mutant of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, J P; Smerdon, M J

    1995-01-01

    Repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) was examined in a yeast plasmid of known chromatin structure and in genomic DNA in a radiation-sensitive deletion mutant of yeast, rad7 delta, and its isogenic wild-type strain. A whole plasmid repair assay revealed that only approximately 50% of the CPDs in plasmid DNA are repaired after 6 h in this mutant, compared with almost 90% repaired in wild-type. Using a site-specific repair assay on 44 individual CPD sites within the plasmid we found that repair in the rad7 delta mutant occurred primarily in the transcribed regions of each strand of the plasmid, however, the rate of repair at nearly all sites measured was less than in the wild-type. There was no apparent correlation between repair rate and nucleosome position. In addition, approximately 55% of the CPDs in genomic DNA of the mutant are repaired during the 6 h period, compared with > 80% in the wild-type. Images PMID:7567456

  15. A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sargueil, B; Delahodde, A; Hatat, D; Tian, G L; Lazowska, J; Jacq, C

    1991-02-01

    Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the CO XI gene.

  16. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  17. Efficient Assembly of DNA Using Yeast Homologous Recombination (YHR).

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sunil; Shapland, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    The assembly of multiple DNA parts into a larger DNA construct is a requirement in most synthetic biology laboratories. Here we describe a method for the efficient, high-throughput, assembly of DNA utilizing the yeast homologous recombination (YHR). The YHR method utilizes overlapping DNA parts that are assembled together by Saccharomyces cerevisiae via homologous recombination between designed overlapping regions. Using this method, we have successfully assembled up to 12 DNA parts in a single reaction.

  18. cDNA microarray analysis of isogenic paclitaxel- and doxorubicin-resistant breast tumor cell lines reveals distinct drug-specific genetic signatures of resistance.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, David J; Hembruff, Stacey L; Veitch, Zachary; Cecchetto, Melanie; Dew, William A; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2006-03-01

    cDNA microarray analysis is a highly useful tool for the classification of tumors and for prediction of patient prognosis to specific cancers based on this classification. However, to date, there is little evidence that microarray approaches can be used to reliably predict patient response to specific chemotherapy drugs or regimens. This is likely due to an inability to differentiate between genes affecting patient prognosis and genes that play a role in response to specific drugs. Thus, it would be highly useful to identify genes whose expression correlates with tumor cell sensitivity to specific chemotherapy agents in a drug-specific manner. Using cDNA microarray analysis of wildtype MCF-7 breast tumor cells and isogenic paclitaxel-resistant (MCF-7(TAX)) or doxorubicin-resistant (MCF-7(DOX)) derivative cell lines, we have uncovered drug-specific changes in gene expression that accompany the establishment of paclitaxel or doxorubicin resistance. These changes in gene expression were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting experiments, with a confirmation rate of approximately 91-95%. The genes identified may prove highly useful for prediction of response to paclitaxel or doxorubicin in patients with breast cancer. To our knowledge this is the first report of drug-specific genetic signatures of resistance to paclitaxel or doxorubicin, based on a comparison of gene expression between isogenic wildtype and drug-resistant tumor cell lines. Moreover, this study provides significant insight into the wide variety of mechanisms through which resistance to these agents may be acquired in breast cancer.

  19. Origin plasticity during budding yeast DNA replication in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gros, Julien; Devbhandari, Sujan; Remus, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The separation of DNA replication origin licensing and activation in the cell cycle is essential for genome stability across generations in eukaryotic cells. Pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs) license origins by loading Mcm2-7 complexes in inactive form around DNA. During origin firing in S phase, replisomes assemble around the activated Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. Budding yeast pre-RCs have previously been reconstituted in vitro with purified proteins. Here, we show that reconstituted pre-RCs support replication of plasmid DNA in yeast cell extracts in a reaction that exhibits hallmarks of cellular replication initiation. Plasmid replication in vitro results in the generation of covalently closed circular daughter molecules, indicating that the system recapitulates the initiation, elongation, and termination stages of DNA replication. Unexpectedly, yeast origin DNA is not strictly required for DNA replication in vitro, as heterologous DNA sequences could support replication of plasmid molecules. Our findings support the notion that epigenetic mechanisms are important for determining replication origin sites in budding yeast, highlighting mechanistic principles of replication origin specification that are common among eukaryotes. PMID:24566988

  20. Modeling the Control of DNA Replication in Fission Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Bela; Tyson, John J.

    1997-08-01

    A central event in the eukaryotic cell cycle is the decision to commence DNA replication (S phase). Strict controls normally operate to prevent repeated rounds of DNA replication without intervening mitoses (``endoreplication'') or initiation of mitosis before DNA is fully replicated (``mitotic catastrophe''). Some of the genetic interactions involved in these controls have recently been identified in yeast. From this evidence we propose a molecular mechanism of ``Start'' control in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Using established principles of biochemical kinetics, we compare the properties of this model in detail with the observed behavior of various mutant strains of fission yeast: wee1- (size control at Start), cdc13Δ and rum1OP (endoreplication), and wee1- rum1Δ (rapid division cycles of diminishing cell size). We discuss essential features of the mechanism that are responsible for characteristic properties of Start control in fission yeast, to expose our proposal to crucial experimental tests.

  1. Evolutionary Mobility of the Ribosomal DNA Array in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Proux-Wéra, Estelle; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of eukaryotes is organized as large tandem arrays. Here, we compare the genomic locations of rDNA among yeast species and show that, despite its huge size (>1 Mb), the rDNA array has moved around the genome several times within the family Saccharomycetaceae. We identify an ancestral, nontelomeric, rDNA site that is conserved across many species including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Within the genus Lachancea, however, the rDNA apparently transposed from the ancestral site to a new site internal to a different chromosome, becoming inserted into a short intergenic region beside a tRNA gene. In at least four other yeast lineages, the rDNA moved from the ancestral site to telomeric locations. Remarkably, both the ancestral rDNA site and the new site in Lachancea are adjacent to protein-coding genes whose products maintain the specialized chromatin structure of rDNA (HMO1 and CDC14, respectively). In almost every case where the rDNA was lost from the ancestral site, the entire array disappeared without any other rearrangements in the region, leaving just an intergenic spacer of less than 2 kb. The mechanism by which this large and complex locus moves around the genome is unknown, but we speculate that it may involve the formation of double-strand DNA breaks by Fob1 protein or the formation of extrachromosomal rDNA circles. PMID:23419706

  2. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  3. The Yeast Copper Response Is Regulated by DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kangzhen; Addinall, Stephen G.; Lydall, David

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential but potentially toxic redox-active metal, so the levels and distribution of this metal are carefully regulated to ensure that it binds to the correct proteins. Previous studies of copper-dependent transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the response of genes to changes in the exogenous levels of copper. We now report that yeast copper genes are regulated in response to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydroxyurea by a mechanism(s) that requires the copper-responsive transcription factors Mac1 and AceI, copper superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity, and the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. Furthermore, in copper-starved yeast, the response of the Rad53 pathway to MMS is compromised due to a loss of Sod1 activity, consistent with the model that yeast imports copper to ensure Sod1 activity and Rad53 signaling. Crucially, the Mac1 transcription factor undergoes changes in its redox state in response to changing levels of copper or MMS. This study has therefore identified a novel regulatory relationship between cellular redox, copper homeostasis, and the DNA damage response in yeast. PMID:23959798

  4. NADH dehydrogenase subunit genes in the mitochondrial DNA of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Nosek, J; Fukuhara, H

    1994-01-01

    The genes encoding the NADH dehydrogenase subunits of respiratory complex I have not been identified so far in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of yeasts. In the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis, we found six new open reading frames whose sequences were unambiguously homologous to those of the genes known to code for NADH dehydrogenase subunit proteins of different organisms, i.e., ND1, ND2, ND3, ND4L, ND5, and ND6. The gene for ND4 also appears to be present, as judged from hybridization experiments with a Podospora gene probe. Specific transcripts from these open reading frames (ND genes) could be detected in the mitochondria. Hybridization experiments using C. parapsilosis genes as probes suggested that ND genes are present in the mtDNAs of a wide range of yeast species including Candida catenulata, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hansenula polymorpha, and others. Images PMID:7521869

  5. Toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 wild-type and its nine isogenic single-gene deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Kasemets, Kaja; Suppi, Sandra; Künnis-Beres, Kai; Kahru, Anne

    2013-03-18

    A suite of eight tentatively oxidative stress response-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 single-gene mutants (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, yap1Δ, cta1Δ, ctt1Δ, gsh1Δ, glr1Δ, and ccs1Δ) and one copper-vulnerable mutant (cup2Δ) was used to elucidate weather the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to S. cerevisiae is mediated by oxidative stress (OS). Specifically, sensitivity profiles of mutants' phenotypes and wild-type (wt) upon exposure to nano-CuO were compared. As controls, CuSO4 (solubility), bulk-CuO (size), H2O2, and menadione (OS) were used. Growth inhibition of wt and mutant strains was studied in rich YPD medium and cell viability in deionized water (DI). Dissolved Cu-ions were quantified by recombinant metal-sensing bacteria and chemical analysis. To wt strain nano-CuO was 32-fold more toxic than bulk-CuO: 24-h IC50 4.8 and 155 mg/L in DI and 643 and >20000 mg/L in YPD, respectively. In toxicant-free YPD medium, all mutants had practically similar growth patterns as wt. However, the mutant strains sod1Δ, sod2Δ, ccs1Δ, and yap1Δ showed up to 12-fold elevated sensitivity toward OS standard chemicals menadione and H2O2 but not to nano-CuO, indicating that CuO nanoparticles exerted toxicity to yeast cells via different mechanisms. The most vulnerable strain to all studied Cu compounds was the copper stress response-deficient strain cup2Δ (∼16-fold difference with wt), indicating that the toxic effect of CuO (nano)particles proceeds via dissolved Cu-ions. The dissolved copper solely explained the toxicity of nano-CuO in DI but not in YPD. Assumingly, in YPD nano-CuO acquired a coating of peptides/proteins and sorbed onto the yeast's outer surface, resulting in their increased solubility in the close vicinity of yeast cells and increased uptake of Cu-ions that was not registered by the assays used for the analysis of dissolved Cu-ions in the test medium. Lastly, as yeast retained its viability in DI even by 24th hour of incubation, the profiling of the acute

  6. Yeast DNA sequences initiating gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Astrid; Tran, Thi Tuyen; Jacob, Daniela; Mayer, Martin; Freytag, Barbara; Appel, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    DNA transfer between pro- and eukaryotes occurs either during natural horizontal gene transfer or as a result of the employment of gene technology. We analysed the capacity of DNA sequences from a eukaryotic donor organism (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to serve as promoter region in a prokaryotic recipient (Escherichia coli) by creating fusions between promoterless luxAB genes from Vibrio harveyi and random DNA sequences from S. cerevisiae and measuring the luminescence of transformed E. coli. Fifty-four out of 100 randomly analysed S. cerevisiae DNA sequences caused considerable gene expression in E. coli. Determination of transcription start sites within six selected yeast sequences in E. coli confirmed the existence of bacterial -10 and -35 consensus sequences at appropriate distances upstream from transcription initiation sites. Our results demonstrate that the probability of transcription of transferred eukaryotic DNA in bacteria is extremely high and does not require the insertion of the transferred DNA behind a promoter of the recipient genome.

  7. DNA Compaction by Yeast Mitochondrial Protein ABF2p

    SciTech Connect

    Friddle, R W; Klare, J E; Noy, A; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R; Baskin, R J; Martin, S S; Baldwin, E P

    2003-05-09

    We used high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image compaction of linear and circular DNA by the yeast mitochondrial protein ABF2p , which plays a major role in maintaining mitochondrial DNA. AFM images show that protein binding induces drastic bends in the DNA backbone for both linear and circular DNA. At high concentration of ABF2p DNA collapses into a tight globular structure. We quantified the compaction of linear DNA by measuring the end-to-end distance of the DNA molecule at increasing concentrations of ABF2p. We also derived a polymer statistical mechanics model that gives quantitative description of compaction observed in our experiments. This model shows that a number of sharp bends in the DNA backbone is often sufficient to cause DNA compaction. Comparison of our model with the experimental data showed excellent quantitative correlation and allowed us to determine binding characteristics for ABF2. Our studies indicate that ABF2 compacts DNA through a novel mechanism that involves bending of DNA backbone. We discuss the implications of such a mechanism for mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

  8. Structural Basis of High-Fidelity DNA Synthesis by Yeast DNA Polymerase δ

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, M.; Johnson, R; Prakash, L; Prakash, S; Aggarwal, A

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymerase ? (Pol ?) has a crucial role in eukaryotic replication. Now the crystal structure of the yeast DNA Pol ? catalytic subunit in complex with template primer and incoming nucleotide is presented at 2.0-A resolution, providing insight into its high fidelity and a framework to understand the effects of mutations involved in tumorigenesis.

  9. Dynamics of telomeric DNA turnover in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    McEachern, Michael J; Underwood, Dana Hager; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase adds telomeric DNA repeats to telomeric termini using a sequence within its RNA subunit as a template. We characterized two mutations in the Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNA gene (TER1) template. Each initially produced normally regulated telomeres. One mutation, ter1-AA, had a cryptic defect in length regulation that was apparent only if the mutant gene was transformed into a TER1 deletion strain to permit extensive replacement of basal wild-type repeats with mutant repeats. This mutant differs from previously studied delayed elongation mutants in a number of properties. The second mutation, TER1-Bcl, which generates a BclI restriction site in newly synthesized telomeric repeats, was indistinguishable from wild type in all phenotypes assayed: cell growth, telomere length, and in vivo telomerase fidelity. TER1-Bcl cells demonstrated that the outer halves of the telomeric repeat tracts turn over within a few hundred cell divisions, while the innermost few repeats typically resisted turnover for at least 3000 cell divisions. Similarly deep but incomplete turnover was also observed in two other TER1 template mutants with highly elongated telomeres. These results indicate that most DNA turnover in functionally normal telomeres is due to gradual replicative sequence loss and additions by telomerase but that there are other processes that also contribute to turnover. PMID:11805045

  10. Preferential recombination between GC clusters in yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, C L; Gandy, B

    1987-01-01

    Yeast mitochondrial DNA molecules have long, AT-rich intergenic spacers punctuated by short GC clusters. GC-rich elements have previously been characterized by others as preferred sites for intramolecular recombination leading to the formation of subgenomic petite molecules. In the present study we show that GC clusters are favored sites for intermolecular recombination between a petite and the wild-type grande genome. The petite studied retains 6.5 kb of mitochondrial DNA reiterated tandemly to form molecules consisting of repeated units. Genetic selection for integration of tandem 6.5 kb repeats of the petite into the grande genome yielded a novel recombination event. One of two crossovers in a double exchange event occurred as expected in the 6.5 kb of matching sequence between the genomes, whereas the second exchange involved a 44 bp GC cluster in the petite and another 44 bp GC cluster in the grande genome 700 bp proximal to the region of homology. Creation of a mitochondrial DNA molecule with a repetitive region led to secondary recombination events that generated a family of molecules with zero to several petite units. The finding that 44 bp GC clusters are preferred as sites for intermolecular exchange adds to the data on petite excision implicating these elements as recombinational hotspots in the yeast mitochondrial genome. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3327690

  11. Assembly of large, high G+C bacterial DNA fragments in yeast.

    PubMed

    Noskov, Vladimir N; Karas, Bogumil J; Young, Lei; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Gibson, Daniel G; Lin, Ying-Chi; Stam, Jason; Yonemoto, Isaac T; Suzuki, Yo; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Glass, John I; Smith, Hamilton O; Hutchison, Clyde A; Venter, J Craig; Weyman, Philip D

    2012-07-20

    The ability to assemble large pieces of prokaryotic DNA by yeast recombination has great application in synthetic biology, but cloning large pieces of high G+C prokaryotic DNA in yeast can be challenging. Additional considerations in cloning large pieces of high G+C DNA in yeast may be related to toxic genes, to the size of the DNA, or to the absence of yeast origins of replication within the sequence. As an example of our ability to clone high G+C DNA in yeast, we chose to work with Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, which has an average G+C content of 55%. We determined that no regions of the chromosome are toxic to yeast and that S. elongatus DNA fragments over ~200 kb are not stably maintained. DNA constructs with a total size under 200 kb could be readily assembled, even with 62 kb of overlapping sequence between pieces. Addition of yeast origins of replication throughout allowed us to increase the total size of DNA that could be assembled to at least 454 kb. Thus, cloning strategies utilizing yeast recombination with large, high G+C prokaryotic sequences should include yeast origins of replication as a part of the design process.

  12. Complementation in cytoplasmic petite mutants of yeast to form respiratory competent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Walker, G D; Miklos, G L

    1975-01-01

    Complementation has been observed in cytoplasmic respiratory deficient yeast cells (petites) to yield respiratory competent diploids. This successful demonstration depended on the use of spontaneous petites of recent origin and on crosses involving all possible apirwise combinations between the many different petite isolates of opposite mating type. The possibility of deletion of a single unique region of yeast mitochondrial DNA as the initial lesion in petite formation has been eliminated by using strains isogenic for their mitochondrial DNA. Images PMID:1090936

  13. Ribosomal DNA polymorphisms in the yeast Geotrichum candidum.

    PubMed

    Alper, Iraz; Frenette, Michel; Labrie, Steve

    2011-12-01

    The dimorphic yeast Geotrichum candidum (teleomorph: Galactomyces candidus) is commonly used to inoculate washed-rind and bloomy-rind cheeses. However, little is known about the phylogenetic lineage of this microorganism. We have sequenced the complete 18S, 5.8S, 26S ribosomal RNA genes and their internal transcribed spacers (ITS1) and ITS2 regions (5126 nucleotides) from 18 G. candidum strains from various environmental niches, with a focus on dairy strains. Multiple sequence alignments revealed the presence of 60 polymorphic sites, which is generally unusual for ribosomal DNA (rDNA) within a given species because of the concerted evolution mechanism. This mechanism drives genetic homogenization to prevent the divergent evolution of rDNA copies within individuals. While the polymorphisms observed were mainly substitutions, one insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism was detected in ITS1. No polymorphic sites were detected downstream from this indel site, that is, in 5.8S and ITS2. More surprisingly, many sequence electrophoregrams generated during the sequencing of the rDNA had dual peaks, suggesting that many individuals exhibited intragenomic rDNA variability. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions of four strains were cloned. The sequence analysis of 68 clones revealed 32 different ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 variants within these four strains. Depending on the strain, from four to twelve variants were detected, indicating that multiple rDNA copies were present in the genomes of these G. candidum strains. These results contribute to the debate concerning the use of the ITS region for barcoding fungi and suggest that community profiling techniques based on rDNA should be used with caution.

  14. Structural basis of high-fidelity DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase [delta

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, Michael K.; Johnson, Robert E.; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2009-09-25

    DNA polymerase {delta} (Pol {delta}) is a high-fidelity polymerase that has a central role in replication from yeast to humans. We present the crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of yeast Pol {delta} in ternary complex with a template primer and an incoming nucleotide. The structure, determined at 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, catches the enzyme in the act of replication, revealing how the polymerase and exonuclease domains are juxtaposed relative to each other and how a correct nucleotide is selected and incorporated. The structure also reveals the 'sensing' interactions near the primer terminus, which signal a switch from the polymerizing to the editing mode. Taken together, the structure provides a chemical basis for the bulk of DNA synthesis in eukaryotic cells and a framework for understanding the effects of cancer-causing mutations in Pol {delta}.

  15. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  16. Yeast redoxyendonuclease, a DNA repair enzyme similar to Escherichia coli endonuclease III

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, J.; Lee, K.; Cunningham, R.P.; Doetsch, P.W.

    1988-04-05

    A DNA repair endonuclease (redoxyendonuclease) was isolated from bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The enzyme has been purified by a series of column chromatography steps and cleaves OsO/sub 4/-damaged, double-stranded DNA at sites of thymine glycol and heavily UV-irradiated DNA at sites of cytosine, thymine, and guanine photoproducts. The base specificity and mechanism of phosphodiester bond cleavage for the yeast redoxyendonuclease appear to be identical with those of Escherichia coli endonuclease III when thymine glycol containing, end-labeled DNA fragments of defined sequence are employed as substrates. Yeast redoxyendonuclease has an apparent molecular size of 38,000-42,000 daltons and is active in the absence of divalent metal cations. The identification of such an enzyme in yeast may be of value in the elucidation of the biochemical basis for radiation sensitivity in certain yeast mutants.

  17. Recent advances in the genome-wide study of DNA replication origins in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chong; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication, one of the central events in the cell cycle, is the basis of biological inheritance. In order to be duplicated, a DNA double helix must be opened at defined sites, which are called DNA replication origins (ORIs). Unlike in bacteria, where replication initiates from a single replication origin, multiple origins are utilized in the eukaryotic genomes. Among them, the ORIs in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have been best characterized. In recent years, advances in DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have increased the number of yeast species involved in ORIs research dramatically. The ORIs in some non-conventional yeast species such as Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris have also been genome-widely identified. Relevant databases of replication origins in yeast were constructed, then the comparative genomic analysis can be carried out. Here, we review several experimental approaches that have been used to map replication origins in yeast and some of the available web resources related to yeast ORIs. We also discuss the sequence characteristics and chromosome structures of ORIs in the four yeast species, which can be utilized to improve yeast replication origins prediction. PMID:25745419

  18. Genome-wide characterization of fission yeast DNA replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Heichinger, Christian; Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg; Nurse, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is initiated from multiple origins of replication, but little is known about the global regulation of origins throughout the genome or in different types of cell cycles. Here, we identify 401 strong origins and 503 putative weaker origins spaced in total every 14 kb throughout the genome of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The same origins are used during premeiotic and mitotic S-phases. We found that few origins fire late in mitotic S-phase and that activating the Rad3 dependent S-phase checkpoint by inhibiting DNA replication had little effect on which origins were fired. A genome-wide analysis of eukaryotic origin efficiencies showed that efficiency was variable, with large chromosomal domains enriched for efficient or inefficient origins. Average efficiency is twice as high during mitosis compared with meiosis, which can account for their different S-phase lengths. We conclude that there is a continuum of origin efficiency and that there is differential origin activity in the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles. PMID:17053780

  19. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA segment in wine yeast genomes by extrachromosomal circular DNA formation.

    PubMed

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Novo, Maite; Legras, Jean-Luc; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-03-10

    We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations.

  20. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA Segment in Wine Yeast Genomes by Extrachromosomal Circular DNA Formation

    PubMed Central

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Novo, Maite; Legras, Jean-Luc; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations. PMID:21423766

  1. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  2. Strategy for the extraction of yeast DNA from artisan agave must for quantitative PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Kirchmayr, Manuel Reinhart; Segura-Garcia, Luis Eduardo; Flores-Berrios, Ericka Patricia; Gschaedler, Anne

    2011-11-01

    An efficient method for the direct extraction of yeast genomic DNA from agave must was developed. The optimized protocol, which was based on silica-adsorption of DNA on microcolumns, included an enzymatic cell wall degradation step followed by prolonged lysis with hot detergent. The resulting extracts were suitable templates for subsequent qPCR assays that quantified mixed yeast populations in artisan Mexican mezcal fermentations.

  3. Mitotic entry in the presence of DNA damage is a widespread property of aneuploidy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Heidi M.; Sheltzer, Jason M.; Meehl, Colleen M.; Amon, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of aneuploidy in budding and fission yeast. All aneuploid yeast strains analyzed to date harbor elevated levels of Rad52-GFP foci, a sign of DNA damage. Here we investigate how continuously elevated levels of DNA damage affect aneuploid cells. We show that Rad52-GFP foci form during S phase, consistent with the observation that DNA replication initiation and elongation are impaired in some aneuploid yeast strains. We furthermore find that although DNA damage is low in aneuploid cells, it nevertheless has dramatic consequences. Many aneuploid yeast strains adapt to DNA damage and undergo mitosis despite the presence of unrepaired DNA leading to cell death. Wild-type cells exposed to low levels of DNA damage exhibit a similar phenotype, indicating that adaptation to low levels of unrepaired DNA is a general property of the cell's response to DNA damage. Our results indicate that by causing low levels of DNA damage, whole-chromosome aneuploidies lead to DNA breaks that persist into mitosis. Such breaks provide the substrate for translocations and deletions that are a hallmark of cancer. PMID:25694455

  4. Cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are transformable by DNA under non-artificial conditions.

    PubMed

    Nevoigt, E; Fassbender, A; Stahl, U

    2000-09-15

    Transformants of bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) can be generated when non-growing cells metabolize sugars (without additional nutrients) in the presence of plasmid DNA. These results suggest that there is a mechanism by which DNA can naturally be taken up by the yeast cell. Natural transformation does not take place in common complete or minimal yeast culture media such as YPD and YNB. The starvation conditions used in our experiments thus seem to be an important prerequisite for such transformation events. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. RNA∶DNA Hybrids Initiate Quasi-Palindrome-Associated Mutations in Highly Transcribed Yeast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayun; Cho, Jang-Eun; Li, Yue C.; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    RNase H enzymes promote genetic stability by degrading aberrant RNA∶DNA hybrids and by removing ribonucleotide monophosphates (rNMPs) that are present in duplex DNA. Here, we report that loss of RNase H2 in yeast is associated with mutations that extend identity between the arms of imperfect inverted repeats (quasi-palindromes or QPs), a mutation type generally attributed to a template switch during DNA synthesis. QP events were detected using frameshift-reversion assays and were only observed under conditions of high transcription. In striking contrast to transcription-associated short deletions that also are detected by these assays, QP events do not require Top1 activity. QP mutation rates are strongly affected by the direction of DNA replication and, in contrast to their elevation in the absence of RNase H2, are reduced when RNase H1 is additionally eliminated. Finally, transcription-associated QP events are limited by components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway and are promoted by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. We suggest that QP mutations reflect either a transcription-associated perturbation of Okazaki-fragment processing, or the use of a nascent transcript to resume replication following a transcription-replication conflict. PMID:24244191

  6. RNA∶DNA hybrids initiate quasi-palindrome-associated mutations in highly transcribed yeast DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayun; Cho, Jang-Eun; Li, Yue C; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-11-01

    RNase H enzymes promote genetic stability by degrading aberrant RNA:DNA hybrids and by removing ribonucleotide monophosphates (rNMPs) that are present in duplex DNA. Here, we report that loss of RNase H2 in yeast is associated with mutations that extend identity between the arms of imperfect inverted repeats (quasi-palindromes or QPs), a mutation type generally attributed to a template switch during DNA synthesis. QP events were detected using frameshift-reversion assays and were only observed under conditions of high transcription. In striking contrast to transcription-associated short deletions that also are detected by these assays, QP events do not require Top1 activity. QP mutation rates are strongly affected by the direction of DNA replication and, in contrast to their elevation in the absence of RNase H2, are reduced when RNase H1 is additionally eliminated. Finally, transcription-associated QP events are limited by components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway and are promoted by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. We suggest that QP mutations reflect either a transcription-associated perturbation of Okazaki-fragment processing, or the use of a nascent transcript to resume replication following a transcription-replication conflict.

  7. Accumulation of linear mitochondrial DNA fragments in the nucleus shortens the chronological life span of yeast.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Ivessa, Andreas S

    2012-10-01

    Translocation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragments to the nucleus and insertion of those fragments into nuclear DNA has been observed in several organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals. Disruption of specific nuclear genes by de novo insertions of mtDNA fragments has even been linked to the initiation of several human diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that baker's yeast strains with high rates of mtDNA fragments migrating to the nucleus (yme1-1 mutant) exhibit short chronological life spans (CLS). The yeast CLS is determined by the survival of non-dividing cell populations. Here, we show that lack of the non-homologous-end-joining enzyme DNA ligase IV (DNL4) can rescue the short CLS of the yme1-1 mutant. In fission yeast, DNA ligase IV has been shown to be required for the capture of mtDNA fragments during the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks in nuclear DNA. In further analyses using pulse field gel and 2D gel electrophoresis we demonstrate that linear mtDNA fragments with likely nuclear localization accumulate in the yme1-1 mutant. The accumulation of the linear mtDNA fragments in the yme1-1 mutant is suppressed when Dnl4 is absent. We propose that the linear nuclear mtDNA fragments accelerate the aging process in the yme1-1 mutant cells by possibly affecting nuclear processes including DNA replication, recombination, and repair as well as transcription of nuclear genes. We speculate further that Dnl4 protein has besides its function as a ligase also a role in DNA protection. Dnl4 protein may stabilize the linear mtDNA fragments in the nucleus by binding to their physical ends. In the absence of Dnl4 protein the linear fragments are therefore unprotected and possibly degraded by nuclear nucleases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Yeast general transcription factor GFI: sequence requirements for binding to DNA and evolutionary conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Dorsman, J C; van Heeswijk, W C; Grivell, L A

    1990-01-01

    GFI is an abundant DNA binding protein in the yeast S. cerevisiae. The protein binds to specific sequences in both ARS elements and the upstream regions of a large number of genes and is likely to play an important role in yeast cell growth. To get insight into the relative strength of the various GFI-DNA binding sites within the yeast genome, we have determined dissociation rates for several GFI-DNA complexes and found them to vary over a 70-fold range. Strong binding sites for GFI are present in the upstream activating sequences of the gene encoding the 40 kDa subunit II of the QH2:cytochrome c reductase, the gene encoding ribosomal protein S33 and in the intron of the actin gene. The binding site in the ARS1-TRP1 region is of intermediate strength. All strong binding sites conform to the sequence 5' RTCRYYYNNNACG-3'. Modification interference experiments and studies with mutant binding sites indicate that critical bases for GFI recognition are within the two elements of the consensus DNA recognition sequence. Proteins with the DNA binding specificities of GFI and GFII can also be detected in the yeast K. lactis, suggesting evolutionary conservation of at least the respective DNA-binding domains in both yeasts. Images PMID:2187179

  9. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  10. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  11. Structural Basis for Error-free Replication of Oxidatively Damaged DNA by Yeast DNA Polymerase eta

    SciTech Connect

    T Silverstein; R Jain; R Johnson; L Prakash; S Prakash; A Aggarwal

    2011-12-31

    7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adducts are formed frequently by the attack of oxygen-free radicals on DNA. They are among the most mutagenic lesions in cells because of their dual coding potential, where, in addition to normal base-pairing of 8-oxoG(anti) with dCTP, 8-oxoG in the syn conformation can base pair with dATP, causing G to T transversions. We provide here for the first time a structural basis for the error-free replication of 8-oxoG lesions by yeast DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}). We show that the open active site cleft of Pol{eta} can accommodate an 8-oxoG lesion in the anti conformation with only minimal changes to the polymerase and the bound DNA: at both the insertion and post-insertion steps of lesion bypass. Importantly, the active site geometry remains the same as in the undamaged complex and provides a basis for the ability of Pol to prevent the mutagenic replication of 8-oxoG lesions in cells.

  12. Optimization of yeast surface-displayed cDNA library screening for low abundance targets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juh-Yung; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Jang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Moon Kyu

    2015-04-01

    The yeast surface-displayed cDNA library has been used to identify unknown antigens. However, when unknown target antigens show moderate-to-low abundance, some modifications are needed in the screening process. In this study, a directional random-primed cDNA library was used to increase the number of candidates for the unknown antigen. To avoid the loss of target yeast clones that express proteins at a low frequency in the cDNA library, a comprehensive monitoring system based on magnetic-activated cell sorting, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and immunofluorescence was established, and a small number of target yeast cells was successfully enriched. These results showed that our optimized method has potential application for identifying rare unknown antigens of the human monoclonal antibody.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Interaction of Human and Yeast DNA Damage Recognition Complexes with Damaged DNA in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Pestryakov, Pavel E.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2013-01-01

    The human XPC-RAD23B complex and its yeast ortholog, Rad4-Rad23, are the primary initiators of global genome nucleotide excision repair. The interaction of these proteins with damaged DNA was analyzed using model DNA duplexes containing a single fluorescein-substituted dUMP analog as a lesion. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed similarity between human and yeast proteins in DNA binding. Quantitative analyses of XPC/Rad4 binding to the model DNA structures were performed by fluorescent depolarization measurements. XPC-RAD23B and Rad4-Rad23 proteins demonstrate approximately equal binding affinity to the damaged DNA duplex (KD ∼ (0.5 ± 0.1) and (0.6 ± 0.3) nm, respectively). Using photoreactive DNA containing 5-iodo-dUMP in defined positions, XPC/Rad4 location on damaged DNA was shown. Under conditions of equimolar binding to DNA both proteins exhibited the highest level of cross-links to 5I-dUMP located exactly opposite the damaged nucleotide. The positioning of the XPC and Rad4 proteins on damaged DNA by photocross-linking footprinting is consistent with x-ray analysis of the Rad4-DNA crystal complex. The identity of the XPC and Rad4 location illustrates the common principles of structure organization of DNA damage-scanning proteins from different Eukarya organisms. PMID:23443653

  14. Yeast one-hybrid screens for detection of transcription factor DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2011-01-01

    The yeast one-hybrid system is widely recognized as a valuable and straightforward technique to study interactions between transcription factors and DNA. By means of one-hybrid screens, transcription factors or other DNA-binding proteins, expressed from cDNA expression libraries, can be identified due to the interactions with a DNA sequence-of-interest that is linked to a reporter gene, such as the yeast HIS3 gene. Usually, the library is constructed in an E. coli-yeast shuttle vector designed for production of hybrid proteins consisting of a library protein and the trans-activating domain (AD) from the yeast GAL4 transcription factor. Here, we describe an optimized system of vectors for one-hybrid screenings together with detailed step-wise protocols, an elaborate trouble-shooting guide and many technical tips to conduct successful screenings. This system and other yeast genetic selection procedures derived from one-hybrid methodology proved highly useful to help understanding the regulatory networks controlling expression of the genome.

  15. Development of large DNA methods for plants: molecular cloning of large segments of Arabidopsis and carrot DNA into yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, P; Ecker, J R

    1988-01-01

    Procedures for the preparation, analysis and cloning of large DNA molecules from two different plant species are described. Arabidopsis and carrot protoplasts were used for the preparation of large DNA molecules in agarose "plugs" or in solution. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of large plant DNA preparations using a contour-clamped homogeneous field (CHEF) apparatus indicated that the size of the DNA was at least 12 Mb. Large DNA preparations were shown to be useful for restriction enzyme analysis of the Arabidopsis genome using both frequent and infrequent cutting enzymes and for the molecular cloning of large segments of DNA into yeast using artificial chromosome (YAC) vectors. PFGE and blot hybridization analysis of Arabidopsis and carrot DNA-containing YACs indicated that both unique and highly repeated DNA sequences were represented in these libraries. Images PMID:3060856

  16. Initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotic cells; contribution of yeast genetics to the elucidation.

    PubMed

    Araki, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is a fundamental process in the transmission of genetic information through generations. While the molecular mechanism of DNA replication has been studied for a long time, knowledge regarding this process in eukaryotic cells has advanced rapidly in the past 20 years. Yeast genetics contributed profoundly to this rapid advancement. Reverse genetics and genetic screenings identified all genes encoding replication proteins in budding yeast. Moreover, the genetic interactions that were used in screenings and analyses provided an insight into the molecular mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication. Further studies showed that complicated but sophisticated mechanisms govern chromosomal DNA replication. The retrospective view of the genetic approaches used to elucidate DNA replication in eukaryotes, together with current knowledge, tell us the reasons why some of the genetic screenings are successful, and also provide ideas for future directions.

  17. Cloning of large segments of exogenous DNA into yeast by means of artificial chromosome vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.T.; Carle, G.F.; Olson, M.V.

    1987-05-11

    Fragments of exogenous DNA that range in size up to several hundred kilobase pairs have been cloned into yeast by ligating them to vector sequences that allow their propagation as linear artificial chromosomes. Individual clones of yeast and human DNA that have been analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis appear to represent faithful replicas of the source DNA. The efficiency with which clones can be generated is high enough to allow the construction of comprehensive libraries from the genomes of higher by offering a tenfold in the size of the DNA molecules that can be cloned microbial host, this system addresses a major gap in existing experimental methods for analyzing complex DNA sources.

  18. A vital function for mitochondrial DNA in the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Clark-Walker, G D; Chen, X J

    1996-10-28

    Petite-negative yeasts do not form viable respiratory-deficient mutants on treatment with DNA-targeting drugs that readily eliminate the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from petite-positive yeasts. However, in the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, specific mutations in the nuclear genes MG12 and MG15 encoding the alpha- and gamma-subunits of the mitochondrial F1-ATPase, allow mtDNA to be lost. In this study we show that wild-type K. lactis does not survive in the absence of its mitochondrial genome and that the function of mgi mutations is to suppress lethality caused by loss of mtDNA. Firstly, we find that loss of a multicopy plasmid bearing a mgi allele readily occurs from a wild-type strain with functional mtDNA but is not tolerated in the absence of mtDNA. Secondly, we cloned the K. lactis homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial genome maintenance gene MGM101, and disrupted one of the two copies in a diploid. Following sporulation, we find that segregants containing the disrupted gene form minicolonies containing 6-8000 inviable cells. By contrast, disruption of MGM101 is not lethal in a haploid mgi strain with a specific mutation in a subunit of the mitochondrial F1-ATPase. These observations suggest that mtDNA in K. lactis encodes a vital function which may reside in one of the three mitochondrially encoded subunits of Fo.

  19. The yeast telomere length regulator TEL2 encodes a protein that binds to telomeric DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kota, R S; Runge, K W

    1998-01-01

    TEL2 is required for telomere length regulation and viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate the mechanism by which Tel2p regulates telomere length, the majority (65%) of the TEL2 ORF was fused to the 3'-end of the gene for maltose binding protein, expressed in bacteria and the purified protein used in DNA binding studies. Rap1p, the major yeast telomere binding protein, recognizes a 13 bp duplex site 5'-GGTGTGTGGGTGT-3' in yeast telomeric DNA with high affinity. Gel shift experiments revealed that the MBP-Tel2p fusion binds the double-stranded yeast telomeric Rap1p site in a sequence-specific manner. Analysis of mutated sites showed that MBP-Tel2p could bind 5'-GTGTGTGG-3' within this 13 bp site. Methylation interference analysis revealed that Tel2p contacts the 5'-terminal guanine in the major groove. MBP-Tel2p did not bind duplex telomeric DNA repeats from vertebrates, Tetrahymena or Oxytricha. These results suggest that Tel2p is a DNA binding protein that recognizes yeast telomeric DNA. PMID:9490802

  20. Transferring whole genomes from bacteria to yeast spheroplasts using entire bacterial cells to reduce DNA shearing.

    PubMed

    Karas, Bogumil J; Jablanovic, Jelena; Irvine, Edward; Sun, Lijie; Ma, Li; Weyman, Philip D; Gibson, Daniel G; Glass, John I; Venter, J Craig; Hutchison, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Suzuki, Yo

    2014-04-01

    Direct cell-to-cell transfer of genomes from bacteria to yeast facilitates genome engineering for bacteria that are not amenable to genetic manipulation by allowing instead for the utilization of the powerful yeast genetic tools. Here we describe a protocol for transferring whole genomes from bacterial cells to yeast spheroplasts without any DNA purification process. The method is dependent on the treatment of the bacterial and yeast cellular mixture with PEG, which induces cell fusion, engulfment, aggregation or lysis. Over 80% of the bacterial genomes transferred in this way are complete, on the basis of structural and functional tests. Excluding the time required for preparing starting cultures and for incubating cells to form final colonies, the protocol can be completed in 3 h.

  1. DNA polymerase γ and disease: what we have learned from yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Tiziana; Dallabona, Cristina; Nolli, Cecilia; Goffrini, Paola; Donnini, Claudia; Baruffini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Mip1 is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ), which is responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It belongs to the family A of the DNA polymerases and it is orthologs to human POLGA. In humans, mutations in POLG(1) cause many mitochondrial pathologies, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), Alpers' syndrome, and ataxia-neuropathy syndrome, all of which present instability of mtDNA, which results in impaired mitochondrial function in several tissues with variable degrees of severity. In this review, we summarize the genetic and biochemical knowledge published on yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase from 1989, when the MIP1 gene was first cloned, up until now. The role of yeast is particularly emphasized in (i) validating the pathological mutations found in human POLG and modeled in MIP1, (ii) determining the molecular defects caused by these mutations and (iii) finding the correlation between mutations/polymorphisms in POLGA and mtDNA toxicity induced by specific drugs. We also describe recent findings regarding the discovery of molecules able to rescue the phenotypic defects caused by pathological mutations in Mip1, and the construction of a model system in which the human Pol γ holoenzyme is expressed in yeast and complements the loss of Mip1. PMID:25852747

  2. The Yeast Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor Complex Catalyzes Efficient Priming of DNA Synthesis on Single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Nandakumar, Divya; Deshpande, Aishwarya P; Lucas, Thomas P; R-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Tang, Guo-Qing; Raney, Kevin; Yin, Y Whitney; Patel, Smita S

    2016-08-05

    Primases use single-stranded (ss) DNAs as templates to synthesize short oligoribonucleotide primers that initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis or reprime DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse, but the origin of this activity in the mitochondria remains unclear. Herein, we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41) and its transcription factor (Mtf1) is an efficient primase that initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA coated with the yeast mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Both Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 can synthesize short and long RNAs on ssDNA template and prime DNA synthesis by the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase Mip1. However, the ssDNA-binding protein Rim1 severely inhibits the RNA synthesis activity of Rpo41, but not the Rpo41-Mtf1 complex, which continues to prime DNA synthesis efficiently in the presence of Rim1. We show that RNAs as short as 10-12 nt serve as primers for DNA synthesis. Characterization of the RNA-DNA products shows that Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 have slightly different priming specificity. However, both prefer to initiate with ATP from short priming sequences such as 3'-TCC, TTC, and TTT, and the consensus sequence is 3'-Pu(Py)2-3 Based on our studies, we propose that Rpo41-Mtf1 is an attractive candidate for serving as the primase to initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis during normal replication and/or to restart stalled replication from downstream ssDNA.

  3. Biochemical, cellular and molecular identification of DNA polymerase α in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Plissonneau, Jacqueline; Velours, Christophe; Bonneu, Marc; Litvak, Simon; Laquel, Patricia; Castroviejo, Michel

    2013-04-01

    DNA replication occurs in various compartments of eukaryotic cells such as the nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts, the latter of which is used in plants and algae. Replication appears to be simpler in the mitochondria than in the nucleus where multiple DNA polymerases, which are key enzymes for DNA synthesis, have been characterized. In mammals, only one mitochondrial DNA polymerase (pol γ) has been described to date. However, in the mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have found and characterized a second DNA polymerase. To identify this enzyme, several biochemical approaches such as proteinase K treatment of sucrose gradient purified mitochondria, analysis of mitoplasts, electron microscopy and the use of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic markers for immunoblotting demonstrated that this second DNA polymerase is neither a nuclear or cytoplasmic contaminant nor a proteolytic product of pol γ. An improved purification procedure and the use of mass spectrometry allowed us to identify this enzyme as DNA polymerase α. Moreover, tagging DNA polymerase α with a fluorescent probe demonstrated that this enzyme is localized both in the nucleus and in the organelles of intact yeast cells. The presence of two replicative DNA polymerases may shed new light on the mtDNA replication process in S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Detecting protein-DNA interactions using a modified yeast one-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kazuhisa; Feng, Shu-Ying; Ito, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) system has been among the methods of choice to detect protein-DNA interactions. However, conventional Y1H systems with a single auxotrophic reporter gene often suffer from high incidence of false positives to demonstrate a limited power in large-scale screenings. Here we describe a refined Y1H system that uses two independent bait sequences, each controlling a distinct reporter gene integrated in the host genome. With these modifications and a method of targeted DNA methylation, we succeeded in efficient isolation of clones for methylated DNA-binding proteins from mammalian cDNA libraries.

  5. Heavy ion induced DNA-DSB in yeast and mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loebrich, M.; Ikpeme, S.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular changes at the DNA are assumed to be the main cause for radiation effects in a number of organisms. During the course of the last decades techniques have been developed for measuring DNA double-strand breaks (dsb), generally assumed to be the most critical DNA lesions. The outcome of all those different approaches portrays a collection of data useful for a theoretical description of radiation action mechanisms. However, in the case of heavy ion induced DNA dsb the picture is not quite clear yet and further projects and strategies have to be developed. The biological systems studied in our group are yeast and mammalian cells. While in the case of yeast cells technical and methodical reasons highlight these organisms mammalian cells reach greater importance when dsb repair studies are performed. In both types of organisms the technique of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is applied, although with different modifications and evaluation procedures mainly due to the different genome sizes.

  6. Yeast artificial chromosome libraries containing large inserts from mouse and human DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, Z.; Monaco, A.P.; Lehrach, H. )

    1991-05-15

    Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries have been difficult to construct with average insert sizes >400 kilobase pairs when DNA is size-fractionated in low-melting-point agarose. By using yeast chromosomes in mock cloning experiments, the authors found that polyamines should be present whenever agarose containing high molecular weight DNA is melted to protect DNA from degradation. By incorporating polyamines during the cloning procedure, they constructed YAC libraries from mouse and human DNA with average insert sizes of 700 and 620 kilobase pairs, respectively. Several genome equivalents of these YAC libraries were replicated onto the surface of many duplicate agar plates using a 40,000 multipin transfer device. High-density filter replicas were screened by hybridization, and 70 mouse YAC clones from 31 loci and 132 human YAC clones from 49 loci were isolated.

  7. EdU Incorporation for FACS and Microscopy Analysis of DNA Replication in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Talarek, Nicolas; Petit, Julie; Gueydon, Elisabeth; Schwob, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication is a key determinant of chromosome segregation and stability in eukaryotes. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used for cell cycle studies, yet simple but key parameters such as the fraction of cells in S phase in a population or the subnuclear localization of DNA synthesis have been difficult to gather for this organism. 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a thymidine analogue that can be incorporated in vivo and later detected using copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (Click reaction) without prior DNA denaturation. This chapter describes a budding yeast strain and conditions that allow rapid EdU incorporation at moderate extracellular concentrations, followed by its efficient detection for the analysis of DNA replication in single cells by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy.

  8. Cisplatin-modification of DNA repair and ionizing radiation lethality in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dolling, J A; Boreham, D R; Brown, D L; Raaphorst, G P; Mitchel, R E

    1999-03-10

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin) is a DNA inter- and intrastrand crosslinking agent which can sensitize prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to killing by ionizing radiation. The mechanism of radiosensitization is unknown but may involve cisplatin inhibition of repair of DNA damage caused by radiation. Repair proficient wild type and repair deficient (rad52, recombinational repair or rad3, excision repair) strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used to determine whether defects in DNA repair mechanisms would modify the radiosensitizing effect of cisplatin. We report that cisplatin exposure could sensitize yeast cells with a competent recombinational repair mechanism (wild type or rad3), but could not sensitize cells defective in recombinational repair (rad52), indicating that the radiosensitizing effect of cisplatin was due to inhibition of DNA repair processes involving error free RAD52-dependent recombinational repair. The presence or absence of oxygen during irradiation did not alter this radiosensitization. Consistent with this result, cisplatin did not sensitize cells to mutation that results from lesion processing by an error prone DNA repair system. However, under certain circumstances, cisplatin exposure did not cause radiosensitization to killing by radiation in repair competent wild type cells. Within 2 h after a sublethal cisplatin treatment, wild type yeast cells became both thermally tolerant and radiation resistant. Cisplatin pretreatment also suppressed mutations caused by exposure to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), a response previously shown in wild type yeast cells following radiation pretreatment. Like radiation, the cisplatin-induced stress response did not confer radiation resistance or suppress MNNG mutations in a recombinational repair deficient mutant (rad52), although thermal tolerance was still induced. These results support the idea that cisplatin adducts in DNA interfere with RAD52-dependent

  9. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Detection, identification, and classification of yeasts has undergone a major transformation in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of th...

  10. Proficient Replication of the Yeast Genome by a Viral DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Stodola, Joseph L; Stith, Carrie M; Burgers, Peter M

    2016-05-27

    DNA replication in eukaryotic cells requires minimally three B-family DNA polymerases: Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ϵ. Pol δ replicates and matures Okazaki fragments on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol δ is a three-subunit enzyme (Pol3-Pol31-Pol32). A small C-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit Pol3 carries both iron-sulfur cluster and zinc-binding motifs, which mediate interactions with Pol31, and processive replication with the replication clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), respectively. We show that the entire N-terminal domain of Pol3, containing polymerase and proofreading activities, could be effectively replaced by those from bacteriophage RB69, and could carry out chromosomal DNA replication in yeast with remarkable high fidelity, provided that adaptive mutations in the replication clamp PCNA were introduced. This result is consistent with the model that all essential interactions for DNA replication in yeast are mediated through the small C-terminal domain of Pol3. The chimeric polymerase carries out processive replication with PCNA in vitro; however, in yeast, it requires an increased involvement of the mutagenic translesion DNA polymerase ζ during DNA replication.

  11. DNA replication and damage checkpoints and meiotic cell cycle controls in the fission and budding yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, H; Nurse, P

    2000-01-01

    The cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms ensure the order of cell cycle events to preserve genomic integrity. Among these, the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints prevent chromosome segregation when DNA replication is inhibited or DNA is damaged. Recent studies have identified an outline of the regulatory networks for both of these controls, which apparently operate in all eukaryotes. In addition, it appears that these checkpoints have two arrest points, one is just before entry into mitosis and the other is prior to chromosome separation. The former point requires the central cell-cycle regulator Cdc2 kinase, whereas the latter involves several key regulators and substrates of the ubiquitin ligase called the anaphase promoting complex. Linkages between these cell-cycle regulators and several key checkpoint proteins are beginning to emerge. Recent findings on post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions of the checkpoint proteins provide new insights into the checkpoint responses, although the functional significance of these biochemical properties often remains unclear. We have reviewed the molecular mechanisms acting at the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the modifications of these controls during the meiotic cell cycle. We have made comparisons with the controls in fission yeast and other organisms, mainly the distantly related budding yeast. PMID:10861204

  12. DNA typing methods for differentiation of yeasts related to dry-cured meat products.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M J; Rodríguez, M; Sánchez, B; Aranda, E; Córdoba, J J

    2006-03-01

    RFLP analysis of the ITS and 18S rDNA, RAPD-PCR using mini- and microsatellite primers and RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA were examined to discriminate yeasts related to dry-cured meat products at species and strain level. Seven species and 35 strains of yeasts usually found in dry-cured meat products were tested. RFLP analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 and 18S rDNA did not allow the separation at species level of all of the species tested. RAPD with a M13 primer was found to be useful for differentiation of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Candida zeylanoides, Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no differences were observed between Debaryomyces polymorphus and Pichia carsonii. RAPD analysis with microsatellite primers (GACA)(4), (GTG)(5) and (GAC)(5) enabled discrimination at species and strain level. However, the degree of discrimination by means of RAPD-PCR depends highly on the primers used. Thus, the PCR fingerprinting with primer (GACA)(4) enabled a higher level of discrimination than primers (GAC)(5) and (GTG)(5). The RFLP analysis of mtDNA allowed the discrimination at the species and strain level except for R. mucilaginosa, where no polymorphisms were observed in the strains tested. RAPD analysis with primer (GACA)(4) and the restriction analysis of mtDNA used in the present work are useful for the differentiation at species and strain level of yeasts related to dry-cured meat products.

  13. DNA replication components as regulators of epigenetic inheritance--lesson from fission yeast centromere.

    PubMed

    He, Haijin; Gonzalez, Marlyn; Zhang, Fan; Li, Fei

    2014-06-01

    Genetic information stored in DNA is accurately copied and transferred to subsequent generations through DNA replication. This process is accomplished through the concerted actions of highly conserved DNA replication components. Epigenetic information stored in the form of histone modifications and DNA methylation, constitutes a second layer of regulatory information important for many cellular processes, such as gene expression regulation, chromatin organization, and genome stability. During DNA replication, epigenetic information must also be faithfully transmitted to subsequent generations. How this monumental task is achieved remains poorly understood. In this review, we will discuss recent advances on the role of DNA replication components in the inheritance of epigenetic marks, with a particular focus on epigenetic regulation in fission yeast. Based on these findings, we propose that specific DNA replication components function as key regulators in the replication of epigenetic information across the genome.

  14. Strand displacement synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase ε

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, Rais A.; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Johansson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) is a replicative DNA polymerase with an associated 3′–5′ exonuclease activity. Here, we explored the capacity of Pol ε to perform strand displacement synthesis, a process that influences many DNA transactions in vivo. We found that Pol ε is unable to carry out extended strand displacement synthesis unless its 3′–5′ exonuclease activity is removed. However, the wild-type Pol ε holoenzyme efficiently displaced one nucleotide when encountering double-stranded DNA after filling a gap or nicked DNA. A flap, mimicking a D-loop or a hairpin structure, on the 5′ end of the blocking primer inhibited Pol ε from synthesizing DNA up to the fork junction. This inhibition was observed for Pol ε but not with Pol δ, RB69 gp43 or Pol η. Neither was Pol ε able to extend a D-loop in reconstitution experiments. Finally, we show that the observed strand displacement synthesis by exonuclease-deficient Pol ε is distributive. Our results suggest that Pol ε is unable to extend the invading strand in D-loops during homologous recombination or to add more than two nucleotides during long-patch base excision repair. Our results support the hypothesis that Pol ε participates in short-patch base excision repair and ribonucleotide excision repair. PMID:27325747

  15. Mitochondrial depolarization in yeast zygotes inhibits clonal expansion of selfish mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Golyshev, Sergey A; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Sokolov, Svyatoslav S; Severin, Fedor F; Knorre, Dmitry A

    2017-04-01

    Non-identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) compete with each other within a cell and the ultimate variant of mtDNA present depends on their relative replication rates. Using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as a model, we studied the effects of mitochondrial inhibitors on the competition between wild-type mtDNA and mutant selfish mtDNA in heteroplasmic zygotes. We found that decreasing mitochondrial transmembrane potential by adding uncouplers or valinomycin changes the competition outcomes in favor of the wild-type mtDNA. This effect was significantly lower in cells with disrupted mitochondria fission or repression of the autophagy-related genes ATG8, ATG32 or ATG33, implying that heteroplasmic zygotes activate mitochondrial degradation in response to the depolarization. Moreover, the rate of mitochondrially targeted GFP turnover was higher in zygotes treated with uncoupler than in haploid cells or untreated zygotes. Finally, we showed that vacuoles of zygotes with uncoupler-activated autophagy contained DNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mitochondrial depolarization inhibits clonal expansion of selfish mtDNA and this effect depends on mitochondrial fission and autophagy. These observations suggest an activation of mitochondria quality control mechanisms in heteroplasmic yeast zygotes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Specific replication origins promote DNA amplification in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Lee; Heichinger, Christian; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Nurse, Paul

    2010-09-15

    To ensure equal replication of the genome in every eukaryotic cell cycle, replication origins fire only once each S phase and do not fire after passive replication. Failure in these controls can lead to local amplification, contributing to genome instability and the development of cancer. To identify features of replication origins important for such amplification, we have investigated origin firing and local genome amplification in the presence of excess helicase loaders Cdc18 and Cdt1 in fission yeast. We find that S phase controls are attenuated and coordination of origin firing is lost, resulting in local amplification. Specific origins are necessary for amplification but act only within a permissive chromosomal context. Origins associated with amplification are highly AT-rich, fire efficiently and early during mitotic S phase, and are located in large intergenic regions. We propose that these features predispose replication origins to re-fire within a single S phase, or to remain active after passive replication.

  17. A Dynamic Mobile DNA Family in the Yeast Mitochondrial Genome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Baojun; Hao, Weilong

    2015-04-20

    Transposable elements (TEs) are an important factor shaping eukaryotic genomes. Although a significant body of research has been conducted on the abundance of TEs in nuclear genomes, TEs in mitochondrial genomes remain elusive. In this study, we successfully assembled 28 complete yeast mitochondrial genomes and took advantage of the power of population genomics to determine mobile DNAs and their propensity. We have observed compelling evidence of GC clusters propagating within the mitochondrial genome and being horizontally transferred between species. These mitochondrial TEs experience rapid diversification by nucleotide substitution and, more importantly, undergo dynamic merger and shuffling to form new TEs. Given the hyper mobile and transformable nature of mitochondrial TEs, our findings open the door to a deeper understanding of eukaryotic mitochondrial genome evolution and the origin of nonautonomous TEs. Copyright © 2015 Wu and Hao.

  18. In vivo analysis of mtDNA replication defects in yeast.

    PubMed

    Baruffini, Enrico; Ferrero, Iliana; Foury, Françoise

    2010-08-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the capacity to survive large deletions or total loss of mtDNA (petite mutants), and thus in the last few years it has been used as a model system to study defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance produced by mutations in genes involved in mtDNA replication. In this paper we describe methods to obtain strains harboring mutations in nuclear genes essential for the integrity of mtDNA, to measure the frequency and the nature of petite mutants, to estimate the point mutation frequency in mtDNA and to determine whether a nuclear mutation is recessive or dominant and, in the latter case, the kind of dominance. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Transcription-Dependent DNA Transactions in the Mitochondrial Genome of a Yeast Hypersuppressive Petite Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Eric; Clayton, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains highly conserved sequences, called rep/ori, that are associated with several aspects of its metabolism. These rep/ori sequences confer the transmission advantage exhibited by a class of deletion mutants called hypersuppressive petite mutants. In addition, because they share features with the mitochondrial leading-strand DNA replication origin of mammals, rep/ori sequences have also been proposed to participate in mtDNA replication initiation. Like the mammalian origins, where transcription is used as a priming mechanism for DNA synthesis, yeast rep/ori sequences contain an active promoter. Although transcription is required for maintenance of wild-type mtDNA in yeast, the role of the rep/ori promoter as a cis-acting element involved in the replication of wild-type mtDNA is unclear, since mitochondrial deletion mutants need neither transcription nor a rep/ori sequence to maintain their genome. Similarly, transcription from the rep/ori promoter does not seem to be necessary for biased inheritance of mtDNA. As a step to elucidate the function of the rep/ori promoter, we have attempted to detect transcription-dependent DNA transactions in the mtDNA of a hypersuppressive petite mutant. We have examined the mtDNA of the well-characterized petite mutant a-1/1R/Z1, whose repeat unit shelters the rep/ori sequence ori1, in strains carrying either wild-type or null alleles of the nuclear genes encoding the mitochondrial transcription apparatus. Complex DNA transactions were detected that take place around GC-cluster C, an evolutionarily conserved GC-rich sequence block immediately downstream from the rep/ori promoter. These transactions are strictly dependent upon mitochondrial transcription. PMID:9566917

  20. Transcription-dependent DNA transactions in the mitochondrial genome of a yeast hypersuppressive petite mutant.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, E; Clayton, D A

    1998-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains highly conserved sequences, called rep/ori, that are associated with several aspects of its metabolism. These rep/ori sequences confer the transmission advantage exhibited by a class of deletion mutants called hypersuppressive petite mutants. In addition, because they share features with the mitochondrial leading-strand DNA replication origin of mammals, rep/ori sequences have also been proposed to participate in mtDNA replication initiation. Like the mammalian origins, where transcription is used as a priming mechanism for DNA synthesis, yeast rep/ori sequences contain an active promoter. Although transcription is required for maintenance of wild-type mtDNA in yeast, the role of the rep/ori promoter as a cis-acting element involved in the replication of wild-type mtDNA is unclear, since mitochondrial deletion mutants need neither transcription nor a rep/ori sequence to maintain their genome. Similarly, transcription from the rep/ori promoter does not seem to be necessary for biased inheritance of mtDNA. As a step to elucidate the function of the rep/ori promoter, we have attempted to detect transcription-dependent DNA transactions in the mtDNA of a hypersuppressive petite mutant. We have examined the mtDNA of the well-characterized petite mutant a-1/1R/Z1, whose repeat unit shelters the rep/ori sequence ori1, in strains carrying either wild-type or null alleles of the nuclear genes encoding the mitochondrial transcription apparatus. Complex DNA transactions were detected that take place around GC-cluster C, an evolutionarily conserved GC-rich sequence block immediately downstream from the rep/ori promoter. These transactions are strictly dependent upon mitochondrial transcription.

  1. The Strictly Aerobic Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Tolerates Loss of a Mitochondrial DNA-Packaging Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaiova, Jana; Arata, Kosuke; Matsunobu, Miki; Ono, Bungo; Aoki, Tomoyo; Lajdova, Dana; Nebohacova, Martina; Nosek, Jozef; Miyakawa, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is highly compacted into DNA-protein structures termed mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). The key mt-nucleoid components responsible for mtDNA condensation are HMG box-containing proteins such as mammalian mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and Abf2p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To gain insight into the function and organization of mt-nucleoids in strictly aerobic organisms, we initiated studies of these DNA-protein structures in Yarrowia lipolytica. We identified a principal component of mt-nucleoids in this yeast and termed it YlMhb1p (Y. lipolytica mitochondrial HMG box-containing protein 1). YlMhb1p contains two putative HMG boxes contributing both to DNA binding and to its ability to compact mtDNA in vitro. Phenotypic analysis of a Δmhb1 strain lacking YlMhb1p resulted in three interesting findings. First, although the mutant exhibits clear differences in mt-nucleoids accompanied by a large decrease in the mtDNA copy number and the number of mtDNA-derived transcripts, its respiratory characteristics and growth under most of the conditions tested are indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain. Second, our results indicate that a potential imbalance between subunits of the respiratory chain encoded separately by nuclear DNA and mtDNA is prevented at a (post)translational level. Third, we found that mtDNA in the Δmhb1 strain is more prone to mutations, indicating that mtHMG box-containing proteins protect the mitochondrial genome against mutagenic events. PMID:24972935

  2. Yeast Pif1 Accelerates Annealing of Complementary DNA Strands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pif1 is a helicase involved in the maintenance of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in eukaryotes. Here we report a new activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1, annealing of complementary DNA strands. We identified preferred substrates for annealing as those that generate a duplex product with a single-stranded overhang relative to a blunt end duplex. Importantly, we show that Pif1 can anneal DNA in the presence of ATP and Mg2+. Pif1-mediated annealing also occurs in the presence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins. Additionally, we show that partial duplex substrates with 3′-single-stranded overhangs such as those generated during double-strand break repair can be annealed by Pif1. PMID:25393406

  3. Yeast Pif1 accelerates annealing of complementary DNA strands.

    PubMed

    Ramanagoudr-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Byrd, Alicia K; Dahl, Christopher; Raney, Kevin D

    2014-12-09

    Pif1 is a helicase involved in the maintenance of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in eukaryotes. Here we report a new activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1, annealing of complementary DNA strands. We identified preferred substrates for annealing as those that generate a duplex product with a single-stranded overhang relative to a blunt end duplex. Importantly, we show that Pif1 can anneal DNA in the presence of ATP and Mg(2+). Pif1-mediated annealing also occurs in the presence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins. Additionally, we show that partial duplex substrates with 3'-single-stranded overhangs such as those generated during double-strand break repair can be annealed by Pif1.

  4. Comparison of DNA-based techniques for differentiation of production strains of ale and lager brewing yeast.

    PubMed

    Kopecká, J; Němec, M; Matoulková, D

    2016-06-01

    Brewing yeasts are classified into two species-Saccharomyces pastorianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most of the brewing yeast strains are natural interspecies hybrids typically polyploids and their identification is thus often difficult giving heterogenous results according to the method used. We performed genetic characterization of a set of the brewing yeast strains coming from several yeast culture collections by combination of various DNA-based techniques. The aim of this study was to select a method for species-specific identification of yeast and discrimination of yeast strains according to their technological classification. A group of 40 yeast strains were characterized using PCR-RFLP analysis of ITS-5·8S, NTS, HIS4 and COX2 genes, multiplex PCR, RAPD-PCR of genomic DNA, mtDNA-RFLP and electrophoretic karyotyping. Reliable differentiation of yeast to the species level was achieved by PCR-RFLP of HIS4 gene. Numerical analysis of the obtained RAPD-fingerprints and karyotype revealed species-specific clustering corresponding with the technological classification of the strains. Taxonomic position and partial hybrid nature of strains were verified by multiplex PCR. Differentiation among species using the PCR-RFLP of ITS-5·8S and NTS region was shown to be unreliable. Karyotyping and RFLP of mitochondrial DNA evinced small inaccuracies in strain categorization. PCR-RFLP of HIS4 gene and RAPD-PCR of genomic DNA are reliable and suitable methods for fast identification of yeast strains. RAPD-PCR with primer 21 is a fast and reliable method applicable for differentiation of brewing yeasts with only 35% similarity of fingerprint profile between the two main technological groups (ale and lager) of brewing strains. It was proved that PCR-RFLP method of HIS4 gene enables precise discrimination among three technologically important Saccharomyces species. Differentiation of brewing yeast to the strain level can be achieved using the RAPD-PCR technique. © 2016 The

  5. Identification of a human cDNA with high homology to yeast omnipotent suppressor 45.

    PubMed

    Grenett, H E; Bounelis, P; Fuller, G M

    1992-01-15

    Omnipotent suppression is a well-established phenomenon in yeast and bacteria in which nonsense mutations are misread. Wild-type (wt) suppressors are presumed to be involved in ensuring the fidelity of translation. We report a human homolog to wt yeast omnipotent suppressor 45 which shares 63% identity at the nucleotide level in the area of open reading frame (ORF) and 73% similarity at the amino acid (aa) level. The aa sequence of the human protein was deduced from a 2.3-kb cDNA (TB3-1) isolated from an adenocarcinoma T84 cell line cDNA library. The cDNA contains an ORF of 1284 bp which encodes a 47.8-kDa protein. Two transcripts for the clone were identified (2.6 and 4.0 kb) in a variety of human cell types. The strong structural similarity to yeast omnipotent suppressor 45, and its widespread expression suggest that this cDNA may play a role in the accurate recognition of nonsense codons in mammalian cells.

  6. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E. H.; Naylor, Maria L.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Gygi, Steven P.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast. PMID:27298372

  7. Transposon tools for recombinant DNA manipulation: characterization of transcriptional regulators from yeast, Xenopus, and mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, B A; Conlon, F L; Manzanares, M; Millar, J B; Kanuga, N; Sharpe, J; Krumlauf, R; Smith, J C; Sedgwick, S G

    1996-01-01

    Transposon Tn1000 has been adapted to deliver novel DNA sequences for manipulating recombinant DNA. The transposition procedure for these "tagged" Tn1000s is simple and applicable to most plasmids in current use. For yeast molecular biology, tagged Tn1000s introduce a variety of yeast selective markers and replication origins into plasmids and cosmids. In addition, the beta-globin minimal promoter and lacZ gene of Tn(beta)lac serve as a mobile reporter of eukaryotic enhancer activity. In this paper, Tn(beta)lac was used to localize a mouse HoxB-complex enhancer in transgenic mice. Other tagged transposons create Gal4 DNA-binding-domain fusions, in either Escherichia coli or yeast plasmids, for use in one- and two-hybrid tests of transcriptional activation and protein-protein interaction, respectively. With such fusions, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi6 G1/S-phase transcription factor and the Xenopus laevis Pintallavis developmental regulator are shown to activate transcription. Furthermore, the same transposon insertions also facilitated mapping of the Swi6 and Pintallavis domains responsible for transcriptional activation. Thus, as well as introducing novel sequences, tagged transposons share the numerous other applications of transposition such as producing insertional mutations, creating deletion series, or serving as mobile primer sites for DNA sequencing. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8610121

  8. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E H; Naylor, Maria L; Dephoure, Noah; Ballif, Bryan A; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gygi, Steven P; Elledge, Stephen J

    2016-06-28

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast.

  9. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human. Progress report, November 1, 1991--April 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  10. Cloning human telomeric DNA fragments into Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a yeast-artificial-chromosome vector

    SciTech Connect

    Riethman, H.C.; Burke, D.T.; Olson, M.V. ); Moyzis, R.K.; Meyne, J. )

    1989-08-01

    Telomeric fragments of human DNA ranging in size from 50 to 250 kilobases were cloned into Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a yeast-artificial-chromosome (YAC) vector. Six human-telomeric YAC (HTY) strains were selected by virtue of the specific hybridization of their DNA with the human telomeric terminal-repeat sequence (TTAGGG){sub n}, and the telomeric localization of this sequence within each YAC was demonstrated by its sensitivity to nuclease BAL-31. In situ hybridization of DNA from three of these HTY strains with human metaphase chromosomes yielded discrete patterns of hybridization signals at the telomeres of a limited number of human chromosomes, different for each clone. DNA from selected cosmid subclones of one of the HTY strains was used to localize the origin of the cloned telomeric DNA by in situ hybridization to the tip of the long arm of chromosome 7.

  11. Efficient yeast ChIP-Seq using multiplex short-read DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lefrançois, Philippe; Euskirchen, Ghia M; Auerbach, Raymond K; Rozowsky, Joel; Gibson, Theodore; Yellman, Christopher M; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Short-read high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies provide new tools to answer biological questions. However, high cost and low throughput limit their widespread use, particularly in organisms with smaller genomes such as S. cerevisiae. Although ChIP-Seq in mammalian cell lines is replacing array-based ChIP-chip as the standard for transcription factor binding studies, ChIP-Seq in yeast is still underutilized compared to ChIP-chip. We developed a multiplex barcoding system that allows simultaneous sequencing and analysis of multiple samples using Illumina's platform. We applied this method to analyze the chromosomal distributions of three yeast DNA binding proteins (Ste12, Cse4 and RNA PolII) and a reference sample (input DNA) in a single experiment and demonstrate its utility for rapid and accurate results at reduced costs. Results We developed a barcoding ChIP-Seq method for the concurrent analysis of transcription factor binding sites in yeast. Our multiplex strategy generated high quality data that was indistinguishable from data obtained with non-barcoded libraries. None of the barcoded adapters induced differences relative to a non-barcoded adapter when applied to the same DNA sample. We used this method to map the binding sites for Cse4, Ste12 and Pol II throughout the yeast genome and we found 148 binding targets for Cse4, 823 targets for Ste12 and 2508 targets for PolII. Cse4 was strongly bound to all yeast centromeres as expected and the remaining non-centromeric targets correspond to highly expressed genes in rich media. The presence of Cse4 non-centromeric binding sites was not reported previously. Conclusion We designed a multiplex short-read DNA sequencing method to perform efficient ChIP-Seq in yeast and other small genome model organisms. This method produces accurate results with higher throughput and reduced cost. Given constant improvements in high-throughput sequencing technologies, increasing multiplexing will be possible to

  12. Packaging of Single DNA Molecules by the Yeast Mitochondrial Protein Abf2p

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Laurence R.; Friddle, Raymond; Noy, Aleksandr; Baldwin, Enoch; Martin, Shelley S.; Corzett, Michele; Balhorn, Rod; Baskin, Ronald J.

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA are packaged by proteins in a very different manner. Although protein-DNA complexes called “nucleoids” have been identified as the genetic units of mitochondrial inheritance in yeast and man, little is known about their physical structure. The yeast mitochondrial protein Abf2p was shown to be sufficient to compact linear dsDNA, without the benefit of supercoiling, using optical and atomic force microscopy single molecule techniques. The packaging of DNA by Abf2p was observed to be very weak as evidenced by a fast Abf2p off-rate (koff = 0.014 ± 0.001 s−1) and the extremely small forces (<0.6 pN) stabilizing the condensed protein-DNA complex. Atomic force microscopy images of individual complexes showed the 190-nm structures are loosely packaged relative to nuclear chromatin. This organization may leave mtDNA accessible for transcription and replication, while making it more vulnerable to damage. PMID:14507714

  13. Cloning and sequencing of the PIF gene involved in repair and recombination of yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Foury, F; Lahaye, A

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear gene PIF of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for both repair of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and recognition of a recombinogenic signal characterized by a 26-bp palindromic AT sequence in the ery region of mtDNA. This gene has been cloned in yeast by genetic complementation of pif mutants. Its chromosomal disruption does not destroy the genetic function of mitochondria. The nucleotide sequence of the 3.5-kb insert from a complementing plasmid reveals an open reading frame encoding a potential protein of 857 amino acids and Mr = 97,500. An ATP-binding domain is present in the central part of the gene and in the carboxy-terminal region a putative DNA-binding site is present. Its alpha helix-turn-alpha helix motif is found in DNA-binding proteins such as lambda and lactose repressors which recognize symmetric sequences. Significant amino acid homology is observed with yeast RAD3 and E. coli UvrD (helicase II) proteins which are required for excision repair of damaged DNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3038524

  14. Characterization of a cDNA from Beta maritima that confers nickel tolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Gonensin O; Kaya, Alaattin; Koc, Ahmet; Noll, Gundula A; Prüfer, Dirk; Karakaya, Hüseyin Caglar

    2014-04-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient due to its involvement in many enzymatic reactions as a cofactor. However, excess of this element is toxic to biological systems. Here, we constructed a cDNA library from Beta maritima and screened it in the yeast system to identify genes that confer resistance to toxic levels of nickel. A cDNA clone (NIC6), which encodes for a putative membrane protein with unknown function, was found to help yeast cells to tolerate toxic levels of nickel. A GFP fused form of Nic6 protein was localized to multivesicular structures in tobacco epidermal cells. Thus, our results suggest a possible role of Nic6 in nickel and intracellular ion homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. One-step assembly in yeast of 25 overlapping DNA fragments to form a complete synthetic Mycoplasma genitalium genome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G; Benders, Gwynedd A; Axelrod, Kevin C; Zaveri, Jayshree; Algire, Mikkel A; Moodie, Monzia; Montague, Michael G; Venter, J Craig; Smith, Hamilton O; Hutchison, Clyde A

    2008-12-23

    We previously reported assembly and cloning of the synthetic Mycoplasma genitalium JCVI-1.0 genome in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by recombination of six overlapping DNA fragments to produce a 592-kb circle. Here we extend this approach by demonstrating assembly of the synthetic genome from 25 overlapping fragments in a single step. The use of yeast recombination greatly simplifies the assembly of large DNA molecules from both synthetic and natural fragments.

  16. How cells recognize damaged DNA: Clues from xeroderma pigmentosum and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, G.; Chang, E.; Patterson, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by the defective excision repair of DNA damaged by many agents, including ultraviolet radiation (UV) and cisplatin. We have identified a factor in human cells that recognizes multiple forms of DNA damage and is absent in XP complementation group E. Denoted XPE binding factor, it is expressed at five-fold higher levels in tumor cell lines resistant to the antitumor drug cisplatin. Finally, although it does not have photoreactivating activity, XPE binding factor shares multiple binding characteristics with yeast photolyase, suggesting that it is the human homolog of photolyase.

  17. Situation-dependent repair of DNA damage in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    von Borstel, R.C.; Hastings, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of channelling of lesions in DNA into defined repair systems has been used to explain many aspects of induced and spontaneous mutation. The channelling hypothesis states that lesions excluded from one repair process will be taken up by another repair process. This is a simplification. The three known modes of repair of damage induced by radiation are not equivalent modes of repair; they are, instead, different solutions to the problem of replacement of damaged molecules with new molecules which have the same informational content as those that were damaged. The mode of repair that is used is the result of the response to the situation in which the damage takes place. Thus, when the most likely mode of repair does not take place, then the situation changes with respect to the repair of the lesion; the lesion may enter the replication fork and be reparable by another route.

  18. Nucleosome organization of the yeast 2-micrometer DNA plasmid: a eukaryotic minichromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R G; Fangman, W L

    1979-01-01

    The eukaryotic microorganism Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains 50-100 copies per cell of a circular plasmid called 2-micrometer DNA. The intracellular structure of these molecules, which represent about 4% of the total DNA, was examined by digestion of total cellular chromatin with micrococcal nuclease (nucleate 3'-oligonucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.31.1). Nuclease-resistant DNA fragments were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and 2-micrometer DNA sequences were detected by hybridization. The 2-micrometer and chromosomal DNA digestion patterns were very similar indicating that both types of DNA are condensed into nucleosomes. An analysis of these digestion patterns showed that the kinetics of digestion of 2-micrometer chromatin and total chromatin are similar and that both have the same nucleosome repeat length of about 165 base pairs. Native 2-micrometer plasmids were examined by zone sedimentation in sucrose gradients containing 0.15 M NaCl and were found to have a sedimentation constant of 75 S, about 3 times the sedimentation constant of protein-free 2-micrometer DNA. This sedimentation property is what would be expected for a 2-micrometer DNA minichromosome. We conclude that within the cell 2-micrometer DNA molecules are organized in a chromatin structure very similar to that of the yeast chromosomes. Images PMID:392520

  19. Introduction of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1 into normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the work described herein is to determine how UV light kills and mutates human cells. Specifically, the hypothesis to be tested states that the major cause of cell death is the cyclobutane dimer. The yeast (S. cerevisiae) enzyme photolyase provides an elegant means of dissecting the biological effects of the two lesions. Photolyase, the product of the PHR1 gene, catalyzes the visible light-dependent reversal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Introducing the gene for photolyase into human cells, which do not have a functional photoreactivation mechanism, should allow specific repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. To express the yeast DNA repair gene in human cells, the yeast PHR1 coding sequence was cloned into the mammalian expression vector pRSV4NEO-I. The resulting plasmid, pRSVPHR1, contains the coding sequence of the yeast gene, under control of transcription signals recognized by mammalian cells, and the dominant selectable gene neo. pRSVPHR1 was introduced into normal and XP SV40-transformed fibroblasts by the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique, and G418-resistant clones were isolated. The level of PHR1 expression was determined by cytoplasmic RNA dot blots. Two clones, XP-3B and GM-20A, had high levels of expression.

  20. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-11-20

    Detection, identification and classification of yeasts have undergone major changes in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of the nuclear large subunit rRNA gene and from ITS now permits many laboratories to identify species quickly and accurately, thus replacing the laborious and often inaccurate phenotypic tests previously used. Phylogenetic analysis of gene sequences has resulted in a major revision of yeast systematics resulting in redefinition of nearly all genera. This new understanding of species relationships has prompted a change of rules for naming and classifying yeasts and other fungi, and these new rules are presented in the recently implemented International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (Melbourne Code). The use of molecular methods for species identification and the impact of Code changes on classification will be discussed, especially in the context of food and beverage spoilage yeasts.

  1. Meiotic chromosome synapsis in yeast can occur without spo11-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Hasanuzzaman; Schmekel, Karin

    2004-10-01

    Proper chromosome segregation and formation of viable gametes depend on synapsis and recombination between homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Previous reports have shown that the synaptic structures, the synaptonemal complexes (SCs), do not occur in yeast cells with the SPO11 gene removed. The Spo11 enzyme makes double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the DNA and thereby initiates recombination. The view has thus developed that synapsis in yeast strictly depends on the initiation of recombination. Synapsis in some other species (Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans) is independent of recombination events, and SCs are found in spo11 mutants. This difference between species led us to reexamine spo11 deletion mutants of yeast. Using antibodies against Zip1, a SC component, we found that a small fraction (1%) of the spo11 null mutant cells can indeed form wild-type-like SCs. We further looked for synapsis in a spo11 mutant strain that accumulates pachytene cells (spo11Delta ndt80Delta), and found that the frequency of cells with apparently complete SC formation was 10%. Other phenotypic criteria, such as spore viability and homologous chromosome juxtaposition measured by FISH labeling of chromosomal markers, agree with several previous reports of the spo11 mutant. Our results demonstrate that although the Spo11-induced DSBs obviously promote synapsis in yeast, the presence of Spo11 is not an absolute requirement for synapsis.

  2. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  3. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013.

  4. Activation of polyomavirus DNA replication by yeast GAL4 is dependent on its transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Cook, E R; Hassell, J A

    1991-01-01

    The polyomavirus replication origin contains transcriptional regulatory sequences. To determine how these elements function in DNA replication, and to learn whether a common mechanism underlies the activation of transcription and DNA replication, we tested whether a well-characterized transcriptional activator, yeast GAL4, was capable of stimulating DNA replication and transcription in the same mammalian cell line. We observed that GAL4 activated polyomavirus DNA replication in mouse cells when its binding site was juxtaposed to the late border of the polyomavirus origin core. Synergistic activation of DNA replication was achieved by multimerization of the GAL4 binding site. Analysis of GAL4 mutant proteins, GAL4 hybrid proteins and mutants of the latter revealed that the activation domains of these transcriptional activators were required to stimulate DNA replication. In agreement with previously published data, the activation domains of GAL4 were also required to enhance transcription in the same mouse cell line. These observations implicate transcriptional activators in Py DNA replication and suggest that similar mechanisms govern the activation of transcription and DNA replication. Images PMID:1849079

  5. Ribosomal DNA spacer probes for yeast identification: studies in the genus Metschnikowia.

    PubMed

    Henriques, M; Sá-Nogueira, I; Giménez-Jurado, G; van Uden, N

    1991-02-01

    To test whether DNA probes derived from ribosomal DNA spacer sequences are suitable for rapid and species-specific yeast identification, a pilot study was undertaken. A 7.7 kb entire ribosomal DNA unit of the type strain of Metschnikowia reukaufii was isolated, cloned and mapped. A 0.65 kb BamHI-HpaI fragment containing non-transcribed spacer sequences was amplified and selected for testing as a 32P hybridization probe with total DNA from the type strains of M. reukaufii, M. pulcherrima, M. lunata, M. bicuspidata, M. australis, M. zobellii, M. krissii, five other strains identified as M. reukaufii and strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Hansenula canadensis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica. The probe hybridized exclusively with DNA from the type strain and four other strains of M. reukaufii. DNA from one strain labelled M. reukaufii did not hybridize with the probe. Subsequent % G + C comparison and DNA-DNA reassociation with the type strain revealed that the non-hybridizing strain does not belong to the species M. reukaufii.

  6. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Louise Prakash

    2000-01-15

    Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'-ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of the carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does not affect

  7. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Louisek Prakash

    2000-01-15

    OAK B202 Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of the carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does

  8. Surface Etching and DNA Damage Induced by Low-Energy Ion Irradiation in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuelan; Xu, An; Dai, Yin; Yuan, Hang; Yu, Zengliang

    2011-06-01

    Bio-effects of survival and etching damage on cell surface and DNA strand breaks were investigated in the yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae after exposure by nitrogen ion with an energy below 40 keV. The result showed that 16% of trehalose provided definite protection for cells against vacuum stress compared with glycerol. In contrast to vacuum control, significant morphological damage and DNA strand breaks were observed, in yeast cells bombarded with low-energy nitrogen, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, PI (propidium iodide) fluorescent staining indicated that cell integrity could be destroyed by ion irradiation. Cell damage eventually affected cell viability and free radicals were involved in cell damage as shown by DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) rescue experiment. Our primary experiments demonstrated that yeast cells can be used as an optional experimental model to study the biological effects of low energy ions and be applied to further investigate the mechanism(s) underlying the bio-effects of eukaryotic cells.

  9. Chromatin structures and transcription of rDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Dammann, R; Lucchini, R; Koller, T; Sogo, J M

    1993-01-01

    The chromatin structure of yeast ribosomal DNA was analyzed in vivo by crosslinking intact cells with psoralen. We found that in exponentially growing cultures the regions coding for the 35S rRNA precursor fall into two distinct classes. One class was highly accessible to psoralen and associated with nascent RNAs, characteristic for transcriptionally active rRNA genes devoid of nucleosomes, whereas the other class showed a crosslinking pattern indistinguishable from that of bulk chromatin and was interpreted to represent the inactive rRNA gene copies. By crosslinking the same strain growing in complex or minimal medium, we have shown that yeast cells can modulate the proportion of active (non-nucleosomal) and inactive (nucleosomal) rRNA gene copies in response to variations in environmental conditions which suggests that yeast can regulate rRNA synthesis by varying the number of active gene copies, in contrast to the vertebrate cells studied so far. Whereas intergenic spacers flanking inactive rRNA gene copies are packaged in a regular nucleosomal array, spacers flanking active genes show an unusual crosslinking pattern suggesting a complex interaction of regulatory factors and histones with DNA. Images PMID:8506130

  10. Rapid DNA, RNA and protein extraction protocols optimized for slow continuously growing yeast cultures.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Kalesh; Amariei, Cornelia; Tomita, Masaru; Murray, Douglas B

    2012-08-01

    Conventional extraction protocols for yeast have been developed for relatively rapid-growing low cell density cultures of laboratory strains and often do not have the integrity for frequent sampling of cultures. Therefore, these protocols are usually inefficient for cultures under slow growth conditions or of non-laboratory strains. We have developed a combined mechanical and chemical disruption procedure using vigorous bead-beating that can consistently disrupt yeast cells (> 95%), irrespective of cell cycle and metabolic state. Using this disruption technique coupled with quenching, we have developed DNA, RNA and protein extraction protocols that are optimized for a large number of samples from slow-growing high-density industrial yeast cultures. Additionally, sample volume, the use of expensive reagents/enzymes, handling times and incubations were minimized. We have tested the reproducibility of our methods using triplicate/time-series extractions and compared these with commonly used protocols or commercially available kits. Moreover, we utilized a simple flow-cytometric approach to estimate the mitochondrial DNA copy number. Based on the results, our methods have shown higher reproducibility, yield and quality. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Replication protein A binds to regulatory elements in yeast DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, K K; Samson, L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to DNA damage by arresting cell cycle progression (thereby preventing the replication and segregation of damaged chromosomes) and by inducing the expression of numerous genes, some of which are involved in DNA repair, DNA replication, and DNA metabolism. Induction of the S. cerevisiae 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase repair gene (MAG) by DNA-damaging agents requires one upstream activating sequence (UAS) and two upstream repressing sequences (URS1 and URS2) in the MAG promoter. Sequences similar to the MAG URS elements are present in at least 11 other S. cerevisiae DNA repair and metabolism genes. Replication protein A (Rpa) is known as a single-stranded-DNA-binding protein that is involved in the initiation and elongation steps of DNA replication, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination. We now show that the MAG URS1 and URS2 elements form similar double-stranded, sequence-specific, DNA-protein complexes and that both complexes contain Rpa. Moreover, Rpa appears to bind the MAG URS1-like elements found upstream of 11 other DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. These results lead us to hypothesize that Rpa may be involved in the regulation of a number of DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7761422

  12. Genetic transformation of the yeast Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis with non-homologous DNA.

    PubMed

    Miklenić, Marina; Štafa, Anamarija; Bajić, Ana; Žunar, Bojan; Lisnić, Berislav; Svetec, Ivan-Krešimir

    2013-05-01

    Yeast Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis is probably the most common contaminant in wineries and ethanol production processes. The considerable economic losses caused by this yeast, but also its ability to produce and tolerate high ethanol concentrations, make it an attractive subject for research with potential for industrial applications. Unfortunately, efforts to understand the biology of D. bruxellensis and facilitate its broader use in industry are hampered by the lack of adequate procedures for delivery of exogenous DNA into this organism. Here we describe the development of transformation protocols (spheroplast transformation, LiAc/PEG method, and electroporation) and report the first genetic transformation of yeast D. bruxellensis. A linear heterologous DNA fragment carrying the kanMX4 sequence was used for transformation, which allowed transformants to be selected on plates containing geneticin. We found the spheroplast transformation method using 1M sorbitol as osmotic stabilizer to be inappropriate because sorbitol strikingly decreases the plating efficiency of both D. bruxellensis spheroplast and intact cells. However, we managed to modify the LiAc/ PEG transformation method and electroporation to accommodate D. bruxellensis transformation, achieving efficiencies of 0.6-16 and 10-20 transformants/microg DNA, respectively. The stability of the transformants ranged from 93.6% to 100%. All putative transformants were analyzed by Southern blot using the kanMX4 sequence as a hybridization probe, which confirmed that the transforming DNA fragment had integrated into the genome. The results of the molecular analysis were consistent with the expected illegitimate integration of a heterologous transforming fragment.

  13. Selective in vitro transcription by purified yeast RNA polymerase II on cloned 2 micron DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ballario, P; Buongiorno-Nardelli, M; Carnevali, F; Di Mauro, E; Pedone, F

    1981-01-01

    The in vitro transcription properties of purified yeast RNA polymerase II have been analyzed on prokaryotic plasmids (pBR322 and pBR313) and chimaeric plasmids bearing yeast 2 micron sequences (BTYP 1, BTYH 2 and BTYH 3). Conditions for selective transcription of the 2 micron DNA sequences in chimaeric plasmids have been determined. pBR322 and pBR313 are not transcribed by the purified RNA polymerase II when not bearing eukaryotic inserts. We show that the agarose gel electrophoretic analysis of ternary transcription complexes allows the localization of nascent RNA chains. The RNA produced has been visualized by electron microscopy (nascent RNA hybridization loops) and by gel electrophoretic analysis. All the observed properties are shared by RNA polymerase II purified by a conventional method (1) and by a rapid alternative procedure described herein. The peculiar properties of a partially purified form of RNA polymerase II are reported. Images PMID:7029462

  14. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-03-03

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ(0)). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ(0) cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ(0) cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ(0) cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent.

  15. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ0 cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent. PMID:28357227

  16. Site-specific DNA repair at the nucleosome level in a yeast minichromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Smerdon, M.J.; Thoma, F. )

    1990-05-18

    The rate of excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers (PDs) was measured at specific sites in each strand of a yeast minichromosome containing an active gene (URA3), a replication origin (ARS1), and positioned nucleosomes. All six PD sites analyzed in the transcribed URA3 strand were repaired more rapidly (greater than 5-fold on average) than any of the nine PD sites analyzed in the nontranscribed strand. Efficient repair also occurred in both strands of a disrupted TRP1 gene (ten PD sites), containing four unstable nucleosomes, and in a nucleosome gap at the 5' end of URA3 (two PD sites). Conversely, slow repair occurred in both strands immediately downstream of the URA3 gene (12 of 14 PD sites). This region contains the ARS1 consensus sequence, a nucleosome gap, and two stable nucleosomes. Thus, modulation of DNA repair occurs in a simple yeast minichromosome and correlates with gene expression, nucleosome stability, and (possibly) control of replication.

  17. Genetic analysis of yeast RPA1 reveals its multiple functions in DNA metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Umezu, K; Sugawara, N; Chen, C; Haber, J E; Kolodner, R D

    1998-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein identified as an essential factor for SV40 DNA replication in vitro. To understand the in vivo functions of RPA, we mutagenized the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RFA1 gene and identified 19 ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation- and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-sensitive mutants and 5 temperature-sensitive mutants. The UV- and MMS-sensitive mutants showed up to 10(4) to 10(5) times increased sensitivity to these agents. Some of the UV- and MMS-sensitive mutants were killed by an HO-induced double-strand break at MAT. Physical analysis of recombination in one UV- and MMS-sensitive rfa1 mutant demonstrated that it was defective for mating type switching and single-strand annealing recombination. Two temperature-sensitive mutants were characterized in detail, and at the restrictive temperature were found to have an arrest phenotype and DNA content indicative of incomplete DNA replication. DNA sequence analysis indicated that most of the mutations altered amino acids that were conserved between yeast, human, and Xenopus RPA1. Taken together, we conclude that RPA1 has multiple roles in vivo and functions in DNA replication, repair, and recombination, like the single-stranded DNA-binding proteins of bacteria and phages. PMID:9539419

  18. Monitoring DNA replication in fission yeast by incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Hua, Hui; Kearsey, Stephen E

    2011-05-01

    We report procedures to allow incorporation and detection of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) in fission yeast, a thymidine analogue which has some technical advantages over use of bromodeoxyuridine. Low concentrations of EdU (1 µM) are sufficient to allow detection of incorporation in cells expressing thymidine kinase and human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1). However EdU is toxic and activates the rad3-dependent checkpoint, resulting in cell cycle arrest, potentially limiting its applications for procedures which require labelling over more than one cell cycle. Limited DNA synthesis, when elongation is largely blocked by hydroxyurea, can be readily detected by EdU incorporation using fluorescence microscopy. Thus EdU should be useful for detecting early stages of S phase, or DNA synthesis associated with DNA repair and recombination.

  19. Direct evidence for SIR2 modulation of chromatin structure in yeast rDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fritze, C E; Verschueren, K; Strich, R; Easton Esposito, R

    1997-01-01

    The yeast SIR2 gene maintains inactive chromatin domains required for transcriptional repression at the silent mating-type loci and telomeres. We previously demonstrated that SIR2 also acts to repress mitotic and meiotic recombination between the tandem ribosomal RNA gene array (rDNA). Here we address whether rDNA chromatin structure is altered by loss of SIR2 function by in vitro and in vivo assays of sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease and dam methyltransferase, respectively, and present the first chromatin study that maps sites of SIR2 action within the rDNA locus. Control studies at the MAT alpha locus also revealed a previously undetected MNase-sensitive site at the a1-alpha 2 divergent promoter which is protected in sir2 mutant cells by the derepressed a1-alpha 2 regulator. In rDNA, SIR2 is required for a more closed chromatin structure in two regions: SRR1, the major SIR-Responsive Region in the non-transcribed spacer, and SRR2, in the 18S rRNA coding region. None of the changes in rDNA detected in sir2 mutants are due to the presence of the a1-alpha 2 repressor. Reduced recombination in the rDNA correlates with a small, reproducible transcriptional silencing position effect. Deletion and overexpression studies demonstrate that SIR2, but not SIR1, SIR3 or SIR4, is required for this rDNA position effect. Significantly, rDNA transcriptional silencing and rDNA chromatin accessibility respond to SIR2 dosage, indicating that SIR2 is a limiting component required for chromatin modeling in rDNA. PMID:9351831

  20. Synapsis-Mediated Fusion of Free DNA Ends Forms Inverted Dimer Plasmids in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kunes, S.; Botstein, D.; Fox, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    When yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is transformed with linearized plasmid DNA and the ends of the plasmid do not share homology with the yeast genome, circular inverted (head-to-head) dimer plasmids are the principal product of repair. By measurements of the DNA concentration dependence of transformation with a linearized plasmid, and by transformation with mixtures of genetically marked plasmids, we show that two plasmid molecules are required to form an inverted dimer plasmid. Several observations suggest that homologous pairing accounts for the head-to-head joining of the two plasmid molecules. First, an enhanced frequency of homologous recombination is detected when genetically marked plasmids undergo end-to-end fusion. Second, when a plasmid is linearized within an inverted repeat, such that its ends could undergo head-to-tail homologous pairing, it is repaired by intramolecular head-to-tail joining. Last, in the joining of homologous linearized plasmids of different length, a shorter molecule can acquire a longer plasmid end by homologous recombination. The formation of inverted dimer plasmids may be related to some forms of chromosomal rearrangement. These might include the fusion of broken sister chromatids in the bridge-breakage-fusion cycle and the head-to-head duplication of genomic DNA at the sites of gene amplifications. PMID:2407606

  1. Specification of DNA replication origins and genomic base composition in fission yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mojardín, Laura; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2013-11-29

    In the "Replicon Theory", Jacob, Brenner and Cuzin proposed the existence of replicators and initiators as the two major actors in DNA replication. Over the years, many protein components of initiators have been shown to be conserved in different organisms during evolution. By contrast, replicator DNA sequences (often referred to as replication origins) have diverged beyond possible comparison between eukaryotic genomes. Replication origins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are made up of A+T-rich sequences that do not share any consensus elements. The information encoded in these replicators is interpreted by the Orc4 subunit of the ORC (origin recognition complex), which is unique among eukaryotes in that it contains a large domain harboring nine AT-hook subdomains that target ORC to a great variety of A+T-rich sequences along the chromosomes. Recently, the genomes of other Schizosaccharomyces species have been sequenced and the regions encompassing their replication origins have been identified. DNA sequence analysis and comparison of the organization of their Orc4 proteins have revealed species-specific differences that contribute to our understanding of how the specification of replication origins has evolved during the phylogenetic divergence of fission yeasts.

  2. A pathway of targeted autophagy is induced by DNA damage in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Vinay V.; Waterman, David P.; Bernard, Amélie; Schiffmann, Nathan; Sayas, Enrich; Kamber, Roarke; Lemos, Brenda; Memisoglu, Gonen; Ang, Jessie; Mazella, Allison; Chuartzman, Silvia G.; Loewith, Robbie J.; Schuldiner, Maya; Denic, Vladimir; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Haber, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy plays a central role in the DNA damage response (DDR) by controlling the levels of various DNA repair and checkpoint proteins; however, how the DDR communicates with the autophagy pathway remains unknown. Using budding yeast, we demonstrate that global genotoxic damage or even a single unrepaired double-strand break (DSB) initiates a previously undescribed and selective pathway of autophagy that we term genotoxin-induced targeted autophagy (GTA). GTA requires the action primarily of Mec1/ATR and Rad53/CHEK2 checkpoint kinases, in part via transcriptional up-regulation of central autophagy proteins. GTA is distinct from starvation-induced autophagy. GTA requires Atg11, a central component of the selective autophagy machinery, but is different from previously described autophagy pathways. By screening a collection of ∼6,000 yeast mutants, we identified genes that control GTA but do not significantly affect rapamycin-induced autophagy. Overall, our findings establish a pathway of autophagy specific to the DNA damage response. PMID:28154131

  3. A pathway of targeted autophagy is induced by DNA damage in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Vinay V; Waterman, David P; Bernard, Amélie; Schiffmann, Nathan; Sayas, Enrich; Kamber, Roarke; Lemos, Brenda; Memisoglu, Gonen; Ang, Jessie; Mazella, Allison; Chuartzman, Silvia G; Loewith, Robbie J; Schuldiner, Maya; Denic, Vladimir; Klionsky, Daniel J; Haber, James E

    2017-02-14

    Autophagy plays a central role in the DNA damage response (DDR) by controlling the levels of various DNA repair and checkpoint proteins; however, how the DDR communicates with the autophagy pathway remains unknown. Using budding yeast, we demonstrate that global genotoxic damage or even a single unrepaired double-strand break (DSB) initiates a previously undescribed and selective pathway of autophagy that we term genotoxin-induced targeted autophagy (GTA). GTA requires the action primarily of Mec1/ATR and Rad53/CHEK2 checkpoint kinases, in part via transcriptional up-regulation of central autophagy proteins. GTA is distinct from starvation-induced autophagy. GTA requires Atg11, a central component of the selective autophagy machinery, but is different from previously described autophagy pathways. By screening a collection of ∼6,000 yeast mutants, we identified genes that control GTA but do not significantly affect rapamycin-induced autophagy. Overall, our findings establish a pathway of autophagy specific to the DNA damage response.

  4. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Guzder, S.N.; Sung, P.; Prakash, S. ); Prakash, L. )

    1993-06-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A--G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. The authors have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. They also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Use of conventional taxonomy, electrophoretic karyotyping and DNA-DNA hybridization for the classification of fermentative apiculate yeasts.

    PubMed

    Vaughan-Martini, A; Angelini, P; Cardinali, G

    2000-07-01

    A taxonomic study was conducted that considered strains of the genera Hanseniaspora/Kloeckera held in the Industrial Yeasts Collection (DBVPG) of the Dipartimento di Biologia Vegetale of the Università di Perugia, Italy. Standard phenotypic as well as molecular criteria were considered in a effort to revisit the classification of these strains, some of which have been in the collection for about 50 years. Results of salient physiological tests showed that some of the DBVPG and type strains could not be identified by current taxonomic keys. Electrophoretic karyotypes were identical for some species, with the type strains of the seven accepted species showing only five distinct chromosomal patterns. DNA-DNA hybridization analyses, using a non-radioactive dot-blot technique, allowed for the distinction of taxa. The taxonomic implications of these results are discussed.

  6. A genome-wide map of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Emilie S; Chabbert, Christophe D; Klaus, Bernd; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the production of cellular energy requires close interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial genome is essential in that it encodes several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains several mitochondrial genome copies and mitochondrial DNA recombination is a widespread process occurring in plants, fungi, protists, and invertebrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model to dissect mitochondrial biology. Several studies have focused on DNA recombination in this organelle, yet mostly relied on reporter genes or artificial systems. However, no complete mitochondrial recombination map has been released for any eukaryote so far. In the present work, we sequenced pools of diploids originating from a cross between two different S. cerevisiae strains to detect recombination events. This strategy allowed us to generate the first genome-wide map of recombination for yeast mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that recombination events are enriched in specific hotspots preferentially localized in non-protein-coding regions. Additionally, comparison of the recombination profiles of two different crosses showed that the genetic background affects hotspot localization and recombination rates. Finally, to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial recombination, we assessed the impact of individual depletion of four genes previously associated with this process. Deletion of NTG1 and MGT1 did not substantially influence the recombination landscape, alluding to the potential presence of additional regulatory factors. Our findings also revealed the loss of large mitochondrial DNA regions in the absence of MHR1, suggesting a pivotal role for Mhr1 in mitochondrial genome maintenance during mating. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast and thus paves the way for future mechanistic studies of mitochondrial recombination and genome

  7. A Genome-Wide Map of Mitochondrial DNA Recombination in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Emilie S.; Chabbert, Christophe D.; Klaus, Bernd; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the production of cellular energy requires close interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial genome is essential in that it encodes several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains several mitochondrial genome copies and mitochondrial DNA recombination is a widespread process occurring in plants, fungi, protists, and invertebrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model to dissect mitochondrial biology. Several studies have focused on DNA recombination in this organelle, yet mostly relied on reporter genes or artificial systems. However, no complete mitochondrial recombination map has been released for any eukaryote so far. In the present work, we sequenced pools of diploids originating from a cross between two different S. cerevisiae strains to detect recombination events. This strategy allowed us to generate the first genome-wide map of recombination for yeast mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that recombination events are enriched in specific hotspots preferentially localized in non-protein-coding regions. Additionally, comparison of the recombination profiles of two different crosses showed that the genetic background affects hotspot localization and recombination rates. Finally, to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial recombination, we assessed the impact of individual depletion of four genes previously associated with this process. Deletion of NTG1 and MGT1 did not substantially influence the recombination landscape, alluding to the potential presence of additional regulatory factors. Our findings also revealed the loss of large mitochondrial DNA regions in the absence of MHR1, suggesting a pivotal role for Mhr1 in mitochondrial genome maintenance during mating. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast and thus paves the way for future mechanistic studies of mitochondrial recombination and genome

  8. A direct droplet digital PCR method for quantification of residual DNA in protein drugs produced in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Musaddeq; Fantuzzo, Rebecca; Mercorelli, Suzanne; Cullen, Constance

    2016-05-10

    Yeast cells, in particular Pichia pastoris, are the host cell of choice for manufacturing several protein therapeutic agents in the biopharmaceutical industry. Host cell DNA is an impurity of such manufacturing process and the residual DNA after the purification process of the drug must be monitored to ensure drug purity and safety. Currently, real-time PCR (qPCR) based methods are widely employed for quantification of host residual DNA. At the same time the digital PCR technology is coming into prominence with promise of higher sensitivity. Here we report a method where the protein drug is directly added to the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) reaction including yeast-specific primers and fluorescent-tagged probe and nanoliter-sized droplets are generated. The droplets are then subjected to PCR followed by analysis for fluorescence. This Pichia residual DNA direct ddPCR method for yeast can be used to test higher amount of drug compared to the corresponding qPCR method thereby increasing sensitivity, retaining high precision and accuracy and has a wide linear range of determination. The method has been successfully tested with three batches of a recombinant human IgG1-Fc-based drug (RP-1) and with commercially available human insulin, both manufactured in yeast cells. This method simplifies the residual DNA quantification protocol by eliminating DNA extraction or protease digestion and eliminates use of DNA standards in day-to-day running of the method.

  9. Targeting a truncated Ho-endonuclease of yeast to novel DNA sites with foreign zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Nahon, E; Raveh, D

    1998-01-01

    Ho-endonuclease of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, initiates a mating type switch by making a site-specific double strand break in the mating type gene, MAT. Ho is a dodecamer endonuclease and shares six of the seven intein motifs with PI- Sce I endonuclease, an intein encoded by the VMAI gene. We show that a 113 residue truncated Ho-endonuclease starting at intein motif C initiates a mating type switch in yeast. Ho is the only dodecamer endonuclease with zinc fingers. To see whether they have a role in determining site specificity we exchanged them for zinc fingers of the yeast transcription factor, Swi5. A chimeric endonuclease comprising the dodecamer motifs of Ho (C-E) and the zinc finger domain of Swi5 cleaves a Swi5 substrate plasmid in vivo. A similar chimera with the zinc fingers of SpI cleaves a GC box rich substrate plasmid. These experiments delineate a catalytic fragment of Ho-endonuclease that can be fused to various DNA binding moieties in the design of chimeric endonucleases with new site specificities. PMID:9469831

  10. Multiple Orientation-Dependent, Synergistically Interacting, Similar Domains in the Ribosomal DNA Replication Origin of the Fission Yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Mi; Huberman, Joel A.

    1998-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, has DNA replication origins (500 to 1500 bp) that are larger than those in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (100 to 150 bp). Deletion and linker substitution analyses of two fission yeast origins revealed that they contain multiple important regions with AT-rich asymmetric (abundant A residues in one strand and T residues in the complementary strand) sequence motifs. In this work we present the characterization of a third fission yeast replication origin, ars3001, which is relatively small (∼570 bp) and responsible for replication of ribosomal DNA. Like previously studied fission yeast origins, ars3001 contains multiple important regions. The three most important of these regions resemble each other in several ways: each region is essential for origin function and is at least partially orientation dependent, each region contains similar clusters of A+T-rich asymmetric sequences, and the regions can partially substitute for each other. These observations suggest that ars3001 function requires synergistic interactions between domains binding similar proteins. It is likely that this requirement extends to other fission yeast origins, explaining why such origins are larger than those of budding yeast. PMID:9819416

  11. Stable yeast transformants that secrete functional. cap alpha. -amylase encoded by cloned mouse pancreatic cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, S.A.; Galembeck, E.V.; Faria, J.B.; Frascino, A.C.S.

    1986-04-01

    Mouse pancreatic ..cap alpha..-amylase complementary DNA was inserted into a yeast shuttle vector after the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MF..cap alpha..1 promoter and secretion signals coding sequences. When transformed with the recombinant plasmid, S. cerevisiae cells were able to synthesize and secrete functional ..cap alpha..-amylase, efficiently hydrolyzing starch present in the culture medium. Stable amylolytic cells were obtained from different yeast strains. This work represents a significant step towards producing yeast that can convert starchy materials directly to ethanol.

  12. Positioning of a nucleosome on mouse satellite DNA inserted into a yeast plasmid is determined by its DNA sequence and an adjacent nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Kiryanov, G I; Kintsurashvili, L N; Isaeva, L V; Zakharova, M G

    2004-09-01

    It has earlier been shown that multiple positioning of nucleosomes on mouse satellite DNA is determined by its nucleotide sequence. To clarify whether other factors, such as boundary ones, can affect the positionings, we modified the environment of satellite DNA monomer by inserting it into a yeast plasmid between inducible GalCyc promoter and a structural region of the yeast FLP gene. We have revealed that the positions of nucleosomes on satellite DNA are identical to those detected upon reconstruction in vitro. The positioning signal (GAAAAA sequence) of satellite DNA governs nucleosome location at the adjacent nucleotide sequence as well. Upon promoter induction the nucleosome, translationally positioned on the GalCyc promoter, transfers to the satellite DNA and its location follows the positioning signal of the latter. Thus, the alternatives of positioning of a nucleosome on satellite DNA are controlled by its nucleotide sequence, though the choice of one of them is determined by the adjacent nucleosome.

  13. DNA microarray analysis suggests that zinc pyrithione causes iron starvation to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yasokawa, Daisuke; Murata, Satomi; Iwahashi, Yumiko; Kitagawa, Emiko; Kishi, Katsuyuki; Okumura, Yukihiro; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Zinc pyrithione has been used in anti-dandruff shampoos and in anti-fouling paint on ships. However, little is known of its mode of action. We characterized the effects of sub-lethal concentrations of zinc pyrithione (Zpt) on Saccharomyces cerevisiae using DNA microarrays. The majority of the strongly upregulated genes are related to iron transport, and many of the strongly downregulated genes are related to the biosynthesis of cytochrome (heme). These data suggest that Zpt induces severe iron starvation. To confirm the DNA microarray data, we supplemented cultures containing Zpt with iron, and the growth of the yeast was restored significantly. From these results, we propose that the principal toxicity of zinc pyrithione arises from iron starvation.

  14. Using RFLP-mtDNA for the rapid monitoring of the dominant inoculated yeast strain in industrial wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, María Esther; Infante, Juan José; Molina, Montse; Rebordinos, Laureana; Cantoral, Jesús Manuel

    2011-01-31

    The analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-RFLP) has been applied as a test to monitor the abundance of the starter yeast strain during industrial wine fermentations without previous isolation of yeast colonies. For white wine fermentations, we performed a rapid assay consisting in taking a sample of fermenting must, purifying the DNA from harvested cells, and obtaining the restriction patterns by digestion with the endonuclease HinfI. The same protocol, but adding an overnight cultivation step before DNA purification, was also applied to red wine fermentations. The results were compared with those obtained from the subsequent characterisation of strains, for the same samples, by analysis of the electrophoretic karyotype of isolated yeast colonies. In all cases, when the inoculated strain was dominant within the yeast population, the rapid assay anticipated the result by showing the coincidence between the restriction profiles obtained from both total cells and the inoculated strain. The results were obtained at 11 or 23 h after sampling for white- or red-wine fermentations respectively. This method allows a rapid intervention of the wine-producer if the presence of the inoculated yeasts has suffered a sudden decrease in any phase of the fermentation process.

  15. Budding Yeast Rif1 Controls Genome Integrity by Inhibiting rDNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Shyian, Maksym; Mattarocci, Stefano; Albert, Benjamin; Hafner, Lukas; Lezaja, Aleksandra; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charlie; Shore, David

    2016-11-01

    The Rif1 protein is a negative regulator of DNA replication initiation in eukaryotes. Here we show that budding yeast Rif1 inhibits DNA replication initiation at the rDNA locus. Absence of Rif1, or disruption of its interaction with PP1/Glc7 phosphatase, leads to more intensive rDNA replication. The effect of Rif1-Glc7 on rDNA replication is similar to that of the Sir2 deacetylase, and the two would appear to act in the same pathway, since the rif1Δ sir2Δ double mutant shows no further increase in rDNA replication. Loss of Rif1-Glc7 activity is also accompanied by an increase in rDNA repeat instability that again is not additive with the effect of sir2Δ. We find, in addition, that the viability of rif1Δ cells is severely compromised in combination with disruption of the MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 complexes, both of which are implicated in stabilization of stalled replication forks. Significantly, we show that removal of the rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB) protein Fob1, alleviation of replisome pausing by deletion of the Tof1/Csm3 complex, or a large deletion of the rDNA repeat array all rescue this synthetic growth defect of rif1Δ cells lacking in addition either MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 activity. These data suggest that the repression of origin activation by Rif1-Glc7 is important to avoid the deleterious accumulation of stalled replication forks at the rDNA RFB, which become lethal when fork stability is compromised. Finally, we show that Rif1-Glc7, unlike Sir2, has an important effect on origin firing outside of the rDNA locus that serves to prevent activation of the DNA replication checkpoint. Our results thus provide insights into a mechanism of replication control within a large repetitive chromosomal domain and its importance for the maintenance of genome stability. These findings may have important implications for metazoans, where large blocks of repetitive sequences are much more common.

  16. Budding Yeast Rif1 Controls Genome Integrity by Inhibiting rDNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Benjamin; Hafner, Lukas; Lezaja, Aleksandra; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charlie; Shore, David

    2016-01-01

    The Rif1 protein is a negative regulator of DNA replication initiation in eukaryotes. Here we show that budding yeast Rif1 inhibits DNA replication initiation at the rDNA locus. Absence of Rif1, or disruption of its interaction with PP1/Glc7 phosphatase, leads to more intensive rDNA replication. The effect of Rif1-Glc7 on rDNA replication is similar to that of the Sir2 deacetylase, and the two would appear to act in the same pathway, since the rif1Δ sir2Δ double mutant shows no further increase in rDNA replication. Loss of Rif1-Glc7 activity is also accompanied by an increase in rDNA repeat instability that again is not additive with the effect of sir2Δ. We find, in addition, that the viability of rif1Δ cells is severely compromised in combination with disruption of the MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 complexes, both of which are implicated in stabilization of stalled replication forks. Significantly, we show that removal of the rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB) protein Fob1, alleviation of replisome pausing by deletion of the Tof1/Csm3 complex, or a large deletion of the rDNA repeat array all rescue this synthetic growth defect of rif1Δ cells lacking in addition either MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 activity. These data suggest that the repression of origin activation by Rif1-Glc7 is important to avoid the deleterious accumulation of stalled replication forks at the rDNA RFB, which become lethal when fork stability is compromised. Finally, we show that Rif1-Glc7, unlike Sir2, has an important effect on origin firing outside of the rDNA locus that serves to prevent activation of the DNA replication checkpoint. Our results thus provide insights into a mechanism of replication control within a large repetitive chromosomal domain and its importance for the maintenance of genome stability. These findings may have important implications for metazoans, where large blocks of repetitive sequences are much more common. PMID:27820830

  17. Differential chromatin proteomics of the MMS-induced DNA damage response in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein enrichment by sub-cellular fractionation was combined with differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (DIGE) to address the detection of the low abundance chromatin proteins in the budding yeast proteome. Comparisons of whole-cell extracts and chromatin fractions were used to provide a measure of the degree of chromatin association for individual proteins, which could be compared across sample treatments. The method was applied to analyze the effect of the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) on levels of chromatin-associated proteins. Results Up-regulation of several previously characterized DNA damage checkpoint-regulated proteins, such as Rnr4, Rpa1 and Rpa2, was observed. In addition, several novel DNA damage responsive proteins were identified and assessed for genotoxic sensitivity using either DAmP (decreased abundance by mRNA perturbation) or knockout strains, including Acf2, Arp3, Bmh1, Hsp31, Lsp1, Pst2, Rnr4, Rpa1, Rpa2, Ste4, Ycp4 and Yrb1. A strain in which the expression of the Ran-GTPase binding protein Yrb1 was reduced was found to be hypersensitive to genotoxic stress. Conclusion The described method was effective at unveiling chromatin-associated proteins that are less likely to be detected in the absence of fractionation. Several novel proteins with altered chromatin abundance were identified including Yrb1, pointing to a role for this nuclear import associated protein in DNA damage response. PMID:21967861

  18. Characterization of a DNA uptake reaction through the nuclear membrane of isolated yeast nuclei. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, E.; Shakuto, S.; Miyakawa, T.; Fukui, S.

    1988-02-01

    Isolated yeast nuclei were able to incorporate /sup 3/H-labeled pJDB219 DNA in vitro in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. The number of plasmid molecules incorporated into each nucleus was calculated to be 60 under the conditions we used. Enzyme-histochemical staining of the incorporated biotinylated pJDB219 with streptavidin-biotinylated-peroxidase complex indicated a uniform distribution of the incorporated plasmids within each nucleus. After intranuclear incorporation, substrate pJDB219 DNAs (open and closed circular forms) were changed to the linear form and were weakly digested over the longer incubation period (over 60 min). Facile release of the once-incorporated plasmid DNA was never observable; discharge of the incorporated (/sup 3/H)pJDB219 during a 60-min incubation was less than 5%. The addition of adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), or quercetin inhibited in vitro DNA uptake reaction. DCCD and quercetin inhibited the nuclear ATPase and apparent protein kinase, respectively; hence, the involvement of these enzymes in the nuclear DNA transport system was suggested.

  19. The fission yeast CENP-B protein Abp1 prevents pervasive transcription of repetitive DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Daulny, Anne; Mejía-Ramírez, Eva; Reina, Oscar; Rosado-Lugo, Jesus; Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Auer, Herbert; Zaratiegui, Mikel; Azorin, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that eukaryotic genomes are pervasively transcribed producing cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs). However, the mechanisms regulating pervasive transcription are not well understood. Here, we report that the fission yeast CENP-B homolog Abp1 plays an important role in preventing pervasive transcription. We show that loss of abp1 results in the accumulation of CUTs, which are targeted for degradation by the exosome pathway. These CUTs originate from different types of genomic features, but the highest increase corresponds to Tf2 retrotransposons and rDNA repeats, where they map along the entire elements. In the absence of abp1, increased RNAPII-Ser5P occupancy is observed throughout the Tf2 coding region and, unexpectedly, RNAPII-Ser5P is enriched at rDNA repeats. Loss of abp1 also results in Tf2 derepression and increased nucleolus size. Altogether these results suggest that Abp1 prevents pervasive RNAPII transcription of repetitive DNA elements (i.e., Tf2 and rDNA repeats) from internal cryptic sites.

  20. Yeast Cells Expressing the Human Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase Reveal Correlations between Polymerase Fidelity and Human Disease Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yufeng; Kachroo, Aashiq H.; Yellman, Christopher M.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Johnson, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial polymerase (polymerase-γ (Pol-γ)) are associated with various mitochondrial disorders, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome, Alpers syndrome, and progressive external opthamalplegia. To correlate biochemically quantifiable defects resulting from point mutations in Pol-γ with their physiological consequences, we created “humanized” yeast, replacing the yeast mtDNA polymerase (MIP1) with human Pol-γ. Despite differences in the replication and repair mechanism, we show that the human polymerase efficiently complements the yeast mip1 knockouts, suggesting common fundamental mechanisms of replication and conserved interactions between the human polymerase and other components of the replisome. We also examined the effects of four disease-related point mutations (S305R, H932Y, Y951N, and Y955C) and an exonuclease-deficient mutant (D198A/E200A). In haploid cells, each mutant results in rapid mtDNA depletion, increased mutation frequency, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mutation frequencies measured in vivo equal those measured with purified enzyme in vitro. In heterozygous diploid cells, wild-type Pol-γ suppresses mutation-associated growth defects, but continuous growth eventually leads to aerobic respiration defects, reduced mtDNA content, and depolarized mitochondrial membranes. The severity of the Pol-γ mutant phenotype in heterozygous diploid humanized yeast correlates with the approximate age of disease onset and the severity of symptoms observed in humans. PMID:24398692

  1. Quantitative epigenetics through epigenomic perturbation of isogenic lines.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Frank; Colomé-Tatché, Maria

    2011-05-01

    Interindividual differences in chromatin states at a locus (epialleles) can result in gene expression changes that are sometimes transmitted across generations. In this way, they can contribute to heritable phenotypic variation in natural and experimental populations independent of DNA sequence. Recent molecular evidence shows that epialleles often display high levels of transgenerational instability. This property gives rise to a dynamic dimension in phenotypic inheritance. To be able to incorporate these non-Mendelian features into quantitative genetic models, it is necessary to study the induction and the transgenerational behavior of epialleles in controlled settings. Here we outline a general experimental approach for achieving this using crosses of epigenomically perturbed isogenic lines in mammalian and plant species. We develop a theoretical description of such crosses and model the relationship between epiallelic instability, recombination, parent-of-origin effects, as well as transgressive segregation and their joint impact on phenotypic variation across generations. In the limiting case of fully stable epialleles our approach reduces to the classical theory of experimental line crosses and thus illustrates a fundamental continuity between genetic and epigenetic inheritance. We consider data from a panel of Arabidopsis epigenetic recombinant inbred lines and explore estimates of the number of quantitative trait loci for plant height that resulted from a manipulation of DNA methylation levels in one of the two isogenic founder strains.

  2. Kinetic analysis of bypass of abasic site by the catalytic core of yeast DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juntang; Wang, Rong; Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Zhong, Mengyu; Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Huidong

    2015-09-01

    Abasic sites (Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites), produced ∼ 50,000 times/cell/day, are very blocking and miscoding. To better understand miscoding mechanisms of abasic site for yeast DNA polymerase η, pre-steady-state nucleotide incorporation and LC-MS/MS sequence analysis of extension product were studied using pol η(core) (catalytic core, residues 1-513), which can completely eliminate the potential effects of the C-terminal C2H2 motif of pol η on dNTP incorporation. The extension beyond the abasic site was very inefficient. Compared with incorporation of dCTP opposite G, the incorporation efficiencies opposite abasic site were greatly reduced according to the order of dGTP > dATP > dCTP and dTTP. Pol η(core) showed no fast burst phase for any incorporation opposite G or abasic site, suggesting that the catalytic step is not faster than the dissociation of polymerase from DNA. LC-MS/MS sequence analysis of extension products showed that 53% products were dGTP misincorporation, 33% were dATP and 14% were -1 frameshift, indicating that Pol η(core) bypasses abasic site by a combined G-rule, A-rule and -1 frameshift deletions. Compared with full-length pol η, pol η(core) relatively reduced the efficiency of incorporation of dCTP opposite G, increased the efficiencies of dNTP incorporation opposite abasic site and the exclusive incorporation of dGTP opposite abasic site, but inhibited the extension beyond abasic site, and increased the priority in extension of A: abasic site relative to G: abasic site. This study provides further understanding in the mutation mechanism of abasic sites for yeast DNA polymerase η.

  3. Modulation of the yeast protein interactome in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Samuel; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Diss, Guillaume; Landry, Christian R

    2014-04-04

    Cells deploy diverse mechanisms to physiologically adapt to potentially detrimental perturbations. These mechanisms include changes in the organization of protein-protein interaction networks (PINs). Most PINs characterized to date are portrayed in a single environmental condition and are thus likely to miss important connections among biological processes. In this report, we show that the yeast DHFR-PCA on high-density arrays allows to detects modulations of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in different conditions by testing more than 1000 PPIs in standard and in a drug-inducing DNA damage conditions. We identify 156 PPIs that show significant modulation in response to DNA damage. We provide evidence that modulated PPIs involve essential genes (NOP7, EXO84 and LAS17) playing critical roles in response to DNA damage. Additionally, we show that a significant proportion of PPI changes are likely explained by changes in protein localization and, to a lesser extent, protein abundance. The protein interaction modules affected by changing PPIs support the role of mRNA stability and translation, protein degradation and ubiquitylation and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in response to DNA damage. Overall, we provide a valuable tool and dataset for the study of the rewiring of PINs in response to environmental perturbations. We show that the DHFR-PCA is a high-throughput method that allows the detection of changes in PPIs associated with different environmental conditions using DNA damage response as a testbed. We provide a valuable resource for the study of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells. This article is part of a Special Issue: Can Proteomics Fill the Gap Between Genomics and Phenotypes? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Poly(dA.dT) sequences exist as rigid DNA structures in nucleosome-free yeast promoters in vivo.

    PubMed

    Suter, B; Schnappauf, G; Thoma, F

    2000-11-01

    Poly(dA.dT) sequences (T-tracts) are abundant genomic DNA elements with unusual properties in vitro and an established role in transcriptional regulation of yeast genes. In vitro T-tracts are rigid, contribute to DNA bending, affect assembly in nucleosomes and generate a characteristic pattern of CPDs (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) upon irradiation with UV light (UV photofootprint). In eukaryotic cells, where DNA is packaged in chromatin, the DNA structure of T-tracts is unknown. Here we have used in vivo UV photofootprinting and DNA repair by photolyase to investigate the structure and accessibility of T-tracts in yeast promoters (HIS3, URA3 and ILV1). The same characteristic photofootprints were obtained in yeast and in naked DNA, demonstrating that the unusual T-tract structure exists in living cells. Rapid repair of CPDs in the T-tracts demonstrates that these T-tracts were not folded in nucleosomes. Moreover, neither datin, a T-tract binding protein, nor Gcn5p, a histone acetyltransferase involved in nucleosome remodelling, showed an influence on the structure and accessibility of T-tracts. The data support a contribution of this unusual DNA structure to transcriptional regulation.

  5. Transcription Factor UAF, Expansion and Contraction of Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) Repeats, and RNA Polymerase Switch in Transcription of Yeast rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Melanie; Siddiqi, Imran; Vu, Loan; Aris, John; Nomura, Masayasu

    1999-01-01

    Strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in transcription factor UAF give rise to variants able to grow by transcribing endogenous ribosomal DNA (rDNA) by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We have demonstrated that the switch to growth using the Pol II system consists of two steps: a mutational alteration in UAF and an expansion of chromosomal rDNA repeats. The first step, a single mutation in UAF, is sufficient to allow Pol II transcription of rDNA. In contrast to UAF mutations, mutations in Pol I or other Pol I transcription factors can not independently lead to Pol II transcription of rDNA, suggesting a specific role of UAF in preventing polymerase switch. The second step, expansion of chromosomal rDNA repeats to levels severalfold higher than the wild type, is required for efficient cell growth. Mutations in genes that affect recombination within the rDNA repeats, fob1 and sir2, decrease and increase, respectively, the frequency of switching to growth using Pol II, indicating that increased rDNA copy number is a cause rather than a consequence of the switch. Finally, we show that the switch to the Pol II system is accompanied by a striking alteration in the localization and morphology of the nucleolus. The altered state that uses Pol II for rDNA transcription is semistable and heritable through mitosis and meiosis. We discuss the significance of these observations in relation to the plasticity of rDNA tandem repeats and nucleolar structures as well as evolution of the Pol I machinery. PMID:10567580

  6. Assessing Genetic Diversity among Brettanomyces Yeasts by DNA Fingerprinting and Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Crauwels, Sam; Zhu, Bo; Steensels, Jan; Busschaert, Pieter; De Samblanx, Gorik; Marchal, Kathleen; Willems, Kris A.

    2014-01-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts, with the species Brettanomyces (Dekkera) bruxellensis being the most important one, are generally reported to be spoilage yeasts in the beer and wine industry due to the production of phenolic off flavors. However, B. bruxellensis is also known to be a beneficial contributor in certain fermentation processes, such as the production of certain specialty beers. Nevertheless, despite its economic importance, Brettanomyces yeasts remain poorly understood at the genetic and genomic levels. In this study, the genetic relationship between more than 50 Brettanomyces strains from all presently known species and from several sources was studied using a combination of DNA fingerprinting techniques. This revealed an intriguing correlation between the B. bruxellensis fingerprints and the respective isolation source. To further explore this relationship, we sequenced a (beneficial) beer isolate of B. bruxellensis (VIB X9085; ST05.12/22) and compared its genome sequence with the genome sequences of two wine spoilage strains (AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499). ST05.12/22 was found to be substantially different from both wine strains, especially at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, there were major differences in the genome structures between the strains investigated, including the presence of large duplications and deletions. Gene content analysis revealed the presence of 20 genes which were present in both wine strains but absent in the beer strain, including many genes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and vice versa, no genes that were missing in both AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499 were found in ST05.12/22. Together, this study provides tools to discriminate Brettanomyces strains and provides a first glimpse at the genetic diversity and genome plasticity of B. bruxellensis. PMID:24814796

  7. Assessing genetic diversity among Brettanomyces yeasts by DNA fingerprinting and whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Crauwels, Sam; Zhu, Bo; Steensels, Jan; Busschaert, Pieter; De Samblanx, Gorik; Marchal, Kathleen; Willems, Kris A; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Lievens, Bart

    2014-07-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts, with the species Brettanomyces (Dekkera) bruxellensis being the most important one, are generally reported to be spoilage yeasts in the beer and wine industry due to the production of phenolic off flavors. However, B. bruxellensis is also known to be a beneficial contributor in certain fermentation processes, such as the production of certain specialty beers. Nevertheless, despite its economic importance, Brettanomyces yeasts remain poorly understood at the genetic and genomic levels. In this study, the genetic relationship between more than 50 Brettanomyces strains from all presently known species and from several sources was studied using a combination of DNA fingerprinting techniques. This revealed an intriguing correlation between the B. bruxellensis fingerprints and the respective isolation source. To further explore this relationship, we sequenced a (beneficial) beer isolate of B. bruxellensis (VIB X9085; ST05.12/22) and compared its genome sequence with the genome sequences of two wine spoilage strains (AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499). ST05.12/22 was found to be substantially different from both wine strains, especially at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, there were major differences in the genome structures between the strains investigated, including the presence of large duplications and deletions. Gene content analysis revealed the presence of 20 genes which were present in both wine strains but absent in the beer strain, including many genes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and vice versa, no genes that were missing in both AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499 were found in ST05.12/22. Together, this study provides tools to discriminate Brettanomyces strains and provides a first glimpse at the genetic diversity and genome plasticity of B. bruxellensis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged into chromatin structure, where most of DNA is wrapped into nucleosomes. DNA compaction and nucleosome positioning have clear functional implications, since they modulate the accessibility of genomic regions to regulatory proteins. Despite the intensive research effort focused in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning and the location of DNA regulatory regions still remain elusive. Results Naked (histone-free) and nucleosomal DNA from yeast were digested by microccocal nuclease (MNase) and sequenced genome-wide. MNase cutting preferences were determined for both naked and nucleosomal DNAs. Integration of their sequencing profiles with DNA conformational descriptors derived from atomistic molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to extract the physical properties of DNA on a genomic scale and to correlate them with chromatin structure and gene regulation. The local structure of DNA around regulatory regions was found to be unusually flexible and to display a unique pattern of nucleosome positioning. Ab initio physical descriptors derived from molecular dynamics were used to develop a computational method that accurately predicts nucleosome enriched and depleted regions. Conclusions Our experimental and computational analyses jointly demonstrate a clear correlation between sequence-dependent physical properties of naked DNA and regulatory signals in the chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that nucleosome positioning around TSS (Transcription Start Site) and TTS (Transcription Termination Site) (at least in yeast) is strongly dependent on DNA physical properties, which can define a basal regulatory mechanism of gene expression. PMID:21981773

  9. Human DNA-Damage-Inducible 2 Protein Is Structurally and Functionally Distinct from Its Yeast Ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Sivá, Monika; Svoboda, Michal; Veverka, Václav; Trempe, Jean-François; Hofmann, Kay; Kožíšek, Milan; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Sedlák, František; Belza, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Šácha, Pavel; Hubálek, Martin; Starková, Jana; Flaisigová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Šašková, Klára Grantz

    2016-01-01

    Although Ddi1-like proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, their biological functions remain poorly characterized. Yeast Ddi1 has been implicated in cell cycle regulation, DNA-damage response, and exocytosis. By virtue of its ubiquitin-like (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains, it has been proposed to serve as a proteasomal shuttle factor. All Ddi1-like family members also contain a highly conserved retroviral protease-like (RVP) domain with unknown substrate specificity. While the structure and biological function of yeast Ddi1 have been investigated, no such analysis is available for the human homologs. To address this, we solved the 3D structures of the human Ddi2 UBL and RVP domains and identified a new helical domain that extends on either side of the RVP dimer. While Ddi1-like proteins from all vertebrates lack a UBA domain, we identify a novel ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM) located at the C-terminus of the protein. The UIM showed a weak yet specific affinity towards ubiquitin, as did the Ddi2 UBL domain. However, the full-length Ddi2 protein is unable to bind to di-ubiquitin chains. While proteomic analysis revealed no activity, implying that the protease requires other factors for activation, our structural characterization of all domains of human Ddi2 sets the stage for further characterization. PMID:27461074

  10. Replication intermediates of the linear mitochondrial DNA of Candida parapsilosis suggest a common recombination based mechanism for yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gerhold, Joachim M; Sedman, Tiina; Visacka, Katarina; Slezakova, Judita; Tomaska, Lubomir; Nosek, Jozef; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-08-15

    Variation in the topology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in eukaryotes evokes the question if differently structured DNAs are replicated by a common mechanism. RNA-primed DNA synthesis has been established as a mechanism for replicating the circular animal/mammalian mtDNA. In yeasts, circular mtDNA molecules were assumed to be templates for rolling circle DNA-replication. We recently showed that in Candida albicans, which has circular mapping mtDNA, recombination driven replication is a major mechanism for replicating a complex branched mtDNA network. Careful analyses of C. albicans-mtDNA did not reveal detectable amounts of circular DNA molecules. In the present study we addressed the question of how the unit sized linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis terminating at both ends with arrays of tandem repeats (mitochondrial telomeres) is replicated. Originally, we expected to find replication intermediates diagnostic of canonical bi-directional replication initiation at the centrally located bi-directional promoter region. However, we found that the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis also employs recombination for replication initiation. The most striking findings were that the mitochondrial telomeres appear to be hot spots for recombination driven replication, and that stable RNA:DNA hybrids, with a potential role in mtDNA replication, are also present in the mtDNA preparations.

  11. Lack of DNA helicase Pif1 disrupts zinc and iron homoeostasis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Guirola, María; Barreto, Lina; Pagani, Ayelen; Romagosa, Miriam; Casamayor, Antonio; Atrian, Silvia; Ariño, Joaquín

    2010-12-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene PIF1 encodes a conserved eukaryotic DNA helicase required for both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity. Our previous work revealed that a pif1Δ strain is tolerant to zinc overload. In the present study we demonstrate that this effect is independent of the Pif1 helicase activity and is only observed when the protein is absent from the mitochondria. pif1Δ cells accumulate abnormal amounts of mitochondrial zinc and iron. Transcriptional profiling reveals that pif1Δ cells under standard growth conditions overexpress aconitase-related genes. When exposed to zinc, pif1Δ cells show lower induction of genes encoding iron (siderophores) transporters and higher expression of genes related to oxidative stress responses than wild-type cells. Coincidently, pif1Δ mutants are less prone to zinc-induced oxidative stress and display a higher reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. Strikingly, although pif1Δ cells contain normal amounts of the Aco1 (yeast aconitase) protein, they completely lack aconitase activity. Loss of Aco1 activity is also observed when the cell expresses a non-mitochondrially targeted form of Pif1. We postulate that lack of Pif1 forces aconitase to play its DNA protective role as a nucleoid protein and that this triggers a domino effect on iron homoeostasis resulting in increased zinc tolerance.

  12. Transcription-coupled DNA repair in yeast transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) mutants.

    PubMed

    Lommel, L; Gregory, S M; Becker, K I; Sweder, K S

    2000-02-01

    We examined the role of yeast transcription initiation factor IIE (TFIIE) in eukaryotic transcription-coupled repair (TCR), the preferential removal of DNA damage from the transcribed strands of genes over non-transcribed sequences. TFIIE can recruit the transcription initiation/repair factor TFIIH to the RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) initiation complex to facilitate promoter clearance. Following exposure to UV radiation, the RNA pol II elongation complex is blocked at sites of UV-induced DNA damage, and may be recognized by nucleotide excision repair proteins, thus enabling TCR. The TFA1 gene encodes the large subunit of TFIIE. We determined how DNA repair is affected by TFA1 conditional mutations. In particular, we find proficient TCR in a heat-sensitive tfa1 mutant at the non-permissive temperature during which growth is inhibited and overall RNA pol II transcription is reported to be inhibited. We demonstrate that transcription of the RPB2 gene was reduced, but readily detectable, in the heat-sensitive tfa1 mutant at the non-permissive temperature and thereby prove that TCR does occur in an expressed gene in the absence of TFIIE in vivo. We demonstrate that TCR occurs even at low levels of transcription.

  13. Development and application of a DNA microarray-based yeast two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Bernhard; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Yildirimman, Reha; Raskó, Tamás; Schaefer, Martin H.; Rasche, Axel; Porras, Pablo; Vázquez-Álvarez, Blanca M.; Russ, Jenny; Rau, Kirstin; Foulle, Raphaele; Zenkner, Martina; Saar, Kathrin; Herwig, Ralf; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Wanker, Erich E.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system is the most widely applied methodology for systematic protein–protein interaction (PPI) screening and the generation of comprehensive interaction networks. We developed a novel Y2H interaction screening procedure using DNA microarrays for high-throughput quantitative PPI detection. Applying a global pooling and selection scheme to a large collection of human open reading frames, proof-of-principle Y2H interaction screens were performed for the human neurodegenerative disease proteins huntingtin and ataxin-1. Using systematic controls for unspecific Y2H results and quantitative benchmarking, we identified and scored a large number of known and novel partner proteins for both huntingtin and ataxin-1. Moreover, we show that this parallelized screening procedure and the global inspection of Y2H interaction data are uniquely suited to define specific PPI patterns and their alteration by disease-causing mutations in huntingtin and ataxin-1. This approach takes advantage of the specificity and flexibility of DNA microarrays and of the existence of solid-related statistical methods for the analysis of DNA microarray data, and allows a quantitative approach toward interaction screens in human and in model organisms. PMID:23275563

  14. Sequencing Spo11 Oligonucleotides for Mapping Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Lam, Isabel; Mohibullah, Neeman; Keeney, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized form of cell division resulting in reproductive cells with a reduced, usually haploid, genome complement. A key step after premeiotic DNA replication is the occurrence of homologous recombination at multiple places throughout the genome, initiated with the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the topoisomerase-like protein Spo11. DSBs are distributed non-randomly in genomes, and understanding the mechanisms that shape this distribution is important for understanding how meiotic recombination influences heredity and genome evolution. Several methods exist for mapping where Spo11 acts. Of these, sequencing of Spo11-associated oligonucleotides (Spo11 oligos) is the most precise, specifying the locations of DNA breaks to the base pair. In this chapter we detail the steps involved in Spo11-oligo mapping in the SK1 strain of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, from harvesting cells of highly synchronous meiotic cultures, through preparation of sequencing libraries, to the mapping pipeline used for processing the data.

  15. Comparing protocols for preparation of DNA-free total yeast RNA suitable for RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Del Aguila, Eduardo M; Dutra, Marcio B; Silva, Joab T; Paschoalin, Vânia MF

    2005-01-01

    Background Preparation of RNA free from DNA is a critical step before performing RT-PCR assay. Total RNA isolated from several sources, including those obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using routine methodologies are frequently contaminated with DNA, which can give rise to amplification products that mimic the amplicons expected from the RNA target. Results We investigated the efficiency of two DNase I based protocols for eliminating DNA contaminations from RNA samples obtained from yeast cells. Both procedures are very efficient in eliminating DNA contamination from RNA samples and entail three main steps, which involve treating of RNA samples with DNase I, inhibition of the enzyme by EDTA and its subsequent inactivation at 65°C. The DNase I treated samples were further purified with phenol: chloroform followed by precipitation with ice-cold ethanol (protocol I) or, alternatively, they were directly used in RT-PCR reactions (protocol II). Transcripts from ACT1, PDA1, CNA1, CNA2, TPS1 and TPS2 analyzed after each treatment showed that all mRNAs tested can be amplified if total RNA was extracted and purified after DNase I treatment, however, only TPS1, TPS2 and ACT1 mRNAs were amplified without extraction/purification step. Conclusion Although more laborious and requiring a higher initial amount of material, the inclusion of an extraction and purification step allows to prepare RNA samples that are free from DNA and from low molecular contaminants and can be applied to amplify any Saccharomyces cerevisiae mRNA by RT-PCR. PMID:15833107

  16. Mitochondria inheritance is a key factor for tolerance to dehydration in wine yeast production.

    PubMed

    Picazo, C; Gamero-Sandemetrio, E; Orozco, H; Albertin, W; Marullo, P; Matallana, E; Aranda, A

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondria are the cell's powerhouse when organisms are grown in the presence of oxygen. They are also the source of reactive oxygen species that cause damage to the biochemical components of the cell and lead to cellular ageing and death. Under winemaking conditions, Saccharomyces yeasts exclusively have a fermentative metabolism due to the high sugar content of grape must. However, their production as an active dry yeast (ADY) form required aerobic propagation and a dehydration process. In these industrial steps, oxidative stress is particularly harmful for the cell. In this work, we analysed the impact of the mitochondrial genome on oxidative stress response, longevity and dehydration tolerance using the synthetic interspecific hybrids obtained between two S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum strains. The isogenic nature of nuclear DNA of such hybrids allowed us to analyse the impact of mitochondrial DNA for fermentative and oxidative stress conditions. Under grape must conditions, the inheritance of mitochondrial DNA poorly impacted the fermentative performance of interspecific hybrids, unlike the hybrids with S. cerevisiae mitochondrial inheritance, which displayed increased tolerance to oxidative stress and dehydration, and showed an extended chronological longevity when cells were grown with aeration. In modern oenology, yeast starters are employed to inoculate grape juice, usually in the form of active dry yeast (ADY). The dehydration process implies stressful conditions that lead to oxidative damage. Other yeast species and interspecific hybrids other than Saccharomyces cerevisiae may be used to confer novel properties to the final product. However, these yeasts are usually more sensitive to drying. Understanding the causes of oxidative stress tolerance is therefore necessary for developing the use of these organisms in industry. This study indicates the impact of mitochondrial DNA inheritance for oxidative stress resistance in an interspecific context using

  17. Construction and characterization of yeast two-hybrid cDNA library derived from LFBK cell line.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Sonalika; Sharma, Gaurav Kumar; Matura, Rakesh; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Mohapatra, Jajati Keshari; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-05-01

    The cDNA libraries are indispensable and critical tools for performing protein-protein interaction studies. In this study, a high quality yeast two-hybrid cDNA library from the LFBK cell line was constructed and characterized. LFBK cell line was originally derived from the swine kidney cells and is highly susceptible to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection. The total RNA was extracted from the LFBK cells and the switching mechanism at the 5' end of RNA template (SMART) technique was employed for the cDNA synthesis. Subsequently, double stranded cDNA was amplified by long-distance PCR, purified and co-transformed with pGADT7-rec vector in yeast strain Y187. The quality parameters of the constructed library were evaluated to qualify the constructed library. Nucleotide sequencing of the randomly selected clones from the library confirmed the swine genotype of LFBK cell line. The LFBK cDNA library was mated with the 2C protein of FMDV in yeast two-hybrid (YTH) system and several putative interaction partners were identified in the preliminary screening. The LFBK library was observed to be of high quality and could potentially be applied to protein interaction studies between FMDV and the host cells using YTH system. Copyright © 2015 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rad25p, a DNA helicase subunit of yeast transcription factor TFIIH, is required for promoter escape in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, D; Gileadi, O

    2000-03-07

    The general transcription factor TFIIH is required for initial DNA unwinding and promoter escape by RNA polymerase II in vitro. We examined whether Rad25p, a DNA helicase subunit of TFIIH, mediates promoter opening and promoter escape in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA unwinding was probed with an in vivo permanganate reactivity assay, in a temperature-sensitive mutant of RAD25. The consequences of Rad25p inactivation were promoter-specific. Whereas in the TDH2 promoter permanganate reactivity was entirely abolished, the reactivity at the GAL1 and GAL10 promoter regions was only moderately affected. In the GAL genes permanganate reactivity uniformly decreased downstream of the transcription start site, indicating that progression of RNA polymerase II to this region was impaired. Our results suggest that in yeast cells, promoter opening is not sufficient for productive initiation and that Rad25p-mediated promoter escape may be a limiting step in the transcription of some promoters.

  19. Mutations on the DNA Binding Surface of TBP Discriminate between Yeast TATA and TATA-Less Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kamenova, Ivanka; Warfield, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Most RNA polymerase (Pol) II promoters lack a TATA element, yet nearly all Pol II transcription requires TATA binding protein (TBP). While the TBP-TATA interaction is critical for transcription at TATA-containing promoters, it has been unclear whether TBP sequence-specific DNA contacts are required for transcription at TATA-less genes. Transcription factor IID (TFIID), the TBP-containing coactivator that functions at most TATA-less genes, recognizes short sequence-specific promoter elements in metazoans, but analogous promoter elements have not been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generated a set of mutations in the yeast TBP DNA binding surface and found that most support growth of yeast. Both in vivo and in vitro, many of these mutations are specifically defective for transcription of two TATA-containing genes with only minor defects in transcription of two TATA-less, TFIID-dependent genes. TBP binds several TATA-less promoters with apparent high affinity, but our results suggest that this binding is not important for transcription activity. Our results are consistent with the model that sequence-specific TBP-DNA contacts are not important at yeast TATA-less genes and suggest that other general transcription factors or coactivator subunits are responsible for recognition of TATA-less promoters. Our results also explain why yeast TBP derivatives defective for TATA binding appear defective in activated transcription. PMID:24865972

  20. Mutations on the DNA binding surface of TBP discriminate between yeast TATA and TATA-less gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Kamenova, Ivanka; Warfield, Linda; Hahn, Steven

    2014-08-01

    Most RNA polymerase (Pol) II promoters lack a TATA element, yet nearly all Pol II transcription requires TATA binding protein (TBP). While the TBP-TATA interaction is critical for transcription at TATA-containing promoters, it has been unclear whether TBP sequence-specific DNA contacts are required for transcription at TATA-less genes. Transcription factor IID (TFIID), the TBP-containing coactivator that functions at most TATA-less genes, recognizes short sequence-specific promoter elements in metazoans, but analogous promoter elements have not been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generated a set of mutations in the yeast TBP DNA binding surface and found that most support growth of yeast. Both in vivo and in vitro, many of these mutations are specifically defective for transcription of two TATA-containing genes with only minor defects in transcription of two TATA-less, TFIID-dependent genes. TBP binds several TATA-less promoters with apparent high affinity, but our results suggest that this binding is not important for transcription activity. Our results are consistent with the model that sequence-specific TBP-DNA contacts are not important at yeast TATA-less genes and suggest that other general transcription factors or coactivator subunits are responsible for recognition of TATA-less promoters. Our results also explain why yeast TBP derivatives defective for TATA binding appear defective in activated transcription. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Cytosine DNA methylation is found in Drosophila melanogaster but absent in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and other yeast species.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Floriana; Mülleder, Michael; Kok, Robert; Blom, Henk J; Ralser, Markus

    2014-04-15

    The methylation of cytosine to 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic DNA modification in many bacteria, plants, and mammals, but its relevance for important model organisms, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, is still equivocal. By reporting the presence of 5-meC in a broad variety of wild, laboratory, and industrial yeasts, a recent study also challenged the dogma about the absence of DNA methylation in yeast species. We would like to bring to attention that the protocol used for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry involved hydrolysis of the DNA preparations. As this process separates cytosine and 5-meC from the sugar phosphate backbone, this method is unable to distinguish DNA- from RNA-derived 5-meC. We employed an alternative LC-MS/MS protocol where by targeting 5-methyldeoxycytidine moieties after enzymatic digestion, only 5-meC specifically derived from DNA is quantified. This technique unambiguously identified cytosine DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana (14.0% of cytosines methylated), Mus musculus (7.6%), and Escherichia coli (2.3%). Despite achieving a detection limit at 250 attomoles (corresponding to <0.00002 methylated cytosines per nonmethylated cytosine), we could not confirm any cytosine DNA methylation in laboratory and industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces paradoxus, or Pichia pastoris. The protocol however unequivocally confirmed DNA methylation in adult Drosophila melanogaster at a value (0.034%) that is up to 2 orders of magnitude below the detection limit of bisulphite sequencing. Thus, 5-meC is a rare DNA modification in drosophila but absent in yeast.

  2. Development and Characterization of Complex DNA Fingerprinting Probes for the Infectious Yeast Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Sophie; Pujol, Claude; Rysz, Michal; Vargas, Kaaren; Soll, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Using a strategy to clone large genomic sequences containing repetitive elements from the infectious yeast Candida dubliniensis, the three unrelated sequences Cd1, Cd24, and Cd25, with respective molecular sizes of 15,500, 10,000, and 16,000 bp, were cloned and analyzed for their efficacy as DNA fingerprinting probes. Each generated a complex Southern blot hybridization pattern with endonuclease-digested genomic DNA. Cd1 generated an extremely variable pattern that contained all of the bands of the pattern generated by the repeat element RPS of Candida albicans. We demonstrated that Cd1 does not contain RPS but does contain a repeat element associated with RPS throughout the C. dubliniensis genome. The Cd1 pattern was the least stable over time both in vitro and in vivo and for that reason proved most effective in assessing microevolution. Cd24, which did not exhibit microevolution in vitro, was highly variable in vivo, suggesting in vivo-dependent microevolution. Cd25 was deemed the best probe for broad epidemiological studies, since it was the most stable over time, was the only truly C. dubliniensis-specific probe of the three, generated the most complex pattern, was distributed throughout all C. dubliniensis chromosomes, and separated a worldwide collection of 57 C. dubliniensis isolates into two distinct groups. The presence of a species-specific repetitive element in Cd25 adds weight to the already substantial evidence that C. dubliniensis represents a bona fide species. PMID:10074523

  3. The Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex is required for yeast DNA postreplication repair.

    PubMed

    Ball, Lindsay G; Hanna, Michelle D; Lambrecht, Amanda D; Mitchell, Bryan A; Ziola, Barry; Cobb, Jennifer A; Xiao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Yeast DNA postreplication repair (PRR) bypasses replication-blocking lesions to prevent damage-induced cell death. PRR employs two different mechanisms to bypass damaged DNA, namely translesion synthesis (TLS) and error-free PRR, which are regulated via sequential ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). We previously demonstrated that error-free PRR utilizes homologous recombination to facilitate template switching. To our surprise, genes encoding the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex, which are also required for homologous recombination, are epistatic to TLS mutations. Further genetic analyses indicated that two other nucleases involved in double-strand end resection, Sae2 and Exo1, are also variably required for efficient lesion bypass. The involvement of the above genes in TLS and/or error-free PRR could be distinguished by the mutagenesis assay and their differential effects on PCNA ubiquitination. Consistent with the observation that the MRX complex is required for both branches of PRR, the MRX complex was found to physically interact with Rad18 in vivo. In light of the distinct and overlapping activities of the above nucleases in the resection of double-strand breaks, we propose that the interplay between distinct single-strand nucleases dictate the preference between TLS and error-free PRR for lesion bypass.

  4. Architecture of the Human and Yeast General Transcription and DNA Repair Factor TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Cimermancic, Peter; Viswanath, Shruthi; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Kim, Bong; Dehecq, Marine; Raman, Vishnu; Greenberg, Charles H; Pellarin, Riccardo; Sali, Andrej; Taatjes, Dylan J; Hahn, Steven; Ranish, Jeff

    2015-09-03

    TFIIH is essential for both RNA polymerase II transcription and DNA repair, and mutations in TFIIH can result in human disease. Here, we determine the molecular architecture of human and yeast TFIIH by an integrative approach using chemical crosslinking/mass spectrometry (CXMS) data, biochemical analyses, and previously published electron microscopy maps. We identified four new conserved "topological regions" that function as hubs for TFIIH assembly and more than 35 conserved topological features within TFIIH, illuminating a network of interactions involved in TFIIH assembly and regulation of its activities. We show that one of these conserved regions, the p62/Tfb1 Anchor region, directly interacts with the DNA helicase subunit XPD/Rad3 in native TFIIH and is required for the integrity and function of TFIIH. We also reveal the structural basis for defects in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy, with mutations found at the interface between the p62 Anchor region and the XPD subunit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Architecture of the human and yeast general transcription and DNA repair factor TFIIH

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Cimermancic, Peter; Viswanath, Shruthi; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Kim, Bong; Dehecq, Marine; Raman, Vishnu; Greenberg, Charles H.; Pellarin, Riccardo; Sali, Andrej; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Hahn, Steven; Ranish, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Summary TFIIH is essential for both RNA polymerase II transcription and DNA repair, and mutations in TFIIH can result in human disease. Here, we determine the molecular architecture of human and yeast TFIIH by an integrative approach using chemical crosslinking/mass spectrometry (CXMS) data, biochemical analyses, and previously published electron microscopy maps. We identified four new conserved “topological regions” that function as hubs for TFIIH assembly and more than 35 conserved topological features within TFIIH, illuminating a network of interactions involved in TFIIH assembly and regulation of its activities. We show that one of these conserved regions, the p62/Tfb1 Anchor region, directly interacts with the DNA helicase subunit XPD/Rad3 in native TFIIH and is required for the integrity and function of TFIIH. We also reveal the structural basis for defects in patients with Xeroderma pigmentosum and Trichothiodystrophy, with mutations found at the interface between the p62 Anchor region and the XPD subunit. PMID:26340423

  6. Requirement for the SRS2 DNA helicase gene in non-homologous end joining in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vijay; Klein, Hannah

    2000-01-01

    Mitotic cells experience double-strand breaks (DSBs) from both exogenous and endogenous sources. Since unrepaired DSBs can result in genome rearrangements or cell death, cells mobilize multiple pathways to repair the DNA damage. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mitotic cells preferentially use a homologous recombination repair pathway. However, when no significant homology to the DSB ends is available, cells utilize a repair process called non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which can join ends with no homology through resection to uncover microhomologies of a few nucleotides. Although components of the homologous recombination repair system are also involved in NHEJ, the rejoining does not involve all of the homologous recombination repair genes. The SRS2 DNA helicase has been shown to be required for DSB repair when the homologous single-stranded regions are short. Here it is shown that SRS2 is also required for NHEJ, regardless of the cell mating type. Efficient NHEJ of sticky ends requires the Ku70 and Ku80 proteins and the silencing genes SIR2, SIR3 and SIR4. However, NHEJ of blunt ends, while very inefficient, is not further reduced by mutations in YKU70, SIR2, SIR3, SIR4 or SRS2, suggesting that this rejoining process occurs by a different mechanism. PMID:10908335

  7. Isolation and characterization of a sucrose carrier cDNA from spinach by functional expression in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Riesmeier, J W; Willmitzer, L; Frommer, W B

    1992-01-01

    Active loading of the phloem with sucrose in leaves is an essential part of the process of supplying non-photosynthetic tissues with carbon and energy. The transport is protein mediated and coupled to proton-symport, but so far no sucrose carrier gene has been identified. Using an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, a cDNA from spinach encoding a sucrose carrier was identified by functional expression. Yeast strains that allow the phenotypic recognition of a sucrose carrier activity were constructed by expressing a cytoplasmic invertase from yeast, or the potato sucrose synthase gene, in a strain unable to transport or grow on sucrose due to a deletion in the SUC2 gene. A spinach cDNA expression library established from the poly(A)+ RNA from source leaves of spinach and cloned in a yeast expression vector yielded transformed yeast clones which were able to grow on media containing sucrose as the sole carbon source. This ability was strictly linked to the presence of the spinach cDNA clone pS21. Analysis of the sucrose uptake process in yeast strains transformed with this plasmid show a pH-dependent uptake of sucrose with a Km of 1.5 mM, which can be inhibited by maltose, alpha-phenylglucoside, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid. These data are in accordance with measurements using both leaf discs and plasma membrane vesicles from leaves of higher plants. DNA sequence analysis of the pS21 clone reveals the presence of an open reading frame encoding a protein with a molecular mass of 55 kDa. The predicted protein contains several hydrophobic regions which could be assigned to 12 membrane-spanning regions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1464305

  8. Purification and staining of intact yeast DNA chromosomes and real-time observation of their migration during gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Gurrieri, S; Bustamante, C

    1997-01-01

    In the past few years, fluorescence microscopy has been used successfully to characterize the motion of intermediate-size DNA molecules (50-500 kbp) during steady- and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. However, experimental difficulties had prevented the application of this technique to the direct observation of longer DNA chromosomes (1-2 Mbp). In the present study a particular procedure was followed for the purification and staining of chromosomal yeast DNA to protect it from shear forces. Also, a new highly fluorescent DNA-labelling dye, YOYO-1, was employed to improve brightness and contrast. Finally, the motion of such long DNA molecules (1-2 Mbp) was characterized under steady-field electrophoresis conditions. An accurate description of the molecular mechanisms of motion of such long molecules should provide the basis for a detailed analysis of the mechanisms responsible for DNA trapping. PMID:9337860

  9. Efficiency of mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham at the different geographic areas of ripening.

    PubMed

    Andrade, María J; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva; Córdoba, Juan J

    2010-03-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham was evaluated. Besides, the distribution of the main species and biotypes of yeasts in the different ripening areas of this product was investigated. MtDNA restriction analysis allowed yeast characterization at species and strain level. RAPD-PCR with the primers (GACA)(4) and (GAC)(5) was inappropriate for characterization at species level. Most of the mtDNA restriction patterns detected in dry-cured Iberian ham were consistent with Debaryomyces hansenii. Several yeasts biotypes were associated to specific geographic areas of dry-cured Iberian ham ripening. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of S-phase DNA damage-response targets in fission yeast reveals conservation of damage-response networks

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E. H.; Murray, Johanne M.; Carr, Antony M.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Rhind, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The cellular response to DNA damage during S-phase regulates a complicated network of processes, including cell-cycle progression, gene expression, DNA replication kinetics, and DNA repair. In fission yeast, this S-phase DNA damage response (DDR) is coordinated by two protein kinases: Rad3, the ortholog of mammalian ATR, and Cds1, the ortholog of mammalian Chk2. Although several critical downstream targets of Rad3 and Cds1 have been identified, most of their presumed targets are unknown, including the targets responsible for regulating replication kinetics and coordinating replication and repair. To characterize targets of the S-phase DDR, we identified proteins phosphorylated in response to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced S-phase DNA damage in wild-type, rad3∆, and cds1∆ cells by proteome-wide mass spectrometry. We found a broad range of S-phase–specific DDR targets involved in gene expression, stress response, regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis, and DNA replication and repair. These targets are highly enriched for proteins required for viability in response to MMS, indicating their biological significance. Furthermore, the regulation of these proteins is similar in fission and budding yeast, across 300 My of evolution, demonstrating a deep conservation of S-phase DDR targets and suggesting that these targets may be critical for maintaining genome stability in response to S-phase DNA damage across eukaryotes. PMID:27298342

  11. Specific targeted integration of kanamycin resistance-associated nonselectable DNA in the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Sanjeev K; Caputo, Valentina; Radovic, Slobodanka; Bruschi, Carlo V

    2003-05-01

    Sophisticated genome manipulation requires the possibility to modify any intergenic or intragenic DNA sequence at will, without leaving large amounts of undesired vector DNA at the site of alteration. To this end, a series of vectors was developed from a previous gene knockout plasmid system to integrate nonselectable foreign DNA at any desired genomic location in yeast, with a minimum amount of residual plasmid DNA. These vectors have two mutated Flp recognition targets (FRT) sequences flanking the KanMX4 gene and multiple sites for subcloning the DNA fragment to be integrated. The selectable marker can be recycled by Flp site-specific excision between the identical FRTs, thereby allowing the integration of further DNA fragments. With this system, the NLS-tetR-GFP and DsRed genes were successfully integrated at the thr1 locus, and the RVB1 gene was tagged at the C-terminus with the V5-epitope-6-histidine tag. This plasmid system provides for a new molecular tool to integrate any DNA fragment at any genome location in [cir+] yeast strains. Moreover, the system can be extrapolated to other eukaryotic cells in which the FLP/FRT system functions efficiently.

  12. Evolution of divergent DNA recognition specificities in VDE homing endonucleases from two yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Karen L.; Koufopanou, Vassiliki; Burt, Austin; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2004-01-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are mobile DNA elements that are thought to confer no benefit to their host. They encode site-specific DNA endonucleases that perpetuate the element within a species population by homing and disseminate it between species by horizontal transfer. Several yeast species contain the VMA1 HEG that encodes the intein-associated VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE). The evolutionary state of VDEs from 12 species was assessed by assaying their endonuclease activities. Only two enzymes are active, PI-ZbaI from Zygosaccharomyces bailii and PI-ScaI from Saccharomyces cariocanus. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii recognition sequence significantly faster than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae site, which differs at six nucleotide positions. A mutational analysis indicates that PI-ZbaI cleaves the S.cerevisiae substrate poorly due to the absence of a contact that is analogous to one made in PI-SceI between Gln-55 and nucleotides +9/+10. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii substrate primarily due to a single base-pair substitution (A/T+5 → T/A+5). Structural modeling of the PI-ZbaI/DNA complex suggests that Arg-331, which is absent in PI-SceI, contacts T/A+5, and the reduced activity observed in a PI-ZbaI R331A mutant provides evidence for this interaction. These data illustrate that homing endonucleases evolve altered specificity as they adapt to recognize alternative target sites. PMID:15280510

  13. Prevalence and Dynamics of Ribosomal DNA Micro-heterogeneity Are Linked to Population History in Two Contrasting Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen A.; West, Claire; Davey, Robert P.; Dicks, Jo; Roberts, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable number and taxonomic breadth of past and current genome sequencing projects, many of which necessarily encompass the ribosomal DNA, detailed information on the prevalence and evolutionary significance of sequence variation in this ubiquitous genomic region are severely lacking. Here, we attempt to address this issue in two closely related yet contrasting yeast species, the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus. By drawing on existing datasets from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project, we identify a rich seam of ribosomal DNA sequence variation, characterising 1,068 and 970 polymorphisms in 34 S. cerevisiae and 26 S. paradoxus strains respectively. We discover the two species sets exhibit distinct mutational profiles. Furthermore, we show for the first time that unresolved rDNA sequence variation resulting from imperfect concerted evolution of the ribosomal DNA region follows a U-shaped allele frequency distribution in each species, similar to loci that evolve under non-concerted mechanisms but arising through rather different evolutionary processes. Finally, we link differences between the shapes of these allele frequency distributions to the two species’ contrasting population histories. PMID:27345953

  14. Yeast mitochondrial HMG proteins: DNA-binding properties of the most evolutionarily divergent component of mitochondrial nucleoids

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaiova, Jana; Marini, Victoria; Willcox, Smaranda; Nosek, Jozef; Griffith, Jack D.; Krejci, Lumir; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2015-01-01

    Yeast mtDNA is compacted into nucleoprotein structures called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). The principal mediators of nucleoid formation are mitochondrial high-mobility group (HMG)-box containing (mtHMG) proteins. Although these proteins are some of the fastest evolving components of mt-nucleoids, it is not known whether the divergence of mtHMG proteins on the level of their amino acid sequences is accompanied by diversification of their biochemical properties. In the present study we performed a comparative biochemical analysis of yeast mtHMG proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScAbf2p), Yarrowia lipolytica (YlMhb1p) and Candida parapsilosis (CpGcf1p). We found that all three proteins exhibit relatively weak binding to intact dsDNA. In fact, ScAbf2p and YlMhb1p bind quantitatively to this substrate only at very high protein to DNA ratios and CpGcf1p shows only negligible binding to dsDNA. In contrast, the proteins exhibit much higher preference for recombination intermediates such as Holliday junctions (HJ) and replication forks (RF). Therefore, we hypothesize that the roles of the yeast mtHMG proteins in maintenance and compaction of mtDNA in vivo are in large part mediated by their binding to recombination/replication intermediates. We also speculate that the distinct biochemical properties of CpGcf1p may represent one of the prerequisites for frequent evolutionary tinkering with the form of the mitochondrial genome in the CTG-clade of hemiascomycetous yeast species. PMID:26647378

  15. The expression of the open reading frame of "Arabidopsis" CAX1, but not its cDNA, confers metal tolerance in yeast

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The biochemical properties and regulation of several plant CAX (CAtion eXchanger)-type vacuolar Ca (2+)/H (+) exchangers have been extensively analyzed in yeast expression assays. In the present study, we compare and contrast the phenotypes of yeast cells expressing the CAX1 cDNA and open reading fr...

  16. Investigations on hydrolytic activities from Stachybotrys microspora and their use as an alternative in yeast DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Abdeljalil, Salma; Ben Hmad, Ines; Saibi, Walid; Amouri, Bahia; Maalej, Wiem; Kaaniche, Marwa; Koubaa, Aida; Gargouri, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Stachybotrys microspora is a filamentous fungus characterized by the secretion of multiple hydrolytic activities (cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic enzymes). The production of these biocatalysts was studied under submerged culture using glucose, cellulose, and wheat bran as carbon sources. Endoglucanases, pectinases, xylanases, β-glucanases, chitinases, and proteases were induced on cellulose-based medium and repressed on glucose in both strains with higher amounts produced by the mutant. β-glucosidases were roughly equally produced by both strains under glucose and cellulose conditions. The yield of chitinases, β-glucanases, and proteases produced by Stachybotrys strains was as much higher than the commercialized lysing enzyme called "zymolyase," currently used in yeast DNA extraction. In this context, we showed that S. microspora hydrolases can be successfully applied in the extraction of yeast DNA.

  17. Mining Enzyme Diversity of Transcriptome Libraries through DNA Synthesis for Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Pathway Optimization in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Narcross, Lauren; Bourgeois, Leanne; Fossati, Elena; Burton, Euan; Martin, Vincent J J

    2016-12-16

    The ever-increasing quantity of data deposited to GenBank is a valuable resource for mining new enzyme activities. Falling costs of DNA synthesis enables metabolic engineers to take advantage of this resource for identifying superior or novel enzymes for pathway optimization. Previously, we reported synthesis of the benzylisoquinoline alkaloid dihydrosanguinarine in yeast from norlaudanosoline at a molar conversion of 1.5%. Molar conversion could be improved by reduction of the side-product N-methylcheilanthifoline, a key bottleneck in dihydrosanguinarine biosynthesis. Two pathway enzymes, an N-methyltransferase and a cytochrome P450 of the CYP719A subfamily, were implicated in the synthesis of the side-product. Here, we conducted an extensive screen to identify enzyme homologues whose coexpression reduces side-product synthesis. Phylogenetic trees were generated from multiple sources of sequence data to identify a library of candidate enzymes that were purchased codon-optimized and precloned into expression vectors designed to facilitate high-throughput analysis of gene expression as well as activity assay. Simple in vivo assays were sufficient to guide the selection of superior enzyme homologues that ablated the synthesis of the side-product, and improved molar conversion of norlaudanosoline to dihydrosanguinarine to 10%.

  18. Cloning yeast actin cDNA leads to an investigative approach for the molecular biology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael W; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the classroom because of the preparation, expense, and logistics involved in independent student projects. The authors have designed a 10-week lab series that mimics the research environment by tying separate fundamental lab techniques to a common goal: to build a plasmid with yeast actin cDNA cloned in a particular orientation. In the process of completing this goal, a problem arises in that students are unable to obtain the target plasmid and instead only recover the gene cloned in the opposite orientation. To address this problem, students identify four plausible hypotheses and work in teams to address them by designing and executing experiments. This project reinforces the utility and flexibility of techniques covered earlier in the class and serves to develop their skills in experimental design and analysis. As the project is focused on one problem, the diversity of experimental approaches is limited and may be prepared in advance with little additional expense in reagents or technical support. Copyright © 2008 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. HRR25, a putative protein kinase from budding yeast: Association with repair of damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, M.F.; Ou, A.C.; DeMaggio, A.J.; Burbee, D.G. ); Liskay, R.M. ); Heffron, F. )

    1991-08-30

    In simple eukaryotes, protein kinases regulate mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, the response to polypeptide pheromones, and the initiation of nuclear DNA synthesis. The protein HRR25 from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was defined by the mutation hrr25-1. This mutation resulted in sensitivity to continuous expression of the HO double-strand endonuclease, to methyl methanesulfonate, and to x-irradiation. Homozygotes of hrr25-1 were unable to sporulate and disruption and deletion of HRR25 interfered with mitotic and meiotic cell division. Sequence analysis revealed two distinctive regions in the protein. The NH{sub 2}-terminus of HRR25 contains the hallmark features of protein kinases, whereas the COOH-terminus is rich in proline and glutamine. Mutations in HRR25 at conserved residues found in all protein kinases inactivated the gene, and these mutants exhibited the hrr25 null phenotypes. Taken together, the hrr25 mutant phenotypes and the features of the gene product indicate that HRR25 is a distinctive member of the protein kinase superfamily.

  20. Designed construction of recombinant DNA at the ura3Δ0 locus in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Tomoaki; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Hirakawa, Yuki; Sakai, Ryota; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Nonklang, Sanom; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant DNAs are traditionally constructed using Escherichia coli plasmids. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chromosomal gene targeting is a common technique, implying that the yeast homologous recombination system could be applied for recombinant DNA construction. In an attempt to use a S. cerevisiae chromosome for recombinant DNA construction, we selected the single ura3Δ0 locus as a gene targeting site. By selecting this single locus, repeated recombination using the surrounding URA3 sequences can be performed. The recombination system described here has several advantages over the conventional plasmid system, as it provides a method to confirm the selection of correct recombinants because transformation of the same locus replaces the pre-existing selection marker, resulting in the loss of the marker in successful recombinations. In addition, the constructed strains can serve as both PCR templates and hosts for preparing subsequent recombinant strains. Using this method, several yeast strains that contained selection markers, promoters, terminators and target genes at the ura3Δ0 locus were successfully generated. The system described here can potentially be applied for the construction of any recombinant DNA without the requirement for manipulations in E. coli. Interestingly, we unexpectedly found that several G/C-rich sequences used for fusion PCR lowered gene expression when located adjacent to the start codon.

  1. Non-homologous end joining-mediated functional marker selection for DNA cloning in the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Hoshida, Hisashi; Murakami, Nobutada; Suzuki, Ayako; Tamura, Ryoko; Asakawa, Jun; Abdel-Banat, Babiker M A; Nonklang, Sanom; Nakamura, Mikiko; Akada, Rinji

    2014-01-01

    The cloning of DNA fragments into vectors or host genomes has traditionally been performed using Escherichia coli with restriction enzymes and DNA ligase or homologous recombination-based reactions. We report here a novel DNA cloning method that does not require DNA end processing or homologous recombination, but that ensures highly accurate cloning. The method exploits the efficient non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) activity of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus and consists of a novel functional marker selection system. First, to demonstrate the applicability of NHEJ to DNA cloning, a C-terminal-truncated non-functional ura3 selection marker and the truncated region were PCR-amplified separately, mixed and directly used for the transformation. URA3(+) transformants appeared on the selection plates, indicating that the two DNA fragments were correctly joined by NHEJ to generate a functional URA3 gene that had inserted into the yeast chromosome. To develop the cloning system, the shortest URA3 C-terminal encoding sequence that could restore the function of a truncated non-functional ura3 was determined by deletion analysis, and was included in the primers to amplify target DNAs for cloning. Transformation with PCR-amplified target DNAs and C-terminal truncated ura3 produced numerous transformant colonies, in which a functional URA3 gene was generated and was integrated into the chromosome with the target DNAs. Several K. marxianus circular plasmids with different selection markers were also developed for NHEJ-based cloning and recombinant DNA construction. The one-step DNA cloning method developed here is a relatively simple and reliable procedure among the DNA cloning systems developed to date.

  2. Complete absence of mitochondrial DNA in the petite-negative yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe leads to resistance towards the alkaloid lycorine.

    PubMed

    Massardo, D R; Manna, F; Schäfer, B; Wolf, K; Del Giudice, L

    1994-01-01

    The petite-positive yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be efficiently and completely converted to respiratory-deficient cytoplasmic petite mutants by intercalating drugs. Rho0 petites from Schizosaccharomyces pombe could only be obtained in strains carrying a nuclear mutation. In this paper we report the efficient isolation of rho0 mutants in a Sch. pombe strain containing a mitochondrial mutator mutation. We also show that the alkaloid lycorine is able to differentiate between cells containing defective mitochondrial DNA (mit-) and those lacking mitochondrial DNA completely (rho0). Rho0 cells are resistant to the alkaloid whereas mit- and wild-type cells show the same sensitivity.

  3. Comparative molecular dynamics studies of heterozygous open reading frames of DNA polymerase eta (η) in pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Satpati, Suresh; Manohar, Kodavati; Acharya, Narottam; Dixit, Anshuman

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability in Candida albicans is believed to play a crucial role in fungal pathogenesis. DNA polymerases contribute significantly to stability of any genome. Although Candida Genome database predicts presence of S. cerevisiae DNA polymerase orthologs; functional and structural characterizations of Candida DNA polymerases are still unexplored. DNA polymerase eta (Polη) is unique as it promotes efficient bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Interestingly, C. albicans is heterozygous in carrying two Polη genes and the nucleotide substitutions were found only in the ORFs. As allelic differences often result in functional differences of the encoded proteins, comparative analyses of structural models and molecular dynamic simulations were performed to characterize these orthologs of DNA Polη. Overall structures of both the ORFs remain conserved except subtle differences in the palm and PAD domains. The complementation analysis showed that both the ORFs equally suppressed UV sensitivity of yeast rad30 deletion strain. Our study has predicted two novel molecular interactions, a highly conserved molecular tetrad of salt bridges and a series of π–π interactions spanning from thumb to PAD. This study suggests these ORFs as the homologues of yeast Polη, and due to its heterogeneity in C. albicans they may play a significant role in pathogenicity. PMID:28120914

  4. Comparative molecular dynamics studies of heterozygous open reading frames of DNA polymerase eta (η) in pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpati, Suresh; Manohar, Kodavati; Acharya, Narottam; Dixit, Anshuman

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability in Candida albicans is believed to play a crucial role in fungal pathogenesis. DNA polymerases contribute significantly to stability of any genome. Although Candida Genome database predicts presence of S. cerevisiae DNA polymerase orthologs; functional and structural characterizations of Candida DNA polymerases are still unexplored. DNA polymerase eta (Polη) is unique as it promotes efficient bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Interestingly, C. albicans is heterozygous in carrying two Polη genes and the nucleotide substitutions were found only in the ORFs. As allelic differences often result in functional differences of the encoded proteins, comparative analyses of structural models and molecular dynamic simulations were performed to characterize these orthologs of DNA Polη. Overall structures of both the ORFs remain conserved except subtle differences in the palm and PAD domains. The complementation analysis showed that both the ORFs equally suppressed UV sensitivity of yeast rad30 deletion strain. Our study has predicted two novel molecular interactions, a highly conserved molecular tetrad of salt bridges and a series of π-π interactions spanning from thumb to PAD. This study suggests these ORFs as the homologues of yeast Polη, and due to its heterogeneity in C. albicans they may play a significant role in pathogenicity.

  5. High-resolution mapping of heteroduplex DNA formed during UV-induced and spontaneous mitotic recombination events in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yi; Dominska, Margaret; Yim, Eunice; Petes, Thomas D

    2017-01-01

    In yeast, DNA breaks are usually repaired by homologous recombination (HR). An early step for HR pathways is formation of a heteroduplex, in which a single-strand from the broken DNA molecule pairs with a strand derived from an intact DNA molecule. If the two strands of DNA are not identical, there will be mismatches within the heteroduplex DNA (hetDNA). In wild-type strains, these mismatches are repaired by the mismatch repair (MMR) system, producing a gene conversion event. In strains lacking MMR, the mismatches persist. Most previous studies involving hetDNA formed during mitotic recombination were restricted to one locus. Below, we present a global mapping of hetDNA formed in the MMR-defective mlh1 strain. We find that many recombination events are associated with repair of double-stranded DNA gaps and/or involve Mlh1-independent mismatch repair. Many of our events are not explicable by the simplest form of the double-strand break repair model of recombination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.28069.001 PMID:28714850

  6. Fission yeast Drp1 is an essential protein required for recovery from DNA damage and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Ahamad, Nafees; Ahmed, Shakil

    2014-12-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most critical types of DNA damage that can leads to chromosomal aberrations, genomic instability and cancer. Several genetic disorders such as Xeroderma pigmentosum are linked with defects in DNA repair. Human Rint1, a TIP1 domain containing protein is involved in membrane trafficking but its role in DNA damage response is elusive. In this study we characterized the role of Drp1 (damage responsive protein 1), a Rint1 family protein during DNA damage response in fission yeast. We identified that Drp1 is an essential protein and indispensable for survival and growth. Using in vitro random mutagenesis approach we isolated a temperature sensitive mutant allele of drp1 gene (drp1-654) that exhibits sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, in particular to alkylation damage and UV associated DNA damage. The drp1-654 mutant cells are also sensitive to double strand break inducing agent bleomycin. Genetic interaction studies identified that Rad50 and Drp1 act in the same pathway during DNA damage response and the physical interaction of Drp1 with Rad50 was unaffected in drp1-654 mutant at permissive as well as non permissive temperature. Furthermore Drp1 was found to be required for the recovery from MMS induced DNA damage. We also demonstrated that the Drp1 protein localized to nucleus and was required to maintain the chromosome stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields do not affect DNA damage and gene expression profiles of yeast and human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Luceri, Cristina; De Filippo, Carlotta; Giovannelli, Lisa; Blangiardo, Marta; Cavalieri, Duccio; Aglietti, Filippo; Pampaloni, Monica; Andreuccetti, Daniele; Pieri, Lapo; Bambi, Franco; Biggeri, Annibale; Dolara, Piero

    2005-09-01

    We studied the effects of extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on peripheral human blood lymphocytes and DBY747 Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Graded exposure to 50 Hz magnetic flux density was obtained with a Helmholtz coil system set at 1, 10 or 100 microT for 18 h. The effects of EMFs on DNA damage were studied with the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) in lymphocytes. Gene expression profiles of EMF-exposed human and yeast cells were evaluated with DNA microarrays containing 13,971 and 6,212 oligonucleotides, respectively. After exposure to the EMF, we did not observe an increase in the amount of strand breaks or oxidated DNA bases relative to controls or a variation in gene expression profiles. The results suggest that extremely low-frequency EMFs do not induce DNA damage or affect gene expression in these two different eukaryotic cell systems.

  8. Comparative analysis of the molecular mechanisms controlling the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in yeast and in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Elena; Hasan, Md Mehedi; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes DNA replication takes place in the S phase of the cell cycle. It initiates from hundreds to thousands of replication origins in a coordinated manner, in order to efficiently duplicate the genome. The sequence of events leading to the onset of DNA replication is conventionally divided in two interdependent processes: licensing-a process during which replication origins acquire replication competence but are kept inactive- and firing-a process during which licensed origins are activated but not re-licensed. In this review we investigate the evolutionary conservation of the molecular machinery orchestrating DNA replication initiation both in yeast and in mammalian cells, highlighting a remarkable conservation of the general architecture of this central biological mechanism. Many steps are conserved down to molecular details and are performed by orthologous proteins with high sequence conservation, while differences in molecular structure of the performing proteins and their interactions are apparent in other steps. Tight regulation of initiation of DNA replication is achieved through protein phosphorylation, exerted mostly by Cyclin-dependent kinases in order to ensure that each chromosome is fully replicated once, and only once, during each cycle, and to avoid the formation of aberrant DNA structures and incorrect chromosomal duplication, that in mammalian cells are a prerequisite for genome instability and tumorigenesis. We then consider a molecular mathematical model of DNA replication, recently proposed by our group in a collaborative project, as a frame of reference to discuss similarities and differences observed in the regulatory program controlling DNA replication initiation in yeast and in mammalian cells and discuss whether they may be dependent upon different functional constraints. We conclude that a systems biology approach, integrating molecular analysis with modeling and computational investigations, is the best choice to investigate the

  9. Links between nucleolar activity, rDNA stability, aneuploidy and chronological aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Miedziak, Beata; Kulak, Klaudia; Molon, Mateusz; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-06-01

    The nucleolus is speculated to be a regulator of cellular senescence in numerous biological systems (Guarente, Genes Dev 11(19):2449-2455, 1997; Johnson et al., Curr Opin Cell Biol 10(3):332-338, 1998). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alterations in nucleolar architecture, the redistribution of nucleolar protein and the accumulation of extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA circles (ERCs) during replicative aging have been reported. However, little is known regarding rDNA stability and changes in nucleolar activity during chronological aging (CA), which is another yeast aging model used. In the present study, the impact of aberrant cell cycle checkpoint control (knock-out of BUB1, BUB2, MAD1 and TEL1 genes in haploid and diploid hemizygous states) on CA-mediated changes in the nucleolus was studied. Nucleolus fragmentation, changes in the nucleolus size and the nucleolus/nucleus ratio, ERC accumulation, expression pattern changes and the relocation of protein involved in transcriptional silencing during CA were revealed. All strains examined were affected by oxidative stress, aneuploidy (numerical rather than structural aberrations) and DNA damage. However, the bub1 cells were the most prone to aneuploidy events, which may contribute to observed decrease in chronological lifespan. We postulate that chronological aging may be affected by redox imbalance-mediated chromosome XII instability leading to both rDNA instability and whole chromosome aneuploidy. CA-mediated nucleolus fragmentation may be a consequence of nucleolus enlargement and/or Nop2p upregulation. Moreover, the rDNA content of chronologically aging cells may be a factor determining the subsequent replicative lifespan. Taken together, we demonstrated that the nucleolus state is also affected during CA in yeast.

  10. A novel plant vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene evolved by DNA shuffling confers improved salt tolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Zhang, Hui; Blumwald, Eduardo; Xia, Tao

    2010-07-23

    Plant vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporters play important roles in maintaining cellular ion homeostasis and mediating the transport of Na(+) out of the cytosol and into the vacuole. Vacuolar antiporters have been shown to play significant roles in salt tolerance; however the relatively low V(max) of the Na(+)/H(+) exchange of the Na(+)/H(+) antiporters identified could limit its application in the molecular breeding of salt tolerant crops. In this study, we applied DNA shuffling methodology to generate and recombine the mutations of Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene AtNHX1. Screening using a large scale yeast complementation system identified AtNHXS1, a novel Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. Expression of AtNHXS1 in yeast showed that the antiporter localized to the vacuolar membrane and that its expression improved the tolerance of yeast to NaCl, KCl, LiCl, and hygromycin B. Measurements of the ion transport activity across the intact yeast vacuole demonstrated that the AtNHXS1 protein showed higher Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity and a slightly improved K(+)/H(+) exchange activity.

  11. Hypermutability of Damaged Single-Strand DNA Formed at Double-Strand Breaks and Uncapped Telomeres in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Sterling, Joan; Storici, Francesca; Resnick, Michael A.; Gordenin, Dmitry A.

    2008-01-01

    The major DNA repair pathways operate on damage in double-strand DNA because they use the intact strand as a template after damage removal. Therefore, lesions in transient single-strand stretches of chromosomal DNA are expected to be especially threatening to genome stability. To test this hypothesis, we designed systems in budding yeast that could generate many kilobases of persistent single-strand DNA next to double-strand breaks or uncapped telomeres. The systems allowed controlled restoration to the double-strand state after applying DNA damage. We found that lesions induced by UV-light and methyl methanesulfonate can be tolerated in long single-strand regions and are hypermutagenic. The hypermutability required PCNA monoubiquitination and was largely attributable to translesion synthesis by the error-prone DNA polymerase ζ. In support of multiple lesions in single-strand DNA being a source of hypermutability, analysis of the UV-induced mutants revealed strong strand-specific bias and unexpectedly high frequency of alleles with widely separated multiple mutations scattered over several kilobases. Hypermutability and multiple mutations associated with lesions in transient stretches of long single-strand DNA may be a source of carcinogenesis and provide selective advantage in adaptive evolution. PMID:19023402

  12. Differentiation of yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and their volatile compounds production.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M J; Rodríguez, M; Casado, E M; Bermúdez, E; Córdoba, J J

    2009-09-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and volatile compounds analysis to differentiate yeast biotypes involved in flavour development of dry-cured Iberian ham throughout the ripening process is evaluated. For this purpose, 86 yeasts isolated from Iberian hams in the main ripening stages at different industries of the four Protected Designations of Origin of this product, were used. The combination of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR using the primer (GACA)4 showed a higher variability in the yeast species detected than obtained using only mtDNA restriction analysis. Only two species, Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides, were identified throughout the whole ripening process and a wide diversity of biotypes was found in these two species, with those of D. hansenii predominating. Clear differences between biotypes were detected in the generation of volatile compounds, with the biotype C2-2 of D. hansenii showing the highest concentrations of volatiles. The combined use of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR distinguishes yeast biotypes with different production of volatile compounds. In addition, analysis of the production profile of volatile compounds is needed to differentiate yeast strains of the same biotype recovered at different stages of ripening. Thus, the combination of these three methods could be very useful to select or monitor yeasts as starter cultures in dry-cured meat products.

  13. The use of anonymous DNA markers in assessing worldwide relatedness in the yeast species Pichia kluyveri Bedford and Kudrjavzev.

    PubMed

    Ganter, P F; de Barros Lopes, M

    2000-11-01

    Pichia kluyveri, a sexual ascomycetous yeast from cactus necroses and acidic fruit, is divided into three varieties. We used physiological, RAPD, and AFLP data to compare 46 P. kluyveri strains collected worldwide to investigate relationships among varieties. Physiology did not place all strains into described varieties. Although the combined AFLP and RAPD data produced a single most parsimonious tree, separate analysis of AFLP and RAPD data resulted in significantly different trees (by the partition homogeneity test). We then compared the distribution of strains per band to an expected distribution. This suggested we could separate both the AFLP and RAPD datasets into bands from rapidly and slowly changing DNA regions. When only bands from slowly changing regions (from each dataset) were included in the analysis, both the RAPD and AFLP datasets supported a single tree. This second tree did not differ significantly from the cladogram based on all of the DNA data, which we accepted as the best estimate of the phylogeny of these yeast strains. Based on this phylogeny, we were able to demonstrate the strong influence of geography on the population structure of this yeast, confirm the monophyly of one variety, question the utility of maintaining another variety, and demonstrate that the physiological differences used to separate the varieties did not do so in all cases.

  14. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine; Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2014-04-07

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tus, to specific DNA sequences called Ter. Here, we demonstrate that Tus-Ter modules also induce polar RF pausing when engineered into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. This heterologous RF barrier is distinct from a number of previously characterized, protein-mediated, RF pause sites in yeast, as it is neither Tof1-dependent nor counteracted by the Rrm3 helicase. Although the yeast replisome can overcome RF pausing at Tus-Ter modules, this event triggers site-specific homologous recombination that requires the RecQ helicase, Sgs1, for its timely resolution. We propose that Tus-Ter can be utilized as a versatile, site-specific, heterologous DNA replication-perturbing system, with a variety of potential applications.

  15. Dna2 is involved in CA strand resection and nascent lagging strand completion at native yeast telomeres.

    PubMed

    Budd, Martin E; Campbell, Judith L

    2013-10-11

    Post-replicational telomere end processing involves both extension by telomerase and resection to produce 3'-GT-overhangs that extend beyond the complementary 5'-CA-rich strand. Resection must be carefully controlled to maintain telomere length. At short de novo telomeres generated artificially by HO endonuclease in the G2 phase, we show that dna2-defective strains are impaired in both telomere elongation and sequential 5'-CA resection. At native telomeres in dna2 mutants, GT-overhangs do clearly elongate during late S phase but are shorter than in wild type, suggesting a role for Dna2 in 5'-CA resection but also indicating significant redundancy with other nucleases. Surprisingly, elimination of Mre11 nuclease or Exo1, which are complementary to Dna2 in resection of internal double strand breaks, does not lead to further shortening of GT-overhangs in dna2 mutants. A second step in end processing involves filling in of the CA-strand to maintain appropriate telomere length. We show that Dna2 is required for normal telomeric CA-strand fill-in. Yeast dna2 mutants, like mutants in DNA ligase 1 (cdc9), accumulate low molecular weight, nascent lagging strand DNA replication intermediates at telomeres. Based on this and other results, we propose that FEN1 is not sufficient and that either Dna2 or Exo1 is required to supplement FEN1 in maturing lagging strands at telomeres. Telomeres may be among the subset of genomic locations where Dna2 helicase/nuclease is essential for the two-nuclease pathway of primer processing on lagging strands.

  16. Chl1p, a DNA helicase-like protein in budding yeast, functions in sister-chromatid cohesion.

    PubMed Central

    Skibbens, Robert V

    2004-01-01

    From the time of DNA replication until anaphase onset, sister chromatids remain tightly paired along their length. Ctf7p/Eco1p is essential to establish sister-chromatid pairing during S-phase and associates with DNA replication components. DNA helicases precede the DNA replication fork and thus will first encounter chromatin sites destined for cohesion. In this study, I provide the first evidence that a DNA helicase is required for proper sister-chromatid cohesion. Characterizations of chl1 mutant cells reveal that CHL1 interacts genetically with both CTF7/ECO1 and CTF18/CHL12, two genes that function in sister-chromatid cohesion. Consistent with genetic interactions, Chl1p physically associates with Ctf7p/Eco1p both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, a functional assay reveals that Chl1p is critical for sister-chromatid cohesion. Within the budding yeast genome, Chl1p exhibits the highest degree of sequence similarity to human CHL1 isoforms and BACH1. Previous studies revealed that human CHLR1 exhibits DNA helicase-like activities and that BACH1 is a helicase-like protein that associates with the tumor suppressor BRCA1 to maintain genome integrity. Our findings document a novel role for Chl1p in sister-chromatid cohesion and provide new insights into the possible mechanisms through which DNA helicases may contribute to cancer progression when mutated. PMID:15020404

  17. Deletion of the cruciform binding domain in CBP/14-3-3 displays reduced origin binding and initiation of DNA replication in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yahyaoui, Wafaa; Callejo, Mario; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Background Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication involves many protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. We have previously shown that 14-3-3 proteins bind cruciform DNA and associate with mammalian and yeast replication origins in a cell cycle dependent manner. Results By expressing the human 14-3-3ε, as the sole member of 14-3-3 proteins family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that 14-3-3ε complements the S. cerevisiae Bmh1/Bmh2 double knockout, conserves its cruciform binding activity, and associates in vivo with the yeast replication origins ARS307. Deletion of the α5-helix, the potential cruciform binding domain of 14-3-3, decreased the cruciform binding activity of the protein as well as its association with the yeast replication origins ARS307 and ARS1. Furthermore, the mutant cells had a reduced ability to stably maintain plasmids bearing one or multiple origins. Conclusion 14-3-3, a cruciform DNA binding protein, associates with yeast origins of replication and functions as an initiator of DNA replication, presumably through binding to cruciform DNA forming at yeast replicators. PMID:17430600

  18. Isolation of a single-stranded DNA-binding protein from the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris and its identification as zeta crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Kranthi, Balla Venkata; Balasubramanian, Natarajan; Rangarajan, Pundi N.

    2006-01-01

    A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) that binds to specific upstream sequences of alcohol oxidase (AOX1) promoter of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has been isolated and identified as zeta crystallin (ZTA1). The cDNA encoding P.pastoris ZTA1 (PpZTA1) was cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector, the recombinant PpZTA1 was expressed and purified from E.coli cell lysates. The DNA-binding properties of recombinant PpZTA1 are identical to those of the SSB present in P.pastoris cell lysates. PpZTA1 binds to ssDNA sequences >24 nt and its DNA-binding activity is abolished by NADPH. This is the first report on the characterization of DNA-binding properties of a yeast ZTA1. PMID:16914438

  19. Complete DNA Sequence of Kuraishia capsulata Illustrates Novel Genomic Features among Budding Yeasts (Saccharomycotina)

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Lucia; Noel, Benjamin; Porcel, Betina; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Hullo, Marie-Francoise; Sacerdot, Christine; Tekaia, Fredj; Leh-Louis, Véronique; Despons, Laurence; Khanna, Varun; Aury, Jean-Marc; Barbe, Valérie; Couloux, Arnaud; Labadie, Karen; Pelletier, Eric; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Boekhout, Teun; Gabaldon, Toni; Wincker, Patrick; Dujon, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid-type strain of Kuraishia capsulata (CBS1993T), a nitrate-assimilating Saccharomycetales of uncertain taxonomy, isolated from tunnels of insect larvae underneath coniferous barks and characterized by its copious production of extracellular polysaccharides. The sequence is composed of seven scaffolds, one per chromosome, totaling 11.4 Mb and containing 6,029 protein-coding genes, ∼13.5% of which being interrupted by introns. This GC-rich yeast genome (45.7%) appears phylogenetically related with the few other nitrate-assimilating yeasts sequenced so far, Ogataea polymorpha, O. parapolymorpha, and Dekkera bruxellensis, with which it shares a very reduced number of tRNA genes, a novel tRNA sparing strategy, and a common nitrate assimilation cluster, three specific features to this group of yeasts. Centromeres were recognized in GC-poor troughs of each scaffold. The strain bears MAT alpha genes at a single MAT locus and presents a significant degree of conservation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, suggesting that it can perform sexual cycles in nature, although genes involved in meiosis were not all recognized. The complete absence of conservation of synteny between K. capsulata and any other yeast genome described so far, including the three other nitrate-assimilating species, validates the interest of this species for long-range evolutionary genomic studies among Saccharomycotina yeasts. PMID:24317973

  20. Complete DNA sequence of Kuraishia capsulata illustrates novel genomic features among budding yeasts (Saccharomycotina).

    PubMed

    Morales, Lucia; Noel, Benjamin; Porcel, Betina; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Hullo, Marie-Francoise; Sacerdot, Christine; Tekaia, Fredj; Leh-Louis, Véronique; Despons, Laurence; Khanna, Varun; Aury, Jean-Marc; Barbe, Valérie; Couloux, Arnaud; Labadie, Karen; Pelletier, Eric; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Boekhout, Teun; Gabaldon, Toni; Wincker, Patrick; Dujon, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid-type strain of Kuraishia capsulata (CBS1993(T)), a nitrate-assimilating Saccharomycetales of uncertain taxonomy, isolated from tunnels of insect larvae underneath coniferous barks and characterized by its copious production of extracellular polysaccharides. The sequence is composed of seven scaffolds, one per chromosome, totaling 11.4 Mb and containing 6,029 protein-coding genes, ~13.5% of which being interrupted by introns. This GC-rich yeast genome (45.7%) appears phylogenetically related with the few other nitrate-assimilating yeasts sequenced so far, Ogataea polymorpha, O. parapolymorpha, and Dekkera bruxellensis, with which it shares a very reduced number of tRNA genes, a novel tRNA sparing strategy, and a common nitrate assimilation cluster, three specific features to this group of yeasts. Centromeres were recognized in GC-poor troughs of each scaffold. The strain bears MAT alpha genes at a single MAT locus and presents a significant degree of conservation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, suggesting that it can perform sexual cycles in nature, although genes involved in meiosis were not all recognized. The complete absence of conservation of synteny between K. capsulata and any other yeast genome described so far, including the three other nitrate-assimilating species, validates the interest of this species for long-range evolutionary genomic studies among Saccharomycotina yeasts.

  1. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Acne Patients by Analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Chan; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Ko, Jong Hyun; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2011-01-01

    Background Although acne is a common follicular inflammatory dermatosis, studies of the relationship between Malassezia yeasts and acne have rarely been conducted. Objective We sought to identify Malassezia yeasts from acne patients and establish a relationship between specific types of species of Malassezia and acne. Methods Sixty acne patients were enrolled. Each strain obtained was identified as one of eleven species by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP. We then compared these data with those of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Results Growth of Malassezia was evident in fewer patients with acne (50%) in comparison to controls (70.6%). M. restricta was dominant in patients with acne (23.9%), whereas M. globosa was most common (26.7%) in healthy controls. In the patients group, the rate was the highest (71.7%) in the twenties and, in terms of body site, the rate was the highest (60%) in the chest. In the control group, the rate was the highest (75.0%) in the thirties and in the forehead (85.0%). Conclusion The detection rate of Malassezia yeasts was conspicuously low in the acne patients group. Statistically significant differences were observed between the patient and the control groups in the twenties and thirties, and in terms of body site, in the forehead and chest. PMID:21909202

  2. Integrity of chromatin and replicating DNA in nuclei released from fission yeast by semi-automated grinding in liquid nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies of nuclear function in many organisms, especially those with tough cell walls, are limited by lack of availability of simple, economical methods for large-scale preparation of clean, undamaged nuclei. Findings Here we present a useful method for nuclear isolation from the important model organism, the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To preserve in vivo molecular configurations, we flash-froze the yeast cells in liquid nitrogen. Then we broke their tough cell walls, without damaging their nuclei, by grinding in a precision-controlled motorized mortar-and-pestle apparatus. The cryo-ground cells were resuspended and thawed in a buffer designed to preserve nuclear morphology, and the nuclei were enriched by differential centrifugation. The washed nuclei were free from contaminating nucleases and have proven well-suited as starting material for genome-wide chromatin analysis and for preparation of fragile DNA replication intermediates. Conclusions We have developed a simple, reproducible, economical procedure for large-scale preparation of endogenous-nuclease-free, morphologically intact nuclei from fission yeast. With appropriate modifications, this procedure may well prove useful for isolation of nuclei from other organisms with, or without, tough cell walls. PMID:22088094

  3. Integrity of chromatin and replicating DNA in nuclei released from fission yeast by semi-automated grinding in liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Givens, Robert M; Mesner, Larry D; Hamlin, Joyce L; Buck, Michael J; Huberman, Joel A

    2011-11-16

    Studies of nuclear function in many organisms, especially those with tough cell walls, are limited by lack of availability of simple, economical methods for large-scale preparation of clean, undamaged nuclei. Here we present a useful method for nuclear isolation from the important model organism, the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To preserve in vivo molecular configurations, we flash-froze the yeast cells in liquid nitrogen. Then we broke their tough cell walls, without damaging their nuclei, by grinding in a precision-controlled motorized mortar-and-pestle apparatus. The cryo-ground cells were resuspended and thawed in a buffer designed to preserve nuclear morphology, and the nuclei were enriched by differential centrifugation. The washed nuclei were free from contaminating nucleases and have proven well-suited as starting material for genome-wide chromatin analysis and for preparation of fragile DNA replication intermediates. We have developed a simple, reproducible, economical procedure for large-scale preparation of endogenous-nuclease-free, morphologically intact nuclei from fission yeast. With appropriate modifications, this procedure may well prove useful for isolation of nuclei from other organisms with, or without, tough cell walls.

  4. Identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeasts based on nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzman, C P; Robnett, C J

    1997-01-01

    Clinically important species of Candida and related organisms were compared for extent of nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene. This rDNA region is sufficiently variable to allow reliable separation of all known clinically significant yeast species. Of the 204 described species examined, 21 appeared to be synonyms of previously described organisms. Phylogenetic relationships among the species are presented. PMID:9114410

  5. The conserved bromo-adjacent homology domain of yeast Orc1 functions in the selection of DNA replication origins within chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Philipp; Park, Sookhee; Shor, Erika; Huebert, Dana J.; Warren, Christopher L.; Ansari, Aseem Z.; Weinreich, Michael; Eaton, Matthew L.; MacAlpine, David M.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds to the specific positions on chromosomes that serve as DNA replication origins. Although ORC is conserved from yeast to humans, the DNA sequence elements that specify ORC binding are not. In particular, metazoan ORC shows no obvious DNA sequence specificity, whereas yeast ORC binds to a specific DNA sequence within all yeast origins. Thus, whereas chromatin must play an important role in metazoan ORC's ability to recognize origins, it is unclear whether chromatin plays a role in yeast ORC's recognition of origins. This study focused on the role of the conserved N-terminal bromo-adjacent homology domain of yeast Orc1 (Orc1BAH). Recent studies indicate that BAH domains are chromatin-binding modules. We show that the Orc1BAH domain was necessary for ORC's stable association with yeast chromosomes, and was physiologically relevant to DNA replication in vivo. This replication role was separable from the Orc1BAH domain's previously defined role in transcriptional silencing. Genome-wide analyses of ORC binding in ORC1 and orc1bahΔ cells revealed that the Orc1BAH domain contributed to ORC's association with most yeast origins, including a class of origins highly dependent on the Orc1BAH domain for ORC association (orc1bahΔ-sensitive origins). Orc1bahΔ-sensitive origins required the Orc1BAH domain for normal activity on chromosomes and plasmids, and were associated with a distinct local nucleosome structure. These data provide molecular insights into how the Orc1BAH domain contributes to ORC's selection of replication origins, as well as new tools for examining conserved mechanisms governing ORC's selection of origins within eukaryotic chromosomes. PMID:20595233

  6. Structural studies of the yeast DNA damage-inducible protein Ddi1 reveal domain architecture of this eukaryotic protein family

    PubMed Central

    Trempe, Jean-François; Šašková, Klára Grantz; Sivá, Monika; Ratcliffe, Colin D. H.; Veverka, Václav; Hoegl, Annabelle; Ménade, Marie; Feng, Xin; Shenker, Solomon; Svoboda, Michal; Kožíšek, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan; Gehring, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic Ddi1 family is defined by a conserved retroviral aspartyl protease-like (RVP) domain found in association with a ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain. Ddi1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae additionally contains a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain. The substrate specificity and role of the protease domain in the biological functions of the Ddi family remain unclear. Yeast Ddi1 has been implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression, DNA-damage repair, and exocytosis. Here, we investigated the multi-domain structure of yeast Ddi1 using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and small-angle X-ray scattering. The crystal structure of the RVP domain sheds light on a putative substrate recognition site involving a conserved loop. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms that both UBL and UBA domains bind ubiquitin, and that Ddi1 binds K48-linked diubiquitin with enhanced affinity. The solution NMR structure of a helical domain that precedes the protease displays tertiary structure similarity to DNA-binding domains from transcription regulators. Our structural studies suggest that the helical domain could serve as a landing platform for substrates in conjunction with attached ubiquitin chains binding to the UBL and UBA domains. PMID:27646017

  7. Draft genome sequence of Cryptococcus terricola JCM 24523, an oleaginous yeast capable of expressing exogenous DNA

    DOE PAGES

    Close, Dan; Ojumu, John O.; Zhang, Gui X.

    2016-11-03

    Cryptococcus terricola JCM 24523 has recently been identified as an oleaginous yeast capable of converting starch into fatty acids. Here, this draft genome sequence provides a platform for elucidating its fatty acid production potential and supporting comparisons with other oleaginous species.

  8. Precise mapping and characterization of the RNA primers of DNA replication for a yeast hypersuppressive petite by in vitro capping with guanylyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Graves, T; Dante, M; Eisenhour, L; Christianson, T W

    1998-03-01

    The active origins of DNA replication for yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mitochondrial DNA share 280 conserved base pairs and have a promoter. Since intact replication intermediates retain their initiating ribonucleotide triphosphate, we used guanylyltransferase to in vitro cap the replication intermediates present in restriction enzyme-cut DNA from an ori-5 hypersuppressive petite. Restriction mapping and RNA sequencing of these labeled intermediates showed that each DNA strand is primed at a single discrete nucleotide, that one primer starts at the promoter and that the other primer starts 34 nt away, outside the conserved region. Deoxyribonuclease digestion of the capped fragments left resistant RNA primers, which enabled identification of zones of transition from RNA to DNA synthesis. Some of the results contradict the prevailing model for priming at the yeast mitochondrial origins.

  9. Yeast TATA Binding Protein Interaction with DNA: Fluorescence Determination of Oligomeric State, Equilibrium Binding, On-Rate, and Dissociation Kinetics†

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Howard, Gina M.; Weil, P. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    A combination of steady-state, stopped-flow, and time-resolved fluorescence of intrinsic tryptophan and extrinsically labeled fluorescent DNA is utilized to examine the interaction of yeast TATA binding protein (TBP) with DNA. TBP is composed of two structural domains, the carboxy domain (residues 61–240), which is responsible for DNA binding and initiation of basal level transcription, and an amino terminal domain (residues 1–60), whose function is currently unknown. The steady-state fluorescence emission spectrum of the single tryptophan in the amino terminal domain of TBP undergoes a huge (30–40 nm) red-shift upon interaction with stoichiometric amounts of TATA box containing DNA. From time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence anisotropy studies, we demonstrate that, in the absence of DNA, the protein exists as a multimer in solution and it contains (at least) two primary conformations, one with the amino terminus associated tightly with the protein(s) in a hydrophobic environment and one with the amino terminus decoupled away from the rest of the protein and solvent-exposed. Upon binding DNA, the protein dissociates into a monomeric complex, upon which only the solvent-exposed amino terminus conformation remains. Kinetic and equilibrium binding studies were performed on TATA box containing DNA which was extrinsically labeled with a fluorescent probe Rhodamine-X at the 5′-end. This “fluorescent” DNA allowed for the collection of quantitative spectroscopic binding, kinetic on-rate, and kinetic off-rate data at physiological concentrations. Global analysis of equilibrium binding studies performed from 500 pM to 50 nM DNA reveals a single dissociation constant (Kd) of approximately 5 nM. Global analysis of stopped-flow anisotropy on-rate experiments, with millisecond timing resolution and TBP concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 nM (20 nM DNA), can be perfectly described by a single second-order rate constant of 1.66 × 105 M−1 s−1. These measurements

  10. Early Loss of Telomerase Action in Yeast Creates a Dependence on the DNA Damage Response Adaptor Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Kyle A.; Smith, Dana L.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres cap the ends of chromosomes, protecting them from degradation and inappropriate DNA repair processes that can lead to genomic instability. A short telomere elicits increased telomerase action on itself that replenishes telomere length, thereby stabilizing the telomere. In the prolonged absence of telomerase activity in dividing cells, telomeres eventually become critically short, inducing a permanent cell cycle arrest (senescence). We recently showed that even early after telomerase inactivation (ETI), yeast cells have accelerated mother cell aging and mildly perturbed cell cycles. Here, we show that the complete disruption of DNA damage response (DDR) adaptor proteins in ETI cells causes severe growth defects. This synthetic-lethality phenotype was as pronounced as that caused by extensive DNA damage in wild-type cells but showed genetic dependencies distinct from such damage and was completely alleviated by SML1 deletion, which increases deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools. Our results indicated that these deleterious effects in ETI cells cannot be accounted for solely by the slow erosion of telomeres due to incomplete replication that leads to senescence. We propose that normally occurring telomeric DNA replication stress is resolved by telomerase activity and the DDR in two parallel pathways and that deletion of Sml1 prevents this stress. PMID:27161319

  11. Early Loss of Telomerase Action in Yeast Creates a Dependence on the DNA Damage Response Adaptor Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jay, Kyle A; Smith, Dana L; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2016-07-15

    Telomeres cap the ends of chromosomes, protecting them from degradation and inappropriate DNA repair processes that can lead to genomic instability. A short telomere elicits increased telomerase action on itself that replenishes telomere length, thereby stabilizing the telomere. In the prolonged absence of telomerase activity in dividing cells, telomeres eventually become critically short, inducing a permanent cell cycle arrest (senescence). We recently showed that even early after telomerase inactivation (ETI), yeast cells have accelerated mother cell aging and mildly perturbed cell cycles. Here, we show that the complete disruption of DNA damage response (DDR) adaptor proteins in ETI cells causes severe growth defects. This synthetic-lethality phenotype was as pronounced as that caused by extensive DNA damage in wild-type cells but showed genetic dependencies distinct from such damage and was completely alleviated by SML1 deletion, which increases deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools. Our results indicated that these deleterious effects in ETI cells cannot be accounted for solely by the slow erosion of telomeres due to incomplete replication that leads to senescence. We propose that normally occurring telomeric DNA replication stress is resolved by telomerase activity and the DDR in two parallel pathways and that deletion of Sml1 prevents this stress. Copyright © 2016 Jay et al.

  12. Mechanistic aspects of DnaA–RepA interaction as revealed by yeast forward and reverse two-hybrid analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rahul; Kachroo, Aardra; Bastia, Deepak

    2001-01-01

    Using yeast forward and reverse two-hybrid analysis and biochemical techniques, we present novel and definitive in vivo and in vitro evidence that both the N-terminal domain I and C-terminal domain IV of the host-encoded DnaA initiator protein of Escherichia coli interact physically with plasmid-encoded RepA initiator of pSC101. The N-terminal, but not the C-terminal, region of RepA interacted with DnaA in vitro. These protein–protein interactions are critical for two very early steps of replication initiation, namely origin unwinding and helicase loading. Neither domain I nor IV of DnaA could individually collaborate with RepA to promote pSC101 replication. However, when the two domains are co-expressed within a common cell milieu and allowed to associate non-covalently with each other via a pair of leucine zippers, replication of the plasmid was supported in vivo. Thus, the result shows that physical tethering, either non-covalent or covalent, of domain I and IV of DnaA and interaction of both domains with RepA, are critical for replication initiation. The results also provide the molecular basis for a novel, potential, replication-based bacterial two-hybrid system. PMID:11500384

  13. Trans-complementation by human apurinic endonuclease (Ape) of hypersensitivity to DNA damage and spontaneous mutator phenotype in apn1-yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D M; Bennett, R A; Marquis, J C; Ansari, P; Demple, B

    1995-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites in DNA are potentially lethal and mutagenic. 'Class II' AP endonucleases initiate the repair of these and other DNA lesions. In yeast, the predominant enzyme of this type is Apn1, and its elimination sensitizes the cells to killing by simple alkylating agents or oxidants, and raises the rate of spontaneous mutation. We investigated the ability of the major human class II AP endonuclease, Ape, which is structurally unrelated to Apn1, to replace the yeast enzyme in vivo. Confocal immunomicroscopy studies indicate that approximately 25% of the Ape expressed in yeast is present in the nucleus. High-level Ape expression corresponding to approximately 7000 molecules per nucleus, equal to the normal Apn1 copy number, restored resistance to methyl methanesulfonate to near wild-type levels in Apn1-deficient (apn1-) yeast. Ape expression in apn1- yeast provided little protection against H2O2 challenges, consistent with the weak 3'-repair diesterase activity of the human enzyme. Ape expression at approximately 2000 molecules per nucleus reduced the spontaneous mutation rate of apn1- yeast to that seen for wild-type cells. Because Ape has a powerful AP endonuclease but weak 3'-diesterase activity, these findings indicate that endogenously generated AP sites can drive spontaneous mutagenesis. Images PMID:8559661

  14. Running on empty: does mitochondrial DNA mutation limit replicative lifespan in yeast?: Mutations that increase the division rate of cells lacking mitochondrial DNA also extend replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Cory D

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations escalate with increasing age in higher organisms. However, it has so far been difficult to experimentally determine whether mtDNA mutation merely correlates with age or directly limits lifespan. A recent study shows that budding yeast can also lose functional mtDNA late in life. Interestingly, independent studies of replicative lifespan (RLS) and of mtDNA-deficient cells show that the same mutations can increase both RLS and the division rate of yeast lacking the mitochondrial genome. These exciting, parallel findings imply a potential causal relationship between mtDNA mutation and replicative senescence. Furthermore, these results suggest more efficient methods for discovering genes that determine lifespan.

  15. The RXL motif of the African cassava mosaic virus Rep protein is necessary for rereplication of yeast DNA and viral infection in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hipp, Katharina; Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin; Gronenborn, Bruno; Jeske, Holger

    2014-08-15

    Geminiviruses, single-stranded DNA plant viruses, encode a replication-initiator protein (Rep) that is indispensable for virus replication. A potential cyclin interaction motif (RXL) in the sequence of African cassava mosaic virus Rep may be an alternative link to cell cycle controls to the known interaction with plant homologs of retinoblastoma protein (pRBR). Mutation of this motif abrogated rereplication in fission yeast induced by expression of wildtype Rep suggesting that Rep interacts via its RXL motif with one or several yeast proteins. The RXL motif is essential for viral infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants, since mutation of this motif in infectious clones prevented any symptomatic infection. The cell-cycle link (Clink) protein of a nanovirus (faba bean necrotic yellows virus) was investigated that activates the cell cycle by binding via its LXCXE motif to pRBR. Expression of wildtype Clink and a Clink mutant deficient in pRBR-binding did not trigger rereplication in fission yeast. - Highlights: • A potential cyclin interaction motif is conserved in geminivirus Rep proteins. • In ACMV Rep, this motif (RXL) is essential for rereplication of fission yeast DNA. • Mutating RXL abrogated viral infection completely in Nicotiana benthamiana. • Expression of a nanovirus Clink protein in yeast did not induce rereplication. • Plant viruses may have evolved multiple routes to exploit host DNA synthesis.

  16. Role of the yeast DNA repair protein Nej1 in end processing during the repair of DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Trujillo, Kelly M; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Osley, Mary Ann; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2015-07-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s often require end processing prior to joining during their repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although the yeast proteins, Pol4, a Pol X family DNA polymerase, and Rad27, a nuclease, participate in the end processing reactions of NHEJ, the mechanisms underlying the recruitment of these factors to DSBs are not known. Here we demonstrate that Nej1, a NHEJ factor that interacts with and modulates the activity of the NHEJ DNA ligase complex (Dnl4/Lif1), physically and functionally interacts with both Pol4 and Rad27. Notably, Nej1 and Dnl4/Lif1, which also interacts with both Pol4 and Rad27, independently recruit the end processing factors to in vivo DSBs via mechanisms that are additive rather than redundant. As was observed with Dnl4/Lif1, the activities of both Pol4 and Rad27 were enhanced by the interaction with Nej1. Furthermore, Nej1 increased the joining of incompatible DNA ends in reconstituted reactions containing Pol4, Rad27 and Dnl4/Lif1, indicating that the stimulatory activities of Nej1 and Dnl4/Lif1 are also additive. Together our results reveal novel roles for Nej1 in the recruitment of Pol4 and Rad27 to in vivo DSBs and the coordination of the end processing and ligation reactions of NHEJ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of DNA Damage in Yeast Apoptosis Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide, Acetic Acid, and Hyperosmotic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Gabriela F.; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been reported to die, under certain conditions, from programmed cell death with apoptotic markers. One of the most important markers is chromosomal DNA fragmentation as indicated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining. We found TUNEL staining in S. cerevisiae to be a consequence of both single- and double-strand DNA breaks, whereas in situ ligation specifically stained double-strand DNA breaks. Cells treated with hydrogen peroxide or acetic acid staining positively for TUNEL assay stained negatively for in situ ligation, indicating that DNA damage in both cases mainly consists of single-strand DNA breaks. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA from cells dying from hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, or hyperosmotic shock revealed DNA breakdown into fragments of several hundred kilobases, consistent with the higher order chromatin degradation preceding DNA laddering in apoptotic mammalian cells. DNA fragmentation was associated with death by treatment with 10 mM hydrogen peroxide but not 150 mM and was absent if cells were fixed with formaldehyde to eliminate enzyme activity before hydrogen peroxide treatment. These observations are consistent with a process that, like mammalian apoptosis, is enzyme dependent, degrades chromosomal DNA, and is activated only at low intensity of death stimuli. PMID:16899507

  18. Yeast Pif1 helicase exhibits a one-base-pair stepping mechanism for unwinding duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Ramanagoudr-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Chib, Shubeena; Byrd, Alicia K; Aarattuthodiyil, Suja; Pandey, Manjula; Patel, Smita S; Raney, Kevin D

    2013-05-31

    Kinetic analysis of the DNA unwinding and translocation activities of helicases is necessary for characterization of the biochemical mechanism(s) for this class of enzymes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1 helicase was characterized using presteady state kinetics to determine rates of DNA unwinding, displacement of streptavidin from biotinylated DNA, translocation on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and ATP hydrolysis activities. Unwinding of substrates containing varying duplex lengths was fit globally to a model for stepwise unwinding and resulted in an unwinding rate of ∼75 bp/s and a kinetic step size of 1 base pair. Pif1 is capable of displacing streptavidin from biotinylated oligonucleotides with a linear increase in the rates as the length of the oligonucleotides increased. The rate of translocation on ssDNA was determined by measuring dissociation from varying lengths of ssDNA and is essentially the same as the rate of unwinding of dsDNA, making Pif1 an active helicase. The ATPase activity of Pif1 on ssDNA was determined using fluorescently labeled phosphate-binding protein to measure the rate of phosphate release. The quantity of phosphate released corresponds to a chemical efficiency of 0.84 ATP/nucleotides translocated. Hence, when all of the kinetic data are considered, Pif1 appears to move along DNA in single nucleotide or base pair steps, powered by hydrolysis of 1 molecule of ATP.

  19. The yeast telomere-binding protein RAP1 binds to and promotes the formation of DNA quadruplexes in telomeric DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, R; Rhodes, D

    1994-01-01

    The protein RAP1 is essential for the maintenance of the telomeres of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and binds in vitro to multiple sites found within the TG1-3 telomeric repeats. We show here that, in addition to its known binding activity for double-stranded DNA, RAP1 binds sequence-specifically to the GT-strands. This indicates that RAP1 is the protein that binds to the telomeric terminal GT-tails. Furthermore, we have found that RAP1 binds to and promotes the formation of G-tetrads, i.e. DNA quadruplexes, in GT-strand oligonucleotides at nanomolar concentrations. The formation of DNA quadruplexes appears to involve the intermolecular association of GT-strands. The minimal DNA-binding domain of RAP1 (DBD) binds only to double-stranded DNA, so that the novel DNA-binding activity we have found involves regions of the protein located outside of the DBD. The finding that a telomeric protein promotes the formation of G-tetrads argues for the use of DNA quadruplexes in telomere association. Images PMID:8194531

  20. Chromosomal localization of a human cDNA containing a DIDS binding domain and demonstrating high homology to yeast omnipotent suppressor 45.

    PubMed

    Grenett, H E; Eipers, P G; Kidd, V J; Bounelis, P; Fuller, G M

    1992-01-01

    We recently have identified a full-length cDNA (TB3-1) from a human adenocarcinoma cell line T84 cDNA library that encodes a 47.8-kDa protein. TB3-1 shares identity with the putative yeast translation termination factor omnipotent suppressor 45. Using human-mouse somatic cell panel analysis, a family of sequences with high homology to the TB3-1 cDNA clone were localized to human chromosomes 5, 6, 7, and X. Southern analysis of a panel of mammalian and chicken genomic DNA demonstrates that TB3-1 is well conserved in higher vertebrates.

  1. Activation of DNA replication in yeast by recruitment of the RNA polymerase II transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Stagljar, I; Hübscher, U; Barberis, A

    1999-05-01

    Activators of transcription are known to also play an important and direct role in activating DNA replication. However, the mechanism whereby they stimulate replication has remained elusive. One model suggests that, in the context of replication origins, transcriptional activators work by interacting with replication factors. We show that a defined, single interaction between a DNA-bound derivative of the activator Gal4 and Gal11P, a mutant form of the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme component Gal11, suffices for stimulating DNA replication as it does for transcription. Moreover, recruitment of TBP, which can activate transcription from a gene promoter, also stimulates DNA replication from an origin site. These results strongly argue that transcriptional activators may not necessarily need to contact DNA replication factors directly, but can stimulate replication by recruiting the RNA polymerase II transcription complex to DNA.

  2. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones.

    PubMed

    Arenhart, Sandra; Silva, José Valter Joaquim; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; Weiblen, Rudi; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3). The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement.

  4. Role of Inositol Phosphosphingolipid Phospholipase C1, the Yeast Homolog of Neutral Sphingomyelinases in DNA Damage Response and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids play a very crucial role in many diseases and are well-known as signaling mediators in many pathways. Sphingolipids are produced during the de novo process in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) from the nonsphingolipid precursor and comprise both structural and bioactive lipids. Ceramide is the central core of the sphingolipid pathway, and its production has been observed following various treatments that can induce several different cellular effects including growth arrest, DNA damage, apoptosis, differentiation, and senescence. Ceramides are generally produced through the sphingomyelin hydrolysis and catalyzed by the enzyme sphingomyelinase (SMase) in mammals. Presently, there are many known SMases and they are categorized into three groups acid SMases (aSMases), alkaline SMases (alk-SMASES), and neutral SMases (nSMases). The yeast homolog of mammalians neutral SMases is inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C. Yeasts generally have inositol phosphosphingolipids instead of sphingomyelin, which may act as a homolog of mammalian sphingomyelin. In this review, we shall explain the structure and function of inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1, its localization inside the cells, mechanisms, and its roles in various cell responses during replication stresses and diseases. This review will also give a new basis for our understanding for the mechanisms and nature of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1/nSMase.

  5. Rfc5, a small subunit of replication factor C complex, couples DNA replication and mitosis in budding yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, K; Shimomura, T; Hashimoto, K; Araki, H; Sugino, A; Matsumoto, K

    1996-01-01

    The inhibition of DNA synthesis prevents mitotic entry through the action of the S phase checkpoint. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an essential protein kinase, Spk1/Mec2/Rad53/Sad1, controls the coupling of S phase to mitosis. In an attempt to identify genes that genetically interact with Spk1, we have isolated a temperature-sensitive mutation, rfc5-1, that can be suppressed by overexpression of SPK1. The RFC5 gene encodes a small subunit of replication factor C complex. At the restrictive temperature, rfc5-1 mutant cells entered mitosis with unevenly separated or fragmented chromosomes, resulting in loss of viability. Thus, the rfc5 mutation defective for DNA replication is also impaired in the S phase checkpoint. Overexpression of POL30, which encodes the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, suppressed the replication defect of the rfc5 mutant but not its checkpoint defect. Taken together, these results suggested that replication factor C has a direct role in sensing the state of DNA replication and transmitting the signal to the checkpoint machinery. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692942

  6. Accurate and Efficient Bypass of 8,5'-Cyclopurine-2'-Deoxynucleosides by Human and Yeast DNA Polymerase η

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Ashley L.; Wang, Jianshuang; Wang, Yinsheng

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be produced during normal aerobic metabolism, can induce the formation of tandem DNA lesions, including 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cyclo-dA) and 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (cyclo-dG). Previous studies have shown that cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG accumulate in cells and can block mammalian RNA polymerase II and replicative DNA polymerases. Here, we used primer extension and steady-state kinetic assays to examine the efficiency and fidelity for polymerase η to insert nucleotides opposite, and extend primer past, these cyclopurine lesions. We found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human polymerase η inserted 2'-deoxynucleotides opposite cyclo-dA, cyclo-dG, and their adjacent 5' nucleosides at fidelities and efficiencies that were similar as their respective undamaged nucleosides. Moreover, the yeast enzyme exhibited similar processivity in DNA synthesis on templates housing a cyclo-dA or cyclo-dG as those carrying an unmodified dA or dG; the human polymerase, however, dissociated from the primer-template complex after inserting one or two additional nucleotides after the lesion. Pol η's accurate and efficient bypass of cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG indicate that this polymerase is likely responsible for error-free bypass of these lesions, whereas mutagenic bypass of these lesions may involve other translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. Together, our results suggested that pol η may have an additional function in cells, i.e., to alleviate the cellular burden of endogenously induced DNA lesions, including cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG. PMID:22768970

  7. Accurate and efficient bypass of 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides by human and yeast DNA polymerase η.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Ashley L; Wang, Jianshuang; Wang, Yinsheng

    2012-08-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be produced during normal aerobic metabolism, can induce the formation of tandem DNA lesions, including 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cyclo-dA) and 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (cyclo-dG). Previous studies have shown that cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG accumulate in cells and can block mammalian RNA polymerase II and replicative DNA polymerases. Here, we used primer extension and steady-state kinetic assays to examine the efficiency and fidelity for polymerase η to insert nucleotides opposite, and extend primer past, these cyclopurine lesions. We found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human polymerase η inserted 2'-deoxynucleotides opposite cyclo-dA, cyclo-dG and their adjacent 5' nucleosides at fidelities and efficiencies that were similar to those of their respective undamaged nucleosides. Moreover, the yeast enzyme exhibited similar processivity in DNA synthesis on templates housing a cyclo-dA or cyclo-dG to those carrying an unmodified dA or dG; the human polymerase, however, dissociated from the primer-template complex after inserting one or two additional nucleotides after the lesion. Pol η's accurate and efficient bypass of cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG indicates that this polymerase is likely responsible for error-free bypass of these lesions, whereas mutagenic bypass of these lesions may involve other translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. Together, our results suggested that pol η may have an additional function in cells, i.e., to alleviate the cellular burden of endogenously induced DNA lesions, including cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG.

  8. Telomere binding of checkpoint sensor and DNA repair proteins contributes to maintenance of functional fission yeast telomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Toru M; Moser, Bettina A; Russell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres, the ends of linear chromosomes, are DNA double-strand ends that do not trigger a cell cycle arrest and yet require checkpoint and DNA repair proteins for maintenance. Genetic and biochemical studies in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were undertaken to understand how checkpoint and DNA repair proteins contribute to telomere maintenance. On the basis of telomere lengths of mutant combinations of various checkpoint-related proteins (Rad1, Rad3, Rad9, Rad17, Rad26, Hus1, Crb2, Chk1, Cds1), Tel1, a telomere-binding protein (Taz1), and DNA repair proteins (Ku70, Rad32), we conclude that Rad3/Rad26 and Tel1/Rad32 represent two pathways required to maintain telomeres and prevent chromosome circularization. Rad1/Rad9/Hus1/Rad17 and Ku70 are two additional epistasis groups, which act in the Rad3/Rad26 pathway. However, Rad3/Rad26 must have additional target(s), as cells lacking Tel1/Rad32, Rad1/Rad9/Hus1/Rad17, and Ku70 groups did not circularize chromosomes. Cells lacking Rad3/Rad26 and Tel1/Rad32 senesced faster than a telomerase trt1Delta mutant, suggesting that these pathways may contribute to telomere protection. Deletion of taz1 did not suppress chromosome circularization in cells lacking Rad3/Rad26 and Tel1/Rad32, also suggesting that two pathways protect telomeres. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses found that Rad3, Rad1, Rad9, Hus1, Rad17, Rad32, and Ku70 associate with telomeres. Thus, checkpoint sensor and DNA repair proteins contribute to telomere maintenance and protection through their association with telomeres. PMID:12196391

  9. A 6. 5-Mb yeast artificial chromosome contig incorporating 33 DNA markers on the human X chromosome at Xq22

    SciTech Connect

    Vetrie, D.; Kendall, E.; Coffey, A.; Hassock, S.; Collins, J.; Todd, C.; Bobrow, M.; Bentley, D.R. ); Lehrach, H. ); Harris, A. )

    1994-01-01

    The Xq22 region of the human X chromosome contains genes for a number of inherited disorders. Sixty-nine yeast artificial chromosome clones have been isolated and assembled into a 6.5-Mb contig that contains 33 DNA markers localized to this region. This contig extends distally from DXS366 to beyond DXS87 and includes the genes involved in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (btk), Fabry disease (GLA), and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PLP). The order of markers in this contig is consistent with the known genetic and physical mapping information of Xq22. This cloned material provides a source from which to isolate other genes located in this part of the X chromosome. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. The Yeast PUF Protein Puf5 Has Pop2-Independent Roles in Response to DNA Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    Traven, Ana; Lo, Tricia L.; Lithgow, Trevor; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    PUFs are RNA binding proteins that promote mRNA deadenylation and decay and inhibit translation. Yeast Puf5 is the prototype for studying PUF-dependent gene repression. Puf5 binds to the Pop2 subunit of the Ccr4-Pop2-NOT mRNA deadenylase, recruiting the deadenylase and associated translational repressors to mRNAs. Here we used yeast genetics to show that Puf5 has additional roles in vivo that do not require Pop2. Deletion of PUF5 caused increased sensitivity to DNA replication stress in cells lacking Pop2, as well as in cells mutated for two activities recruited to mRNAs by the Puf5-Pop2 interaction, the deadenylase Ccr4 and the translational repressor Dhh1. A functional Puf5 RNA binding domain was required, and Puf5 cytoplasmic localisation was sufficient for resistance to replication stress, indicating posttranscriptional gene expression control is involved. In contrast to DNA replication stress, in response to the cell wall integrity pathway activator caffeine, PUF5 and POP2 acted in the same genetic pathway, indicating that functions of Puf5 in the caffeine response are mediated by Pop2-dependent gene repression. Our results support a model in which Puf5 uses multiple, Pop2-dependent and Pop2-independent mechanisms to control mRNA expression. The Pop2-independent roles for Puf5 could involve spatial control of gene expression, a proposition supported by our data indicating that the active form of Puf5 is localised to cytoplasmic foci. PMID:20498834

  11. Homologous recombination rescues ssDNA gaps generated by nucleotide excision repair and reduced translesion DNA synthesis in yeast G2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjian; Westmoreland, James W.; Resnick, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of DNA bulky lesions often involves multiple repair pathways such as nucleotide-excision repair, translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), and homologous recombination (HR). Although there is considerable information about individual pathways, little is known about the complex interactions or extent to which damage in single strands, such as the damage generated by UV, can result in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and/or generate HR. We investigated the consequences of UV-induced lesions in nonreplicating G2 cells of budding yeast. In contrast to WT cells, there was a dramatic increase in ssDNA gaps for cells deficient in the TLS polymerases η (Rad30) and ζ (Rev3). Surprisingly, repair in TLS-deficient G2 cells required HR repair genes RAD51 and RAD52, directly revealing a redundancy of TLS and HR functions in repair of ssDNAs. Using a physical assay that detects recombination between circular sister chromatids within a few hours after UV, we show an approximate three-fold increase in recombinants in the TLS mutants over that in WT cells. The recombination, which required RAD51 and RAD52, does not appear to be caused by DSBs, because a dose of ionizing radiation producing 20 times more DSBs was much less efficient than UV in producing recombinants. Thus, in addition to revealing TLS and HR functional redundancy, we establish that UV-induced recombination in TLS mutants is not attributable to DSBs. These findings suggest that ssDNA that might originate during the repair of closely opposed lesions or of ssDNA-containing lesions or from uncoupled replication may drive recombination directly in various species, including humans. PMID:23858457

  12. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1.

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, J; Sancar, G B

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. We report here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 upstream repression sequence, that together regulate induction of PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. A prominent feature of the foot-printed region is a 22-base-pair palindrome. Deletion of the PHR1 upstream repression sequence increased the basal level expression of PHR1 in vivo and decreased induction after exposure of cells to UV radiation or methyl methanesulfonate, whereas insertion of the PRP binding site between the CYC1 upstream activation sequence and "TATA" sequence reduced basal level expression and conferred damage responsiveness upon a reporter gene. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription. Images PMID:1763039

  13. Stimulation of RNA Polymerase II ubiquitination and degradation by yeast mRNA 3'-end processing factors is a conserved DNA damage response in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kuehner, Jason N; Kaufman, James W; Moore, Claire

    2017-09-01

    The quality and retrieval of genetic information is imperative to the survival and reproduction of all living cells. Ultraviolet (UV) light induces lesions that obstruct DNA access during transcription, replication, and repair. Failure to remove UV-induced lesions can abrogate gene expression and cell division, resulting in permanent DNA mutations. To defend against UV damage, cells utilize transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) to quickly target lesions within active genes. In cases of long-term genotoxic stress, a slower alternative pathway promotes degradation of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) to allow for global genomic nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER). The crosstalk between TC-NER and GG-NER pathways and the extent of their coordination with other nuclear events has remained elusive. We aimed to identify functional links between the DNA damage response (DDR) and the mRNA 3'-end processing complex. Our labs have previously shown that UV-induced inhibition of mRNA processing is a conserved DDR between yeast and mammalian cells. Here we have identified mutations in the yeast mRNA 3'-end processing cleavage factor IA (CFIA) and cleavage and polyadenylation factor (CPF) that confer sensitivity to UV-type DNA damage. In the absence of TC-NER, CFIA and CPF mutants show reduced UV tolerance and an increased frequency of UV-induced genomic mutations, consistent with a role for RNA processing factors in an alternative DNA repair pathway. CFIA and CPF mutants impaired the ubiquitination and degradation of Pol II following DNA damage, but the co-transcriptional recruitment of Pol II degradation factors Elc1 and Def1 was undiminished. Overall these data are consistent with yeast 3'-end processing factors contributing to the removal of Pol II stalled at UV-type DNA lesions, a functional interaction that is conserved between homologous factors in yeast and human cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA “intrinsic properties” (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome. PMID:26291518

  15. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  16. Probing the Potential Role of Non-B DNA Structures at Yeast Meiosis-Specific DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Rucha; Khan, Krishnendu; Joshi, Mamata V; Hosur, Ramakrishna V; Muniyappa, K

    2017-05-23

    A plethora of evidence suggests that different types of DNA quadruplexes are widely present in the genome of all organisms. The existence of a growing number of proteins that selectively bind and/or process these structures underscores their biological relevance. Moreover, G-quadruplex DNA has been implicated in the alignment of four sister chromatids by forming parallel guanine quadruplexes during meiosis; however, the underlying mechanism is not well defined. Here we show that a G/C-rich motif associated with a meiosis-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae folds into G-quadruplex, and the C-rich sequence complementary to the G-rich sequence forms an i-motif. The presence of G-quadruplex or i-motif structures upstream of the green fluorescent protein-coding sequence markedly reduces the levels of gfp mRNA expression in S. cerevisiae cells, with a concomitant decrease in green fluorescent protein abundance, and blocks primer extension by DNA polymerase, thereby demonstrating the functional significance of these structures. Surprisingly, although S. cerevisiae Hop1, a component of synaptonemal complex axial/lateral elements, exhibits strong affinity to G-quadruplex DNA, it displays a much weaker affinity for the i-motif structure. However, the Hop1 C-terminal but not the N-terminal domain possesses strong i-motif binding activity, implying that the C-terminal domain has a distinct substrate specificity. Additionally, we found that Hop1 promotes intermolecular pairing between G/C-rich DNA segments associated with a meiosis-specific DSB site. Our results support the idea that the G/C-rich motifs associated with meiosis-specific DSBs fold into intramolecular G-quadruplex and i-motif structures, both in vitro and in vivo, thus revealing an important link between non-B form DNA structures and Hop1 in meiotic chromosome synapsis and recombination. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of the Accuracy of Two Conventional Phenotypic Methods and Two MALDI-TOF MS Systems with That of DNA Sequencing Analysis for Correctly Identifying Clinically Encountered Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Qiao-Ting; Lee, Tai-Fen; Teng, Shih-Hua; Peng, Li-Yun; Chen, Ping-Hung; Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the accuracy of species-level identification of two commercially available matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems (Bruker Biotyper and Vitek MS) and two conventional phenotypic methods (Phoenix 100 YBC and Vitek 2 Yeast ID) with that of rDNA gene sequencing analysis among 200 clinical isolates of commonly encountered yeasts. The correct identification rates of the 200 yeast isolates to species or complex (Candida parapsilosis complex, C. guilliermondii complex and C. rugosa complex) levels by the Bruker Biotyper, Vitek MS (using in vitro devices [IVD] database), Phoenix 100 YBC and Vitek 2 Yeast ID (Sabouraud's dextrose agar) systems were 92.5%, 79.5%, 89%, and 74%, respectively. An additional 72 isolates of C. parapsilosis complex and 18 from the above 200 isolates (30 in each of C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis) were also evaluated separately. Bruker Biotyper system could accurately identify all C. parapsilosis complex to species level. Using Vitek 2 MS (IVD) system, all C. parapsilosis but none of C. metapsilosis, or C. orthopsilosis could be accurately identified. Among the 89 yeasts misidentified by the Vitek 2 MS (IVD) system, 39 (43.8%), including 27 C. orthopsilosis isolates, could be correctly identified Using the Vitek MS Plus SARAMIS database for research use only. This resulted in an increase in the rate of correct identification of all yeast isolates (87.5%) by Vitek 2 MS. The two species in C. guilliermondii complex (C. guilliermondii and C. fermentati) isolates were correctly identified by cluster analysis of spectra generated by the Bruker Biotyper system. Based on the results obtained in the current study, MALDI-TOF MS systems present a promising alternative for the routine identification of yeast species, including clinically commonly and rarely encountered yeast species and several species belonging to C. parapsilosis complex, C. guilliermondii complex

  18. Rpd3- and Spt16-Mediated Nucleosome Assembly and Transcriptional Regulation on Yeast Ribosomal DNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joseph M.; French, Sarah L.; Osheim, Yvonne N.; Li, Mingguang; Hall, Lindsey; Beyer, Ann L.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes in eukaryotes are organized into multicopy tandem arrays and transcribed by RNA polymerase I. During cell proliferation, ∼50% of these genes are active and have a relatively open chromatin structure characterized by elevated accessibility to psoralen cross-linking. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of rDNA genes becomes repressed and chromatin structure closes when cells enter the diauxic shift and growth dramatically slows. In this study, we found that nucleosomes are massively depleted from the active rDNA genes during log phase and reassembled during the diauxic shift, largely accounting for the differences in psoralen accessibility between active and inactive genes. The Rpd3L histone deacetylase complex was required for diauxic shift-induced H4 and H2B deposition onto rDNA genes, suggesting involvement in assembly or stabilization of the entire nucleosome. The Spt16 subunit of FACT, however, was specifically required for H2B deposition, suggesting specificity for the H2A/H2B dimer. Miller chromatin spreads were used for electron microscopic visualization of rDNA genes in an spt16 mutant, which was found to be deficient in the assembly of normal nucleosomes on inactive genes and the disruption of nucleosomes on active genes, consistent with an inability to fully reactivate polymerase I (Pol I) transcription when cells exit stationary phase. PMID:23689130

  19. Regulation of yeast DNA polymerase δ-mediated strand displacement synthesis by 5'-flaps.

    PubMed

    Koc, Katrina N; Stodola, Joseph L; Burgers, Peter M; Galletto, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    The strand displacement activity of DNA polymerase δ is strongly stimulated by its interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). However, inactivation of the 3'-5' exonuclease activity is sufficient to allow the polymerase to carry out strand displacement even in the absence of PCNA. We have examined in vitro the basic biochemical properties that allow Pol δ-exo(-) to carry out strand displacement synthesis and discovered that it is regulated by the 5'-flaps in the DNA strand to be displaced. Under conditions where Pol δ carries out strand displacement synthesis, the presence of long 5'-flaps or addition in trans of ssDNA suppress this activity. This suggests the presence of a secondary DNA binding site on the enzyme that is responsible for modulation of strand displacement activity. The inhibitory effect of a long 5'-flap can be suppressed by its interaction with single-stranded DNA binding proteins. However, this relief of flap-inhibition does not simply originate from binding of Replication Protein A to the flap and sequestering it. Interaction of Pol δ with PCNA eliminates flap-mediated inhibition of strand displacement synthesis by masking the secondary DNA site on the polymerase. These data suggest that in addition to enhancing the processivity of the polymerase PCNA is an allosteric modulator of other Pol δ activities.

  20. Transcription Termination Factor reb1p Causes Two Replication Fork Barriers at Its Cognate Sites in Fission Yeast Ribosomal DNA In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; López-Estraño, Carlos; Krimer, Dora B.; Schvartzman, Jorge B.; Hernández, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Polar replication fork barriers (RFBs) near the 3′ end of the rRNA transcriptional unit are a conserved feature of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) replication in eukaryotes. In the mouse, in vivo studies indicate that the cis-acting Sal boxes required for rRNA transcription termination are also involved in replication fork blockage. On the contrary, in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the rRNA transcription termination factors are not required for RFBs. Here we characterized the rDNA RFBs in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. S. pombe rDNA contains three closely spaced polar replication barriers named RFB1, RFB2, and RFB3 in the 3′ to 5′ order. The transcription termination protein reb1 and its two binding sites, present at the 3′ end of the coding region, were required for fork arrest at RFB2 and RFB3 in vivo. On the other hand, fork arrest at the strongest RFB1 barrier was independent of the above transcription termination factors. Therefore, RFB2 and RFB3 resemble the barriers present in the mouse rDNA, whereas RFB1 is similar to the budding yeast RFBs. These results suggest that during evolution, cis- and trans-acting factors required for rRNA transcription termination became involved in replication fork blockage also. S. pombe is suggested to be a transitional species in which both mechanisms coexist. PMID:14673172

  1. Maximal stimulation of meiotic recombination by a yeast transcription factor requires the transcription activation domain and a DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, D T; Fan, Q; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The DNA sequences located upstream of the yeast HIS4 represent a very strong meiotic recombination hotspot. Although the activity of this hotspot requires the transcription activator Rap1p, the level of HIS4 transcription is not directly related to the level of recombination. We find that the recombination-stimulating activity of Rap1p requires the transcription activation domain of the protein. We show that a hybrid protein with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain and the Rap1p activation domain can stimulate recombination in a strain in which Gal4p-binding sites are inserted upstream of HIS4. In addition, we find recombination hotspot activity associated with the Gal4p DNA-binding sites that is independent of known transcription factors. We suggest that yeast cells have two types of recombination hotspots, alpha (transcription factor dependent) and beta (transcription factor independent). PMID:10224246

  2. [Expression Of DNA-Encoded Antidote to Organophosphorus Toxins in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia Pastoris].

    PubMed

    Terekhov, S S; Bobik, T V; Mokrushina, Yu A; Stepanova, A V; Aleksandrova, N M; Smirnov, I V; Belogurov, A A; Ponomarenko, N A; Gabibov, A G

    2016-01-01

    A platform for the cloning and expression of active human butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) in the yeast Pichia pastoris is first presented. Genetic constructs for BuChE gene expression, separately and in conjunction with a proline-rich peptide called proline-rich attachment domain (PRAD), are based on the vector pPICZαA. It is shown that the highest level of production is achieved in the expression of a BuChE gene without PRAD pPICZαA. It is found that one can obtain up to 125 mg of active enzyme from 1 L of culture medium at an optimal pH environment (pH 7.6), an optical seed culture density of 3 o.u., and an optimum methanol addition mode of (0.5% methanol in the first day and 0.2% thereafter from the second day).

  3. Time resolved DNA occupancy dynamics during the respiratory oscillation uncover a global reset point in the yeast growth program

    PubMed Central

    Amariei, Cornelia; Machné, Rainer; Stolc, Viktor; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Murray, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    The structural dynamics of chromatin have been implicated in the regulation of fundamental eukaryotic processes, such as DNA transcription, replication and repair. Although previous studies have revealed that the chromatin landscape, nucleosome remodeling and histone modification events are intimately tied into cellular energetics and redox state, few studies undertake defined time-resolved measurements of these state variables. Here, we use metabolically synchronous, continuously-grown yeast cultures to measure DNA occupancy and track global patterns with respect to the metabolic state of the culture. Combined with transcriptome analyses and ChIP-qPCR experiments, these paint an intriguing picture where genome-wide nucleosome focusing occurs during the recovery of energy charge, followed by clearance of the promoter regions and global transcriptional slow-down, thus indicating a nucleosome-mediated “reset point” for the cycle. The reset begins at the end of the catabolic and stress-response transcriptional programs and ends prior to the start of the anabolic and cell-growth transcriptional program, and the histones on genes from both the catabolic and anabolic superclusters are deacetylated. PMID:28357254

  4. DNA sequence of a mutation in the leader region of the yeast iso-1-cytochrome c mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, J.I.; Szostak, J.W.; Young, A.T.; Wu, R.; Consaul, S.; Sherman, F.

    1981-07-01

    A plasmid was constructed that selectively integrates adjacent to the CYC1 locus, which determines iso-1-cytochrome c in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Different CYC1 alleles can be conveniently recovered by digestion of total DNA from transformed strains with BgI II, a restriction endouclease that does not cut the vector or the CYC1 gene, followed by transformation of Escherichia coli, selecting the ampicillin resistance gene carried on the original vector. This procedure was used to clone the cyc1-362 gene, which contains an alteration in front of the AUG initiation codon. The cyc1-362 mutation causes a deficiency of the iso-1-cytochrome c protein but still allows transcription of the iso-1-cytochrome c mRNA. DNA sequence analysis showed that the cyc1-362 mutation consisted of two single-base-pair substitutions, producing an A ..-->.. G change 18 nucleotides and a G ..-->.. A change 30 nucleotides in front of the AUG initiation codon in the mRNA. The A ..-->.. G change at position -18 resulted in the creation of an AUG triplet, which is proximal to the normal initiation site and out of phase with the normal reading frame. The deficiency of iso-1-cytochrome c is most simply explained by assuming that translation initiates at the more proximal abnormal AUG site but not at the normal AUG site.

  5. Genotoxicity study with special reference to DNA damage by comet assay in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe exposed to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pamela; Talapatra, Soumendra N; Mandal, Nivedita; Sundaram, Geetanjali; Mukhopadhyay, Aniruddha; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Sudip K

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate genotoxicity, especially DNA damage, in drinking water samples collected from tap by using fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model organism. Generally raw water potabolization is done by treatment with polymeric coagulant, alum, chlorine, etc. In the comet test, highly significant (P<0.001) effects of DNA damage were detected in treated water (tap water) when compared to negative control (raw water) as well as laboratory control (distilled water) samples for both 1 h and 2 h exposure. In the water treatment plant, raw water treatment is done by the process of prechlorination, alum and polymeric coagulant (CatflocT) dosing, postchlorination, filtration and final discharge for consumption. In conclusion it can be stated from the results that chlorinated disinfectant, alum and polymeric coagulant (CatflocT) mixture used in drinking water has a potent cumulative genotoxic effect in the eukaryotic cells and may pose potential genotoxic risk for human health following long-term consumption.

  6. Trans-acting factors and properly positioned DNA elements repress mating-type genes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ekwall, K; Olsson, T; Ruusala, T

    1992-04-01

    Repression of the mating-type P genes at the silent mat2-P locus in fission yeast is dependent on four cis-acting DNA elements, two on each side of the coding sequences. The mechanism by which these elements exert their influence on the mating-type promoter is studied here by insertion of a bacterial antibiotic resistance gene at several positions in the silent region. The behavior of the resistance gene itself, and the changes its insertion causes in mating-type expression, reveal that the repressive elements have a limited range of action and that the four elements have unequal effects on gene expression. Repression of the antibiotic resistance gene inside the silent region leads to an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype and facilitates the selection of resistant mutants. These mutants can de-repress the resistance gene at other positions than the one used for their selection. Strong antibiotic resistance correlates with derepression of the plasmid-borne mating-type cassette. These data argue that mat2-P repression is dependent on trans-acting factors and the positioning of the repressive DNA elements, but less dependent on the nature of the affected promoter.

  7. A role for DNA polymerase α in epigenetic control of transcriptional silencing in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Jun-ichi; Allshire, Robin C.; Klar, Amar J.S.; Grewal, Shiv I.S.

    2001-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, transcriptional silencing at the mating-type region, centromeres and telomeres is epigenetically controlled, and results from the assembly of higher order chromatin structures. Chromatin proteins associated with these silenced loci are believed to serve as molecular bookmarks that help promote inheritance of the silenced state during cell division. Specifically, a chromodomain protein Swi6 is believed to be an important determinant of the epigenetic imprint. Here, we show that a mutation in DNA polymerase α (polα) affects Swi6 localization at the mating-type region and causes a 45-fold increase in spontaneous transition from the silenced epigenetic state to the expressed state. We also demonstrate that polα mutant cells are defective in Swi6 localization at centromeres and telomeres. Genetic analysis suggests that Polα and Swi6 are part of the same silencing pathway. Interestingly, we found that Swi6 directly binds to Polα in vitro. Moreover, silencing-defective mutant Polα displays reduced binding to Swi6 protein. This work indicates involvement of a DNA replication protein, Polα, in heterochromatin assembly and inheritance of epigenetic chromatin structures. PMID:11387218

  8. A new set of rDNA-NTS-based multiple integrative cassettes for the development of antibiotic-marker-free recombinant yeasts.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hye Yun; Lee, Dong Wook; Sim, Gyu Hun; Kim, Hong-Jin; Hwang, Jee Youn; Kwon, Mun-Gyeong; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong Man; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2016-09-10

    The traditional yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used as a host system to produce recombinant proteins and metabolites of great commercial value. To engineer recombinant yeast that stably maintains expression cassettes without an antibiotic resistance gene, we developed new multiple integration cassettes by exploiting the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in combination with defective selection markers. The 5' and 3'-fragments of rDNA-NTS2 were used as flanking sequences for the expression cassettes carrying a set of URA3, LEU2, HIS3, and TRP1 selection markers with truncated promoters of different lengths. The integration numbers of NTS-based expression cassettes, ranging from one to ∼30 copies, showed a proportional increase with the extent of decreased expression of the auxotrophic markers. The NTS-based cassettes were used to construct yeast strains expressing the capsid protein of red-spotted grouper necrosis virus (RG-NNVCP) in a copy number-dependent manner. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast, harboring ∼30 copies of the integrated RG-NNVCP cassettes, provoked efficient immune responses in mice. In contrast, for the NTS cassettes expressing a truncated 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, the integrant carrying only 4 copies was screened as the highest producer of squalene, showing a 150-fold increase compared to that of the wild-type strain. The multiple integrated cassettes were stably retained under prolonged nonselective conditions. Altogether, our results strongly support that rDNA-NTS integrative cassettes are useful tools to construct recombinant yeasts carrying optimal copies of a desired expression cassette without an antibiotic marker gene, which are suitable as oral vaccines or feed additives for animal and human consumption.

  9. Role of base stacking and sequence context in the inhibition of yeast DNA polymerase eta by pyrene nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hanshin; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2004-11-23

    The Y family DNA polymerase yeast pol eta inserts pyrene deoxyribose monophosphate (dPMP) in preference to A opposite an abasic site, the 3'-T of a thymine dimer, and a normal T with almost equal efficiency. In contrast, pol A family polymerases such as Klenow fragment and T7 DNA polymerase only insert dPMP efficiently opposite an abasic site and the 3'-T of a thymine dimer but not opposite undamaged DNA. Pyrene nucleotide is also an efficient chain-terminating inhibitor of DNA synthesis by pol eta but not by Klenow fragment or T7 DNA polymerase. To better understand the origin of the efficiency and sequence specificity of dPMP insertion by pol eta, the kinetics of dPMP insertion opposite various templates have been determined. In one sequence context, the efficiency of dPMP insertion increases 4.6-fold opposite G < A < T < C, suggesting that the templating nucleotide modulates dPMP insertion efficiency by having to destack prior to dPTP binding. The efficiency of insertion of dPMP opposite T in the same sequence context increases 7-fold for primers terminating in G < A < C < T and is similar to that observed for nontemplated blunt-end extension, suggesting that stacking interactions between the pyrene and the primer terminus are also important. On heterogeneous templates, the average selectivity for dPMP insertion relative to the complementary dNMP decreases in the order of dAMP > dGMP > dTMP > dCMP, from a high of 5.8 when dAMP is to be inserted following a T to a low of 0.5 when dCMP is to be inserted following a C. The relative preference for dPMP insertion at a given site can be largely explained by the energetic cost of destacking the templating base and stacking of pyrene nucleotide relative to that of stacking and base pairing the complementary nucleotide. Thus, pyrene nucleotide represents a novel class of nucleotide-based chain-terminating DNA synthesis inhibitors whose base portion consists of a hydrophobic, non-hydrogen bonding, base-pair mimic.

  10. Cpf1 protein induced bending of yeast centromere DNA element I.

    PubMed Central

    Niedenthal, R K; Sen-Gupta, M; Wilmen, A; Hegemann, J H

    1993-01-01

    The centromere complex is a multicomponent structure essential for faithful chromosome transmission. Here we show that the S. cerevisiae centromere protein Cpf1 bends centromere DNA element I (CDEI) with the bend angle ranging from 66 degrees to 71 degrees. CDEI DNA sequences that carry point mutations which lead to reduced Cpf1 binding affinity and in vivo centromere activity are still able to show bending. The Cpf1 induced bend is directed towards the major groove with the bend centre located in CDEI. An intrinsic bend cannot replace the Cpf1 induced DNA bend for in vivo centromere function. An in vivo phasing experiment suggests that both the distance and the correct spatial arrangement of the CDEI/Cpf1 complex to CDEII and CDEIII are important for optimal centromere function. Images PMID:8233820

  11. The yeast CDP1 gene encodes a triple-helical DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Musso, M; Bianchi-Scarrà, G; Van Dyke, M W

    2000-11-01

    The formation of triple-helical DNA has been implicated in several cellular processes, including transcription, replication and recombination. While there is no direct evidence for triplexes in vivo, cellular proteins that specifically recognize triplex DNA have been described. Using a purine-motif triplex probe and southwestern library screening, we isolated five independent clones expressing the same C-terminal 210 amino acids of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Cdp1p fused with beta-galactosidase. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, recombinant Cdp1pDelta1-867 bound Pu-motif triplex DNAs with high affinity (K:(d) approximately 5 nM) and bound Py-motif triplex, duplex and single-stranded DNAs with far lower affinity (0.5-5.0 microM). Genetic analyses revealed that the CDP1 gene product was required for proper chromosome segregation. The possible involvement of triplex DNA in this process is discussed.

  12. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  13. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation.

    PubMed

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fox, Catherine A

    2016-04-07

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  14. Isolation of a human cDNA for heme A:farnesyltransferase by functional complementation of a yeast cox10 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Glerum, D M; Tzagoloff, A

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned the human homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX10 gene by functional complementation of a yeast cox10 null mutant. The 2.8-kb cDNA encoding the human heme A:farnesyltransferase codes for a 443-aa protein with high homology to the yeast and bacterial farnesylases. The human COX10 homolog, however, does not complement the mutation as efficiently as the yeast COX10 protein, likely due to the heterologous environment. PCR amplification and Southern analysis confirm the existence of a large mRNA for the human protein, with an unusually long 3' untranslated region. This clone can now be used to screen patients with inherited deficiencies in cytochrome oxidase in which the mutations remain unidentified and are likely to reside in a protein influencing the assembly of the enzyme. Images PMID:8078902

  15. Complementation of snf1, a mutation affecting global regulation of carbon metabolism in yeast, by a plant protein kinase cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, A; Sabelli, P A; Dickinson, J R; Cole, D; Richardson, M; Kreis, M; Shewry, P R; Halford, N G

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA, cRKIN1, encoding a putative homologue of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) SNF1-encoded protein-serine/threonine kinase, has been isolated from a library prepared from rye endosperm mRNA. Northern blot analysis demonstrated the presence of cRKIN1-related transcripts in developing endosperms but not in shoots, and Southern blot analysis showed the presence of a small gene family. SNF1 plays a central role in carbon catabolite repression in yeast and expression of the RKIN1 sequence in yeast snf1 mutants restored SNF1 function. This suggests that the RKIN1 protein has a role in the control of carbon metabolism in endosperms of rye. Images PMID:1924320

  16. Yeast Studies Lead to a New DNA-Based Model for Research on Development | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A paper from Amar J. S. Klar, Ph.D., with the RNA Biology Laboratory in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, has identified a model for DNA research that explains the congenital disorder of mirror hand movements in humans. A mirror movement is when an intentional movement on one side of the body is mirrored by an involuntary movement on the other.

  17. Yeast Studies Lead to a New DNA-Based Model for Research on Development | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A paper from Amar J. S. Klar, Ph.D., with the RNA Biology Laboratory in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, has identified a model for DNA research that explains the congenital disorder of mirror hand movements in humans. A mirror movement is when an intentional movement on one side of the body is mirrored by an involuntary movement on the other.

  18. A DNA unwinding element and an ARS consensus comprise a replication origin within a yeast chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, R Y; Kowalski, D

    1993-01-01

    We have defined a replication origin, ORI305, within chromosome III of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of mutational analysis. cis-acting elements required for origin activity in the chromosome, as assayed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of replication intermediates, are the same as those required for the function of an autonomously replicating sequence, ARS305, in a plasmid. Essential elements include (i) an 11 bp sequence that is a near match to the ARS consensus and (ii) a broad sequence directly 3' to the consensus near match. Origin function is inactivated by point mutations in the essential near match sequence, suggesting that the sequence contributes to specifying the origin in the chromosome. Other consensus near matches with different sequences are present but are not required. The essential 3'-flanking sequence exhibits DNA helical instability and is sensitive to deletion mutations that stabilize the DNA helix. The wild-type 3'-flanking sequence can be functionally substituted by dissimilar sequences that also exhibit helical instability. The requirement for DNA helical instability indicates that the essential 3'-flanking sequence serves as a DNA unwinding element in the chromosome. Images PMID:8223462

  19. A mutation in the catalytic subunit of yeast telomerase alters primer-template alignment while promoting processivity and protein-DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Bairley, Robin C B; Guillaume, Gina; Vega, Leticia R; Friedman, Katherine L

    2011-12-15

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that is required for maintenance of linear chromosome ends (telomeres). In yeast, the Est2 protein reverse transcribes a short template region of the TLC1 RNA using the chromosome terminus to prime replication. Yeast telomeres contain heterogeneous G(1-3)T sequences that arise from incomplete reverse transcription of the TLC1 template and alignment of the DNA primer at multiple sites within the template region. We have previously described mutations in the essential N-terminal TEN domain of Est2p that alter telomere sequences. Here, we demonstrate that one of these mutants, glutamic acid 76 to lysine (est2-LT(E76K)), restricts possible alignments between the DNA primer and the TLC1 template. In addition, this mutant exhibits increased processivity in vivo. Within the context of the telomerase enzyme, the Est2p TEN domain is thought to contribute to enzyme processivity by mediating an anchor-site interaction with the DNA primer. We show that binding of the purified TEN domain (residues 1-161) to telomeric DNA is enhanced by the E76K mutation. These results support the idea that the anchor-site interaction contributes to telomerase processivity and suggest a role for the anchor site of yeast telomerase in mediating primer-template alignment within the active site.

  20. A mutation in the catalytic subunit of yeast telomerase alters primer–template alignment while promoting processivity and protein–DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Bairley, Robin C. B.; Guillaume, Gina; Vega, Leticia R.; Friedman, Katherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that is required for maintenance of linear chromosome ends (telomeres). In yeast, the Est2 protein reverse transcribes a short template region of the TLC1 RNA using the chromosome terminus to prime replication. Yeast telomeres contain heterogeneous G1–3T sequences that arise from incomplete reverse transcription of the TLC1 template and alignment of the DNA primer at multiple sites within the template region. We have previously described mutations in the essential N-terminal TEN domain of Est2p that alter telomere sequences. Here, we demonstrate that one of these mutants, glutamic acid 76 to lysine (est2-LTE76K), restricts possible alignments between the DNA primer and the TLC1 template. In addition, this mutant exhibits increased processivity in vivo. Within the context of the telomerase enzyme, the Est2p TEN domain is thought to contribute to enzyme processivity by mediating an anchor-site interaction with the DNA primer. We show that binding of the purified TEN domain (residues 1–161) to telomeric DNA is enhanced by the E76K mutation. These results support the idea that the anchor-site interaction contributes to telomerase processivity and suggest a role for the anchor site of yeast telomerase in mediating primer–template alignment within the active site. PMID:22193961

  1. Genomic heterogeneity and structural variation in soybean near isogenic lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Near-isogenic lines (NILs) are a critical genetic resource for the soybean research community. The ability to identify and characterize the genes driving the phenotypic differences between NILs is limited by the degree to which differential genetic introgressions can be resolved. Furthermore, the ge...

  2. ER-associated mitochondrial division links the distribution of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in yeast.

    PubMed

    Murley, Andrew; Lackner, Laura L; Osman, Christof; West, Matthew; Voeltz, Gia K; Walter, Peter; Nunnari, Jodi

    2013-05-14

    Mitochondrial division is important for mitochondrial distribution and function. Recent data have demonstrated that ER-mitochondria contacts mark mitochondrial division sites, but the molecular basis and functions of these contacts are not understood. Here we show that in yeast, the ER-mitochondria tethering complex, ERMES, and the highly conserved Miro GTPase, Gem1, are spatially and functionally linked to ER-associated mitochondrial division. Gem1 acts as a negative regulator of ER-mitochondria contacts, an activity required for the spatial resolution and distribution of newly generated mitochondrial tips following division. Previous data have demonstrated that ERMES localizes with a subset of actively replicating mitochondrial nucleoids. We show that mitochondrial division is spatially linked to nucleoids and that a majority of these nucleoids segregate prior to division, resulting in their distribution into newly generated tips in the mitochondrial network. Thus, we postulate that ER-associated division serves to link the distribution of mitochondria and mitochondrial nucleoids in cells. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00422.001.

  3. DNA typing methods for differentiation of Debaryomyces hansenii strains and other yeasts related to surface ripened cheeses.

    PubMed

    Petersen, K M; Møller, P L; Jespersen, L

    2001-09-19

    The discriminative power of ITS-PCR, ITS-PCR RFLP and mitochondrial (mt)-DNA RFLP were evaluated for differentiation of yeasts of importance for surface ripened cheeses. In total 60 isolates were included. Of these, 40 strains of the following species, Debaryomyces hansenii var. hansenii, D. hansenii var. fabryi, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida zeylanoides, Kluyveromyces lactis and Yarrowia lipolytica, were obtained from culture collections and 20 isolates of D. hansenii representing six different phenotypes were collected from seven Danish producers of surface ripened cheeses. ITS-PCR was evaluated for differentiation at species level on the 40 strains obtained from culture collections. Ten strains of each variety of D. hansenii and five strains of each of the above mentioned species were analysed. For each of the investigated species, a specific ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region size was observed. Accordingly ITS-PCR was found valuable for differentiation at species level of yeasts of importance for surface ripened cheeses. ITS-PCR RFLP was investigated for the purpose of strain typing of D. hansenii. Ten CBS strains of each variety of D. hansenii were analysed. Only one enzyme (TaqI) out of several investigated (BamHI, DpnI, Fnu4HI, HaeIII, HindIII, HpaII, NlaII, Sau3AI, TaqI) demonstrated genetic diversity within the strains. This enzyme divided the 20 strains in three groups. Sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region for the type strains of each variety of D. hansenii showed an identity of 99.84%, corresponding to a difference in one basepair. Based on these results, ITS-PCR RFLP was found ineffective for strain typing of D. hansenii. MtDNA RFLP using HaeIII and HpaII was evaluated for strain typing of D. hansenii on the 20 CBS strains of D. hansenii. The CBS strains were divided into 16 groups according to their restriction profiles, which proved the method useful for typing of D. hansenii at subspecies level. The 20 dairy isolates showed a lower genetic

  4. Identification of genes whose expressions are enhanced or reduced in baker's yeast during fed-batch culture process using molasses medium by DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Shima, Jun; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Tanaka, Fumiko; Watanabe, Hajime; Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakajima, Ryoichi; Tokashiki, Tadaaki; Tamura, Hiromi

    2005-06-25

    Genes whose expression levels are enhanced or reduced during the cultivation process that uses cane molasses in baker's yeast production were identified in this study. The results showed that baker's yeast grown in molasses medium had higher fermentation ability and stress tolerance compared with baker's yeast grown in synthetic medium. Molasses apparently provided not only sugar as a carbon source but also provided functional components that enhanced or reduced expression of genes involved in fermentation ability and stress tolerance. To identify the genes whose expression is enhanced or reduced during cultivation in molasses medium, DNA microarray analysis was then used to compare the gene expression profile of cells grown in molasses with that of cells grown in synthetic medium. To simulate the commercial baker's yeast production process, cells were cultivated using a fed-batch culture system. In molasses medium, genes involved in the synthesis or uptake of vitamins (e.g., biotin, pyridoxine and thiamine) showed enhanced expression, suggesting that vitamin concentrations in molasses medium were lower than those in synthetic medium. Genes involved in formate dehydrogenase and maltose assimilation showed enhanced expression in molasses medium. In contrast, genes involved in iron utilization (e.g., siderophore, iron transporter and ferroxidase) showed enhanced expression in synthetic medium, suggesting that iron starvation occurred. The genes involved in the metabolism of amino acids also showed enhanced expression in synthetic medium. This identification of genes provides information that will help improve the baker's yeast production process.

  5. Novel Functional Residues in the Core Domain of Histone H2B Regulate Yeast Gene Expression and Silencing and Affect the Response to DNA Damage ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kyriss, McKenna N. M.; Jin, Yi; Gallegos, Isaura J.; Sanford, James A.; Wyrick, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have identified novel modifications in the core fold domain of histone H2B, but relatively little is known about the function of these putative histone modification sites. We have mutated core modifiable residues that are conserved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone H2B and characterized the effects of the mutants on yeast silencing, gene expression, and the DNA damage response. We identified three histone H2B core modifiable residues as functionally important. We find that mutating H2B K49 in yeast confers a UV sensitivity phenotype, and we confirm that the homologous residue in human histone H2B is acetylated and methylated in human cells. Our results also indicate that mutating H2B K111 impairs the response to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA lesions and disrupts telomeric silencing and Sir4 binding. In contrast, mutating H2B R102 enhances silencing at yeast telomeres and the HML silent mating loci and increases Sir4 binding to these regions. The H2B R102A mutant also represses the expression of endogenous genes adjacent to yeast telomeres, which is likely due to the ectopic spreading of the Sir complex in this mutant strain. We propose a structural model by which H2B R102 and K111 regulate the binding of the Sir complex to the nucleosome. PMID:20479120

  6. Recombination between DNA repeats in yeast hpr1delta cells is linked to transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Prado, F; Piruat, J I; Aguilera, A

    1997-05-15

    The induction of recombination by transcription activation has been documented in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Unwinding of the DNA duplex, disruption of chromatin structure or changes in local supercoiling associated with transcription can be indirectly responsible for the stimulation of recombination. Here we provide genetic and molecular evidence for a specific mechanism of stimulation of recombination by transcription. We show that the induction of deletions between repeats in hpr1delta cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is linked to transcription elongation. Molecular analysis of different direct repeat constructs reveals that deletions induced by hpr1delta are specific for repeat constructs in which transcription initiating at an external promoter traverses particular regions of the DNA flanked by the repeats. Transcription becomes HPR1 dependent when elongating through such regions. Both the induction of deletions and the HPR1 dependence of transcription were abolished when a strong terminator was used to prevent transcription from proceeding through the DNA region flanked by the repeats. In contrast to previously reported cases of transcription-induced recombination, there was no correlation between high levels of transcripts and high levels of recombination. Our study provides evidence that direct repeat recombination can be induced by transcriptional elongation.

  7. Recombination between DNA repeats in yeast hpr1delta cells is linked to transcription elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Prado, F; Piruat, J I; Aguilera, A

    1997-01-01

    The induction of recombination by transcription activation has been documented in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Unwinding of the DNA duplex, disruption of chromatin structure or changes in local supercoiling associated with transcription can be indirectly responsible for the stimulation of recombination. Here we provide genetic and molecular evidence for a specific mechanism of stimulation of recombination by transcription. We show that the induction of deletions between repeats in hpr1delta cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is linked to transcription elongation. Molecular analysis of different direct repeat constructs reveals that deletions induced by hpr1delta are specific for repeat constructs in which transcription initiating at an external promoter traverses particular regions of the DNA flanked by the repeats. Transcription becomes HPR1 dependent when elongating through such regions. Both the induction of deletions and the HPR1 dependence of transcription were abolished when a strong terminator was used to prevent transcription from proceeding through the DNA region flanked by the repeats. In contrast to previously reported cases of transcription-induced recombination, there was no correlation between high levels of transcripts and high levels of recombination. Our study provides evidence that direct repeat recombination can be induced by transcriptional elongation. PMID:9184227

  8. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping of DNA binding by a zinc-finger domain from the yeast transcription factor ADR1.

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedeskamp, M.; Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies have revealed that the minimal DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor ADR1 consists of two Cys2-His2 zinc fingers plus an additional 20 residues proximal and N-terminal to the fingers. We have assigned NMR 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts for the entire minimal DNA-binding domain of ADR1 both free and bound to specific DNA. 1H chemical shift values suggest little structural difference between the zinc fingers in this construct and in single-finger constructs, and 13C alpha chemical shift index analysis indicates little change in finger structure upon DNA binding. 1H chemical shift perturbations upon DNA binding are observed, however, and these are mapped to define the protein-DNA interface. The two zinc fingers appear to bind DNA with different orientations, as the entire helix of finger 1 is perturbed, while only the extreme N-terminus of the finger 2 helix is affected. Furthermore, residues N-terminal to the first finger undergo large chemical shift changes upon DNA binding suggesting a role at the protein-DNA interface. A striking correspondence is observed between the protein-DNA interface mapped by chemical shift changes and that previously mapped by mutagenesis. PMID:9300483

  9. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  10. RAD25 (SSL2), the yeast homolog of the human xeroderma pigmentosum group B DNA repair gene, is essential for viability

    SciTech Connect

    Park, E.; Prakash, L. ); Guzder, S.N.; Prakash, S. ); Koken, M.H.M.; Jaspers-Dekker, I.; Weeda, G.; Hoeijmakers, H.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients are extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers, due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and seven complementation groups, A-G, have been identified. Homologs of human excision repair genes ERCC1, XPDC/ERCC2, and XPAC have been identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since no homolog of human XPBC/ERCC3 existed among the known yeast genes, we cloned the yeast homolog by using XPBC cDNA as a hybridization probe. The yeast homolog, RAD25 (SSL2), encodes a protein of 843 amino acids (M[sub r] 95,356). The RAD25 (SSL2)- and XPCX-encoded proteins share 55% identical and 72% conserved amino acid residues, and the two proteins resemble one another in containing the conserved DNA helicase sequence motifs. A nonsense mutation at codon 799 that deletes the 45 C-terminal amino acid residues in RAD25 (SSL2) confers UV sensitivity. This mutation shows epistasis with genes in the excision repair group, whereas a synergistic increase in UN sensitivity occurs when it is combined with mutations in genes in other DNA repair pathways, indicating that RAD25 (SSL2) functions in excision repair but not in other repair pathways. We also show that RAD25 (SSL2) is an essential gene. A mutation of the Lys[sup 392] residue to arginine in the conserved Walker type A nucleotide-binding motif is lethal, suggesting an essential role of the putative RAD 25 (SSL2) ATPase/DNA helicase activity in viability. 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC...

  12. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC7...

  13. Lesion bypass in yeast cells: Pol η participates in a multi-DNA polymerase process

    PubMed Central

    Bresson, Anne; Fuchs, Robert P.P.

    2002-01-01

    Replication through (6–4)TT and G-AAF lesions was compared in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains proficient and deficient for the RAD30-encoded DNA polymerase η (Pol η). In the RAD30 strain, the (6–4)TT lesion is replicated both inaccurately and accurately 60 and 40% of the time, respectively. Surprisingly, in a rad30Δ strain, the level of mutagenic bypass is essentially suppressed, while error-free bypass remains unchanged. Therefore, Pol η is responsible for mutagenic replication through the (6–4)TT photoproduct, while another polymerase mediates its error-free bypass. Deletion of the RAD30 gene also reduces the levels of both accurate and inaccurate bypass of AAF lesions within two different sequence contexts up to 8-fold. These data show that, in contrast to the accurate bypass by Pol η of TT cyclobutane dimers, it is responsible for the mutagenic bypass of other lesions. In conclusion, this paper shows that, in yeast, translesion synthesis involves the combined action of several polymerases. PMID:12110599

  14. The role of CSM3, MRC1, and TOF1 in minisatellite stability and large loop DNA repair during meiosis in yeast.

    PubMed

    LeClere, Andrea R; Yang, John K; Kirkpatrick, David T

    2013-01-01

    Double-stranded break (DSB) repair during meiotic recombination in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to the formation of heteroduplex DNA, a hybrid DNA molecule composed of single strands from two homologous chromosomes. Differences in sequence between the strands within heteroduplex DNA generate mismatches or large unpaired loops that are substrates for repair. At least two pathways function to repair large loops that form within heteroduplex DNA: the RAD1-dependent large loop repair (LLR) pathway and another as yet uncharacterized RAD1-independent LLR pathway. Repair of large loops during meiotic recombination is especially important for the genomic stability of the repetitive DNA sequences known as minisatellites. Minisatellite DNA tracts are generally stable during mitotic cell divisions but frequently alter in length during meiosis. Using a yeast minisatellite system in which the human minisatellite associated with the HRAS1 proto-oncogene has been inserted into the recombination hotspot region upstream of HIS4 in S. cerevisiae, our lab previously showed that the RAD1-dependent LLR pathway controls minisatellite length expansions, but not contractions. Here we show that minisatellite length expansions are controlled by the products of the CSM3 and TOF1 genes, while contractions are controlled by MRC1. By examining meiotic segregation patterns in yeast strains heterozygous for the 26bp his4-lopd insert, we found that deleting CSM3 caused a loss of LLR activity similar to that seen in a RAD1 mutant. Double mutant analysis revealed that failure to repair loops is exacerbated upon deleting both RAD1 and CSM3 - specifically the type of repair that fills in loops, which would generate minisatellite length expansions. A model for minisatellite length alteration based on these results is presented.

  15. [Obtaining and characterization of DNA-containing micromummies of yeasts and gram-positive bacteria with enhanced cell wall permeability: application in PCR].

    PubMed

    Danilevich, V N; Duda, V I; Suzina, N E; Grishin, E V

    2007-01-01

    The procedure of obtaining DNA-containing cell envelopes ("micromummies") of bacteria, yeasts, and fungi using chaotropic salts has been developed previously and the possibility of their direct application in PCR has been demonstrated. The fine structure of micromummies has been studied by electron microscopic methods. This work has demonstrated that additional treatment of micromummies of yeasts and gram-positive bacteria with proteinase K results in hydrolytic degradation of cell proteins and drastic enhancement of cell wall permeability for macromolecules (DNA). Thus, the efficiency of PCR ex situ using resultant micromummies after washing off the products of protein hydrolysis and proteinase K can be increased. The results of electron microscopic study of ultrathin sections of yeasts (Pichia pastoris, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and gram-positive bacteria (Micrococcus luteus, Arthrobacter globiformis, Bacillus subtilis) support the biochemical data that treatment with chaotropic salts and proteinase K results in the loosening of microbial cell walls and in a decrease in the intracellular protein content. At the same time, cell walls generally maintain their integrity (continuity) and initial spherical or rodlike shape. The optimal modes of treatment of the cells of different microbial species with chaotropic salts and proteinase K have been selected to obtain permeabilized cell envelopes containing denatured or native DNA.

  16. Comparative Analysis of in vivo Interactions Between Rev1 Protein and Other Y-Family DNA Polymerases in Animals and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Kosarek, J. Nicole; Woodruff, Rachel V.; Rivera-Begeman, Amanda; Guo, Caixia; D’Souza, Sanjay; Koonin, Eugene V.; Walker, Graham C.; Friedberg, Errol C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotes are endowed with multiple specialized DNA polymerases, some (if not all) of which are believed to play important roles in the tolerance of base damage during DNA replication. Among these DNA polymerases, Rev1 protein (a deoxycytidyl transferase) from vertebrates interacts with several other specialized polymerases via a highly conserved C-terminal region. The present studies assessed whether these interactions are retained in more experimentally tractable model systems, including yeasts, flies, and the nematode C. elegans. We observed a physical interaction between Rev1 protein and other Y-family polymerases in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, despite the fact that the C-terminal region of Drosophila and yeast Rev1 are conserved from vertebrates to a similar extent, such interactions were not observed in S. cerevisiae or S. pombe. With respect to regions in specialized DNA polymerases that are required for interaction with Rev1, we find predicted disorder to be an underlying structural commonality. The results of this study suggest that special consideration should be exercised when making mechanistic extrapolations regarding translesion DNA synthesis from one eukaryotic system to another. PMID:18242152

  17. Inactivation of the budding yeast cohesin loader Scc2 alters gene expression both globally and in response to a single DNA double strand break.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Emma; Hägg, Sara; Giordano, Fosco; Björkegren, Johan; Ström, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is fundamental for cell survival and cell cycle progression. Important mechanisms for keeping the genome intact are proper sister chromatid segregation, correct gene regulation and efficient repair of damaged DNA. Cohesin and its DNA loader, the Scc2/4 complex have been implicated in all these cellular actions. The gene regulation role has been described in several organisms. In yeast it has been suggested that the proteins in the cohesin network would effect transcription based on its role as insulator. More recently, data are emerging indicating direct roles for gene regulation also in yeast. Here we extend these studies by investigating whether the cohesin loader Scc2 is involved in regulation of gene expression. We performed global gene expression profiling in the absence and presence of DNA damage, in wild type and Scc2 deficient G2/M arrested cells, when it is known that Scc2 is important for DNA double strand break repair and formation of damage induced cohesion. We found that not only the DNA damage specific transcriptional response is distorted after inactivation of Scc2 but also the overall transcription profile. Interestingly, these alterations did not correlate with changes in cohesin binding.

  18. Isolation of a gene encoding a chaperonin-like protein by complementation of yeast amino acid transport mutants with human cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Segel, G B; Boal, T R; Cardillo, T S; Murant, F G; Lichtman, M A; Sherman, F

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA library in lambda-yes plasmid was used to transform a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defects in histidine biosynthesis (his4-401) and histidine permease (hip1-614) and with the general amino acid permease (GAP) repressed by excess ammonium. We investigated three plasmids complementing the transport defect on a medium with a low concentration of histidine. Inserts in these plasmids hybridized with human genomic but not yeast genomic DNA, indicating their human origin. mRNA corresponding to the human DNA insert was produced by each yeast transformant. Complementation of the histidine transport defect was confirmed by direct measurement of histidine uptake, which was increased 15- to 65-fold in the transformants as compared with the parental strain. Competitive inhibition studies, measurement of citrulline uptake, and lack of complementation in gap1- strains indicated that the human cDNA genes code for proteins that prevent GAP repression by ammonium. The amino acid sequence encoded by one of the cDNA clones is related to T-complex proteins, which suggests a "chaperonin"-like function. We suggest that the human chaperonin-like protein stabilizes the NPR1 gene product and prevents inactivation of GAP. Images PMID:1352881

  19. Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Targeting the rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions for Accurate Identification of Clinically Important Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Accurate species identification of Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and other yeast pathogens is important for clinical management. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a yeast species identification scheme by determining the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region length types (LTs) using a sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE) approach. A total of 156 yeast isolates encompassing 32 species were first used to establish a reference SCGE ITS LT database. Evaluation of the ITS LT database was then performed on (i) a separate set of (n = 97) clinical isolates by SCGE, and (ii) 41 isolates of 41 additional yeast species from GenBank by in silico analysis. Of 156 isolates used to build the reference database, 41 ITS LTs were identified, which correctly identified 29 of the 32 (90.6%) species, with the exception of Trichosporon asahii, Trichosporon japonicum and Trichosporon asteroides. In addition, eight of the 32 species revealed different electropherograms and were subtyped into 2–3 different ITS LTs each. Of the 97 test isolates used to evaluate the ITS LT scheme, 96 (99.0%) were correctly identified to species level, with the remaining isolate having a novel ITS LT. Of the additional 41 isolates for in silico analysis, none was misidentified by the ITS LT database except for Trichosporon mucoides whose ITS LT profile was identical to that of Trichosporon dermatis. In conclusion, yeast identification by the present SCGE ITS LT assay is a fast, reproducible and accurate alternative for the identification of clinically important yeasts with the exception of Trichosporon species. PMID:27105313

  20. Two residues in the basic region of the yeast transcription factor Yap8 are crucial for its DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Catarina; Pimentel, Catarina; Matos, Rute G; Arraiano, Cecília M; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2013-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Yap8 is a key determinant in arsenic stress response. Contrary to Yap1, another basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) yeast regulator, Yap8 has a very restricted DNA-binding specificity and only orchestrates the expression of ACR2 and ACR3 genes. In the DNA-binding basic region, Yap8 has three distinct amino acids residues, Leu26, Ser29 and Asn31, at sites of highly conserved positions in the other Yap family of transcriptional regulators and Pap1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To evaluate whether these residues are relevant to Yap8 specificity, we first built a homology model of the complex Yap8bZIP-DNA based on Pap1-DNA crystal structure. Several Yap8 mutants were then generated in order to confirm the contribution of the residues predicted to interact with DNA. Using bioinformatics analysis together with in vivo and in vitro approaches, we have identified several conserved residues critical for Yap8-DNA binding. Moreover, our data suggest that Leu26 is required for Yap8 binding to DNA and that this residue together with Asn31, hinder Yap1 response element recognition by Yap8, thus narrowing its DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore our results point to a role of these two amino acids in the stability of the Yap8-DNA complex.

  1. Evaluation and mapping of the DNA binding and oligomerization domains of the IE2 regulatory protein of human cytomegalovirus using yeast one and two hybrid interaction assays.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J H; Chiou, C J; Hayward, G S

    1998-03-27

    The 86-kDa IE2 nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) major immediate-early (MIE) gene behaves as both a non-specific transactivator of viral and cellular gene expression and as a specific DNA-binding protein targeted to the cis-repression sequence (CRS) at the cap site of its own promoter/enhancer region. Although the IE2 protein produced in bacteria has been shown to bind to the 14-bp palindromic CRS motif and IE2 synthesized in vitro forms stable dimers in solution through the conserved C-terminus of the protein, there is no direct evidence as yet that the intracellular mammalian forms of IE2 do so. Here, we show that the intact HCMV IE2 protein both binds to CRS DNA and dimerizes in yeast cells. In a one-hybrid assay system, a GAL4/IE2 fusion protein expressed in yeast cells activated target HIS3 expression only when CRS sites were located upstream of the GAL1 minimal promoter, but failed to do so on mutant CRS sites, demonstrating a requirement for sequence-specific DNA-binding by IE2. Examination of a series of deletion and triple amino acid point mutations in the C-terminal half of IE2 mapped the domains required for DNA-binding in yeast to the entire region between codons 313 and 579, whereas in the previous in-vitro study with truncated bacterial GST fusion proteins, it was mapped to between codons 346 and 579. Transient co-transfection assays with deleted IE2 effector genes in Vero cells showed that the extra segment of IE2 between codons 313 and 346 is also required for both autoregulation and transactivation activity in mammalian cells. In a two-hybrid assay to study IE2 self-interations, we generated both GAL4 DNA-binding (DB) and activation domain (A)/IE2 fusion proteins and showed that IE2 could also dimerize or oligomerize through the C-terminus of the protein in yeast cells. Domains required for this interaction were all mapped to within the region between codons 388 and 542, which is coincident with the domain mapped

  2. Genetic dissection of black grain rice by the development of a near isogenic line.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Omoteno, Motoyasu; Takarada, Takeshi; Fujita, Kenji; Murata, Kazumasa; Iyama, Yukihide; Kojima, Yoichiro; Morikawa, Makiko; Ozaki, Hidenobu; Mukaino, Naoyuki; Kidani, Yoshinori; Ebitani, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) can produce black grains as well as white. In black rice, the pericarp of the grain accumulates anthocyanin, which has antioxidant activity and is beneficial to human health. We developed a black rice introgression line in the genetic background of Oryza sativa L. 'Koshihikari', which is a leading variety in Japan. We used Oryza sativa L. 'Hong Xie Nuo' as the donor parent and backcrossed with 'Koshihikari' four times, resulting in a near isogenic line (NIL) for black grains. A whole genome survey of the introgression line using DNA markers suggested that three regions, on chromosomes 1, 3 and 4 are associated with black pigmentation. The locus on chromosome 3 has not been identified previously. A mapping analysis with 546 F2 plants derived from a cross between the black rice NIL and 'Koshihikari' was evaluated. The results indicated that all three loci are essential for black pigmentation. We named these loci Kala1, Kala3 and Kala4. The black rice NIL was evaluated for eating quality and general agronomic traits. The eating quality was greatly superior to that of 'Okunomurasaki', an existing black rice variety. The isogenicity of the black rice NIL to 'Koshihikari' was very high.

  3. Participation of translesion synthesis DNA polymerases in the maintenance of chromosome integrity in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kochenova, O V; Soshkina, J V; Stepchenkova, E I; Inge-Vechtomov, S G; Shcherbakova, P V

    2011-01-01

    We employed a genetic assay based on illegitimate hybridization of heterothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (the α-test) to analyze the consequences for genome stability of inactivating translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases. The α-test is the only assay that measures the frequency of different types of mutational changes (point mutations, recombination, chromosome or chromosome arm loss) and temporary changes in genetic material simultaneously. All these events are manifested as illegitimate hybridization and can be distinguished by genetic analysis of the hybrids and cytoductants. We studied the effect of Polζ, Polη, and Rev1 deficiency on the genome stability in the absence of genotoxic treatment and in UV-irradiated cells. We show that, in spite of the increased percent of accurately repaired primary lesions, chromosome fragility, rearrangements, and loss occur in the absence of Polζ and Polη. Our findings contribute to further refinement of the current models of translesion synthesis and the organization of eukaryotic replication fork.

  4. Retrovirus-like vectors for Saccharomyces cerevisiae: integration of foreign genes controlled by efficient promoters into yeast chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, E; Dewerchin, M; Boeke, J D

    1988-07-30

    Using modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 elements located on a 2 mu plasmid, reverse-transcriptase-mediated transposition into yeast chromosomes of expression cassettes containing a foreign gene can be induced. These expression cassettes consist of the yeast ARG3 and CUP1 promoter sequences fused to the Escherichia coli galK structural gene. Expression cassettes as large as 2 kb can be inserted into Ty elements and transposed efficiently to various sites in the yeast genome. A third yeast promoter (from the yeast CAR1 gene) seems to be unsuitable for use in the expression cassette. This may be because it does not allow the transcription run-through necessary for Ty1 transposition. Ways of improving this vector system are discussed, as are its advantages over episomal vector systems.

  5. Mitophagy plays an essential role in reducing mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and mutation of mitochondrial DNA by maintaining mitochondrial quantity and quality in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yusuke; Kanki, Tomotake; Aoki, Yoshimasa; Hirota, Yuko; Saigusa, Tetsu; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Kang, Dongchon

    2012-01-27

    In mammalian cells, the autophagy-dependent degradation of mitochondria (mitophagy) is thought to maintain mitochondrial quality by eliminating damaged mitochondria. However, the physiological importance of mitophagy has not been clarified in yeast. Here, we investigated the physiological role of mitophagy in yeast using mitophagy-deficient atg32- or atg11-knock-out cells. When wild-type yeast cells in respiratory growth encounter nitrogen starvation, mitophagy is initiated, excess mitochondria are degraded, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from mitochondria is suppressed; as a result, the mitochondria escape oxidative damage. On the other hand, in nitrogen-starved mitophagy-deficient yeast, excess mitochondria are not degraded and the undegraded mitochondria spontaneously age and produce surplus ROS. The surplus ROS damage the mitochondria themselves and the damaged mitochondria produce more ROS in a vicious circle, ultimately leading to mitochondrial DNA deletion and the so-called "petite-mutant" phenotype. Cells strictly regulate mitochondrial quantity and quality because mitochondria produce both necessary energy and harmful ROS. Mitophagy contributes to this process by eliminating the mitochondria to a basal level to fulfill cellular energy requirements and preventing excess ROS production.

  6. Identification of the DNA sequences controlling the expression of the MAT alpha locus of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Siliciano, P G; Tatchell, K

    1986-01-01

    We have excised a 28-base-pair DNA fragment from the MAT alpha intergenic region and tested its ability to direct diploid-specific transcriptional repression. This fragment (1643-1671, 5'-GCTTCCCAATGTAGAAAAGTACA-TCATA-3') lies within a region required for the normal diploid-specific repression of the MAT alpha transcripts. First, the fragment was inserted into a 53-base-pair MAT alpha deletion that expresses alpha 1 and alpha 2 constitutively. Insertion of the fragment restores proper diploid regulation to the MAT alpha transcripts: alpha 1 mRNA is strongly repressed and alpha 2 mRNA is reduced by a factor of approximately equal to 10 from its haploid level. The fragment works equally well in either orientation, and two copies of the fragment do not lead to stronger repression than a single copy. We also inserted the fragment at three sites upstream of the CYC1-lacZ fusion gene. Insertions placing the regulatory fragment between the CYC1 upstream activator sequence (UAS) and the coding region make beta-galactosidase efficiently in alpha haploids but produce 1/40th the enzyme in a/alpha diploids. This diploid-specific repression requires functional MATa-1 gene product. Insertion of the MAT fragment on the opposite side of the UAS (37 base pairs upstream of the UAS) also caused diploid repression of the fusion gene, but only by a factor of 7. When the regulatory fragment is inserted at a large distance on the far side of the UAS (375 base pairs), it has little if any effect on beta-galactosidase expression. We postulate that this sequence is the operator recognized by the diploid-specific repressor. Images PMID:3517864

  7. Numerical and spatial patterning of yeast meiotic DNA breaks by Tel1.

    PubMed

    Mohibullah, Neeman; Keeney, Scott

    2017-02-01

    The Spo11-generated double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination are dangerous lesions that can disrupt genome integrity, so meiotic cells regulate their number, timing, and distribution. Mechanisms of this regulation remain poorly understood. Here, we use Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes, a byproduct of DSB formation, to reveal aspects of the contribution of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA damage-responsive kinase Tel1 (ortholog of mammalian ATM). A tel1Δ mutant has globally increased amounts of Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes and altered Spo11-oligonucleotide lengths, consistent with conserved roles for Tel1 in control of DSB number and processing. A kinase-dead tel1 mutation similarly increases Spo11-oligonucleotide levels but mutating known Tel1 phosphotargets on Hop1 and Rec114 does not, implicating Tel1 kinase activity and clarifying roles of Tel1 phosphorylation substrates. Deep sequencing of Spo11 oligonucleotides demonstrates that Tel1 shapes the genome-wide DSB landscape in unexpected ways. Early in meiosis, Tel1 absence causes widespread changes in DSB distributions across large chromosomal domains. Many of these changes are erased as meiosis proceeds, however, illustrating homeostatic behavior of DSB regulatory systems. We further find that effects of Tel1 are distinct but partially overlapping with previously described contributions of the recombination regulator Cst9 (also known as Zip3). Finally, we provide evidence indicating that Tel1-dependent DSB interference influences the population-average DSB landscape but also demonstrate that locally inhibitory effects of an artificial hotspot insertion can be both Tel1-independent and chromosomal context-dependent. Our findings delineate Tel1 roles in regulating number and location of DSBs and illuminate the complex interplay between Tel1 and other pathways for DSB control.

  8. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Hooykaas, Paul J J; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Bundock, Paul; Soltani, Jalal; van Attikum, Haico; van Heusden, G Paul H

    2006-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic organisms. This species has enabled a detailed study of the (genetic) requirements for Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transformation. For instance research with this yeast has led to the recognition that the transforming DNA molecules integrate into the eukaryotic chromosomes either by homologous recombination, which is the preferred pathway in S. cerevisiae, or by nonhomologous end-joining. Based on the protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of S. cerevisiae methodology has been developed for the transformation of many other yeast and fungal species.

  9. Generation of high-affinity fully human anti-interleukin-8 antibodies from its cDNA by two-hybrid screening and affinity maturation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Azam, Mark; Lin, Yu-Huei; Sheridan, James; Wei, Shuanghong; Gupta, Gigi; Singh, Rakesh K; Pauling, Michelle H; Chu, Waihei; Tran, Antares; Yu, Nai-Xuan; Hu, Jiefeng; Wang, Wei; Long, Hao; Xiang, Dong; Zhu, Li; Hua, Shao-Bing

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a technology for rapidly generating novel and fully human antibodies by simply using the antigen DNA. A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was constructed in a yeast two-hybrid vector with high complexity. After cloning cDNA encoding the mature sequence of human interleukin-8 (hIL8) into the yeast two-hybrid system vector, we have screened the human scFv antibody library and obtained three distinct scFv clones that could specifically bind to hIL8. One clone was chosen for further improvement by a novel affinity maturation process using the error-prone PCR of the scFv sequence followed by additional rounds of yeast two-hybrid screening. The scFv antibodies of both primary and affinity-matured scFv clones were expressed in E. coli. All purified scFvs showed specific binding to hIL8 in reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and ELISA assays. All scFvs, as well as a fully human IgG antibody converted from one of the scFv clones and expressed in the mammalian cells, were able to effectively inhibit hIL8 in neutrophil chemotaxis assays. The technology described can generate fully human antibodies with high efficiency and low cost.

  10. Construction and analysis of the cDNA subtraction library of yeast and mycelial phases of Sporothrix globosa isolated in China: identification of differentially expressed genes*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing-bi; He, Yu; Zhou, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Species included in the Sporothrix schenckii complex are temperature-dependent with dimorphic growth and cause sporotrichosis that is characterized by chronic and fatal lymphocutaneous lesions. The putative species included in the Sporothrix complex are S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, S. schenckii, and S. lurei. S. globosa is the causal agent of sporotrichosis in China, and its pathogenicity appears to be closely related to the dimorphic transition, i.e. from the mycelial to the yeast phase, it adapts to changing environmental conditions. To determine the molecular mechanisms of the switching process that mediates the dimorphic transition of S. globosa, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to prepare a complementary DNA (cDNA) subtraction library from the yeast and mycelial phases. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to profile the relationship between differently expressed genes and the dimorphic transition. Two genes that were expressed at higher levels by the yeast form were selected, and their differential expression levels were verified using a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). It is believed that these differently expressed genes are involved in the pathogenesis of S. globosa infection in China. PMID:26642182

  11. DNA microarray analyses reveal a post-irradiation differential time-dependent gene expression profile in yeast cells exposed to X-rays and gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shinzo; Ishidou, Emi; Kurita, Sakiko; Suzuki, Yoshiteru; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2006-07-21

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is the most enigmatic of genotoxic stress inducers in our environment that has been around from the eons of time. IR is generally considered harmful, and has been the subject of numerous studies, mostly looking at the DNA damaging effects in cells and the repair mechanisms therein. Moreover, few studies have focused on large-scale identification of cellular responses to IR, and to this end, we describe here an initial study on the transcriptional responses of the unicellular genome model, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain S288C), by cDNA microarray. The effect of two different IR, X-rays, and gamma (gamma)-rays, was investigated by irradiating the yeast cells cultured in YPD medium with 50 Gy doses of X- and gamma-rays, followed by resuspension of the cells in YPD for time-course experiments. The samples were collected for microarray analysis at 20, 40, and 80 min after irradiation. Microarray analysis revealed a time-course transcriptional profile of changed gene expressions. Up-regulated genes belonged to the functional categories mainly related to cell cycle and DNA processing, cell rescue defense and virulence, protein and cell fate, and metabolism (X- and gamma-rays). Similarly, for X- and gamma-rays, the down-regulated genes belonged to mostly transcription and protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, control of cellular organization, cell fate, and C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism categories, respectively. This study provides for the first time a snapshot of the genome-wide mRNA expression profiles in X- and gamma-ray post-irradiated yeast cells and comparatively interprets/discusses the changed gene functional categories as effects of these two radiations vis-à-vis their energy levels.

  12. DNA microarray analyses reveal a post-irradiation differential time-dependent gene expression profile in yeast cells exposed to X-rays and {gamma}-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shinzo; Ishidou, Emi; Kurita, Sakiko; Suzuki, Yoshiteru; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep . E-mail: rakwal-68@aist.go.jp; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2006-07-21

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is the most enigmatic of genotoxic stress inducers in our environment that has been around from the eons of time. IR is generally considered harmful, and has been the subject of numerous studies, mostly looking at the DNA damaging effects in cells and the repair mechanisms therein. Moreover, few studies have focused on large-scale identification of cellular responses to IR, and to this end, we describe here an initial study on the transcriptional responses of the unicellular genome model, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain S288C), by cDNA microarray. The effect of two different IR, X-rays, and gamma ({gamma})-rays, was investigated by irradiating the yeast cells cultured in YPD medium with 50 Gy doses of X- and {gamma}-rays, followed by resuspension of the cells in YPD for time-course experiments. The samples were collected for microarray analysis at 20, 40, and 80 min after irradiation. Microarray analysis revealed a time-course transcriptional profile of changed gene expressions. Up-regulated genes belonged to the functional categories mainly related to cell cycle and DNA processing, cell rescue defense and virulence, protein and cell fate, and metabolism (X- and {gamma}-rays). Similarly, for X- and {gamma}-rays, the down-regulated genes belonged to mostly transcription and protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, control of cellular organization, cell fate, and C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism categories, respectively. This study provides for the first time a snapshot of the genome-wide mRNA expression profiles in X- and {gamma}-ray post-irradiated yeast cells and comparatively interprets/discusses the changed gene functional categories as effects of these two radiations vis-a-vis their energy levels.

  13. The DNA Repair Protein yKu80 Regulates the Function of Recombination Enhancer during Yeast Mating Type Switching†

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Chun; Workman, Jerry L.; Simpson, Robert T.

    2005-01-01

    Recombination enhancer (RE) is essential for regulating donor preference during yeast mating type switching. In this study, by using minichromosome affinity purification (MAP) and mass spectrometry, we found that yeast Ku80p is associated with RE in MATa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed its occupancy in vivo. Deletion of YKU80 results in altered chromatin structure in the RE region and more importantly causes a dramatic decrease of HML usage in MATa cells. We also detect directional movement of yKu80p from the RE towards HML during switching. These results indicate a novel function of yeast Ku80p in regulating mating type switching. PMID:16166630

  14. Genotoxicity of stannous chloride in yeast and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pungartnik, C; Viau, C; Picada, J; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Henriques, J A P; Brendel, M

    2005-06-06

    Stannous chloride was found genotoxic in microbial test systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in one strain of Salmonella typhimurium and in the Mutoxitest of Escherichia coli. Five isogenic haploid yeast strains differing only in a particular repair-deficiency had the following ranking in Sn2+ -sensitivity: rad52delta>rad6delta>rad2delta>rad4delta>RAD, indicating a higher relevance of recombinogenic repair mechanisms than nucleotide excision in repair of Sn2+ -induced DNA damage. Sn2+ -treated cells formed aggregates that lead to gross overestimation of toxicity when not undone before diluting and plating. Reliable inactivation assays at exposure doses of 25-75 mM SnCl2 were achieved by de-clumping with either EDTA- or phosphate buffer. Sn2+ -induced reversion of the yeast his1-798, his1-208 and lys1-1 mutant alleles, in diploid and haploid cells, respectively, and putative frameshift mutagenesis (reversion of the hom3-10 allele) was observed. In diploid yeast, SnCl2 induced intra-genic mitotic recombination while inter-genic (reciprocal) recombination was very weak and not significant. Yeast cells of exponentially growing cultures were killed to about the same extend at 0.1% of SnCl2 than respective cells in stationary phase, suggesting a major involvement of physiological parameters of post-diauxic shift oxidative stress resistance in enhanced Sn2+ -tolerance. Superoxide dismutases, but not catalase, protected against SnCl2-induced reactive oxygen species as sod1delta had a three-fold higher sensitivity than the WT while the sod2delta mutant was only slightly more sensitive but conferred significant sensitivity increase in a sod1delta sod2delta double mutant. In the Salmonella reversion assay, SnCl2 did not induce mutations in strains TA97, TA98 or TA100, while a positive response was seen in strain TA102. SnCl2 induced a two-fold increase in mutation in the Mutoxitest strain IC203 (uvrA oxyR), but was less mutagenic in strain IC188 (uvrA). We propose

  15. A Functional Yeast Survival Screen of Tumor-Derived cDNA Libraries Designed to Identify Anti-Apoptotic Mammalian Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Inga Maria; Moser, Julia; Siele, Dagmar; Köhl, Ulrike; Rieker, Ralf Joachim; Wachter, David Lukas; Agaimy, Abbas; Herpel, Esther; Baumgarten, Peter; Mittelbronn, Michel; Rakel, Stefanie; Kögel, Donat; Böhm, Stefanie; Gutschner, Tony; Diederichs, Sven; Zörnig, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Yeast cells can be killed upon expression of pro-apoptotic mammalian proteins. We have established a functional yeast survival screen that was used to isolate novel human anti-apoptotic genes overexpressed in treatment-resistant tumors. The screening of three different cDNA libraries prepared from metastatic melanoma, glioblastomas and leukemic blasts allowed for the identification of many yeast cell death-repressing cDNAs, including 28% of genes that are already known to inhibit apoptosis, 35% of genes upregulated in at least one tumor entity and 16% of genes described as both anti-apoptotic in function and upregulated in tumors. These results confirm the great potential of this screening tool to identify novel anti-apoptotic and tumor-relevant molecules. Three of the isolated candidate genes were further analyzed regarding their anti-apoptotic function in cell culture and their potential as a therapeutic target for molecular therapy. PAICS, an enzyme required for de novo purine biosynthesis, the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 and the MAST2 kinase are overexpressed in certain tumor entities and capable of suppressing apoptosis in human cells. Using a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model, we also demonstrated that glioblastoma tumor growth requires MAST2 expression. An additional advantage of the yeast survival screen is its universal applicability. By using various inducible pro-apoptotic killer proteins and screening the appropriate cDNA library prepared from normal or pathologic tissue of interest, the survival screen can be used to identify apoptosis inhibitors in many different systems. PMID:23717670

  16. ERCC2: cDNA cloning and molecular characterization of a human nucleotide excision repair gene with high homology to yeast RAD3.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, C A; Salazar, E P; Stewart, S A; Thompson, L H

    1990-01-01

    Human ERCC2 genomic clones give efficient, stable correction of the nucleotide excision repair defect in UV5 Chinese hamster ovary cells. One clone having a breakpoint just 5' of classical promoter elements corrects only transiently, implicating further flanking sequences in stable gene expression. The nucleotide sequences of a cDNA clone and genomic flanking regions were determined. The ERCC2 translated amino acid sequence has 52% identity (73% homology) with the yeast nucleotide excision repair protein RAD3. RAD3 is essential for cell viability and encodes a protein that is a single-stranded DNA dependent ATPase and an ATP dependent helicase. The similarity of ERCC2 and RAD3 suggests a role for ERCC2 in both cell viability and DNA repair and provides the first insight into the biochemical function of a mammalian nucleotide excision repair gene. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2184031

  17. G-rich telomeric and ribosomal DNA sequences from the fission yeast genome form stable G-quadruplex DNA structures in vitro and are unwound by the Pfh1 DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Wallgren, Marcus; Mohammad, Jani B; Yan, Kok-Phen; Pourbozorgi-Langroudi, Parham; Ebrahimi, Mahsa; Sabouri, Nasim

    2016-07-27

    Certain guanine-rich sequences have an inherent propensity to form G-quadruplex (G4) structures. G4 structures are e.g. involved in telomere protection and gene regulation. However, they also constitute obstacles during replication if they remain unresolved. To overcome these threats to genome integrity, organisms harbor specialized G4 unwinding helicases. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one such candidate helicase is Pfh1, an evolutionarily conserved Pif1 homolog. Here, we addressed whether putative G4 sequences in S. pombe can adopt G4 structures and, if so, whether Pfh1 can resolve them. We tested two G4 sequences, derived from S. pombe ribosomal and telomeric DNA regions, and demonstrated that they form inter- and intramolecular G4 structures, respectively. Also, Pfh1 was enriched in vivo at the ribosomal G4 DNA and telomeric sites. The nuclear isoform of Pfh1 (nPfh1) unwound both types of structure, and although the G4-stabilizing compound Phen-DC3 significantly enhanced their stability, nPfh1 still resolved them efficiently. However, stable G4 structures significantly inhibited adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis by nPfh1. Because ribosomal and telomeric DNA contain putative G4 regions conserved from yeasts to humans, our studies support the important role of G4 structure formation in these regions and provide further evidence for a conserved role for Pif1 helicases in resolving G4 structures.

  18. The Ddc1-Mec3-Rad17 sliding clamp regulates histone-histone chaperone interactions and DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca J; Han, Junhong; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-04-11

    The maintenance of genome integrity is regulated in part by chromatin structure and factors involved in the DNA damage response pathway. Nucleosome assembly is a highly regulated process that restores chromatin structure after DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. During S phase the histone chaperones Asf1, CAF-1, and Rtt106 coordinate to deposit newly synthesized histones H3-H4 onto replicated DNA in budding yeast. Here we describe synthetic genetic interactions between RTT106 and the DDC1-MEC3-RAD17 (9-1-1) complex, a sliding clamp functioning in the S phase DNA damage and replication checkpoint response, upon treatment with DNA damaging agents. The DNA damage sensitivity of rad17Δ rtt106Δ cells depends on the function of Rtt106 in nucleosome assembly. Epistasis analysis reveals that 9-1-1 complex components interact with multiple DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly factors, including Rtt106, CAF-1, and lysine residues of H3-H4. Furthermore, rad17Δ cells exhibit defects in the deposition of newly synthesized H3-H4 onto replicated DNA. Finally, deletion of RAD17 results in increased association of Asf1 with checkpoint kinase Rad53, which may lead to the observed reduction in Asf1-H3 interaction in rad17Δ mutant cells. In addition, we observed that the interaction between histone H3-H4 with histone chaperone CAF-1 or Rtt106 increases in cells lacking Rad17. These results support the idea that the 9-1-1 checkpoint protein regulates DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly in part through regulating histone-histone chaperone interactions.

  19. The mitochondrial genome of the pathogenic yeast Candida subhashii: GC-rich linear DNA with a protein covalently attached to the 5′ termini

    PubMed Central

    Fricova, Dominika; Valach, Matus; Farkas, Zoltan; Pfeiffer, Ilona; Kucsera, Judit; Tomaska, Lubomir; Nosek, Jozef

    2010-01-01

    As a part of our initiative aimed at a large-scale comparative analysis of fungal mitochondrial genomes, we determined the complete DNA sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the yeast Candida subhashii and found that it exhibits a number of peculiar features. First, the mitochondrial genome is represented by linear dsDNA molecules of uniform length (29 795 bp), with an unusually high content of guanine and cytosine residues (52.7 %). Second, the coding sequences lack introns; thus, the genome has a relatively compact organization. Third, the termini of the linear molecules consist of long inverted repeats and seem to contain a protein covalently bound to terminal nucleotides at the 5′ ends. This architecture resembles the telomeres in a number of linear viral and plasmid DNA genomes classified as invertrons, in which the terminal proteins serve as specific primers for the initiation of DNA synthesis. Finally, although the mitochondrial genome of C. subhashii contains essentially the same set of genes as other closely related pathogenic Candida species, we identified additional ORFs encoding two homologues of the family B protein-priming DNA polymerases and an unknown protein. The terminal structures and the genes for DNA polymerases are reminiscent of linear mitochondrial plasmids, indicating that this genome architecture might have emerged from fortuitous recombination between an ancestral, presumably circular, mitochondrial genome and an invertron-like element. PMID:20395267

  20. Transcription initiation in vivo without classical transactivators: DNA kinks flanking the core promoter of the housekeeping yeast adenylate kinase gene, AKY2, position nucleosomes and constitutively activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, Michaela; Oechsner, Ulrich; Gregor, Kerstin; Schroth, Gary P; Bandlow, Wolfhard

    2002-10-01

    The housekeeping gene of the major adenylate kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (AKY2, ADK1) is constitutively transcribed at a moderate level. The promoter has been dissected in order to define elements that effect constitutive transcription. Initiation of mRNA synthesis at the AKY2 promoter is shown to be mediated by a non-canonic core promoter, (TA)(6). Nucleotide sequences 5' of this element only marginally affect transcription suggesting that promoter activation can dispense with transactivators and essentially involves basal transcription. We show that the core promoter of AKY2 is constitutively kept free of nucleosomes. Analyses of permutated AKY2 promoter DNA revealed the presence of bent DNA. DNA structure analysis by computer and by mutation identified two kinks flanking an interstitial stretch of 65 bp of moderately bent core promoter DNA. Kinked DNA is likely incompatible with packaging into nucleosomes and responsible for positioning nucleosomes at the flanks allowing unimpeded access of the basal transcription machinery to the core promoter. The data show that in yeast, constitutive gene expression can dispense with classical transcriptional activator proteins, if two prerequisites are met: (i) the core promoter is kept free of nucleosomes; this can be due to structural properties of the DNA as an alternative to chromatin remodeling factors; and (ii) the core promoter is pre-bent to allow a high rate of basal transcription initiation.

  1. Efficient Identification of Clinically Relevant Candida Yeast Species by Use of an Assay Combining Panfungal Loop-Mediated Isothermal DNA Amplification with Hybridization to Species-Specific Oligonucleotide Probes▿

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, João; Flores, Orfeu; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of invasive mycoses has progressively increased in recent years. Yeasts of the genus Candida remain the leading etiologic agents of those infections. Early identification of opportunistic yeasts may contribute significantly to improved disease management and the selection of appropriate antifungal therapy. We developed a rapid and reliable molecular identification system for clinically relevant yeasts that makes use of nonspecific primers to amplify a region of the 26S rRNA gene, followed by reverse hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled products to a panel of species-specific oligonucleotide probes arranged on a nylon membrane macroarray format. DNA amplification was achieved by the recently developed loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification technology, a promising option for the development of improved laboratory diagnostic kits. The newly developed method was successful in distinguishing among the major clinically relevant yeasts associated with bloodstream infections by using simple, rapid, and cost-effective procedures and equipment. PMID:18077626

  2. The exonuclease activity of the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ suppresses mitochondrial DNA deletions between short direct repeats in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D; Copeland, William C

    2013-06-01

    The importance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions in the progeroid phenotype of exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerase γ mice has been intensely debated. We show that disruption of Mip1 exonuclease activity increases mtDNA deletions 160-fold, whereas disease-associated polymerase variants were mostly unaffected, suggesting that exonuclease activity is vital to avoid deletions during mtDNA replication.

  3. An enzyme in yeast mitochondria that catalyzes a step in branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis also functions in mitochondrial DNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Zelenaya-Troitskaya, O; Perlman, P S; Butow, R A

    1995-01-01

    The yeast mitochondrial high mobility group protein Abf2p is required, under certain growth conditions, for the maintenance of wild-type (rho+) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have identified a multicopy suppressor of the mtDNA instability phenotype of cells with a null allele of the ABF2 gene (delta abf2). The suppressor is a known gene, ILV5, encoding the mitochondrial protein, acetohydroxy acid reductoisomerase, which catalyzes a step in branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. Efficient suppression occurs with just a 2- to 3-fold increase in ILV5 copy number. Moreover, in delta abf2 cells with a single copy of ILV5, changes in mtDNA stability correlate directly with changes in conditions that are known to affect ILV5 expression. Wild-type mtDNA is unstable in cells with an ILV5 null mutation (delta ilv5), leading to the production of mostly rho- petite mutants. The instability of rho+ mtDNA in delta ilv5 cells is not simply a consequence of a block in branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis, since mtDNA is stable in cells with a null allele of the ILV2 gene, which encodes another enzyme of that pathway. The most severe instability of rho+ mtDNA is observed in cells with null alleles of both ABF2 and ILV5. We suggest that ILV5 encodes a bifunctional protein required for branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis and for the maintenance of rho+ mtDNA. Images PMID:7621838

  4. Mitochondria are the main source and one of the targets of Pb (lead)-induced oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cátia A; Soares, Eduardo V

    2014-06-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a useful model organism for studying lead (Pb) toxicity. Yeast cells of a laboratory S. cerevisiae strain (WT strain) were incubated with Pb concentrations up to 1,000 μmol/l for 3 h. Cells exposed to Pb lost proliferation capacity without damage to the cell membrane, and they accumulated intracellular superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The involvement of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by Pb was evaluated. For this purpose, an isogenic derivative ρ(0) strain, lacking mitochondrial DNA, was used. The ρ(0) strain, without respiratory competence, displayed a lower intracellular ROS accumulation and a higher resistance to Pb compared to the WT strain. The kinetic study of ROS generation in yeast cells exposed to Pb showed that the production of O2 (.-) precedes the accumulation of H2O2, which is compatible with the leakage of electrons from the mitochondrial ETC. Yeast cells exposed to Pb displayed mutations at the mitochondrial DNA level. This is most likely a consequence of oxidative stress. In conclusion, mitochondria are an important source of Pb-induced ROS and, simultaneously, one of the targets of its toxicity.

  5. Zygotic genome activation in isogenic and hybrid plant embryos.

    PubMed

    Del Toro-De León, Gerardo; Lepe-Soltero, Daniel; Gillmor, C Stewart

    2016-02-01

    Zygotic genome activation (ZGA) is the onset of large-scale transcription that occurs after fertilization. In animal embryos, ZGA occurs after a period of transcriptional quiescence that varies between species. In plants, the timing of ZGA may also vary between species, and may or may not occur in a parent-of-origin dependent manner: some studies have shown a maternal bias in mRNA transcripts and gene activity in early embryogenesis, while other experiments have found the contribution of maternal and paternal genomes to be equal. In order to differentiate between maternal and paternal mRNAs, RNA sequencing studies of ZGA in plants have used embryos hybrid for polymorphic accessions. A recent genetic assay in Arabidopsis demonstrated significant variation in paternal allele activity between some hybrid combinations and isogenic embryos, as well as between different hybrid combinations, suggesting a possible source for conflicting results obtained by various experiments on paternal genome activation. We review recent literature on paternal genome activation studies in the zygote in both isogenic and hybrid embryos, and discuss possible explanations for the effects of hybridization on gene expression in early embryogenesis in plants.

  6. Isogenic Strain Construction and Gene Targeting in Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Staib, Peter; Moran, Gary P.; Sullivan, Derek J.; Coleman, David C.; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently described opportunistic fungal pathogen that is closely related to Candida albicans but differs from it with respect to epidemiology, certain virulence characteristics, and the ability to develop fluconazole resistance in vitro. A comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis at the molecular level should therefore provide clues about the mechanisms used by these two species to adapt to their human host. In contrast to C. albicans, no auxotrophic C. dubliniensis strains are available for genetic manipulations. Therefore, we constructed homozygous ura3 mutants from a C. dubliniensis wild-type isolate by targeted gene deletion. The two URA3 alleles were sequentially inactivated using the MPAR-flipping strategy, which is based on the selection of integrative transformants carrying a mycophenolic acid resistance marker that is subsequently deleted again by site-specific, FLP-mediated recombination. The URA3 gene from C. albicans (CaURA3) was then used as a selection marker for targeted integration of a fusion between the C. dubliniensis MDR1 (CdMDR1) promoter and a C. albicans-adapted GFP reporter gene. Uridine-prototrophic transformants were obtained with high frequency, and all transformants of two independent ura3-negative parent strains had correctly integrated the reporter gene fusion into the CdMDR1 locus, demonstrating that the CaURA3 gene can be used for efficient and specific targeting of recombinant DNA into the C. dubliniensis genome. Transformants carrying the reporter gene fusion did not exhibit detectable fluorescence during growth in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose medium in vitro, suggesting that CdMDR1 is not significantly expressed under these conditions. Fluconazole had no effect on MDR1 expression, but the addition of the drug benomyl strongly activated the reporter gene fusion in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating that the CdMDR1 gene, which encodes an efflux pump mediating resistance to toxic compounds, is

  7. Yeast Sub1 and human PC4 are G-quadruplex binding proteins that suppress genome instability at co-transcriptionally formed G4 DNA.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christopher R; Singh, Shivani; Hambarde, Shashank; Griffin, Wezley C; Gao, Jun; Chib, Shubeena; Yu, Yang; Ira, Grzegorz; Raney, Kevin D; Kim, Nayun

    2017-06-02

    G-quadruplex or G4 DNA is a non-B secondary DNA structure consisting of a stacked array of guanine-quartets that can disrupt critical cellular functions such as replication and transcription. When sequences that can adopt Non-B structures including G4 DNA are located within actively transcribed genes, the reshaping of DNA topology necessary for transcription process stimulates secondary structure-formation thereby amplifying the potential for genome instability. Using a reporter assay designed to study G4-induced recombination in the context of an actively transcribed locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we tested whether co-transcriptional activator Sub1, recently identified as a G4-binding factor, contributes to genome maintenance at G4-forming sequences. Our data indicate that, upon Sub1-disruption, genome instability linked to co-transcriptionally formed G4 DNA in Top1-deficient cells is significantly augmented and that its highly conserved DNA binding domain or the human homolog PC4 is sufficient to suppress G4-associated genome instability. We also show that Sub1 interacts specifically with co-transcriptionally formed G4 DNA in vivo and that yeast cells become highly sensitivity to G4-stabilizing chemical ligands by the loss of Sub1. Finally, we demonstrate the physical and genetic interaction of Sub1 with the G4-resolving helicase Pif1, suggesting a possible mechanism by which Sub1 suppresses instability at G4 DNA. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Mdm31 and Mdm32 are inner membrane proteins required for maintenance of mitochondrial shape and stability of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Dimmer, Kai Stefan; Jakobs, Stefan; Vogel, Frank; Altmann, Katrin; Westermann, Benedikt

    2005-01-03

    The MDM31 and MDM32 genes are required for normal distribution and morphology of mitochondria in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They encode two related proteins located in distinct protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Cells lacking Mdm31 and Mdm32 harbor giant spherical mitochondria with highly aberrant internal structure. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is instable in the mutants, mtDNA nucleoids are disorganized, and their association with Mmm1-containing complexes in the outer membrane is abolished. Mutant mitochondria are largely immotile, resulting in a mitochondrial inheritance defect. Deletion of either one of the MDM31 and MDM32 genes is synthetically lethal with deletion of either one of the MMM1, MMM2, MDM10, and MDM12 genes, which encode outer membrane proteins involved in mitochondrial morphogenesis and mtDNA inheritance. We propose that Mdm31 and Mdm32 cooperate with Mmm1, Mmm2, Mdm10, and Mdm12 in maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and mtDNA.

  9. The fission yeast Cdc1 protein, a homologue of the small subunit of DNA polymerase delta, binds to Pol3 and Cdc27.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, S A; Moreno, S; Reynolds, N; Nurse, P; Fantes, P A

    1996-01-01

    cdc1+ is required for cell cycle progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Cells carrying temperature-sensitive cdc1 mutants undergo cell cycle arrest when shifted to the restrictive temperature, becoming highly elongated. Here we describe the cloning and sequencing of cdc1+, which is shown to encode a 462 residue protein that displays significant sequence similarity to the small subunit of mammalian DNA polymerase delta. cdc1+ interacts genetically with pol3+, which encodes the large subunit of DNA polymerase delta in fission yeast, and the Cdc1 protein binds to Pol3 in vitro, strongly suggesting that Cdc1 is likely to be the small subunit of Pol delta. In addition, we show that cdc1+ overexpression is sufficient to rescue cells carrying temperature-sensitive cdc27 alleles and that the Cdc1 and Cdc27 proteins interact in vivo and in vitro. Deletion of either cdc1+ or cdc27+ results in cell cycle arrest with the arrested cells having a single nucleus with 2C DNA content. No evidence was obtained for a cut phenotype, indicating that neither cdc1+ nor cdc27+ is required for checkpoint function. cdc1 mutant cells are supersensitive to the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea and to the DNA damaging agent MMS, display increased frequency of mini-chromosome loss and have an extended S phase. Images PMID:8887553

  10. The binding of bridged bis-pyridinium oximes to DNA and its relevance to the induction of mitochondrial dysfunction in yeast.

    PubMed

    Dodin, G; Kühnel, J M; Demerseman, P; Averbeck, D; Nocentini, S

    1992-08-14

    Bis-pyridium oximes and methoximes from a newly synthesized series are weak DNA binders (K = 3.10(4) M-1 under physiological conditions). From the number of binding sites per phosphate, 0.25, the ionic strength dependence of the binding constant and the negative electric dichroism, it is concluded that monointercalation is the mode of association. In contrast to methoxy compounds, the oxime derivatives are able both to induce the mutated "petite" phenotype in yeast S. cerevisiae and to cause "in vitro" extensive condensation of single stranded DNA. This reaction is postulated to be relevant to the mutational process that leads to "peptide" cells. The absence of nuclear mutation is interpreted in terms of sequestration of the drug in mitochondria under the effect of the organelle inner membrane electrochemical potential.

  11. Determination of fruit origin by using 26S rDNA fingerprinting of yeast communities by PCR-DGGE: preliminary application to Physalis fruits from Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Sheikha, Aly Farag; Condur, Ana; Métayer, Isabelle; Nguyen, Doan Duy Le; Loiseau, Gérard; Montet, Didier

    2009-10-01

    The determination of geographical origin is a demand of the traceability system of import-export food products. One hypothesis for tracing the source of a product is by global analysis of the microbial communities of the food and statistical linkage of this analysis to the geographical origin of the food. For this purpose, a molecular technique employing 26S rDNA profiles generated by PCR-DGGE was used to detect the variation in yeast community structures of three species of Physalis fruit (Physalis ixocarpa Brat, Physalis pubescens L, Physalis pruinosa L) from four Egyptian regions (Qalyoubia, Minufiya, Beheira and Alexandria Governments). When the 26S rDNA profiles were analysed by multivariate analysis, distinct microbial communities were detected. The band profiles of Physalis yeasts from different Governments were specific for each location and could be used as a bar code to discriminate the origin of the fruits. This method is a new traceability tool which provides fruit products with a unique biological bar code and makes it possible to trace back the fruits to their original location.

  12. Draft genome sequence of Cryptococcus terricola JCM 24523, an oleaginous yeast capable of expressing exogenous DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Dan; Ojumu, John O.; Zhang, Gui X.

    2016-11-03

    Cryptococcus terricola JCM 24523 has recently been identified as an oleaginous yeast capable of converting starch into fatty acids. Here, this draft genome sequence provides a platform for elucidating its fatty acid production potential and supporting comparisons with other oleaginous species.

  13. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Activities of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Family by One-Hybrid Experiments in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Zsolt; Sebastian, Alvaro; Xu, Wenjia; Grain, Damaris; Salsac, Fabien; Avon, Alexandra; Berger, Nathalie; Tran, Joseph; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Lurin, Claire; Lepiniec, Loïc; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Dubos, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The control of growth and development of all living organisms is a complex and dynamic process that requires the harmonious expression of numerous genes. Gene expression is mainly controlled by the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins called transcription factors (TFs). Amongst the various classes of eukaryotic TFs, the MYB superfamily is one of the largest and most diverse, and it has considerably expanded in the plant kingdom. R2R3-MYBs have been extensively studied over the last 15 years. However, DNA-binding specificity has been characterized for only a small subset of these proteins. Therefore, one of the remaining challenges is the exhaustive characterization of the DNA-binding specificity of all R2R3-MYB proteins. In this study, we have developed a library of Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB open reading frames, whose DNA-binding activities were assayed in vivo (yeast one-hybrid experiments) with a pool of selected cis-regulatory elements. Altogether 1904 interactions were assayed leading to the discovery of specific patterns of interactions between the various R2R3-MYB subgroups and their DNA target sequences and to the identification of key features that govern these interactions. The present work provides a comprehensive in vivo analysis of R2R3-MYB binding activities that should help in predicting new DNA motifs and identifying new putative target genes for each member of this very large family of TFs. In a broader perspective, the generated data will help to better understand how TF interact with their target DNA sequences. PMID:26484765

  14. Characterisation of cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by the topoisomerase II-directed bisdioxopiperazine anti-cancer agent ICRF-187 (dexrazoxane) in yeast and mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lars H; Dejligbjerg, Marielle; Hansen, Lasse T; Grauslund, Morten; Jensen, Peter B; Sehested, Maxwell

    2004-01-01

    Background Bisdioxopiperazine anti-cancer agents are inhibitors of eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II, sequestering this protein as a non-covalent protein clamp on DNA. It has been suggested that such complexes on DNA represents a novel form of DNA damage to cells. In this report, we characterise the cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by the bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-187 by a combination of genetic and molecular approaches. In addition, the well-established topoisomerase II poison m-AMSA is used for comparison. Results By utilizing a panel of Saccharomyces cerevisiae single-gene deletion strains, homologous recombination was identified as the most important DNA repair pathway determining the sensitivity towards ICRF-187. However, sensitivity towards m-AMSA depended much more on this pathway. In contrast, disrupting the post replication repair pathway only affected sensitivity towards m-AMSA. Homologous recombination (HR) defective irs1SF chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells showed increased sensitivity towards ICRF-187, while their sensitivity towards m-AMSA was increased even more. Furthermore, complementation of the XRCC3 deficiency in irs1SF cells fully abrogated hypersensitivity towards both drugs. DNA-PKcs deficient V3-3 CHO cells having reduced levels of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) showed slightly increased sensitivity to both drugs. While exposure of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) OC-NYH cells to m-AMSA strongly induced γH2AX, exposure to ICRF-187 resulted in much less induction, showing that ICRF-187 generates fewer DNA double strand breaks than m-AMSA. Accordingly, when yeast cells were exposed to equitoxic concentrations of ICRF-187 and m-AMSA, the expression of DNA damage-inducible genes showed higher levels of induction after exposure to m-AMSA as compared to ICRF-187. Most importantly, ICRF-187 stimulated homologous recombination in SPD8 hamster lung fibroblast cells to lower levels than m-AMSA at all cytotoxicity levels tested, showing that the

  15. Characterisation of cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by the topoisomerase II-directed bisdioxopiperazine anti-cancer agent ICRF-187 (dexrazoxane) in yeast and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lars H; Dejligbjerg, Marielle; Hansen, Lasse T; Grauslund, Morten; Jensen, Peter B; Sehested, Maxwell

    2004-12-02

    Bisdioxopiperazine anti-cancer agents are inhibitors of eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II, sequestering this protein as a non-covalent protein clamp on DNA. It has been suggested that such complexes on DNA represents a novel form of DNA damage to cells. In this report, we characterise the cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by the bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-187 by a combination of genetic and molecular approaches. In addition, the well-established topoisomerase II poison m-AMSA is used for comparison. By utilizing a panel of Saccharomyces cerevisiae single-gene deletion strains, homologous recombination was identified as the most important DNA repair pathway determining the sensitivity towards ICRF-187. However, sensitivity towards m-AMSA depended much more on this pathway. In contrast, disrupting the post replication repair pathway only affected sensitivity towards m-AMSA. Homologous recombination (HR) defective irs1SF chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells showed increased sensitivity towards ICRF-187, while their sensitivity towards m-AMSA was increased even more. Furthermore, complementation of the XRCC3 deficiency in irs1SF cells fully abrogated hypersensitivity towards both drugs. DNA-PKcs deficient V3-3 CHO cells having reduced levels of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) showed slightly increased sensitivity to both drugs. While exposure of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) OC-NYH cells to m-AMSA strongly induced gammaH2AX, exposure to ICRF-187 resulted in much less induction, showing that ICRF-187 generates fewer DNA double strand breaks than m-AMSA. Accordingly, when yeast cells were exposed to equitoxic concentrations of ICRF-187 and m-AMSA, the expression of DNA damage-inducible genes showed higher levels of induction after exposure to m-AMSA as compared to ICRF-187. Most importantly, ICRF-187 stimulated homologous recombination in SPD8 hamster lung fibroblast cells to lower levels than m-AMSA at all cytotoxicity levels tested, showing that the mechanism of

  16. Defining the sequence specificity of DNA-binding proteins by selecting binding sites from random-sequence oligonucleotides: analysis of yeast GCN4 protein.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, A R; Brandl, C J; Struhl, K

    1989-07-01

    We describe a new method for accurately defining the sequence recognition properties of DNA-binding proteins by selecting high-affinity binding sites from random-sequence DNA. The yeast transcriptional activator protein GCN4 was coupled to a Sepharose column, and binding sites were isolated by passing short, random-sequence oligonucleotides over the column and eluting them with increasing salt concentrations. Of 43 specifically bound oligonucleotides, 40 contained the symmetric sequence TGA(C/G)TCA, whereas the other 3 contained sequences matching six of these seven bases. The extreme preference for this 7-base-pair sequence suggests that each position directly contacts GCN4. The three nucleotide positions on each side of this core heptanucleotide also showed sequence preferences, indicating their effect on GCN4 binding. Interestingly, deviations in the core and a stronger sequence preference in the flanking region were found on one side of the central C . G base pair. Although GCN4 binds as a dimer, this asymmetry supports a model in which interactions on each side of the binding site are not equivalent. The random selection method should prove generally useful for defining the specificities of other DNA-binding proteins and for identifying putative target sequences from genomic DNA.

  17. The Investigation on the Distribution of Malassezia Yeasts on the Normal Korean Skin by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo-Jung; Lim, Sang-Hee; Ko, Jong-Hyun; Oh, Byung-Ho; Kim, Sang-Min; Song, Young-Chan; Yim, Seon-Mi; Lee, Yang-Won; Choe, Yong-Beom

    2009-01-01

    Background Malassezia yeasts are normal flora of the skin that are discovered in 75~98% of health subjects, but since its association with various skin disorders have been known, many studies have been conducted in the distribution of the yeasts. Objective To isolate, identify, and classify Malassezia yeasts from the normal human skin of Koreans by using the rapid and accurate molecular biology method (26S rDNA PCR-RFLP) which overcome the limits of morphological and biochemical methods, and to gather a basic database that will show its relation to various skin diseases. Methods Malassezia yeasts were cultured from clinically healthy human skin using scrub-wash technique at five sites (forehead, cheek, chest, upper arm, and thigh) and swabbing technique at scalp in 160 participants comprised of 80 males and 80 females aged from 0 to 80. Identification of obtained strains were placed into the one of the 11 species by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP. Results An overall positive culture rate was 62.4% (599/960). As shown in the experiment groups by their age, the positive culture rate was the highest (74.2%) in the age 21~30 and 31~40 (89/120). In the experiment groups by different body areas, the scalp showed the highest positive culture rate of 90% (144/160). On analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP, M. globosa was the most predominant species in the age 0~10 (32.8%), 11~20 (28.9%), 21~30 (32.3%). M. restricta was identified as predominant species in the age 41~50 (27.9%), 61~70 (31.5%) and 71~80 (24.0%). In the age 31~40 years, M. sympodialis was found to be the most common species (24.6%). According to body site, M. restricta was more frequently recovered in the scalp (56.8%), forehead (39.8%) and cheek (24.0%) and while M. globosa was more frequently recovered in the chest (36.8%). Higher positive culture rates of Malassezia yeasts were shown in male subjects than female counterparts in all body areas except scalp (p<0.05). Especially in this study, M. dermatis, newly isolated

  18. Conformational properties of bacterial DnaK and yeast mitochondrial Hsp70. Role of the divergent C-terminal alpha-helical subdomain.

    PubMed

    Moro, Fernando; Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; Slutsky, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam; Muga, Arturo

    2005-06-01

    Among the eukaryotic members of the Hsp70 family, mitochondrial Hsp70 shows the highest degree of sequence identity with bacterial DnaK. Although they share a functional mechanism and homologous co-chaperones, they are highly specific and cannot be exchanged between Escherichia coli and yeast mitochondria. To provide a structural basis for this finding, we characterized both proteins, as well as two DnaK/mtHsp70 chimeras constructed by domain swapping, using biochemical and biophysical methods. Here, we show that DnaK and mtHsp70 display different conformational and biochemical properties. Replacing different regions of the DnaK peptide-binding domain with those of mtHsp70 results in chimeric proteins that: (a) are not able to support growth of an E. coli DnaK deletion strain at stress temperatures (e.g. 42 degrees C); (b) show increased accessibility and decreased thermal stability of the peptide-binding pocket; and (c) have reduced activation by bacterial, but not mitochondrial co-chaperones, as compared with DnaK. Importantly, swapping the C-terminal alpha-helical subdomain promotes a conformational change in the chimeras to an mtHsp70-like conformation. Thus, interaction with bacterial co-chaperones correlates well with the conformation that natural and chimeric Hsp70s adopt in solution. Our results support the hypothesis that a specific protein structure might regulate the interaction of Hsp70s with particular components of the cellular machinery, such as Tim44, so that they perform specific functions.

  19. The budding yeast Centromere DNA Element II wraps a stable Cse4 hemisome in either orientation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Henikoff, Steven; Ramachandran, Srinivas; Krassovsky, Kristina; Bryson, Terri D; Codomo, Christine A; Brogaard, Kristin; Wang, Ji-Ping; Henikoff, Jorja G

    2014-01-01

    In budding yeast, a single cenH3 (Cse4) nucleosome occupies the ∼120-bp functional centromere, however conflicting structural models for the particle have been proposed. To resolve this controversy, we have applied H4S47C-anchored cleavage mapping, which reveals the precise position of histone H4 in every nucleosome in the genome. We find that cleavage patterns at centromeres are unique within the genome and are incompatible with symmetrical structures, including octameric nucleosomes and (Cse4/H4)2 tetrasomes. Centromere cleavage patterns are compatible with a precisely positioned core structure, one in which each of the 16 yeast centromeres is occupied by oppositely oriented Cse4/H4/H2A/H2B hemisomes in two rotational phases within the population. Centromere-specific hemisomes are also inferred from distances observed between closely-spaced H4 cleavages, as predicted from structural modeling. Our results indicate that the orientation and rotational position of the stable hemisome at each yeast centromere is not specified by the functional centromere sequence. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01861.001 PMID:24737863

  20. Yeast two-hybrid screen.

    PubMed

    Makuch, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Yeast two-hybrid is a method for screening large numbers of gene products (encoded by cDNA libraries) for their ability to interact with a protein of interest. This system can also be used for characterizing and manipulating candidate protein: protein interactions. Interactions between proteins are monitored by the growth of yeast plated on selective media.

  1. Curated collection of yeast transcription factor DNA binding specificity data reveals novel structural and gene regulatory insights

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating gene expression by interacting with cis-regulatory DNA elements associated with their target genes. Recent surveys have examined the DNA binding specificities of most Saccharomyces cerevisiae TFs, but a comprehensive evaluation of their data has been lacking. Results We analyzed in vitro and in vivo TF-DNA binding data reported in previous large-scale studies to generate a comprehensive, curated resource of DNA binding specificity data for all characterized S. cerevisiae TFs. Our collection comprises DNA binding site motifs and comprehensive in vitro DNA binding specificity data for all possible 8-bp sequences. Investigation of the DNA binding specificities within the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) and VHT1 regulator (VHR) TF families revealed unexpected plasticity in TF-DNA recognition: intriguingly, the VHR TFs, newly characterized by protein binding microarrays in this study, recognize bZIP-like DNA motifs, while the bZIP TF Hac1 recognizes a motif highly similar to the canonical E-box motif of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) TFs. We identified several TFs with distinct primary and secondary motifs, which might be associated with different regulatory functions. Finally, integrated analysis of in vivo TF binding data with protein binding microarray data lends further support for indirect DNA binding in vivo by sequence-specific TFs. Conclusions The comprehensive data in this curated collection allow for more accurate analyses of regulatory TF-DNA interactions, in-depth structural studies of TF-DNA specificity determinants, and future experimental investigations of the TFs' predicted target genes and regulatory roles. PMID:22189060

  2. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients by the Analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Byung Ho; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2010-01-01

    Background This case-control study concerns a molecular biological method based on the data gathered from a group of Korean subjects to examine the distribution of Malassezia yeasts in seborrheic dermatitis (SD) patients. Cultures for Malassezia yeasts were taken from the foreheads, cheeks and chests of 60 patients with SD and in 60 healthy controls of equivalent age. Objective The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between certain species of Malassezia and SD. This was done by analyzing the differences in the distribution of Malassezia species in terms of age and body parts of the host with healthy controls. Methods 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP, a fast and accurate molecular biological method, was used to overcome the limits of morphological and biochemical methods. Results The positive Malassezia culture rate was 51.7% in patients with SD, which was lower than that of healthy adults (63.9%). M. restricta was dominant in patients with SD (19.5%). Likewise, M. restricta was identified as a common species (20.5%) in healthy controls. In the ages 31~40, M. restricta was found to be the most common species (31.6%) among SD patients. Conclusion According to the results of the study, the most frequently isolated species was M. restricta (19.5%) in patients with SD. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of Malassezia species between the SD patients and healthy control groups. PMID:20548904

  3. Rad4 mainly functions in Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint pathway as a scaffold protein in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ming; Zeng, Li; Singh, Amanpreet; Xu, Yongjie

    2014-01-01

    Rad4/Cut5 is a scaffold protein in the Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint in S. pombe. However, whether it contains a robust ATR-activation domain (AAD) required for checkpoint signaling like its orthologs TopBP1 in humans and Dpb11 in budding yeast has been incompletely clear. To identify the putative AAD in Rad4, we carried out an extensive genetic screen looking for novel mutants with an enhanced sensitivity to replication stress or DNA damage in which the function of the AAD can be eliminated by the mutations. Two new mutations near the N-terminus were identified that caused significantly higher sensitivities to DNA damage or chronic replication stress than all previously reported mutants, suggesting that most of the checkpoint function of the protein is eliminated. However, these mutations did not affect the activation of Rad3 (ATR in humans) yet eliminated the scaffolding function of the protein required for the activation of Chk1. Several mutations were also identified in or near the recently reported AAD in the C-terminus of Rad4. However, all mutations in the C-terminus only slightly sensitized the cells to DNA damage. Interestingly, a mutant lacking the whole C-terminus was found resistant to DNA damage and replication stress almost like the wild type cells. Consistent with the resistance, all known Rad3 dependent phosphorylations of checkpoint proteins remained intact in the C-terminal deletion mutant, indicating that unlike that in Dpb11, the C-terminus of Rad4 does not contain a robust AAD. These results, together with those from the biochemical studies, show that Rad4 mainly functions as a scaffold protein in the Chk1, not the Cds1(CHK2 in humans), checkpoint pathway. It plays a minor role or is functionally redundant with an unknown factor in Rad3 activation.

  4. Rad4 Mainly Functions in Chk1-Mediated DNA Damage Checkpoint Pathway as a Scaffold Protein in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ming; Zeng, Li; Singh, Amanpreet; Xu, Yongjie

    2014-01-01

    Rad4/Cut5 is a scaffold protein in the Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint in S. pombe. However, whether it contains a robust ATR-activation domain (AAD) required for checkpoint signaling like its orthologs TopBP1 in humans and Dpb11 in budding yeast has been incompletely clear. To identify the putative AAD in Rad4, we carried out an extensive genetic screen looking for novel mutants with an enhanced sensitivity to replication stress or DNA damage in which the function of the AAD can be eliminated by the mutations. Two new mutations near the N-terminus were identified that caused significantly higher sensitivities to DNA damage or chronic replication stress than all previously reported mutants, suggesting that most of the checkpoint function of the protein is eliminated. However, these mutations did not affect the activation of Rad3 (ATR in humans) yet eliminated the scaffolding function of the protein required for the activation of Chk1. Several mutations were also identified in or near the recently reported AAD in the C-terminus of Rad4. However, all mutations in the C-terminus only slightly sensitized the cells to DNA damage. Interestingly, a mutant lacking the whole C-terminus was found resistant to DNA damage and replication stress almost like the wild type cells. Consistent with the resistance, all known Rad3 dependent phosphorylations of checkpoint proteins remained intact in the C-terminal deletion mutant, indicating that unlike that in Dpb11, the C-terminus of Rad4 does not contain a robust AAD. These results, together with those from the biochemical studies, show that Rad4 mainly functions as a scaffold protein in the Chk1, not the Cds1(CHK2 in humans), checkpoint pathway. It plays a minor role or is functionally redundant with an unknown factor in Rad3 activation. PMID:24663817

  5. Identification of a putative methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase by sequence analysis of a 6.8 kb DNA fragment of yeast chromosome VII.

    PubMed

    Tizon, B; Rodríguez-Torres, M; Rodríguez-Belmonte, E; Cadahia, J L; Cerdan, E

    1996-09-01

    We report the sequence analysis of a 6.8 kb DNA fragment from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VII. This sequence contains five open reading frames (ORFs) greater than 100 amino acids. There is also an incomplete ORF flanking one of the extremes, G2868, which is the 3' end of the SCS3 gene (Hosaka et al., 1994). The translated sequence of ORF G2882 shows similarity to the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Goyette et al., 1994). ORF G2889 shows no significant homologies with the sequences compiled in databases. ORF G2893 corresponds to the gene SUP44, coding for the yeast ribosomal protein S4 (All-Robin et al., 1990). G2873 and G2896 are internal ORFs.

  6. Systematics of basidiomycetous yeasts: a comparison of large subunit D1/D2 and internal transcribed spacer rDNA regions.

    PubMed

    Scorzetti, Gloria; Fell, J W; Fonseca, A; Statzell-Tallman, Adele

    2002-12-01

    Basidiomycetous yeasts in the Urediniomycetes and Hymenomycetes were examined by sequence analysis in two ribosomal DNA regions: the D1/D2 variable domains at the 5' end of the large subunit rRNA gene (D1/D2) and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2. Four major lineages were recognized in each class: Microbotryum, Sporidiobolus, Erythrobasidium and Agaricostilbum in the Urediniomycetes; Tremellales, Trichosporonales, Filobasidiales and Cystofilobasidiales in the Hymenomycetes. Bootstrap support for many of the clades within those lineages is weak; however, phylogenetic analysis provides a focal point for in-depth study of biological relationships. Combined sequence analysis of the D1/D2 and ITS regions is recommended for species identification, while species definition requires classical biological information such as life cycles and phenotypic characterization.

  7. A yeast gene, MGS1, encoding a DNA-dependent AAA+ ATPase is required to maintain genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Hishida, Takashi; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Ohno, Takayuki; Morishita, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hideo

    2001-01-01

    Changes in DNA superhelicity during DNA replication are mediated primarily by the activities of DNA helicases and topoisomerases. If these activities are defective, the progression of the replication fork can be hindered or blocked, which can lead to double-strand breaks, elevated recombination in regions of repeated DNA, and genome instability. Hereditary diseases like Werner's and Bloom's Syndromes are caused by defects in DNA helicases, and these diseases are associated with genome instability and carcinogenesis in humans. Here we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, MGS1 (Maintenance of Genome Stability 1), which encodes a protein belonging to the AAA+ class of ATPases, and whose central region is similar to Escherichia coli RuvB, a Holliday junction branch migration motor protein. The Mgs1 orthologues are highly conserved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The Mgs1 protein possesses DNA-dependent ATPase and single-strand DNA annealing activities. An mgs1 deletion mutant has an elevated rate of mitotic recombination, which causes genome instability. The mgs1 mutation is synergistic with a mutation in top3 (encoding topoisomerase III), and the double mutant exhibits severe growth defects and markedly increased genome instability. In contrast to the mgs1 mutation, a mutation in the sgs1 gene encoding a DNA helicase homologous to the Werner and Bloom helicases suppresses both the growth defect and the increased genome instability of the top3 mutant. Therefore, evolutionarily conserved Mgs1 may play a role together with RecQ family helicases and DNA topoisomerases in maintaining proper DNA topology, which is essential for genome stability. PMID:11459965

  8. Conflicting results obtained by RAPD-PCR and large-subunit rDNA sequences in determining and comparing yeast strains isolated from flowers: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Michael; Fischer, Reinhard; Titze, Andreas

    2002-07-01

    Sixty-six yeast strains isolated from the nectar of various plant species in Central Europe were characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR) and by sequencing of the variable D1/D2 domain of large-subunit (26S) rDNA. The usefulness of both methods for the determination and comparison of unknown ascomycetous and basidiomycetous yeast strains was compared and evaluated. The reproducibility of RAPD-PCR was shown to be low and the information obtained by this method was clearly not as precise as that obtained from sequence analysis. Numerous imponderables make RAPD-PCR analysis unreliable, at least as a means of identifying yeasts in ecological studies. The lack of standard protocols for RAPD-PCR analysis and the absence of a general database of banding patterns made it impossible to identify unknown yeast strains or to recognize new species. In contrast to RAPD-PCR, sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain was found to be a fast and reliable method for the rapid identification of yeast species and was also shown to be an invaluable tool for the discovery of new species.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA replication in petite mutants of yeast: resistance to inhibition by ethidium bromide, berenil and euflavine.

    PubMed

    Nagley, P; Mattick, J S

    1977-04-29

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication in petite mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is generally less sensitive to inhibition by ethidium bromide than in grande (respiratory competent) cells. In every petite that we have examined, which retain a range of different grande mtDNA sequences, this general phenomenon has been demonstrated by measurements of the loss of mtDNA from cultures grown in the presence of the drug. The resistance is also demonstrable by direct analysis of drug inhibition of mtDNA replication in isolated mitochondria. Furthermore, the resistance to ethidium bromide is accompanied, in every case tested, by cross-resistance to berenil and euflavine, although variations in the levels of resistance are observed. In one petite the level of in vivo resistance to the three drugs was very similar (4-fold over the grande parent) whilst another petite was mildly resistant to ethidium bromide and berenil (each 1.6-fold over the parent) and strongly resistant (nearly 8-fold) to inhibition of mtDNA replication by euflavine. The level of resistance to ethidium bromide in several other petite clones tested was found to vary markedly. Using genetic techniques it is possible to identify those petites which display an enhanced resistance to ethidium bromide inhibition of mtDNA replication. It is considered that the general resistance of petites arises because a product of mitochondrial protein synthesis is normally involved in facilitating the inhibitory action of these drugs on mtDNA synthesis in grande cells. The various levels of resistance in petites may be modulated by the particular mtDNA sequences retained in each petite.

  10. A novel cis-acting element required for DNA damage-inducible expression of yeast DIN7

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitani, Ayako; Yoshida, Minoru; Ling Feng

    2008-01-04

    Din7 is a DNA damage-inducible mitochondrial nuclease that modulates the stability of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. How DIN7 gene expression is regulated, however, has remained largely unclear. Using promoter sequence alignment, we found a highly conserved 19-bp sequence in the promoter regions of DIN7 and NTG1, which encodes an oxidative stress-inducible base-excision-repair enzyme. Deletion of the 19-bp sequence markedly reduced the hydroxyurea (HU)-enhanced DIN7 promoter activity. In addition, nuclear fractions prepared from HU-treated cells were used in in vitro band shift assays to reveal the presence of currently unidentified trans-acting factor(s) that preferentially bound to the 19-bp region. These results suggest that the 19-bp sequence is a novel cis-acting element that is required for the regulation of DIN7 expression in response to HU-induced DNA damage.

  11. Targeted detection of in vivo endogenous DNA base damage reveals preferential base excision repair in the transcribed strand

    PubMed Central

    Reis, António M. C.; Mills, Wilbur K.; Ramachandran, Ilangovan; Friedberg, Errol C.; Thompson, David; Queimado, Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous DNA damage is removed mainly via base excision repair (BER), however, whether there is preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage is still under intense debate. We developed a highly sensitive primer-anchored DNA damage detection assay (PADDA) to map and quantify in vivo endogenous DNA damage. Using PADDA, we documented significantly higher levels of endogenous damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in stationary phase than in exponential phase. We also documented that yeast BER-defective cells have significantly higher levels of endogenous DNA damage than isogenic wild-type cells at any phase of growth. PADDA provided detailed fingerprint analysis at the single-nucleotide level, documenting for the first time that persistent endogenous nucleotide damage in CAN1 co-localizes with previously reported spontaneous CAN1 mutations. To quickly and reliably quantify endogenous strand-specific DNA damage in the constitutively expressed CAN1 gene, we used PADDA on a real-time PCR setting. We demonstrate that wild-type cells repair endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. In contrast, yeast BER-defective cells accumulate endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. These data provide the first direct evidence for preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage and documents the major role of BER in this process. PMID:21911361

  12. Subclones in B-lymphoma cell lines: isogenic models for the study of gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Quentmeier, Hilmar; Pommerenke, Claudia; Ammerpohl, Ole; Geffers, Robert; Hauer, Vivien; MacLeod, Roderick AF; Nagel, Stefan; Romani, Julia; Rosati, Emanuela; Rosén, Anders; Uphoff, Cord C; Zaborski, Margarete; Drexler, Hans G

    2016-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity though common in tumors has been rarely documented in cell lines. To examine how often B-lymphoma cell lines are comprised of subclones, we performed immunoglobulin (IG) heavy chain hypermutation analysis. Revealing that subclones are not rare in B-cell lymphoma cell lines, 6/49 IG hypermutated cell lines (12%) consisted of subclones with individual IG mutations. Subclones were also identified in 2/284 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines exhibiting bimodal CD marker expression. We successfully isolated 10 subclones from four cell lines (HG3, SU-DHL-5, TMD-8, U-2932). Whole exome sequencing was performed to molecularly characterize these subclones. We describe in detail the clonal structure of cell line HG3, derived from chronic lymphocytic leukemia. HG3 consists of three subclones each bearing clone-specific aberrations, gene expression and DNA methylation patterns. While donor patient leukemic cells were CD5+, two of three HG3 subclones had independently lost this marker. CD5 on HG3 cells was regulated by epigenetic/transcriptional mechanisms rather than by alternative splicing as reported hitherto. In conclusion, we show that the presence of subclones in cell lines carrying individual mutations and characterized by sets of differentially expressed genes is not uncommon. We show also that these subclones can be useful isogenic models for regulatory and functional studies. PMID:27566572

  13. Functional characterization of a rice de novo DNA methyltransferase, OsDRM2, expressed in Escherichia coli and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Jinsong; Dong, Mingyue; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yanli; Liu, Bao

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► A rice de novo DNA methyltransferase OsDRM2 was cloned. ► In vitro methylation activity of OsDRM2 was characterized with Escherichia coli. ► Assays of OsDRM2 in vivo methylation were done with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ► OsDRM2 methylation activity is not preferential to any type of cytosine context. ► The activity of OsDRM2 is independent of RdDM pathway. - Abstract: DNA methylation of cytosine nucleotides is an important epigenetic modification that occurs in most eukaryotic organisms and is established and maintained by various DNA methyltransferases together with their co-factors. There are two major categories of DNA methyltransferases: de novo and maintenance. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a de novo methyltransferase, named OsDRM2, from rice (Oryza sativa L.). The full-length coding region of OsDRM2 was cloned and transformed into Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both of these organisms expressed the OsDRM2 protein, which exhibited stochastic de novo methylation activity in vitro at CG, CHG, and CHH di- and tri-nucleotide patterns. Two lines of evidence demonstrated the de novo activity of OsDRM2: (1) a 5′-CCGG-3′ containing DNA fragment that had been pre-treated with OsDRM2 protein expressed in E. coli was protected from digestion by the CG-methylation-sensitive isoschizomer HpaII; (2) methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis of S. cerevisiae genomic DNA from transformants that had been introduced with OsDRM2 revealed CG and CHG methylation levels of 3.92–9.12%, and 2.88–6.93%, respectively, whereas the mock control S. cerevisiae DNA did not exhibit cytosine methylation. These results were further supported by bisulfite sequencing of the 18S rRNA and EAF5 genes of the transformed S. cerevisiae, which exhibited different DNA methylation patterns, which were observed in the genomic DNA. Our findings establish that OsDRM2 is an active de novo DNA

  14. Chromodomain protein Swi6-mediated role of DNA polymerase alpha in establishment of silencing in fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S; Saini, S; Arora, S; Singh, J

    2001-12-21

    Although DNA replication has been thought to play an important role in the silencing of mating type loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, recent studies indicate that silencing can be decoupled from replication. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, mating type silencing is brought about by the trans-acting proteins, namely Swi6, Clr1-Clr4, and Rhp6, in cooperation with the cis-acting silencers. The latter contain an autonomous replication sequence, suggesting that DNA replication may be critical for silencing in S. pombe. To investigate the connection between DNA replication and silencing in S. pombe, we analyzed several temperature-sensitive mutants of DNA polymerase alpha. We find that one such mutant, swi7H4, exhibits silencing defects at mat, centromere, and telomere loci. This effect is independent of the checkpoint and replication defects of the mutant. Interestingly, the extent of the silencing defect in the swi7H4 mutant at the silent mat2 locus is further enhanced in absence of the cis-acting, centromere-proximal silencer. The chromodomain protein Swi6, which is required for silencing and is localized to mat and other heterochromatin loci, interacts with DNA polymerase alpha in vivo and in vitro in wild type cells. However, it does not interact with the mutant pol alpha and is delocalized away from the silent mat loci in the mutant. Our results demonstrate a role of DNA polymerase alpha in the establishment of silencing. We propose a recruitment model for the coupling of DNA replication with the establishment of silencing by the chromodomain protein Swi6, which may be applicable to higher eukaryotes.

  15. The Wheat cDNA LCT1 Generates Hypersensitivity to Sodium in a Salt-Sensitive Yeast Strain1

    PubMed Central

    Amtmann, Anna; Fischer, Marc; Marsh, Ellen L.; Stefanovic, Aleksandra; Sanders, Dale; Schachtman, Daniel P.

    2001-01-01

    Salinity affects large areas of agricultural land, and all major crop species are intolerant to high levels of sodium ions. The principal route for Na+ uptake into plant cells remains to be identified. Non-selective ion channels and high-affinity potassium transporters have emerged as potential pathways for Na+ entry. A third candidate for Na+ transport into plant cells is a low-affinity cation transporter represented by the wheat protein LCT1, which is known to be permeable for a wide range of cations when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). To investigate the role of LCT1 in salt tolerance we have used the yeast strain G19, which is disrupted in the genes encoding Na+ export pumps and as a result displays salt sensitivity comparable with wheat. After transformation with LCT1, G19 cells became hypersensitive to NaCl. We show that LCT1 expression results in a strong decrease of intracellular K+/Na+ ratio in G19 cells due to the combined effect of enhanced Na+ accumulation and loss of intracellular K+. Na+ uptake through LCT1 was inhibited by K+ and Ca2+ at high concentrations and the addition of these ions rescued growth of LCT1-transformed G19 on saline medium. LCT1 was also shown to mediate the uptake of Li+ and Cs+. Expression of two mutant LCT1 cDNAs with N-terminal truncations resulted in decreased Ca2+ uptake and increased Na+ tolerance compared with expression of the full-length LCT1. Our findings strongly suggest that LCT1 represents a molecular link between Ca2+ and Na+ uptake into plant cells. PMID:11457957

  16. Yeast DNA ligase IV mutations reveal a nonhomologous end joining function of BRCT1 distinct from XRCC4/Lif1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Renard, Brian M.; Birkeland, Shanda R.; Sunder, Sham; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    LIG4/Dnl4 is the DNA ligase that (re)joins DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), an activity supported by binding of its tandem BRCT domains to the ligase accessory protein XRCC4/Lif1. We screened a panel of 88 distinct ligase mutants to explore the structure-function relationships of the yeast Dnl4 BRCT domains and inter-BRCT linker in NHEJ. Screen results suggested two distinct classes of BRCT mutations with differential effects on Lif1 interaction as compared to NHEJ completion. Validated constructs confirmed that D800K and GG(868:869)AA mutations, which target the Lif1 binding interface, showed a severely defective Dnl4-Lif1 interaction but a less consistent and often small decrease in NHEJ activity in some assays, as well as nearly normal levels of Dnl4 accumulation at DSBs. In contrast, mutants K742A and KTT(742:744)ATA, which target the β3-α2 region of the first BRCT domain, substantially decreased NHEJ function commensurate with a large defect in Dnl4 recruitment to DSBs, despite a comparatively greater preservation of the Lif1 interaction. Together, these separation-of-function mutants indicate that Dnl4 BRCT1 supports DSB recruitment and NHEJ in a manner distinct from Lif1 binding and reveal a complexity of Dnl4 BRCT domain functions in support of stable DSB association. PMID:25457772

  17. Yeast DNA ligase IV mutations reveal a nonhomologous end joining function of BRCT1 distinct from XRCC4/Lif1 binding.

    PubMed

    Chiruvella, Kishore K; Renard, Brian M; Birkeland, Shanda R; Sunder, Sham; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    LIG4/Dnl4 is the DNA ligase that (re)joins DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), an activity supported by binding of its tandem BRCT domains to the ligase accessory protein XRCC4/Lif1. We screened a panel of 88 distinct ligase mutants to explore the structure–function relationships of the yeast Dnl4 BRCT domains and inter-BRCT linker in NHEJ. Screen results suggested two distinct classes of BRCT mutations with differential effects on Lif1 interaction as compared to NHEJ completion. Validated constructs confirmed that D800K and GG(868:869)AA mutations, which target the Lif1 binding interface, showed a severely defective Dnl4–Lif1 interaction but a less consistent and often small decrease in NHEJ activity in some assays, as well as nearly normal levels of Dnl4 accumulation at DSBs. In contrast, mutants K742A and KTT(742:744)ATA, which target the β3-α2 region of the first BRCT domain, substantially decreased NHEJ function commensurate with a large defect in Dnl4 recruitment to DSBs, despite a comparatively greater preservation of the Lif1 interaction. Together, these separation-of-function mutants indicate that Dnl4 BRCT1 supports DSB recruitment and NHEJ in a manner distinct from Lif1 binding and reveal a complexity of Dnl4 BRCT domain functions in support of stable DSB association.

  18. Use of a ring chromosome and pulsed-field gels to study interhomolog recombination, double-strand DNA breaks and sister-chromatid exchange in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Game, J.C. ); Sitney, K.C.; Cook, V.E.; Mortimer, R.K. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors describe a system that uses pulsed-field gels for the physical detection of recombinant DNA molecules, double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) and sister-chromatid exchange in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The system makes use of a circular variant of chromosome II (Chr. III). Meiotic recombination between this ring chromosome and a linear homolog produces new molecules of sizes distinguishable on gels from either parental molecule. They demonstrate that these recombinant molecules are not present either in strains with two linear Chr. III molecules or in rad50 mutants, which are defective in meiotic recombination. In conjunction with the molecular endpoints. They present data on the timing of commitment to meiotic recombination scored genetically. They have used x-rays to linearize circular Chr. III, both to develop a sensitive method for measuring frequency of DSB and as a means of detecting double-size circles originating in part from sister-chromatid exchange, which they find to be frequent during meiosis.

  19. Expression of tetanus toxin fragment C in yeast: gene synthesis is required to eliminate fortuitous polyadenylation sites in AT-rich DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Romanos, M A; Makoff, A J; Fairweather, N F; Beesley, K M; Slater, D E; Rayment, F B; Payne, M M; Clare, J J

    1991-01-01

    Fragment C is a non-toxic 50 kDa fragment of tetanus toxin which is a candidate subunit vaccine against tetanus. The AT-rich Clostridium tetani DNA encoding fragment C could not be expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the presence of several fortuitous polyadenylation sites which gave rise to truncated mRNAs. The polyadenylation sites were eliminated by chemically synthesising the DNA with increased GC-content (from 29% to 47%). Synthesis of the entire gene (1400 base pairs) was necessary to generate full-length transcripts and for protein production in yeast. Using a GAL1 promoter vector, fragment C was expressed to 2-3% of soluble cell protein. Fragment C could also be secreted using the alpha-factor leader peptide as a secretion signal. The protein was present at 5-10 mg/l in the culture medium in two forms: a high molecular mass hyper-glycosylated protein (75-200 kDa) and a core-glycosylated protein (65 kDa). Intracellular fragment C was as effective in vaccinating mice against tetanus authentic fragment C. The glycosylated material was inactive, though it was rendered fully active by de-glycosylation. Images PMID:2027754

  20. Rad51-dependent DNA structures accumulate at damaged replication forks in sgs1 mutants defective in the yeast ortholog of BLM RecQ helicase.

    PubMed

    Liberi, Giordano; Maffioletti, Giulio; Lucca, Chiara; Chiolo, Irene; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Cotta-Ramusino, Cecilia; Lopes, Massimo; Pellicioli, Achille; Haber, James E; Foiani, Marco

    2005-02-01

    S-phase cells overcome chromosome lesions through replication-coupled recombination processes that seem to be assisted by recombination-dependent DNA structures and/or replication-related sister chromatid junctions. RecQ helicases, including yeast Sgs1 and human BLM, have been implicated in both replication and recombination and protect genome integrity by preventing unscheduled mitotic recombination events. We have studied the RecQ helicase-mediated mechanisms controlling genome stability by analyzing replication forks encountering a damaged template in sgs1 cells. We show that, in sgs1 mutants, recombination-dependent cruciform structures accumulate at damaged forks. Their accumulation requires Rad51 protein, is counteracted by Srs2 DNA helicase, and does not prevent fork movement. Sgs1, but not Srs2, promotes resolution of these recombination intermediates. A functional Rad53 checkpoint kinase that is known to protect the integrity of the sister chromatid junctions is required for the accumulation of recombination intermediates in sgs1 mutants. Finally, top3 and top3 sgs1 mutants accumulate the same structures as sgs1 cells. We suggest that, in sgs1 cells, the unscheduled accumulation of Rad51-dependent cruciform structures at damaged forks result from defective maturation of recombination-dependent intermediates that originate from the replication-related sister chromatid junctions. Our findings might contribute to explaining some of the recombination defects of BLM cells.

  1. N-Termini of Fungal CSL Transcription Factors Are Disordered, Enriched in Regulatory Motifs and Inhibit DNA Binding in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Atkinson, Sophie R.; Ptáčková, Martina; McLean, Janel R.; Gould, Kathleen; Folk, Petr; Půta, František; Bähler, Jürg

    2011-01-01

    Background CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) transcription factors are the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway, which is critical for metazoan development. The metazoan CSL proteins (class M) can also function in a Notch-independent manner. Recently, two novel classes of CSL proteins, designated F1 and F2, have been identified in fungi. The role of the fungal CSL proteins is unclear, because the Notch pathway is not present in fungi. In fission yeast, the Cbf11 and Cbf12 CSL paralogs play antagonistic roles in cell adhesion and the coordination of cell and nuclear division. Unusually long N-terminal extensions are typical for fungal and invertebrate CSL family members. In this study, we investigate the functional significance of these extended N-termini of CSL proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings We identify 15 novel CSL family members from 7 fungal species and conduct bioinformatic analyses of a combined dataset containing 34 fungal and 11 metazoan CSL protein sequences. We show that the long, non-conserved N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins are likely disordered and enriched in phosphorylation sites and PEST motifs. In a case study of Cbf12 (class F2), we provide experimental evidence that the protein is proteolytically processed and that the N-terminus inhibits the Cbf12-dependent DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Conclusions/Significance This study provides insight into the characteristics of the long N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins that may be crucial for controlling DNA-binding and CSL function. We propose that the regulation of DNA binding by Cbf12 via its N-terminal region represents an important means by which fission yeast strikes a balance between the class F1 and class F2 paralog activities. This mode of regulation might be shared with other CSL-positive fungi, some of which are relevant to human disease and biotechnology. PMID:21858190

  2. τ91, an Essential Subunit of Yeast Transcription Factor IIIC, Cooperates with τ138 in DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Arrebola, Rosalía; Manaud, Nathalie; Rozenfeld, Sophie; Marsolier, Marie-Claude; Lefebvre, Olivier; Carles, Christophe; Thuriaux, Pierre; Conesa, Christine; Sentenac, André

    1998-01-01

    Transcription factor IIIC (TFIIIC) (or τ) is a large multisubunit and multifunctional factor required for transcription of all class III genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is responsible for promoter recognition and TFIIIB assembly. We report here the cloning and characterization of TFC6, an essential gene encoding the 91-kDa polypeptide, τ91, present in affinity-purified TFIIIC. τ91 has a predicted molecular mass of 74 kDa. It harbors a central cluster of His and Cys residues and has basic and acidic amino acid regions, but it shows no specific similarity to known proteins or predicted open reading frames. The TFIIIC subunit status of τ91 was established by the following biochemical and genetic evidence. Antibodies to τ91 bound TFIIIC-DNA complexes in gel shift assays; in vivo, a B block-deficient U6 RNA gene (SNR6) harboring GAL4 binding sites was reactivated by fusing the GAL4 DNA binding domain to τ91; and a point mutation in TFC6 (τ91-E330K) was found to suppress the thermosensitive phenotype of a tfc3-G349E mutant affected in the B block binding subunit (τ138). The suppressor mutation alleviated the DNA binding and transcription defects of mutant TFIIIC in vitro. These results indicated that τ91 cooperates with τ138 for DNA binding. Recombinant τ91 by itself did not interact with a tRNA gene, although it showed a strong affinity for single-stranded DNA. PMID:9418847

  3. A unique nucleosome arrangement, maintained actively by chromatin remodelers facilitates transcription of yeast tRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yatendra; Bhargava, Purnima

    2013-06-17

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcribes a unique class of genes with intra-genic promoters and high transcriptional activity. The major contributors to the pol III transcriptome, tRNAs genes are found scattered on all chromosomes of yeast. A prototype tDNA of <150 bp length, is generally considered nucleosome-free while some pol III-transcribed genes have been shown to have nucleosome-positioning properties. Using high resolution ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq methods, we found several unique features associated with nucleosome profiles on all tRNA genes of budding yeast, not seen on nucleosome-dense counterparts in fission yeast and resting human CD4+ T cells. The nucleosome-free region (NFR) on all but three yeast tDNAs is found bordered by an upstream (US) nucleosome strongly positioned at -140 bp position and a downstream (DS) nucleosome at variable positions with respect to the gene terminator. Perturbation in this nucleosomal arrangement interferes with the tRNA production. Three different chromatin remodelers generate and maintain the NFR by targeting different gene regions. Isw1 localizes to the gene body and makes it nucleosome-depleted, Isw2 maintains periodicity in the upstream nucleosomal array, while RSC targets the downstream nucleosome. Direct communication of pol III with RSC serves as a stress-sensory mechanism for these genes. In its absence, the downstream nucleosome moves towards the gene terminator. Levels of tRNAs from different families are found to vary considerably as different pol III levels are seen even on isogenes within a family. Pol III levels show negative correlation with the nucleosome occupancies on different genes. Budding yeast tRNA genes maintain an open chromatin structure, which is not due to sequence-directed nucleosome positioning or high transcription activity of genes. Unlike 5' NFR on pol II-transcribed genes, the tDNA NFR, which facilitates tDNA transcription, results from action of chromatin remodeler Isw1, aided by Isw2 and RSC

  4. QTL mapping with near-isogenic lines in maize.

    PubMed

    Szalma, S J; Hostert, B M; Ledeaux, J R; Stuber, C W; Holland, J B

    2007-05-01

    A set of 89 near-isogenic lines (NILs) of maize was created using marker-assisted selection. Nineteen genomic regions, identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism loci and chosen to represent portions of all ten maize chromosomes, were introgressed by backcrossing three generations from donor line Tx303 into the B73 genetic background. NILs were genotyped at an additional 128 simple sequence repeat loci to estimate the size of introgressions and the amount of background introgression. Tx303 introgressions ranged in size from 10 to 150 cM, with an average of 60 cM. Across all NILs, 89% of the Tx303 genome is represented in targeted and background introgressions. The average proportion of background introgression was 2.5% (range 0-15%), significantly lower than the expected value of 9.4% for third backcross generation lines developed without marker-assisted selection. The NILs were grown in replicated field evaluations in two years to map QTLs for flowering time traits. A parallel experiment of testcrosses of each NIL to the unrelated inbred, Mo17, was conducted in the same environments to map QTLs in NIL testcross hybrids. QTLs affecting days to anthesis, days to silking, and anthesis-silk interval were detected in both inbreds and hybrids in both environments. The testing environments differed dramatically for drought stress, and different sets of QTLs were detected across environments. Furthermore, QTLs detected in inbreds were typically different from QTLs detected in hybrids, demonstrating the genetic complexity of flowering time. NILs can serve as a valuable genetic mapping resource for maize breeders and geneticists.

  5. Replication Past the γ-Radiation-Induced Guanine-Thymine Cross-Link G[8,5-Me]T by Human and Yeast DNA Polymerase η

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhury, Paromita; Basu, Ashis K.

    2010-01-01

    γ-Radiation-induced intrastrand guanine-thymine cross-link, G[8,5-Me]T, hinders replication in vitro and is mutagenic in mammalian cells. Herein we report in vitro translesion synthesis of G[8,5-Me]T by human and yeast DNA polymerase η (hPol η and yPol η). dAMP misincorporation opposite the cross-linked G by yPol η was preferred over correct incorporation of dCMP, but further extension was 100-fold less efficient for G∗:A compared to G∗:C. For hPol η, both incorporation and extension were more efficient with the correct nucleotides. To evaluate translesion synthesis in the presence of all four dNTPs, we have developed a plasmid-based DNA sequencing assay, which showed that yPol η was more error-prone. Mutational frequencies of yPol η and hPol η were 36% and 14%, respectively. Targeted G → T was the dominant mutation by both DNA polymerases. But yPol η induced targeted G → T in 23% frequency relative to 4% by hPol η. For yPol η, targeted G → T and G → C constituted 83% of the mutations. By contrast, with hPol η, semi-targeted mutations (7.2%), that is, mutations at bases near the lesion, occurred at equal frequency as the targeted mutations (6.9%). The kind of mutations detected with hPol η showed significant similarities with the mutational spectrum of G[8,5-Me]T in human embryonic kidney cells. PMID:20936176

  6. Differential suppression of DNA repair deficiencies of Yeast rad50, mre11 and xrs2 mutants by EXO1 and TLC1 (the RNA component of telomerase).

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, L Kevin; Karthikeyan, G; Westmoreland, James W; Resnick, Michael A

    2002-01-01

    Rad50, Mre11, and Xrs2 form a nuclease complex that functions in both nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). A search for highly expressed cDNAs that suppress the DNA repair deficiency of rad50 mutants yielded multiple isolates of two genes: EXO1 and TLC1. Overexpression of EXO1 or TLC1 increased the resistance of rad50, mre11, and xrs2 mutants to ionizing radiation and MMS, but did not increase resistance in strains defective in recombination (rad51, rad52, rad54, rad59) or NHEJ only (yku70, sir4). Increased Exo1 or TLC1 RNA did not alter checkpoint responses or restore NHEJ proficiency, but DNA repair defects of yku70 and rad27 (fen) mutants were differentially suppressed by the two genes. Overexpression of Exo1, but not mutant proteins containing substitutions in the conserved nuclease domain, increased recombination and suppressed HO and EcoRI endonuclease-induced killing of rad50 strains. exo1 rad50 mutants lacking both nuclease activities exhibited a high proportion of enlarged, G2-arrested cells and displayed a synergistic decrease in DSB-induced plasmid:chromosome recombination. These results support a model in which the nuclease activity of the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is required for recombinational repair, but not NHEJ. We suggest that the 5'-3' exo activity of Exo1 is able to substitute for Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 in rescission of specific classes of DSB end structures. Gene-specific suppression by TLC1, which encodes the RNA subunit of the yeast telomerase complex, demonstrates that components of telomerase can also impact on DSB repair pathways. PMID:11805044

  7. Comparison of DNA extraction methods used to detect bacterial and yeast DNA from spiked whole blood by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Morello, Luis G; Conte, Danieli; Pereira, Luciane A; Palmeiro, Jussara K; Ambrosio, Altair; Cardozo, Dayane; Krieger, Marco A; Raboni, Sonia M

    2017-09-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide and its diagnosis remains a challenge. Blood culturing is the gold standard technique for blood stream infection (BSI) identification. Molecular tests to detect pathogens in whole blood enable early use of antimicrobials and affect clinical outcomes. Here, using real-time PCR, we evaluated DNA extraction using seven manual and three automated commercially available systems with whole blood samples artificially contaminated with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans, microorganisms commonly associated with BSI. Overall, the commercial kits evaluated presented several technical limitations including long turnaround time and low DNA yield and purity. The performance of the kits was comparable for detection of high microorganism loads (10(6)CFU/mL). However, the detection of lower concentrations was variable, despite the addition of pre-processing treatment to kits without such steps. Of the evaluated kits, the UMD-Universal CE IVD kit generated a higher quantity of DNA with greater nucleic acid purity and afforded the detection of the lowest microbial load in the samples. The inclusion of pre-processing steps with the kit seems to be critical for the detection of microorganism DNA directly from whole blood. In conclusion, future application of molecular techniques will require overcoming major challenges such as the detection of low levels of microorganism nucleic acids amidst the large quantity of human DNA present in samples or differences in the cellular structures of etiological agents that can also prevent high-quality DNA yields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Centromeric chromatin in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Janet F

    2008-05-01

    A fundamental requirement for life is the ability of cells to divide properly and to pass on to their daughters a full complement of genetic material. The centromere of the chromosome is essential for this process, as it provides the DNA sequences on which the kinetochore (the proteinaceous structure that links centromeric DNA to the spindle microtubules) assembles to allow segregation of the chromosomes during mitosis. It has long been recognized that kinetochore assembly is subject to epigenetic control, and deciphering how centromeres promote faithful chromosome segregation provides a fascinating intellectual challenge. This challenge is made more difficult by the scale and complexity of DNA sequences in metazoan centromeres, thus much research has focused on dissecting centromere function in the single celled eukaryotic yeasts. Interestingly, in spite of similarities in the genome size of budding and fission yeasts, they seem to have adopted some striking differences in their strategy for passing on their chromosomes. Budding yeast have "point" centromeres, where a 125 base sequence is sufficient for mitotic propagation, whereas fission yeast centromeres are more reminiscent of the large repetitive centromeres of metazoans. In addition, the centromeric heterochromatin which coats centromeric domains of fission yeast and metazoan centromeres and is critical for their function, is largely absent from budding yeast centromeres. This review focuses on the assembly and maintenance of centromeric chromatin in the fission yeast.

  9. Uniparental Inheritance of Mitochondrial Genes in Yeast: Dependence on Input Bias of Mitochondrial DNA and Preliminary Investigations of the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Birky, C. William; Demko, Catherine A.; Perlman, Philip S.; Strausberg, Robert

    1978-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, previous studies on the inheritance of mitochondrial genes controlling antibiotic resistance have shown that some crosses produce a substantial number of uniparental zygotes , which transmit to their diploid progeny mitochondrial alleles from only one parent. In this paper, we show that uniparental zygotes are formed especially when one parent (majority parent) contributes substantially more mitochondrial DNA molecules to the zygote than does the other (minority) parent. Cellular contents of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are increased in these experiments by treatment with cycloheximide, alpha-factor, or the uvsρ5 nuclear mutation. In such a biased cross, some zygotes are uniparental for mitochondrial alleles from the majority parent, and the frequency of such zygotes increases with increasing bias. In two- and three-factor crosses, the cap1, ery1, and oli1 loci behave coordinately, rather than independently; minority markers tend to be transmitted or lost as a unit, suggesting that the uniparental mechanism acts on entire mtDNA molecules rather than on individual loci. This rules out the possibility that uniparental inheritance can be explained by the conversion of minority markers to the majority alleles during recombination. Exceptions to the coordinate behavior of different loci can be explained by marker rescue via recombination. Uniparental inheritance is largely independent of the position of buds on the zygote. We conclude that it is due to the failure of minority markers to replicate in some zygotes, possibly involving the rapid enzymatic destruction of such markers. We have considered two general classes of mechanisms: (1) random selection of molecules for replication, as for example by competition for replicating sites on a membrane; and (2) differential marking of mtDNA molecules in the two parents, possibly by modification enzymes, followed by a mechanism that "counts" molecules and replicates only the majority type. These

  10. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous human ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    van Duin, M; van Den Tol, J; Hoeijmakers, J H; Bootsma, D; Rupp, I P; Reynolds, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1989-01-01

    We report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is the first example in human cells), our findings indicate that antisense transcription in the ERCC-1-RAD10 gene regions represents an evolutionarily conserved feature. Images PMID:2471070

  11. The structure and DNA-binding properties of Mgm101 from a yeast with a linear mitochondrial genome

    PubMed Central

    Pevala, Vladimír; Truban, Dominika; Bauer, Jacob A.; Košťan, Július; Kunová, Nina; Bellová, Jana; Brandstetter, Marlene; Marini, Victoria; Krejčí, Lumír; Tomáška, Ľubomír; Nosek, Jozef; Kutejová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    To study the mechanisms involved in the maintenance of a linear mitochondrial genome we investigated the biochemical properties of the recombination protein Mgm101 from Candida parapsilosis. We show that CpMgm101 complements defects associated with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mgm101–1ts mutation and that it is present in both the nucleus and mitochondrial nucleoids of C. parapsilosis. Unlike its S. cerevisiae counterpart, CpMgm101 is associated with the entire nucleoid population and is able to bind to a broad range of DNA substrates in a non-sequence specific manner. CpMgm101 is also able to catalyze strand annealing and D-loop formation. CpMgm101 forms a roughly C-shaped trimer in solution according to SAXS. Electron microscopy of a complex of CpMgm101 with a model mitochondrial telomere revealed homogeneous, ring-shaped structures at the telomeric single-stranded overhangs. The DNA-binding properties of CpMgm101, together with its DNA recombination properties, suggest that it can play a number of possible roles in the replication of the mitochondrial genome and the maintenance of its telomeres. PMID:26743001

  12. Mutations in the yeast SRB2 general transcription factor suppress hpr1-induced recombination and show defects in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Piruat, J I; Aguilera, A

    1996-08-01

    We have obtained genetic and molecular evidence that the hrs2-1 mutation, isolated as a suppressor of the hyperrecombination phenotype of hpr1 delta, is in the SRB2 gene, which encodes a component of the RNA polII holoenzyme. A newly constructed srb2 delta allele restores the wild-type levels of deletions in hpr1 delta cells, indicating that the lack of a functional SRB2 transcription factor suppresses recombination between direct repeats. These results suggest a direct connection between transcription and recombination between DNA repeats. On the other hand, the hrs2-1 mutation (renamed srb2-101), in which Gly150 has been changed to Asp, makes cells sensitive to long MMS treatments, a phenotype observed for the srb2 delta null allele only in a hpr1 delta background. This indicates that mutations in the basal transcription factor SRB2 impair DNA repair of MMS-induced damage, which adds a new connection between transcription and DNA repair. We discuss the possibility that hpr1-induced deletions occurred as a consequence of a SRB2-dependent stalled or blocked transcription complex.

  13. Mutations in the Yeast Srb2 General Transcription Factor Suppress Hpr1-Induced Recombination and Show Defects in DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Piruat, J. L.; Aguilera, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have obtained genetic and molecular evidence that the hrs2-1 mutation, isolated as a suppressor of the hyperrecombination phenotype of hpr1Δ, is in the SRB2 gene, which encodes a component of the RNA polII holoenzyme. A newly constructed srb2Δ allele restores the wild-type levels of deletions in hpr1Δ cells, indicating that the lack of a functional SRB2 transcription factor suppresses recombination between direct repeats. These results suggest a direct connection between transcription and recombination between DNA repeats. On the other hand, the hrs2-1 mutation (renamed srb2-101), in which Gly(150) has been changed to Asp, makes cells sensitive to long MMS treatments, a phenotype observed for the srb2Δ null allele only in a hpr1Δ background. This indicates that mutations in the basal transcription factor SRB2 impair DNA repair of MMS-induced damage, which adds a new connection between transcription and DNA repair. We discuss the possibility that hpr1-induced deletions occurred as a consequence of a SRB2-dependent stalled or blocked transcription complex. PMID:8844143

  14. Combined analysis of transcriptome and metabolite data reveals extensive differences between black and brown nearly-isogenic soybean (Glycine max) seed coats enabling the identification of pigment isogenes.

    PubMed

    Kovinich, Nik; Saleem, Ammar; Arnason, John T; Miki, Brian

    2011-07-29

    The R locus controls the color of pigmented soybean (Glycine max) seeds. However information about its control over seed coat biochemistry and gene expressions remains limited. The seed coats of nearly-isogenic black (iRT) and brown (irT) soybean (Glycine max) were known to differ by the presence or absence of anthocyanins, respectively, with genes for only a single enzyme (anthocyanidin synthase) found to be differentially expressed between isolines. We recently identified and characterized a UDP-glycose:flavonoid-3-O-glycosyltransferase (UGT78K1) from the seed coat of black (iRT) soybean with the aim to engineer seed coat color by suppression of an anthocyanin-specific gene. However, it remained to be investigated whether UGT78K1 was overexpressed with anthocyanin biosynthesis in the black (iRT) seed coat compared to the nearly-isogenic brown (irT) tissue.In this study, we performed a combined analysis of transcriptome and metabolite data to elucidate the control of the R locus over seed coat biochemistry and to identify pigment biosynthesis genes. Two differentially expressed late-stage anthocyanin biosynthesis isogenes were further characterized, as they may serve as useful targets for the manipulation of soybean grain color while minimizing the potential for unintended effects on the plant system. Metabolite composition differences were found to not be limited to anthocyanins, with specific proanthocyanidins, isoflavones, and phenylpropanoids present exclusively in the black (iRT) or the brown (irT) seed coat. A global analysis of gene expressions identified UGT78K1 and 19 other anthocyanin, (iso)flavonoid, and phenylpropanoid isogenes to be differentially expressed between isolines. A combined analysis of metabolite and gene expression data enabled the assignment of putative functions to biosynthesis and transport isogenes. The recombinant enzymes of two genes were validated to catalyze late-stage steps in anthocyanin biosynthesis in vitro and expression

  15. Brief Report: Isogenic Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines From an Adult With Mosaic Down Syndrome Model Accelerated Neuronal Ageing and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Aoife; Letourneau, Audrey; Canzonetta, Claudia; Stathaki, Elisavet; Gimelli, Stefania; Sloan‐Bena, Frederique; Abrehart, Robert; Goh, Pollyanna; Lim, Shuhui; Baldo, Chiara; Dagna‐Bricarelli, Franca; Hannan, Saad; Mortensen, Martin; Ballard, David; Syndercombe Court, Denise; Fusaki, Noemi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Smart, Trevor G.; Bishop, Cleo; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Trisomy 21 (T21), Down Syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of dementia and intellectual disability. Modeling DS is beginning to yield pharmaceutical therapeutic interventions for amelioration of intellectual disability, which are currently being tested in clinical trials. DS is also a unique genetic system for investigation of pathological and protective mechanisms for accelerated ageing, neurodegeneration, dementia, cancer, and other important common diseases. New drugs could be identified and disease mechanisms better understood by establishment of well‐controlled cell model systems. We have developed a first nonintegration‐reprogrammed isogenic human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of DS by reprogramming the skin fibroblasts from an adult individual with constitutional mosaicism for DS and separately cloning multiple isogenic T21 and euploid (D21) iPSC lines. Our model shows a very low number of reprogramming rearrangements as assessed by a high‐resolution whole genome CGH‐array hybridization, and it reproduces several cellular pathologies seen in primary human DS cells, as assessed by automated high‐content microscopic analysis. Early differentiation shows an imbalance of the lineage‐specific stem/progenitor cell compartments: T21 causes slower proliferation of neural and faster expansion of hematopoietic lineage. T21 iPSC‐derived neurons show increased production of amyloid peptide‐containing material, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and an increased number and abnormal appearance of mitochondria. Finally, T21‐derived neurons show significantly higher number of DNA double‐strand breaks than isogenic D21 controls. Our fully isogenic system therefore opens possibilities for modeling mechanisms of developmental, accelerated ageing, and neurodegenerative pathologies caused by T21. Stem Cells 2015;33:2077–2084 PMID:25694335

  16. ATP utilization by yeast replication factor C. IV. RFC ATP-binding mutants show defects in DNA replication, DNA repair, and checkpoint regulation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S L; Pautz, A L; Burgers, P M

    2001-09-14

    Replication factor C is required to load proliferating cell nuclear antigen onto primer-template junctions, using the energy of ATP hydrolysis. Four of the five RFC genes have consensus ATP-binding motifs. To determine the relative importance of these sites for proper DNA metabolism in the cell, the conserved lysine in the Walker A motif of RFC1, RFC2, RFC3, or RFC4 was mutated to either arginine or glutamic acid. Arginine mutations in all RFC genes tested permitted cell growth, although poor growth was observed for rfc2-K71R. A glutamic acid substitution resulted in lethality in RFC2 and RFC3 but not in RFC1 or RFC4. Most double mutants combining mutations in two RFC genes were inviable. Except for the rfc1-K359R and rfc4-K55E mutants, which were phenotypically similar to wild type in every assay, the mutants were sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. The rfc2-K71R and rfc4-K55R mutants show checkpoint defects, most likely in the intra-S phase checkpoint. Regulation of the damage-inducible RNR3 promoter was impaired in these mutants, and phosphorylation of Rad53p in response to DNA damage was specifically defective when cells were in S phase. No dramatic defects in telomere length regulation were detected in the mutants. These data demonstrate that the ATP binding function of RFC2 is important for both DNA replication and checkpoint function and, for the first time, that RFC4 also plays a role in checkpoint regulation.

  17. Identification of three signaling molecules required for calcineurin-dependent monopolar growth induced by the DNA replication checkpoint in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kazunori; Hashimoto, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Masashi; Mizunuma, Masaki; Toda, Takashi; Hirata, Dai

    2017-09-30

    Cell polarity is coordinately regulated with the cell cycle. Growth polarity of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe transits from monopolar to bipolar during G2 phase, termed NETO (new end take off). Upon perturbation of DNA replication, the checkpoint kinase Cds1/CHK2 induces NETO delay through activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CN). CN in turn regulates its downstream targets including the microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking CLIP170 homologue Tip1 and the Casein kinase 1γ Cki3. However, whether and which Ca(2+) signaling molecules are involved in the NETO delay remains elusive. Here we show that 3 genes (trp1322, vcx1 and SPAC6c3.06c encoding TRP channel, antiporter and P-type ATPase, respectively) play vital roles in the NETO delay. Upon perturbation of DNA replication, these 3 genes are required for not only the NETO delay but also for the maintenance of cell viability. Trp1322 and Vcx1 act downstream of Cds1 and upstream of CN for the NETO delay, whereas SPAC6c3.06c acts downstream of CN. Consistently, Trp1322 and Vcx1, but not SPAC6c3.06c, are essential for activation of CN. Interestingly, we have found that elevated extracellular Ca(2+) per se induces a NETO delay, which depends on CN and its downstream target genes. These findings imply that Ca(2+)-CN signaling plays a central role in cell polarity control by checkpoint activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular cloning of a cytochrome P450 taxane 10β-hydroxylase cDNA from Taxus and functional expression in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Schoendorf, Anne; Rithner, Christopher D.; Williams, Robert M.; Croteau, Rodney B.

    2001-01-01

    The early steps in the biosynthesis of Taxol involve the cyclization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to taxa-4(5),11(12)-diene followed by cytochrome P450-mediated hydroxylation at C5, acetylation of this intermediate, and a second cytochrome P450-dependent hydroxylation at C10 to yield taxadien-5α-acetoxy-10β-ol. Subsequent steps of the pathway involve additional cytochrome P450 catalyzed oxygenations and CoA-dependent acylations. The limited feasibility of reverse genetic cloning of cytochrome P450 oxygenases led to the use of Taxus cell cultures induced for Taxol production and the development of an approach based on differential display of mRNA-reverse transcription-PCR, which ultimately provided full-length forms of 13 unique but closely related cytochrome P450 sequences. Functional expression of these enzymes in yeast was monitored by in situ spectrophotometry coupled to in vivo screening of oxygenase activity by feeding taxoid substrates. This strategy yielded a family of taxoid-metabolizing enzymes and revealed the taxane 10β-hydroxylase as a 1494-bp cDNA that encodes a 498-residue cytochrome P450 capable of transforming taxadienyl acetate to the 10β-hydroxy derivative; the identity of this latter pathway intermediate was confirmed by chromatographic and spectrometric means. The 10β-hydroxylase represents the initial cytochrome P450 gene of Taxol biosynthesis to be isolated by an approach that should provide access to the remaining oxygenases of the pathway. PMID:11171980

  19. Structural bases of dimerization of yeast telomere protein Cdc13 and its interaction with the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase [alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jia; Yang, Yuting; Wan, Ke; Mao, Ninghui; Yu, Tai-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Chien; DeZwaan, Diane C.; Freeman, Brian C.; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lue, Neal F.; Lei, Ming

    2011-08-24

    Budding yeast Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 (CST) complex plays an essential role in telomere protection and maintenance, and has been proposed to be a telomere-specific replication protein A (RPA)-like complex. Previous genetic and structural studies revealed a close resemblance between Stn1-Ten1 and RPA32-RPA14. However, the relationship between Cdc13 and RPA70, the largest subunit of RPA, has remained unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold of Cdc13. Although Cdc13 has an RPA70-like domain organization, the structures of Cdc13 OB folds are significantly different from their counterparts in RPA70, suggesting that they have distinct evolutionary origins. Furthermore, our structural and biochemical analyses revealed unexpected dimerization by the N-terminal OB fold and showed that homodimerization is probably a conserved feature of all Cdc13 proteins. We also uncovered the structural basis of the interaction between the Cdc13 N-terminal OB fold and the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase {alpha} (Pol1), and demonstrated a role for Cdc13 dimerization in Pol1 binding. Analysis of the phenotypes of mutants defective in Cdc13 dimerization and Cdc13-Pol1 interaction revealed multiple mechanisms by which dimerization regulates telomere lengths in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms and evolution of Cdc13.

  20. Direct screening for chromatin status on DNA barcodes in yeast delineates the regulome of H3K79 methylation by Dot1

    PubMed Central

    Vlaming, Hanneke; Molenaar, Thom M; van Welsem, Tibor; Poramba-Liyanage, Deepani W; Smith, Desiree E; Velds, Arno; Hoekman, Liesbeth; Korthout, Tessy; Hendriks, Sjoerd; Maarten Altelaar, AF; van Leeuwen, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Given the frequent misregulation of chromatin in cancer, it is important to understand the cellular mechanisms that regulate chromatin structure. However, systematic screening for epigenetic regulators is challenging and often relies on laborious assays or indirect reporter read-outs. Here we describe a strategy, Epi-ID, to directly assess chromatin status in thousands of mutants. In Epi-ID, chromatin status on DNA barcodes is interrogated by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing, allowing for quantitative comparison of many mutants in parallel. Screening of a barcoded yeast knock-out collection for regulators of histone H3K79 methylation by Dot1 identified all known regulators as well as novel players and processes. These include histone deposition, homologous recombination, and adenosine kinase, which influences the methionine cycle. Gcn5, the acetyltransferase within the SAGA complex, was found to regulate histone methylation and H2B ubiquitination. The concept of Epi-ID is widely applicable and can be readily applied to other chromatin features. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18919.001 PMID:27922451

  1. Functional screening of a cDNA library from the desiccation-tolerant plant Selaginella lepidophylla in yeast mutants identifies trehalose biosynthesis genes of plant and microbial origin.

    PubMed

    Pampurova, Suzana; Verschooten, Katrien; Avonce, Nelson; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide that accumulates to large quantities in microbial cells, but in plants it is generally present in very low, barely-detectible levels. A notable exception is the desiccation-tolerant plant Selaginella lepidophylla, which accumulates very high levels of trehalose in both the hydrated and dehydrated state. As trehalose is known to protect membranes, proteins, and whole cells against dehydration stress, we have been interested in the characterization of the trehalose biosynthesis enzymes of S. lepidophylla; they could assist in engineering crop plants towards better stress tolerance. We previously isolated and characterized trehalose-6-phosphate synthases from Arabidopsis thaliana (desiccation sensitive) and S. lepidophylla (desiccation tolerant) and found that they had similar enzymatic characteristics. In this paper, we describe the isolation and characterization of trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from S. lepidophylla and show that its catalytic activities are also similar to those of its homolog in A. thaliana. Screening of an S. lepidophylla cDNA library using yeast trehalose biosynthesis mutants resulted in the isolation of a large number of trehalose biosynthesis genes that were of microbial rather than plant origin. Thus, we suggest that the high trehalose levels observed in S. lepidophylla are not the product of the plant but that of endophytes, which are known to be present in this plant. Additionally, the high trehalose levels in S. lepidophylla are unlikely to account for its desiccation tolerance, because its drought-stress-sensitive relative, S. moellendorffii, also accumulated high levels of trehalose.

  2. A Functional Interface at the rDNA Connects rRNA Synthesis, Pre-rRNA Processing and Nucleolar Surveillance in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Leporé, Nathalie; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2011-01-01

    Ribogenesis is a multistep error-prone process that is actively monitored by quality control mechanisms. How ribosomal RNA synthesis, pre-rRNA processing and nucleolar surveillance are integrated is unclear. Nor is it understood how defective ribosomes are recognized. We report in budding yeast that, in vivo, the interaction between the transcription elongation factor Spt5 and Rpa190, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase (Pol) I, requires the Spt5 C-terminal region (CTR), a conserved and highly repetitive domain that is reminiscent of the RNA Pol II C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that this sequence is also required for the interaction between Spt5 and Nrd1, an RNA specific binding protein, and an exosome cofactor. Both the Spt4-Spt5, and the Nrd1-Nab3 complexes interact functionally with Rrp6, and colocalize at the rDNA. Mutations in the RNA binding domain of Nrd1, but not in its RNA Pol II CTD-interacting domain, and mutations in the RRM of Nab3 led to the accumulation of normal and aberrant polyadenylated pre-rRNAs. Altogether these results indicate that Nrd1-Nab3 contributes to recruiting the nucleolar surveillance to elongating polymerases to survey nascent rRNA transcripts. PMID:21949810

  3. Improved production of fatty acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through screening a cDNA library from the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Ji, Haichuan; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Biological production of fatty acid (FA)-derived products has gained increasing attention to replace petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. FA biosynthesis is highly regulated, and usually it is challenging to design rational engineering strategies. In addition, the conventional 'one sample at a time' method for lipid determination is time consuming and laborious, and it is difficult to screen large numbers of samples. Here, a method for detecting free FAs in viable cells using Nile red staining was developed for use in large-scale screening. Following optimization of the method, it was used for screening a cDNA library from the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for identification of genes/enzymes that were able to enhance free FA accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several novel enzymes resulting in increasing FA accumulation were discovered. These targets include a GPI anchor protein, malate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, FA hydroxylase, farnesyltransferase, anoctamin, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase and phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein. The best enzyme resulted in a 2.5-fold improvement in production of free FAs. Our findings not only provide a novel method for high-throughput evaluation of the content of free FAs, but also give new insight into how enzymes from Y. lipolytica may increase the production of fatty acids in S. cerevisiae. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. [Improvement of thermal adaptability and fermentation of industrial ethanologenic yeast by genomic DNA mutagenesis-based genetic recombination].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuying; He, Xiuping; Lu, Ying; Zhang, Borun

    2011-07-01

    Ethanol is an attractive alternative to fossil fuels. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most important ethanol producer. However, in the process of industrial production of ethanol, both cell growth and fermentation of ethanologenic S. cerevisiae are dramatically affected by environmental stresses, such as thermal stress. In this study, we improved both the thermotolerance and fermentation performance of industrial ethanologenic S. cerevisiae by combined usage of chemical mutagenesis and genomic DNA mutagenesis-based genetic recombination method. The recombinant S. cerevisiae strain T44-2 could grow at 44 degrees C, 3 degrees C higher than that of the original strain CE6. The survival rate of T44-2 was 1.84 and 1.87-fold of that of CE6 when heat shock at 48 degrees C and 52 degrees C for 1 h respectively. At temperature higher than 37 degrees C, recombinant strain T44-2 always gave higher cell growth and ethanol production than those of strain CE6. Meanwhile, from 30 degrees C to 40 degrees C, recombinant strain T44-2 produces 91.2-83.8 g/L of ethanol from 200 g/L of glucose, which indicated that the recombinant strain T44-2 had both thermotolerance and broad thermal adaptability. The work offers a novel method, called genomic DNA mutagenesis-based genetic recombination, to improve the physiological functions of S. cerevisiae.

  5. Nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways in integration mutagenesis in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis.

    PubMed

    Maassen, Nicole; Freese, Stefan; Schruff, Barbara; Passoth, Volkmar; Klinner, Ulrich

    2008-08-01

    Pichia stipitis integrates linear homologous DNA fragments mainly ectopically. High rates of randomly occurring integration allow tagging mutagenesis with high efficiency using simply PCR amplificates of suitable selection markers from the P. stipitis genome. Linearization of an autonomously replicating vector caused a distinct increase of the transformation efficiency compared with the circular molecule. Cotransformation of a restriction endonuclease further enhanced the transformation efficiency. This effect was also observed with integrative vector DNA. In most cases vector integration in chromosomal targets did not depend on microhomologies, indicating that restriction-enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) does not play an essential role in P. stipitis. Small deletions were observed at the ends of the integrated vectors and in the target sites. Disruption of the PsKU80 gene increased the frequency of homologous integration considerably but resulted in a remarkable decrease of the transformation efficiency. These results suggest that in P. stipitis the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway obviously predominates the homologous recombination pathway of double-strand break repair.

  6. The yeast type I topoisomerase Top3 interacts with Sgs1, a DNA helicase homolog: a potential eukaryotic reverse gyrase.

    PubMed Central

    Gangloff, S; McDonald, J P; Bendixen, C; Arthur, L; Rothstein, R

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that cells mutant for TOP3, a gene encoding a prokaryotic-like type I topoisomerase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, display a pleiotropic phenotype including slow growth and genome instability. We identified a mutation, sgs1 (slow growth suppressor), that suppresses both the growth defect and the increased genomic instability of top3 mutants. Here we report the independent isolation of the SGS1 gene in a screen for proteins that interact with Top3. DNA sequence analysis reveals that the putative Sgs1 protein is highly homologous to the helicase encoded by the Escherichia coli recQ gene. These results imply that Sgs1 creates a deleterious topological substrate that Top3 preferentially resolves. The interaction of the Sgs1 helicase homolog and the Top3 topoisomerase is reminiscent of the recently described structure of reverse gyrase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, in which a type I DNA topoisomerase and a helicase-like domain are fused in a single polypeptide. Images PMID:7969174

  7. Amphimeric mitochondrial genomes of petite mutants of yeast. II. A model for the amplification of amphimeric mitochondrial petite DNA.

    PubMed

    Rayko, E; Goursot, R

    1996-07-31

    A model for the recombination-directed replication and amplification of the mtDNA of amphimeric petite mutants of S. cerevisiae is proposed. Replication of an amphimeric master basic unit datA would be initiated in the inverted components a and A. The initiation of replication should be associated with the amphimeric structure of the master basic unit itself, but could be promoted by the presence of ori sequences or of sequences facilitating the initiation of replication in the inverted duplications. The amplification unit of amphimeric genomes is considered to be the double-stranded circular hetero-diamphimer datA-DaTA. Amplification of both diamphimeric strands involves an invasion of the 3' ends of the newly synthesized strands into symmetrical homologous duplex DNA regions promoting the continuation of replication, and leads to the accumulation of two ("flip" and "flop") types of multi-amphimers. We consider that this mode of amplification represents a modified rolling-circle mechanism. By analogy, we propose to call our model of amplification the "rocking-circle model". This model is likely to apply to other genomes organized as amphimeric structures.

  8. Expression of Plant Receptor Kinases in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Barberini, María Laura; Muschietti, Jorge P

    2017-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a useful system to express recombinant proteins and analyze protein-protein interaction. Membrane-spanning proteins like plant receptor kinases find their way to the plasma membrane when expressed in yeast and seem to retain their structure and function. Here, we describe a general yeast DNA transformation procedure based on lithium acetate, salmon sperm DNA, and polyethylene glycol used to express recombinant proteins. Yeast cells expressing plant receptor kinases can be used for in vivo and in vitro studies of receptor function.

  9. Sequence analysis of a 10 kb DNA fragment from yeast chromosome VII reveals a novel member of the DnaJ family.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Belmonte, E; Rodriguez-Torres, A M; Tizon, B; Cadahia, J L; Gonzalez-Siso, I; Ramil, E; Becerra, M; Gonzalez-Dominguez, M; Cerdan, E

    1996-02-01

    We report the sequence analysis of a 10 kb DNA fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VII. This sequence contains four complete open reading frames (ORFs) of greater than 100 amino acids. There are also two incomplete ORFs flanking the extremes: one of these, G2868, is the 5' part of the SCS3 gene (Hosaka et al., 1994). ORFs G2853 and G2856 correspond to the genes CEG1, coding for the alfa subunit of the mRNA guanylyl transferase and a 3' gene of unknown function previously sequenced (Shibagaki et al., 1992). G2864 is identical to SOH1 also reported (Fan and Klein, 1994).

  10. Physical and functional interaction between yeast Pif1 helicase and Rim1 single-stranded DNA binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Ramanagoudr-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Blair, Lauren P.; Tackett, Alan J.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Pif1 helicase plays various roles in the maintenance of nuclear and mitochondrial genome integrity in most eukaryotes. Here, we used a proteomics approach called isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted to identify specific protein complexes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1. We identified a stable association between Pif1 and a mitochondrial SSB, Rim1. In vitro co-precipitation experiments using recombinant proteins indicated a direct interaction between Pif1 and Rim1. Fluorescently labeled Rim1 was titrated with Pif1 resulting in an increase in anisotropy and a Kd value of 0.69 µM. Deletion mutagenesis revealed that the OB-fold domain and the C-terminal tail of Rim1 are both involved in interaction with Pif1. However, a Rim1 C-terminal truncation (Rim1ΔC18) exhibited a nearly 4-fold higher Kd value. Rim1 stimulated Pif1 DNA helicase activity by 4- to 5-fold, whereas Rim1ΔC18 stimulated Pif1 by 2-fold. Hence, two regions of Rim1, the OB-fold domain and the C-terminal domain, interact with Pif1. One of these interactions occurs through the N-terminal domain of Pif1 because a deletion mutant of Pif1 (Pif1ΔN) retained interaction with Rim1 but did not exhibit stimulation of helicase activity. In light of our in vivo and in vitro data, and previous work, it is likely that the Rim1–Pif1 interaction plays a role in coordination of their functions in mtDNA metabolism. PMID:23175612

  11. From yeast genetics to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anna

    2002-01-01

    fermentation biotechnology [6]. Developments in yeast genetics, biochemistry, physiology and process engineering provided bases of rapid development in modern biotechnology, but elaboration of the recombinant DNA technique is far the most important milestone in this field. Other molecular genetic techniques, as molecular genotyping of yeast strains proved also very beneficial in yeast fermentation technologies, because dynamics of both the natural and inoculated yeast biota could be followed by these versatile DNA-based techniques.

  12. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  13. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  14. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologues of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli, Ntg1 and Ntg2, are both required for efficient repair of spontaneous and induced oxidative DNA damage in yeast.

    PubMed

    Alseth, I; Eide, L; Pirovano, M; Rognes, T; Seeberg, E; Bjørås, M

    1999-05-01

    Endonuclease III from Escherichia coli is the prototype of a ubiquitous DNA repair enzyme essential for the removal of oxidized pyrimidine base damage. The yeast genome project has revealed the presence of two genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, NTG1 and NTG2, encoding proteins with similarity to endonuclease III. Both contain the highly conserved helix-hairpin-helix motif, whereas only one (Ntg2) harbors the characteristic iron-sulfur cluster of the endonuclease III family. We have characterized these gene functions by mutant and enzyme analysis as well as by gene expression and intracellular localization studies. Targeted gene disruption of NTG1 and NTG2 produced mutants with greatly increased spontaneous and hydrogen peroxide-induced mutation frequency relative to the wild type, and the mutation response was further increased in the double mutant. Both enzymes were found to remove thymine glycol and 2, 6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-N-methylformamidopyrimidine (faPy) residues from DNA with high efficiency. However, on UV-irradiated DNA, saturating concentrations of Ntg2 removed only half of the cytosine photoproducts released by Ntg1. Conversely, 5-hydroxycytosine was removed efficiently only by Ntg2. The enzymes appear to have different reaction modes, as judged from much higher affinity of Ntg2 for damaged DNA and more efficient borhydride trapping of Ntg1 to abasic sites in DNA despite limited DNA binding. Northern blot and promoter fusion analysis showed that NTG1 is inducible by cell exposure to DNA-damaging agents, whereas NTG2 is constitutively expressed. Ntg2 appears to be a nuclear enzyme, whereas Ntg1 was sorted both to the nucleus and to the mitochondria. We conclude that functions of both NTG1 and NTG2 are important for removal of oxidative DNA damage in yeast.

  15. Homologous DNA exchanges in humans can be explained by the yeast double-strand break repair model: a study of 17p11.2 rearrangements associated with CMT1A and HNPP.

    PubMed

    Lopes, J; Tardieu, S; Silander, K; Blair, I; Vandenberghe, A; Palau, F; Ruberg, M; Brice, A; LeGuern, E

    1999-11-01

    Rearrangements in 17p11.2, responsible for the 1.5 Mb duplications and deletions associated, respectively, with autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A disease (CMT1A) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are a suitable model for studying human recombination. Rearrangements in 17p11.2 are caused by unequal crossing-over between two homologous 24 kb sequences, the CMT1A-REPs, that flank the disease locus and occur in most cases within a 1.7 kb hotspot. We sequenced this hotspot in 28 de novo patients (25 CMT1A and three HNPP), in order to localize precisely, at the DNA sequence level, the crossing-overs. We show that some chimeric CMT1A-REPs in de novo patients (10/28) present conversion of DNA segments associated with the crossing-over. These rearrangements can be explained by the double-strand break (DSB) repair model described in yeast. Fine mapping of the de novo rearrangements provided evidence that the successive steps of this model, heteroduplex DNA formation, mismatch correction and gene conversion, occurred in patients. Furthermore, the model explains 17p11.2 recombinations between chromosome homologues as well as between sister chromatids. In addition, defective mismatch repair of the heteroduplex DNA, observed in two patients, resulted in two heterozygous chimeric CMT1A-REPs which can be explained, as in yeast, by post-meiotic segregation. This work supports the hypothesis that the DSB repair model of DNA exchange may apply universally from yeasts to humans.

  16. Ribosomal DNA sequence polymorphism and the delineation of two ascosporic yeast species: Metschnikowia agaves and Starmerella bombicola.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Marc-André; Wijayanayaka, Tishara M; Bundus, Joanna D; Wijayanayaka, Dilini N

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between mating success and sequence divergence in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)/5.8S-D1/D2 rDNA region was examined in isolates tentatively assigned to Metschnikowia agaves and Starmerella bombicola. Both species are haplontic and heterothallic, such that the formation of mature asci can be used as a measure of genetic compatibility. Parsimony haplotype network analysis and mating success confirmed that all known isolates of M. agaves are conspecific. The previously reported D1/D2 polymorphism of five substitutions was not corroborated; the maximum divergence observed between any two strains was three substitutions, four with ITS. Of 39 putative S. bombicola strains, 36 formed an ITS-D1/D2 haplotype network using the 95% criterion. Thirty-five strains could mate with one or more compatible partner. The excluded strains did not mate. Mature asci arose from crosses between individuals differing by as many as five, but not six or seven substitutions in the D1/D2 domain. All strains capable of mating formed mature asci with at least one partner and all network members could be linked to another member by three or fewer substitutions. These results support the use of sequence divergence as a criterion for species delineation, but caution against describing poorly sampled species solely on the basis of that criterion.

  17. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Patients with Malassezia Folliculitis by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jong Hyun; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2011-01-01

    Background So far, studies on the inter-relationship between Malassezia and Malassezia folliculitis have been rather scarce. Objective We sought to analyze the differences in body sites, gender and age groups, and to determine whether there is a relationship between certain types of Malassezia species and Malassezia folliculitis. Methods Specimens were taken from the forehead, cheek and chest of 60 patients with Malassezia folliculitis and from the normal skin of 60 age- and gender-matched healthy controls by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP. Results M. restricta was dominant in the patients with Malassezia folliculitis (20.6%), while M. globosa was the most common species (26.7%) in the controls. The rate of identification was the highest in the teens for the patient group, whereas it was the highest in the thirties for the control group. M. globosa was the most predominant species on the chest with 13 cases (21.7%), and M. restricta was the most commonly identified species, with 17 (28.3%) and 12 (20%) cases on the forehead and cheek, respectively, for the patient group. Conclusion Statistically significant differences were observed between the patient and control groups for the people in their teens and twenties, and in terms of the body site, on the forehead only. PMID:21747616

  18. Use of a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide to probe the precision of RNA splicing in a yeast mitochondrial petite mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, H F; van der Laan, J; Osinga, K A; Schouten, J P; van Boom, J H; Veeneman, G H

    1981-01-01

    In some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae the mitochondrial gene coding for 21S rRNA is interrupted by an intron of 1143 bp. This intron contains a reading frame for 235 amino acids: Unassigned Reading Frame (URF). In order to check whether expression of this URF is required for proper splicing of precursors to 21S rRNA, the precision of RNA splicing was analysed in a petite mutant, where no mitochondrial protein synthesis is possible anymore. We have devised a new assay to monitor the precision of the splicing event. The method is of general application, provided that the sequence of the splice boundaries is known. In the case of the 21S rRNA it involves the synthesis of the DNA oligonucleotide d(CGATCCCTATTGTC( complementary to the 5' d(CGATCCCTAT) and 3' d(TGTC) borders flanking the intron in the 21S rRNA gene. The oligonucleotide is labelled with 32p at the 5'-end, hybridised to RNA and subsequently subjected to digestion with S1 nuclease. Resistance to digestion will only be observed if the correct splice-junction is made. The petite mutant we have studied contains a 21S rRNA with the same migration behaviour as wildtype 21S rRNA. In RNA blotting experiments, using an intron specific hybridisation probe, the same intermediates in splicing are found both in wild type and petite mutant. Finally the synthetic oligonucleotide hybridises to petite 21S rRNA and its thermal dissociation behaviour is indistinguishable from a hybrid formed with wildtype 21S rRNA. We conclude that expression of the URF, present in the intron of the 21S rRNA gene, is not required for processing and correct splicing of 21S ribosomal precursor RNA. Images PMID:7029466

  19. The conserved Fanconi anemia nuclease Fan1 and the SUMO E3 ligase Pli1 act in two novel Pso2-independent pathways of DNA interstrand crosslink repair in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fontebasso, Y.; Etheridge, T.J.; Oliver, A.W.; Murray, J.M.; Carr, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) represent a physical barrier to the progression of cellular machinery involved in DNA metabolism. Thus, this type of adduct represents a serious threat to genomic stability and as such, several DNA repair pathways have evolved in both higher and lower eukaryotes to identify this type of damage and restore the integrity of the genetic material. Human cells possess a specialized ICL-repair system, the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway. Conversely yeasts rely on the concerted action of several DNA repair systems. Recent work in higher eukaryotes identified and characterized a novel conserved FA component, FAN1 (Fanconi anemia-associated nuclease 1, or FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1). In this study, we characterize Fan1 in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Using standard genetics, we demonstrate that Fan1 is a key component of a previously unidentified ICL-resolution pathway. Using high-throughput synthetic genetic arrays, we also demonstrate the existence of a third pathway of ICL repair, dependent on the SUMO E3 ligase Pli1. Finally, using sequence-threaded homology models, we predict and validate key residues essential for Fan1 activity in ICL repair. PMID:24192486

  20. A yeast gene important for protein assembly into the endoplasmic reticulum and the nucleus has homology to DnaJ, an Escherichia coli heat shock protein

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    When nuclear localization sequences (termed NLS) are placed at the N terminus of cytochrome c1, a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, the resulting hybrid proteins do not assemble into mitochondria when synthesized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells lacking mitochondrial cytochrome c1, but expressing the hybrid NLS-cytochrome c1 proteins, are unable to grow on glycerol since the hybrid proteins are associated primarily with the nucleus. A similar hybrid protein with a mutant NLS is transported to and assembled into the mitochondria. To identify proteins that might be involved in recognition of nuclear localization signals, we isolated conditional- lethal mutants (npl, for nuclear protein localization) that missorted NLS-cytochrome c1 to the mitochondria, allowing growth on glycerol. The gene corresponding to one complementation group (NPL1) encodes a protein with homology to DnaJ, an Escherichia coli heat shock protein. npl1-1 is allelic to sec63, a gene that affects transit of nascent secretory proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum. Rothblatt, J. A., R. J. Deshaies, S. L. Sanders, G. Daum, and R. Schekman. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2641-2652. The npl1 mutants reported here also weakly affect translocation of preprocarboxypeptidaseY across the ER membrane. A normally nuclear hybrid protein containing a NLS fused to invertase and a nucleolar protein are not localized to the nucleus in npl1/sec63 cells at the nonpermissive temperature. Thus, NPL1/SEC63 may act at a very early common step in localization of proteins to the nucleus and the ER. Alternatively, by affecting ER and nuclear envelope assembly, npl1 may indirectly alter assembly of proteins into the nucleus. PMID:2556404

  1. Suppressive-subtractive cDNA analysis indicates that elevated yeast antioxidant gene expression is associated with increased stress tolerance and biocontrol efficacy in the antagonistic yeast, Candida Oleophila

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several yeast species have been used as biocontrol agents against postharvest diseases of fruits and vegetables. The objectives of the current study are to develop a better understanding of the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in relation to viability and biocontrol activity of Candida oleophi...

  2. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  3. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  4. An integrative analysis of reprogramming in human isogenic system identified a clone selection criterion.

    PubMed

    Shutova, Maria V; Surdina, Anastasia V; Ischenko, Dmitry S; Naumov, Vladimir A; Bogomazova, Alexandra N; Vassina, Ekaterina M; Alekseev, Dmitry G; Lagarkova, Maria A; Kiselev, Sergey L

    2016-01-01

    The pluripotency of newly developed human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is usually characterized by physiological parameters; i.e., by their ability to maintain the undifferentiated state and to differentiate into derivatives of the 3 germ layers. Nevertheless, a molecular comparison of physiologically normal iPSCs to the "gold standard" of pluripotency, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), often reveals a set of genes with different expression and/or methylation patterns in iPSCs and ESCs. To evaluate the contribution of the reprogramming process, parental cell type, and fortuity in the signature of human iPSCs, we developed a complete isogenic reprogramming system. We performed a genome-wide comparison of the transcriptome and the methylome of human isogenic ESCs, 3 types of ESC-derived somatic cells (fibroblasts, retinal pigment epithelium and neural cells), and 3 pairs of iPSC lines derived from these somatic cells. Our analysis revealed a high input of stochasticity in the iPSC signature that does not retain specific traces of the parental cell type and reprogramming process. We showed that 5 iPSC clones are sufficient to find with 95% confidence at least one iPSC clone indistinguishable from their hypothetical isogenic ESC line. Additionally, on the basis of a small set of genes that are characteristic of all iPSC lines and isogenic ESCs, we formulated an approach of "the best iPSC line" selection and confirmed it on an independent dataset.

  5. Assessment of genetic variability of fish personality traits using rainbow trout isogenic lines.

    PubMed

    Millot, Sandie; Péan, Samuel; Labbé, Laurent; Kerneis, Thierry; Quillet, Edwige; Dupont-Nivet, Mathilde; Bégout, Marie-Laure

    2014-07-01

    The study of inter-individual variability of personality in fish is a growing field of interest but the genetic basis of this complex trait is still poorly investigated due to the difficulty in controlling fish genetic origin and life history. When available, isogenic lines that allow performing independent tests on different individuals having identical genotype constitute a very relevant experimental material to disentangle the genetic and environmental components of behavioural individuality. We took advantage of heterozygous isogenic lines to investigate the personality in rainbow trout through the analysis of their reactions to different experimental situations. To this end, seven to ten rainbow trout isogenic lines were screened for their spatial exploratory behaviour, their flight response toward a stressor and their risk taking behaviour. Results showed that some lines seemed less sensitive to new events or environmental changes and could be defined as low responsive, while others were very sensitive and defined as high responsive. The use of isogenic lines highlighted the importance of genetic factors, in combination with life history, in the expression of personality in domesticated fish.

  6. Biological properties of two distinct pilus types produced by isogenic variants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae P9.

    PubMed Central

    Lambden, P R; Robertson, J N; Watt, P J

    1980-01-01

    Isogenic variants from a single strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were shown to produce two distinct types of pili. These pili, designated alpha and beta, differed in both subunit molecular weight and in ability to attach to buccal epithelial cells. Images PMID:6101593

  7. Genomic heterogeneity and structural variation in soybean near-isogenic lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Near-isogenic lines (NILs) are a critical genetic resource for the soybean research community. The ability to identify and characterize the genes driving the phenotypic differences between NILs is limited by the degree to which differential genetic introgressions can be resolved. Furthermore, the ...

  8. Construction and characterization of an isogenic urease-negative mutant of Helicobacter mustelae.

    PubMed Central

    Solnick, J V; Josenhans, C; Suerbaum, S; Tompkins, L S; Labigne, A

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter mustelae infects the ferret stomach and provides an opportunity to study pathogenic determinants of a Helicobacter species in its natural host. We constructed an isogenic urease-negative mutant of H. mustelae which produced no detectable urease and showed a reduced acid tolerance. This mutant provides an opportunity to further evaluate the role of urease in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter infection. PMID:7642313

  9. Protein and quality characterization of complete and partial near isogenic lines of waxy wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to evaluate protein composition and its effects on flour quality and physical dough test parameters using waxy wheat near-isogenic lines. Partial waxy (single and double nulls) and waxy (null at all three waxy loci, Wx-A1, Wx-B1, and Wx-D1) lines of N11 set (bread whe...

  10. Registration of isogenic HMW-GS Ax1 protein deficient lines of an elite wheat variety

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A series of isogenic wheat lines deficient in high-molecular weight subunit (HMW-GS) proteins encoded on the A-genome of an elite variety of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed by USDA-ARS at the Western Regional Research Center in Albany, CA. This set of A-genome encoded HMW-GS defi...

  11. Differential composition of culture supernatants from wild-type Brucella abortus and its isogenic virB mutants.

    PubMed

    Delpino, M Victoria; Comerci, Diego J; Wagner, Mary Ann; Eschenbrenner, Michel; Mujer, Cesar V; Ugalde, Rodolfo A; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C; Delvecchio, Vito G

    2009-07-01

    The virB genes coding type IV secretion system are necessary for the intracellular survival and replication of Brucella spp. In this study, extracellular proteins from B. abortus 2308 (wild type, WT) and its isogenic virB10 polar mutant were compared. Culture supernatants harvested in the early stationary phase were concentrated and subjected to 2D electrophoresis. Spots present in the WT strain but absent in the virB10 mutant (differential spots) were considered extracellular proteins released in a virB-related manner, and were identified by MALDI-TOF analysis and matching with Brucella genomes. Among the 11 differential proteins identified, DnaK chaperone (Hsp70), choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH) and a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) were chosen for further investigation because of their homology with extracellular and/or virulence factors from other bacteria. The three proteins were obtained in recombinant form and specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared. By Western blot with these mAbs, the three proteins were detected in supernatants from the WT but not in those from the virB10 polar mutant or from strains carrying non-polar mutations in virB10 or virB11 genes. These results suggest that the expression of virB genes affects the extracellular release of DnaK, PPIase and CGH, and possibly other proteins from B. abortus.

  12. Genotoxicity of Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT) on Isogenic Human Colorectal Cell Lines: Potential Promoting Effects for Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Graillot, Vanessa; Dormoy, Inge; Dupuy, Jacques; Shay, Jerry W.; Huc, Laurence; Mirey, Gladys; Vignard, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the human microbiota influences tumorigenesis, notably in colorectal cancer (CRC). Pathogenic Escherichia coli possesses a variety of virulent factors, among them the Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT). CDT displays dual DNase and phosphatase activities and induces DNA double strand breaks, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a broad range of mammalian cells. As CDT could promote malignant transformation, we investigated the cellular outcomes induced by acute and chronic exposures to E. coli CDT in normal human colon epithelial cells (HCECs). Moreover, we conducted a comparative study between isogenic derivatives cell lines of the normal HCECs in order to mimic the mutation of three major genes found in CRC genetic models: APC, KRAS, and TP53. Our results demonstrate that APC and p53 deficient cells showed impaired DNA damage response after CDT exposure, whereas HCECs expressing oncogenic KRASV12 were more resistant to CDT. Compared to normal HCECs, the precancerous derivatives exhibit hallmarks of malignant transformation after a chronic exposure to CDT. HCECs defective in APC and p53 showed enhanced anchorage independent growth and genetic instability, assessed by the micronucleus formation assay. In contrast, the ability to grow independently of anchorage was not impacted by CDT chronic exposure in KRASV12 HCECs, but micronucleus formation is dramatically increased. Thus, CDT does not initiate CRC by itself, but may have promoting effects in premalignant HCECs, involving different mechanisms in function of the genetic alterations associated to CRC. PMID:27047802

  13. Mitochondrial inheritance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Benedikt

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondria are the site of oxidative phosphorylation, play a key role in cellular energy metabolism, and are critical for cell survival and proliferation. The propagation of mitochondria during cell division depends on replication and partitioning of mitochondrial DNA, cytoskeleton-dependent mitochondrial transport, intracellular positioning of the organelle, and activities coordinating these processes. Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be a valuable model organism to study the mechanisms that drive segregation of the mitochondrial genome and determine mitochondrial partitioning and behavior in an asymmetrically dividing cell. Here, I review past and recent advances that identified key components and cellular pathways contributing to mitochondrial inheritance in yeast. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  14. Enhancement of menadione stress tolerance in yeast by accumulation of hypotaurine and taurine: co-expression of cDNA clones, from Cyprinus carpio, for cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Honjoh, Ken-ichi; Matsuura, Kanae; Machida, Takeshi; Nishi, Koutarou; Nakao, Miki; Yano, Tomoki; Miyamoto, Takahisa; Iio, Masayoshi

    2010-04-01

    Taurine is known to function as a protectant against various stresses in animal cells. In order to utilize taurine as a compatible solute for stress tolerance of yeast, isolation of cDNA clones for genes encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of taurine was attempted. Two types of cDNA clones corresponding to genes encoding cysteine dioxygenase (CDO1 and CDO2) and a cDNA clone for cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD) were isolated from Cyprinus carpio. Deduced amino acid sequences of the two CDOs and that of CSD showed high similarity to those of CDOs and those of CSDs from other organisms, respectively. The coding regions of CDO1, CDO2, and CSD were subcloned into an expression vector, pESC-TRP, for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, to enhance the efficiency of synthesis of taurine in S. cerevisiae, a CDO-CSD fusion was designed and expressed. Expression of CDO and CSD proteins, or the CDO-CSD fusion protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. HPLC analysis showed that the expression of the proteins led to enhancement of the accumulation level of hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine, rather than taurine. The yeast cells expressing corresponding genes showed tolerance to oxidative stress induced by menadione, but not to freezing-thawing stress.

  15. Defining the impact on yeast ATP synthase of two pathogenic human mitochondrial DNA mutations, T9185C and T9191C.

    PubMed

    Kabala, Anna Magdalena; Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Ackerman, Sharon H; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Kucharczyk, Roza

    2014-05-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial ATP6 gene encoding ATP synthase subunit a/6 (referred to as Atp6p in yeast) are at the base of neurodegenerative disorders like Neurogenic Ataxia and Retinitis Pigmentosa (NARP), Leigh syndrome (LS), Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT), and ataxia telangiectasia. In previous studies, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model we were able to better define how several of these mutations impact the ATP synthase. Here we report the construction of yeast models of two other ATP6 pathogenic mutations, T9185C and T9191C. The first one was reported as conferring a mild, sometimes reversible, CMT clinical phenotype; the second one has been described in a patient presenting with severe LS. We found that an equivalent of the T9185C mutation partially impaired the functioning of yeast ATP synthase, with only a 30% deficit in mitochondrial ATP production. An equivalent of the mutation T9191C had much more severe effects, with a nearly complete block in yeast Atp6p assembly and an >95% drop in the rate of ATP synthesis. These findings provide a molecular basis for the relative severities of the diseases induced by T9185C and T9191C.

  16. Gene and genome construction in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2011-04-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the capacity to take up and assemble dozens of different overlapping DNA molecules in one transformation event. These DNA molecules can be single-stranded oligonucleotides, to produce gene-sized fragments, or double-stranded DNA fragments, to produce molecules up to hundreds of kilobases in length, including complete bacterial genomes. This unit presents protocols for designing the DNA molecules to be assembled, transforming them into yeast, and confirming their assembly. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. The uses of AFLP for detecting DNA polymorphism, genotype identification and genetic diversity between yeasts isolated from Mexican agave-distilled beverages and from grape musts.

    PubMed

    Flores Berrios, E P; Alba González, J F; Arrizon Gaviño, J P; Romano, P; Capece, A; Gschaedler Mathis, A

    2005-01-01

    The objectives were to determine the variability and to compare the genetic diversity obtained using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers in analyses of wine, tequila, mezcal, sotol and raicilla yeasts. A molecular characterization of yeasts isolated from Mexican agave musts, has been performed by AFLP marker analysis, using reference wine strains from Italian and South African regions. A direct co-relation between genetic profile, origin and fermentation process of strains was found especially in strains isolated from agave must. In addition, unique molecular markers were obtained for all the strains using six combination primers, confirming the discriminatory power of AFLP markers. This is the first report of molecular characterization between yeasts isolated from different Mexican traditional agave-distilled beverages, which shows high genetic differences with respect to wine strains.

  18. Marine yeasts-a review.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Sreedevi N; Philip, Rosamma

    2008-07-01

    Yeasts are ubiquitous in their distribution and populations mainly depend on the type and concentration of organic materials. The distribution of species, as well as their numbers and metabolic characteristics were found to be governed by existing environmental conditions. Marine yeasts were first discovered from the Atlantic Ocean and following this discovery, yeasts were isolated from different sources, viz. seawater, marine deposits, seaweeds, fish, marine mammals and sea birds. Near-shore environments are usually inhabited by tens to thousands of cells per litre of water, whereas low organic surface to deep-sea oceanic regions contain 10 or fewer cells/litre. Aerobic forms are found more in clean waters and fermentative forms in polluted waters. Yeasts are more abundant in silty muds than in sandy sediments. The isolation frequency of yeasts fell as the depth of the sampling site is increased. Major genera isolated in this study were Candida, Cryptococcus, Debaryomyces and Rhodotorula. For biomass estimation ergosterol method was used. Classification and identification of yeasts were performed using different criteria, i.e. morphology, sexual reproduction and physiological/biochemical characteristics. Fatty acid profiling or molecular sequencing of the IGS and ITS regions and 28S gene rDNA ensured accurate identification. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Organ-specific isogenic metastatic breast cancer cell lines exhibit distinct Raman spectral signatures and metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Zhang, Chi; Vesuna, Farhad; Kang, Jeon Woong; Garry, Jonah; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Raman, Venu

    2017-03-21

    Molecular characterization of organ-specific metastatic lesions, which distinguish them from the primary tumor, will provide a better understanding of tissue specific adaptations that regulate metastatic progression. Using an orthotopic xenograft model, we have isolated isogenic metastatic human breast cancer cell lines directly from organ explants that are phenotypically distinct from the primary tumor cell line. Label-free Raman spectroscopy was used and informative spectral bands were ascertained as differentiators of organ-specific metastases as opposed to the presence of a single universal marker. Decision algorithms derived from the Raman spectra unambiguously identified these isogenic cell lines as unique biological entities - a finding reinforced through metabolomic analyses that indicated tissue of origin metabolite distinctions between the cell lines. Notably, complementarity of the metabolomics and Raman datasets was found. Our findings provide evidence that metastatic spread generates tissue-specific adaptations at the molecular level within cancer cells, which can be differentiated with Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Organ-specific isogenic metastatic breast cancer cell lines exhibit distinct Raman spectral signatures and metabolomes

    PubMed Central

    Winnard, Paul T.; Zhang, Chi; Vesuna, Farhad; Kang, Jeon Woong; Garry, Jonah; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Raman, Venu

    2017-01-01

    Molecular characterization of organ-specific metastatic lesions, which distinguish them from the primary tumor, will provide a better understanding of tissue specific adaptations that regulate metastatic progression. Using an orthotopic xenograft model, we have isolated isogenic metastatic human breast cancer cell lines directly from organ explants that are phenotypically distinct from the primary tumor cell line. Label-free Raman spectroscopy was used and informative spectral bands were ascertained as differentiators of organ-specific metastases as opposed to the presence of a single universal marker. Decision algorithms derived from the Raman spectra unambiguously identified these isogenic cell lines as unique biological entities – a finding reinforced through metabolomic analyses that indicated tissue of origin metabolite distinctions between the cell lines. Notably, complementarity of the metabolomics and Raman datasets was found. Our findings provide evidence that metastatic spread generates tissue-specific adaptations at the molecular level within cancer cells, which can be differentiated with Raman spectroscopy. PMID:28145887

  1. Expressed sequence tag analysis and development of gene associated markers in a near-isogenic plant system of Eragrostis curvula.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Díaz, Marina; Selva, Juan P; Zappacosta, Diego; Zanazzi, Darío; Landerreche, Iñaki; Martelotto, Luciano; Felitti, Silvina; Pessino, Silvina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees is a forage grass native to the semiarid regions of Southern Africa, which reproduces mainly by pseudogamous diplosporous apomixis. A collection of ESTs was generated from four cDNA libraries, three of them obtained from panicles of near-isogenic lines with different ploidy levels and reproductive modes, and one obtained from 12 days-old plant leaves. A total of 12,295 high-quality ESTs were clustered and assembled, rendering 8,864 unigenes, including 1,490 contigs and 7,394 singletons, with a genome coverage of 22%. A total of 7,029 (79.11%) unigenes were functionally categorized by BLASTX analysis against sequences deposited in public databases, but only 37.80% could be classified according to Gene Ontology. Sequence comparison against the cereals genes indexes (GI) revealed 50% significant hits. A total of 254 EST-SSRs were detected from 219 singletons and 35 from contigs. Di- and tri- motifs were similarly represented with percentages of 38.95 and 40.16%, respectively. In addition, 190 SNPs and Indels were detected in 18 contigs generated from 3 to 4 libraries. The ESTs and the molecular markers obtained in this study will provide valuable resources for a wide range of applications including gene identification, genetic mapping, cultivar identification, analysis of genetic diversity, phenotype mapping and marker assisted selection.

  2. An integrative analysis of reprogramming in human isogenic system identified a clone selection criterion

    PubMed Central

    Shutova, Maria V.; Surdina, Anastasia V.; Ischenko, Dmitry S.; Naumov, Vladimir A.; Bogomazova, Alexandra N.; Vassina, Ekaterina M.; Alekseev, Dmitry G.; Lagarkova, Maria A.; Kiselev, Sergey L

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pluripotency of newly developed human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is usually characterized by physiological parameters; i.e., by their ability to maintain the undifferentiated state and to differentiate into derivatives of the 3 germ layers. Nevertheless, a molecular comparison of physiologically normal iPSCs to the “gold standard” of pluripotency, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), often reveals a set of genes with different expression and/or methylation patterns in iPSCs and ESCs. To evaluate the contribution of the reprogramming process, parental cell type, and fortuity in the signature of human iPSCs, we developed a complete isogenic reprogramming system. We performed a genome-wide comparison of the transcriptome and the methylome of human isogenic ESCs, 3 types of ESC-derived somatic cells (fibroblasts, retinal pigment epithelium and neural cells), and 3 pairs of iPSC lines derived from these somatic cells. Our analysis revealed a high input of stochasticity in the iPSC signature that does not retain specific traces of the parental cell type and reprogramming process. We showed that 5 iPSC clones are sufficient to find with 95% confidence at least one iPSC clone indistinguishable from their hypothetical isogenic ESC line. Additionally, on the basis of a small set of genes that are characteristic of all iPSC lines and isogenic ESCs, we formulated an approach of “the best iPSC line” selection and confirmed it on an independent dataset. PMID:26919644

  3. Mitochondrial inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Boldogh, I R; Yang, H C; Pon, L A

    2001-06-01

    During the past decade significant advances were made toward understanding the mechanism of mitochondrial inheritance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A combination of genetics, cell-free assays and microscopy has led to the discovery of a great number of components. These fall into three major categories: cytoskeletal elements, mitochondrial membrane components and regulatory proteins. These proteins mediate activities, including movement of mitochondria from mother cells to buds, segregation of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA, and equal distribution of the organelle between mother cells and buds during yeast cell division.

  4. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  5. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  6. Multiple Cooperating Oncogenes Drive Recurrent Breast Cancer-Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Josh Lauring , M.D., Ph.D...Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0285 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Josh Lauring ...on work described in this award: 1R21CA191262-01 (P.I. Lauring ) 12/1/14-11/30/16 20% (2.4 cal) National Cancer Institute Engineering

  7. Genetic diversity of the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Stoltenburg, R; Klinner, U; Ritzerfeld, P; Zimmermann, M; Emeis, C C

    1992-12-01

    The electrophoretic karyotypes and some mtDNA restriction fragment patterns of 13 strains of Candida utilis and one strain of Hansenula jadinii were compared. PFGE separations revealed remarkable chromosome length polymorphisms between two groups of strains suggesting that perhaps they do not belong to the same species. However, all strains had the same or similar EcoRI, HindIII and BamHI mtDNA restriction patterns. The mtDNA genomes had an average size range of 55 kb. These results support the supposition that C. utilis is a yeast with a highly variable electrophoretic karyotype as already known for another imperfect yeast species, Candida albicans.

  8. Construction of high-quality Caco-2 three-frame cDNA library and its application to yeast two-hybrid for the human astrovirus protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Xin; Liu, Wen-Hui; Zhao, Jian; Jin, Yi-Ming; Sui, Ting-Ting

    2014-09-01

    Human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells are widely used as an in vitro model of the human small intestinal mucosa. Caco-2 cells are host cells of the human astrovirus (HAstV) and other enteroviruses. High quality cDNA libraries are pertinent resources and critical tools for protein-protein interaction research, but are currently unavailable for Caco-2 cells. To construct a three-open reading frame, full length-expression cDNA library from the Caco-2 cell line for application to HAstV protein-protein interaction screening, total RNA was extracted from Caco-2 cells. The switching mechanism at the 5' end of the RNA transcript technique was used for cDNA synthesis. Double-stranded cDNA was digested by Sfi I and ligated to reconstruct a pGADT7-Sfi I three-frame vector. The ligation mixture was transformed into Escherichia coli HST08 premium electro cells by electroporation to construct the primary cDNA library. The library capacity was 1.0×10(6)clones. Gel electrophoresis results indicated that the fragments ranged from 0.5kb to 4.2kb. Randomly picked clones show that the recombination rate was 100%. The three-frame primary cDNA library plasmid mixture (5×10(5)cfu) was also transformed into E. coli HST08 premium electro cells, and all clones were harvested to amplify the cDNA library. To detect the sufficiency of the cDNA library, HAstV capsid protein as bait was screened and tested against the Caco-2 cDNA library by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. A total of 20 proteins were found to interact with the capsid protein. These results showed that a high-quality three-frame cDNA library from Caco-2 cells was successfully constructed. This library was efficient for the application to the Y2H system, and could be used for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Assembly of eukaryotic algal chromosomes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Karas, Bogumil J; Molparia, Bhuvan; Jablanovic, Jelena; Hermann, Wolfgang J; Lin, Ying-Chi; Dupont, Christopher L; Tagwerker, Christian; Yonemoto, Isaac T; Noskov, Vladimir N; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Allen, Andrew E; Glass, John I; Hutchison, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Venter, J Craig; Weyman, Philip D

    2013-12-10

    Synthetic genomic approaches offer unique opportunities to use powerful yeast and Escherichia coli genetic systems to assemble and modify chromosome-sized molecules before returning the modified DNA to the target host. For example, the entire 1 Mb Mycoplasma mycoides chromosome can be stably maintained and manipulated in yeast before being transplanted back into recipient cells. We have previously demonstrated that cloning in yeast of large (> ~ 150 kb), high G + C (55%) prokaryotic DNA fragments was improved by addition of yeast replication origins every ~100 kb. Conversely, low G + C DNA is stable (up to at least 1.8 Mb) without adding supplemental yeast origins. It has not been previously tested whether addition of yeast replication origins similarly improves the yeast-based cloning of large (>150 kb) eukaryotic DNA with moderate G + C content. The model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has an average G + C content of 48% and a 27.4 Mb genome sequence that has been assembled into chromosome-sized scaffolds making it an ideal test case for assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic chromosomes in yeast. We present a modified chromosome assembly technique in which eukaryotic chromosomes as large as ~500 kb can be assembled from cloned ~100 kb fragments. We used this technique to clone fragments spanning P. tricornutum chromosomes 25 and 26 and to assemble these fragments into single, chromosome-sized molecules. We found that addition of yeast replication origins improved the cloning, assembly, and maintenance of the large chromosomes in yeast. Furthermore, purification of the fragments to be assembled by electroelution greatly increased assembly efficiency. Entire eukaryotic chromosomes can be successfully cloned, maintained, and manipulated in yeast. These results highlight the improvement in assembly and maintenance afforded by including yeast replication origins in eukaryotic DNA with moderate G + C content (48%). They also highlight

  10. Assembly of eukaryotic algal chromosomes in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Synthetic genomic approaches offer unique opportunities to use powerful yeast and Escherichia coli genetic systems to assemble and modify chromosome-sized molecules before returning the modified DNA to the target host. For example, the entire 1 Mb Mycoplasma mycoides chromosome can be stably maintained and manipulated in yeast before being transplanted back into recipient cells. We have previously demonstrated that cloning in yeast of large (> ~ 150 kb), high G + C (55%) prokaryotic DNA fragments was improved by addition of yeast replication origins every ~100 kb. Conversely, low G + C DNA is stable (up to at least 1.8 Mb) without adding supplemental yeast origins. It has not been previously tested whether addition of yeast replication origins similarly improves the yeast-based cloning of large (>150 kb) eukaryotic DNA with moderate G + C content. The model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has an average G + C content of 48% and a 27.4 Mb genome sequence that has been assembled into chromosome-sized scaffolds making it an ideal test case for assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic chromosomes in yeast. Results We present a modified chromosome assembly technique in which eukaryotic chromosomes as large as ~500 kb can be assembled from cloned ~100 kb fragments. We used this technique to clone fragments spanning P. tricornutum chromosomes 25 and 26 and to assemble these fragments into single, chromosome-sized molecules. We found that addition of yeast replication origins improved the cloning, assembly, and maintenance of the large chromosomes in yeast. Furthermore, purification of the fragments to be assembled by electroelution greatly increased assembly efficiency. Conclusions Entire eukaryotic chromosomes can be successfully cloned, maintained, and manipulated in yeast. These results highlight the improvement in assembly and maintenance afforded by including yeast replication origins in eukaryotic DNA with moderate G

  11. Functional expression of chicken calmodulin in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Y; Anraku, Y

    1989-01-31

    The coding region of a chicken calmodulin cDNA was fused to a galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter, and an expression system was constructed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of calmodulin was demonstrated by purifying the heterologously expressed protein and analyzing its biochemical properties. When the expression plasmid was introduced into a calmodulin gene (cmd1)-disrupted strain of yeast, the cells grew in galactose medium, showing that chicken calmodulin could complement the lesion of yeast calmodulin functionally. Repression of chicken calmodulin in the (cmd1)-disrupted strain caused cell cycle arrest with a G2/M nucleus, as observed previously with a conditional-lethal mutant of yeast calmodulin. These results suggest that the essential function of calmodulin for cell proliferation is conserved in cells ranging from yeast to vertebrate cells.

  12. DNA damage and oxidative stress response to selenium yeast in the non-smoking individuals: a short-term supplementation trial with respect to GPX1 and SEPP1 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, E; Raimondi, S; Gromadzinska, J; Reszka, E; Wieczorek, E; Krol, M B; Smok-Pieniazek, A; Nocun, M; Stepnik, M; Socha, K; Borawska, M H; Wasowicz, W

    2016-12-01

    Selenium, both essential and toxic element, is considered to protect against cancer, though human supplementation trials have generated many inconsistent data. Genetic background may partially explain a great variability of the studies related to selenium and human health. The aim of this study was to assess whether functional polymorphisms within two selenoprotein-encoding genes modify the response to selenium at the level of oxidative stress, DNA damage, and mRNA expression, especially in the individuals with a relatively low selenium status. The trial involved 95 non-smoking individuals, stratified according to GPX1 rs1050450 and SEPP1 rs3877899 genotypes, and supplemented with selenium yeast (200 µg) for 6 weeks. Blood was collected at four time points, including 4 weeks of washout. After genotype stratification, the effect of GPX1 rs1050450 on lower GPx1 activity responsiveness was confirmed; however, in terms of DNA damage, we failed to indicate that individuals homozygous for variant allele may especially benefit from the increased selenium intake. Surprisingly, considering gene and time interaction, GPX1 polymorphism was observed to modify the level of DNA strand breaks during washout, showing a significant increase in GPX1 wild-type homozygotes. Regardless of the genotype, selenium supplementation was associated with a selectively suppressed selenoprotein mRNA expression and inconsistent changes in oxidative stress response, indicating for overlapped, antioxidant, and prooxidant effects. Intriguingly, DNA damage was not influenced by supplementation, but it was significantly increased during washout. These results point to an unclear relationship between selenium, genotype, and DNA damage.

  13. Analysis of yeast isolates related to Metschnikowia pulcherrima using the partial sequences of the large subunit rDNA and the actin gene; description of Metschnikowia andauensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Orsolya; Prillinger, Hansjörg

    2005-10-01

    Thirty-two yeast isolates were cultured from guts or excrements of three different pests of corn or from the stem of healthy corn. The strains were analyzed using MSP-PCR (micro/minisatellite-primed polymerase chain reaction), sequences of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rDNA and a 979 bp long part of the actin gene (act-1). They seem to belong to three groups that are all sister groups of Metschnikowia pulcherrima, M. fructicola and M. chrysoperlae. A new species, Metschnikowia andauensis (HA 1657T) is described. In contrast to M. pulcherrima and M. fructicola, M. andauensis is well separated in the act-1 phylogenetic tree too.

  14. Yeast red pigment modifies Amyloid beta growth in Alzheimer disease models in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Nevzglyadova, Olga V; Mikhailova, Ekaterina V; Amen, Triana R; Zenin, Valeriy V; Artemov, Alexey V; Kostyleva, Elena I; Mezhenskaya, Daria A; Rodin, Dmitry I; Saifitdinova, Alsu F; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail A; Sarantseva, Svetlana V; Soidla, Tonu R

    2015-01-01

    The effect of yeast red pigment on amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation and fibril growth was studied in yeasts, fruit flies and in vitro. Yeast strains accumulating red pigment (red strains) contained less amyloid and had better survival rates compared to isogenic strains without red pigment accumulation (white strains). Confocal and fluorescent microscopy was used to visualise fluorescent Aβ-GFP aggregates. Yeast cells containing less red pigment had more Aβ-GFP aggregates despite the lower level of overall GFP fluorescence. Western blot analysis with anti-GFP, anti-Aβ and A11 antibodies also revealed that red cells contained a considerably lower amount of Aβ GFP aggregates as compared to white cells. Similar results were obtained with exogenous red pigment that was able to penetrate yeast cells. In vitro experiments with thioflavine and TEM showed that red pigment effectively decreased Aβ fibril growth. Transgenic flies expressing Aβ were cultivated on medium containing red and white isogenic yeast strains. Flies cultivated on red strains had a significant decrease in Aβ accumulation levels and brain neurodegeneration. They also demonstrated better memory and learning indexes and higher locomotor ability.

  15. Identification of Protein Components of Yeast Telomerase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    for forming telomeres at sites with stretches of telomere- like DNA. The pifl mutants also exhibit increased loss and decreased recombination of...like DNA. The pifl mutants also exhibit increased loss 6 and decreased recombination of mitochondrial DNA and thus have a high fraction of...the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that was predicted to encode a 805 amino acid protein. The S. pombe gene was called rphl+ (RRM3/PIF1

  16. The activity of the histone chaperone yeast Asf1 in the assembly and disassembly of histone H3/H4–DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Douglas C.; Scorgie, Jean K.; Churchill, Mair E. A.

    2011-01-01

    The deposition of the histones H3/H4 onto DNA to give the tetrasome intermediate and the displacement of H3/H4 from DNA are thought to be the first and the last steps in nucleosome assembly and disassembly, respectively. Anti-silencing function 1 (Asf1) is a chaperone of the H3/H4 dimer that functions in both of these processes. However, little is known about the thermodynamics of chaperone–histone interactions or the direct role of Asf1 in the formation or disassembly of histone–DNA complexes. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Asf1 shields H3/H4 from unfavorable DNA interactions and aids the formation of favorable histone–DNA interactions through the formation of disomes. However, Asf1 was unable to disengage histones from DNA for tetrasomes formed with H3/H4 and strong nucleosome positioning DNA sequences or tetrasomes weakened by mutant (H3K56Q/H4) histones or non-positioning DNA sequences. Furthermore, Asf1 did not associate with preformed tetrasomes. These results are consistent with the measured affinity of Asf1 for H3/H4 dimers of 2.5 nM, which is weaker than the association of H3/H4 for DNA. These studies support a mechanism by which Asf1 aids H3/H4 deposition onto DNA but suggest that additional factors or post-translational modifications are required for Asf1 to remove H3/H4 from tetrasome intermediates in chromatin. PMID:21447559

  17. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  18. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  19. Din7 and Mhr1 expression levels regulate double-strand-break-induced replication and recombination of mtDNA at ori5 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ling, Feng; Hori, Akiko; Yoshitani, Ayako; Niu, Rong; Yoshida, Minoru; Shibata, Takehiko

    2013-06-01

    The Ntg1 and Mhr1 proteins initiate rolling-circle mitochondrial (mt) DNA replication to achieve homoplasmy, and they also induce homologous recombination to maintain mitochondrial genome integrity. Although replication and recombination profoundly influence mitochondrial inheritance, the regulatory mechanisms that determine the choice between these pathways remain unknown. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced by Ntg1 at the mitochondrial replication origin ori5 induce homologous DNA pairing by Mhr1, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) enhance production of DSBs. Here, we show that a mitochondrial nuclease encoded by the nuclear gene DIN7 (DNA damage inducible gene) has 5'-exodeoxyribonuclease activity. Using a small ρ(-) mtDNA bearing ori5 (hypersuppressive; HS) as a model mtDNA, we revealed that DIN7 is required for ROS-enhanced mtDNA replication and recombination that are both induced at ori5. Din7 overproduction enhanced Mhr1-dependent mtDNA replication and increased the number of residual DSBs at ori5 in HS-ρ(-) cells and increased deletion mutagenesis at the ori5 region in ρ(+) cells. However, simultaneous overproduction of Mhr1 suppressed all of these phenotypes and enhanced homologous recombination. Our results suggest that after homologous pairing, the relative activity levels of Din7 and Mhr1 modulate the preference for replication versus homologous recombination to repair DSBs at ori5.

  20. Din7 and Mhr1 expression levels regulate double-strand-break–induced replication and recombination of mtDNA at ori5 in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Feng; Hori, Akiko; Yoshitani, Ayako; Niu, Rong; Yoshida, Minoru; Shibata, Takehiko

    2013-01-01

    The Ntg1 and Mhr1 proteins initiate rolling-circle mitochondrial (mt) DNA replication to achieve homoplasmy, and they also induce homologous recombination to maintain mitochondrial genome integrity. Although replication and recombination profoundly influence mitochondrial inheritance, the regulatory mechanisms that determine the choice between these pathways remain unknown. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced by Ntg1 at the mitochondrial replication origin ori5 induce homologous DNA pairing by Mhr1, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) enhance production of DSBs. Here, we show that a mitochondrial nuclease encoded by the nuclear gene DIN7 (DNA damage inducible gene) has 5′-exodeoxyribonuclease activity. Using a small ρ− mtDNA bearing ori5 (hypersuppressive; HS) as a model mtDNA, we revealed that DIN7 is required for ROS-enhanced mtDNA replication and recombination that are both induced at ori5. Din7 overproduction enhanced Mhr1-dependent mtDNA replication and increased the number of residual DSBs at ori5 in HS-ρ− cells and increased deletion mutagenesis at the ori5 region in ρ+ cells. However, simultaneous overproduction of Mhr1 suppressed all of these phenotypes and enhanced homologous recombination. Our results suggest that after homologous pairing, the relative activity levels of Din7 and Mhr1 modulate the preference for replication versus homologous recombination to repair DSBs at ori5. PMID:23598996

  1. Cloning of a human cDNA encoding a CDC2-related kinase by complementation of a budding yeast cdc28 mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun ); Nomoto, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kunihiro ); Yasuda, Hideyo ); Reed, S.I. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors have cloned two different human cDNAs that can complement cdc28 mutations of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One corresponds to a gene encoding human p34{sup CDC2} kinase, and the other to a gene (CDK2; cell division kinase) that has not been characterized previously. The CDK2 protein is highly homologous to p34{sup CDC2} kinase and more significantly is homologous to Xenopus Eg1 kinase, suggesting that CDK2 is the human homolog of Eg1. The human CDC2 and CDK2 genes were both able to complement the inviability of a null allele of S. cerevisiae CDC28. This result indicates that the CDK2 protein has a biological activity closely related to the CDC28 and p34{sup CDC2} kinases. However, CDK2 was unable to complement cdc2 mutants in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe under the condition where the human CDC2 gene could complement them. CDK2 mRNA appeared late in G{sub 1} or in early S phase, slightly before CDC2 mRNA, after growth stimulation in normal human fibroblast cells. These results suggest that in human cells, two different CDC2-like kinases may regulate the cell cycle at distinct stages.

  2. Species-specific identification of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts by fluorescently labeled DNA probes targeting the 26S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Röder, Christoph; König, Helmut; Fröhlich, Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    Sequencing of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all Dekkera/Brettanomyces species colonizing different beverages revealed the potential for a specific primer and probe design to support diagnostic PCR approaches and FISH. By analysis of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all five currently known Dekkera/Brettanomyces species (Dekkera bruxellensis, D. anomala, Brettanomyces custersianus, B. nanus and B. naardenensis), several regions with high nucleotide sequence variability yet distinct from the D1/D2 domains were identified. FISH species-specific probes targeting the 26S rRNA gene's most variable regions were designed. Accessibility of probe targets for hybridization was facilitated by the construction of partially complementary 'side'-labeled probes, based on secondary structure models of the rRNA sequences. The specificity and routine applicability of the FISH-based method for yeast identification were tested by analyzing different wine isolates. Investigation of the prevalence of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts in the German viticultural regions Wonnegau, Nierstein and Bingen (Rhinehesse, Rhineland-Palatinate) resulted in the isolation of 37 D. bruxellensis strains from 291 wine samples.

  3. Identification of RAPD Markers Linked to Digestive Amylase Genes using Near Isogenic Lines of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Ashwath, S.K.; Sreekumar, S.; Toms, J.T.; Dandin, S.B.; Kamble, C.K.

    2010-01-01

    Digestive amylase has been identified as a useful marker for breeding in the silkwrom, Bombyx mori L (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), due to its wide genetic divergence, its role in better digestibility and robustness. The low yielding indigenous B. mori breeds of tropics like India are characterized by high activity amylase genes controlled by Amy div or dv alleles, while the high yielding breeds of temperate origin are endowed with ‘null’ type (Amy dn) with low activity. For improving the digestibility and survival of temperate breeds of Japanese origin, Near Isogenic Lines (NILs) were developed introgressing the Amy div and dv alleles from the Donor Parents (DPs) into the genetic background of the Recurrent Parents (RPs) with ‘null’ type of amylase, which showed significant improvement in viability of the NILs. With the objective to know whether the amylase gene itself may confer higher survival by improving digestibility or some other closely linked genes flanking the amylase locus is responsible for better viability of the NILs, RAPD profiles among six B. mori breeds comprising of the DPs, RPs, and NILs developed through introgression of Amy div or dv alleles were analysed using 27 sets of RAPD primers. Out of the 27 primers, six (OPA01, OPA06, OPA09, OPA15, OPAH03, and OPAH05) showed RAPD products linked to the amylase genes of the DPs introgressed in the NILs, which were absent in their respective RPs. Three amplicons of 1584 bp, 1904 bp, and 1232 bp were specific to Amy div allele and one amplified product of 1776 bp was found to be linked with the Amy dv allele. Interestingly, two PCR products of 2628 and 1375 bp were associated with both Amy div and dv alleles. The results are discussed in light of further characterization of these amplified products leading to identification of DNA sequences that may be responsible for better digestibility and higher survival in B. mori. PMID:20673069

  4. Construction of near-isogenic lines to investigate the efficiency of different resistance genes to anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Mahé, A; Bannerot, H; Grisvard, J

    1995-05-01

    A suitable experimental model was designed with the aim of investigating the specific effect of different resistance genes in the Phaseolus vulgaris - Colletotrichum lindemuthianum interaction. The four resistance genes examined were chosen because they confer a different phenotype (resistance or susceptibility) to the lines carrying them when challenged by a range of C. lindemuthianum races. These different resistance genes were introgressed independently into the same susceptible recipient line. The isogenicity of the five near-isogenic lines (NILs) thus obtained (four resistant lines, one susceptible line = recipient line) was assessed by a RAPD analysis. The hypersensitive reaction occurred at the same time after infection, whatever the resistance gene present, when the NILs were challenged by the avirulent race 9 of the pathogen. In contrast, the pathogen development was arrested more or less rapidly in the different NILs. At the first stages of the infection process, the transcripts encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase were accumulated to a different extent in the different resistant NILs but always to a higher level than in the susceptible recipient line. These results suggest that the different resistance genes operate through more than one way in the production of defense factors.

  5. Genome engineering of isogenic human ES cells to model autism disorders

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Refugio A.; Stein, Jason L.; Krostag, Anne-Rachel F.; Nelson, Angelique M.; Marken, John S.; Menon, Vilas; May, Ryan C.; Yao, Zizhen; Kaykas, Ajamete; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Grimley, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic pluripotent stem cells are critical tools for studying human neurological diseases by allowing one to study the effects of a mutation in a fixed genetic background. Of particular interest are the spectrum of autism disorders, some of which are monogenic such as Timothy syndrome (TS); others are multigenic such as the microdeletion and microduplication syndromes of the 16p11.2 chromosomal locus. Here, we report engineered human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines for modeling these two disorders using locus-specific endonucleases to increase the efficiency of homology-directed repair (HDR). We developed a system to: (1) computationally identify unique transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) binding sites in the genome using a new software program, TALENSeek, (2) assemble the TALEN genes by combining golden gate cloning with modified constructs from the FLASH protocol, and (3) test the TALEN pairs in an amplification-based HDR assay that is more sensitive than the typical non-homologous end joining assay. We applied these methods to identify, construct, and test TALENs that were used with HDR donors in hESCs to generate an isogenic TS cell line in a scarless manner and to model the 16p11.2 copy number disorder without modifying genomic loci with high sequence similarity. PMID:25765640

  6. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Tanya C.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells) and RC77T/E (malignant cells) were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mitochondria and the Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism RT2 PCR arrays. Forty-seven genes were differentially regulated between the two cell lines. The interaction and regulatory networks of these genes were generated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. UCP2 was the most significantly upregulated gene in primary adenocarcinoma cells in the current study. The overexpression of UCP2 upon malignant transformation was further validated using human prostatectomy clinical specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the overexpression of multiple genes that are involved in mitochondria biogenesis, bioenergetics, and modulation of apoptosis. These genes may play a role in malignant transformation and disease progression. The upregulation of some of these genes in clinical samples indicates that some of the differentially transcribed genes could be the potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27478826

  7. The non-canonical protein binding site at the monomer-monomer interface of yeast proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) regulates the Rev1-PCNA interaction and Polζ/Rev1-dependent translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeru M; Kochenova, Olga V; Shcherbakova, Polina V

    2011-09-23

    Rev1 and DNA polymerase ζ (Polζ) are involved in the tolerance of DNA damage by translesion synthesis (TLS). The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the auxiliary factor of nuclear DNA polymerases, plays an important role in regulating the access of TLS polymerases to the primer terminus. Both Rev1 and Polζ lack the conserved hydrophobic motif that is used by many proteins for the interaction with PCNA at its interdomain connector loop. We have previously reported that the interaction of yeast Polζ with PCNA occurs at an unusual site near the monomer-monomer interface of the trimeric PCNA. Using GST pull-down assays, PCNA-coupled affinity beads pull-down and gel filtration chromatography, we show that the same region is required for the physical interaction of PCNA with the polymerase-associated domain (PAD) of Rev1. The interaction is disrupted by the pol30-113 mutation that results in a double amino acid substitution at the monomer-monomer interface of PCNA. Genetic analysis of the epistatic relationship of the pol30-113 mutation with an array of DNA repair and damage tolerance mutations indicated that PCNA-113 is specifically defective in the Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS pathway. Taken together, the data suggest that Polζ and Rev1 are unique among PCNA-interacting proteins in using the novel binding site near the intermolecular interface of PCNA. The new mode of Rev1-PCNA binding described here suggests a mechanism by which Rev1 adopts a catalytically inactive configuration at the replication fork.

  8. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  9. Mitochondrial inheritance in budding yeasts: towards an integrated understanding.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa

    2010-11-01

    Recent advances in yeast mitogenomics have significantly contributed to our understanding of the diversity of organization, structure and topology in the mitochondrial genome of budding yeasts. In parallel, new insights on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae highlighted an integrated scenario where recombination, replication and segregation of mtDNA are intricately linked to mitochondrial nucleoid (mt-nucleoid) structure and organelle sorting. In addition to this, recent discoveries of bifunctional roles of some mitochondrial proteins have interesting implications on mito-nuclear genome interactions and the relationship between mtDNA inheritance, yeast fitness and speciation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on yeast mitogenomics, mtDNA inheritance with regard to mt-nucleoid structure and organelle dynamics, and mito-nuclear genome interactions.

  10. Two glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase isogenes from Candida versatilis SN-18 play an important role in glycerol biosynthesis under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Daiki; Iwata, Hisashi; Ishimaki, Yuki; Ogihara, Jun; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2016-05-01

    Two isogenes of glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) from Candida versatilis SN-18 were cloned and sequenced. These intronless genes (Cagpd1 and Cagpd2) were both predicted to encode a 378 amino acid polypeptide, and the deduced amino acid sequences mutually showed 76% identity. Interestingly, Cagpd1 and Cagpd2 were located tandemly in a locus of genomic DNA within a 262 bp interval. To our knowledge, this represents a novel instance of isogenic genes relating to glucose metabolism. The stress response element (STRE) was found respectively at -93 to -89 bp upstream of the 5'end of Cagpd1 and -707 to -703 bp upstream of Cagpd2, indicating that these genes are involved in osmotic stress response. In heterologous expression using a gpd1Δgpd2Δ double deletion mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cagpd1 and Cagpd2 transformants complemented the function of GPD, with Cagpd2 being much more effective than Cagpd1 in promoting growth and glycerol synthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences suggested that Cagpd1p and Cagpd2p are NADP(+)-dependent GPDs (EC 1.1.1.94). However, crude enzyme extract from Cagpd1 and Cagpd2 transformants showed GPD activity with only NAD(+) as cofactor. Hence, both Cagpd1p and Cagpd2p are likely NAD(+)-dependent GPDs (EC 1.1.1.8), similar to GPDs from S. cerevisiae and Candida magnoliae. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Histones H3 and H4 are components of upstream activation factor required for the high-level transcription of yeast rDNA by RNA polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Keener, John; Dodd, Jonathan A.; Lalo, Dominique; Nomura, Masayasu

    1997-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is greatly stimulated in vivo and in vitro by the multiprotein complex, upstream activation factor (UAF). UAF binds tightly to the upstream element of the rDNA promoter, such that once bound (in vitro), UAF does not readily exchange onto a competing template. Of the polypeptides previously identified in purified UAF, three are encoded by genes required for Pol I transcription in vivo: RRN5, RRN9, and RRN10. Two others, p30 and p18, have remained uncharacterized. We report here that the N-terminal amino acid sequence, its mobility in gel electrophoresis, and the immunoreactivity of p18 shows that it is histone H3. In addition, histone H4 was found in UAF, and myc-tagged histone H4 could be used to affinity-purify UAF. Histones H2A and H2B were not detectable in UAF. These results suggest that histones H3 and H4 probably account for the strong binding of UAF to DNA and may offer a means by which general nuclear regulatory signals could be transmitted to Pol I. PMID:9391047

  12. Isolation of a cDNA clone (PcSrp) encoding serine-rich-protein from Porteresia coarctata T. and its expression in yeast and finger millet (Eleusine coracana L.) affording salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mahalakshmi, S; Christopher, G S B; Reddy, T P; Rao, K V; Reddy, V D

    2006-07-01

    A 1.4 Kb cDNA clone encoding a serine-rich protein has been isolated from the cDNA library of salt stressed roots of Porteresia coarctata, and designated as P. coarctata serine-rich-protein (PcSrp) encoding gene. Northern analysis and in situ mRNA hybridization revealed the expression of PcSrp in the salt stressed roots and rhizome of P. coarctata. However, no such expression was seen in the salt stressed leaves and in the unstressed tissues of root, rhizome and leaf, indicating that PcSrp is under the control of a salt-inducible tissue-specific promoter. In yeast, the PcSrp conferred increased NaCl tolerance, implicating its role in salinity tolerance at cellular level. Further, PcSrp was cloned downstream to rice Actin-1 promoter and introduced into finger millet through particle-inflow-gun method. Transgenic plants expressing PcSrp were able to grow to maturity and set seed under 250 mM NaCl stress. The untransformed control plants by contrast failed to survive under similar salt stress. The stressed roots of transgenic plants invariably accumulated higher Na(+) and K(+) ion contents compared to roots of untransformed plants; whereas, shoots of transgenics accumulated lower levels of both the ions than that of untransformed plants under identical stress, clearly suggesting the involvement of PcSrp in ion homeostasis contributing to salt tolerance.

  13. In vivo genomic footprint of a yeast centromere.

    PubMed Central

    Densmore, L; Payne, W E; Fitzgerald-Hayes, M

    1991-01-01

    We have used in vivo genomic footprinting to investigate the protein-DNA interactions within the conserved DNA elements (CDEI, CDEII, and CDEIII) in the centromere from chromosome III of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The in vivo footprint pattern obtained from wild-type cells shows that some guanines within the centromere DNA are protected from methylation by dimethyl sulfate. These results are consistent with studies demonstrating that yeast cells contain sequence-specific centromere DNA-binding proteins. Our in vivo experiments on chromosomes with mutant centromeres show that some mutations which affect chromosome segregation also alter the footprint pattern caused by proteins bound to the centromere DNA. The results of this study provide the first fine-structure map of proteins bound to centromere DNA in living yeast cells and suggest a direct correlation between these protein-DNA interactions and centromere function. Images PMID:1986217

  14. Activated levels of rRNA synthesis in fission yeast are driven by an intergenic rDNA region positioned over 2500 nucleotides upstream of the initiation site.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z; Zhao, A; Chen, L; Pape, L

    1997-01-01

    RNA polymerase I-catalyzed synthesis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe approximately 37S pre-rRNAs was shown to be sensitive to regulatory sequences located several kilobases upstream of the initiation site for the rRNA gene. An in vitro transcription system for RNA polymerase I-catalyzed RNA synthesis was established that supports correct and activated transcription from templates bearing a full S. pombe rRNA gene promoter. A 780 bp region starting at -2560 significantly stimulates transcription of ac is-located rDNA promoter and competes with an rDNA promoter in trans, thus displaying some of the activities of rDNA transcriptional enhancers in vitro. Deletion of a 30 bp enhancer-homologous domain in this 780 bp far upstream region blocked its cis-stimulatory effect. The sequence of the S. pombe 3.5 kb intergenic spacer was determined and its organization differs from that of vertebrate, Drosophila, Acanthamoeba and plant intergenic rDNA spacers: it does not contain multiple, imperfect copies of the rRNA gene promoter nor repetitive elements of 140 bp, as are found in vertebrate rDNA enhancers. PMID:9016610

  15. Extensive genomic characterization of a set of near-isogenic lines for heterotic QTL in maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the crucial role that heterosis has played in crop improvement, its genetic and molecular bases are still elusive. Several types of structured populations were used to discover the genetic architecture underlying complex phenotypes, and several QTL related to heterosis were detected. However, such analyses generally lacked the statistical power required for the detailed characterization of individual QTL. Currently, QTL introgression into near-isogenic materials is considered the most effective strategy to this end, despite such materials inevitably contain a variable, unknown and undesired proportion of non-isogenic genome. An introgression program based on residual heterozygous lines allowed us to develop five pairs of maize (Zea mays L.) near-isogenic lines (NILs) suitable for the fine characterization of three major heterotic QTL previously detected. Here we describe the results of the detailed genomic characterization of these NILs that we undertook to establish their genotypic structure, to verify the presence of the expected genotypes within target QTL regions, and to determine the extent and location of residual non-isogenic genomic regions. Results The SNP genotyping approach allowed us to determine the parent-of-origin allele for 14,937 polymorphic SNPs and to describe in detail the genotypic structure of all NILs. The correct introgression was confirmed for all target QTL in the respective NIL and several non-isogenic regions were detected genome-wide. Possible linkage drag effects associated to the specific introgressed regions were observed. The extent and position of other non-isogenic regions varied among NIL pairs, probably deriving from random segregating sections still present at the separation of lineages within pairs. Conclusions The results of this work strongly suggest that the actual isogenicity and the genotypic architecture of near-isogenic materials should be monitored both during the introgression procedure and on the

  16. Two Distinct Cdc2 Pools Regulate Cell Cycle Progression and the DNA Damage Response in the Fission Yeast S.pombe.

    PubMed

    Caspari, Thomas; Hilditch, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The activity of Cdc2 (CDK1) kinase, which coordinates cell cycle progression and DNA break repair, is blocked upon its phosphorylation at tyrosine 15 (Y15) by Wee1 kinase in the presence of DNA damage. How Cdc2 can support DNA repair whilst being inactivated by the DNA damage checkpoint remains to be explained. Human CDK1 is phosphorylated by Myt1 kinase at threonine 14 (T14) close to its ATP binding site before being modified at threonine 161 (T167Sp) in its T-loop by the CDK-activating kinase (CAK). While modification of T161 promotes association with the cyclin partner, phosphorylation of T14 inhibits the CDK1-cyclin complex. This inhibition is further enforced by the modification of Y15 by Wee1 in the presence of DNA lesions. In S.pombe, the dominant inhibition of Cdc2 is provided by the phosphorylation of Y15 and only a small amount of Cdc2 is modified at T14 when cells are in S phase. Unlike human cells, both inhibitory modifications are executed by Wee1. Using the novel IEFPT technology, which combines isoelectric focusing (IEF) with Phos-tag SDS electrophoresis (PT), we report here that S.pombe Cdc2 kinase exists in seven forms. While five forms are phosphorylated, two species are not. Four phospho-forms associate with cyclin B (Cdc13) of which only two are modified at Y15 by Wee1. Interestingly, only one Y15-modified species carries also the T14 modification. The fifth phospho-form has a low affinity for cyclin B and is neither Y15 nor T14 modified. The two unphosphorylated forms may contribute directly to the DNA damage response as only they associate with the DNA damage checkpoint kinase Chk1. Interestingly, cyclin B is also present in the unphosphorylated pool. We also show that the G146D mutation in Cdc2.1w, which renders Cdc2 insensitive to Wee1 inhibition, is aberrantly modified in a Wee1-dependent manner. In conclusion, our work adds support to the idea that two distinct Cdc2 pools regulate cell cycle progression and the response to DNA damage.

  17. Expression in yeast of a cDNA clone encoding a transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 fragment (a.a. 591-642) bearing the major immunodominant domain of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Gairin, J E; Madaule, P; Traincard, F; Barrès, E; Rossier, J

    1991-04-01

    A cDNA clone corresponding to the gp41 gene fragment nucl. 7573-7730 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was selected from a random HIV-1 genomic library expressed in yeast. This clone encodes a 52-residue long peptide (amino acid (a.a.)) 591-642) bearing the major immunodominant domain (a.a. 598-609) of the HIV-1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Expression of the recombinant peptide pSE-env591-642 was driven by the alpha-mating factor leader sequence contained in a plasmid pSE-x allowing the synthesis and secretion of foreign gene product in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Time-course analysis of the secretion into culture medium revealed an optimal production of the glycoprotein fragment at 28-30 h with no observable cytotoxicity. The secreted peptide is highly glycosylated with NH2-terminal heterogeneity probably due to different post-translational modifications. The secreted peptide shows an extreme antigenicity since in ELISA assays, as few as 5 microliters/well of crude supernatant are sufficient to obtain a strong detection by monoclonal antibodies or by 100% of sera from HIV-infected individuals. The purified glycopeptide pSE-env591-642 binds to a monoclonal antibody directed against the immunodominant epitope (a.a. 603-609) with an affinity similar to that of the complete glycoprotein gp160 (Kd values within the 10(-10) M range) and with a 100-fold higher affinity than that of a linear peptide fragment SP-env584-609. These results indicate that overexpression in yeast can efficiently provide an abundant source of highly antigenic gp41 protein fragment pSE-env591-642 which retains the antigenic properties of the native gp160 protein. Such a recombinant peptide should therefore be considered as a good candidate for antigen in HIV detection tests.

  18. Genetic constitution of industrial yeast.

    PubMed

    Benítez, T; Martínez, P; Codón, A C

    1996-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae industrial yeast strains are highly heterogeneous. These industrial strains, including bakers', wine, brewing and distillers', have been compared with respect to their DNA content, number and size of chromosomes, homologies between their genes and those of laboratory strains, and restriction fragment lengths of their mitDNA. A high variability, and the presence of multigenic families, were observed in some industrial yeast groups. The occurrence or the lack of chromosomal polymorphism, as well as the presence of multiple copies of some genes, could be related to a selective process occurring under specific industrial conditions. This polymorphism is generated by reorganization events, that take place mainly during meiosis and are mediated by repetitive Y' and Ty elements. These elements give rise to ectopic and asymmetric recombination and to gene conversion. The polymorphism displayed by the mitDNA could also result from specific industrial conditions. However, in enological strains the selective process is masked by the mutagenic effect that ethanol exerts on this DNA.

  19. [Selenium tolerance of yeasts].

    PubMed

    Golubev, V I; Golubev, N V

    2002-01-01

    Selenium tolerance of yeasts widely varies: the growth of some yeasts can be inhibited by a selenium concentration as low as 10(-4) M, whereas others can grow in the presence of 10(-1) M selenium. Homogeneous yeast taxa are characterized by a certain level of selenium tolerance, and heterogeneous taxa show a variable level of tolerance to selenium. In general, ascomycetous yeasts are more tolerant to selenium than basidiomycetous yeasts. Among the ascomycetous yeasts, the genera Dekkera and Schizosaccharomyces exhibited the lowest and the species Candida maltosa, Hanseniaspora valbyensis, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica the highest tolerance to selenium. Among the basidiomycetous yeasts, the genera Bullera, Cryptococcus, and Holtermannia showed the lowest and the species Cryptococcus curvatus, Cr. humicola, and Trichosporon spp. the highest tolerance to selenium. The selenium tolerance of yeasts depends on the composition of the growth medium, in particular, on the presence of sulfate, sulfur-containing amino acids, and glutamine in the medium.

  20. Protein expression-yeast.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Klaus H

    2014-01-01

    Yeast is an excellent system for the expression of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. Both endogenous and heterologous proteins can be overexpressed in yeast (Phan et al., 2001; Ton and Rao, 2004). Because yeast is easy to manipulate genetically, a strain can be optimized for the expression of a specific protein. Many eukaryotic proteins contain posttranslational modifications that can be performed in yeast but not in bacterial expression systems. In comparison with mammalian cell culture expression systems, growing yeast is both faster and less expensive, and large-scale cultures can be performed using fermentation. While several different yeast expression systems exist, this chapter focuses on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and will briefly describe some options to consider when selecting vectors and tags to be used for protein expression. Throughout this chapter, the expression and purification of yeast eIF3 is shown as an example alongside a general scheme outline.

  1. Yeast Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

    Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of yeast based sensors have been developed as analytical tools. Yeasts are known as facultative anaerobes. Facultative anaerobes can survive in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The yeast based sensor consisted of a DO electrode and an immobilized omnivorous yeast. In yeast based sensor development, many kinds of yeast have been employed by applying their characteristics to adapt to the analyte. For example, Trichosporon cutaneum was used to estimate organic pollution in industrial wastewater. Yeast based sensors are suitable for online control of biochemical processes and for environmental monitoring. In this review, principles and applications of yeast based sensors are summarized.

  2. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  3. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  4. Yeast Infection during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... OK? What's the best way to treat a yeast infection during pregnancy? Answers from Yvonne Butler Tobah, M.D. You can safely treat a yeast infection during pregnancy with various over-the-counter ...

  5. Developmentally programmed nuclear destruction during yeast gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Michael D; Cheung, Sally W T; Lee, Kwan Yin; Moffat, Jason; Meneghini, Marc D

    2012-07-17

    Autophagy controls cellular catabolism in diverse eukaryotes and modulates programmed cell death in plants and animals. While studies of the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided fundamental insights into the mechanisms of autophagy, the roles of cell death pathways in yeast are less well understood. Here, we describe widespread developmentally programmed nuclear destruction (PND) events that occur during yeast gametogenesis. PND is executed through apoptotic-like DNA fragmentation in coordination with an unusual form of autophagy that is most similar to mammalian lysosomal membrane permeabilization and mega-autophagy, a form of plant autophagic cell death. Undomesticated strains execute gametogenic PND broadly in maturing colonies to the apparent benefit of sibling cells, confirming its prominence during the yeast life cycle. Our results reveal that diverse cell-death-related processes converge during gametogenesis in a microbe distantly related to plants or animals, highlighting gametogenesis as a process during which programmed cell death mechanisms may have evolved.

  6. The Analysis Of The Correlations And Regressions Between Some Characters On A Wheat Isogenic Varities Assortment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Păniţă, Ovidiu

    2015-09-01

    In the years 2012-2014 on Banu-Maracine DRS there were tested an assortment of 25 isogenic lines of wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp.vulgare), the analyzed characters being the number of seeds/spike, seeds weight/spike (g), no. of spikes/m2, weight of a thousand seeds (WTS) (g) and no. of emerged plants/m2. Based on recorded data and statistical processing of those, they were identified a numbers of links between these characters. Also available regression models were identified between some of the studied characters. Based on component analysis, no. of seeds/spike and seeds weight/spike are components that influence in excess of 88% variance analysis, a total of seven genotypes with positive scores for both factors.

  7. Development of Near-Isogenic Lines in a Parthenogenetically Reproduced Thrips Species, Frankliniella occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guangdi; Wan, Yanran; Li, Xiaoyu; He, Bingqing; Zhang, Youjun; Xu, Baoyun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhou, Xuguo; Wu, Qingjun

    2017-01-01

    Although near-isogenic lines (NILs) can standardize genetic backgrounds among individuals, it has never been applied in parthenogenetically reproduced animals. Here, through multiple rounds of backcrossing and spinosad screening, we generated spinosad resistant NILs in the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), with a haplo-diploid reproduction system. The resultant F. occidentalis NIL-R strain maintained a resistance ratio over 30,000-fold, which was comparable to its parental resistant strain, Spin-R. More importantly, F. occidentalis NIL-R shared 98.90% genetic similarity with its susceptible parental strain Ivf03. By developing this toolset, we are able to segregate individual resistance and facilitate the mechanistic study of insecticide resistances in phloem-feeding arthropods, a group of devastating pest species reproducing sexually as well as asexually. PMID:28348528

  8. How to build a yeast nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hua; Arbona, Jean-Michel; Zimmer, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions including gene expression and DNA repair are affected by the 3D architecture of the genome, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Notably, it remains unclear to what extent nuclear architecture is driven by generic physical properties of polymers or by specific factors such as proteins binding particular DNA sequences. The budding yeast nucleus has been intensely studied by imaging and biochemical techniques, resulting in a large quantitative data set on locus positions and DNA contact frequencies. We recently described a quantitative model of the interphase yeast nucleus in which chromosomes are represented as passively moving polymer chains. This model ignores the DNA sequence information except for specific constraints at the centromeres, telomeres, and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Despite its simplicity, the model accounts for a large majority of experimental data, including absolute and relative locus positions and contact frequency patterns at chromosomal and subchromosomal scales. Here, we also illustrate the model's ability to reproduce observed features of chromatin movements. Our results strongly suggest that the dynamic large-scale architecture of the yeast nucleus is dominated by statistical properties of randomly moving polymers with a few sequence-specific constraints, rather than by a large number of DNA-specific factors or epigenetic modifications. In addition, we show that our model accounts for recently measured variations in homologous recombination efficiency, illustrating its potential for quantitatively understanding functional consequences of nuclear architecture.

  9. Molecular identification of yeasts associated with traditional Egyptian dairy products.

    PubMed

    El-Sharoud, W M; Belloch, C; Peris, D; Querol, A

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the diversity and ecology of yeasts associated with traditional Egyptian dairy products employing molecular techniques in yeast identification. A total of 120 samples of fresh and stored Domiati cheese, kariesh cheese, and "Matared" cream were collected from local markets and examined. Forty yeast isolates were cultured from these samples and identified using the restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs) of 5.8S-ITS rDNA region and sequencing of the domains D1 and D2 of the 26S rRNA gene. Yeasts were identified as Issatchenkia orientalis (13 isolates), Candida albicans (4 isolates), Clavispora lusitaniae (Candida lusitaniae) (9 isolates), Kodamaea ohmeri (Pichia ohmeri) (1 isolate), Kluyveromyces marxianus (6 isolates), and Candida catenulata (7 isolates). With the exception of C. lusitaniae, the D1/D2 26S rRNA gene sequences were 100% identical for the yeast isolates within the same species. Phylogenetic reconstruction of C. lusitaniae isolates grouped them into 3 distinguished clusters. Kariesh cheese was found to be the most diverse in its yeast floras and contained the highest total yeast count compared with other examined dairy products. This was linked to the acidic pH and lower salt content of this cheese, which favor the growth and survival of yeasts in foodstuffs. Stored Domiati cheese also contained diverse yeast species involving isolates of the pathogenic yeast C. albicans. This raises the possibility of dairy products being vehicles of transmission of pathogenic yeasts.

  10. Repair of nerve injury by implanting prostheses obtained from isogenic acellular nerve segments.

    PubMed

    García-Medrano, B; Mesuro Domínguez, N; Simón Pérez, Cl; Garrosa García, M; Gayoso Del Villar, S; Mayo Íscar, A; Gayoso Rodríguez, M J; Martín Ferrero, M A

    When a nerve section with a significant gap occurs, it is necessary to use a prosthesis to suture it. To date an autologous nerve segment graft appears to be the best treatment; but it has several important disadvantages. Our goal is to study the effectiveness of an isogenic acellular nerve prosthesis comparing a simple suture with tubulisation. Four groups of Wistar rats were used. The animals in Group 0 served as donors of nerve segments to graft. Group 1 received the implant with an end-to-end suture. In group 2, the implant was sutured inside an ɛ-caprolactone tube. Group 3 received it in a polylactic-co-glycolic acid tube. We evaluated the motor function (sciatic index and step test in motion), and the regeneration length by histological study of regeneration, after a maximum of 3 weeks. Regeneration was uneven in the three groups. In all groups, there were implants with regenerated nerve fibres at the maximum studied length (15mm) and others where regeneration was scarce. The mean regeneration length was greater in the direct end-to-end suture group (G1), although the regeneration speed was similar in the three groups. Group 1 showed the highest percentage of regeneration, but the variability of results prevents this difference reaching statistical significance. We found no significant differences between the two groups with polymer tubes. For the implantation of isogenic acellular nerve prosthesis, under our experimental conditions, the direct end-to-end suture was more effective than when it isprotected with biopolymer tubes. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification and characterization of a second isogene encoding γ-terpinene synthase in Thymus caespititius.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Marta D; Barroso, José G; Oliveira, M Margarida; Trindade, Helena

    2014-07-15

    Thymus caespititius Brot. is an Iberian endemic species, whose essential oils possess high polymorphism. They consist mostly of mono- and sesquiterpene, some of them with interest for the pharmaceutical and food industries. The search for terpene synthase genes was performed in three in vitro T. caespititius genotypes. For these plants, the expression of a previously described γ-terpinene synthase gene, Tctps2, was confirmed, occurring concomitantly with a new gene encoding an enzyme with similar activity, named Thymus caespititius terpene synthase 4 (Tctps4). The two isogenes were isolated and functionally characterized in the three plant genotypes. Alignment of the two Tctps revealed a transit peptide much shorter in Tctps4 than in Tctps2 (3-4 amino acids instead of 47). The Tctps4 open reading frame is shorter than Tctps2 (1665 bp versus 1794 bp). The amino acid sequence of both γ-terpinene synthases shared an 88% pairwise identity. The fact that T. caespititius carries two isogenes for γ-terpinene synthases, suggests gene duplication along the evolutionary process, followed by mutations leading to the differentiation of both genes. These mutations didn't compromise protein activity. A high accumulation of transcripts from both genes was found in shoots of in vitro plantlets, while in roots they could not be detected. Still, γ-terpinene levels in aerial parts were reduced, probably due to fast conversion into carvacrol and thymol, the main components from T. caespititius essential oils. This study is a contribution to the identification of terpene synthase genes in Lamiaceae.

  12. Survival time of cardiac allografts prolonged by isogeneic BMT in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Jiang, H; Chen, R; Feng, S; Jin, J; Bi, Y; Yang, H; Chen, J

    2012-08-01

    To find an approach to prolong the survival time of cardiac allografts in a BALB/c-to-C57/BL6 heterotopic heart transplant model and to try to figure out related chemokines and cytokines, isogeneic and allogeneic BM cells were obtained from pregnant C57/BL6 (♀C57/BL6 × ♂BALB/c) and regular BALB/c mice and injected to the half lethally irradiated C57/BL6 mice 1 day before heart transplantation. Recipients were treated with CsA or phosphate-buffered saline for 7 days. Isogeneic BMT (iBMT) from pregnant C57/BL6 mice was observed to significantly prolong the survival of BALB/c allografts and reduce the lymphocyte infiltration. Allogeneic BMT (aBMT) and iBMT both exhibited signicantly less T-cell proliferation reactivity and the similar degree of chimerism. There was no significant difference in these groups of IFN-γ and IL-4 production. The level of chemokine MIG (CXCL9) dramatically decreased in aBMT and iBMT groups compared with the control group. But there were no significant differences between aBMT and iBMT group. IL-17 and RORγ(t) (receptor-related orphan receptor) production were downregulated in iBMT recipients. These results indicate that iBMT can prolong the survival of cardiac allografts. IL-17 production downregulated in iBMT recipients. This means that iBMT may have important therapeutic implications.

  13. YeastIP: a database for identification and phylogeny of Saccharomycotina yeasts.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Stéphanie; Samson, Franck; Navarro, David; Casaregola, Serge

    2013-02-01

    With the advances in sequencing techniques, identification of ascomycetous yeasts to the species level and phylogeny reconstruction increasingly require curated and updated taxonomic information. A specific database with nucleotide sequences of the most common markers used for yeast taxonomy and phylogeny and a user-friendly interface allowing identification, taxonomy and phylogeny of yeasts species was developed. By 1 September 2012, the YeastIP database contained all the described Saccharomycotina species for which sequences used for taxonomy and phylogeny, such as D1/D2 rDNA and ITS, are available. The database interface was developed to provide a maximum of relevant information and data mining tools, including the following features: (1) the blast n program for the sequences of the YeastIP database; (2) easy retrieval of selected sequences; (3) display of the available markers for each selected group of species; and (4) a tool to concatenate marker sequences, including those provided by the user. The concatenation tool allows phylogeny reconstruction through a direct link to the Phylogeny.fr platform. YeastIP is thus a unique database in that it provides taxonomic information and guides users in their taxonomic analyses. YeastIP facilitates multigenic analysis to encourage good practice in ascomycetous yeast phylogeny (URL: http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/yeastip.). © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of different yeast cell-wall mutants on performance and protection against pathogenic bacteria (Vibrio campbellii) in gnotobiotically-grown Artemia.

    PubMed

    Soltanian, Siyavash; Dhont, Jean; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2007-07-01

    A selection of isogenic yeast strains (with deletion for genes involved in cell-wall synthesis) was used to evaluate their nutritional and immunostimulatory characteristics for gnotobiotically-grown Artemia. In the first set of experiments the nutritional value of isogenic yeast strains (effected in mannoproteins, glucan, chitin and cell-wall bound protein synthesis) for gnotobiotically-grown Artemia was studied. Yeast cell-wall mutants were always better feed for Artemia than the isogenic wild type mainly because they supported a higher survival but not a stronger individual growth. The difference in Artemia performance between WT and mutants feeding was reduced when stationary-phase grown cells were used. These results suggest that any mutation affecting the yeast cell-wall make-up is sufficient to improve the digestibility in Artemia. The second set of experiments, investigates the use of a small amount of yeast cells in gnotobiotic Artemia to overcome pathogenicity of Vibrio campbellii (VC). Among all yeast cell strains used in this study, only mnn9 yeast (less cell-wall bound mannoproteins and more glucan and chitin) seems to completely protect Artemia against the pathogen. Incomplete protection against the pathogen was obtained by the gas1 and chs3 mutants, which are lacking the gene for a particular cell-wall protein and chitin synthesis, respectively, resulting in more glucan. The result with the chs3 mutant is of particular interest, as its nutritional value for Artemia is comparable to the wild type. Hence, only with the chs3 strain, in contrast to the gas1 or mnn9 strains, the temporary protection to VC is not concomitant with a better growth performance under non-challenged conditions, suggesting non-interference of general nutritional effects.

  15. Multiple Cooperating Oncogenes Drive Recurrent Breast Cancer-Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Josh Lauring , M.D., Ph.D...5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0285 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Josh Lauring , M.D., Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  16. Transcriptome profile of near-isogenic soybean lines for ß-conglycinin a-subunit deficiency during seed maturation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crossing, backcrossing and molecular marker assisted background selection produced a near isogenic line (‘cgy-2NIL’) containing cgy-2 allele, which is responsible for the absence of allergen a-subunit of ß-conglycinin. To identify a-null-related transcriptional changes, the gene expressions of ‘cgy-...

  17. High-Temperature Ethanol Fermentation and Transformation with Linear DNA in the Thermotolerant Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus DMKU3-1042▿

    PubMed Central

    Nonklang, Sanom; Abdel-Banat, Babiker M. A.; Cha-aim, Kamonchai; Moonjai, Nareerat; Hoshida, Hisashi; Limtong, Savitree; Yamada, Mamoru; Akada, Rinji

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate herein the ability of Kluyveromyces marxianus to be an efficient ethanol producer and host for expressing heterologous proteins as an alternative to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth and ethanol production by strains of K. marxianus and S. cerevisiae were compared under the same conditions. K. marxianus DMKU3-1042 was found to be the most suitable strain for high-temperature growth and ethanol production at 45°C. This strain, but not S. cerevisiae, utilized cellobiose, xylose, xylitol, arabinose, glycerol, and lactose. To develop a K. marxianus DMKU3-1042 derivative strain suitable for genetic engineering, a uracil auxotroph was isolated and transformed with a linear DNA of the S. cerevisiae ScURA3 gene. Surprisingly, Ura+ transformants were easily obtained. By Southern blot hybridization, the linear ScURA3 DNA was found to have inserted randomly into the K. marxianus genome. Sequencing of one Lys− transformant confirmed the disruption of the KmLYS1 gene by the ScURA3 insertion. A PCR-amplified linear DNA lacking K. marxianus sequences but containing an Aspergillus α-amylase gene under the control of the ScTDH3 promoter together with an ScURA3 marker was subsequently used to transform K. marxianus DMKU3-1042 in order to obtain transformants expressing Aspergillus α-amylase. Our results demonstrate that K. marxianus DMKU3-1042 can be an alternative cost-effective bioethanol producer and a host for transformation with linear DNA by use of S. cerevisiae-based molecular genetic tools. PMID:18931291

  18. Metschnikowia viticola sp. nov., a new yeast species from grape.

    PubMed

    Péter, Gábor; Tornai-Lehoczki, Judit; Suzuki, Motofumi; Dlauchy, Dénes

    2005-02-01

    Two yeast strains, producing needle-shaped ascospores under suitable conditions, were isolated from grapes grown in Hungary. Based on these two strains, Metschnikowia viticola (type strain NCAIM Y.01705, CBS 9950, JCM 12561) is proposed as a new yeast species. Considering its phenotypic features, the restriction fragment patterns of 18S rDNA and the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA, the proposed new species is closely related to Candida kofuensis.

  19. [Construction and analysis of the SSH library with the resistant wheat near-isogenic line and its susceptible parent infected by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici].

    PubMed

    Shu, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Niu, Yong-Chun

    2011-09-01

    To analyze the differentially expressed genes between resistant and susceptible wheat near-isogenic lines infected by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici, a subtractive library containing about 1300 clones was constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) in which the cDNA from resistant Yr4/6 × Taichung 29 seedlings inoculated with race CY26 was used as the tester, and the corresponding cDNA from susceptible Taichung 29 as the driver. Six hundred clones from the library were analyzed with reverse Northern blot. The positive clones were further tested by Northern blotting analysis. Twelve clones were verified and showed significant difference. By means of sequencing and BlastX analysis, six function-known differentially expressed sequences were detected, and their putative products were leucine-rich repeat protein, catalase, thioredoxin H-type, RNA binding protein, ascorbate peroxidase, and heat shock protein, respectively. Among them, leucine-rich repeat protein belongs to signal transduction protein, and others belong to defense response protein.

  20. Expression of virulence genes in luminescent and nonluminescent isogenic vibrios and virulence towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana).

    PubMed

    Ruwandeepika, H A D; Defoirdt, T; Bhowmick, P P; Karunasagar, I; Bossier, P

    2011-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the expression levels of virulence gene regulators (luxR and toxR) and virulence factors (serine protease, metalloprotease and haemolysin) in luminescent and nonluminescent isogenic Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio campbellii. Nonluminescent variants have been reported before to become dominant in cultures of luminescent vibrios when grown under static conditions in the dark. Wild-type V. harveyi BB120, V. campbellii LMG 21363, quorum sensing mutants of V. harveyi BB120 and their previously reported nonluminescent isogenic counterparts were used in this study. The expression level of the virulence genes srp serine protease, vhp metalloprotease and vhh haemolysin, the quorum sensing master regulator gene luxR and the virulence regulator gene toxR in isogenic luminescent and nonluminescent strains were quantified using reverse transcriptase real-time PCR. These experiments revealed that the nonluminescent strains produced lower levels of the quorum sensing master regulator gene luxR and the vhp metalloprotease gene (which is known to be regulated by quorum sensing). Finally, challenge tests with gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) larvae revealed that the nonluminescent strains are less virulent than their luminescent isogenic counterparts. Nonluminescent variants of V. harveyi and V. campbellii strains produce lower levels of the quorum sensing master regulator gene luxR and the vhp metalloprotease gene and are less virulent to brine shrimp than their isogenic luminescent counterparts. These results indicate that adaptation of luminescent vibrios to specific growth conditions that result in a dominant nonluminescent phenotype is accompanied by a decreased adaptation to a host environment because of altered virulence gene regulation. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. A Mutation in a Novel Yeast Proteasomal Gene, RPN11/MPR1, Produces a Cell Cycle Arrest, Overreplication of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA, and an Altered Mitochondrial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Teresa; Ricci, Carlo; Porro, Danilo; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Frontali, Laura

    1998-01-01

    We report here the functional characterization of an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, MPR1, coding for a regulatory proteasomal subunit for which the name Rpn11p has been proposed. For this study we made use of the mpr1-1 mutation that causes the following pleiotropic defects. At 24°C growth is delayed on glucose and impaired on glycerol, whereas no growth is seen at 36°C on either carbon source. Microscopic observation of cells growing on glucose at 24°C shows that most of them bear a large bud, whereas mitochondrial morphology is profoundly altered. A shift to the nonpermissive temperature produces aberrant elongated cell morphologies, whereas the nucleus fails to divide. Flow cytometry profiles after the shift to the nonpermissive temperature indicate overreplication of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Consistently with the identification of Mpr1p with a proteasomal subunit, the mutation is complemented by the human POH1 proteasomal gene. Moreover, the mpr1-1 mutant grown to stationary phase accumulates ubiquitinated proteins. Localization of the Rpn11p/Mpr1p protein has been studied by green fluorescent protein fusion, and the fusion protein has been found to be mainly associated to cytoplasmic structures. For the first time, a proteasomal mutation has also revealed an associated mitochondrial phenotype. We actually showed, by the use of [rho°] cells derived from the mutant, that the increase in DNA content per cell is due in part to an increase in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. Moreover, microscopy of mpr1-1 cells grown on glucose showed that multiple punctate mitochondrial structures were present in place of the tubular network found in the wild-type strain. These data strongly suggest that mpr1-1 is a valuable tool with which to study the possible roles of proteasomal function in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:9763452

  2. Effects of DNA double-strand and single-strand breaks on intrachromosomal recombination events in cell-cycle-arrested yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Galli, A; Schiestl, R H

    1998-01-01

    Intrachromosomal recombination between repeated elements can result in deletion (DEL recombination) events. We investigated the inducibility of such intrachromosomal recombination events at different stages of the cell cycle and the nature of the primary DNA lesions capable of initiating these events. Two genetic systems were constructed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that select for DEL recombination events between duplicated alleles of CDC28 and TUB2. We determined effects of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-strand breaks (SSBs) between the duplicated alleles on DEL recombination when induced in dividing cells or cells arrested in G1 or G2. Site-specific DSBs and SSBs were produced by overexpression of the I-Sce I endonuclease and the gene II protein (gIIp), respectively. I-Sce I-induced DSBs caused an increase in DEL recombination frequencies in both dividing and cell-cycle-arrested cells, indicating that G1- and G2-arrested cells are capable of completing DSB repair. In contrast, gIIp-induced SSBs caused an increase in DEL recombination frequency only in dividing cells. To further examine these phenomena we used both gamma-irradiation, inducing DSBs as its most relevant lesion, and UV, inducing other forms of DNA damage. UV irradiation did not increase DEL recombination frequencies in G1 or G2, whereas gamma-rays increased DEL recombination frequencies in both phases. Both forms of radiation, however, induced DEL recombination in dividing cells. The results suggest that DSBs but not SSBs induce DEL recombination, probably via the single-strand annealing pathway. Further, DSBs in dividing cells may result from the replication of a UV or SSB-damaged template. Alternatively, UV induced events may occur by replication slippage after DNA polymerase pausing in front of the damage. PMID:9649517

  3. Isolation and characterization of ethanol tolerant yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Tikka, Chiranjeevi; Osuru, Hari Prasad; Atluri, Navya; Raghavulu, Praveen Chakravarthi Veera; yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Mannur, Ismail Shaik; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Aluru, Sudheer; K, Narasimha Varma; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2013-01-01

    Yeast strains are commonly associated with sugar rich environments. Various fruit samples were selected as source for isolating yeast cells. The isolated cultures were identified at Genus level by colony morphology, biochemical characteristics and cell morphological characters. An attempt has been made to check the viability of yeast cells under different concentrations of ethanol. Ethanol tolerance of each strain was studied by allowing the yeast to grow in liquid YEPD (Yeast Extract Peptone Dextrose) medium having different concentrations of ethanol. A total of fifteen yeast strains isolated from different samples were used for the study. Seven strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained from different fruit sources were screened for ethanol tolerance. The results obtained in this study show a range of tolerance levels between 7%-12% in all the stains. Further, the cluster analysis based on 22 RAPD (Random Amplified polymorphic DNA) bands revealed polymorphisms in these seven Saccharomyces strains. PMID:23750092

  4. Yeast Genomics for Bread, Beer, Biology, Bucks and Breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakharkar, Kishore R.; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    The rapid advances and scale up of projects in DNA sequencing dur ing the past two decades have produced complete genome sequences of several eukaryotic species. The versatile genetic malleability of the yeast, and the high degree of conservation between its cellular processes and those of human cells have made it a model of choice for pioneering research in molecular and cell biology. The complete sequence of yeast genome has proven to be extremely useful as a reference towards the sequences of human and for providing systems to explore key gene functions. Yeast has been a ‘legendary model’ for new technologies and gaining new biological insights into basic biological sciences and biotechnology. This chapter describes the awesome power of yeast genetics, genomics and proteomics in understanding of biological function. The applications of yeast as a screening tool to the field of drug discovery and development are highlighted and the traditional importance of yeast for bakers and brewers is discussed.

  5. Elimination of the Yeast Rad6 Ubiquitin Conjugase Enhances Base-Pair Transitions and G.c -> T.a Transversions as Well as Transposition of the Ty Element: Implications for the Control of Spontaneous Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, X.; Yadao, F.; Gietz, R. D.; Kunz, B. A.

    1992-01-01

    The RAD6 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an enzyme that conjugates ubiquitin to other proteins. Defects in RAD6 confer a mutator phenotype due, in part, to an increased rate of transposition of the yeast Ty element. To further delineate the role of protein ubiquitination in the control of spontaneous mutagenesis in yeast, we have characterized 202 mutations that arose spontaneously in the SUP4-o gene carried on a centromere vector in a RAD6 deletion strain. The resulting mutational spectrum was compared to that for 354 spontaneous SUP4-o mutations isolated in the isogenic wild-type parent. This comparison revealed that the rad6 mutator enhanced the rate of single base-pair substitution, as well as Ty insertion, but did not affect the rates of the other mutational classes detected. Relative to the wild-type parent, Ty inserted at considerably more SUP4-o positions in the rad6 strain with a significantly smaller fraction detected at a transposition hotspot. These findings suggest that, in addition to the rate of transposition, protein ubiquitination might influence the target site specificity of Ty insertion. The increase in the substitution rate accounted for approximately 90% of the rad6 mutator effect but only the two transitions and the G.C -> T.A transversion were enhanced. Analysis of the distribution of these events within SUP4-o suggested that the site specificity of the substitutions was influenced by DNA sequence context. Transformation of heteroduplex plasmid DNAs into the two strains demonstrated that the rad6 mutator did not reduce the efficiency of correcting mismatches that could give rise to the transitions or transversion nor did it bias restoration of the mismatches to the incorrect base-pairs. These results are discussed in relation to possible mechanisms that might link ubiquitination of proteins to spontaneous mutation rates. PMID:1311695

  6. Methylations of histone H3 lysine 9 and lysine 36 are functionally linked to DNA replication checkpoint control in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Rhee, Dong Keun; Jang, Yeun Kyu

    2008-04-04

    Recently, histone H4 lysine 20 and H3 lysine 79 methylations were functionally linked to DNA damage checkpoint. The crosstalk between histone methylation and the S-M checkpoint, however, has remained unclear. Here, we show that H3 lysine 9 (K9) and lysine 36 (K36) methylations catalyzed by two histone methyltransferases Clr4 and Set2 are involved in hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication checkpoint. The clr4-set2 double mutants besides histone H3-K9 and K36 double mutants exhibited HU-sensitivity, a defective HU-induced S-M checkpoint, and a significant reduction of HU-induced phosphorylation of Cdc2. Intriguingly, the clr4-set2 double mutations impaired the HU-induced accumulation of a mitotic inhibitor Mik1. Double mutants in Alp13 and Swi6, which can specifically bind to H3-K36 and K9 methylations, exhibited phenotypes similar to those of the clr4-set2 mutants. Together, these findings suggest that methylations of histone H3-K9 and K36 by Clr4 and Set2 are functionally linked to DNA replication checkpoint via accumulation of Mik1.

  7. Yeast MPH1 gene functions in an error-free DNA damage bypass pathway that requires genes from Homologous recombination, but not from postreplicative repair.

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, K Anke; Rudolph, Christian; Ulrich, Helle D; Kramer, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    The MPH1 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a member of the DEAH family of proteins, had been identified by virtue of the spontaneous mutator phenotype of respective deletion mutants. Genetic analysis suggested that MPH1 functions in a previously uncharacterized DNA repair pathway that protects the cells from damage-induced mutations. We have now analyzed genetic interactions of mph1 with a variety of mutants from different repair systems with respect to spontaneous mutation rates and sensitivities to different DNA-damaging agents. The dependence of the mph1 mutator phenotype on REV3 and REV1 and the synergy with mutations in base and nucleotide excision repair suggest an involvement of MPH1 in error-free bypass of lesions. However, although we observed an unexpected partial suppression of the mph1 mutator phenotype by rad5, genetic interactions with other mutations in postreplicative repair imply that MPH1 does not belong to this pathway. Instead, mutations from the homologous recombination pathway were found to be epistatic to mph1 with respect to both spontaneous mutation rates and damage sensitivities. Determination of spontaneous mitotic recombination rates demonstrated that mph1 mutants are not deficient in homologous recombination. On the contrary, in an sgs1 background we found a pronounced hyperrecombination phenotype. Thus, we propose that MPH1 is involved in a branch of homologous recombination that is specifically dedicated to error-free bypass. PMID:15126389

  8. Activation of an alternative, rec12 (spo11)-independent pathway of fission yeast meiotic recombination in the absence of a DNA flap endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Farah, Joseph A; Cromie, Gareth; Davis, Luther; Steiner, Walter W; Smith, Gerald R

    2005-12-01

    Spo11 or a homologous protein appears to be essential for meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and recombination in all organisms tested. We report here the first example of an alternative, mutationally activated pathway for meiotic recombination in the absence of Rec12, the Spo11 homolog of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Rad2, a FEN-1 flap endonuclease homolog, is involved in processing Okazaki fragments. In its absence, meiotic recombination and proper segregation of chromosomes were restored in rec12Delta mutants to nearly wild-type levels. Although readily detectable in wild-type strains, meiosis-specific DSBs were undetectable in recombination-proficient rad2Delta rec12Delta strains. On the basis of the biochemical properties of Rad2, we propose that meiotic recombination by this alternative (Rec*) pathway can be initiated by non-DSB lesions, such as nicks and gaps, which accumulate during premeiotic DNA replication in the absence of Okazaki fragment processing. We compare the Rec* pathway to alternative pathways of homologous recombination in other organisms.

  9. Production of alpha-amylase by yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Thomse, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    The enzyme alpha-amylase confers to an organism the enzymatic activity for the degradation of polyglucosides with alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds such as starch and glycogen which are among the major storage compounds in plants and animals. Most alpha-amylases are single polypeptides of molecular weights around 50,000 dalton. They are generally found in the digestive tract of animals and in germinating seeds. Among the products released upon enzymatic degradation of polyglucosides maltose, a sugar that can be utilized as carbon source by yeast, is a major constituent. A cDNA segment complementary to mouse salivary amylase messenger RNA has been inserted into the yeast expression vector pMA56 behind the promoter of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase I of yeast. Yeast transformants harboring plasmids with the normal orientation of the promoter and the mouse amylase cDNA gene produce amylase and release the enzyme in free form into the culture medium. Approximately 90% of the amylase activity is found in the medium. Yeast strains carrying MAL allele and transformed with a plasmid which directed the synthesis of mouse alpha-amylase were tested on plates containing starch and in batch fermentations using different high molecular weight sugars and oligosaccharides as carbon source. The results of these experiments will be discussed. (Refs. 21).

  10. Phylogenetics of Saccharomycetales, the ascomycete yeasts.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Oui; Blackwell, Meredith; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Lachance, Marc-André

    2006-01-01

    Ascomycete yeasts (phylum Ascomycota: subphylum Saccharomycotina: class Saccharomycetes: order Saccharomycetales) comprise a monophyletic lineage with a single order of about 1000 known species. These yeasts live as saprobes, often in association with plants, animals and their interfaces. A few species account for most human mycotic infections, and fewer than 10 species are plant pathogens. Yeasts are responsible for important industrial and biotechnological processes, including baking, brewing and synthesis of recombinant proteins. Species such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae are model organisms in research, some of which led to a Nobel Prize. Yeasts usually reproduce asexually by budding, and their sexual states are not enclosed in a fruiting body. The group also is well defined by synapomorphies visible at the ultrastructural level. Yeast identification and classification changed dramatically with the availability of DNA sequencing. Species identification now benefits from a constantly updated sequence database and no longer relies on ambiguous growth tests. A phylogeny based on single gene analyses has shown the order to be remarkably divergent despite morphological similarities among members. The limits of many previously described genera are not supported by sequence comparisons, and multigene phylogenetic studies are under way to provide a stable circumscription of genera, families and orders. One recent multigene study has resolved species of the Saccharomycetaceae into genera that differ markedly from those defined by analysis of morphology and growth responses, and similar changes are likely to occur in other branches of the yeast tree as additional sequences become available.

  11. Subcellular localization of the yeast proteome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Agarwal, Seema; Heyman, John A; Matson, Sandra; Heidtman, Matthew; Piccirillo, Stacy; Umansky, Lara; Drawid, Amar; Jansen, Ronald; Liu, Yang; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Roeder, G Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2002-03-15

    Protein localization data are a valuable information resource helpful in elucidating eukaryotic protein function. Here, we report the first proteome-scale analysis of protein localization within any eukaryote. Using directed topoisomerase I-mediated cloning strategies and genome-wide transposon mutagenesis, we have epitope-tagged 60% of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome. By high-throughput immunolocalization of tagged gene products, we have determined the subcellular localization of 2744 yeast proteins. Extrapolating these data through a computational algorithm employing Bayesian formalism, we define the yeast localizome (the subcellular distribution of all 6100 yeast proteins). We estimate the yeast proteome to encompass approximately 5100 soluble proteins and >1000 transmembrane proteins. Our results indicate that 47% of yeast proteins are cytoplasmic, 13% mitochondrial, 13% exocytic (including proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and secretory vesicles), and 27% nuclear/nucleolar. A subset of nuclear proteins was further analyzed by immunolocalization using surface-spread preparations of meiotic chromosomes. Of these proteins, 38% were found associated with chromosomal DNA. As determined from phenotypic analyses of nuclear proteins, 34% are essential for spore viability--a percentage nearly twice as great as that observed for the proteome as a whole. In total, this study presents experimentally derived localization data for 955 proteins of previously unknown function: nearly half of all functionally uncharacterized proteins in yeast. To facilitate access to these data, we provide a searchable database featuring 2900 fluorescent micrographs at http://ygac.med.yale.edu.

  12. Subcellular localization of the yeast proteome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuj; Agarwal, Seema; Heyman, John A.; Matson, Sandra; Heidtman, Matthew; Piccirillo, Stacy; Umansky, Lara; Drawid, Amar; Jansen, Ronald; Liu, Yang; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Roeder, G. Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Protein localization data are a valuable information resource helpful in elucidating eukaryotic protein function. Here, we report the first proteome-scale analysis of protein localization within any eukaryote. Using directed topoisomerase I-mediated cloning strategies and genome-wide transposon mutagenesis, we have epitope-tagged 60% of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome. By high-throughput immunolocalization of tagged gene products, we have determined the subcellular localization of 2744 yeast proteins. Extrapolating these data through a computational algorithm employing Bayesian formalism, we define the yeast localizome (the subcellular distribution of all 6100 yeast proteins). We estimate the yeast proteome to encompass ∼5100 soluble proteins and >1000 transmembrane proteins. Our results indicate that 47% of yeast proteins are cytoplasmic, 13% mitochondrial, 13% exocytic (including proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and secretory vesicles), and 27% nuclear/nucleolar. A subset of nuclear proteins was further analyzed by immunolocalization using surface-spread preparatio