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Sample records for isolated 2-methylbutyrylglycinuria caused

  1. Isolated 2-methylbutyrylglycinuria caused by short/branched-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: identification of a new enzyme defect, resolution of its molecular basis, and evidence for distinct acyl-CoA dehydrogenases in isoleucine and valine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Andresen, B S; Christensen, E; Corydon, T J; Bross, P; Pilgaard, B; Wanders, R J; Ruiter, J P; Simonsen, H; Winter, V; Knudsen, I; Schroeder, L D; Gregersen, N; Skovby, F

    2000-11-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) defects in isoleucine and valine catabolism have been proposed in clinically diverse patients with an abnormal pattern of metabolites in their urine, but they have not been proved enzymatically or genetically, and it is unknown whether one or two ACADs are involved. We investigated a patient with isolated 2-methylbutyrylglycinuria, suggestive of a defect in isoleucine catabolism. Enzyme assay of the patient's fibroblasts, using 2-methylbutyryl-CoA as substrate, confirmed the defect. Sequence analysis of candidate ACADs revealed heterozygosity for the common short-chain ACAD A625 variant allele and no mutations in ACAD-8 but a 100-bp deletion in short/branched-chain ACAD (SBCAD) cDNA from the patient. Our identification of the SBCAD gene structure (11 exons; >20 kb) enabled analysis of genomic DNA. This showed that the deletion was caused by skipping of exon 10, because of homozygosity for a 1228G-->A mutation in the patient. This mutation was not present in 118 control chromosomes. In vitro transcription/translation experiments and overexpression in COS cells confirmed the disease-causing nature of the mutant SBCAD protein and showed that ACAD-8 is an isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase and that both wild-type proteins are imported into mitochondria and form tetramers. In conclusion, we report the first mutation in the SBCAD gene, show that it results in an isolated defect in isoleucine catabolism, and indicate that ACAD-8 is a mitochondrial enzyme that functions in valine catabolism.

  2. Rare or unusual causes of chronic, isolated, pure aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, B.F.; Taliercio, C.P.; Dickos, D.K.; Howard, J.; Adlam, J.H.; Jolly, W. )

    1990-08-01

    Six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement had rare or unusual causes of isolated, pure aortic regurgitation. Two patients had congenitally bicuspid aortic valves with a false commissure (raphe) displaced to the aortic wall (tethered bicuspid aortic valve), two had floppy aortic valves, one had a congenital quadricuspid valve, and one had radiation-induced valve damage.

  3. [Fetal death caused by myocarditis and isolated congenital auriculoventricular block].

    PubMed

    Herreman, G; Ferme, I; Morel, S; Batisse, J; Vuon, N P; Meyer, O

    1985-09-07

    A 26-year old woman gave birth, at term, to a child with isolated complete heart block. A second pregnancy was interrupted by foetal death. Among other immunological abnormalities, this young woman had an antibody resembling the anti-SS-B antibody. At pathological examination the foetus' heart was found to be free of malformation but presented with subacute myocarditis associated with microcalcifications of the conductive tissue. Such findings suggest that an incipient myocarditis may either result in foetal death or lead to fibrosis of conduction pathways with isolated complete heart block.

  4. Isolation of an agent causing bilirubinemia and jaundice in raccoons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilham, L.; Herman, C.M.

    1954-01-01

    An infectious agent, which appears to be a virus (RJV) has been isolated from the liver of a wild raccoon which has led to a highly fatal type of disease characterized by conjunctivitis and an elevated serum bilirubin frequently accompanied by jaundice on inoculation of raccoons. Ferrets also appear to be susceptible to infections with this agent.

  5. Characterization of Escherichia coli O157 : H7 isolates causing haemolytic uraemic syndrome in France.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Philippe; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Grimont, Francine; Brahimi, Naïma; Courroux, Céline; Grimont, Patrick; Bingen, Edouard

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven non-epidemic Escherichia coli O157 : H7 isolates causing haemolytic uraemic syndrome in France were characterized. The isolates clustered into 36 clones using PFGE typing. All the isolates harboured eae and one or more copies of stx2 and belonged to phylogenetic group D. Nine per cent were resistant to amoxicillin.

  6. Isolated paroxysmal dysarthria caused by a single demyelinating midbrain lesion.

    PubMed

    Codeluppi, Luca; Bigliardi, Guido; Chiari, Annalisa; Meletti, Stefano

    2013-10-16

    Paroxysmal dysarthria is an unusual condition characterised by brief episodes of dysarthria with the sudden onset and frequent recurrence. It has been mainly reported in multiple sclerosis and an association with midbrain lesions has been claimed; however, most of the reported patients had multiple brain alterations so it was difficult to associate this symptom with a specific lesion site. We illustrate the cases of two patients with an isolated demyelinating midbrain lesion presenting paroxysmal dysarthria as the only symptom; both participants had oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and an unremarkable follow-up. Both patients had benefit from carbamazepine treatment, similarly to previously reported cases. Our report confirms that a demyelinating midbrain lesion is sufficient to provoke paroxysmal dysarthria. It is noteworthy that an erroneous diagnosis of psychogenic disorders was initially made in both cases, highlighting the importance not to underestimate isolated paroxysmal symptoms in clinical practice.

  7. Dissemination of clonal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates causing salmonellosis in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Issack, Mohammad I; Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Ramsamy, Veemala D; Svendsen, Christina A; Pornruangwong, Srirat; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is one of the leading causes of salmonellosis in Mauritius, where it has also been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness. However, little is known about its molecular epidemiology in the country. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the clonality and source of Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius by studying human, food, and poultry isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration determination. Forty-nine isolates collected between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed, including 25 stool isolates from foodborne illness outbreaks and sporadic gastroenteritis cases, four blood isolates, one postmortem colon isolate, 14 food isolates, and five poultry isolates. All isolates were pansusceptible to the 16 antibiotics tested, except for two isolates that were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Overall characterization of the isolates by PFGE digested with XbaI and BlnI resulted in eight different patterns. The largest of the clusters in the composite dataset consisted of 20 isolates, including two raw chicken isolates, four poultry isolates, and nine human stool isolates from two outbreaks. A second cluster consisted of 18 isolates, of which 12 originated from human blood and stool samples from both sporadic and outbreak cases. Six food isolates were also found in this cluster, including isolates from raw and grilled chicken, marlin mousse, and cooked pork. One poultry isolate had a closely related PFGE pattern. The results indicate that one clone of Salmonella Typhimurium found in poultry has been causing outbreaks of foodborne illness in Mauritius and another clone that has caused many cases of gastrointestinal illness and bacteremia in humans could also be linked to poultry. Thus, poultry appears to be a major reservoir for Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius. Initiating on-farm control strategies and measures against future dissemination may

  8. A homozygous mutation in LTBP2 causes isolated microspherophakia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Duvvari, Maheswara R; Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C; Shetty, Jyoti S; Murthy, Gowri J; Blanton, Susan H

    2010-10-01

    Microspherophakia is an autosomal-recessive congenital disorder characterized by small spherical lens. It may be isolated or occur as part of a hereditary systemic disorder, such as Marfan syndrome, autosomal dominant and recessive forms of Weill-Marchesani syndrome, autosomal dominant glaucoma-lens ectopia-microspherophakia-stiffness-shortness syndrome, autosomal dominant microspherophakia with hernia, and microspherophakia-metaphyseal dysplasia. The purpose of this study was to map and identify the gene for isolated microspherophakia in two consanguineous Indian families. Using a whole-genome linkage scan in one family, we identified a likely locus for microspherophakia (MSP1) on chromosome 14q24.1-q32.12 between markers D14S588 and D14S1050 in a physical distance of 22.76 Mb. The maximum multi-point lod score was 2.91 between markers D14S1020 and D14S606. The MSP1 candidate region harbors 110 reference genes. DNA sequence analysis of one of the genes, LTBP2, detected a homozygous duplication (insertion) mutation, c.5446dupC, in the last exon (exon 36) in affected family members. This homozygous mutation is predicted to elongate the LTBP2 protein by replacing the last 6 amino acids with 27 novel amino acids. Microspherophakia in the second family did not map to this locus, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. The present study suggests a role for LTBP2 in the structural stability of ciliary zonules, and growth and development of lens.

  9. Few isolated neurons in hypothalamic hamartomas may cause gelastic seizures.

    PubMed

    Waldau, Ben; McLendon, Roger E; Fuchs, Herbert E; George, Timothy M; Grant, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are congenital, benign masses in the hypothalamus and tuber cinereum that may cause central precocious puberty and gelastic seizures. Nodules of small neurons are thought to be a universal feature of the microarchitecture of HH lesions associated with epilepsy. Here we describe the case of a 5-year-old boy with gelastic seizures who underwent resection of a HH that contained nodules of glial cells, but only few, randomly distributed neurons. HHs that contain few or no neurons have only been reported thus far in cases associated with precocious puberty. This case demonstrates that few solitary neurons in HHs can drive the development of gelastic seizures, and nodules of small neurons may not be a universal feature of HHs associated with epilepsy. This finding is clinically important since hypothalamic hamartomas with rare neurons can easily be misdiagnosed as pilocytic astrocytomas or subependymomas if their presence is overlooked. A neuronal stain is helpful in making the correct diagnosis in these cases.

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Different Bordetella sp. Isolates Causing Human Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Bowden, Katherine E.; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Davis, Jamie K.; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Miner, Christine E.; Rowe, Lori; Sheth, Mili; Tondella, M. Lucia; Williams, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Species of the genus Bordetella associate with various animal hosts, frequently causing respiratory disease. Bordetella pertussis is the primary agent of whooping cough and other Bordetella species can cause similar cough illness. Here, we report four complete genome sequences from isolates of different Bordetella species recovered from human respiratory infections. PMID:27795250

  11. High frequency of Acinetobacter soli among Acinetobacter isolates causing bacteremia at a tertiary hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Endo, Shiro; Yano, Hisakazu; Kanamori, Hajime; Inomata, Shinya; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Hatta, Masumitsu; Gu, Yoshiaki; Tokuda, Koichi; Kitagawa, Miho; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2014-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is generally the most frequently isolated Acinetobacter species. Sequence analysis techniques allow reliable identification of Acinetobacter isolates at the species level. Forty-eight clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. were obtained from blood cultures at Tohoku University Hospital. These isolates were identified at the species level by partial sequencing of the RNA polymerase β-subunit (rpoB), 16S rRNA, and gyrB genes. Then further characterization was done by using the PCR for detection of OXA-type β-lactamase gene clusters, metallo-β-lactamases, and carO genes. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing were also performed. The most frequent isolate was Acinetobacter soli (27.1%). Six of the 13 A. soli isolates were carbapenem nonsusceptible, and all of these isolates produced IMP-1. PFGE revealed that the 13 A. soli isolates were divided into 8 clusters. This study demonstrated that A. soli accounted for a high proportion of Acinetobacter isolates causing bacteremia at a Japanese tertiary hospital. Non-A. baumannii species were identified more frequently than A. baumannii and carbapenem-nonsusceptible isolates were found among the non-A. baumannii strains. These results emphasize the importance of performing epidemiological investigations of Acinetobacter species.

  12. Bilateral pulmonary aspergilloma caused by an atypical isolate of Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z U; Kortom, M; Marouf, R; Chandy, R; Rinaldi, M G; Sutton, D A

    2000-05-01

    A case of bilateral pulmonary aspergilloma caused by an atypical isolate of Aspergillus terreus is described. The diagnosis was established by the presence of septate, dichotomously branched fungal elements in freshly collected bronchoalveolar lavage and sputum specimens and by repeated isolation of the fungus in culture. Specific precipitating antibodies against the A. terreus isolate were demonstrated in the patient's serum. The isolate was atypical as it failed to produce fruiting structures on routine mycological media, but it did so on extended incubation on potato flake agar and produced globose, relatively heavy-walled, hyaline accessory conidia (formerly termed aleurioconidia) on both vegetative and aerial mycelia. Also, it produced an intense yellow diffusing pigment in the medium. The report underscores the increasing importance of A. terreus in the etiology of pulmonary aspergillosis. It is suggested that A. terreus antigen be included in the battery of serodiagnostic reagents to facilitate the early diagnosis of infections caused by this species.

  13. Social isolation, loneliness, and all-cause mortality in older men and women.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Andrew; Shankar, Aparna; Demakakos, Panayotes; Wardle, Jane

    2013-04-09

    Both social isolation and loneliness are associated with increased mortality, but it is uncertain whether their effects are independent or whether loneliness represents the emotional pathway through which social isolation impairs health. We therefore assessed the extent to which the association between social isolation and mortality is mediated by loneliness. We assessed social isolation in terms of contact with family and friends and participation in civic organizations in 6,500 men and women aged 52 and older who took part in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing in 2004-2005. A standard questionnaire measure of loneliness was administered also. We monitored all-cause mortality up to March 2012 (mean follow-up 7.25 y) and analyzed results using Cox proportional hazards regression. We found that mortality was higher among more socially isolated and more lonely participants. However, after adjusting statistically for demographic factors and baseline health, social isolation remained significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio 1.26, 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.48 for the top quintile of isolation), but loneliness did not (hazard ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.09). The association of social isolation with mortality was unchanged when loneliness was included in the model. Both social isolation and loneliness were associated with increased mortality. However, the effect of loneliness was not independent of demographic characteristics or health problems and did not contribute to the risk associated with social isolation. Although both isolation and loneliness impair quality of life and well-being, efforts to reduce isolation are likely to be more relevant to mortality.

  14. [Evaluation of beta-glucuronidase activity for the isolation of diarrhea-causing Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Muto, T; Arai, K; Miyai, M

    1991-06-01

    To compare the isolating efficiency of diarrhea-causing Escherichia coli between Fluorocult agar plates, which reveal the beta-glucuronidase activity of E. coli, and a combination of SS and DHL agar plates, a total of 330 fecal specimens collected from outpatients were examined. Diarrhea-causing E. coli, identified by serological and toxigenic characters, were demonstrated in 52 samples. Among these specimens, 35 samples tested were positive on the Fluorocult agar plates, and 26 samples on the combination of SS and DHL agar plates. However, only 10 samples were positive on both the Fluorocult agar plates and the combination of SS and DHL agar plates. Thus, using Fluorocult agar plates for the isolation of diarrhea-causing E. coli in addition to the conventional SS and DHL agar plates will improve isolating efficacy.

  15. Isolated sinusitis sphenoidalis caused by Trichoderma longibrachiatum in an immunocompetent patient with headache.

    PubMed

    Molnár-Gábor, Etelka; Dóczi, Ilona; Hatvani, Lóránt; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Kredics, László

    2013-08-01

    We present a case of isolated sinusitis sphenoidalis caused by Trichoderma longibrachiatum, an emerging causal agent of fungal infections with an often fatal outcome. A Trichoderma strain was isolated from secretion obtained from the sinus sphenoidalis of a rhinosinusitis patient and identified by sequence analysis of two loci as Trichoderma longibrachiatum from the Longibrachiatum Clade of the genus Trichoderma. T. longibrachiatum can trigger a fatal pathomechanism in immunodeficient patients, but only rarely causes disease in healthy people. The case presented is unique because the patient was not immunocompromised.

  16. Molecular characterization of serotype III group B-streptococcus isolates causing neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Philippe; Brahimi, Naima; Chalas, Céline; Aujard, Yannick; Bingen, Edouard

    2003-10-15

    We studied a collection of 110 serotype III group B streptococcus (GBS) isolates causing neonatal meningitis, by means of both pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI and Southern hybridization with probes for genes potentially associated with virulence (neuA, cpsA, scpB, and hylB and, for mobile genetic elements [MGEs], GBSi1 and IS1548), in comparison with 44 serotype III GBS isolates colonizing healthy neonates. Using polymerase chain reaction, we assessed both the insertion of MGEs downstream of the scpB gene and the insertion of IS1548 within the hylB gene. PFGE clustered the isolates into 3 main groups. One PFGE group accounted for 80% of typeable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolates, versus 24% of colonization isolates (P=1.8 x 10-9). GBSi1 was found in 67% of CSF isolates and in only 23% of colonization isolates (P=5.3 x 10-7). A 15-kbp SmaI restriction-DNA fragment bearing the neuA gene was significantly associated with CSF isolates (P=1.1 x 10-11).

  17. Epidemiological markers of Serratia marcescens isolates causing nosocomial infections in Spain (1981-1991).

    PubMed

    Boquete, T; Vindel, A; Martin-Bourgon, C; Azañedo, L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1996-12-01

    The distribution of epidemiological markers (serotyping and phage-typing) of Serratia marcescens isolates from nosocomial episodes (63 nosocomial cutbreaks with 475 isolates, and 1208 sporadic cases) received in our laboratory during the period 1981-1991 was studied. The records for 1683 isolates from Spanish hospitals have been analyzed. In relation with the sporadic cases, the predominant types were serotype O6 (13.4%) and serotype O14 (11.4%); polyagglutinable strains accounted for 15.6%; in outbreaks, type O14 is clearly predominant (27.4%). Phage-typing was a good secondary marker, with a 87.9% of typability; the number of lytic patterns was very high, extended patterns (six or more phages) being the most frequent. We have studied the characteristics of S. marcescens isolates causing infections in the nosocomial environment in Spain.

  18. Identification at biovar level of Brucella isolates causing abortion in small ruminants of iran.

    PubMed

    Behroozikhah, Ali Mohammad; Bagheri Nejad, Ramin; Amiri, Karim; Bahonar, Ali Reza

    2012-01-01

    To determine the most prevalent biovar responsible for brucellosis in sheep and goat populations of Iran, a cross-sectional study was carried out over 2 years in six provinces selected based on geography and disease prevalence. Specimens obtained from referred aborted sheep and goat fetuses were cultured on Brucella selective media for microbiological isolation. Brucellae were isolated from 265 fetuses and examined for biovar identification using standard microbiological methods. Results showed that 246 isolates (92.8%) were B. melitensis biovar 1, 18 isolates (6.8%) were B. melitensis biovar 2, and, interestingly, one isolate (0.4%) obtained from Mazandaran province was B. abortus biovar 3. In this study, B. melitensis biovar 3 was isolated in none of the selected provinces, and all isolates from 3 provinces (i.e., Chehar-mahal Bakhtiari, Markazi, and Ilam) were identified only as B. melitensis biovar 1. In conclusion, we found that B. melitensis biovar 1 remains the most prevalent cause of small ruminant brucellosis in various provinces of Iran.

  19. A novel mitochondrial MTND5 frameshift mutation causing isolated complex I deficiency, renal failure and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Morak, Monika; Reid, Christopher; Hargreaves, Iain P; Pope, Simon A S; Land, John M; Heales, Simon J; Horvath, Rita; Mundy, Helen; Taylor, Robert W

    2010-02-01

    Isolated complex I deficiency is the most commonly reported enzyme defect in paediatric mitochondrial disorders, and may arise due to mutations in nuclear-encoded structural or assembly genes, or the mitochondrial genome. We present the clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic data in a young girl whose clinical picture is dominated by chronic renal failure, myopathy and persistent lactic acidosis. An isolated complex I deficiency in muscle was identified due to a novel mutation (m.12425delA) in the MTND5 gene. This single nucleotide deletion is heteroplasmic and detectable in several tissues from the proband but not her mother, suggesting a de novo mutation event. The description of the first frameshift mutation in a mitochondrial complex I gene affirms mitochondrial DNA mutations as an important cause of isolated complex I deficiency in children and the importance of whole mitochondrial genome sequencing in the diagnostic work-up to elucidate the underlying molecular genetic abnormality and provide important genetic advice.

  20. Control of potato soft rot caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Moroccan actinobacteria isolates.

    PubMed

    Baz, M; Lahbabi, D; Samri, S; Val, F; Hamelin, G; Madore, I; Bouarab, K; Beaulieu, C; Ennaji, M M; Barakate, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum are dreadful causal agents of potato soft rot. Actually, there are no efficient bactericides used to protect potato against Pectobacterium spp. Biological control using actinobacteria could be an interesting approach to manage this disease. Thus, two hundred actinobacteria isolated from Moroccan habitats were tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro 4 environmental Pectobacterium strains and the two reference strains (P. carotovorum CFBP 5890 and P. atrosepticum CFBP 5889). Eight percent of these isolates were active against at least one of the tested pathogens and only 2% exhibited an antimicrobial activity against all tested Pectobacterium strains. Four bioactive isolates having the greatest pathogen inhibitory capabilities and classified as belonging to the genus Streptomyces species through 16S rDNA analysis were subsequently tested for their ability to reduce in vivo soft rot symptoms on potato slices of Bintje, Yukon Gold, Russet and Norland cultivars caused by the two pathogens P. carotovorum and P. atrosepticum. This test was carried out by using biomass inoculums and culture filtrate of the isolates as treatment. Among these, strain Streptomyces sp. OE7, reduced by 65-94% symptom severity caused by the two pathogens on potato slices. Streptomyces OE7 showed a potential for controlling soft rot on potato slices and could be useful in an integrated control program against potato soft rot pathogens in the objective to reduce treatments with chemical compounds.

  1. A truncating PET100 variant causing fatal infantile lactic acidosis and isolated cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Alston, Charlotte L; Houghton, Jessica Ac; He, Langping; Morris, Andrew Am; Brown, Garry K; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia Ma; Lightowlers, Robert N; Prokisch, Holger; Taylor, Robert W

    2015-07-01

    Isolated mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency is an important cause of mitochondrial disease in children and adults. It is genetically heterogeneous, given that both mtDNA-encoded and nuclear-encoded gene products contribute to structural components and assembly factors. Pathogenic variants within these proteins are associated with clinical variability ranging from isolated organ involvement to multisystem disease presentations. Defects in more than 10 complex IV assembly factors have been described including a recent Lebanese founder mutation in PET100 in patients presenting with Leigh syndrome. We report the clinical and molecular investigation of a patient with a fatal, neonatal-onset isolated complex IV deficiency associated with multiorgan involvement born to consanguineous, first-cousin British Asian parents. Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous truncating variant (c.142C>T, p.(Gln48*)) in the PET100 gene that results in a complete loss of enzyme activity and assembly of the holocomplex. Our report confirms PET100 mutation as an important cause of isolated complex IV deficiency outside of the Lebanese population, extending the phenotypic spectrum associated with abnormalities within this gene.

  2. Neonatal isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD): a potentially life-threatening but treatable cause of neonatal cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Alsaleem, Mahdi; Saadeh, Lina; Misra, Amrit; Madani, Shailender

    2016-01-01

    Isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) is a rare cause of neonatal cholestasis and hypoglycaemia. This diagnosis has a 20% mortality potential if unrecognised. We describe a case of an infant presenting with cholestatic jaundice and hypoglycaemia. The patient had laboratory findings suggestive of IAD, which was later confirmed with molecular genetic testing. One of the mutations this patient had is a new finding. The patient was started on glucocorticoid replacement therapy after which his bilirubin and glucose levels normalised. PMID:27535729

  3. Fluoroquinolone resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease: special focus on zabofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tark; Park, Su-Jin; Chong, Yong Pil; Park, Ki-Ho; Lee, Yu-Mi; Hong, Hyo-Lim; Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Eun Sil; Lee, Sungkyoung; Choi, Dong Rack; Kim, Sung-Han; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Yang Soo

    2016-10-01

    The present study examined the in vitro activity of various antibiotics including zabofloxacin, against isolates responsible for invasive pneumococcal diseases. Between 1997 and 2008, a total of 208 isolates were collected from sterile fluids, including blood (n=196, 94.2%), pleural fluid (n=5, 2.4%), cerebrospinal fluid (n=5, 2.4%), and ascites (n=2, 1.0%). Zabofloxacin showed the lowest MIC50 (0.015μg/mL) and MIC90 (0.025μg/mL) values of all the tested antibiotics. Rates of isolates resistant to penicillin (MIC ≥8μg/mL), ceftriaxone (MIC ≥4μg/mL) and levofloxacin (MIC ≥8μg/mL) were 3.4%, 0.4% and 2.0%, respectively. Four isolates (2.0%) were resistant to levofloxacin, and zabofloxacin showed low MICs (range, 0.025-0.125μg/mL). Zabofloxacin shows potent in vitro activity against S. pneumoniae isolates that caused invasive disease, even strains that are resistant to levofloxacin.

  4. Xylella fastidiosa Isolates from Both subsp. multiplex and fastidiosa Cause Disease on Southern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) Under Greenhouse Conditions.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J E; Cobine, P A; De La Fuente, L

    2015-07-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited gram-negative plant pathogen that affects numerous crop species, including grape, citrus, peach, pecan, and almond. Recently, X. fastidiosa has also been found to be the cause of bacterial leaf scorch on blueberry in the southeastern United States. Thus far, all X. fastidiosa isolates obtained from infected blueberry have been classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex; however, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates are also present in the southeastern United States and commonly cause Pierce's disease of grapevines. In this study, seven southeastern U.S. isolates of X. fastidiosa, including three X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates from grape, one X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolate from elderberry, and three X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry, were used to infect the southern highbush blueberry 'Rebel'. Following inoculation, all isolates colonized blueberry, and isolates from both X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex and X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa caused symptoms, including characteristic stem yellowing and leaf scorch symptoms as well as dieback of the stem tips. Two X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry caused more severe symptoms than the other isolates examined, and infection with these two isolates also had a significant impact on host mineral nutrient content in sap and leaves. These findings have potential implications for understanding X. fastidiosa host adaptation and expansion and the development of emerging diseases caused by this bacterium.

  5. Nicotine in high concentration causes contraction of isolated strips of rabbit corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoai Bac; Lee, Shin Young; Park, Soo Hyun; Han, Jun Hyun; Lee, Moo Yeol; Myung, Soon Chul

    2015-05-01

    It is well known that cigarette smoke can cause erectile dysfunction by affecting the penile vascular system. However, the exact effects of nicotine on the corpus cavernosum remains poorly understood. Nicotine has been reported to cause relaxation of the corpus cavernosum; it has also been reported to cause both contraction and relaxation. Therefore, high concentrations of nicotine were studied in strips from the rabbit corpus cavernosum to better understand its effects. The proximal penile corpus cavernosal strips from male rabbits weighing approximately 4 kg were used in organ bath studies. Nicotine in high concentrations (10(-5)~10(-4) M) produced dose-dependent contractions of the corpus cavernosal strips. The incubation with 10(-5) M hexamethonium (nicotinic receptor antagonist) significantly inhibited the magnitude of the nicotine associated contractions. The nicotine-induced contractions were not only significantly inhibited by pretreatment with 10(-5) M indomethacin (nonspecific cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and with 10(-6) M NS-398 (selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor), but also with 10(-6) M Y-27632 (Rho kinase inhibitor). Ozagrel (thromboxane A2 synthase inhibitor) and SQ-29548 (highly selective TP receptor antagonist) pretreatments significantly reduced the nicotine-induced contractile amplitude of the strips. High concentrations of nicotine caused contraction of isolated rabbit corpus cavernosal strips. This contraction appeared to be mediated by activation of nicotinic receptors. Rho-kinase and cyclooxygenase pathways, especially cyclooxygenase-2 and thromboxane A2, might play a pivotal role in the mechanism associated with nicotine-induced contraction of the rabbit corpus cavernosum.

  6. Human Escherichia coli isolates from hemocultures: Septicemia linked to urogenital tract infections is caused by isolates harboring more virulence genes than bacteraemia linked to other conditions.

    PubMed

    Micenková, Lenka; Beňová, Alžbeta; Frankovičová, Lucia; Bosák, Juraj; Vrba, Martin; Ševčíková, Alena; Kmeťová, Marta; Šmajs, David

    2017-02-27

    Escherichia coli is the most common cause of bloodstream infections and community-acquired sepsis. The main aim of this study was to determine virulence characteristics of E. coli isolates from hemocultures of patients with a primary disease of urogenital tract, digestive system, a neoplastic blood disease, or other conditions. Results from a set of 314 E. coli isolates from hemocultures were compared to data from a previously published analysis of 1283 fecal commensal E. coli isolates. Genetic profiling of the 314 E. coli isolates involved determination of phylogenetic group (A, B1, B2, D, C, E, and F), identification of 21 virulence factors, as well as 30 bacteriocin-encoding determinants. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to analyze clonal character of the hemoculture-derived isolates. The E. coli isolates from hemocultures belonged mainly to phylogenetic groups B2 (59.9%) and D (21.0%), and less frequently to phylogroups A (10.2%) and B1 (5.7%). Commonly detected virulence factors included adhesins (fimA 92.0%, pap 47.1%, and sfa 26.8%), and iron-uptake encoding genes (fyuA 87.9%, fepC 79.6%, aer 70.7%, iucC 68.2%, and ireA 13.7%), followed by colibactin (pks island 31.5%), and cytotoxic necrotizing factor (cnf1 11.1%). A higher frequency of microcin producers (and microcin M determinant) and a lower frequency of colicin Ib and microcin B17 was found in hemoculture-derived isolates compared to commensal fecal isolates. E. coli isolates from hemocultures harbored more virulence genes compared to fecal E. coli isolates. In addition, hemoculture E. coli isolates from patients with primary diagnosis related to urogenital tract were clearly different and more virulence genes were detected in these isolates compared to both fecal isolates and hemoculture-derived isolates from patients with blood and gastrointestinal diseases.

  7. Intestinal lesions caused by two swine chlamydial isolates in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D G; Andersen, A A

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether 2 distinct chlamydial isolates recovered from the intestines and feces of diarrheic nursery pigs could cause intestinal lesions in gnotobiotic pigs. Both isolates share biological characteristics with Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydial isolates R27 and R19 were propagated in Vero cells or embryonated eggs, respectively, and suspended in sucrose-phosphate-glutamine buffer with 10% fetal bovine serum for inoculation. Sham inocula were prepared from uninfected cell culture lysates and from uninfected eggs. Each piglet was fed 1 ml of inoculum or sham inoculum at 3-4 days of age. Ten piglets were each fed 10(9) inclusion-forming-units (IFU) and 14 piglets were each fed 10(6) IFU of isolate R27; 5 control piglets were fed sham inoculum. Twenty piglets were each fed 10(5) IFU R19; 5 control piglets were fed sham inoculum. All infected piglets developed diarrhea 4-5 days postinfection (DPI). Most piglets fed 10(9) IFU R27 became anorexic, dehydrated, and weak and were necropsied 4-7 DPI. Piglets fed 10(6) IFU R27 or 10(5) IFU R19 were necropsied 4, 7, 10, 14, and 18 DPI. Diarrhea, although never profuse, persisted in the piglets fed 10(6) IFU R27 or 10(5) IFU R19 through 12 DPI. At necropsy, all diarrheic piglets had watery colonic contents with flecks of undigested curd. In small intestine, histologic lesions were seen most consistently in distal jejunum and ileum. Distal jejunum and ileum from piglets fed 10(9) IFU R27 and necropsied 4-5 DPI were characterized by villus atrophy and multifocal necrosis of villi; necrosis was limited to the tips or apical one half of villi. Mild to severe villus atrophy, lymphangitis, and perilymphangitis were seen in the distal jejunum and ileum from all infected piglets 7 and 10 DPI. Colon from 1 infected piglet necropsied 10 DPI had mild focal serositis; significant colonic lesions were not seen in the other infected piglets. Immunostaining done on sections of distal jejunum and ileum

  8. Congenital isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency: an underestimated cause of neonatal death, explained by TPIT gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Brue, Thierry; Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Gueydan, Magali; Barlier, Anne; David, Michel; Nicolino, Marc; Malpuech, Georges; Déchelotte, Pierre; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; de Zegher, Francis; Beckers, Dominique; Kyllo, Jennifer; Donohoue, Patricia; Fassnacht, Martin; Hahner, Stefanie; Allolio, Bruno; Noordam, C; Dunkel, Leo; Hero, Matti; Pigeon, B; Weill, Jacques; Yigit, Sevket; Brauner, Raja; Heinrich, Juan Jorge; Cummings, Elizabeth; Riddell, Christie; Enjalbert, Alain; Drouin, Jacques

    2005-03-01

    Tpit is a T box transcription factor important for terminal differentiation of pituitary proopiomelanocortin-expressing cells. We demonstrated that human and mouse mutations of the TPIT gene cause a neonatal-onset form of congenital isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD). In the absence of glucocorticoid replacement, IAD can lead to neonatal death by acute adrenal insufficiency. This clinical entity was not previously well characterized because of the small number of published cases. Since identification of the first TPIT mutations, we have enlarged our series of neonatal IAD patients to 27 patients from 21 unrelated families. We found TPIT mutations in 17 of 27 patients. We identified 10 different TPIT mutations, with one mutation found in five unrelated families. All patients appeared to be homozygous or compound heterozygous for TPIT mutations, and their unaffected parents are heterozygous carriers, confirming a recessive mode of transmission. We compared the clinical and biological phenotype of the 17 IAD patients carrying a TPIT mutation with the 10 IAD patients with normal TPIT-coding sequences. This series of neonatal IAD patients revealed a highly homogeneous clinical presentation, suggesting that this disease may be an underestimated cause of neonatal death. Identification of TPIT gene mutations as the principal molecular cause of neonatal IAD permits prenatal diagnosis for families at risk for the purpose of early glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

  9. Epidemiological isolation causing variable mortality in Island populations during the 1918–1920 influenza pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, G. Dennis; Hussell, Tracy; Brundage, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Shanks et al. (2012) Epidemiological isolation causing variable mortality in Island populations during the 1918–1920 influenza pandemic. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(6), 417–423. Background  During the 1918 pandemic period, influenza‐related mortality increased worldwide; however, mortality rates varied widely across locations and demographic subgroups. Islands are isolated epidemiological situations that may elucidate why influenza pandemic mortality rates were so variable in apparently similar populations. Objectives  Our objectives were to determine and compare the patterns of pandemic influenza mortality on islands. Methods  We reviewed historical records of mortality associated with the 1918–1920 influenza pandemic in various military and civilian groups on islands. Results and Conclusions  Mortality differed more than 50‐fold during pandemic‐related epidemics on Pacific islands [range: 0·4% (Hawaii) to 22% (Samoa)], and on some islands, mortality sharply varied among demographic subgroups of island residents such as Saipan: Chamorros [12%] and Caroline Islanders [0·4%]. Among soldiers from island populations who had completed initial military training, influenza‐related mortality rates were generally low, for example, Puerto Rico (0·7%) and French Polynesia (0·13%). The findings suggest that among island residents, those who had been exposed to multiple, antigenically diverse respiratory pathogens prior to infection with the 1918 pandemic strain (e.g., less isolated) experienced lower mortality. The continuous circulation of antigenically diverse influenza viruses and other respiratory infectious agents makes widespread high mortality during future influenza pandemics unlikely. PMID:22226378

  10. A nairovirus isolated from African bats causes haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and severe hepatic disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Akihiro; Ueno, Keisuke; Orba, Yasuko; Sasaki, Michihito; Moonga, Ladslav; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Umemura, Takashi; Ito, Kimihito; Hall, William W; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2014-12-02

    Bats can carry important zoonotic pathogens. Here we use a combination of next-generation sequencing and classical virus isolation methods to identify novel nairoviruses from bats captured from a cave in Zambia. This nairovirus infection is highly prevalent among giant leaf-nosed bats, Hipposideros gigas (detected in samples from 16 individuals out of 38). Whole-genome analysis of three viral isolates (11SB17, 11SB19 and 11SB23) reveals a typical bunyavirus tri-segmented genome. The strains form a single phylogenetic clade that is divergent from other known nairoviruses, and are hereafter designated as Leopards Hill virus (LPHV). When i.p. injected into mice, the 11SB17 strain causes only slight body weight loss, whereas 11SB23 produces acute and lethal disease closely resembling that observed with Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus in humans. We believe that our LPHV mouse model will be useful for research on the pathogenesis of nairoviral haemorrhagic disease.

  11. A nairovirus isolated from African bats causes haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and severe hepatic disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Akihiro; Ueno, Keisuke; Orba, Yasuko; Sasaki, Michihito; Moonga, Ladslav; Hang’ombe, Bernard M.; Mweene, Aaron S.; Umemura, Takashi; Ito, Kimihito; Hall, William W.; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Bats can carry important zoonotic pathogens. Here we use a combination of next-generation sequencing and classical virus isolation methods to identify novel nairoviruses from bats captured from a cave in Zambia. This nairovirus infection is highly prevalent among giant leaf-nosed bats, Hipposideros gigas (detected in samples from 16 individuals out of 38). Whole-genome analysis of three viral isolates (11SB17, 11SB19 and 11SB23) reveals a typical bunyavirus tri-segmented genome. The strains form a single phylogenetic clade that is divergent from other known nairoviruses, and are hereafter designated as Leopards Hill virus (LPHV). When i.p. injected into mice, the 11SB17 strain causes only slight body weight loss, whereas 11SB23 produces acute and lethal disease closely resembling that observed with Crimean–Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus in humans. We believe that our LPHV mouse model will be useful for research on the pathogenesis of nairoviral haemorrhagic disease. PMID:25451856

  12. Multiple Genes Cause Postmating Prezygotic Reproductive Isolation in the Drosophila virilis Group

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of speciation is a central problem in evolutionary biology. Studies of reproductive isolation have provided several insights into the genetic causes of speciation, especially in taxa that lend themselves to detailed genetic scrutiny. Reproductive barriers have usually been divided into those that occur before zygote formation (prezygotic) and after (postzygotic), with the latter receiving a great deal of attention over several decades. Reproductive barriers that occur after mating but before zygote formation [postmating prezygotic (PMPZ)] are especially understudied at the genetic level. Here, I present a phenotypic and genetic analysis of a PMPZ reproductive barrier between two species of the Drosophila virilis group: D. americana and D. virilis. This species pair shows strong PMPZ isolation, especially when D. americana males mate with D. virilis females: ∼99% of eggs laid after these heterospecific copulations are not fertilized. Previous work has shown that the paternal loci contributing to this incompatibility reside on two chromosomes, one of which (chromosome 5) likely carries multiple factors. The other (chromosome 2) is fixed for a paracentric inversion that encompasses nearly half the chromosome. Here, I present two results. First, I show that PMPZ in this species cross is largely due to defective sperm storage in heterospecific copulations. Second, using advanced intercross and backcross mapping approaches, I identify genomic regions that carry genes capable of rescuing heterospecific fertilization. I conclude that paternal incompatibility between D. americana males and D. virilis females is underlain by four or more genes on chromosomes 2 and 5. PMID:27729433

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteriophages Against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Gang; Lim, Jeong-A; Song, Yu-Rim; Heu, Sunggi; Kim, Gyoung Hee; Koh, Young Jin; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Owing to the prohibition of agricultural antibiotic use in major kiwifruit-cultivating countries, alternative methods need to be developed to manage this disease. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically infect target bacteria and have recently been reconsidered as potential biological control agents for bacterial pathogens owing to their specificity in terms of host range. In this study, we isolated bacteriophages against P. syringae pv. actinidiae from soils collected from kiwifruit orchards in Korea and selected seven bacteriophages for further characterization based on restriction enzyme digestion patterns of genomic DNA. Among the studied bacteriophages, two belong to the Myoviridae family and three belong to the Podoviridae family, based on morphology observed by transmission electron microscopy. The host range of the selected bacteriophages was confirmed using 18 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae, including the Psa2 and Psa3 groups, and some were also effective against other P. syringae pathovars. Lytic activity of the selected bacteriophages was sustained in vitro until 80 h, and their activity remained stable up to 50°C, at pH 11, and under UV-B light. These results indicate that the isolated bacteriophages are specific to P. syringae species and are resistant to various environmental factors, implying their potential use in control of bacterial canker disease in kiwifruits.

  14. Isolated inclusion body myopathy caused by a multisystem proteinopathy–linked hnRNPA1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Rumiko; Warita, Hitoshi; Niihori, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tateyama, Maki; Suzuki, Naoki; Nishiyama, Ayumi; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Funayama, Ryo; Nakayama, Keiko; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo; Aoki, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause of isolated inclusion body myopathy (IBM) with autosomal dominant inheritance in 2 families. Methods: Genetic investigations were performed using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 gene (hnRNPA1). The clinical and pathologic features of patients in the 2 families were evaluated with neurologic examinations, muscle imaging, and muscle biopsy. Results: We identified a missense p.D314N mutation in hnRNPA1, which is also known to cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in 2 families with IBM. The affected individuals developed muscle weakness in their 40s, which slowly progressed toward a limb-girdle pattern. Further evaluation of the affected individuals revealed no apparent motor neuron dysfunction, cognitive impairment, or bone abnormality. The muscle pathology was compatible with IBM, lacking apparent neurogenic change and inflammation. Multiple immunohistochemical analyses revealed the cytoplasmic aggregation of hnRNPA1 in close association with autophagosomes and myonuclei. Furthermore, the aberrant accumulation was characterized by coaggregation with ubiquitin, sequestome-1/p62, valosin-containing protein/p97, and a variety of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Conclusions: The present study expands the clinical phenotype of hnRNPA1-linked multisystem proteinopathy. Mutations in hnRNPA1, and possibly hnRNPA2B1, will be responsible for isolated IBM with a pure muscular phenotype. Although the mechanisms underlying the selective skeletal muscle involvement remain to be elucidated, the immunohistochemical results suggest a broad sequestration of RBPs by the mutated hnRNPA1. PMID:27066560

  15. Mild recessive mutations in six Fraser syndrome-related genes cause isolated congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hilger, Alina C; Saisawat, Pawaree; Vivante, Asaf; Stajic, Natasa; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Reutter, Heiko M; Kehinde, Elijah O; Tasic, Velibor; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for approximately 40% of children with ESRD in the United States. Hitherto, mutations in 23 genes have been described as causing autosomal dominant isolated CAKUT in humans. However, >90% of cases of isolated CAKUT still remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here, we hypothesized that genes mutated in recessive mouse models with the specific CAKUT phenotype of unilateral renal agenesis may also be mutated in humans with isolated CAKUT. We applied next-generation sequencing technology for targeted exon sequencing of 12 recessive murine candidate genes in 574 individuals with isolated CAKUT from 590 families. In 15 of 590 families, we identified recessive mutations in the genes FRAS1, FREM2, GRIP1, FREM1, ITGA8, and GREM1, all of which function in the interaction of the ureteric bud and the metanephric mesenchyme. We show that isolated CAKUT may be caused partially by mutations in recessive genes. Our results also indicate that biallelic missense mutations in the Fraser/MOTA/BNAR spectrum genes cause isolated CAKUT, whereas truncating mutations are found in the multiorgan form of Fraser syndrome. The newly identified recessive biallelic mutations in these six genes represent the molecular cause of isolated CAKUT in 2.5% of the 590 affected families in this study.

  16. Distribution of strain type and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolates causing meningitis in a large urban setting in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Berman, Hillary; Barberino, Maria Goreth; Moreira, Edson Duarte; Riley, Lee; Reis, Joice N

    2014-05-01

    The clinical management of meningitis caused by Escherichia coli is greatly complicated when the organism becomes resistant to broad-spectrum antibiotics. We sought to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibilities, sequence types (ST), and presence of known drug resistance genes of E. coli isolates that caused meningitis between 1996 and 2011 in Salvador, Brazil. We then compared these findings to those for E. coli isolates from community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) that occurred during the same time period and in the same city. We found that 19% of E. coli isolates from cases of meningitis and less than 1% of isolates from UTI were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. The sequence types of E. coli isolates from cases of meningitis included ST131, ST69, ST405, and ST62, which were also found among isolates from UTI. Additionally, among the E. coli isolates that were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, we found genes that encode the extended-spectrum beta-lactamases CTX-M-2, CTX-M-14, and CTX-M-15. These observations demonstrate that compared to E. coli strains isolated from cases of community-acquired UTI, those isolated from cases of meningitis are more resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, even though the same sequence types are shared between the two forms of extraintestinal infections.

  17. Coxiella burnetii Isolates Cause Genogroup-Specific Virulence in Mouse and Guinea Pig Models of Acute Q Fever▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Russell-Lodrigue, K. E.; Andoh, M.; Poels, M. W. J.; Shive, H. R.; Weeks, B. R.; Zhang, G. Q.; Tersteeg, C.; Masegi, T.; Hotta, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Fukushi, H.; Hirai, K.; McMurray, D. N.; Samuel, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease of worldwide significance caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Humans with Q fever may experience an acute flu-like illness and pneumonia and/or chronic hepatitis or endocarditis. Various markers demonstrate significant phylogenetic separation between and clustering among isolates from acute and chronic human disease. The clinical and pathological responses to infection with phase I C. burnetii isolates from the following four genomic groups were evaluated in immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice and in guinea pig infection models: group I (Nine Mile, African, and Ohio), group IV (Priscilla and P), group V (G and S), and group VI (Dugway). Isolates from all of the groups produced disease in the SCID mouse model, and genogroup-consistent trends were noted in cytokine production in response to infection in the immunocompetent-mouse model. Guinea pigs developed severe acute disease when aerosol challenged with group I isolates, mild to moderate acute disease in response to group V isolates, and no acute disease when infected with group IV and VI isolates. C. burnetii isolates have a range of disease potentials; isolates within the same genomic group cause similar pathological responses, and there is a clear distinction in strain virulence between these genomic groups. PMID:19786560

  18. Soluble Prion Protein Binds Isolated Low Molecular Weight Amyloid-β Oligomers Causing Cytotoxicity Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas L; Choi, Jin-Kyu; Surewicz, Krystyna; Surewicz, Witold K

    2015-12-16

    A growing number of observations indicate that soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers play a major role in Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies strongly suggest that at least some of the neurotoxic effects of these oligomers are mediated by cellular, membrane-anchored prion protein and that Aβ neurotoxicity can be inhibited by soluble recombinant prion protein (rPrP) and its fragments. However, the mechanism by which rPrP interacts with Aβ oligomers and prevents their toxicity is largely unknown, and studies in this regard are hindered by the large structural heterogeneity of Aβ oligomers. To overcome this difficulty, here we used photoinduced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) to isolate well-defined oligomers of Aβ42 and characterize these species with regard to their cytotoxicity and interaction with rPrP, as well the mechanism by which rPrP inhibits Aβ42 cytotoxicity. Our data shows that the addition of rPrP to the assembling Aβ42 results in a shift in oligomer size distribution, decreasing the population of toxic tetramers and higher order oligomers and increasing the population of nontoxic (and possibly neuroprotective) monomers. Isolated oligomeric species of Aβ42 are cytotoxic to primary neurons and cause permeation of model lipid bilayers. These toxic effects, which are oligomer size-dependent, can be inhibited by the addition of rPrP, and our data suggest potential mechanisms of this inhibitory action. This insight should help in current efforts to develop PrP-based therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Genetic diversity and dynamic distribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates causing pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srilohasin, Prapaporn; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nishida, Nao; Prammananan, Therdsak; Smittipat, Nat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chaiyasirinroje, Boonchai; Yanai, Hideki; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the genetic diversity and dynamicity of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Thailand using nearly neutral molecular markers. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotypes of 1,414 culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates from 1,282 pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 132 extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) patients collected from 1995 to 2011 were characterized. Among the eight SNP cluster groups (SCG), SCG2 (44.1%), which included the Beijing (BJ) genotype, and SCG1 (39.4%), an East African Indian genotype, were dominant. Comparisons between the genotypes of M. tuberculosis isolates causing PTB and EPTB in HIV-negative cases revealed similar prevalence trends although genetic diversity was higher in the PTB patients. The identification of 10 reported sequence types (STs) and three novel STs was hypothesized to indicate preferential expansion of the SCG2 genotype, especially the modern BJ ST10 (15.6%) and ancestral BJ ST19 (13.1%). An association between SCG2 and SCG1 genotypes and particular patient age groups implies the existence of different genetic advantages among the bacterial populations. The results revealed that increasing numbers of young patients were infected with M. tuberculosis SCGs 2 and 5, which contrasts with the reduction of the SCG1 genotype. Our results indicate the selection and dissemination of potent M. tuberculosis genotypes in this population. The determination of heterogeneity and dynamic population changes of circulating M. tuberculosis strains in countries using the Mycobacterium bovis BCG (bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine are beneficial for vaccine development and control strategies.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus seroproteomes discriminate ruminant isolates causing mild or severe mastitis.

    PubMed

    Le Maréchal, Caroline; Jardin, Julien; Jan, Gwenaël; Even, Sergine; Pulido, Coralie; Guibert, Jean-Michel; Hernandez, David; François, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; Demon, Dieter; Meyer, Evelyne; Berkova, Nadia; Thiéry, Richard; Vautor, Eric; Le Loir, Yves

    2011-02-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of mastitis in ruminants. In ewe mastitis, symptoms range from subclinical to gangrenous mastitis. S. aureus factors or host-factors contributing to the different outcomes are not completely elucidated. In this study, experimental mastitis was induced on primiparous ewes using two S. aureus strains, isolated from gangrenous (strain O11) or subclinical (strain O46) mastitis. Strains induced drastically distinct clinical symptoms when tested in ewe and mice experimental mastitis. Notably, they reproduced mild (O46) or severe (O11) mastitis in ewes. Ewe sera were used to identify staphylococcal immunoreactive proteins commonly or differentially produced during infections of variable severity and to define core and accessory seroproteomes. Such SERological Proteome Analysis (SERPA) allowed the identification of 89 immunoreactive proteins, of which only 52 (58.4%) were previously identified as immunogenic proteins in other staphylococcal infections. Among the 89 proteins identified, 74 appear to constitute the core seroproteome. Among the 15 remaining proteins defining the accessory seroproteome, 12 were specific for strain O11, 3 were specific for O46. Distribution of one protein specific for each mastitis severity was investigated in ten other strains isolated from subclinical or clinical mastitis. We report here for the first time the identification of staphylococcal immunogenic proteins common or specific to S. aureus strains responsible for mild or severe mastitis. These findings open avenues in S. aureus mastitis studies as some of these proteins, expressed in vivo, are likely to account for the success of S. aureus as a pathogen of the ruminant mammary gland.

  1. Ability of Escherichia coli isolates that cause meningitis in newborns to invade epithelial and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meier, C; Oelschlaeger, T A; Merkert, H; Korhonen, T K; Hacker, J

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates that cause meningitis in newborns are able to invade the circulation and subsequently cross the blood-brain barrier. One mechanism for traversing the blood-brain barrier might involve transcytosis through the endothelial cells. The ability of the meningitis isolate E. coli IHE3034, of serotype 018:K1:H7, to invade epithelial (T24) and endothelial (EA-hy926) cells was investigated by the standard gentamicin survival assay and by electron microscopy. Human bladder epithelial and endothelial cells were efficiently invaded by strain IHE3034, whereas epithelial human colon Caco-2 cells, canine kidney MDCK cells, and the opossum [correction of opposum] epithelial kidney cell line OK were not invaded. The ability to invade human epithelial cells of the bladder could also be demonstrated for several other newborn meningitis E. coli strains and one septicemic E. coli strain. Studies utilizing inhibitors which act on eukaryotic cells revealed a dependence on microfilaments as well as on microtubules in the process of E. coli IHE3034 entry into T24 and EA-hy926 cells. These results indicated that cell cytoskeletal rearrangements are involved in bacterial uptake and suggest that there are either two pathways (microtubule dependent and microfilament dependent) or one complex pathway involving both microtubules and microfilaments. The intracellular IHE3034 organisms were contained in a host-membrane-confined compartment mainly as single microorganisms. Intracellular replication of 1HE3034 was not detected, nor did the number of intracellular bacteria decrease significantly during a 48-h period. The ability of E. coli O18:K1 to invade and survive within certain eukaryotic cells may be another virulence factor of meningitis-associated E. coli. PMID:8698457

  2. Social Isolation During Postweaning Development Causes Hypoactivity of Neurons in the Medial Nucleus of the Male Rat Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Adams, Thomas; Rosenkranz, J Amiel

    2016-06-01

    Children exposed to neglect or social deprivation are at heightened risk for psychiatric disorders and abnormal social patterns as adults. There is also evidence that prepubertal neglect in children causes abnormal metabolic activity in several brain regions, including the amygdala area. The medial nucleus of the amygdala (MeA) is a key region for performance of social behaviors and still undergoes maturation during the periadolescent period. As such, the normal development of this region may be disrupted by social deprivation. In rodents, postweaning social isolation causes a range of deficits in sexual and agonistic behaviors that normally rely on the posterior MeA (MeAp). However, little is known about the effects of social isolation on the function of MeA neurons. In this study, we tested whether postweaning social isolation caused abnormal activity of MeA neurons. We found that postweaning social isolation caused a decrease of in vivo firing activity of MeAp neurons, and reduced drive from excitatory afferents. In vitro electrophysiological studies found that postweaning social isolation caused a presynaptic impairment of excitatory input to the dorsal MeAp, but a progressive postsynaptic reduction of membrane excitability in the ventral MeAp. These results demonstrate discrete, subnucleus-specific effects of social deprivation on the physiology of MeAp neurons. This pathophysiology may contribute to the disruption of social behavior after developmental social deprivation, and may be a novel target to facilitate the treatment of social disorders.

  3. Experimental infection of cows with newly isolated Akabane virus strain (AKAV-7) causing encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyeoun; Jeong, Hansol; Park, Surim; Yang, Myeon-Sik; Kim, Jongwon; Bae, Jaehyun; Kwon, Yonghwan; Kim, Min-Su; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lim, Chae-Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2016-06-10

    Akabane virus (AKAV), an arthropod-transmitted bunyavirus, is a major cause of congenital abnormalities and encephalomyelitis in ruminants. In 2010, there was a major outbreak of encephalomyelitis in Korea and fifteen AKAV strains, including AKAV-7, were isolated from cows. To identify the neuropathogenicity of AKAV-7, we performed experimental infection of cows. Six-month-old female Korean Holstein dairy cattle were inoculated with AKAV-7 by various routes, including intracerebral (IC), intrasubarachnoid space (IS), subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous (IV); a separate group was vaccinated before intravenous infection. Five of the six cows in the IC group and two of the six cows in the IS group showed clinical signs such as locomotor ataxia and paralysis of the hind limbs. Three of six cows died after IC infection 9-12 days post infection (dpi). Histopathologic changes such as nonsuppurative encephalomyelitis were confirmed in various parts of the central nervous system in the IC, IS and SC groups. Early onset of neutralizing antibodies in the serum and lower viral mRNA levels in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and various tissues in the vaccinated group was noticeable compared to the unvaccinated group (IV group). We suggest that the AKAV vaccine currently used in Korea may be partially effective for protection against AKAV-7 in cows.

  4. Asymmetric isolating barriers between different microclimatic environments caused by low immigrant survival

    PubMed Central

    Gosden, Thomas P.; Waller, John T.; Svensson, Erik I.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially variable selection has the potential to result in local adaptation unless counteracted by gene flow. Therefore, barriers to gene flow will help facilitate divergence between populations that differ in local selection pressures. We performed spatially and temporally replicated reciprocal field transplant experiments between inland and coastal habitats using males of the common blue damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) as our study organism. Males from coastal populations had lower local survival rates than resident males at inland sites, whereas we detected no differences between immigrant and resident males at coastal sites, suggesting asymmetric local adaptation in a source–sink system. There were no intrinsic differences in longevity between males from the different environments suggesting that the observed differences in male survival are environment-dependent and probably caused by local adaptation. Furthermore, the coastal environment was found to be warmer and drier than the inland environment, further suggesting local adaptation to microclimatic factors has lead to differential survival of resident and immigrant males. Our results suggest that low survival of immigrant males mediates isolation between closely located populations inhabiting different microclimatic environments. PMID:25631994

  5. CT-negative, MRI GRE-positive primary motor cortex contusion causing isolated foot drop

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Alexander M.; Niu, Tianyi; Nagasawa, Daniel T.; Everson, Richard; Sedighim, Shaina; Buitrago Blanco, Manuel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Isolated acute foot drop due to traumatic brain injury is exceedingly rare and is often misdiagnosed during initial evaluation. Here, we present the case of a patient who presented with left foot drop after falling off a bicycle. Case Description: The patient is a 55-year-old male who was mountain biking when he fell, hit his head, and lost consciousness. Neurologic examination of the left leg revealed foot drop, no sensory deficits, and 3+ reflexes at the knee and ankle with clonus. Electroencephalography, computed tomography (CT) of the head, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine, and CT of the lower extremities were all negative. Only MRI of the brain with a gradient echo sequence revealed microhemorrhages focused around the right precentral gyrus. The patient underwent physical therapy, and by 3 months had regained full strength in his left leg. Conclusion: Central causes of foot drop are exceptionally rare, however, they should be considered in all cases of post-traumatic dorsiflexion paresis. The key to the accurate diagnosis is a high index of suspicion as well as thorough and careful physical examination including reflex and sensory testing. Selective imaging modalities such as MRI or CT can then be used to verify the diagnosis. PMID:27904756

  6. Patients with isolated oligo/hypodontia caused by RUNX2 duplication.

    PubMed

    Molin, Arnaud; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena; Pichon, Olivier; Vincent, Marie; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Caignec, Cédric

    2015-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of RUNX2 are responsible for cleidocranial dysplasia, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed closure of cranial sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, moderate short stature and supernumerary teeth. By contrast, an increased gene dosage is expected for duplication of the entire RUNX2 sequence and thus, a phenotype different from cleidocranial dysplasia. To date, two cousins with a duplication including the entire RUNX2 sequence in addition to MIR586, CLIC5 and the 5' half of SUPT3H have been reported. These patients presented with metopic synostosis and hypodontia. Here, we report on a family with an affected mother and three affected children. The four patients carried a 285 kb duplication identified by array comparative genomic hybridization. The duplication includes the entire sequence of RUNX2 and the 5' half of SUPT3H. We confirmed the duplication by real-time quantitative PCR in the four patients. Two children presented with the association of metopic craniosynostosis and oligo/hypodontia previously described, confirming the phenotype caused by RUNX2 duplication. Interestingly, the mother and one child had isolated hypodontia without craniosynostosis, broadening the phenotype observed in patients with such duplications.

  7. Stunting of onion caused by Rhizoctonia spp. isolated from the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2009 and 2010, 45 isolates of Rhizoctonia spp. were recovered from onion bulb crops in the semi-arid Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington, in which patches of severely stunted onion plants developed following rotation with winter cereal cover crops. Characterization of isolates recovered f...

  8. Host ranges of North American isolates of Penicillium causing blue mold of bulb crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single isolates of four Penicillium species belonging to series Corymbifera (Penicillium allii, P. hirsutum, P. tulipae, P. venetum) plus an isolate of P. polonicum, all from North American sources, were inoculated individually into Crocus sativus, Allium sativum (garlic), A. cepa (onion), Iris holl...

  9. Newcastle disease viruses causing recent outbreaks worldwide show unexpectedly high genetic similarity with historical virulent isolates from the 1940s

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), a devastating disease of poultry and wild birds. Phylogenetic analyses clearly distinguish historical isolates (obtained prior to 1960) from currently circulating viruses of class II genotypes V, VI, VII, and XII throug...

  10. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Characterization among Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates Causing Severe Obstetric Infections in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Guiral, Elisabet; Sáez-López, Emma; Bosch, Jordi; Goncé, Anna; López, Marta; Sanz, Sergi; Vila, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The virulence markers and the antimicrobial resistance profiles of 78 Escherichia coli isolates causing obstetric infections accompanied by sepsis or not were studied. Adhesion-related virulence factors were the most prevalent markers. Low rates of resistance to the antimicrobial agents used as first-line therapy suggest their correct implementation in stewardship guidelines. PMID:25740771

  11. Molecular Characterization of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producer Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates Causing Neonatal Sepsis in Peru.

    PubMed

    García, Coralith; Astocondor, Lizeth; Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Jacobs, Jan; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2016-02-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is the most common cause of neonatal sepsis in the low- and middle-income countries. Our objective was to describe the phenotypic and molecular characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producer KP in neonatal care centers from Peru. We collected 176 non-duplicate consecutive KP isolates from blood isolates of neonates from eight general public hospitals of Lima, Peru. The overall rate of ESBL production was 73.3% (N = 129). The resistance rates were higher among ESBL-producer isolates when compared with the nonproducers: 85.3% versus 12.8% for gentamicin (P < 0.01), 59.7% versus 8.5% for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (P < 0.01), 45.0% versus 8.5% for ciprofloxacin (P < 0.01), and 36.4% versus 12.8% for amikacin (P < 0.01). A total of 359 β-lactamase-encoding genes were detected among 129 ESBL-producer isolates; 109 isolates (84.5%) carried two or more genes. Among 37 ESBL-producer isolates randomly selected, CTX-M-15 and CTX-M-2 were the most common ESBLs detected. Most of the isolates (92%) belonged to the group KpI. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that multiple KP clones were circulating among the eight neonatal units included.

  12. Recessive mutations in the α3 (VI) collagen gene COL6A3 cause early-onset isolated dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-06-04

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis.

  13. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing bacteremia at a major hospital in southern Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Dhritiman; Batte, Justin L; Brown, Stephanie N; Crosby, Angela G; Marcos, Luis A; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2015-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant cause of bacteremia worldwide. We assessed the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of methicillin-resistant S aureus isolates causing bacteremia in southern Mississippi. Diverse genetic backgrounds in terms of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing types of methicillin-resistant S aureus were identified as causing bacteremia in Mississippi. A strong association of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes with elevated vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration is one of the important findings of our study.

  14. Comparison of epidemiological marker methods for identification of Salmonella typhimurium isolates from an outbreak caused by contaminated chocolate.

    PubMed Central

    Kapperud, G; Lassen, J; Dommarsnes, K; Kristiansen, B E; Caugant, D A; Ask, E; Jahkola, M

    1989-01-01

    Plasmid profile analysis, restriction endonuclease analysis, and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis were used in conjunction with serotyping, bacteriophage typing, and biochemical fingerprinting to trace epidemiologically related isolates of Salmonella typhimurium from an outbreak caused by contaminated chocolate products in Norway and Finland. To evaluate the efficiency of the epidemiological marker methods, isolates from the outbreak were compared with five groups of control isolates not known to be associated with the outbreak. Both plasmid profile analysis and phage typing provided further discrimination over that produced by serotyping and biochemical fingerprinting. Plasmid profile analysis and phage typing were equally reliable in differentiating the outbreak isolates from the epidemiologically unrelated controls and were significantly more effective than multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. The greatest differentiation was achieved when plasmid profile analysis and phage typing were combined to complement serotyping and biochemical fingerprinting. However, none of the methods employed, including restriction enzyme analysis of plasmid DNA, were able to distinguish the outbreak isolates from five isolates recovered in Norway and Finland over a period of years from dead passerine birds and a calf. Images PMID:2674198

  15. Comparative Study of Virulence Traits of Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates Causing Early and Late Neonatal Sepsis▿

    PubMed Central

    Soto, S. M.; Bosch, J.; Jimenez de Anta, M. T.; Vila, J.

    2008-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis and septicemia caused by Escherichia coli are still major health problems in industrialized countries. Forty-seven E. coli strains causing neonatal sepsis were analyzed. Twenty-two and 25 strains caused early (detected from 0 to 3 days after birth) and late (detected from 4 to 28 days after birth) infections, respectively. Only the ibeA gene was significantly more prevalent in the strains causing early infections. PMID:18160454

  16. Newcastle Disease Viruses Causing Recent Outbreaks Worldwide Show Unexpectedly High Genetic Similarity to Historical Virulent Isolates from the 1940s

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Lee, Dong-Hun; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Olivier, Timothy L.; Miller, Patti J.

    2016-01-01

    Virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), a devastating disease of poultry and wild birds. Phylogenetic analyses clearly distinguish historical isolates (obtained prior to 1960) from currently circulating viruses of class II genotypes V, VI, VII, and XII through XVIII. Here, partial and complete genomic sequences of recent virulent isolates of genotypes II and IX from China, Egypt, and India were found to be nearly identical to those of historical viruses isolated in the 1940s. Phylogenetic analysis, nucleotide distances, and rates of change demonstrate that these recent isolates have not evolved significantly from the most closely related ancestors from the 1940s. The low rates of change for these virulent viruses (7.05 × 10−5 and 2.05 × 10−5 per year, respectively) and the minimal genetic distances existing between these and historical viruses (0.3 to 1.2%) of the same genotypes indicate an unnatural origin. As with any other RNA virus, Newcastle disease virus is expected to evolve naturally; thus, these findings suggest that some recent field isolates should be excluded from evolutionary studies. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses show that these recent virulent isolates are more closely related to virulent strains isolated during the 1940s, which have been and continue to be used in laboratory and experimental challenge studies. Since the preservation of viable viruses in the environment for over 6 decades is highly unlikely, it is possible that the source of some of the recent virulent viruses isolated from poultry and wild birds might be laboratory viruses. PMID:26888902

  17. Isolated hypoplastic circumflex coronary artery: a rare cause of haemorrhagic myocardial infarction in a young athlete

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hypoplastic coronary artery disease is a rare condition that may lead to myocardial infarction and sudden death. Here we describe for the first time an isolated hypoplasia of the left circumflex artery (LCX). An otherwise healthy and athletically active 16-year-old boy was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. He died 12 hours after the initial event. Autopsy revealed an isolated hypoplastic LCX and acute haemorrhagic infarction in the posterolateral myocardium. The existence of isolated hypoplasia of the LCX challenges our understanding of coronary artery development. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1558483061962648 PMID:23742172

  18. Isolated systolic hypertension in Dutch middle aged and all-cause mortality: a 25-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    van den Ban, G C; Kampman, E; Schouten, E G; Kok, F J; van der Heide, R M; van der Heide-Wessel, C

    1989-03-01

    In the early 1950s, the blood pressure of 3901 Dutch civil servants and their spouses aged 40-65 years was measured in a general health survey. Isolated systolic hypertension (systolic pressure greater than 160 mmHg, diastolic pressure less than 90 mmHg) was observed in 6.3% of the women and 3.0% of the men. The prevalence increased with age and it was more common in women in all age groups. Using logistic regression, with adjustment for potential confounders (age, smoking, serum cholesterol, Quetelet index, alcohol consumption, haemoglobin level, pulse rate and diastolic blood pressure) the association of 15- and 25-year total mortality with isolated systolic hypertension was determined. Compared to normotensive people (systolic pressure less than or equal to 135 mmHg, diastolic pressure less than 90 mmHg), the risk of death from all causes was significantly higher for men with isolated systolic hypertension after 15 and 25 years of follow-up (odds ratio OR = 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-4.8 and OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-8.0). For women 15-years mortality risk was strongly associated with isolated systolic hypertension (OR = 3.7, 95% CI 1.4-9.7). The increased risk was less pronounced after 25 years of follow-up (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 0.96-3.0). Our results support those of other studies and indicate that isolated systolic hypertension is an important independent risk factor for all-cause mortality. Since isolated systolic hypertension may be an indicator for the early onset of ageing, it is important to study its determinants and to pay more attention to its diagnosis and treatment in middle-aged populations.

  19. Microsporum aenigmaticum sp. nov. from M. gypseum complex, isolated as a cause of tinea corporis.

    PubMed

    Hubka, Vit; Dobiašova, Stanislava; Dobiaš, Radim; Kolařik, Miroslav

    2014-05-01

    An undescribed Microsporum species was isolated from skin scales recovered from a 40-mm large, annular, scaling lesion on the wrist of a 46-year-old woman. The risk factors for dermatophyte infection in the patient were frequent work in the garden, hunting, and contact with dogs and horses. Direct microscopic examination of the scales revealed the presence of dermatophyte hyphae; when the samples were cultured, a morphologically similar fungus grew on all slants in pure culture. Both of these findings strongly suggested that the isolate was the true causal agent of infection. The possible geophilic nature of the species was based on phylogenetic analysis (internal transcribed spacer region of rDNA and β-tubulin gene) that placed it in between species of the M. gypseum complex. However, its divergencies from all other Microsporum species exceeded 4% base pairs. Based on β-tubulin phylogeny, the isolated species is a sister to M. gypseum. The species produces abundant chlamydospores and clumps of hyphae similar to those of ascomatal primordia but no conidia and ascospores. The species was unable to grow at 37°C and does not grow on T6 basal medium, which is unlike other Microsporum species; hair perforation and urease tests were positive. The addition of histidine to the T6 medium resulted in rapid growth of the fungus. The phylogenetic evidence, morphology, growth parameters, and physiology justified the proposal that the isolate is a new species, M. aenigmaticum, sp. nov.

  20. Bacteremia Caused by a Novel Isolate Resembling Leptotrichia Species in a Neutropenic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Clarridge, Jill; Schuster, Mindy S.; Waddington, Michael; Osborne, Janet; Nachamkin, Irving

    1999-01-01

    We report a case of Leptotrichia species bacteremia in a patient undergoing treatment for acute myelogenous leukemia. Like previously reported Leptotrichia species, this is a gram-variable, pleomorphic rod that is catalase negative and utilizes glucose and sucrose. However, it is more fastidious than previously reported isolates of Leptotrichia and may represent a novel species. PMID:10325382

  1. Type 2 Superior Labral Anterior to Posterior Lesion-Related Paralabral Cyst Causing Isolated Infraspinatus Paralysis: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Ki; Han, Eun Young; Choi, Sung Wook; Kim, Bo Ryun; Suh, Min Ji

    2015-10-01

    Type 2 superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion is a common cause of shoulder pain requiring surgical operation. SLAP tears are often associated with paralabral cysts, but they rarely cause nerve compression. However, we experienced two cases of type 2 SLAP-related paralabral cysts at the spinoglenoid notch which were confirmed as isolated nerve entrapment of the infraspinatus branch of the suprascapular nerve by electrodiagnostic assessment and magnetic resonance imaging. In these pathological conditions, comprehensive electrodiagnostic evaluation is warranted for confirmation of neuropathy, while surgical decompression of the paralabral cyst combined with SLAP repair is recommended.

  2. PBP2a Mutations Causing High-Level Ceftaroline Resistance in Clinical Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Long, S. Wesley; Olsen, Randall J.; Mehta, Shrenik C.; Palzkill, Timothy; Cernoch, Patricia L.; Perez, Katherine K.; Musick, William L.; Rosato, Adriana E.

    2014-01-01

    Ceftaroline is the first member of a novel class of cephalosporins approved for use in the United States. Although prior studies have identified eight ceftaroline-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in Europe and Asia with MICs ranging from 4 to 8 mg/liter, high-level resistance to ceftaroline (>32 mg/liter) has not been described in MRSA strains isolated in the United States. We isolated a ceftaroline-resistant (MIC > 32 mg/liter) MRSA strain from the blood of a cystic fibrosis patient and five MRSA strains from the respiratory tract of this patient. Whole-genome sequencing identified two amino acid-altering mutations uniquely present in the ceftaroline-binding pocket of the transpeptidase region of penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) in ceftaroline-resistant isolates. Biochemical analyses and the study of isogenic mutant strains confirmed that these changes caused ceftaroline resistance. Thus, we identified the molecular mechanism of ceftaroline resistance in the first MRSA strain with high-level ceftaroline resistance isolated in the United States. PMID:25155594

  3. [Acute diarrhea outbreak caused by Shigella flexneri at a school in Madrid, Cundinamarca: phenotypic and genotypic characterization of the isolates].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Realpe, María Elena; Muñoz, Nélida; Sicard, Diego; Silva, Esperanza; Agudelo, Clara Inés; Castañeda, Elizabeth

    2002-09-01

    Shigellosis is an acute diarrhoeal disease that is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In 1997, the Colombian Instituto Nacional de Salud Microbiology Group organized a network surveillance program with the country's Public Health Laboratories (PHLs) to monitor the principal etiological agents responsible for acute diarrhoeal disease. In May, 2001, the PHL of the state of Cundinamarca reported a food poisoning outbreak involving an elementary school community. The main goal of the Microbiology Group involvement was to establish the molecular relationships among the isolates from the outbreak by phenotypic and genotypic methods of characterization. Stool cultures were obtained from 22 of 195 affected individuals. The Microbiology Group confirmed the identification of the isolates by biochemical and serological probes. The antimicrobial susceptibilities were tested against the following battery of antibiotics: chloramphenicol, trimehoprim-sulfamethozazole, cefotaxime, gentamicin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. The isolates were subjected to pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the following CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control) protocols: Xbal restriction enzyme, Shigella sonnei CDC F2353 as the reference standard, and lambda phage as a molecular weight marker. In 15 of 22 (68%) stool cultures Shigella was recovered, all isolates were identified as Shigella flexneri serotype 6 biotype Newcastle with the same antimicrobial susceptibility profile. PFGE showed that 3 (20%) isolates were identical (100% genetic similarity) and the other 12 (80%) were very closely related (genetic similarity between 86-98%). The network system permitted the INS ready access to the isolates and the implementation of the PFGE permitted a quantitative characterization of the clonal relationship among the isolates from the outbreak.

  4. Characterization of Streptomyces isolates causing colour changes of mural paintings in ancient Egyptian tombs.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Haliem, M E F; Sakr, A A; Ali, M F; Ghaly, M F; Sohlenkamp, C

    2013-08-25

    Paintings in ancient Egyptian tombs often suffer colour changes due to microbial growth and colonization. Streptomyces strains were isolated from mural paintings of Tell Basta and Tanis tombs (East of Nile Delta, Egypt) and were identified using biochemical and molecular methods. The16S rDNA sequences data indicated that isolated strains were closely related to S. coelicolor, S. albidofuscus, S. ambofaciens, S. canarius, S. parvullus, S. corchorusii, S. albidofuscus and S. nigrifaciens. It could be shown that Streptomyces strains are involved on a large scale in the colour changes of paintings and stone support by producing a wide range of metabolites such as acids (oxalic, citric and sulphuric acids), biopigments of melanin, carotenoids, and hydrogen sulphide.

  5. Mutations in DCC cause isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum with incomplete penetrance.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Ashley P L; Heron, Delphine; Edwards, Timothy J; Quartier, Angélique; Galea, Charles; Nava, Caroline; Rastetter, Agnès; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Anderson, Vicki; Bitoun, Pierre; Bunt, Jens; Faudet, Anne; Garel, Catherine; Gillies, Greta; Gobius, Ilan; Guegan, Justine; Heide, Solveig; Keren, Boris; Lesne, Fabien; Lukic, Vesna; Mandelstam, Simone A; McGillivray, George; McIlroy, Alissandra; Méneret, Aurélie; Mignot, Cyril; Morcom, Laura R; Odent, Sylvie; Paolino, Annalisa; Pope, Kate; Riant, Florence; Robinson, Gail A; Spencer-Smith, Megan; Srour, Myriam; Stephenson, Sarah E M; Tankard, Rick; Trouillard, Oriane; Welniarz, Quentin; Wood, Amanda; Brice, Alexis; Rouleau, Guy; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Delatycki, Martin B; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Amor, David J; Roze, Emmanuel; Piton, Amélie; Bahlo, Melanie; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Sherr, Elliott H; Leventer, Richard J; Richards, Linda J; Lockhart, Paul J; Depienne, Christel

    2017-04-01

    Brain malformations involving the corpus callosum are common in children with developmental disabilities. We identified DCC mutations in four families and five sporadic individuals with isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) without intellectual disability. DCC mutations result in variable dominant phenotypes with decreased penetrance, including mirror movements and ACC associated with a favorable developmental prognosis. Possible phenotypic modifiers include the type and location of mutation and the sex of the individual.

  6. Pollination of Byrsonima coccolobifolia: short-distance isolation and possible causes for low fruit production.

    PubMed

    Amorim, M E; De Marco, P

    2011-08-01

    Byrsonima coccolobifolia is a tropical plant from the Malpighiaceae family, distributed in the neotropical savanna fields and pollinated by bees known as "collecting-oil bees". In this study, conducted in a Cerrado area located on a farm in the city of Silvânia, GO, the following hypothesis was tested: the greater the isolation degree of a plant, the lower its fruit production due to access difficulties for pollinators. Using a linear regression analysis, it was possible to relate the fruiting rate with the degree of isolation of each B. coccolobifolia individual and consequently it was found that the isolation had no influence on the pollination rate, an unexpected event that can be explained by the distance amongst individuals not being large enough to limit the movement of pollinators, or because cross-pollination was not the predominant form of reproduction, since the rate of cross-pollination was similar to self-pollination. It was also found that the proportion of fruits produced was lower than expected, a factor which may also have influenced the results.

  7. Draft genome sequencing of giardia intestinalis assemblage B isolate GS: is human giardiasis caused by two different species?

    PubMed

    Franzén, Oscar; Jerlström-Hultqvist, Jon; Castro, Elsie; Sherwood, Ellen; Ankarklev, Johan; Reiner, David S; Palm, Daniel; Andersson, Jan O; Andersson, Björn; Svärd, Staffan G

    2009-08-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a major cause of diarrheal disease worldwide and two major Giardia genotypes, assemblages A and B, infect humans. The genome of assemblage A parasite WB was recently sequenced, and the structurally compact 11.7 Mbp genome contains simplified basic cellular machineries and metabolism. We here performed 454 sequencing to 16x coverage of the assemblage B isolate GS, the only Giardia isolate successfully used to experimentally infect animals and humans. The two genomes show 77% nucleotide and 78% amino-acid identity in protein coding regions. Comparative analysis identified 28 unique GS and 3 unique WB protein coding genes, and the variable surface protein (VSP) repertoires of the two isolates are completely different. The promoters of several enzymes involved in the synthesis of the cyst-wall lack binding sites for encystation-specific transcription factors in GS. Several synteny-breaks were detected and verified. The tetraploid GS genome shows higher levels of overall allelic sequence polymorphism (0.5 versus <0.01% in WB). The genomic differences between WB and GS may explain some of the observed biological and clinical differences between the two isolates, and it suggests that assemblage A and B Giardia can be two different species.

  8. Draft Genome Sequencing of Giardia intestinalis Assemblage B Isolate GS: Is Human Giardiasis Caused by Two Different Species?

    PubMed Central

    Franzén, Oscar; Jerlström-Hultqvist, Jon; Castro, Elsie; Sherwood, Ellen; Ankarklev, Johan; Reiner, David S.; Palm, Daniel; Andersson, Jan O.; Andersson, Björn; Svärd, Staffan G.

    2009-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a major cause of diarrheal disease worldwide and two major Giardia genotypes, assemblages A and B, infect humans. The genome of assemblage A parasite WB was recently sequenced, and the structurally compact 11.7 Mbp genome contains simplified basic cellular machineries and metabolism. We here performed 454 sequencing to 16× coverage of the assemblage B isolate GS, the only Giardia isolate successfully used to experimentally infect animals and humans. The two genomes show 77% nucleotide and 78% amino-acid identity in protein coding regions. Comparative analysis identified 28 unique GS and 3 unique WB protein coding genes, and the variable surface protein (VSP) repertoires of the two isolates are completely different. The promoters of several enzymes involved in the synthesis of the cyst-wall lack binding sites for encystation-specific transcription factors in GS. Several synteny-breaks were detected and verified. The tetraploid GS genome shows higher levels of overall allelic sequence polymorphism (0.5 versus <0.01% in WB). The genomic differences between WB and GS may explain some of the observed biological and clinical differences between the two isolates, and it suggests that assemblage A and B Giardia can be two different species. PMID:19696920

  9. Knockout of Lysosomal Enzyme-Targeting Gene Causes Abnormalities in Mouse Pup Isolation Calls

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Terra D.; Holy, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    Humans lacking a working copy of the GNPTAB gene suffer from the metabolic disease Mucolipidosis type II (MLII). MLII symptoms include mental retardation, skeletal deformities and cartilage defects as well as a speech delay with most subjects unable to utter single words (Otomo et al., 2009; Cathey et al., 2010; Leroy et al., 2012). Here we asked whether mice lacking a copy of Gnptab gene exhibited vocal abnormities. We recorded ultrasonic vocalizations from 5 to 8 day old mice separated from their mother and littermates. Although Gnptab−/− pups emitted a similar number of calls, several features of the calls were different from their wild type littermates. Gnptab−/− mice showed a decrease in the length of calls, an increase in the intra-bout pause duration, significantly fewer pitch jumps with smaller mean size, and an increase in the number of isolated calls. In addition, Gnptab−/− mice vocalizations had less power, particularly in the higher frequencies. Gnptab+/− mouse vocalizations did not appear to be affected. We then attempted to classify these recordings using these features to determine the genotype of the animal. We were able to correctly identify 87% of the recordings as either Gnptab−/− or Gnptab+/+ pup, significantly better than chance, demonstrating that genotype is a strong predictor of vocalization phenotype. These data show that deletion of genes in the lysosomal enzyme targeting pathway affect mouse pup isolation calls. PMID:28101008

  10. Microdeletions of chromosome 17p13 as a cause of isolated lissencephaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, S.A.; Kuwano, Akira; Ledbetter, D.H. ); Dobyns, W.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Lissencephaly (agyria-pachygyria) is a brain malformation manifested by a smooth cerebral surface, resulting from arrest of neuronal migration at 10-14 wk gestation. Type I, or classical, lissencephaly can occur either in association with the Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS) or as an isolated finding, termed isolated lissencephaly sequence (ILS). About 90% of MDS patients have visible or submicroscopic deletions of 17p13.3. The authors therefore investigated the possibility that some ILS patients have smaller deletions in this chromosomal region. Forty-five ILS patients with gyral abnormalities ranging from complete agyria to mixed agyria/pachygyria and complete pachygyria were studied. RFLP analysis with five polymorphic loci in 17p13.3 was performed on all patients and their parents. Somatic cell hybrids were constructed on three patients, to confirm a deletion or to determine the boundaries of a deletion. These data demonstrate that a locus on 17p13 represents a major genetic etiology for patients with lissencephaly, ranging from complete agyria to pachygyria. In situ hybridization allows rapid and sensitive deletion detection and is the preferred method for diagnostic evaluation of MDA and ILS patients.

  11. Immune Mediated Necrotizing Myopathy: a Cause of Isolated Myopathy of Neck Extensor Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Rahul; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Yachoui, Ralph; Kenney, Charles V

    2016-01-01

    Immune mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) is a unique form of myositis that is characterized by distinct muscle biopsy features including abundant myofiber necrosis, degeneration, and regeneration with only minimal, if any, inflammation on muscle biopsy. IMNM is clinically similar to idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM); hence, muscle biopsy is essential to diagnose IMNM. Herein we describe a case of neck extensor weakness due to necrotizing myopathy. Isolated weakness of the neck extensor muscles is uncommon in IIM and IMNM. This case describes the diagnostic work-up, treatments utilized, and 2 year follow-up course without involvement of other muscle groups and without progression of neck extensor muscle weakness. Advanced imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilitated the diagnosis by identifying the affected muscles and site for muscle biopsy. PMID:27573534

  12. The antibacterial effect of honey on diarrhoea causing bacterial agents isolated in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obi, C L; Ugoji, E O; Edun, S A; Lawal, S F; Anyiwo, C E

    1994-09-01

    The antibacterial effect of local honey on local isolates of bacterial agents of diarrhoea was determined by an in vitro method involving the impregnation of filter paper discs in undiluted honey and different honey concentrations ranging from 10%-50%. The discs were later placed on plates that have been seeded with the different bacteria and zones of inhibition of growth were measured after a 48 hr. period of incubation. Results presented show that undiluted honey and honey at concentrations of 40% and above were inhibitory to all enteropathogens tested. Zones of inhibition of growth around the disc margin of the various enteropathogens tested ranged from 16-18mm in diameter for the local undiluted honey and 7-12mm in diameter for concentrations of honey at 40% and 50%. The possible mechanisms of this inhibitory effect of local honey are discussed.

  13. A homozygous mutation in ADAMTSL4 causes autosomal-recessive isolated ectopia lentis.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Dina; Sato, T Shawn; Kohilan, Abdulghani; Tayeh, Marwan; Chen, Shan; Leal, Suzanne; Al-Salem, Mahmoud; El-Shanti, Hatem

    2009-02-01

    Ectopia lentis is a genetically heterogeneous condition that is characterized by the subluxation of the lens resulting from the disruption of the zonular fibers. Patients with ectopia lentis commonly present with a marked loss in visual acuity in addition to a number of possibly accompanying ocular complications including cataract, myopia, and retinal detachment. We here describe an isolated form of ectopia lentis in a large inbred family that shows autosomal-recessive inheritance. We map the ectopia lentis locus in this family to the pericentromeric region on chromosome 1 (1p13.2-q21.1). The linkage region contains well more than 60 genes. Mutation screening of four candidate genes revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 11 of ADAMTSL4 (p.Y595X; c.1785T-->G) in all affected individuals that is absent in 380 control chromosomes. The mutation would result in a truncated protein of half the original length, if the mRNA escapes nonsense-mediated decay. We conclude that mutations in ADAMTSL4 are responsible for autosomal-recessive simple ectopia lentis and that ADAMTS-like4 plays a role in the development and/or integrity of the zonular fibers.

  14. Avian mycobacteriosis caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium in four ornamental birds and in vitro drug sensitivity testing of isolates.

    PubMed

    Stepień-Pyśniak, Dagmara; Puk, Krzysztof; Guz, Leszek; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Marek, Agnieszka; Kosikowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Avian tuberculosis, one of the most important diseases affecting various species of birds, is most often caused by Mycobacterium (M.) avium. This report describes cases of M. avium subsp. avium (MAA) infection in a white-crested Holland dwarf rooster, a male and a female golden pheasant and a male peacock. We also investigated the prevalence of mycobacteria in 60 other birds and 40 alpacas. Tissue samples of necropsied birds were cultured for mycobacteria. From non-necropsied 60 other birds and alpacas only faecal samples were collected. Clinical signs in the affected white-crested Holland cock included gradual loss of body weight and hoarse attempts at crowing during its last 3 weeks, with a dramatic loss of body condition and depression over the final week. Only slight weakening was observed in the peacock just before its death, and the golden pheasants died suddenly. Diagnosis was confirmed by microbiological, molecular and pathological results. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium strains were isolated from the internal organs of the affected birds. Only one faecal sample from 60 other birds was culture- and PCR-positive for M. avium subsp. avium, while another one was only PCR-positive for M. chelonae. We did not isolate any Mycobacterium spp. from faecal samples of alpacas and all of them were PCR-negative. All 18 isolated M. avium strains were resistant to rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, ethionamide, capreomycin and ofloxacin, and susceptible to cycloserine and streptomycin.

  15. Cannabinoid HU210 protects isolated rat stomach against impairment caused by serum of rats with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; Han, Tong; Chen, Chang-jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alterations in the pathogenesis of AGML. In addition, we explored the intervention effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 and antagonist AM251 on isolated and serum-perfused rat stomach. Our results showed that the AGML occurred after 5 h of AP replication, and the body homeostasis was disturbed in AP rat, with increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammtory cytokines and chemokines in the blood, and an imbalance of the gastric secretion function. Perfusing the isolated rat stomach with the AP rat serum caused morphological changes in the stomach, accompanied with a significant increment of pepsin and [H+] release, and increased gastrin and decreased somatostatin secretion. HU210 reversed the AP-serum-induced rat pathological alterations, including the reversal of transformation of the gastric morphology to certain degree. The results from this study prove that the inflammatory responses and the imbalance of the gastric secretion during the development of AP are responsible for the pathogenesis of AGML, and suggest the therapeutic potential of HU210 for AGML associated with acute pancreatitis.

  16. Mitochondrial nitric-oxide synthase stimulation causes cytochrome c release from isolated mitochondria. Evidence for intramitochondrial peroxynitrite formation.

    PubMed

    Ghafourifar, P; Schenk, U; Klein, S D; Richter, C

    1999-10-29

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by members of the NO synthase (NOS) family. Recently the existence of a mitochondrial NOS (mtNOS), its Ca(2+) dependence, and its relevance for mitochondrial bioenergetics was reported (Ghafourifar, P., and Richter, C. (1997) FEBS Lett. 418, 291-296; Giulivi, C., Poderoso, J. J., and Boveris, A. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 11038-11043). Here we report on the possible involvement of mtNOS in apoptosis. We show that uptake of Ca(2+) by mitochondria triggers mtNOS activity and causes the release of cytochrome c from isolated mitochondria in a Bcl-2-sensitive manner. mtNOS-induced cytochrome c release was paralleled by increased lipid peroxidation. The release of cytochrome c as well as increase in lipid peroxidation were prevented by NOS inhibitors, a superoxide dismutase mimic, and a peroxynitrite scavenger. We show that mtNOS-induced cytochrome c release is not mediated via the mitochondrial permeability transition pore because the release was aggravated by cyclosporin A and abolished by blockade of mitochondrial calcium uptake by ruthenium red. We conclude that, upon Ca(2+)-induced mtNOS activation, peroxynitrite is formed within mitochondria, which causes the release of cytochrome c from isolated mitochondria, and we propose a mechanism by which elevated Ca(2+) levels induce apoptosis.

  17. A mitochondrial tRNA aspartate mutation causing isolated mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Sara; Goemans, Nathalie; Van Coster, Rudy; Givron, Patrice; Reybrouck, Tony; Sciot, Raf; Meulemans, Ann; Smet, Joel; Van Hove, Johan L K

    2005-08-30

    Several mutations in mitochondrial transfer RNA (tRNA) genes can cause mitochondrial myopathy. We describe a young girl who presented with pronounced exercise intolerance. The anaerobic threshold and the maximal oxygen consumption were decreased. She had decreased complex I and IV enzyme activity and ragged red fibers on muscle biopsy. An A to G transition at nucleotide position 7526 in tRNA Aspartate (tRNA(Asp)) gene was heteroplasmic in several of the patient's tissues. We were unable to detect the mutation in muscle tissue from the patient's mother. This case adds a new genetic etiology for mitochondrial myopathy. It also illustrates for patients with combined deficiency of the complex I and IV enzyme activity the value of sequencing in the affected tissue muscle, and not only in blood, all mitochondrial tRNA genes including those not commonly affected, such as in this case mt tRNA(Asp).

  18. Apolipoprotein A-I Q[-2]X causing isolated apolipoprotein A-I deficiency in a family with analphalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, D S; Leiter, L A; Vezina, C; Connelly, P W; Hegele, R A

    1994-01-01

    We report a Canadian kindred with a novel mutation in the apolipoprotein (apo) A-I gene causing analphalipoproteinemia. The 34-yr-old proband, product of a consanguineous marriage, had bilateral retinopathy, bilateral cataracts, spinocerebellar ataxia, and tendon xanthomata. High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was < 0.1 mM and apoA-I was undetectable. Genomic DNA sequencing of the proband's apoA-I gene identified a nonsense mutation at codon [-2], which we designate as Q[-2]X. This mutation causes a loss of endonuclease digestion sites for both BbvI and Fnu4HI. Genotyping identified four additional homozygotes, four heterozygotes, and two unaffected subjects among the first-degree relatives. Q[-2]X homozygosity causes a selective failure to produce any portion of mature apoA-I, resulting in very low plasma level of HDL. Heterozygosity results in approximately half-normal apoA-I and HDL. Gradient gel electrophoresis and differential electroimmunodiffusion assay revealed that the HDL particles of the homozygotes had peak Stokes diameter of 7.9 nm and contained apoA-II without apoA-I (Lp-AII). Heterozygotes had an additional fraction of HDL3-like particles. Two of the proband's affected sisters had documented premature coronary heart disease. This kindred, the third reported apoA-I gene mutation causing isolated complete apoA-I deficiency, appears to be at significantly increased risk for atherosclerosis. Images PMID:8282791

  19. Liver rupture caused by isolated blunt force impact: the result of a blow, a kick or a fall?

    PubMed

    Vock, R

    2001-01-01

    A total of 5534 protocols of judicial and extrajudicial autopsies performed at the Institute of Legal Medicine of the University of Würzburg between 1974 and 1987 were examined to determine whether an isolated liver rupture can be attributed to a blow, a kick or a fall on a level plane or against a hard edge, based on the nature of the injury alone. From the 5534 autopsies examined, 293 cases of falling on level ground or down staircases were found. In 271 cases the abdomen struck against a flat surface, in 21 cases either against a post or an edge and in one case it was not possible to find out which object the abdomen struck against. A liver rupture was found in only four cases. It is highly unlikely that liver rupture will be caused by a fall on a level plane or down steps. This empirical finding is further supported by biomechanical calculations. A fall on a level plane can only cause a liver rupture if the abdomen strikes against a hard edge or a stake-like object. If such an event can be excluded, the most likely cause of the liver rupture is a blow or a kick. In all cases of liver rupture, however, the differential diagnosis must exclude extrathoracic heart massage as the cause.

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Dickeya sp. Isolates B16 (NIB Z 2098) and S1 (NIB Z 2099) Causing Soft Rot of Phalaenopsis Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Alič, Špela; Naglič, Tina; Llop, Pablo; Toplak, Nataša; Koren, Simon; Ravnikar, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The genus Dickeya contains bacteria causing soft rot of economically important crops and ornamental plants. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of two Dickeya sp. isolates from rotted leaves of Phalaenopsis orchids. PMID:26358590

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Dickeya sp. Isolates B16 (NIB Z 2098) and S1 (NIB Z 2099) Causing Soft Rot of Phalaenopsis Orchids.

    PubMed

    Alič, Špela; Naglič, Tina; Llop, Pablo; Toplak, Nataša; Koren, Simon; Ravnikar, Maja; Dreo, Tanja

    2015-09-10

    The genus Dickeya contains bacteria causing soft rot of economically important crops and ornamental plants. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of two Dickeya sp. isolates from rotted leaves of Phalaenopsis orchids.

  2. Transcriptional Profile during Deoxycholate-Induced Sporulation in a Clostridium perfringens Isolate Causing Foodborne Illness

    PubMed Central

    Okuzaki, Daisuke; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Fujita, Masaya; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.; Miyake, Masami

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens type A is a common source of foodborne illness (FBI) in humans. Vegetative cells sporulate in the small intestinal tract and produce the major pathogenic factor C. perfringens enterotoxin. Although sporulation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of FBI, the mechanisms inducing sporulation remain unclear. Bile salts were shown previously to induce sporulation, and we confirmed deoxycholate (DCA)-induced sporulation in C. perfringens strain NCTC8239 cocultured with human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. In the present study, we performed transcriptome analyses of strain NCTC8239 in order to elucidate the mechanism underlying DCA-induced sporulation. Of the 2,761 genes analyzed, 333 were up- or downregulated during DCA-induced sporulation and included genes for cell division, nutrient metabolism, signal transduction, and defense mechanisms. In contrast, the virulence-associated transcriptional regulators (the VirR/VirS system, the agr system, codY, and abrB) were not activated by DCA. DCA markedly increased the expression of signaling molecules controlled by Spo0A, the master regulator of the sporulation process, whereas the expression of spo0A itself was not altered in the presence or absence of DCA. The phosphorylation of Spo0A was enhanced in the presence of DCA. Collectively, these results demonstrated that DCA induced sporulation, at least partially, by facilitating the phosphorylation of Spo0A and activating Spo0A-regulated genes in strain NCTC8239 while altering the expression of various genes. IMPORTANCE Disease caused by Clostridium perfringens type A consistently ranks among the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses in humans in developed countries. The sporulation of C. perfringens in the small intestinal tract is a key event for its pathogenesis, but the factors and underlying mechanisms by which C. perfringens sporulates in vivo currently remain unclear. Bile salts, major components of bile, which is secreted

  3. Avian influenza virus isolates from wild birds replicate and cause disease in a mouse model of infection.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Elizabeth A; Jones, Cheryl A; Stallknecht, David E; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Tompkins, S Mark

    2010-04-10

    The direct transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses to humans in Eurasia and subsequent disease has sparked research efforts leading to better understanding of HPAI virus transmission and pathogenicity in mammals. There has been minimal focus on examining the capacity of circulating low pathogenic wild bird avian influenza viruses to infect mammals. We have utilized a mouse model for influenza virus infection to examine 28 North American wild bird avian influenza virus isolates that include the hemagglutinin subtypes H2, H3, H4, H6, H7, and H11. We demonstrate that many wild bird avian influenza viruses of several different hemagglutinin types replicate in this mouse model without adaptation and induce histopathologic lesions similar to other influenza virus infections but cause minimal morbidity. These findings demonstrate the potential of wild avian influenza viruses to directly infect mice without prior adaptation and support their potential role in emergence of pandemic influenza.

  4. Biocontrol of tomato plant diseases caused by Fusarium solani using a new isolated Aspergillus tubingensis CTM 507 glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kriaa, Mouna; Hammami, Inès; Sahnoun, Mouna; Azebou, Manel Cheffi; Triki, Mohamed Ali; Kammoun, Radhouane

    2015-10-01

    The present study focuses on the potential of glucose oxidase (GOD) as a promising biocontrol agent for fungal plant pathogens. In fact, a new GOD producing fungus was isolated and identified as an Aspergillus tubingensis. GOD (125 AU) has been found to inhibit Fusarium solani growth and spore production. Indeed, GOD caused the reduction of spores, the formation of chlamydospores, the induction of mycelial cords and the vacuolization of mycelium. In vivo assays, GOD acted as a curative treatment capable of protecting the tomato plants against F. solani diseases. In fact, the incidence was null in the curative treatment with GOD and it is around 45% for the preventive treatment. The optimization of media composition and culture conditions led to a 2.6-fold enhancement in enzyme activity, reaching 81.48U/mL. This study has demonstrated that GOD is a potent antifungal agent that could be used as a new biofungicide to protect plants from diseases.

  5. Screening of Trichoderma Isolates as a Biological Control Agent against Ceratocystis paradoxa Causing Pineapple Disease of Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. A.; Alam, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, dual culture, poison agar, and direct methods were used to assess the ability of Trichoderma virens IMI-392430, T. pseudokoningii IMI-392431, T. harzianum IMI-392432, T. harzianum IMI-392433, and T. harzianum IMI-392434 to control Ceratocystis paradoxa, which causes the pineapple disease of sugarcane. The highest percentage inhibition of radial growth (PIRG) values were observed with T. harzianum IMI-392432 using two dual culture methods, 63.80% in Method I and 80.82% in Method II. The minimum colony overgrowth time was observed with T. harzianum IMI-392432 and the maximum was observed with T. pseudokoningii IMI-392431. Different concentrations of different day-old metabolites of Trichoderma isolates were tested against mycelial growth of C. paradoxa. The highest PIRG (84.685%) exhibited at 80% concentration of 30-day-old metabolites of T. harzianum IMI-392432 using the modified bilayer poison agar method. In the direct assay method the maximum mycelial growth weight (PIGW) was observed at the same concentration and the same day-old metabolites of T. harzianum IMI-392432. This study showed that Trichoderma isolates have a good antagonistic effect on C. paradoxa mycelial growth and T. harzianum IMI-392432 has the most potential to control the pineapple disease pathogen. PMID:23983548

  6. Prevalence and Characterization of Oxacillin Susceptible mecA-Positive Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus Causing Bovine Mastitis in India

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Hiral; Sharma, Paresh; Mahato, Sudipta; Saravanan, R.; Kumar, P. Anand; Bhandari, Vasundhra

    2016-01-01

    Bovine mastitis caused by multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a huge problem reported worldwide, resulting in prolonged antibiotic treatment and death of livestock. The current study is focused on surveillance of antibiotic susceptibility along with genotypic and phenotypic characterization of the pathogenic S. aureus strains causing mastitis in India. One hundred and sixty seven milk samples were collected from mastitis-affected cows from different farms in India resulting in thirty nine isolated S. aureus strains. Antibiotic sensitivity profiling revealed the majority of the strains (n = 24) to be multidrug resistant and eleven strains showed reduced susceptibility to vancomycin (MICs = 2μg/ml). All strains were oxacillin sensitive, but 19 strains were positive for the mecA gene, which revealed the occurrence of oxacillin susceptible mecA positive strains (OS-MRSA) for the first time from India. Additionally, 32 strains were positive for the pvl gene, a virulence determinant; of these 17 were also OS-MRSA strains. Molecular characterization based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, agr typing and SCCmec classification revealed strains belonging to different groups. Moreover, strains showed spa types (t2526, t9602) and MLST sequence types, ST-72, ST-88 and ST-239 which have been earlier reported in human infections. The prevalence of OS-MRSA strains indicates the importance of including both the genetic and phenotypic tests in characterizing S. aureus strains. Increased genotypic variability with strain related to human infections and pvl positive isolates indicates a worrisome situation with the possibility of bilateral transfer. PMID:27603123

  7. Cryptococcus gattii VGIII isolates causing infections in HIV/AIDS patients in Southern California: identification of the local environmental source as arboreal.

    PubMed

    Springer, Deborah J; Billmyre, R Blake; Filler, Elan E; Voelz, Kerstin; Pursall, Rhiannon; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Larsen, Robert A; Dietrich, Fred S; May, Robin C; Filler, Scott G; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Ongoing Cryptococcus gattii outbreaks in the Western United States and Canada illustrate the impact of environmental reservoirs and both clonal and recombining propagation in driving emergence and expansion of microbial pathogens. C. gattii comprises four distinct molecular types: VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV, with no evidence of nuclear genetic exchange, indicating these represent distinct species. C. gattii VGII isolates are causing the Pacific Northwest outbreak, whereas VGIII isolates frequently infect HIV/AIDS patients in Southern California. VGI, VGII, and VGIII have been isolated from patients and animals in the Western US, suggesting these molecular types occur in the environment. However, only two environmental isolates of C. gattii have ever been reported from California: CBS7750 (VGII) and WM161 (VGIII). The incongruence of frequent clinical presence and uncommon environmental isolation suggests an unknown C. gattii reservoir in California. Here we report frequent isolation of C. gattii VGIII MATα and MATa isolates and infrequent isolation of VGI MATα from environmental sources in Southern California. VGIII isolates were obtained from soil debris associated with tree species not previously reported as hosts from sites near residences of infected patients. These isolates are fertile under laboratory conditions, produce abundant spores, and are part of both locally and more distantly recombining populations. MLST and whole genome sequence analysis provide compelling evidence that these environmental isolates are the source of human infections. Isolates displayed wide-ranging virulence in macrophage and animal models. When clinical and environmental isolates with indistinguishable MLST profiles were compared, environmental isolates were less virulent. Taken together, our studies reveal an environmental source and risk of C. gattii to HIV/AIDS patients with implications for the >1,000,000 cryptococcal infections occurring annually for which the causative

  8. Cryptococcus gattii VGIII Isolates Causing Infections in HIV/AIDS Patients in Southern California: Identification of the Local Environmental Source as Arboreal

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Deborah J.; Billmyre, R. Blake; Filler, Elan E.; Voelz, Kerstin; Pursall, Rhiannon; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Larsen, Robert A.; Dietrich, Fred S.; May, Robin C.; Filler, Scott G.; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing Cryptococcus gattii outbreaks in the Western United States and Canada illustrate the impact of environmental reservoirs and both clonal and recombining propagation in driving emergence and expansion of microbial pathogens. C. gattii comprises four distinct molecular types: VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV, with no evidence of nuclear genetic exchange, indicating these represent distinct species. C. gattii VGII isolates are causing the Pacific Northwest outbreak, whereas VGIII isolates frequently infect HIV/AIDS patients in Southern California. VGI, VGII, and VGIII have been isolated from patients and animals in the Western US, suggesting these molecular types occur in the environment. However, only two environmental isolates of C. gattii have ever been reported from California: CBS7750 (VGII) and WM161 (VGIII). The incongruence of frequent clinical presence and uncommon environmental isolation suggests an unknown C. gattii reservoir in California. Here we report frequent isolation of C. gattii VGIII MATα and MATa isolates and infrequent isolation of VGI MATα from environmental sources in Southern California. VGIII isolates were obtained from soil debris associated with tree species not previously reported as hosts from sites near residences of infected patients. These isolates are fertile under laboratory conditions, produce abundant spores, and are part of both locally and more distantly recombining populations. MLST and whole genome sequence analysis provide compelling evidence that these environmental isolates are the source of human infections. Isolates displayed wide-ranging virulence in macrophage and animal models. When clinical and environmental isolates with indistinguishable MLST profiles were compared, environmental isolates were less virulent. Taken together, our studies reveal an environmental source and risk of C. gattii to HIV/AIDS patients with implications for the >1,000,000 cryptococcal infections occurring annually for which the causative

  9. Selection for resistance to Verticillium wilt caused by race 2 isolates of Verticillium dahliae in accessions of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt of lettuce caused by Verticillium dahliae can cause severe economic damage to lettuce producers. The pathogen exists as two races (races 1 and 2) in lettuce, and complete resistance to race 1 is known. Resistance to race 2 isolates has not been reported, and production of race 1 re...

  10. The inheritance of resistance to Verticillium wilt caused by race 1 isolates of Verticillium dahliae in the lettuce cultivar La Brillante.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt of lettuce caused by Verticillium dahliae can cause severe economic damage to lettuce producers. Complete resistance to race 1 isolates is available in L. sativa cultivar (cv) La Brillante and understanding the inheritance of resistance will aid development of new resistant cultiva...

  11. Mechanisms governing the direct removal of wastes from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository caused by exploratory drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    Two processes are identified that can influence the quantity of wastes brought to the ground surface when a waste disposal room of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is inadvertently penetrated by an exploratory borehole. The first mechanism is due to the erosion of the borehole wall adjacent to the waste caused by the flowing drilling fluid (mud); a quantitative computational model based upon the flow characteristics of the drilling fluid (laminar or turbulent) and other drilling parameters is developed and example results shown. The second mechanism concerns the motion of the waste and borehole spall caused by the flow of waste-generated gas to the borehole. Some of the available literature concerning this process is discussed, and a number of elastic and elastic-plastic finite-difference and finite-element calculations are described that confirm the potential importance of this process in directly removing wastes from the repository to the ground surface. Based upon the amount of analysis performed to date, it is concluded that it is not unreasonable to expect that volumes of waste several times greater than that resulting from direct cutting of a gauge borehole could eventually reach the ground surface. No definitive quantitative model for waste removal as a result of the second mechanism is presented; it is concluded that decomposed waste constitutive data must be developed and additional experiments performed to assess further the full significance of this latter mechanism.

  12. Long-lasting endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated arteries caused by an extract from the bark of Combretum leprosum

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Francisco das Chagas; Cavalcanti, Paulo Marques da Silva; Passaglia, Rita de Cassia Aleixo Tostes; Ballejo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe and to characterize the relaxing effect of an extract of the bark of Combretum leprosum on isolated arterial rings from different animals. Methods Rings (3 to 4mm) from rabbit, rat, or porcine arteries rings were suspended in an organ bath (Krebs, 37°C, 95%O2/5%CO2) to record isometric contractions. After the stabilization period (2 to 3 hours) contractions were induced by the addition of phenylephrine (0.1 to 0.3µM) or U46619 (10 to 100nM), and Combretum leprosum extract was added on the plateau of the contractions. Experiments were performed to determine the potency, duration, reversibility, and to get insights on the potential mechanism involved in extract-induced relaxations. Results In all rings tested, Combretumleprosum extract (1.5μg/mL) was able to cause relaxations, which were strictly endothelium-dependent. In rabbit or rat thoracic aorta rings, the relaxations were reversed by vitamin B12a or L-NG-nitroarginine. In porcine right coronary arteries and rabbit abdominal aorta, extract caused both L-NG-nitroarginine-sensitive and L-NG-nitroarginine-resistant relaxations. In rabbit thoracic aorta, the extract was relatively potent (EC50=0.20µg/mL) and caused relaxations; intriguingly the endothelium continued to produce relaxing factors for a long period after removing the extract. The magnitude of extract-induced relaxations was significantly reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca2+; in addition, the TRPs channels blocker ruthenium red (10µM) was able to revert extract-induced relaxations. Phytochemical analyses indicated that the extract was rich in polyphenol-like reacting substances. Conclusions Combretum leprosum extract contains bioactive compounds capable of promoting Ca2+-dependent stimulation of endothelial cells which results in a prolonged production of relaxing factors. PMID:26466063

  13. A ganglionic stimulant, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium, caused both cholinergic and adrenergic responses in the isolated mouse atrium.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kenta; Teraoka, Hiroki; Unno, Toshihiro; Komori, Sei-Ichi; Yamada, Masahisa; Kitazawa, Takio

    2013-03-15

    An isolated atrial preparation of the mouse is useful for analyzing the actions of drugs on the myocardium, autonomic neurons and endocardial endothelium. The aim of the present study was to examine the functions of intrinsic neurons of the atrium using a ganglionic stimulant, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP). DMPP (1-100 μM) caused a negative chronotropic action followed by a positive chronotropic action in spontaneously beating right atria and also caused biphasic inotropic actions consisting of initial inhibition followed by potentiation of electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contraction in the left atria. Inotropic actions in the left atria induced by DMPP were characterized using some autonomic drugs and M2 and/or M3 muscarinic receptor knockout (M2R-KO, M3R-KO and M2M3R-KO) mice. Atropine and hexamethonium decreased the initial negative inotropic actions of DMPP. In the atria from pertussis toxin-treated, M2R-KO and M2/M3R-KO mice, the negative inotropic actions were abolished. On the other hand, the following positive inotropic actions were decreased by hexamethonium, atropine and atenolol. In the atria from reserpine-treated mice, positive inotropic actions were also decreased. The positive inotropic action induced by DMPP was almost the same in M2R-KO mice but was reduced in both M3R-KO mice and M2/M3R-KO mice. In conclusion, DMPP caused biphasic inotropic/chronotropic actions in the mouse atrium through activation of intrinsic cholinergic and adrenergic neurons. M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors and β1-adrenoceptor are thought to be involved in these actions.

  14. Synchronization of Isolated Downstates (K-Complexes) May Be Caused by Cortically-Induced Disruption of Thalamic Spindling

    PubMed Central

    Mak-McCully, Rachel A.; Deiss, Stephen R.; Rosen, Burke Q.; Jung, Ki-Young; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Bastuji, Hélène; Rey, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles and K-complexes (KCs) define stage 2 NREM sleep (N2) in humans. We recently showed that KCs are isolated downstates characterized by widespread cortical silence. We demonstrate here that KCs can be quasi-synchronous across scalp EEG and across much of the cortex using electrocorticography (ECOG) and localized transcortical recordings (bipolar SEEG). We examine the mechanism of synchronous KC production by creating the first conductance based thalamocortical network model of N2 sleep to generate both spontaneous spindles and KCs. Spontaneous KCs are only observed when the model includes diffuse projections from restricted prefrontal areas to the thalamic reticular nucleus (RE), consistent with recent anatomical findings in rhesus monkeys. Modeled KCs begin with a spontaneous focal depolarization of the prefrontal neurons, followed by depolarization of the RE. Surprisingly, the RE depolarization leads to decreased firing due to disrupted spindling, which in turn is due to depolarization-induced inactivation of the low-threshold Ca2+ current (IT). Further, although the RE inhibits thalamocortical (TC) neurons, decreased RE firing causes decreased TC cell firing, again because of disrupted spindling. The resulting abrupt removal of excitatory input to cortical pyramidal neurons then leads to the downstate. Empirically, KCs may also be evoked by sensory stimuli while maintaining sleep. We reproduce this phenomenon in the model by depolarization of either the RE or the widely-projecting prefrontal neurons. Again, disruption of thalamic spindling plays a key role. Higher levels of RE stimulation also cause downstates, but by directly inhibiting the TC neurons. SEEG recordings from the thalamus and cortex in a single patient demonstrated the model prediction that thalamic spindling significantly decreases before KC onset. In conclusion, we show empirically that KCs can be widespread quasi-synchronous cortical downstates, and demonstrate with the first model

  15. Familial isolated pituitary adenoma caused by a Aip gene mutation not described before in a family context.

    PubMed

    García-Arnés, J A; González-Molero, I; Oriola, J; Mazuecos, N; Luque, R; Castaño, J; Arraez, M A

    2013-12-01

    The cause of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) remains unknown in a high percentage of cases, but the AIP gene plays an important role in the etiology. The aim of the study is to describe a family with FIPA syndrome and the results of genomic studies. A 16-year-old man had a giant prolactinoma resistant tomedical treatment with delayed growth and pubertal development. His mother had been previously diagnosed with a nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma. Transsphenoidal endoscopic resection was performed and a genetic study revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 6: 974G>A (p.Arg325Gln). Because the AIP gene is a tumor suppressor gene, we searched for loss of heterozygosity within the AIP gene by amplifying exon 6 from tumor tissue of the patient. In the electropherogram, only the A allele was amplified (hemizygous state), indicating loss of the normal allele. We report a Spanish family with FIPA in whom a mutation in the AIP gene previously unreported in a familiar context was identified.

  16. Evidence of Reversible Bradycardia and Arrhythmias Caused by Immunogenic Proteins Secreted by T. cruzi in Isolated Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Angulo, Héctor O.; Toro-Mendoza, Jhoan; Marques, Juan A.; Concepción, Juan L.; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael; Higuerey, Yoliver; Thomas, Luz E.; Balzano-Nogueira, Leandro; López, José R.; Mijares, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Chagas cardiomyopathy, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is characterized by alterations in intracellular ion, heart failure and arrhythmias. Arrhythmias have been related to sudden death, even in asymptomatic patients, and their molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Objective The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effect of proteins secreted by T. cruzi on healthy, isolated beating rat heart model under a non-damage-inducing protocol. Methods and Results We established a non-damage-inducing recirculation-reoxygenation model where ultrafiltrate fractions of conditioned medium control or conditioned infected medium were perfused at a standard flow rate and under partial oxygenation. Western blotting with chagasic patient serum was performed to determine the antigenicity of the conditioned infected medium fractions. We observed bradycardia, ventricular fibrillation and complete atrioventricular block in hearts during perfusion with >50 kDa conditioned infected culture medium. The preincubation of conditioned infected medium with chagasic serum abolished the bradycardia and arrhythmias. The proteins present in the conditioned infected culture medium of >50 kDa fractions were recognized by the chagasic patient sera associated with arrhythmias. Conclusions These results suggest that proteins secreted by T. cruzi are involved in Chagas disease arrhythmias and may be a potential biomarker in chagasic patients. PMID:25647069

  17. Pathogenicity and oxidative stress in Nile tilapia caused by Aphanomyces laevis and Phoma herbarum isolated from farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Ali, Esam H; Hashem, Mohamed; Al-Salahy, M Bassam

    2011-03-16

    Identified (n = 17) and unidentified (n = 1) fish-pathogenic fungal species from 10 genera of Oomycetes and soil fungi were isolated from 40 infected freshwater fish samples of the species Oreochromis niloticus niloticus (Nile tilapia) and Clarias gariepinus (African catfish). Samples were collected from various fish farms in the Nile Delta, Egypt. Nile tilapia were tested in aquaria for their susceptibility to the commonest Oomycetes species, Aphanomyces laevis and Achlya klebsiana, and also against the 2 most prevalent pathogenic soil fungi, Paecilomyces lilacinus and Phoma herbarum. Two techniques were used: water bath exposure and intramuscular (subcutaneous) injection. Water bath exposure to the 2 species of Oomycetes caused greater mortalities of O. niloticus niloticus than intramuscular injection, but the reverse was true of the soil fungal species. Regardless of the infection method, the 2 Oomycetes species were more potent pathogens than the soil fungal species. In both gills and mytomal muscles of fish infected by A. laevis and P. herbarum, we measured and compared with controls the oxidative stress parameters total peroxide (TP), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO), as well as levels of the antioxidants vitamin E and glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Infection by these 2 fungal species through either spore suspension or spore injection significantly increased oxidative damage in gills and induced marked decrease in most studied antioxidants. In addition, both routes showed similar effects and A. laevis depressed the antioxidants CAT, vitamin E and GSH more than P. herbarum.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a bacterium capable of removing taste- and odor-causing 2-methylisoborneol from water.

    PubMed

    Lauderdale, Chance V; Aldrich, Henry C; Lindner, Angela S

    2004-11-01

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB), a metabolite of blue-green algae, has been implicated in causing unpalatable drinking water throughout the world. Current non-biological water treatment technologies are ineffective in removing MIB from potable water or are cost-prohibitive, and biological applications may address these problems. We have isolated and characterized a bacterium derived from lake water and capable of aerobically degrading MIB. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that this strain is a spore-forming, flagellated bacterium that is bacilloid in shape, and 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis determined that it is most closely related to Bacillus fusiformis and Bacillus sphaericus, both members of the Bacillus sphaericus senso lato taxon. While the growth and oxidation potential of this strain was shown to be affected beyond certain MIB concentrations in the mg/l range, it was capable of depleting MIB at mg/l and ng/l concentrations and of removing MIB to concentrations yielding no observed odor.

  19. Biofilm Formation Caused by Clinical Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates Is Associated with Overexpression of the AdeFGH Efflux Pump.

    PubMed

    He, Xinlong; Lu, Feng; Yuan, Fenglai; Jiang, Donglin; Zhao, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Cheng, Huali; Cao, Jun; Lu, Guozhong

    2015-08-01

    Chronic wound infections are associated with biofilm formation, which in turn has been correlated with drug resistance. However, the mechanism by which bacteria form biofilms in clinical environments is not clearly understood. This study was designed to investigate the biofilm formation potency of Acinetobacter baumannii and the potential association of biofilm formation with genes encoding efflux pumps, quorum-sensing regulators, and outer membrane proteins. A total of 48 clinically isolated A. baumannii strains, identified by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR as types A-II, A-III, and A-IV, were analyzed. Three representative strains, which were designated A. baumannii ABR2, ABR11, and ABS17, were used to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm inducibility, and gene transcription (abaI, adeB, adeG, adeJ, carO, and ompA). A significant increase in the MICs of different classes of antibiotics was observed in the biofilm cells. The formation of a biofilm was significantly induced in all the representative strains exposed to levofloxacin. The levels of gene transcription varied between bacterial genotypes, antibiotics, and antibiotic concentrations. The upregulation of adeG correlated with biofilm induction. The consistent upregulation of adeG and abaI was detected in A-III-type A. baumannii in response to levofloxacin and meropenem (1/8 to 1/2× the MIC), conditions which resulted in the greatest extent of biofilm induction. This study demonstrates a potential role of the AdeFGH efflux pump in the synthesis and transport of autoinducer molecules during biofilm formation, suggesting a link between low-dose antimicrobial therapy and a high risk of biofilm infections caused by A. baumannii. This study provides useful information for the development of antibiofilm strategies.

  20. Reidentification of Streptococcus bovis Isolates Causing Bacteremia According to the New Taxonomy Criteria: Still an Issue? ▿

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Beatriz; Morosini, María-Isabel; Loza, Elena; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Navas, Enrique; Cantón, Rafael; del Campo, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    All Streptococcus bovis blood culture isolates recovered from January 2003 to January 2010 (n = 52) at the Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal were reidentified on the basis of their genetic traits using new taxonomic criteria. Initial identification was performed by the semiautomatic Wider system (Fco. Soria-Melguizo, Spain) and the API 20 Strep system (bioMérieux, France). All isolates were reidentified by PCR amplification and sequencing of both the 16S rRNA and sodA genes and by mass spectrometry using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS; Bruker, Germany). Results of 16S rRNA/sodA gene sequencing were as follows: Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus, 14/14 (number of isolates identified by 16S rRNA/number of isolates identified by sodA gene sequencing); Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus, 24/24; Streptococcus spp., 7/0; Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius, 0/2; Streptococcus lutetiensis, 0/5; Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 4/0; and Lactococcus lactis, 3/3. MALDI-TOF MS identified 27 S. gallolyticus isolates but not at the subspecies level, 4 L. mesenteroides isolates, 3 L. lactis isolates, and 6 S. lutetiensis isolates, whereas 12 isolates rendered a nonreliable identification result. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis grouped all S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates into 3 major clusters clearly different from those of the S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus isolates, which, in turn, exhibited no clonal relationship. The percentages of resistance to the tested antimicrobials were 38% for erythromycin, 23% for fosfomycin, 10% for levofloxacin, 6% for tetracycline, and 4% for co-trimoxazole. The most frequent underlying diseases were hepatobiliary disorders (53%), endocarditis (17%), and malignancies (12%). We conclude that sequencing of the sodA gene was the most discriminatory method and that S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus appears to have a higher genetic diversity

  1. Both PIGA and PIGL Mutations Cause GPI-a Deficient Isolates in the TK6 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, Janice A.; Carter, Elizabeth W.; Albertini, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular analysis of proaerolysin selected glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI-a) deficient isolates in the TK6 cell line was performed. Initial studies found that the expected X-linked PIGA mutations were rare among the spontaneous isolates but did increase modestly after ethyl methane sulfate (EMS) treatment (but to only 50% of isolates). To determine the molecular bases of the remaining GPI-a deficient isolates, real-time analysis for all the 25 autosomal GPI-a pathway genes was performed on the isolates without PIGA mutations, determining that PIGL mRNA was absent for many. Further analysis determined these isolates had several different homozygous deletions of the 5’ region of PIGL (17p12-p22) extending 5’ (telomeric) through NCOR1 and some into the TTC19 gene (total deletion >250,000bp). It was determined that the TK6 parent had a hemizygous deletion in 17p12-p22 (275,712bp) extending from PIGL intron 2 into TTC19 intron 7. Second hit deletions in the other allele in the GPI-a deficient isolates led to the detected homozygous deletions. Several of the deletion breakpoints including the original first hit deletion were sequenced. As strong support for TK6 having a deletion, a number of the isolates without PIGA mutations nor homozygous PIGL deletions had point mutations in the PIGL gene. These studies show that the GPI-a mutation studies using TK6 cell line could be a valuable assay detecting point and deletion mutations in two genes simultaneously. PMID:25970100

  2. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013–2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread

  3. Substance P injected into the dorsal periaqueductal gray causes anxiogenic effects similar to the long-term isolation as assessed by ultrasound vocalizations measurements.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Gabriel Shimizu; Nobre, Manoel Jorge; Carvalho, Milene Cristina; Brandão, Marcus Lira

    2007-09-04

    Housing conditions change the emotional state of the animals. Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) termed as 22 kHz are the usual components of the defensive responses of rats exposed to threatening conditions such as isolation. The amount of emission of 22 kHz USVs depends on the intensity of the aversive stimuli. While short periods of isolation caused an anxiolytic-sensitive enhancement of the defensive responses, long-term isolation tended to reduce the defensive performance of the animals to aversive stimuli. The dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) is an important vocal center and a crucial structure for the expression of defensive response. While it has been shown that Substance P (SP) at this midbrain level is involved in the modulation of the defensive response, its role in the emission of ultrasound vocalizations has not been evaluated. In this study we examined whether the resocialization and local injections of SP into the dPAG have an influence on the isolation-induced 22 kHz USVs recorded within the frequency range of 18-26 kHz. Rats isolated for 1 day showed a significant increase in the number and duration of USVs, which were reversed by resocialization. On the other hand, 2-week isolation reduced the number and duration of 22 kHz USVs, which could not be reversed by resocialization. SP injections into the dPAG (35 pmol/0.2 microL) caused a reduction in the 22 kHz USVs. Pretreatment with the NK-1 receptor antagonist spantide (100 pmol/0.2 microL) blocked these effects but exhibited no effect when given alone. These findings suggest that 1-day and 2-week isolation recruit distinct brain defensive systems. Also, in agreement with the notion that intense fear is associated with the neural substrates of fear of the dPAG, activation of NK-1 receptors of this midbrain structure reduces the 22 kHz USVs.

  4. Comparison of isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae causing meningitis and report of gonococcal meningitis in a patient with C8 deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, C; Stephens, D S; Knapp, J S; Rice, R J; Schalla, W O

    1989-01-01

    We studied a previously healthy 20-year-old woman who presented with gonococcal meningitis. The gonococcal isolate, HT-1, was prototrophic by auxotyping, was protein I serovar IB-1, and agglutinated with wheat germ lectin. This isolate differed from the proline-requiring, serovar IA-1 and IB-4, wheat germ-agglutination-negative gonococcal isolates recovered from three patients during a recent outbreak of gonococcal meningitis in Philadelphia. HT-1 was killed by normal pooled human sera (greater than or equal to 98% at 30 min) but not effectively killed by the convalescent-phase sera of the patient (greater than 30% survival at 30 min). Similar results were obtained when mucosal and cerebrospinal fluid isolates from a Philadelphia patient were exposed to these sera, but mucosal and blood isolates from another Philadelphia case showed increased resistance to killing by normal pooled human sera. Further characterization revealed multiple differences in outer membrane and cellular proteins and lipopolysaccharide between case isolates. Absence of the L8 lipopolysaccharide epitope was noted for all isolates. Sera of our patient were found to have low total hemolytic complement (CH100 = 21 U/ml; normal = 55 to 100 U/ml) due to deficiency of C8 (C8 less than 1,000 CH50 U/ml; normal = greater than or equal to 16,000 CH50 U/ml). This is the first reported case of gonococcal meningitis occurring in a patient with a terminal-complement deficiency. Gonococcal meningitis is a rare complication of gonococcal bacteremia. Both defects in host defenses (e.g., terminal-complement deficiency) and organisms with unusual virulence appear to contribute to the pathogenesis of this complication of gonococcal bacteremia. Images PMID:2473091

  5. Cross-reactions in specific Brachyspira spp. PCR assays caused by "Brachyspira hampsonii" isolates: implications for detection.

    PubMed

    Aller-Morán, Luis M; Martínez-Lobo, F Javier; Rubio, Pedro; Carvajal, Ana

    2016-11-01

    An emerging novel spirochete in swine, provisionally designated "Brachyspira hampsonii," has been detected worldwide. It has been associated with swine dysentery and cannot be differentiated from B. hyodysenteriae, the classical etiologic agent of this disease, using standard phenotypic methods. We evaluated cross-reactions of "B. hampsonii" isolates recovered from avian species in some of the currently available species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for the identification of swine Brachyspira species. Ten avian "B. hampsonii" isolates recovered from wild waterfowl were used. No false-positive results were recorded with a B. pilosicoli-specific PCR based on the amplification of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. However, the percentage of false-positive results varied, with a range of 10-80%, in the evaluated B. hyodysenteriae-specific assays based on the amplification of the 23S rRNA, nox, and tlyA genes. Similarly, results of the B. intermedia-specific PCR assays yielded poor specificity, with up to 80% of the "B. hampsonii" isolates tested giving false-positive results. Finally, 2 "B. hampsonii" avian isolates yielded a positive result in a B. innocens- and B. murdochii-specific PCR. This result should be interpreted very cautiously as these 2 isolates could represent a recombinant genotype.

  6. Protective effect of dieckol isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol caused damage in vitro and in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kang, Sung-Myung; Yang, Xiudong; Kim, Eun-A; Song, Choon Bok; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jang, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Jung-Suck; Jung, Won-Kyo; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the protective effects of phlorotannins isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol-induced cell damage and apoptosis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Three phlorotannin compounds, namely phloroglucinol, eckol and dieckol, were successively isolated and identified from the extract. Dieckol showed the strongest protective effect against ethanol-induced cell apoptosis in Chang liver cells, with the lowest cytotoxicity. It was observed that dieckol reduced cell apoptosis through activation of Bcl-xL and PARP, and down-regulation of Bax and caspase-3 in Western blot analyses. In the in vivo study, the protective effect of ethanol induced by dieckol was investigated in a zebrafish model. The dieckol treated group scavenged intracellural reactive oxygen species and prevented lipid peroxidation and ethanol induced cell death in the zebrafish embryo. In conclusion, dieckol isolated from E. cava might possess a potential protective effect against ethanol-induced liver diseases.

  7. Determining causes of genetic isolation in a large carnivore (Ursus americanus) population to direct contemporary conservation measures.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Agnès; Obbard, Martyn E; Harnden, Matthew; McConnell, Sabine; Howe, Eric J; Burrows, Frank G; White, Bradley N; Kyle, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    The processes leading to genetic isolation influence a population's local extinction risk, and should thus be identified before conservation actions are implemented. Natural or human-induced circumstances can result in historical or contemporary barriers to gene flow and/or demographic bottlenecks. Distinguishing between these hypotheses can be achieved by comparing genetic diversity and differentiation in isolated vs. continuous neighboring populations. In Ontario, American black bears (Ursus americanus) are continuously distributed, genetically diverse, and exhibit an isolation-by-distance structuring pattern, except on the Bruce Peninsula (BP). To identify the processes that led to the genetic isolation of BP black bears, we modelled various levels of historical and contemporary migration and population size reductions using forward simulations. We compared simulation results with empirical genetic indices from Ontario black bear populations under different levels of geographic isolation, and conducted additional simulations to determine if translocations could help achieve genetic restoration. From a genetic standpoint, conservation concerns for BP black bears are warranted because our results show that: i) a recent demographic bottleneck associated with recently reduced migration best explains the low genetic diversity on the BP; and ii) under sustained isolation, BP black bears could lose between 70% and 80% of their rare alleles within 100 years. Although restoring migration corridors would be the most effective method to enhance long-term genetic diversity and prevent inbreeding, it is unrealistic to expect connectivity to be re-established. Current levels of genetic diversity could be maintained by successfully translocating 10 bears onto the peninsula every 5 years. Such regular translocations may be more practical than landscape restoration, because areas connecting the peninsula to nearby mainland black bear populations have been irreversibly modified

  8. Determining causes of genetic isolation in a large carnivore (Ursus americanus) population to direct contemporary conservation measures

    PubMed Central

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Harnden, Matthew; McConnell, Sabine; Howe, Eric J.; Burrows, Frank G.; White, Bradley N.; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    The processes leading to genetic isolation influence a population’s local extinction risk, and should thus be identified before conservation actions are implemented. Natural or human-induced circumstances can result in historical or contemporary barriers to gene flow and/or demographic bottlenecks. Distinguishing between these hypotheses can be achieved by comparing genetic diversity and differentiation in isolated vs. continuous neighboring populations. In Ontario, American black bears (Ursus americanus) are continuously distributed, genetically diverse, and exhibit an isolation-by-distance structuring pattern, except on the Bruce Peninsula (BP). To identify the processes that led to the genetic isolation of BP black bears, we modelled various levels of historical and contemporary migration and population size reductions using forward simulations. We compared simulation results with empirical genetic indices from Ontario black bear populations under different levels of geographic isolation, and conducted additional simulations to determine if translocations could help achieve genetic restoration. From a genetic standpoint, conservation concerns for BP black bears are warranted because our results show that: i) a recent demographic bottleneck associated with recently reduced migration best explains the low genetic diversity on the BP; and ii) under sustained isolation, BP black bears could lose between 70% and 80% of their rare alleles within 100 years. Although restoring migration corridors would be the most effective method to enhance long-term genetic diversity and prevent inbreeding, it is unrealistic to expect connectivity to be re-established. Current levels of genetic diversity could be maintained by successfully translocating 10 bears onto the peninsula every 5 years. Such regular translocations may be more practical than landscape restoration, because areas connecting the peninsula to nearby mainland black bear populations have been irreversibly modified

  9. Molecular characteristics of penicillin-binding protein 2b, 2x and 1a sequences in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases among children in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Liu, J; Zhang, Z; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Liu, Y

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the common pathogens causing severe invasive infections in children. This study aimed to investigate the serotype distribution and variations of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) 2b, 2x and 1a in S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases in Northeast China. A total of 256 strains were isolated from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) from January 2000 to October 2014. All strains were serotyped and determined for antibiotic resistance. The amplicons of penicillin-binding domains in pbp1a, pbp2b and pbp2x genes were sequenced for variation identification. The most prevalent serotypes of isolates in IPD children were 19A, 14, 19F, 23F and 6B. 19A and 19F were the most frequent serotypes of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP), which present with high resistance to amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and meropenem. The numbers of amino acid substitutions of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PNSP) isolates were higher than those of penicillin-sensitive S. pneumoniae isolates in all the PBP genes (p < 0.01). The patterns of amino acid mutation in PBP2b, PBP2x and PBP1a were unique and different from those of other countries. All of the serotype 19A and 19F PRSP isolates carried 25 amino acid mutations, including Ala618 → Gly between positions 560 and 675 in PBP2b and Thr338 → Ala substitutions in PBP2x. The amino acid alterations in PBP2b, PBP2x and PBP1a from S. pneumoniae were closely associated with resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. This study provides new data for further monitoring of genetic changes related to the emergence and spread of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in China.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a distinct duck-origin goose parvovirus causing an outbreak of duckling short beak and dwarfism syndrome in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shilong; Wang, Shao; Cheng, Xiaoxia; Xiao, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoli; Lin, Fengqiang; Wu, Nanyang; Wang, Jinxiang; Huang, Meiqing; Zheng, Min; Chen, Shaoying; Yu, Fusong

    2016-09-01

    Many mule duck and Cherry Valley duck flocks in different duck-producing regions of China have shown signs of an apparently new disease designated "short beak and dwarfism syndrome" (SBDS) since 2015. The disease is characterized by dyspraxia, weight loss, a protruding tongue, and high morbidity and low mortality rates. In order to characterize the etiological agent, a virus designated SBDSV M15 was isolated from allantoic fluid of dead embryos following serial passage in duck embryos. This virus causes a cytopathic effect in duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cells. Using monoclonal antibody diagnostic assays, the SBDSV M15 isolate was positive for the antigen of goose parvovirus but not Muscovy duck parvovirus. A 348-bp (2604-2951) VP1gene fragment was amplified, and its sequence indicated that the virus was most closely related to a Hungarian GPV strain that was also isolated from mule ducks with SBDS disease. A similar disease was reproduced by inoculating birds with SBDSV M15. Together, these data indicate that SBDSV M15 is a GPV-related parvovirus causing SBDS disease and that it is divergent from classical GPV isolates.

  11. Outbreak Caused by blaOXA-72-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii ST417 Detected in Clinical and Environmental Isolates.

    PubMed

    Tamayo-Legorreta, Elsa; Turrubiartes-Martínez, Edgar; Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Niño-Moreno, Perla; Barrios, Humberto; Sánchez-Pérez, Alejandro; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Tovar-Oviedo, Juana; Magaña-Aquino, Martin; Cevallos, Miguel Angel; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus

    2016-03-01

    We characterized an outbreak of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii with clinical and environmental isolates from a tertiary care hospital in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. During a 4-month period, a total of 32 nonrepetitive imipenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii were collected. All isolates were susceptible to colistin and tigecycline and resistant to cefepime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, imipenem, and meropenem. Genotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed a major clone (A). Multilocus sequence type (MLST) analysis was performed, revealing sequence type (ST) 417 (ST417) and 208 (ST208). The blaIMP-, blaVIM-, blaGIM-, blaSIM-, blaNDM-type, and blaOXA-type (blaOXA-23-like, blaOXA-24-like, blaOXA-51-like, and blaOXA-58-like) genes were screened and showed that the blaOXA-51-like and blaOXA-24-like genes were present in all isolates. Sequencing and southern hybridization were performed, confirming the presence of the blaOXA-72 gene and its plasmid-borne nature. In addition, the blaOXA-72-XerC/XerD-like association was identified. These findings indicate that a clonal spread of blaOXA-72-producing A. baumannii ST417 had occurred throughout the hospital. The ST417 corresponded with a previous ST described in the United States.

  12. Using MOMP typing as an epidemiological tool to investigate outbreaks caused by milkborne Campylobacter jejuni isolates in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe using major outer membrane protein (MOMP) typing as a screen to compare the C. jejuni porA gene sequences of clinical outbreak strains from human stool with the porA sequences of dairy farm strains isolated during two milkborne campylobacteriosis outbreak investigations in California. Th...

  13. Identification of a novel t17 genotype of acanthamoeba from environmental isolates and t10 genotype causing keratitis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nuprasert, Warisa; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Pariyakanok, Lalida; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2010-12-01

    We analyzed the nuclear small-subunit rRNA genes of Acanthamoeba isolates from freshwater sources (n=16) and from patients (n=6) in Bangkok and surrounding areas. The T10 genotype from a keratitis patient and a novel T17 genotype from water samples were diagnosed for the first time in this study.

  14. [Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) as cause of isolated gamma GT rise in a 5-year old boy with hepatomegaly].

    PubMed

    Wössmann, W; Wiemann, J; Körber, F; Gortner, L

    2000-01-01

    The diagnosis of HFI is easily missed during childhood. It should be suspected in children presenting with hepatomegaly and an isolated increase in GGT. A carefully taken nutritional history forms the basis of the diagnosis of HFI which can be confirmed by molecular analysis with a sensitivity of > 95%. I.v. fructose tolerance tests and liver biopsies often can be omitted.

  15. Species identification of Streptococcus bovis group isolates causing bacteremia: a comparison of two MALDI-TOF MS systems.

    PubMed

    Agergaard, Charlotte N; Knudsen, Elisa; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui C; Christensen, Jens J; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2017-02-20

    This study compared two MALDI-TOF MS systems (Biotyper and VITEK MS) on clinical Streptococcus bovis group isolates (n=66). The VITEK MS gave fewer misidentifications and a higher rate of correct identifications than the Biotyper. Only the identification of S. lutetiensis by the VITEK MS was reliable. Additional optimization of the available system databases is needed.

  16. Evaluation of pathogenesis caused in cattle and guinea pig by a Mycobacterium bovis strain isolated from wild boar

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In many regions of the world, wild mammals act as reservoir of Mycobacterium bovis, a situation that prevents the eradication of bovine tuberculosis. In order to observe whether a strain isolated from a wild boar, previously tested as highly virulent in a mice model, is also virulent in cattle, we performed cattle experimental inoculation with this strain Results Groups of Friesian calves were either infected with the wild boar strain M. bovis 04-303 or with the bovine strain NCTC10772 as a control. We found that antigen-specific IFN-γ release in whole blood samples occurred earlier in animals infected with M. bovis 04-303. Both M. bovis strains resulted in a positive skin test, with animals infected with the wild boar isolate showing a stronger response. These results and the presence of more severe organ lesions, with granuloma and pneumonic areas in cattle demonstrate that the wild boar isolate is more virulent than the NCTC10772 strain. Additionally, we tested the infectivity of the M. bovis strains in guinea pigs and found that M. bovis 04-303 had the highest pathogenicity. Conclusions M. bovis strains isolated from wild boars may be pathogenic for cattle, producing TB lesions. PMID:21745408

  17. Assessing the Role of the Courts in Addressing the Educational Problems Caused by Racial Isolation in School Finance Litigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Preston C., III.

    2013-01-01

    Since the separate-but-equal era, students attending schools with high concentrations of Black students have attempted to improve the quality of their educations through school finance litigation. Because of the negative effects of racial isolation, Black students might consider mounting school finance litigation to force states to explicitly…

  18. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility of yeast isolates causing fungemia collected in a population-based study in Spain in 2010 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Guinea, Jesús; Zaragoza, Óscar; Escribano, Pilar; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Sánchez-Reus, Ferrán; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    We report the molecular identifications and antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates causing fungemia collected in the CANDIPOP population-based study conducted in 29 Spanish hospitals. A total of 781 isolates (from 767 patients, 14 of them having mixed fungemia) were collected. The species found most frequently were Candida albicans (44.6%), Candida parapsilosis (24.5%), Candida glabrata (13.2%), Candida tropicalis (7.6%), Candida krusei (1.9%), Candida guilliermondii (1.7%), and Candida lusitaniae (1.3%). Other Candida and non-Candida species accounted for approximately 5% of the isolates. The presence of cryptic species was low. Compared to findings of previous studies conducted in Spain, the frequency of C. glabrata has increased. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by using EUCAST and CLSI M27-A3 reference procedures; the two methods were comparable. The rate of fluconazole-susceptible isolates was 80%, which appears to be a decrease compared to findings of previous studies, explained mainly by the higher frequency of C. glabrata. Using the species-specific breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values, the rate of voriconazole and posaconazole in vitro resistance was low (<2%). In the case of C. tropicalis, using the EUCAST procedure, the rate of azole resistance was around 20%. There was a correlation between the previous use of azoles and the presence of fluconazole-resistant isolates. Resistance to echinocandins was very rare (2%), and resistance to amphotericin B also was very uncommon. The sequencing of the hot spot (HS) regions from FKS1 or FKS2 genes in echinocandin-resistant isolates revealed previously described point mutations. The decrease in the susceptibility to fluconazole in Spanish isolates should be closely monitored in future studies.

  19. Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility of Yeast Isolates Causing Fungemia Collected in a Population-Based Study in Spain in 2010 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Guinea, Jesús; Zaragoza, Óscar; Escribano, Pilar; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Sánchez-Reus, Ferrán

    2014-01-01

    We report the molecular identifications and antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates causing fungemia collected in the CANDIPOP population-based study conducted in 29 Spanish hospitals. A total of 781 isolates (from 767 patients, 14 of them having mixed fungemia) were collected. The species found most frequently were Candida albicans (44.6%), Candida parapsilosis (24.5%), Candida glabrata (13.2%), Candida tropicalis (7.6%), Candida krusei (1.9%), Candida guilliermondii (1.7%), and Candida lusitaniae (1.3%). Other Candida and non-Candida species accounted for approximately 5% of the isolates. The presence of cryptic species was low. Compared to findings of previous studies conducted in Spain, the frequency of C. glabrata has increased. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by using EUCAST and CLSI M27-A3 reference procedures; the two methods were comparable. The rate of fluconazole-susceptible isolates was 80%, which appears to be a decrease compared to findings of previous studies, explained mainly by the higher frequency of C. glabrata. Using the species-specific breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values, the rate of voriconazole and posaconazole in vitro resistance was low (<2%). In the case of C. tropicalis, using the EUCAST procedure, the rate of azole resistance was around 20%. There was a correlation between the previous use of azoles and the presence of fluconazole-resistant isolates. Resistance to echinocandins was very rare (2%), and resistance to amphotericin B also was very uncommon. The sequencing of the hot spot (HS) regions from FKS1 or FKS2 genes in echinocandin-resistant isolates revealed previously described point mutations. The decrease in the susceptibility to fluconazole in Spanish isolates should be closely monitored in future studies. PMID:24366741

  20. Genome Sequencing and Analysis of Phomopsis longicolla Isolate MSPL 10-6 Causing Phomopsis Seed Decay in Soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phomopsis seed decay of soybean is caused primarily by the seed-borne fungal pathogen Phomopsis longicolla (syn. Diaporthe longicolla). This disease causes poor seed quality, reduces seedling vigor and stand establishment, and suppresses yield in most soybean production regions, especially in southe...

  1. Acoustic stimulation causes tonotopic alterations in the length of isolated outer hair cells from guinea pig hearing organ.

    PubMed Central

    Canlon, B; Brundin, L; Flock, A

    1988-01-01

    Isolated outer hair cells from the mammalian cochlea exhibit a motile response to electrical or chemical stimulation. Here we show that isolated outer hair cells can also respond to acoustic stimulation, in the form of a tone burst of 200 Hz, by either shortening or lengthening depending on their cochlear location. Cells from the apical region of the cochlea (long cells) responded by increasing their length, whereas those from more basal regions (short cells) responded by decreasing their length. Cells from intermediate positions showed an equal probability for either elongating or shortening. Both the elongating and shortening response was inhibited by 3 microM poly(L-lysine). It is suggested that this tonotopic and bidirectional acoustic response may be one of the active components underlying the specific phase and frequency displacement of the basilar membrane. Images PMID:3413135

  2. Clonal and serotype dynamics of serogroup 6 isolates causing invasive pneumococcal disease in Portugal: 1999-2012

    PubMed Central

    Diamantino-Miranda, Jorge; Aguiar, Sandra Isabel; Carriço, João André; Melo-Cristino, José

    2017-01-01

    Although serogroup 6 was among the first to be recognized among Streptococcus pneumoniae, several new serotypes were identified since the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs). A decrease of the 6B-2 variant among invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), but not 6B-1, was noted post conjugate vaccine introduction, underpinned by a decrease of CC273 isolates. Serotype 6C was associated with adult IPD and increased in this age group representing two lineages (CC315 and CC395), while the same lineages expressed other serogroup 6 serotypes in children. Taken together, these findings suggest a potential cross-protection of PCVs against serotype 6C IPD among vaccinated children but not among adults. Serotype 6A became the most important serogroup 6 serotype in children but it decreased in adult IPD. No other serogroup 6 serotypes were detected, so available phenotypic or simple genotypic assays remain adequate for distinguishing serotypes within serogroup 6 isolates. PMID:28152029

  3. Disease and Carrier Isolates of Neisseria meningitidis Cause G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    von Papen, Michael; Oosthuysen, Wilhelm F.; Becam, Jérôme; Claus, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Microbial pathogens have developed several mechanisms to modulate and interfere with host cell cycle progression. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis on the cell cycle of epithelial cells. Two pathogenic isolates, as well as two carrier isolates, were tested for their ability to adhere to and invade into the epithelial cell lines Detroit 562 and NP69 and to modulate the cell cycle. We found that all isolates adhered equally well to both Detroit 562 and NP69 cells, whereas the carrier isolates were significantly less invasive. Using propidium iodide staining and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine pulse-labeling, we provide evidence that meningococcal infection arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle at 24 h postinfection. In parallel, a significant decrease of cells in the S phase was observed. Interestingly, G1-phase arrest was only induced after infection with live bacteria but not with heat-killed bacteria. By Western blotting we demonstrate that bacterial infection resulted in a decreased protein level of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, whereas cyclin E expression levels were increased. Furthermore, N. meningitidis infection induced an accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) p21WAF1/CIP1 that was accompanied by a redistribution of this CKI to the cell nucleus, as shown by immunofluorescence analysis. Moreover, the p27CIP1 CKI was redistributed and showed punctate foci in infected cells. In summary, we present data that N. meningitidis can interfere with the processes of host cell cycle regulation. PMID:27430269

  4. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing skin and soft tissue infections in patients from Malakand, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Madzgalla, S; Syed, M A; Khan, M A; Rehman, S S; Müller, E; Reissig, A; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S

    2016-09-01

    Comparatively few studies have been published describing Staphylococcus aureus/MRSA epidemiology in Central Asia including Pakistan. Here, we report the genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains (that include both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) from community- and hospital-acquired skin and soft-tissue infections in a tertiary care hospital in the Malakand district of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province of Pakistan. Forty-five isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were characterized by microarray hybridization. Twenty isolates (44 %) were MRSA, whereas 22 (49 %) were PVL-positive. Fourteen isolates (31 %) harboured both mecA and PVL genes. The dominant clones were CC121-MSSA (n = 15, 33 %) and the PVL-positive "Bengal Bay Clone" (ST772-MRSA-V; n = 13, 29 %). The PVL-positive CC8-MRSA-IV strain "USA300" was found once. The pandemic ST239-MRSA-III strain was absent, although it has previously been observed in Pakistan. These observations require a re-assessment of schemes for initial antibiotic therapy to cover MRSA and they emphasise the need for a rapid and non-molecular test for PVL.

  5. Isolation of rpoB mutations causing rifampicin resistance in Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to simulated Martian surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Amy E; Schuerger, Andrew C; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2008-12-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial spores are considered prime candidates for Earth-to-Mars transport by natural processes and human spaceflight activities. Previous studies have shown that exposure of Bacillus subtilis spores to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) characteristic of space both increased the spontaneous mutation rate and altered the spectrum of mutation in various marker genes; but, to date, mutagenesis studies have not been performed on spores exposed to milder low pressures encountered in the martian environment. Mutations to rifampicin-resistance (Rif(R)) were isolated in B. subtilis spores exposed to simulated martian atmosphere (99.9% CO(2), 710 Pa) for 21 days in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) and compared to parallel Earth controls. Exposure in the MSC reduced spore viability by approximately 67% compared to Earth controls, but this decrease was not statistically significant (P = 0.3321). The frequency of mutation to Rif(R) was also not significantly increased in the MSC compared to Earth-exposed spores (P = 0.479). Forty-two and 51 Rif(R) mutant spores were isolated from the MSC- and Earth-exposed controls, respectively. Nucleotide sequencing located the Rif(R) mutations in the rpoB gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase at residue V135F of the N-cluster and at residues Q469K/L, H482D/P/R/Y, and S487L in Cluster I. No mutations were found in rpoB Clusters II or III. Two new alleles, Q469L and H482D, previously unreported in B. subtilis rpoB, were isolated from spores exposed in the MSC; otherwise, only slight differences were observed in the spectra of spontaneous Rif(R) mutations from spores exposed to Earth vs. the MSC. However, both spectra are distinctly different from Rif(R) mutations previously reported arising from B. subtilis spores exposed to simulated space vacuum.

  6. Fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from Hebridean cloud and rain water produce biosurfactants but do not cause ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahern, H. E.; Walsh, K. A.; Hill, T. C. J.; Moffett, B. F.

    2007-02-01

    Microorganisms were discovered in clouds over 100 years ago but information on bacterial community structure and function is limited. Clouds may not only be a niche within which bacteria could thrive but they might also influence dynamic processes using ice nucleating and cloud condensing abilities. Cloud and rain samples were collected from two mountains in the Outer Hebrides, NW Scotland, UK. Community composition was determined using a combination of amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and sequencing. 256 clones yielded 100 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of which half were related to bacteria from terrestrial psychrophilic environments. Cloud samples were dominated by a mixture of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., some of which have been reported to be ice nucleators. It was therefore possible that these bacteria were using the ice nucleation (IN) gene to trigger the Bergeron-Findeisen process of raindrop formation as a mechanism for dispersal. In this study the IN gene was not detected in any of the isolates using both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Instead 55% of the total isolates from both cloud and rain samples displayed significant biosurfactant activity when analyzed using the drop-collapse technique. All isolates were characterised as fluorescent pseudomonads. Surfactants have been found to be very important in lowering atmospheric critical supersaturations required for the activation of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). It is also known that surfactants influence cloud droplet size and increase cloud lifetime and albedo. Some bacteria are known to act as CCN and so it is conceivable that these fluorescent pseudomonads are using surfactants to facilitate their activation from aerosols into CCN. This would allow water scavenging,~countering desiccation, and assist in their widespread dispersal.

  7. Isolated clival metastasis as the cause of abducens nerve palsy in a patient of breast carcinoma: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Beniwal, Vimla; Beniwal, Surender; Mathur, Harsh; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic lesions to the clivus have been reported in various cancers including lung cancer, prostate carcinoma, skin melanoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. There have been only a few reports of breast cancer presenting with isolated clival metastasis. We report a case of 35-year-old lady, who was known case of breast carcinoma presented with diplopia as the only sign of clival metastasis. The etiology was established by magnetic resonance imaging which showed an enhancing lesion in the clivus. The diagnosis of clival metastasis from breast cancer was confirmed by transsphenoidal biopsy. PMID:26044482

  8. Inhibition of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Caused by Bacteria Isolated from the Skin of Boreal Toads, Anaxyrus (Bufo) boreas boreas, from Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shawna T; Collingwood, Amanda M; St-Hilaire, Sophie; Sheridan, Peter P

    2014-01-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a significant cause of the worldwide decline in amphibian populations; however, various amphibian species are capable of coexisting with B. dendrobatidis. Among them are boreal toads (Anaxyrus (Bufo) boreas boreas) located in Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) in Wyoming, USA. The purpose of this study was to identify cultivable bacterial isolates from the skin microbiota of boreal toads from GTNP and determine if they were capable of inhibiting B. dendrobatidis in vitro, and therefore might be a factor in the toad’s coexistence with this pathogen. Isolates from 6 of 21 genera tested were found to inhibit the growth of B. dendrobatidis. These bacteria represent diverse lineages such as the Gammaproteobacteria, the Betaproteobacteria, and the Bacteroidetes/Chlorobium groups. We propose that these bacteria compete via microbial antagonism with B. dendrobatidis. PMID:24826077

  9. H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Korean live bird markets continuously evolve and cause the severe clinical signs in layers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin A; Cho, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2006-12-20

    H9N2 influenza viruses are endemic in many Asian countries. We demonstrated that H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Korean live bird markets are genetically changing and could cause the clinical signs in layers. Genetic analysis showed that Korean avian H9N2 influenza viruses are distinct from H9N2 influenza viruses circulating in poultry in China and Hong Kong. When we infected layers with H9N2 isolates, layers showed about 30% mortality and the reduction of egg productions. Considering that H9N2 influenza virus is one of potential pandemic candidates, the continuous surveillance is needed to monitor avian H9N2 influenza viruses for the poultry industry and humans.

  10. Novel TBX1 loss-of-function mutation causes isolated conotruncal heart defects in Chinese patients without 22q11.2 deletion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background TBX1 and CRKL haploinsufficiency is thought to cause the cardiac phenotype of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, few unequivocal mutations of TBX1 and CRKL have been discovered in isolated conotrucal heart defects (CTDs) patients. The aim of the study was to screen the mutation of TBX1 and CRKL in isolated CTDs Chinese patients without 22q11.2 deletion and identify the pathomechanism of the missense mutations. Methods We enrolled 199 non-22q11.2 deletion patients with CTDs and 139 unrelated healthy controls. Gene sequencing were performed for all of them. The functional data of mutations were obtained by in vitro transfection and luciferase experiments and computer modelling. Results Screening of the TBX1 coding sequence identified a de novo missense mutation (c.385G → A; p.E129K) and a known polymorphism (c.928G → A; p.G310S). In vitro experiments demonstrate that the TBX1E129K variant almost lost transactivation activity. The TBX1G310S variant seems to affect the interaction of TBX1 with other factors. Computer molecular dynamics simulations showed the de novo missense mutation is likely to affect TBX1-DNA interaction. No mutation of CRKL gene was found. Conclusions These observations suggest that the TBX1 loss-of-function mutation may be involved in the pathogenesis of isolated CTDs. This is the first human missense mutation showing that TBX1 is a candidate causing isolated CTDs in Chinese patients without 22q11.2 deletion. PMID:24998776

  11. Establishment and maintenance of sexual preferences that cause a reproductive isolation between medaka strains in close association

    PubMed Central

    Ikawa, Mayuka; Ohya, Emi; Shimada, Hiroka; Kamijo, Makiko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animals choose reproductive partners based on their sexual preferences which are established at a certain time point before, during, or after sexual maturation. The preferences are often divergent within a species, which suppresses gene flow between populations and may promote speciation. There are two strains of medaka (Oryzias latipes) that differ by a single transgene and mate assortatively depending on skin color. Here, we demonstrate that symmetrically biased (mutually exclusive) sexual preferences are (1) gradually established during growth depending on skin color and the color of surrounding fish, (2) strong enough to minimize gene flow between the strains at a population level, and (3) inflexibly retained after sexual maturation, even after weeks of daily mating with partners of the other strain. Thus, these laboratory strains of medaka are under premating isolation with the simplest genomic structure. They provide an empirical platform for assessing the complex and hypothetical mechanisms of speciation by mate choice. PMID:28202469

  12. HJC, a new arylnaphthalene lignan isolated from Justicia procumbens, causes apoptosis and caspase activation in K562 leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Kong, Weijun; Yang, Meihua

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether HJC, isolated from Justicia procumbens for the first time, can suppress the proliferation and induce apoptosis of human leukemia K562 cells and finally clarify its related mechanism. The chemical structure of HJC was validated by LC-ESI-MS/MS, cytotoxicity was assayed using MTT, and apoptosis was investigated by flow cytometry. These assays indicated that HJC remarkably inhibited the growth in K562 cells by decreasing cell proliferation, reducing the SOD activity, enhancing ROS levels and inducing apoptosis. Activation of caspase-3 indicated that HJC may be inducing intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways and that HJC-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent. This study suggests that HJC is a high-potency anti-tumor agent, and it induces apoptosis through a caspase-dependent pathway in human leukemia K562 cells. It also presents a potential alternative to leukemia therapy.

  13. Serological and Molecular Studies of a Novel Virus Isolate Causing Yellow Mosaic of Patchouli [Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth

    PubMed Central

    Zaim, Mohammad; Ali, Ashif; Joseph, Jomon; Khan, Feroz

    2013-01-01

    Here we have identified and characterized a devastating virus capable of inducing yellow mosaic on the leaves of Patchouli [Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth]. The diagnostic tools used were host range, transmission studies, cytopathology, electron microscopy, serology and partial coat protein (CP) gene sequencing. Evidence from biological, serological and sequence data suggested that the causal virus belonged to genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae. The isolate, designated as Patchouli Yellow Mosaic Virus (PaYMV), was transmitted through grafting, sap and the insect Myzus persicae (Sulz.). Flexuous rod shaped particles with a mean length of 800 nm were consistently observed in leaf-dip preparations from natural as well as alternate hosts, and in purified preparation. Cytoplasmic cylindrical inclusions, pinwheels and laminar aggregates were observed in ultra-thin sections of infected patchouli leaves. The purified capsid protein has a relative mass of 43 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbits against the coat protein separated on SDS – PAGE; which were used in ELISA and western blotting. Using specific antibodies in ELISA, PaYMV was frequently detected at patchouli plantations at Lucknow and Bengaluru. Potyvirus-specific degenerate primer pair (U335 and D335) had consistently amplified partial CP gene from crude preparations of infected tissues by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Comparison of the PCR product sequence (290 bp) with the corresponding regions of established potyviruses showed 78–82% and 91–95% sequence similarity at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. The results clearly established that the virus under study has close homology with watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) in the coat protein region and therefore could share a common ancestor family. Further studies are required to authenticate the identity of PaYMV as a distinct virus or as an isolate of WMV. PMID:24386278

  14. Conus artery occlusion causing isolated right ventricular outflow tract infarction: novel application of cardiac magnetic resonance in anterior STEMI

    PubMed Central

    Lyle, Melissa; Tweet, Marysia; Young, Phillip M.; Best, Patricia J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute ST elevation in the anterior precordial leads typically suggests an anteroseptal infarction due to left anterior descending coronary artery obstruction, but the differential can be broad. Conus branch artery occlusion is a potentially overlooked cause of anteroseptal ST elevation myocardial infraction. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is an emerging technology which can differentiate the etiology of anterior ST elevation in patients with no apparent coronary abnormalities on coronary angiography and normal echocardiography. PMID:27280090

  15. HLA-B*57 Elite Suppressor and Chronic Progressor HIV-1 Isolates Replicate Vigorously and Cause CD4+ T Cell Depletion in Humanized BLT Mice

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Maria; Swanson, Michael D.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Wu, Jin; Archin, Nancie M.; Williams, Thomas M.; Margolis, David M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elite controllers or suppressors (ES) are HIV-1-infected patients who maintain undetectable viral loads without antiretroviral therapy. The mechanism of control remains unclear, but the HLA-B*57 allele is overrepresented in cohorts of these patients. However, many HLA-B*57 patients develop progressive disease, and some studies have suggested that infection with defective viruses may be the cause of the lack of high levels of virus replication and disease progression in ES. We therefore performed a comprehensive comparative in vivo and in vitro characterization of viruses isolated from well-defined ES. For this purpose, we first performed full-genome sequence analysis and in vitro fitness assays on replication-competent isolates from HLA-B*57 ES and HLA-B*57 chronic progressors (CPs). Under our experimental conditions, we found that isolates from ES and CPs can replicate in vitro. However, since inherently these assays involve the use of unnaturally in vitro-activated cells, we also investigated the replication competence and pathogenic potential of these HIV isolates in vivo using humanized BLT mice. The results from these analyses demonstrate that virus isolates from ES are fully replication competent in vivo and can induce peripheral and systemic CD4 T cell depletion. These results provide the first direct in vivo evidence that viral fitness does not likely determine clinical outcome in HLA-B*57 patients and that elite suppressors can control replication-competent, fully pathogenic viruses. A better understanding of the immunological bases of viral suppression in ES will serve to inform novel approaches to preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccine design. IMPORTANCE Elite suppressors are HIV-1-infected patients who have undetectable levels of viremia despite not being on antiviral drugs. One of the most fundamental questions about this phenomenon involves the mechanism of control. To address this question, we isolated virus from elite suppressors and from

  16. Left Aberrant Gastric Vein Causing Isolated Left Hepatic Portal Venous Gas Secondary to an Incarcerated Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kartik; Anandpara, Karan; Dey, Amit K.; Kedar, Pradnya; Hira, Priya; Kale, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is an ominous radiological sign suggestive of underlying intestinal sepsis, infection or trauma. Portal pneumatosis secondary to gastric pathologies is rare. Case Report We report a rare case of a 34-year-old man who presented with acute epigastric pain and vomiting, diagnosed to have an incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia causing gastric pneumatosis and resultant portal venous gas. Conclusions Our case highlights an unusual presentation of gastric pneumatosis secondary to an incarcerated hiatal hernia with resultant portal venous gas involving only the left lobe of the liver. An aberrant left gastric vein was responsible for this phenomenon in our case. A sound understanding of anatomical variants is thus crucial to radiological diagnosis. PMID:26251676

  17. Efficacy of amoxycillin-clavulanate in an experimental model of murine pneumonia caused by AmpC-non-hyperproducing clinical isolates of Escherichia coli resistant to cefoxitin.

    PubMed

    Docobo-Pérez, F; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Pachón-Ibáñez, M E; Pascual, A; Pichardo, C; Martínez-Martínez, L; Pachón, J

    2008-06-01

    The algorithms included in most automated systems used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing (e.g., Vitek 2) consider that Escherichia coli isolates resistant to cefoxitin are AmpC-hyperproducers and, consequently, resistant also to amoxycillin-clavulanate. However, a recent study revealed that 30% of E. coli clinical isolates resistant to cefoxitin remained susceptible in vitro to amoxycillin-clavulanate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in-vivo efficacy of amoxycillin-clavulanate in the treatment of an experimental model of pneumonia, using two clonally related isolates (with identical repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence (REP)-PCR patterns) of AmpC-non-hyperproducing and OmpF-lacking E. coli (Ec985 and Ec571) that were resistant to cefoxitin and susceptible to cefotaxime and amoxycillin-clavulanate. MICs were determined using a microdilution technique, and in-vitro bactericidal activity was tested using time-kill assays. The in-vivo efficacy of amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime against both isolates was tested in a murine pneumonia model using immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Ec571 (a TEM-1/2 producer) was resistant to amoxycillin, whereas Ec985 (a TEM-1/2 non-producer) was susceptible. Amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime were bactericidal for Ec985, and amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime were bactericidal for Ec571 at different concentrations and time-points, as determined using time-kill assays. Treatment with amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime reduced the bacterial lung concentration of Ec985 compared with non-treated controls (p <0.05), whereas amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime showed efficacy against Ec571 when compared with the control and amoxycillin groups (p <0.05). Regardless of the exact underlying mechanism(s) of resistance, amoxycillin-clavulanate was effective in the experimental murine model in the treatment of pneumonia caused by AmpC-non-hyperproducing strains of E

  18. SMCHD1 mutations associated with a rare muscular dystrophy can also cause isolated arhinia and Bosma arhinia microphthalmia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Natalie D; Brand, Harrison; Kupchinsky, Zachary A; Bengani, Hemant; Plummer, Lacey; Jones, Takako I; Erdin, Serkan; Williamson, Kathleen A; Rainger, Joe; Stortchevoi, Alexei; Samocha, Kaitlin; Currall, Benjamin B; Dunican, Donncha S; Collins, Ryan L; Willer, Jason R; Lek, Angela; Lek, Monkol; Nassan, Malik; Pereira, Shahrin; Kammin, Tammy; Lucente, Diane; Silva, Alexandra; Seabra, Catarina M; Chiang, Colby; An, Yu; Ansari, Morad; Rainger, Jacqueline K; Joss, Shelagh; Smith, Jill Clayton; Lippincott, Margaret F; Singh, Sylvia S; Patel, Nirav; Jing, Jenny W; Law, Jennifer R; Ferraro, Nalton; Verloes, Alain; Rauch, Anita; Steindl, Katharina; Zweier, Markus; Scheer, Ianina; Sato, Daisuke; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Jacobsen, Christina; Tryggestad, Jeanie; Chernausek, Steven; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Brasseur, Benjamin; Cesaretti, Claudia; García-Ortiz, Jose E; Buitrago, Tatiana Pineda; Silva, Orlando Perez; Hoffman, Jodi D; Mühlbauer, Wolfgang; Ruprecht, Klaus W; Loeys, Bart L; Shino, Masato; Kaindl, Angela M; Cho, Chie-Hee; Morton, Cynthia C; Meehan, Richard R; van Heyningen, Veronica; Liao, Eric C; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Hall, Janet E; Seminara, Stephanie B; Macarthur, Daniel; Moore, Steven A; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Gusella, James F; Marsh, Joseph A; Graham, John M; Lin, Angela E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Jones, Peter L; Crowley, William F; Davis, Erica E; FitzPatrick, David R; Talkowski, Michael E

    2017-02-01

    Arhinia, or absence of the nose, is a rare malformation of unknown etiology that is often accompanied by ocular and reproductive defects. Sequencing of 40 people with arhinia revealed that 84% of probands harbor a missense mutation localized to a constrained region of SMCHD1 encompassing the ATPase domain. SMCHD1 mutations cause facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 2 (FSHD2) via a trans-acting loss-of-function epigenetic mechanism. We discovered shared mutations and comparable DNA hypomethylation patterning between these distinct disorders. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated alteration of smchd1 in zebrafish yielded arhinia-relevant phenotypes. Transcriptome and protein analyses in arhinia probands and controls showed no differences in SMCHD1 mRNA or protein abundance but revealed regulatory changes in genes and pathways associated with craniofacial patterning. Mutations in SMCHD1 thus contribute to distinct phenotypic spectra, from craniofacial malformation and reproductive disorders to muscular dystrophy, which we speculate to be consistent with oligogenic mechanisms resulting in pleiotropic outcomes.

  19. A Nonautochthonous U.S. Strain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolated from Chesapeake Bay Oysters Caused the Outbreak in Maryland in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Haendiges, Julie; Jones, Jessica; Myers, Robert A.; Mitchell, Clifford S.; Butler, Erin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the summer of 2010, Vibrio parahaemolyticus caused an outbreak in Maryland linked to the consumption of oysters. Strains isolated from both stool and oyster samples were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). However, the oysters contained other potentially pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains exhibiting different PFGE patterns. In order to assess the identity, genetic makeup, relatedness, and potential pathogenicity of the V. parahaemolyticus strains, we sequenced 11 such strains (2 clinical strains and 9 oyster strains). We analyzed these genomes by in silico multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and determined their phylogeny using a whole-genome MLST (wgMLST) analysis. Our in silico MLST analysis identified six different sequence types (STs) (ST8, ST676, ST810, ST811, ST34, and ST768), with both of the clinical and four of the oyster strains being identified as belonging to ST8. Using wgMLST, we showed that the ST8 strains from clinical and oyster samples were nearly indistinguishable and belonged to the same outbreak, confirming that local oysters were the source of the infections. The remaining oyster strains were genetically diverse, differing in >3,000 loci from the Maryland ST8 strains. eBURST analysis comparing these strains with strains of other STs available at the V. parahaemolyticus MLST website showed that the Maryland ST8 strains belonged to a clonal complex endemic to Asia. This indicates that the ST8 isolates from clinical and oyster sources were likely not endemic to Maryland. Finally, this study demonstrates the utility of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and associated analyses for source-tracking investigations. IMPORTANCE Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important foodborne pathogen and the leading cause of bacterial infections in the United States associated with the consumption of seafood. In the summer of 2010, Vibrio parahaemolyticus caused an outbreak in Maryland linked to oyster consumption. Strains isolated

  20. Antibacterial activity of GUAVA, Psidium guajava Linnaeus, leaf extracts on diarrhea-causing enteric bacteria isolated from Seabob shrimp, Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Heller).

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Flávia A; Andrade Neto, Manoel; Bezerra, José N S; Macrae, Andrew; Sousa, Oscarina Viana de; Fonteles-Filho, Antonio A; Vieira, Regine H S F

    2008-01-01

    Guava leaf tea of Psidium guajava Linnaeus is commonly used as a medicine against gastroenteritis and child diarrhea by those who cannot afford or do not have access to antibiotics. This study screened the antimicrobial effect of essential oils and methanol, hexane, ethyl acetate extracts from guava leaves. The extracts were tested against diarrhea-causing bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli. Strains that were screened included isolates from seabob shrimp, Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Heller) and laboratory-type strains. Of the bacteria tested, Staphylococcus aureus strains were most inhibited by the extracts. The methanol extract showed greatest bacterial inhibition. No statistically significant differences were observed between the tested extract concentrations and their effect. The essential oil extract showed inhibitory activity against S. aureus and Salmonella spp. The strains isolated from the shrimp showed some resistance to commercially available antibiotics. These data support the use of guava leaf-made medicines in diarrhea cases where access to commercial antibiotics is restricted. In conclusion, guava leaf extracts and essential oil are very active against S. aureus, thus making up important potential sources of new antimicrobial compounds.

  1. Inhibition of skin tumor promoter-caused induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase in SENCAR mice by polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea and its individual epicatechin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, R; Katiyar, S K; Zaidi, S I; Mukhtar, H

    1992-07-01

    Green tea, next to water, is the most popular and commonly consumed beverage in the world, especially in eastern countries. In prior studies we have shown that the polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) exerts antigenotoxic effects in various mutagenicity test systems (Mutat. Res., 223: 273-285, 1989) and that its topical application or oral feeding in drinking water protects against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced skin tumor initiation and complete carcinogenesis in SENCAR and BALB/c mice [Cancer Lett., 42: 7-12, 1988; Carcinogenesis (Lond.), 10: 411-415, 1989] and UV B radiation-induced photocarcinogenesis in SKH-1 hairless mice [Carcinogenesis (Lond.), 12: 1527-1530, 1991]. In the present study we assessed the effect of skin application of GTP to SENCAR mice on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and other skin tumor promoter-caused induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity. Topical application of GTP to mouse skin inhibited TPA-induced epidermal ODC activity in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of GTP was also dependent on the time of its application relative to TPA treatment. Maximum inhibitory effect was observed when GTP was applied 30 min prior to topical application of TPA. GTP application to animals also inhibited the induction of epidermal ODC activity caused by several structurally different mouse skin tumor promoters. In order to identify which of the specific epicatechin derivatives present in GTP is responsible for these inhibitory effects, they were isolated from GTP and evaluated for their inhibitory effects against TPA-caused induction of epidermal ODC activity. Among these, (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which was the major constituent present in GTP by weight, exerted the maximum inhibition. EGCG also showed greater inhibitory effects against TPA-caused induction of epidermal ODC activity when compared with several other naturally occurring polyphenols. The results of this study

  2. The inheritance of resistance to Verticillium wilt caused by race 1 isolates of Verticillium dahliae in the lettuce cultivar La Brillante.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ryan J; McHale, Leah K; Vallad, Gary E; Truco, Maria Jose; Michelmore, Richard W; Klosterman, Steve J; Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Subbarao, Krishna V

    2011-08-01

    Verticillium wilt of lettuce caused by Verticillium dahliae can cause severe economic damage to lettuce producers. Complete resistance to race 1 isolates is available in Lactuca sativa cultivar (cv.) La Brillante and understanding the genetic basis of this resistance will aid development of new resistant cultivars. F(1) and F(2) families from crosses between La Brillante and three iceberg cultivars as well as a recombinant inbred line population derived from L. sativa cv. Salinas 88 × La Brillante were evaluated for disease incidence and disease severity in replicated greenhouse and field experiments. One hundred and six molecular markers were used to generate a genetic map from Salinas 88 × La Brillante and for detection of quantitative trait loci. Segregation was consistent with a single dominant gene of major effect which we are naming Verticillium resistance 1 (Vr1). The gene described large portions of the phenotypic variance (R(2) = 0.49-0.68) and was mapped to linkage group 9 coincident with an expressed sequence tag marker (QGD8I16.yg.ab1) that has sequence similarity with the Ve gene that confers resistance to V. dahliae race 1 in tomato. The simple inheritance of resistance indicates that breeding procedures designed for single genes will be applicable for developing resistant cultivars. QGD8I16.yg.ab1 is a good candidate for functional analysis and development of markers suitable for marker-assisted selection.

  3. Protection against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-caused inflammation in SENCAR mouse ear skin by polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Agarwal, R; Ekker, S; Wood, G S; Mukhtar, H

    1993-03-01

    Earlier studies conducted in our laboratory have shown that a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) possesses anti-skin tumor initiating and anti-skin tumor promoting activity in the two-stage skin tumorigenesis protocol in SENCAR mouse. We have also shown that topical application of GTP inhibits tumor promoter-caused induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity in SENCAR mice in a dose-dependent manner, and that its oral feeding in drinking water to SKH-1 hairless mice enhances antioxidant and phase II enzyme activity in liver, lung, small bowel and skin. In this study, we show that single or multiple applications of GTP on SENCAR mouse ear prior to or after the application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) afford significant protection (P < 0.05) against TPA-induced edema. Pre-application of GTP also afforded significant protection against TPA-induced hyperplasia in the ear skin. The percentage protection by GTP both in terms of epidermal thickness and vertical cell layers was 75 and 90% respectively (P < 0.005). In further studies, we assessed the protective effect of GTP against TPA-caused infiltration of neutrophils in the ear skin of SENCAR mouse, by determining a naturally occurring constituent of neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, as a quantitative marker of tissue neutrophil content. Prior application of GTP resulted in significant protection against TPA-caused infiltration of neutrophils (P < 0.005). These results suggest that GTP possesses potential as a cancer chemopreventive agent against stage I tumor promotion.

  4. Where Should We Look for Clues to Resolve the Physical Mechanism Causing Deep Earthquakes? Consider: Deep Moonquakes, and Isolated Deep Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, C.; Nakamura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The physical mechanism responsible for deep earthquakes has been a puzzle since their discovery by Wadati 85 years ago. Today the three most widely accepted mechanisms are dehydration embrittlement (for depths above about 300 km), 'anticracks' in metastable olivine (for deeper events), and thermal runaway. Yet, the puzzle remains: no single mechanism seems satisfactory, and having three mechanisms seems contrary to Occams Razor. Where might we look for observations to help resolve this problem? One of the 20thcenturies greatest scientific surprises was when seismic data collected during the Apollo projects proved that the Moon was seismically active at depths of 850-1100 km. These deep moonquakes occurred repeatedly within clusters or "nests", with occurrence times strongly correlated with solid tides. Although they occur under temperature-pressure conditions highly similar to terrestrial earthquakes at depths of ~120 km, it seems unlikely they are caused by dehydration embrittlement, as there is no subduction on the Moon, and possibly little or no water. Must we propose a fourth mechanism for deep quakes? Or are our explanations for terrestrial deep quakes incorrect? The development of plate tectonics was one of the 20thcentury science's great paradigm shifts; one observation it helped explain was why numerous earthquakes with focal depths exceeding 400 km occurred in the mantle in areas like Tonga where very old, fast-moving plates converged. But some "isolated deep earthquakes" are exceptional; these earthquakes occur separated from neighboring events by hundreds of km. Some, like earthquakes in Spain in 1954 and Colombia in 1970, with Mw exceeding 7.5 are among the largest deep-focus earthquakes known, yet occurred singly without any fore- or aftershocks. What physical mechanism allows such large, isolated earthquakes to occur? The tendency is to focus attention on areas like Tonga where the majority of deep events occur. But understanding rare isolated events

  5. Antimicrobial activity of ceftazidime-avibactam and comparator agents when tested against bacterial isolates causing infection in cancer patients (2013-2014).

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Castanheira, Mariana; Jones, Ronald N; Flamm, Robert K

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility of 623 Gram-negative organisms causing infection in patients with cancer in 52 United States hospitals (2013-2014) as part of the International Network for Optimal Resistance Monitoring (INFORM) program. Isolates were tested for susceptibility by broth microdilution method. β-lactamase encoding genes were evaluated for all Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype by microarray-based assay. ESBL-phenotype was observed among 17.3 and 9.9% of E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, respectively; and 25.0% of Enterobacter cloacae were ceftazidime-non-susceptible. All Enterobacteriaceae (n=486) were susceptible to ceftazidime-avibactam (MIC50/90, 0.12/0.25μg/mL) with the highest MIC value at 1μg/mL. Meropenem was active against Enterobacteriaceae overall (MIC50/90, ≤0.06/≤0.06μg/mL; 99.6% susceptible); but showed more limited activity against Klebsiella spp. with an ESBL-phenotype (84.6% susceptible) and multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (93.3% susceptible). The most active agents tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were colistin (100.0% susceptible), amikacin (97.7% susceptible) and ceftazidime-avibactam (96.6% susceptible).

  6. The Broom of the Sorcerer's Apprentice: The Fine Structure of a Chromosomal Region Causing Reproductive Isolation between Two Sibling Species of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. W.; Wu, C. I.

    1996-01-01

    How many genes contribute to reproductive isolation between closely related species? We determined the number of genes located in the 9D-12B region of the Drosophila mauritiana X chromosome that cause hybrid male sterility in a D. simulans background. Previous low resolution studies suggested that a single hybrid sterility factor was associated with this region. In this study, by taking advantage of a cluster of visible and DNA markers, we identified three D. mauritiana factors in this region and then subjected one of them to detailed analysis. This factor again turned out to be comprised of three factors; one of which, mapped to within 200 kb, may in fact be two factors. The title refers to this exercise of splitting sterile introgressions into ever smaller ones, each of which retains partial or full sterility effects. In a region representing a mere 3% of the Drosophila genome, no fewer than six loci of hybrid sterility were identified between two sibling species that have not shown clear divergence at the molecular level. These results suggest that levels of genetic divergence between closely related species may be quite high for functionally important traits even when the opposite is true for randomly chosen loci. PMID:8807300

  7. Combination of IMP-4 metallo-beta-lactamase production and porin deficiency causes carbapenem resistance in a Klebsiella oxytoca clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Rong; Zhou, Hong-Wei; Cai, Jia-Chang; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Gong-Xiang

    2009-10-01

    This study shows for the first time the mechanism of carbapenem resistance of a Klebsiella oxytoca clinical isolate ZC101 recovered from a Zhejiang University Hospital in Hangzhou, China. MIC values of imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem for K. oxytoca ZC101 were 16, 16, and 128 microg/mL, respectively. Conjugation experiments demonstrated the transferability of a resistance determinant from K. oxytoca ZC101 to Escherichia coli EC600. Results from isoelectric focusing, polymerase chain reactions, and DNA sequencing confirmed that K. oxytoca ZC101 produced IMP-4 metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) and CTX-M-14 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, whereas E. coli transconjugant only produced the IMP-4. Amplification of integron revealed that bla(IMP-4) gene is located within a class I integron that was carried in a plasmid approximately 55 kb in size. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiling of outer membrane proteins of K. oxytoca ZC101 indicated lack of expression of the OmpK36 porin. DNA sequence analysis of ompK36 gene of K. oxytoca ZC101 showed the gene was disrupted by an insertion sequence IS5. In all, the results show that plasmid-mediated IMP-4 MBL production combined with the loss of OmpK36 porin caused the resistance in K. oxytoca ZC101 to carbapenems.

  8. Detection of KPC-2 in a Clinical Isolate of Proteus mirabilis and First Reported Description of Carbapenemase Resistance Caused by a KPC Beta-Lactamase in P. mirabilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An isolate of Proteus mirabilis recovered from bacterial cultures was shown to be resistant to imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem by disk diffusion susceptibility testing. Amplification of whole cell and/or plasmid DNA recovered from the isolate using primers specific for the blaKPC carbapenemase g...

  9. Genome Sequence of a Unique Magnaporthe oryzae RMg-Dl Isolate from India That Causes Blast Disease in Diverse Cereal Crops, Obtained Using PacBio Single-Molecule and Illumina HiSeq2500 Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sheoran, Neelam; Prakash, Ganesan; Ghosh, Arpita; Chikara, Surendra K.; Rajashekara, Hosahatti; Singh, Uday Dhari; Aggarwal, Rashmi; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The whole-genome assembly of a unique rice isolate from India, Magnaporthe oryzae RMg-Dl that causes blast disease in diverse cereal crops is presented. Analysis of the 34.82 Mb genome sequence will aid in better understanding the genetic determinants of host range, host jump, survival, pathogenicity, and virulence factors of M. oryzae. PMID:28209817

  10. Genome Sequence of a Unique Magnaporthe oryzae RMg-Dl Isolate from India That Causes Blast Disease in Diverse Cereal Crops, Obtained Using PacBio Single-Molecule and Illumina HiSeq2500 Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aundy; Sheoran, Neelam; Prakash, Ganesan; Ghosh, Arpita; Chikara, Surendra K; Rajashekara, Hosahatti; Singh, Uday Dhari; Aggarwal, Rashmi; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-02-16

    The whole-genome assembly of a unique rice isolate from India, Magnaporthe oryzae RMg-Dl that causes blast disease in diverse cereal crops is presented. Analysis of the 34.82 Mb genome sequence will aid in better understanding the genetic determinants of host range, host jump, survival, pathogenicity, and virulence factors of M. oryzae.

  11. Distribution of extended-spectrum β-lactamases, AmpC β-lactamases, and carbapenemases among Enterobacteriaceae isolates causing intra-abdominal infections in the Asia-Pacific region: results of the study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART).

    PubMed

    Sheng, Wang-Huei; Badal, Robert E; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2013-07-01

    The increasing trend of β-lactam resistance among Enterobacteriaceae is a worldwide threat. Enterobacteriaceae isolates causing intra-abdominal infections (IAI) from the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART) collected in 2008 and 2009 from the Asia-Pacific region were investigated. Detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC β-lactamases, and carbapenemases was performed by multiplex PCR. A total of 699 Enterobacteriaceae isolates with positive genotypic results, included Escherichia coli (n = 443), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 187), Enterobacter cloacae (n = 45), Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 9), Citrobacter freundii (n = 5), Proteus mirabilis (n = 3), Enterobacter aerogenes (n = 2), Morganella morganii (n = 2), and one each of Enterobacter asburiae, Proteus vulgaris, and Providencia rettgeri were analyzed. Nearly 20% of these β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates were from community-associated IAI. CTX-M (588 isolates, including 428 [72.8%] with CTX-M-15) was the most common ESBL, followed by SHV (n = 59) and TEM (n = 4). CMY (n = 110, including 102 [92.7%] with CMY-2) was the most common AmpC β-lactamase, followed by DHA (n = 46) and ACT/MIR (n = 40). NDM (n = 65, including 62 [95.4%] with NDM-1) was the most common carbapenemase, followed by IMP (n = 7) and OXA (n = 7). Isolates from hospital-associated IAI had more complicated β-lactamase combinations than isolates from the community. Carbapenemases were all exclusively detected in Enterobacteriaceae isolates from India, except that IMP β-lactamases were also detected in Philippines and Australia. CTX-M β-lactamases were the predominant ESBLs produced by Enterobacteriaceae causing IAI in the Asia-Pacific region. Emergence of CTX-M-15-, CMY-2-, and NDM-1-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates is of major concern and highlights the need for further surveillance in this area.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance and beta-lactamase production of Escherichia coli causing canine urinary tract infections: Passive surveillance of laboratory isolates in Saskatoon, Canada, 2014.

    PubMed

    Courtice, Rachel; Sniatynski, Michelle; Rubin, Joseph E

    2016-11-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of canine urinary Escherichia coli (n = 113) isolated by a regional diagnostic laboratory over a 1-year period was determined. Antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined, and those isolates resistant to beta-lactams were screened for broad-spectrum beta-lactamases. Isolates were unexpectedly susceptible, 79.6% were susceptible to all drugs tested and no extended-spectrum beta-lactamases were identified. Our findings indicate that empiric treatment of canine urinary tract infections with first line drugs such as amoxicillin or trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole is likely to be successful.

  13. Dominance of multidrug-resistant Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) clone among Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A isolates causing pneumococcal disease in Bulgaria from 1992 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Setchanova, Lena Petrova; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Dacheva, Daniela; Mitov, Ivan; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio

    2015-02-01

    A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced in Bulgarian national immunization program since April 2010. Clonal composition based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing genotyping of 52 serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates was analyzed. These were invasive and respiratory isolates collected between 1992 and 2013 from both children (78.8% <5 years) and adults with pneumococcal infections. Multidrug resistance was found in 82.7% of all 19A isolates. The most prevalent genotype (63.5%) among serotype 19A pneumococcal strains was the multidrug-resistant clonal complex CC230, which is a capsular switched variant of the Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) global clone. The most frequent sequence type (ST) was ST230 (48.1%) and together with four other closely related STs (15.4%), belonging to ST1611, ST276, ST7466, and ST2013, which were single- and double-locus variants; they were included in the main CC230. The disappearance of highly drug-resistant ST663 clone and emergence of new clones as CC320 and CC199 was also observed among the rest 19A isolates. A comparison of clonal composition between invasive and noninvasive isolates did not show a great genetic diversity among both kinds of isolates. Continuous surveillance of serotype 19A population following the introduction of PCV10 is essential to evaluate the impact of the vaccine on the epidemiology of this serotype.

  14. Cytotoxic effects of Klebsiella oxytoca strains isolated from patients with antibiotic-associated hemorrhagic colitis or other diseases caused by infections and from healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Joainig, Martina M; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Leitner, Eva; Weberhofer, Paul; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Lippe, Irmgard; Feierl, Gebhard; Krause, Robert; Hinterleitner, Thomas; Zechner, Ellen L; Högenauer, Christoph

    2010-03-01

    Antibiotic-associated hemorrhagic colitis (AAHC) is associated with Klebsiella oxytoca. This study analyzed whether cytotoxic properties are linked to specific subtypes of K. oxytoca. Klebsiella isolates from stools of AAHC patients, healthy carriers, and diarrhea patients as well as from infections of other organs were investigated. Cytotoxic effects on human epithelial cells were limited to the species K. oxytoca and were not detectable for any other Klebsiella species. Isolates from AAHC patients and from stools showed the highest proportion of cytotoxic strains. Urinary or respiratory tract isolates exhibited no cytotoxicity. Macrorestriction profiling of strains revealed no genetic relationships of AAHC isolates or the cytotoxic phenotype but identified that different K. oxytoca strains with different cytotoxic behaviors may be prevalent in the same AAHC patient. Under laboratory conditions, cytotoxicity was maximally effective after exponential bacterial growth and then declined despite the continued viability of K. oxytoca cells in culture. Given its capacity to induce AAHC and that a high proportion of stool isolates tested cytotoxin positive, we argue that K. oxytoca should be considered an opportunistic pathogen if detected in stools. The ability to induce disease after antibiotic treatment most likely represents an overgrowth of the toxin-producing bacterium due to an alteration of the normal colonic microflora.

  15. Comparison of genomic and antimicrobial resistance features of latex agglutination test-positive and latex agglutination test-negative Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Moser, A; Stephan, R; Corti, S; Johler, S

    2013-01-01

    The dairy industry suffers massive economic losses due to staphylococcal mastitis in cattle. The Staphaureux latex agglutination test (Oxoid, Basel, Switzerland) was reported to lead to negative results in 54% of bovine Staphylococcus aureus strains, and latex-negative strains are thought to be less virulent than Staphaurex latex-positive strains. However, comparative information on virulence and resistance profiles of these 2 groups of Staph. aureus is scarce. Our objective was to associate the latex agglutination phenotype of Staph. aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis milk with data on clonal complexes, virulence genes, and antibiotic resistance to (1) determine the virulence profiles of the Staphaureux test positive and Staphaurex test negative groups, and (2) provide data needed to improve treatment of bovine mastitis and to identify potential vaccine targets. Seventy-eight Staph. aureus strains isolated from 78 cows on 57 Swiss farms were characterized. Latex agglutination was tested by Staphaureux kit, and resistance profiles were generated by disk diffusion. A DNA microarray was used to assign clonal complexes (CC) and to determine virulence and resistance gene profiles. By the Staphaureux test, 49% of the isolates were latex-positive and 51% were latex-negative. All latex-negative strains were assigned to CC151, whereas latex-positive strains were assigned to various clonal complexes, including CC97 (n=16), CC8 (n=10), CC479 (n=5), CC20 (n=4), CC7 (n=1), CC9 (n=1), and CC45 (n=1). Although the latex-negative isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobial agents tested, 24% of latex-positive isolates were classified as intermediate with regard to cefalexin-kanamycin and 13% were resistant to both ampicillin and penicillin. Microarray profiles of latex-negative isolates were highly similar, but differed largely from those of latex-positive isolates. Although the latex-negative group lacked several enterotoxin genes and sak, it exhibited significantly

  16. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Isolates in a Phase 3 Open-Label Clinical Trial for Complicated Intra-Abdominal and Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Ceftazidime-Nonsusceptible Gram-Negative Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregory G; Bradford, Patricia A; Newell, Paul; Wardman, Angela

    2017-02-01

    The in vitro activity of ceftazidime-avibactam was evaluated against 341 Gram-negative isolates from 333 patients in a randomized, phase 3 clinical trial of patients with complicated urinary tract or intra-abdominal infections caused by ceftazidime-nonsusceptible pathogens (NCT01644643). Ceftazidime-avibactam MIC90 values against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (including several class B or D enzyme producers that avibactam does not inhibit) were 1 and 64 μg/ml, respectively. Overall, the ceftazidime-avibactam activity against ceftazidime-nonsusceptible isolates was comparable to the activity of ceftazidime-avibactam previously reported against ceftazidime-susceptible isolates. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01644643.).

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Two Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola Isolated from Prunus persica Which Are Dissimilar to Strains That Cause Bacterial Spot Disease on Prunus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Garita-Cambronero, Jerson; Palacio-Bielsa, Ana; López, María M.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two strains of Xanthomonas arboricola, isolated from asymptomatic peach trees in Spain, are reported here. These strains are avirulent and do not belong to the same phylogroup as X. arboricola pv. pruni, a causal agent of bacterial spot disease of stone fruits and almonds. PMID:27609931

  18. Clinical characteristics of bacteraemia caused by Lactobacillus spp. and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates at a medical centre in Taiwan, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Liang, Sheng-Kai; Lin, Ching-Kai; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-10-01

    The clinical characteristics of 89 patients with Lactobacillus bacteraemia treated at a university-affiliated hospital in northern Taiwan during 2000-2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Lactobacillus spp. were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates were determined by broth microdilution. The most commonly isolated species was Lactobacillus salivarius (n = 21), followed by Lactobacillus paracasei (n = 16) and Lactobacillus fermentum (n = 13). Excluding three isolates with lower 16S rRNA sequence similarity, MALDI-TOF/MS provided correct identification for 84.9% (73/86) of Lactobacillus isolates. Concordant identification was lowest for Lactobacillus casei (11%). The main infection foci were intra-abdominal infection (49%) and catheter-related bloodstream infection (17%). Only one-half of the patients received adequate antibiotic treatment during the bacteraemic episode. The majority of patients with Lactobacillus bacteraemia were immunocompromised. The 7-day and in-hospital mortality rates were 21% and 62%, respectively, and underlying malignancy was associated with a higher in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio = 2.666). There were no significant differences in mortality (7-day, 14-day, 30-day and in-hospital) among patients with bacteraemia due to different Lactobacillus spp. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were highest for glycopeptides, cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones and were lowest for carbapenems and aminopenicillins. Lactobacillus bacteraemia was associated with a high mortality rate, and patient outcome was associated with underlying malignancy. MALDI-TOF/MS was able to accurately identify 84.9% of the Lactobacillus isolates, and L. salivarius was the predominant pathogen. The accuracy rate for identification of Lactobacillus spp. by MALDI-TOF/MS was lowest for L. casei.

  19. Overexpression of the NHE1 isoform of the Na(+)/H (+) exchanger causes elevated apoptosis in isolated cardiomyocytes after hypoxia/reoxygenation challenge.

    PubMed

    Karki, Pratap; Fliegel, Larry

    2010-05-01

    The mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is a ubiquitously expressed membrane protein that regulates intracellular pH in the myocardium and other tissues. NHE1 is an important mediator of myocardial damage that occurs after ischemia-reperfusion injury. It has also been implicated in apoptotic damage in many tissues and its expression and activity are elevated in disease states in the myocardium. In this study, we examined the effect of additional exogenous NHE1 expression on isolated cardiomyocytes susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion damage. Exogenous NHE1 elevated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger expression and activity when introduced into isolated cardiomyocytes through an adenoviral system. Isolated cardiomyocytes were subjected to simulated ischemia and reperfusion after infection with either control or NHE1-containing adenovirus. Cells were placed into an anaerobic chamber and effects of NHE1 expression after hypoxia/reoxygenation were examined. Hypoxia/reoxygenation increased caspase-3-like activity in controls, and the effect was greatly magnified in cells expressing NHE1 protein. It also elevated the percentage of apoptotic cardiomyocytes, which was also aggravated by expression of NHE1 protein. Hypoxia/reoxygenation also increased phospho-ERK levels. Elevated NHE1 expression was coincidental with increased expression of the ER stress protein, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and calreticulin (CRT). Our results demonstrate that increased NHE1 protein expression makes cells more susceptible to damage induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in isolated cardiomyocytes. They suggest that elevated NHE1 in cardiovascular disease could predispose the human myocardium to enhanced apoptotic damage.

  20. Outbreak caused by Proteus mirabilis isolates producing weakly expressed TEM-derived extended-spectrum β-lactamase in spinal cord injury patients with recurrent bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Cremet, Lise; Bemer, Pascale; Rome, Joanna; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Navas, Dominique; Bourigault, Celine; Guillouzouic, Aurelie; Caroff, Nathalie; Lepelletier, Didier; Asseray, Nathalie; Perrouin-Verbe, Brigitte; Corvec, Stephane

    2011-12-01

    We performed a retrospective extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) molecular characterization of Proteus mirabilis isolates recovered from urine of spinal cord injury patients. A incorrectly detected TEM-24-producing clone and a new weakly expressed TEM-derived ESBL were discovered. In such patients, ESBL detection in daily practice should be improved by systematic use of a synergy test in strains of P. mirabilis resistant to penicillins.

  1. Isolation over 35 years in a heated biotest basin causes selection on MHC class IIß genes in the European perch (Perca fluviatilis L.)

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, Mats; Aho, Teija; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2015-01-01

    Genes that play key roles in host immunity such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in vertebrates are expected to be major targets of selection. It is well known that environmental conditions can have an effect on host–parasite interactions and may thus influence the selection on MHC. We analyzed MHC class IIß variability over 35 years in a population of perch (Perca fluviatilis) from the Baltic Sea that was split into two populations separated from each other. One population was subjected to heating from cooling water of a nuclear power plant and was isolated from the surrounding environment in an artificial lake, while the other population was not subjected to any change in water temperature (control). The isolated population experienced a change of the allelic composition and a decrease in allelic richness of MHC genes compared to the control population. The two most common MHC alleles showed cyclic patterns indicating ongoing parasite–host coevolution in both populations, but the alleles that showed a cyclic behavior differed between the two populations. No such patterns were observed at alleles from nine microsatellite loci, and no genetic differentiation was found between populations. We found no indications for a genetic bottleneck in the isolated population during the 35 years. Additionally, differences in parasitism of the current perch populations suggest that a change of the parasite communities has occurred over the isolation period, although the evidence in form of in-depth knowledge of the change of the parasite community over time is lacking. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis of a selective sweep imposed by a change in the parasite community. PMID:25897384

  2. Clinical Characteristics, Laboratory Identification, and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Yarrowia (Candida) lipolytica Isolates Causing Fungemia: a Multicenter, Prospective Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Wang, He; Guo, Dawen; Pan, Yuhong; Xiao, Yuling; Yue, Na; Lau, Susanna Kar-Pui

    2015-01-01

    Our case series showed that uncomplicated Yarrowia lipolytica fungemia might be treated with catheter removal alone. The Vitek 2 YST identification (ID) card system, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and internal transcribed spacer and 25S nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) gene sequencing provided reliable identification. All isolates had low MICs to voriconazole, echinocandins, and amphotericin B. PMID:26311865

  3. Using major outer membrane protein typing as an epidemiological tool to investigate outbreaks caused by milk-borne Campylobacter jejuni isolates in California.

    PubMed

    Jay-Russell, Michele T; Mandrell, Robert E; Yuan, Jean; Bates, Anna; Manalac, Rosa; Mohle-Boetani, Janet; Kimura, Akiko; Lidgard, Janice; Miller, William G

    2013-01-01

    We describe using major outer membrane protein (MOMP) typing as a screen to compare the Campylobacter jejuni porA gene sequences of clinical outbreak strains from human stool with the porA sequences of dairy farm strains isolated during two milk-borne campylobacteriosis outbreak investigations in California. The genetic relatedness of clinical and environmental strains with identical or closely related porA sequences was confirmed by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. The first outbreak involved 1,644 C. jejuni infections at 11 state correctional facilities and was associated with consumption of pasteurized milk supplied by an on-site dairy (dairy A) at a prison in the central valley. The second outbreak involved eight confirmed and three suspect C. jejuni cases linked to consumption of commercial raw milk and raw chocolate colostrum at another central valley dairy (dairy B). Both dairies bottled fluid milk on the farm and distributed the finished product to off-site locations. Altogether, C. jejuni was isolated from 7 of 15 (46.7%) bovine fecal, 12 of 20 (60%) flush alley water, and 1 of 20 (5%) lagoon samples collected on dairy A. At dairy B, C. jejuni was cultured from 9 of 26 (34.6%) bovine fecal samples. Environmental strains indistinguishable from the clinical outbreak strains were found in five flush alley water samples (dairy A) and four bovine fecal samples (dairy B). The findings demonstrate that MOMP typing is a useful tool to triage environmental isolates prior to conducting more labor-intensive molecular typing methods.

  4. Emergence of a mutL mutation causing multilocus sequence typing-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from a cystic fibrosis patient.

    PubMed

    García-Castillo, María; Máiz, Luis; Morosini, María-Isabel; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Suarez, Lucrecia; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; del Campo, Rosa

    2012-05-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies in chronic infections under constant antibiotic selective pressure.

  5. Emergence of a mutL Mutation Causing Multilocus Sequence Typing–Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    García-Castillo, María; Máiz, Luis; Morosini, María-Isabel; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Suarez, Lucrecia; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies in chronic infections under constant antibiotic selective pressure. PMID:22322352

  6. Partitioning the effects of spatial isolation, nest habitat, and individual diet in causing assortative mating within a population of threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Snowberg, L K; Bolnick, D I

    2012-11-01

    Assortative mating is measured as a phenotypic or genotypic correlation between mates. Although biologists typically view assortative mating in terms of mate preference for similar partners, correlations between mates can also arise from phenotypic spatial structure arising from spatial isolation or habitat preferences. Here, we test whether diet-assortative mating within an ecologically variable population of threespine stickleback results from small-scale geographic isolation or microhabitat preference. We find evidence for assortative mating in the form of a positive correlation between mated pairs' diets (measured using stable isotopes). Stable isotopes reveal diet differences between different nesting areas and among individuals using different nest habitat within a nesting area. This spatial segregation of diet types should generate some assortative mating, but is insufficient to explain the observed assortment strength. Significant male-female isotope correlations remain after controlling for spatial variables. We therefore conclude that sticklebacks' diet-assortative mating arises from additional behavioral preference. More generally, our results illustrate the point that spatial segregation can only drive appreciable levels of phenotypic assortative mating when environment-phenotype correlations are parallel and strong in both sexes. Consequently, intraspecific assortative mating may typically entail mating preferences rather than just spatial cosegregation of phenotypes.

  7. Isolation of Haemophilus somnus from dairy cattle in kwaZulu-Natal. An emerging cause of 'dirty cow syndrome' and infertility?

    PubMed

    Last, R D; Macfarlane, M D; Jarvis, C J

    2001-06-01

    Haemophilus somnus was consistently isolated from vaginal discharges of dairy cows submitted from field cases of vaginitis, cervicitis and/or metritis in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands during the period July 1995 - December 2000 and from the East Griqualand area in November/December 2000. The purulent vaginal discharges, red granular vaginitis and cervicitis, and pain on palpation described in these cases was very similar to that reported in outbreaks of H.somnus endometritis syndrome in Australia, Europe and North America. In all the herds involved in these outbreaks, natural breeding with bulls was employed. Although there was a good cure rate in clinically-affected animals treated with tetracyclines, culling rates for chronic infertility were unacceptably high. Employment of artificial insemination in these herds improved pregnancy rates in cows that had calved previously, but many cows that had formerly been infected failed to conceive.

  8. Evidence of the formation of noctilucent clouds due to propagation of an isolated gravity wave caused by a tropospheric occluded front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalin, P.; Pogoreltsev, A.; Pertsev, N.; Perminov, V.; Shevchuk, N.; Dubietis, A.; Zalcik, M.; Kulikov, S.; Zadorozhny, A.; Kudabayeva, D.; Solodovnik, A.; Salakhutdinov, G.; Grigoryeva, I.

    2015-03-01

    We consider a unique case of a propagating internal gravity wave that has generated in situ a compact and thin layer of noctilucent clouds (NLC) at 82.7-85.2 km with a characteristic horizontal scale of 65-70 km, as observed in the Moscow region on the night of 18-19 July 2013. This particular transient isolated gravity wave together with the whole NLC layer suddenly appeared in the clear twilight sky and lasted about 1 h traveling eastward, which differs significantly from previously observed cases of gravity waves propagating through preexisting NLC layers. Our model studies demonstrate that the wave had a tropospheric source connected to the passage of an occluded front. The wave was likely generated due to strong horizontal wind shears at about 5 km altitude.

  9. Neurotoxins from Clostridium botulinum (serotype A) isolated from the soil of Mendoza (Argentina) differ from the A-Hall archetype and from that causing infant botulism.

    PubMed

    Caballero, P; Troncoso, M; Patterson, S I; López Gómez, C; Fernandez, R; Sosa, M A

    2016-10-01

    The type A of neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum is the prevalent serotype in strains of Mendoza. The soil is the main reservoir for C.botulinum and is possibly one of the infection sources in infant botulism. In this study, we characterized and compared autochthonous C. botulinum strains and their neurotoxins. Bacterial samples were obtained from the soil and from fecal samples collected from children with infant botulism. We first observed differences in the appearance of the colonies between strains from each source and with the A Hall control strain. In addition, purified neurotoxins of both strains were found to be enriched in a band of 300 kDa, whereas the A-Hall strain was mainly made up of a band of ∼600 kDa. This finding is in line with the lack of hemagglutinating activity of the neurotoxins under study. Moreover, the proteolytic activity of C. botulinum neurotoxins was evaluated against SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptor) proteins from rat brain. It was observed that both, SNAP 25 (synaptosomal-associated protein 25) and VAMP 2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein) were cleaved by the neurotoxins isolated from the soil strains, whereas the neurotoxins from infant botulism strains only induced a partial cleavage of VAMP 2. On the other hand, the neurotoxin from the A-Hall strain was able to cleave both proteins, though at a lesser extent. Our data indicate that the C.botulinum strain isolated from the soil, and its BoNT, exhibit different properties compared to the strain obtained from infant botulism patients, and from the A-Hall archetype.

  10. First insights into the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from HIV-infected Mexican patients and mutations causing multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species in HIV-infected patients in Mexico is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of MTb and NTM species in HIV-infected patients from Mexico City, to evaluate the genotypic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains, to determine their drug resistance profiles by colorimetric microplate Alamar Blue assay (MABA), and finally, to detect mutations present in katG, rpoB and inhA genes, resulting in isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) resistance. Results Of the 67 mycobacterial strains isolated, 48 were identified as MTb, 9 as M. bovis, 9 as M. avium and 1 as M. intracellulare. IS6110-RFLP of 48 MTb strains showed 27 profiles. Spoligotyping of the 48 MTb strains yielded 21 patterns, and 9 M. bovis strains produced 7 patterns. Eleven new spoligotypes patterns were found. A total of 40 patterns were produced from the 48 MTb strains when MIRU-VNTR was performed. Nineteen (39.6%) MTb strains were resistant to one or more drugs. One (2.1%) multidrug-resistant (MDR) strain was identified. A novel mutation was identified in a RIF-resistant strain, GAG → TCG (Glu → Ser) at codon 469 of rpoB gene. Conclusions This is the first molecular analysis of mycobacteria isolated from HIV-infected patients in Mexico, which describe the prevalence of different mycobacterial species in this population. A high genetic diversity of MTb strains was identified. New spoligotypes and MIRU-VNTR patterns as well as a novel mutation associated to RIF-resistance were found. This information will facilitate the tracking of different mycobacterial species in HIV-infected individuals, and monitoring the spread of these microorganisms, leading to more appropriate measures for tuberculosis control. PMID:20236539

  11. Identification of a novel gene (HSN2) causing hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II through the Study of Canadian Genetic Isolates.

    PubMed

    Lafreniere, Ronald G; MacDonald, Marcia L E; Dube, Marie-Pierre; MacFarlane, Julie; O'Driscoll, Mary; Brais, Bernard; Meilleur, Sebastien; Brinkman, Ryan R; Dadivas, Owen; Pape, Terry; Platon, Christele; Radomski, Chris; Risler, Jenni; Thompson, Jay; Guerra-Escobio, Ana-Maria; Davar, Gudarz; Breakefield, Xandra O; Pimstone, Simon N; Green, Roger; Pryse-Phillips, William; Goldberg, Y Paul; Younghusband, H Banfield; Hayden, Michael R; Sherrington, Robin; Rouleau, Guy A; Samuels, Mark E

    2004-05-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type II is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by impairment of pain, temperature, and touch sensation owing to reduction or absence of peripheral sensory neurons. We identified two large pedigrees segregating the disorder in an isolated population living in Newfoundland and performed a 5-cM genome scan. Linkage analysis identified a locus mapping to 12p13.33 with a maximum LOD score of 8.4. Haplotype sharing defined a candidate interval of 1.06 Mb containing all or part of seven annotated genes, sequencing of which failed to detect causative mutations. Comparative genomics revealed a conserved ORF corresponding to a novel gene in which we found three different truncating mutations among five families including patients from rural Quebec and Nova Scotia. This gene, termed "HSN2," consists of a single exon located within intron 8 of the PRKWNK1 gene and is transcribed from the same strand. The HSN2 protein may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of peripheral sensory neurons or their supporting Schwann cells.

  12. Identification of a Novel Gene (HSN2) Causing Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathy Type II through the Study of Canadian Genetic Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Lafrenière, Ronald G.; MacDonald, Marcia L. E.; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; MacFarlane, Julie; O’Driscoll, Mary; Brais, Bernard; Meilleur, Sébastien; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Dadivas, Owen; Pape, Terry; Platon, Christèle; Radomski, Chris; Risler, Jenni; Thompson, Jay; Guerra-Escobio, Ana-Maria; Davar, Gudarz; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Pimstone, Simon N.; Green, Roger; Pryse-Phillips, William; Goldberg, Y. Paul; Younghusband, H. Banfield; Hayden, Michael R.; Sherrington, Robin; Rouleau, Guy A.; Samuels, Mark E.

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type II is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by impairment of pain, temperature, and touch sensation owing to reduction or absence of peripheral sensory neurons. We identified two large pedigrees segregating the disorder in an isolated population living in Newfoundland and performed a 5-cM genome scan. Linkage analysis identified a locus mapping to 12p13.33 with a maximum LOD score of 8.4. Haplotype sharing defined a candidate interval of 1.06 Mb containing all or part of seven annotated genes, sequencing of which failed to detect causative mutations. Comparative genomics revealed a conserved ORF corresponding to a novel gene in which we found three different truncating mutations among five families including patients from rural Quebec and Nova Scotia. This gene, termed “HSN2,” consists of a single exon located within intron 8 of the PRKWNK1 gene and is transcribed from the same strand. The HSN2 protein may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of peripheral sensory neurons or their supporting Schwann cells. PMID:15060842

  13. Biocontrol ability and action mechanism of food-isolated yeast strains against Botrytis cinerea causing post-harvest bunch rot of table grape.

    PubMed

    Parafati, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2015-05-01

    Strains belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Aureobasidium pullulans, isolated from different food sources, were tested in vitro as biocontrol agents (BCAs) against the post-harvest pathogenic mold Botrytis cinerea. All yeast strains demonstrated antifungal activity at different levels depending on species and medium. Killer strains of W. anomalus and S. cerevisiae showed the highest biocontrol in vitro activity, as demonstrated by largest inhibition halos. The competition for iron and the ability to form biofilm and to colonize fruit wounds were hypothesized as the main action mechanisms for M. pulcherrima. The production of hydrolytic enzymes and the ability to colonize the wounds were the most important mechanisms for biocontrol activity in A. pullulans and W. anomalus, which also showed high ability to form biofilm. The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effect on pathogen growth was observed for the species W. anomalus, S. cerevisiae and M. pulcherrima. Our study clearly indicates that multiple modes of action may explain as M. pulcherrima provide excellent control of postharvest botrytis bunch rot of grape.

  14. Determinants of Disease Phenotype Differences Caused by Closely-Related Isolates of Begomovirus Betasatellites Inoculated with the Same Species of Helper Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Dang, Mingqing; Huang, Qingqing; Qian, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) is a monopartite begomovirus associated with different betasatellites. In this study, we investigate two different isolates of Tomato yellow leaf curl China betasatellite (TYLCCNB) to determine what features of the viral genome are required for induction of characteristic phenotypic differences between closely-related betasatellite. When co-agroinoculated with TYLCCNV into Nicotiana spp. and tomato plants, TYLCCNB-Y25 induced only leaf curling on all hosts, while TYLCCNB-Y10 also induced enations, vein yellowing, and shoot distortions. Further assays showed that βC1 of TYLCCNB-Y25 differs from that of TYLCCNB-Y10 in symptom induction and transcriptional modulating. Hybrid satellites were constructed in which the βC1 gene or 200 nt partial promoter-like fragment upstream of the βC1 were exchanged. Infectivity assays showed that a TYLCCNB-Y25 hybrid with the intact TYLCCNB-Y10 βC1 gene was able to induce vein yellowing, shoot distortions, and a reduced size and number of enations. A TYLCCNB-Y10 hybrid with the intact TYLCCNB-Y25 βC1 gene produced only leaf curling. In contrast, the TYLCCNB-Y25 and TYLCCNB-Y10 hybrids with swapped partial promoter-like regions had little effect on the phenotypes induced by wild-type betasatellites. Further experiments showed that the TYLCCNB-Y25 hybrid carrying the C-terminal region of TYLCCNB-Y10 βC1 induced TYLCCNB-Y10-like symptoms. These findings indicate that the βC1 protein is the major symptom determinant and that the C-terminal region of βC1 plays an important role in symptom induction. PMID:26389936

  15. Determinants of Disease Phenotype Differences Caused by Closely-Related Isolates of Begomovirus Betasatellites Inoculated with the Same Species of Helper Virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Dang, Mingqing; Huang, Qingqing; Qian, Yajuan

    2015-09-14

    Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) is a monopartite begomovirus associated with different betasatellites. In this study, we investigate two different isolates of Tomato yellow leaf curl China betasatellite (TYLCCNB) to determine what features of the viral genome are required for induction of characteristic phenotypic differences between closely-related betasatellite. When co-agroinoculated with TYLCCNV into Nicotiana spp. and tomato plants, TYLCCNB-Y25 induced only leaf curling on all hosts, while TYLCCNB-Y10 also induced enations, vein yellowing, and shoot distortions. Further assays showed that βC1 of TYLCCNB-Y25 differs from that of TYLCCNB-Y10 in symptom induction and transcriptional modulating. Hybrid satellites were constructed in which the βC1 gene or 200 nt partial promoter-like fragment upstream of the βC1 were exchanged. Infectivity assays showed that a TYLCCNB-Y25 hybrid with the intact TYLCCNB-Y10 βC1 gene was able to induce vein yellowing, shoot distortions, and a reduced size and number of enations. A TYLCCNB-Y10 hybrid with the intact TYLCCNB-Y25 βC1 gene produced only leaf curling. In contrast, the TYLCCNB-Y25 and TYLCCNB-Y10 hybrids with swapped partial promoter-like regions had little effect on the phenotypes induced by wild-type betasatellites. Further experiments showed that the TYLCCNB-Y25 hybrid carrying the C-terminal region of TYLCCNB-Y10 βC1 induced TYLCCNB-Y10-like symptoms. These findings indicate that the βC1 protein is the major symptom determinant and that the C-terminal region of βC1 plays an important role in symptom induction.

  16. Genetic Characterization of Fungi Isolated from the Environmental Swabs collected from a Compounding Center Known to Cause Multistate Meningitis Outbreak in United States Using ITS Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    A multistate fungal meningitis outbreak started in September of 2012 which spread in 20 states of the United States. The outbreak has been fatal so far, and has affected 751 individuals with 64 deaths among those who received contaminated spinal injections manufactured by a Compounding Center located in Massachusetts. In a preliminary study, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated the outbreak in collaboration with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state and local health departments, and identified four fungal and several bacterial contaminations in the recalled unopened injection vials. This follow-up study was carried out to assess DNA sequencing of the ITS1 region of rRNA gene for rapid identification of fungal pathogens during public health outbreak investigations. A total of 26 environmental swabs were collected from several locations at the manufacturing premises of the Compounding Center known to have caused the outbreak. The swab samples were initially examined by conventional microbiologic protocols and a wide range of fungal species were recovered. Species-identification of these microorganisms was accomplished by nucleotide sequencing of ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed 14 additional fungal species in the swabs analyzed. PMID:25438021

  17. Genetic Characterization of Fungi Isolated from the Environmental Swabs collected from a Compounding Center Known to Cause Multistate Meningitis Outbreak in United States Using ITS Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-08-22

    A multistate fungal meningitis outbreak started in September of 2012 which spread in 20 states of the United States. The outbreak has been fatal so far, and has affected 751 individuals with 64 deaths among those who received contaminated spinal injections manufactured by a Compounding Center located in Massachusetts. In a preliminary study, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated the outbreak in collaboration with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state and local health departments, and identified four fungal and several bacterial contaminations in the recalled unopened injection vials. This follow-up study was carried out to assess DNA sequencing of the ITS1 region of rRNA gene for rapid identification of fungal pathogens during public health outbreak investigations. A total of 26 environmental swabs were collected from several locations at the manufacturing premises of the Compounding Center known to have caused the outbreak. The swab samples were initially examined by conventional microbiologic protocols and a wide range of fungal species were recovered. Species-identification of these microorganisms was accomplished by nucleotide sequencing of ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed 14 additional fungal species in the swabs analyzed.

  18. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  19. The Causes and Consequences of Barracks Isolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    Macmillan, 1963. Cattell , R. B. The nature and measurement of intelligence. In Technical Supplement for the Culture Fair Intelligence Tests Scales 2 and 3...Skills. Cognitive skills were assessed using the IPAT - Culture Fair Intelligence Test . This test measures individual intelli- gence in such a way as to...measures were collected on the partici- pants in this study. These were cognitive skills as measured by the Culture Fair IQ test , perceptual skills

  20. Occurrence of 4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP) biodegradation in an aquatic sample caused by the presence of Spirodela polyrrhiza and isolation of a 4-t-BP-utilizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yuka; Toyama, Tadashi; Yu, Ning; Wang, Xuan; Sei, Kazunari; Ike, Michihiko

    2013-04-01

    Although 4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP) is a serious aquatic pollutant, its biodegradation in aquatic environments has not been well documented. In this study, 4-t-BP was obviously and repeatedly removed from water from four different environments in the presence of Spirodela polyrrhiza, giant duckweed, but 4-t-BP persisted in the environmental waters in the absence of S. polyrrhiza. Also, 4-t-BP was not removed from autoclaved pond water with sterilized S. polyrrhiza. These results suggest that the 4-t-BP removal from the environmental waters was caused by biodegradation stimulated by the presence of S. polyrrhiza rather than by uptake by the plant. Moreover, Sphingobium fuliginis OMI capable of utilizing 4-t-BP as a sole carbon and energy source was isolated from the S. polyrrhiza rhizosphere. Strain OMI degraded 4-t-BP via a meta-cleavage pathway, and also degraded a broad range of alkylphenols with linear or branched alkyl side chains containing two to nine carbon atoms. Root exudates of S. polyrrhiza stimulated 4-t-BP degradation and cell growth of strain OMI. Thus, the stimulating effects of S. polyrrhiza root exudates on 4-t-BP-degrading bacteria might have contributed to 4-t-BP removal in the environmental waters with S. polyrrhiza. These results demonstrate that the S. polyrrhiza-bacteria association may be applicable to the removal of highly persistent 4-t-BP from wastewaters or polluted aquatic environments.

  1. Module isolation devices

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Cooke, John Albert; Buzinski, Michael David

    2010-04-27

    A gas flow isolation device includes a gas flow isolation valve movable from an opened condition to a closed condition. The module isolation valve in one embodiment includes a rupture disk in flow communication with a flow of gas when the module isolation valve is in an opened condition. The rupture disk ruptures when a predetermined pressure differential occurs across it causing the isolation valve to close. In one embodiment the valve is mechanically linked to the rupture disk to maintain the valve in an opened condition when the rupture disk is intact, and which permits the valve to move into a closed condition when the rupture disk ruptures. In another embodiment a crushable member maintains the valve in an open condition, and the flow of gas passed the valve upon rupturing of the rupture disk compresses the crushable member to close the isolation valve.

  2. Genome sequences of 12 isolates of the EU1 lineage of Phytophthora ramorum, a fungus-like pathogen that causes extensive damage and mortality to a wide range of trees and other plants.

    PubMed

    Turner, Judith; O'Neill, Paul; Grant, Murray; Mumford, Rick A; Thwaites, Richard; Studholme, David J

    2017-06-01

    Here we present genome sequences for twelve isolates of the invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum EU1. The assembled genome sequences and raw sequence data are available via BioProject accession number PRJNA177509. These data will be useful in developing molecular tools for specific detection and identification of this pathogen.

  3. Influenza virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Scott; Walker, David; Webster, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The isolation of influenza viruses is important for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases in lower animals and humans, for the detection of the infecting agent in surveillance programs, and is an essential element in the development and production of vaccine. Since influenza is caused by a zoonotic virus it is necessary to do surveillance in the reservoir species (aquatic waterfowls), intermediate hosts (quails, pigs), and in affected mammals including humans. Two of the hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of influenza A viruses (H5 and H7) can evolve into highly pathogenic (HP) strains for gallinaceous poultry; some HP H5 and H7 strains cause lethal infection of humans. In waterfowls, low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) isolates are obtained primarily from the cloaca (or feces); in domestic poultry, the virus is more often recovered from the respiratory tract than from cloacal samples; in mammals, the virus is most often isolated from the respiratory tract, and in cases of high pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) from the blood and internal organs of infected birds. Virus isolation procedures are performed by inoculation of clinical specimens into embryonated eggs (primarily chicken eggs) or onto a variety of primary or continuous tissue culture systems. Successful isolation of influenza virus depends on the quality of the sample and matching the appropriate culture method to the sample type.

  4. Endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Peng, Ming-Yieh; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2009-12-01

    Endogenous endophthalmitis occurs when organisms are hematogenously disseminated in to the eye from a distant focus of infection. The most common isolated organisms that cause endogenous endophthalmitis are Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Previous reports on endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter species are limited. We present the first case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri bacteremia and renal abscesses.

  5. A clinical isolate of Leishmania donovani with ITS1 sequence polymorphism as a cause of para-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis in an Ethiopian human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gelanew, T; Amogne, W; Abebe, T; Kuhls, K; Hailu, A; Schönian, G

    2010-10-01

    The diagnosis of para-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL/VL), either as an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)-associated syndrome or as a complication of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in patients with or without highly active antiretroviral therapy, represents a challenge for prompt treatment. The aim of this study was to identify the causative Leishmania species and to clarify whether the post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL)-like lesions appeared as a result of IRIS or not. A 31-year-old Ethiopian male patient, with stage IV HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), was clinically diagnosed with PKDL/VL. He had developed a generalized maculopapular rash on his face after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The Leishmania isolate obtained from the skin lesions was analysed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and partial coding sequences of the heat shock protein 70 gene (hsp70). Restriction analysis of the ITS1 PCR product gave a unique RFLP pattern not seen before for any Leishmania isolate. Sequencing of both the ITS1 and hsp70 PCR products identified the causative species as Leishmania donovani, and further revealed the existence of five different sequence variants of the ITS1 among the 10 clones sequenced. The results indicate that PKDL/VL resulted from an infection by L. donovani. The sequence variants of ITS1 might be due to the presence of multiple strains/clones or the existence of intragenomic variations in the multicopy ITS1, or a combination of both.

  6. Infections caused by Propionibacterium species.

    PubMed

    Brook, I; Frazier, E H

    1991-01-01

    Eight hundred and sixteen isolates of Propionibacterium species (725 of which were Propionibacterium acnes) were isolated from 3,971 specimens submitted for the identification of anaerobic bacteria over the course of 10 years. A total of 94 Propionibacterium isolates (12%) identified in 92 patients were considered to cause infection. The rest of the isolates were determined to be contaminants or of uncertain pathogenic significance. Significant infections caused by Propionibacterium species were associated with the blood in 15 patients, central nervous system in 11, lymph glands in 10, abscesses in eight, joints in seven, wounds in seven, cysts in six, and sinuses in five. Predisposing or underlying conditions were noted in 66 patients (70%). The most common conditions were the presence of foreign bodies (29 patients), diabetes (12), previous surgery (10), trauma (seven), malignancy (seven), immunodeficiency (seven), and steroid therapy (four). Antimicrobial therapy was administered to 83 patients; for 47 patients this therapy was given in conjunction with surgical drainage or correction. Surgical drainage alone was performed in nine patients. Five patients (5%) died. These data illustrate that although Propionibacterium species are rarely associated with infections, these organisms can occasionally cause serious infections.

  7. Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella londiniensis.

    PubMed

    Stallworth, Christina; Steed, Lisa; Fisher, Mark A; Nolte, Frederick S

    2012-12-01

    Legionella londiniensis has been isolated from aqueous environments. However, to our knowledge, this organism has never been isolated from clinical specimens. A case of Legionnaires' disease in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient caused by this organism is described, which confirms that L. londiniensis can be an opportunistic pathogen.

  8. Legionnaires' Disease Caused by Legionella londiniensis

    PubMed Central

    Stallworth, Christina; Steed, Lisa; Fisher, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Legionella londiniensis has been isolated from aqueous environments. However, to our knowledge, this organism has never been isolated from clinical specimens. A case of Legionnaires' disease in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient caused by this organism is described, which confirms that L. londiniensis can be an opportunistic pathogen. PMID:23052303

  9. Cloth colorization caused by microbial biofilm.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yuki; Ohta, Jun; Ishida, Yoshiki; Morisaki, Hisao

    2008-07-15

    In this study, cloth disfeaturement was investigated biologically. To clarify whether or not microbes can cause cloth disfeaturement, and to identify the microbes causing the disfeaturement, worn cloth samples were incubated on sweat-ingredient agar medium. Non-sterilized cloth samples became yellow-colored during incubation, and bacterial strains belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Kocuria, Micrococcus and Staphylococcus were isolated from the yellow-colored parts. Two major isolates close to the genera Bacillus and Micrococcus were inoculated separately or together on cloth samples to examine whether or not these isolates can cause colorization. When the isolate close to Micrococcus was inoculated on its own or mixed with the isolate close to Bacillus, the samples turned yellow to a greater extent and a biofilm-like structure was observed by SEM on the colored areas. In contrast, the isolate close to Bacillus alone barely caused any colorization, and no biofilm-like structure was observed. From the yellow-colored samples, bacterial strains with the same 16S rRNA gene sequences as those of the inoculated strains were re-isolated. These results strongly suggest that the bacterial strain belonging to genus Micrococcus causes cloth colorization by forming a biofilm structure.

  10. Biological control of Xanthomonas Oryzae pv. Oryzae causing rice bacterial blight disease by Streptomyces toxytricini VN08-A-12, isolated from soil and leaf-litter samples in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Van Hop, Duong; Phuong Hoa, Phan Thi; Quang, Nguyen Duc; Ton, Phan Huu; Ha, Trinh Hoang; Van Hung, Nguyen; Van, Nguyen Thi; Van Hai, Tong; Kim Quy, Nguyen Thi; Anh Dao, Nguyen Thi; Thi Thom, Vu

    2014-01-01

    A total of 2690 actinomycete strains were screened as potential biological control agents in controlling rice bacterial blight (BB) in Vietnam. From these microorganisms, seventeen actinomycete strains were found to be capable of inhibiting all 10 major Xoo races isolated from Xoo-infected rice leaves. One strain, namely VN08-A-12, contained effective characteristics in selectively inhibiting all 10 races in vitro, but did not inhibit most of the other tested microorganisms. Therefore, VN08-A-12 was subsequently selected for rice field trials for two seasons on two rice cultivars SS1 and KD18. Results showed VN08-A-12 was not only able to reduce Xoo lesion lengths in the two rice cultivars (lesion length reduction of up to 38.3%), but it also significantly reduced Xoo-related yield loss in infected rice cultivars from the field (yield loss reduction of up to 43.2%). Interestingly, the culture of this strain also increased the rice yield in healthy rice cultivars (from 2.66% to 16.98% for SS1 and from 3.11% to 5.94% for KD18 cultivar). The strain VN08-A-12 was shown to be identical to Streptomyces toxytricini. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting S. toxytricini as a beneficial biological agent for the control of BB in rice.

  11. Onychomycosis Caused by Blastoschizomyces capitatus

    PubMed Central

    D’Antonio, Domenico; Romano, Ferdinando; Iacone, Antonio; Violante, Beatrice; Fazii, Paolo; Pontieri, Eugenio; Staniscia, Tommaso; Caracciolo, Claudia; Bianchini, Stefano; Sferra, Roberta; Vetuschi, Antonella; Gaudio, Eugenio; Carruba, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    Blastoschizomyces capitatus was cultured from the nail of a healthy patient with onychomycosis. The identity of the isolate was initially established by standard methods and ultrastructural analysis and was verified by molecular probing. Strains ATCC 200929, ATCC 62963, and ATCC 62964 served as reference strains for these analyses. To our knowledge, this is the first case of nail infection secondary to paronychia caused by this organism reported in the English literature. PMID:10449477

  12. The isolation and characterisation of six avian infectious bronchitis viruses isolated in Morocco.

    PubMed

    El-Houadfi, M; Jones, R C; Cook, J K; Ambali, A G

    1986-01-01

    The first isolation and characterisation of infectious bronchitis (IB) viruses from poultry flocks in Morocco are reported. Five isolates designated D, E, F, H and M were related serologically to the Massachusetts serotype, while the sixth, isolate G, was found to be different from any previously reported serotype of IB virus. Neutralising antibodies to isolate G have been detected in sera collected from commercial flocks in Britain, although the virus has not been isolated. While all six isolates caused respiratory disease typical of IB in experimentally infected 3-week-old specified pathogen-free (SPF) chickens, isolate G was unusual in that it could be isolated from several parts of the alimentary tract for up to 21 days post inoculation, and from the duodenum up to 28 days. H120 vaccines protected chicks challenged with isolates E and F but not isolate G.

  13. Infectious discitis caused by Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed Central

    Solans, R; Simeon, P; Cuenca, R; Fonollosa, V; Bago, J; Vilardell, M

    1992-01-01

    The case is reported of a patient who developed a vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Enterobacter cloacae. The organism was isolated in cultures of blood and vertebral puncture biopsy samples. The patient was satisfactorily treated with trimethroprim and sulphamethoxazole. Enterobacter cloacae, a Gram negative organism, has been confirmed as the cause of bacteremia in patients with burns, urinary infections, in adults with pneumonia, and in children with joint infections. Spondylodiscitis caused by Enterobacter cloacae has not previously been described. Images PMID:1632668

  14. Diffuser for wellhead isolation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Surjaatmadja, J.B.

    1981-04-21

    An improved diffuser for a wellhead isolation tool which employs a combination of angles in its bore. This improvement reduces the incidence of erosion caused by the flow of fluids through the diffuser, in both the well production tubing adjacent the end of the diffuser and in the diffuser itself.

  15. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  16. Debendox does not cause the Poland anomaly.

    PubMed

    David, T J

    1982-06-01

    The suggestion that Debendox may cause the Poland anomaly is refuted by a study of the antenatal drug exposure in 46 cases of the Poland anomaly and 32 cases of isolated absence of the pectoralis major. Debendox had been prescribed in one case of the Poland anomaly and in one case of isolated pectoralis absence, but in neither was the compound given during organogenesis. In none of the 78 cases could Debendox be causally implicated.

  17. Debendox does not cause the Poland anomaly.

    PubMed Central

    David, T J

    1982-01-01

    The suggestion that Debendox may cause the Poland anomaly is refuted by a study of the antenatal drug exposure in 46 cases of the Poland anomaly and 32 cases of isolated absence of the pectoralis major. Debendox had been prescribed in one case of the Poland anomaly and in one case of isolated pectoralis absence, but in neither was the compound given during organogenesis. In none of the 78 cases could Debendox be causally implicated. PMID:7092316

  18. Antibiotic resistance among Ureaplasma spp. isolates: cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Beeton, M L; Spiller, O B

    2017-02-01

    There is growing global concern regarding the rise of antibiotic-resistant organisms. Many of these reports have focused on various Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, with little attention to the genus Ureaplasma. Ureaplasma spp. are associated with numerous infectious diseases affecting pregnant women, neonates and the immunocompromised. Treatment options are extremely limited due to high levels of intrinsic resistance resulting from the unique physiology of these organisms and further restricted in cases of the developing fetus or neonate, often limiting therapeutic options to predominantly macrolides or rarely fluoroquinolones. The increasing presence of macrolide- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains among neonatal infections may result in pan-drug resistance and potentially untreatable conditions. Here, we review the requirements for accurate measurement of antimicrobial susceptibility, provide a comprehensive review of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) for Ureaplasma species in the literature and contextualize these results relative to some investigators' reliance on commercial kits that are not CLSI compliant when determining AMR. The dramatic variation in the resistance patterns and impact of high levels of AMR amongst neonatal populations suggests the need for continued surveillance. Commercial kits represent an excellent tool for initial antibiotic susceptibility determination and screening. However, AMR reporting must utilize internationally standardized methods, as high-titre samples, or Mycoplasma hominis-contaminated samples routinely give false AMR results. Furthermore, there is a requirement for future reports to determine the underlying AMR mechanisms and determine whether expanding AMR is due to spontaneous mutation, transmission of resistance genes on mobile elements or selection and expansion of resistant clones.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial isolated hyperparathyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... growth and division. The resulting increase in cell proliferation leads to the formation of an adenoma involving ... of other genes (gene transcription) and in cell proliferation. CDC73 gene mutations that cause familial isolated hyperparathyroidism ...

  20. What Causes Cardiomyopathy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and can damage the organs, including the heart. Sarcoidosis : A disease that causes inflammation and can affect ... believe that an abnormal immune response may cause sarcoidosis. This abnormal response causes tiny lumps of cells ...

  1. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  2. [Isolated giant hydatid in kidney].

    PubMed

    Ozgör, Faruk; Erbin, Akif; Berberoğlu, Ahmet Yalçın; Binbay, Murat; Sarılar, Omer; Müslümanoğlu, Ahmet Yaser

    2014-06-01

    Cyst hydatid of the kidney is parasitic condition caused by Echinococcus granulosus and identified in many countries, especially associated with sheep farming. Echinococcal larvae enter the bloodstream using the digestive system and invade any organs in the human body. The urinary system is the third most common area affected by parasitic infection after liver and lungs, but isolated renal involvement is a very rare situation, even in endemic areas. İn our case, we aimed to report a 57-year-old female patient with an 18-centimeter isolated renal cyst hydatid treated by retroperitoneal nephrectomy. The diagnosis was based on imaging findings and confirmed by histopathologically.

  3. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes. During these episodes the person is unable to move or ...

  4. STUDIES ON THE ISOLATION OF METAPHASE CHROMOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    ChoraŻy, M.; Bendich, A.; Borenfreund, E.; Hutchison, D. J.

    1963-01-01

    A method for the isolation of metaphase chromosomes from mouse L1210 leukemia cells has been developed. Cells, arrested at metaphase with colchicine, were exposed to hypotonic solution and the pH was then adjusted to 5.6 to stabilize the chromosomes. The metaphase figures were subsequently disrupted and the chromosomes isolated by a series of differential centrifugations in sucrose. The isolated chromosomes were well preserved, as judged by morphological criteria. The effect of various enzymes and chemical agents on the isolated chromosomes was studied. Chymotrypsin, trypsin, and deoxyribonuclease caused a marked disintegration of the chromosomes, whereas treatment with pepsin and ribonuclease induced no significant morphological alterations. PMID:14069802

  5. Septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae.

    PubMed

    Gay, R M; Lane, T W; Keller, D C

    1983-01-01

    A normal part of the oral flora, Kingella kingae has seldom been recognized as the cause of serious clinical infections. We report a case of documented septic arthritis caused by K. kingae in an otherwise healthy infant. We suggest that it may be more common than thought based on the general unfamiliarity with this organism and the fact that several dozen clinical isolates have been identified by reference laboratories.

  6. Septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae.

    PubMed Central

    Gay, R M; Lane, T W; Keller, D C

    1983-01-01

    A normal part of the oral flora, Kingella kingae has seldom been recognized as the cause of serious clinical infections. We report a case of documented septic arthritis caused by K. kingae in an otherwise healthy infant. We suggest that it may be more common than thought based on the general unfamiliarity with this organism and the fact that several dozen clinical isolates have been identified by reference laboratories. PMID:6826703

  7. Space Suit (Mobil Biological Isolation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Houston five-year-old known as David is getting a "space suit," a vitally important gift that will give him mobility he has never known. David suffers from a rare malady called severe combined immune deficiency, which means that be was born without natural body defenses against disease; germs that would have little or no effect on most people could cause his death. As a result, he has spent his entire life in germ-free isolation rooms, one at Houston's Texas Children's hospital, another at his home. The "space suit" David is getting will allow him to spend four hours ata a time in a mobile sterile environment outside his isolation rooms. Built by NASA's Johnson Space Center, it is a specially-designed by product of Space Suit technology known as the mobile biological isolation system.

  8. Bovine papillomavirus isolation by ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Araldi, R P; Giovanni, D N S; Melo, T C; Diniz, N; Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J; Sant'Ana, T A; Carvalho, R F; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2014-11-01

    The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) is the etiological agent of bovine papillomatosis, which causes significant economic losses to livestock, characterized by the presence of papillomas that regress spontaneously or persist and progress to malignancy. Currently, there are 13 types of BPVs described in the literature as well as 32 putative new types. This study aimed to isolate viral particles of BPV from skin papillomas, using a novel viral isolation method. The virus types were previously identified with new primers designed. 77 cutaneous papilloma samples of 27 animals, Simmental breed, were surgically removed. The DNA was extracted and subjected to PCR using Delta-Epsilon and Xi primers. The bands were purified and sequenced. The sequences were analyzed using software and compared to the GenBank database, by BLAST tool. The viral typing showed a prevalence of BPV-2 in 81.81% of samples. It was also detected the presence of the putative new virus type BR/UEL2 in one sample. Virus isolation was performed by ultracentrifugation in a single density of cesium chloride. The method of virus isolation is less laborious than those previously described, allowing the isolation of complete virus particles of BPV-2.

  9. Compact optical isolator.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, F J

    1971-10-01

    This paper describes a compact Faraday rotation isolator using terbium aluminum garnet (TAG) as the Faraday rotation material and small high field permanent magnets made of copper-rare earth alloys. The nominal isolation is 26 dB with a 0.4-dB forward loss. The present isolator can be adjusted to provide effective isolation from 4880 A to 5145 A. Details of the design, fabrication, and performance of the isolator are presented.

  10. What Causes Polycythemia Vera?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Polycythemia Vera? Primary Polycythemia Polycythemia vera (PV) also is known as primary ... may play a role in causing PV. Secondary Polycythemia Another type of polycythemia, called secondary polycythemia, isn' ...

  11. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pumping enough oxygen-rich blood to the body. Heart Attack Most heart attacks occur as a result of ... or completely block blood flow. Conditions Caused by Heart Attack Heart attacks can cause some serious heart conditions ...

  12. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  13. What Causes Sarcoidosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Sarcoidosis? The cause of sarcoidosis isn't known. More ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  14. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  15. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  16. Acute unilateral isolated ptosis

    PubMed Central

    Court, Jennifer Helen; Janicek, David

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of acute onset painless left ptosis. He had no other symptoms; importantly pupils were equal and reactive and eye movements were full. There was no palpable mass or swelling. He was systemically well with no headache, other focal neurological signs, or symptoms of fatigue. CT imaging showed swelling of the levator palpebrae superioris suggestive of myositis. After showing no improvement over 5 days the patient started oral prednisolone 30 mg reducing over 12 weeks. The ptosis resolved quickly and the patient remains symptom free at 6 months follow-up. Acute ptosis may indicate serious pathology. Differential diagnoses include a posterior communicating artery aneurysm causing a partial or complete third nerve palsy, Horner’s syndrome, and myasthenia gravis. A careful history and examination must be taken. Orbital myositis typically involves the extraocular muscles causing pain and diplopia. Isolated levator myositis is rare. PMID:25564592

  17. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: ...

  18. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: yes and ...

  19. Isolated supraclinoid occlusive disease of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Lagrèze, H L; Hartmann, A; Ries, F; Wappenschmidt, J; Hanisch, E

    1987-01-01

    Isolated supraclinoid occlusive disease of the internal carotid artery is a rare cause of cerebral ischemia. The authors of the only review of this subject concluded that it is caused predominantly by factors other than atherosclerosis. We examined 6 patients with isolated supraclinoid occlusive lesions. Five of them had one or more risk factors for atherosclerosis. Thus, the isolated stenosis of that part of the internal carotid artery does not seem to represent a particular pathologic entity.

  20. Recent advances in micro-vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunchuan; Jing, Xingjian; Daley, Steve; Li, Fengming

    2015-05-01

    Micro-vibration caused by disturbance sources onboard spacecraft can severely degrade the working environment of sensitive payloads. Some notable vibration control methods have been developed particularly for the suppression or isolation of micro-vibration over recent decades. Usually, passive isolation techniques are deployed in aerospace engineering. Active isolators, however, are often proposed to deal with the low frequency vibration that is common in spacecraft. Active/passive hybrid isolation has also been effectively used in some spacecraft structures for a number of years. In semi-active isolation systems, the inherent structural performance can be adjusted to deal with variation in the aerospace environment. This latter approach is potentially one of the most practical isolation techniques for micro-vibration isolation tasks. Some emerging advanced vibration isolation methods that exploit the benefits of nonlinearity have also been reported in the literature. This represents an interesting and highly promising approach for solving some challenging problems in the area. This paper serves as a state-of-the-art review of the vibration isolation theory and/or methods which were developed, mainly over the last decade, specifically for or potentially could be used for, micro-vibration control.

  1. Causes and effects.

    PubMed

    Cone, Carol L; Feldman, Mark A; DaSilva, Alison T

    2003-07-01

    Most companies make charitable donations, but few approach their contributions with an eye toward enhancing their brands. Those that do take such an approach commit talent and know-how, not just dollars, to a pressing but carefully chosen social need and then tell the world about the cause and their service to it. Through the association, both the business and the cause benefit in ways they could not otherwise. Organizations such as Avon, ConAgra Foods, and Chevrolet have recognized that a sustained cause-branding program can improve their reputations, boost their employees' morale, strengthen relations with business partners, and drive sales. And the targeted causes receive far more money than they could have from direct corporate gifts alone. The authors examine these best practices and offer four principles for building successful cause-branding programs. First, they say, a company should select a cause that advances its corporate goals. That is, unless the competitive logic for supporting the cause is clear, a company shouldn't even consider putting its finite resources behind it. Second, a business should commit to a cause before picking its charitable partners. Otherwise, a cause-branding program may become too dependent on its partners. Third, a company should put all its assets to work, especially its employees. It should leverage the professional skills of its workers as well as its other assets such as distribution networks. And fourth, a company should promote its philanthropic initiatives through every possible channel. In addition to using the media, it should communicate its efforts through the Web, annual reports, direct mail, and so on. Cause branding is a way to turn the obligations of corporate citizenship into a valuable asset. When the cause is well chosen, the commitment genuine, and the program well executed, the cause helps the company, and the company helps the cause.

  2. Differentiation among bacteria isolated from turkeys with coryza (rhinotracheitis).

    PubMed

    Rimler, R B; Simmons, D G

    1983-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria isolated from turkeys with coryza in the United States, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Republic of South Africa were compared with known Alcaligenes species and Bordetella bronchiseptica. The turkey isolates were separated into three distinct groups based on biochemical and physiologic tests. Forty of the 68 isolates studied (group I) were different from Alcaligenes sp. and B. bronchiseptica. Isolates in group I produced a heat-labile hemagglutinin and did not grow on Simmons' citrate agar. Isolates in group II (25 isolates) were similar to A. faecalis and A. odorans, grew on Simmons' citrate agar, and did not produce a hemagglutinin. Isolates in group III were B. bronchiseptica. Isolates from groups I and II caused coryza in poults. Group III isolates were not pathogenic.

  3. Single spore isolation and morphological characterization of local Malaysian isolates of rice blast fungus Magnoporthe grisea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ankitta; Ratnam, Wickneswari; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Ponaya, Ariane; Jena, Khisord K.

    2015-09-01

    Rice blast is a destructive disease, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea. It causes considerable damage to rice and leads to crop loss in rice growing regions worldwide. Although fungicides can be used to control rice blast, they generate additional cost in rice production and contamination of environment and food. Therefore, the use of resistant varieties is thought to be one of the most economically and environmentally efficient ways of crop protection from the disease. Six new local Malaysian isolates of M. grisea were isolated using single spore isolation method. Five isolates were from infected leaf samples collected from Kompleks Latihan MADA, Kedah and one was from Kelantan. These isolates were identified using morphological characteristics and microscopic studies and later confirmed by ITSequences. These isolates were induced to sporulate and used for greenhouse screening on two differential rice varieties: Mahsuri (susceptible) and Pongsu Seribu 2 (resistant). Among the 6 isolates, isolate number 3 was found to be the most virulent showing high sporulation while isolate number 4 was very slow growing, and the least virulent.

  4. Psychopathology of social isolation

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Sang-Bin

    2014-01-01

    The most important defining factor of being human is the use of symbolic language. Language or communication problem occurs during the growth, the child will have a higher risk of social isolation and then the survival will be threatened constantly. Today, adolescents and youths are familiar with computer and smart-phone devices, and communication with others by these devices is easy than face-to-face communication. As adolescents and youths live in the comfortable and familiar cyber-world rather than actively participating real society, so they make social isolation. Extreme form of this isolation in adolescents and youths is so-called Socially Withdrawn Youth. In this study, the psychopathological factors inducing social isolation were discussed. Development stages of social isolation in relation with types of social isolation, Ego-syntonic isolation and Ego-dystonic isolation, were also considered. PMID:25061592

  5. Occurrence of Anthracnose on Chinese Mallow Caused by Colletotrichum malvarum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan Gyu; Hong, Sung Kee; Kim, Jin Hee

    2008-06-01

    Anthracnose symptoms were frequently observed on leaves, petioles, and stems of Chinese mallow grown in Namyangju, Korea, during a disease survey performed in November, 2007. The disease incidence was as high as 30% in the 12 greenhouses investigated. A total of 38 isolates of the Colletotrichum species were obtained from the anthracnose symptoms, and all the isolates were identified as Colletotrichum malvarum based on their morphological and culture characteristics. Three isolates of the fungus caused anthracnose symptoms on leaves and stems following artificial inoculation, which were similar to those observed during the greenhouse survey. In this study, mycological and pathological characteristics of C. malvarum identified as causing anthracnose of Chinese mallow were clarified.

  6. Isolation in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Sinclair

    This paper presents information on isolated children and describes a study being undertaken to examine the role of isolation in reported cases of child abuse and neglect. The effects of extreme isolation on language and psychological development are emphasized. The importance of early socialization is seen in relation to normal development.…

  7. Causes of Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by a virus that attacks the nerves which control motor function. > Spina bifida A neural tube defect that causes incomplete closure in the spinal column. > Spinal cord injury Involves damage to the nerves within the bony protection of the spinal canal. > ...

  8. What Causes Bad Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? A A A en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  9. What Causes Angina?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a clot blocks an artery. Variant Angina A spasm in a coronary artery causes variant angina. The spasm causes the walls of the artery to tighten ... those who don’t. The coronary arteries can spasm as a result of: Exposure to cold Emotional ...

  10. Chromoblastomycosis Caused by Phialophora richardsiae

    PubMed Central

    Son, Young-Min; Kang, Hong-Kyu; Na, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Young; Baek, Jin-Ok; Lee, Jong-Rok; Seo, Yiel-Hea

    2010-01-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is a chronic fungal disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissues caused by a group of dematiaceous (black) fungi. The most common etiologic agents are Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Cladophialophora carrionii, both of which can be isolated from plant debris. The infection usually follows traumatic inoculation by a penetrating thorn or splinter wound. Several months after the injury, painless papules or nodules appear on the affected area; these papules then progress to scaly and verrucose plaques. We report a case of chromoblastomycosis caused by Phialophora richardsiae, which has been rarely associated with chromoblastomycosis. The case involved a 43-year-old male, who for the past 2 months had noted an erythematous, pustulous plaque that was somewhat dark brown in color on his right shin; the plaque also had intermittent purulent discharge and crust formation. On histopathological examination, chronic granulomatous inflammation and sclerotic cells were seen. The tissue fungus culture grew out the typical black fungi of P. richardsiae, which was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. The patient has been treated with a combination of terbinafine and itraconazole for 3 months with a good clinical response. PMID:20711281

  11. Ischemic syndromes causing dizziness and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Choi, K-D; Lee, H; Kim, J-S

    2016-01-01

    Dizziness/vertigo and imbalance are the most common symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia. Even though dizziness/vertigo usually accompanies other neurologic symptoms and signs in cerebrovascular disorders, a diagnosis of isolated vascular vertigo is increasing markedly by virtue of recent developments in clinical neurotology and neuroimaging. It is important to differentiate isolated vertigo of a vascular cause from more benign disorders involving the inner ear, since therapeutic strategies and prognosis differ between these two conditions. Over the last decade, we have achieved a marked development in the understanding and diagnosis of vascular dizziness/vertigo. Introduction of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly enhanced detection of infarctions in patients with vascular dizziness/vertigo, especially in the posterior-circulation territories. However, well-organized bedside neurotologic evaluation is even more sensitive than MRI in detecting acute infarction as a cause of spontaneous prolonged vertigo. Furthermore, detailed evaluation of strategic infarctions has elucidated the function of various vestibular structures of the brainstem and cerebellum. In contrast, diagnosis of isolated labyrinthine infarction still remains a challenge. This diagnostic difficulty also applies to isolated transient dizziness/vertigo of vascular origin. Regarding the common nonlacunar mechanisms in the acute vestibular syndrome from small infarctions, individual strategies may be indicated to prevent recurrences of stroke in patients with vascular vertigo.

  12. Cerebral Aspergillosis Caused by Neosartorya hiratsukae, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Kallas, Esper G.; Godoy, Patricio; Karenina, Anna; Gené, Josepa; Stchigel, Alberto; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2002-01-01

    We report the first case of infection by Neosartorya hiratsukae, an ascomycete in which the conidial state resembles Aspergillus fumigatus. The fungus caused a brain infection in a Brazilian woman, who died despite itraconazole treatment. Diagnosis was established by direct microscopic examination, computed tomographic scan, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, and repeated cultures from the lesions. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility of the isolate is provided. PMID:12194781

  13. Abscess and empyema caused by Legionella micdadei.

    PubMed Central

    Halberstam, M; Isenberg, H D; Hilton, E

    1992-01-01

    Legionella micdadei is the second most common species implicated in the occurrence of Legionella pneumonia (D. J. Bremer, Semin. Respir. Infect. 4:190-205, 1987). Although there has been a reported lung abscess caused by dual infection (L. micdadei and L. pneumophila), there are no known cases of L. micdadei as the only causative organism. We report a case of a patient with a lung abscess from which L. micdadei was the sole organism isolated. PMID:1537927

  14. Competition between Two Isolates of Denitrifying Bacteria Added to Soil

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Robert E.; Parsons, Laura L.; Smith, M. Scott

    1992-01-01

    We examined the competitive relationship between two isolates of denitrifying bacteria, both of which grow well under aerobic conditions but differ in their ability to grow under denitrifying conditions. The growth and persistence of the two isolates, added to sterile soil or added to soil previously colonized by the other isolate, were monitored under aerobic and denitrifying (anaerobic) conditions. When isolates were added together to sterile soil, the isolate added at the higher density reduced the growth of the isolate added at the lower density. The magnitude of the growth reduction varied depending on the competitive abilities of the individual isolates and the aeration state of the soil. Prior colonization of soil with one of the isolates conferred a competitive advantage on the colonized isolate but did not lead to the disappearance of the challenging isolate. Fluctuations in aeration state caused large changes in the population density of one isolate and altered the competitive relationship between the two isolates. The competitive effectiveness of each isolate varied with cell density, the degree of prior colonization of the soil by the other isolate, and the aeration state of the soil. PMID:16348820

  15. What Causes Hemochromatosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... each parent), you're at risk for iron overload and signs and symptoms of hemochromatosis. If you ... of another disease or condition that causes iron overload. Examples of such diseases and conditions include: Certain ...

  16. Leading Causes of Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cataract. Photo courtesy of National Eye Institute, NIH Cataracts Cataracts are a clouding of the lenses in your ... older people. More than 22 million Americans have cataracts. They are the leading cause of blindness in ...

  17. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... younger brother might develop it, too. He has seasonal allergies and I've heard that allergies can cause ... TOPIC Asthma Center Asthma Basics All About Allergies Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) If My Child Has Asthma, Can ...

  18. Viral causes of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Goodgame, R W

    2001-09-01

    Viruses are important causes of diarrhea. In healthy adults, the main clinical manifestation is acute, self-limited gastroenteritis. Advances in molecular diagnostics have shown that epidemics of acute gastroenteritis most frequently are due to caliciviruses spread through contaminated food or through person-to-person contact. Application of similar technology is needed to make a definitive statement about the role of such candidate viruses as rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus as the cause of nonepidemic acute gastroenteritis in adults. Rarely a previously healthy adult gets acute CMV colitis. CMV and EBV mainly cause diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, however. Advances in prophylaxis and treatment have reduced the frequency and severity of these diseases. Acute infantile gastroenteritis is caused by rotavirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus. These viral diseases of the gut are seen by the physician as routine and rare clinical problems.

  19. What Causes Atelectasis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites News & ... and medical disorders that can cause atelectasis include pneumonia , lung ... tube from a ventilator. When a blockage occurs, the air that's already ...

  20. Causes of Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Type 2 (AOA1 and AOA2). Affects the Nervous System The various abnormal genes that cause ataxia have ... cord. The details of which parts of the nervous system are most affected vary with the different types ...

  1. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have symptoms worsen if she's exposed to specific allergens (things that cause an allergic reaction). In fact, ... type, which specifically recognizes and attaches to the allergen when the body is exposed to it. When ...

  2. What Causes Bronchitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposed to tobacco smoke, dust, fumes, vapors, or air pollution raises your risk for the condition. These lung ... the major cause of the condition. Breathing in air pollution and dust or fumes from the environment or ...

  3. What Causes Thrombocytopenia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... some conditions that cause too much blood clotting. Autoimmune Diseases Autoimmune diseases occur if the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the body. If an autoimmune disease destroys the body's platelets, thrombocytopenia can occur. One ...

  4. What Causes Pericarditis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Cough Heart Attack Heart Palpitations Heart Surgery Hypotension Send a link ...

  5. What causes bone loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Any treatment or condition that causes calcium or vitamin D to be poorly absorbed can also lead to weak bones. Some of these are: Gastric bypass (weight-loss surgery) Cystic fibrosis Other conditions that ...

  6. What Causes Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... weak or damaged, blood can back up and pool in your veins. This causes the veins to ... pressure in your veins due to overweight or obesity or pregnancy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February ...

  7. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the lungs, airways, diaphragm, rib cage, pulmonary arteries, brain, and spinal cord ... STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US ...

  8. What Causes Lactose Intolerance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... FOIA Jobs at NICHD Meetings, Conferences & Events Partnering & Donating to the ... intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Not having enough lactase in the body is the cause of lactose intolerance. The names ...

  9. [Does vaccination cause disease?].

    PubMed

    Zingg, W

    2005-10-01

    Not many inventions in medical history have influenced our society as much as vaccination. The concept is old and simple. When Edward Jenner published his work on cowpox, "variolation" was quite common. In this procedure, pus of patients with mild smallpox was transferred to healthy individuals. Meanwhile smallpox has been eradicated worldwide. Diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria or tetanus almost disappeared in industrialized countries. The same happened with epiglottitis and meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) after vaccination against Hib was introduced in Switzerland in 1990. This success was possible because of routine vaccination. Immunization is a save procedure and adverse events are much lower than complications in the natural course of the prevented diseases. However vaccinations were accused to cause diseases themselves such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic arthritis or autism. Hitherto no large cohort study or case-control-study was able to proof responsibility of vaccines in any of these diseases. Public media are eager to publish early data from surveillance reports or case reports which are descriptive and never a principle of cause and effect. In large controlled trials there was no proof that vaccination causes asthma, hepatitis-B-vaccination causes multiple sclerosis or macrophagic myofasciitis, Hib-vaccination causes diabetes mellitus, rubella-vaccination causes chronic arthritis, measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination causes gait disturbance or thiomersal causes autism. These results are rarely published in newspapers or television. Thus, many caring parents are left with negative ideas about immunization. Looking for the best for their children they withhold vaccination and give way to resurgence of preventable diseases in our communities. This must be prevented. There is more evidence than expected that vaccination is safe and this can and must be told to parents.

  10. Compensation of thermally induced polarisation distortions in Faraday isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanov, E A

    1999-01-31

    Two new Faraday isolator designs are proposed. They make it possible to compensate partly for the depolarisation of radiation which occurs in magneto-optical elements because of the photoelastic effect caused by heating associated with the absorption of laser radiation. Analytic and numerical comparisons of the new and traditional designs demonstrate a significant (by orders of magnitude) increase in the isolation ratio of the new isolators. The results obtained indicate that it should be possible to construct a Faraday isolator with the isolation ratio of 30 dB for laser radiation with an average power of several kilowatts. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. A comparative study of bovine and ovine Haemophilus somnus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, A C; Jaworski, M D; Eddow, J M; Corbeil, L B

    1995-01-01

    Bacterial isolates (including 17 Haemophilus somnus isolates and an H. somnus-like isolate) from asymptomatic or diseased cattle and sheep, were evaluated for markers associated with virulence and host predilection. The isolates were separated into 6 distinct biovariants, 3 for sheep and 3 for cattle, based on reactions in a battery of 21 test media. Three bovine isolates associated with disease caused hemolysis of bovine blood. The rest of the isolates did not hemolyze either bovine or ovine erythrocytes. Protein profiles of all H. somnus isolates were similar with the exception of the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs). The MOMPs of isolates associated with disease in cattle had a relative molecular weight of approximately 41 kDa compared with 33 kDa for the MOMPs of isolates from asymptomatic cattle. The MOMPs from sheep isolates were either slightly higher or lower than the 41 kDa MOMPs of bovine isolates. Major antigens detected by Western blotting were similar in all isolates except the H. somnus-like isolate. An immunodominant 40 kDa antigen was conserved in all H. somnus isolates. Antibodies to this antigen have previously been found to be protective in cattle and may also be protective for sheep. Marked differences between cattle and sheep isolates were revealed by use of restriction enzyme analysis, which separated the isolates into 12 ribotypes and 15 unique DNA profiles. Thus, cattle and sheep isolates in this collection had distinctive differences in biochemical reactions, MOMP profiles, and DNA analyses. Such differences have potential value for epidemiological studies and may also be used to evaluate host specificity of H. somnus isolates. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:8521348

  12. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  13. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  14. First Draft Genome Sequences of Malaysian Clinical Isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Norazah; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Abd Wahab, Muhammad Adib; Hashim, Rohaidah; Tang, Soo Nee; Liow, Yii Ling; Hamzah, Hazwani; Dahalan, Nurul Ain; Seradja, Valentinus

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Corynebacterium diphtheriae has caused multiple isolated diphtheria cases in Malaysia over the years. Here, we report the first draft genome sequences of 15 Malaysia C. diphtheriae clinical isolates collected from the years 1981 to 2016. PMID:28254972

  15. First Draft Genome Sequences of Malaysian Clinical Isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Norazah; Hii, Shirley Yi Fen; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Abd Wahab, Muhammad Adib; Hashim, Rohaidah; Tang, Soo Nee; Liow, Yii Ling; Hamzah, Hazwani; Dahalan, Nurul Ain; Seradja, Valentinus

    2017-03-02

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae has caused multiple isolated diphtheria cases in Malaysia over the years. Here, we report the first draft genome sequences of 15 Malaysia C. diphtheriae clinical isolates collected from the years 1981 to 2016.

  16. Rare causes of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Gemma; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by loss of bone mass and strength, resulting in increased risk of fractures. It is classically divided into primary (post-menopausal or senile), secondary and idiopathic forms. There are many rare diseases, that cause directly or indirectly osteoporosis. The identification and classification of most of these rare causes of osteoporosis is crucial for the specialists in endocrinology and not, in order to prevent this bone complication and to provide for an early therapy. Several pathogenic mechanisms are involved, including various aspects of bone metabolism such as: decreased bone formation, increased bone resorption, altered calcium, phosphorus and/or vitamin D homeostasis, and abnormal collagen synthesis. In this review, less common forms of primary and secondary osteoporosis are described, specifying, if applicable: genetic causes, epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenic mechanisms causing osteoporosis. A greater awareness of all rare causes of osteoporosis could reduce the number of cases classified as idiopathic osteoporosis and allow the introduction of appropriate and timely treatments. PMID:26604941

  17. Broadband optical isolator based on helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hu; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Based on helical metamaterials, a new broadband optical isolator with a triple-helix structure is proposed in this paper. The right-handed circularly polarized light can transmit through the isolator with its polarization unchanged. The reverse propagating light, which is caused by the reflection of the latter optical devices, is converted into left-handed circularly polarized light that is suppressed by the proposed isolator because of absorption. Our design has some unprecedented advantages such as broad frequency ranges and a compact structure; moreover, neither polarizers nor adscititious magnetic fields are required. Properties of the isolator are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain method, and this phenomenon is studied by the mechanism of helical antenna theory.

  18. In-vacuum Faraday isolation remote tuning.

    PubMed

    Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Antonucci, F; Aoudia, S; Arun, K G; Astone, P; Ballardin, G; Barone, F; Barsuglia, M; Bauer, Th S; Beker, M G; Bigotta, S; Birindelli, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Blom, M; Boccara, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bosi, L; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brillet, A; Brisson; Budzynski, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buskulic, D; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Campagna, E; Canuel, B; Carbognani, F; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cesarini, E; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chincarini, A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Corda, C; Corsi, A; Coulon, J-P; Cuoco, E; D'Antonio, S; Dari, A; Dattilo, V; Davier, M; Day, R; De Rosa, R; del Prete, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Dietz, A; Drago, M; Fafone, V; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J-D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Freise, A; Gammaitoni, L; Garufi, F; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Giazotto, A; Gouaty, R; Granata, M; Greverie, C; Guidi, G M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hild, S; Huet, D; Jaranowski, P; Kowalska, I; Królak, A; La Penna, P; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, T G F; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Losurdo, G; Mackowski, J M; Majorana, E; Man, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Masserot, A; Michel, C; Milano, L; Minenkov, Y; Mohan, M; Moreau, J; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Mosca, S; Moscatelli, V; Mours, B; Neri, I; Nocera, F; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Paoletti, F; Pardi, S; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Persichetti, G; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Poggiani, R; Prato, M; Prodi, G A; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Rabaste, O; Rabeling, D S; Rapagnani, P; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Ricci, F; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Romano, R; Rosińska, D; Ruggi, P; Sassolas, B; Sentenac, D; Sturani, R; Swinkels, B; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Trummer, J; Vajentei, G; van den Brand, J F J; van der Putten, S; Vavoulidis, M; Vedovato, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinet, J-Y; Vocca, H; Was, M; Yvert, M

    2010-09-01

    In-vacuum Faraday isolators (FIs) are used in gravitational wave interferometers to prevent the disturbance caused by light reflected back to the input port from the interferometer itself. The efficiency of the optical isolation is becoming more critical with the increase of laser input power. An in-vacuum FI, used in a gravitational wave experiment (Virgo), has a 20 mm clear aperture and is illuminated by an almost 20 W incoming beam, having a diameter of about 5 mm. When going in vacuum at 10(-6) mbar, a degradation of the isolation exceeding 10 dB was observed. A remotely controlled system using a motorized lambda=2 waveplate inserted between the first polarizer and the Faraday rotator has proven its capability to restore the optical isolation to a value close to the one set up in air.

  19. RHEOLOGY OF EXTRUDED WHEY PROTEIN ISOLATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein isolate (WPI), a high-quality protein used to fortify a number of foods, may be texturized with a twin-screw extruder. Since extrusion of food is commonly performed above 70°C, which causes whey protein to denature, cold extrusion below 70°C was investigated to determine the effects on...

  20. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  1. [Mydocalm causing anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Kwaśniewski, Artur; Korbuszewska-Gontarz, Beata; Mika, Sylwia

    2003-01-01

    The case of anaphylactic shock due to Mydocalm administration is presented. 49-year-old woman suffered from spinal osteoarthritis and she was treated with NSAIDs and Mydocalm for many years. 6 weeks before admission to hospital the first anaphylactic shock was developed with loss of consciousness after oral administration of Mydocalm. Then she was admitted to the hospital in order to diagnose and verify the suspicion whether Mydocalm caused this reaction. Percutaneous test with Mydocalm was performed and it caused anaphylactic shock. Only thirteen cases like this one have been documented in the world literature. It is the first case reported in Poland.

  2. Hybrid isolation of micro vibrations induced by reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-02-01

    As the technology for precision satellite payloads continues to advance, the requirements for the pointing stability of the satellites are becoming extremely high. In many situations, even small amplitude disturbances generated by the onboard components may cause serious degradation in the performance of high precision payloads. In such situations, vibration isolators can be installed to reduce the vibration transmission. In this work, a hybrid vibration isolator comprising passive and active components is proposed to provide an effective solution to the vibration problems caused by the reaction wheel disturbances. Firstly, mathematical modeling and experimental study of a single axis vibration isolator having high damping and high roll-off rate for the high frequency region and active components that enhance isolation performance for narrow frequency bands are presented. This concept is then extended to multi-axis by forming Stewart platform and the performance is experimentally verified. The tests on a flexible testbed show effective vibration isolation by the proposed vibration isolator.

  3. Genetics of isolated auditory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Francisco J; Del Castillo, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Auditory neuropathies are disorders combining absent or abnormal auditory brainstem responses with preserved otoacoustic emissions and/or cochlear microphonics. These features indicate a normal function of cochlear outer hair cells. Thus, the primary lesion might be located in the inner hair cells, in the auditory nerve or in the intervening synapse. Auditory neuropathy is observed in up to 10 percent of deaf infants and children, either as part of some systemic neurodegenerative diseases or as an isolated entity. Research on the genetic causes of isolated auditory neuropathies has been remarkably successful in the last few years. Here we review the current knowledge on the structure, expression and function of the genes and proteins so far known to be involved in these disorders, as well as the clinical features that are associated with mutations in the different genes. This knowledge is permitting to classify isolated auditory neuropathies into etiologically homogeneous types, so providing clues for the better diagnosis, management and therapy of the affected subjects.

  4. Comparison of Virulence Markers of Peritoneal and Fallopian Tube Isolates with Endocervical Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Women with Acute Salpingitis

    PubMed Central

    Draper, D. L.; James, J. F.; Brooks, G. F.; Sweet, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains which cause acute salpingitis are presumed to ascend the genital tract from the cervix. Previous studies utilized isolates obtained from endocervical canal cultures, although it was not known if the isolates truly represented the organisms present in the fallopian tubes. In this study, we compared N. gonorrhoeae isolates from endocervical canal cultures with fallopian tube or peritoneal cul-de-sac isolates or isolates from both sites obtained at laparoscopy. Potential virulence markers were studied, including colony phenotype, auxotype, antimicrobial agent susceptibility, protein patterns on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and susceptibility to normal human serum. Six of seven cervical isolates had the same antibiograms and molecular weight for major outer membrane proteins as those of the corresponding peritoneal isolates. Auxotypes also were the same and included prototrophic, proline-requiring, and proline-and-arginine-requiring isolates. The isolates as a group appeared to be very susceptible to the bactericidal action of pooled serum from normal women. Colony phenotypes varied between sites; the fallopian tubecul-de-sac isolates were predominantly of transparent phenotype and piliated. The cervical isolates were either mixtures of equal quantities of opaque and transparent phenotypes or predominantly opaque phenotype. By these markers, patients' N. gonorrhoeae cervical isolates appeared to be the same as their isolates from fallopian tubes except for a difference or shift in colony phenotype. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6769811

  5. Landslides - Cause and effect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, D. H.; Varnes, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Landslides can cause seismic disturbances; landslides can also result from seismic disturbances, and earthquake-induced slides have caused loss of life in many countries. Slides can cause disastrous flooding, particularly when landslide dams across streams are breached, and flooding may trigger slides. Slope movement in general is a major process of the geologic environment that places constraints on engineering development. In order to understand and foresee both the causes and effects of slope movement, studies must be made on a regional scale, at individual sites, and in the laboratory. Areal studies - some embracing entire countries - have shown that certain geologic conditions on slopes facilitate landsliding; these conditions include intensely sheared rocks; poorly consolidated, fine-grained clastic rocks; hard fractured rocks underlain by less resistant rocks; or loose accumulations of fine-grained surface debris. Field investigations as well as mathematical- and physical-model studies are increasing our understanding of the mechanism of slope movement in fractured rock, and assist in arriving at practical solutions to landslide problems related to all kinds of land development for human use. Progressive failure of slopes has been studied in both soil and rock mechanics. New procedures have been developed to evaluate earthquake response of embankments and slopes. The finite element method of analysis is being extensively used in the calculation of slope stability in rock broken by joints, faults, and other discontinuities. ?? 1976 International Association of Engineering Geology.

  6. What Causes Rainbows?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, John

    2004-01-01

    If one looks at a rain cloud with the Sun behind one's back, the sunlight and water drops may interact just right, revealing the familiar arc of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. Many of people have been pleasantly surprised to see a rainbow in the sky, but probably have not considered why they occur. Rainbows are caused by…

  7. Teacher Dismissal for Cause

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Brad; Schumacher, Gary; Hammonds, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This case presents a discussion of events that led to the dismissal of a teacher for cause. A first year high school principal is confronted with teacher behavior that creates a dangerous situation for students. The decision process to determine the appropriate organizational response involves a number of individuals and systems. The…

  8. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... not yet known. Certain changes in a person’s DNA can cause thyroid cells to become cancerous. DNA is the chemical in each of our cells ... parents because they are the source of our DNA. But DNA affects more than just how we ...

  9. Dandruff: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to certain ingredients in hair care products or hair dyes can cause a red, itchy, scaly scalp. Risk factors Almost anyone can have dandruff, but certain factors can make you ... may play a role. Oily hair and scalp. Malassezia feeds on oils in your ...

  10. Septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae.

    PubMed

    Powell, J M; Bass, J W

    1983-10-01

    Kingella kingae is a slow-growing, fastidious gram-negative coccobacillus that is a normal inhabitant of the oropharynx of man, but it has rarely been implicated as a human pathogen. Two cases of septic arthritis caused by this organism are reported along with a review of seven previously reported cases of infections caused by this organism. Bone and joint infections predominate. Gram's-stained smears of pus from bone or joint fluid aspirate have been negative for organisms, and a delay of growth in cultures with initial difficulty in classification of the isolate is characteristic. Kingella kingae organisms have been uniformly sensitive to the penicillins and all other commonly used antibiotics that were tested. Response to treatment was good in all nine patients found to have infections caused by this organism.

  11. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  12. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  13. Spondylodiscitis Caused by Enterobacter agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    Kothalawala, Mahen; Devakanthan, Balachandran; Arunan, Sinnappoo; Galgamuwa, Dinithi; Rathnayake, Manori

    2016-01-01

    All over the globe, the incidence of vertebral infection is rising. Nowadays, compared to tuberculous variety, pyogenic spondylodiscitis incidence is high. The increase in the susceptible population and improved diagnostics summatively contributed to this. In clinical grounds, differentiation of pyogenic and tuberculous spondylodiscitis is well defined. Enterobacter agglomerans is a hospital contaminant and associated with infections in immunocompromised individuals and intravenous lines. It causes a wide array of infections. Enterobacter agglomerans spondylodiscitis is unusual and there are, around the globe, only less than 31 suspected cases that have been previously reported. Enterobacter agglomerans histology mimics tuberculous rather than pyogenic spondylodiscitis. A 65-year-old farming lady, while being in hospital, developed sudden onset spastic paraparesis with hyperreflexia. Later blood culture revealed Enterobacter agglomerans with 41-hour incubation in 99.9% probability from Ramel identification system. Her initial ESR was 120 mm/first hour. Isolate was susceptible to ciprofloxacin and intravenous followed with oral therapy shows a drastic ESR fall and improved clinical response. Differentiation of tuberculous and pyogenic spondylodiscitis is very much important in management point of view. Therefore, blood culture has a role in diagnosis of spondylodiscitis. ESR can be used as important inflammatory marker in monitoring the response to treatment. Retrospectively, ESR would aid in reaching a definitive diagnosis. PMID:28127480

  14. Sore Throat: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... than two weeks Causes Viruses that cause the common cold and flu (influenza) also cause most sore throats. ... Viral illnesses that cause a sore throat include: Common cold Flu (influenza) Mononucleosis (mono) Measles Chickenpox Croup — a ...

  15. Genomic Characterization of Recent Chicken Anemia Virus Isolates in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicken infectious anemiavirus (CIAV) causes diseases in young chickens, which include increased pathogenicity of secondary infectious agents, generalized lymphoid depletion, and immune-repression. In the present study, we have identified 22 CIAV strains isolated from several commercial chicken farm...

  16. Positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosener, A. A.; Jonkoniec, T. G.

    1975-01-01

    A positive isolation disconnect was developed for component replacement in serviced liquid and gaseous spacecraft systems. Initially a survey of feasible concepts was made to determine the optimum method for fluid isolation, sealing techniques, coupling concepts, and foolproofing techniques. The top concepts were then further evaluated, including the fabrication of a semifunctional model. After all tradeoff analyses were made, a final configuration was designed and fabricated for development testing. This resulted in a 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) line and 12.7 mm (1/2 inch) line positive isolation disconnect, each unit consisting of two coupled disconnect halves, each capable of fluid isolation with essentially zero clearance between them for zero leakage upon disconnect half disengagement. An interlocking foolproofing technique was incorporated that prevents uncoupling of disconnect halves prior to fluid isolation.

  17. Advanced Technology for Isolating Payloads in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.

    1997-01-01

    One presumption of scientific microgravity research is that while in space disturbances are minimized and experiments can be conducted in the absence of gravity. The problem with this assumption is that numerous disturbances actually occur in the space environment. Scientists must consider all disturbances when planning microgravity experiments. Although small disturbances, such as a human sneeze, do not cause most researchers on earth much concern, in space, these minuscule disturbances can be detrimental to the success or failure of an experiment. Therefore, a need exists to isolate experiments and provide a quiescent microgravity environment. The objective of microgravity isolation is to quantify all possible disturbances or vibrations and then attenuate the transmission of the disturbance to the experiment. Some well-defined vibration sources are: experiment operations, pumps, fans, antenna movements, ventilation systems and robotic manipulators. In some cases, it is possible to isolate the source using simple vibration dampers, shock absorbers and other isolation devices. The problem with simple isolation systems is that not all vibration frequencies are attenuated, especially frequencies less than 0.1 Hz. Therefore, some disturbances are actually emitted into the environment. Sometimes vibration sources are not well defined, or cannot be controlled. These include thermal "creak," random acoustic vibrations, aerodynamic drag, crew activities, and other similar disturbances. On some "microgravity missions," such as the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) and the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML) missions, the goal was to create extended quiescent times and limit crew activity during these times. This might be possible for short periods, but for extended durations it is impossible due to the nature of the space environment. On the International Space Station (ISS), vehicle attitude readjustments are required to keep the vehicle in a minimum

  18. Development of vibration isolation platform for low amplitude vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2014-03-01

    The performance of high precision payloads on board a satellite is extremely sensitive to vibration. Although vibration environment of a satellite on orbit is very gentle compared to the launch environment, even a low amplitude vibration disturbances generated by reaction wheel assembly, cryocoolers, etc may cause serious problems in performing tasks such as capturing high resolution images. The most commonly taken approach to protect sensitive payloads from performance degrading vibration is application of vibration isolator. In this paper, development of vibration isolation platform for low amplitude vibration is discussed. Firstly, single axis vibration isolator is developed by adapting three parameter model using bellows and viscous fluid. The isolation performance of the developed single axis isolator is evaluated by measuring force transmissibility. The measured transmissibility shows that both the low Q-factor (about 2) and the high roll-off rate (about -40 dB/dec) are achieved with the developed isolator. Then, six single axis isolators are combined to form Stewart platform in cubic configuration to provide multi-axis vibration isolation. The isolation performance of the developed multi-axis isolator is evaluated using a simple prototype reaction wheel model in which wheel imbalance is the major source of vibration. The transmitted force without vibration isolator is measured and compared with the transmitted force with vibration isolator. More than 20 dB reduction of the X and Y direction (radial direction of flywheel) disturbance is observed for rotating wheel speed of 100 Hz and higher.

  19. Chronic monolateral otomycosis in a dog caused by Aspergillus ochraceus.

    PubMed

    Ghibaudo, Giovanni; Peano, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Aspergillus ochraceus, a widely distributed filamentous fungus, was isolated and identified by cytology and culture as the cause of unilateral ceruminous purulent otitis in a 4-year-old male mixed-breed dog. The pathogenic role of the fungal isolate was confirmed by a good response to antifungal therapy and the absence of other pathogens. No underlying diseases were identified and the dog recovered after 3 weeks of therapy with oral itraconazole and topical miconazole.

  20. Molecular characterization of mycobacteria isolated from seals.

    PubMed

    Zumárraga, M J; Bernardelli, A; Bastida, R; Quse, V; Loureiro, J; Cataldi, A; Bigi, F; Alito, A; Castro Ramos, M; Samper, S; Otal, I; Martin, C; Romano, M I

    1999-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) was diagnosed in 10 seals from three species (Arctocephalus australis, Arctocephalus tropicalis and Otaria flavescens) found in South America. The mycobacteria isolated from these cases belonged to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, as determined by RFLP using an IS6110 probe, spoligotyping, analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and by PCR-restriction analysis of hsp65. Polymorphisms in gyrA, katG, oxyR and pncA were investigated in some of the isolates, as well as the presence of the MPB70 antigen. The insertion sequence IS6110 was present in three to seven copies in the genome of the mycobacteria isolated from seals. Using the IS6110 probe, six patterns (designated A, B, C, D, E and F) were identified from 10 different isolates. Patterns A and B were found for the mycobacteria isolated from two and four seals, respectively, indicating an epidemiological relationship between isolates grouped according to their IS6110 RFLP. The mycobacteria isolated from seals shared the majority of their IS6110 DNA-containing restriction fragments, and nine isolates had an identical spoligotype; only one isolate showed a minor difference in its spoligotype. In addition, none of these spoligotypes were found in other M. tuberculosis complex strains. These results suggest that the isolates from seals constitute a unique group of closely related strains. The mycobacteria isolated from seals showed polymorphisms at gyrA codon 95 and katG codon 463, as do group 1 M. tuberculosis, and M. bovis. Group 1 mycobacteria are associated with cluster cases. The spoligotypes found in the mycobacteria isolated from seals lack spacers 39-43, as does M. bovis, but the MPB70 antigen, which is highly expressed in M. bovis and minimally expressed in M. tuberculosis, was not detected in these mycobacteria. The mycobacteria isolated from seals also showed oxyR and pncA polymorphisms specific to M. tuberculosis. In conclusion, the mycobacteria that cause TB in seals in the South

  1. Atypical causes of cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ken D; Sundaram, Vinay; Ayoub, Walid S

    2014-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease consists of a variety of disorders. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis are the most commonly recognized cholestatic liver disease in the adult population, while biliary atresia and Alagille syndrome are commonly recognized in the pediatric population. In infants, the causes are usually congenital or inherited. Even though jaundice is a hallmark of cholestasis, it is not always seen in adult patients with chronic liver disease. Patients can have “silent” progressive cholestatic liver disease for years prior to development of symptoms such as jaundice and pruritus. In this review, we will discuss some of the atypical causes of cholestatic liver disease such as benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, Alagille Syndrome, biliary atresia, total parenteral nutrition induced cholestasis and cholestasis secondary to drug induced liver injury. PMID:25071336

  2. [Unusual causes of hyperprolactinaemia].

    PubMed

    de Haar-Holleman, Amy; Musson, Ruben E A; Eelkman Rooda, Sebo Jan; Wielders, Jos P M; Demir, Ayse Y

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma is the main cause of hyperprolactinaemia; however, physicians should be aware that the pituitary is not always to blame. There are many other physiological and pathological causes for hyperprolactinaemia, and the contribution of stress, medication and the presence of macroprolactin should not be overlooked. We describe three patients - a 19-year-old female, a 28-year-old female and a 20-year-old male - in whom hyperprolactinaemia was due to medication use, physical stimulation of the nipple and a combination of macroprolactianaemia with a microadenoma, respectively. The first two case reports show that conducting a thorough patient history can prevent unnecessary imaging and laboratory costs. The third case illustrates that macroprolactinaemia and true hyperprolactinaemia may coexist. While early screening for macroprolactinaemia in an asymptomatic patient can save money, finding macroprolactinaemia in a symptomatic patient still warrants further workup.

  3. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  4. Isolated hypomagnesemia in a patient treated with capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Rajapakse, Anoja C

    2013-09-01

    Hypomagnesemia is known to occur for a variety of renal, gastrointestinal and other causes, and is often associated with other electrolyte and metabolic disturbances. We present a case of isolated hypomagnesemia in a patient who had been treated with the chemotherapy agent capecitabine. The approach to diagnosis and treatment is discussed. We postulate that capecitabine may cause isolated hypomagnesemia, possibly due to renal magnesium loss.

  5. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 14 from a human source.

    PubMed Central

    Pastoris, M. C.; Berchicci, C.; Pallonari, G.

    1992-01-01

    A strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 14 was isolated during a retrospective study, after death from the sputum of a patient who had had acute leukaemia and pneumonia. This is the third strain of that serogroup to be isolated from a human source. This event emphasises the importance of performing culture as well as serological tests, so as to detect cases of legionellosis caused by strains which rarely cause fatal clinical illness. PMID:1517467

  6. Particles causing lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.

    1984-04-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. 164 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  7. Isolated adipic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Hasbini, D A; Mikati, M A; Habbal, Z M

    2001-01-01

    Adipic acid can appear, in combination with other dicarboxylic acids, in the urine of patients in a number of underlying metabolic diseases. A child with seizures and mental retardation of unknown etiology who was found to have elevated isolated adipic aciduria on investigation for metabolic diseases is reported. A dietary artifact was suspected, and the adipic aciduria resolved after the child was kept on a specific restricted diet for 3 days. This is the third report of isolated adipic aciduria secondary to food. Findings confirm the previous reports of dietary origin of isolated adipic aciduria and should alert clinicians to such artifact before committing patients to unnecessary treatments.

  8. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1994-01-01

    In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

  9. Isolation of Chlamydomonas Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Craige, Branch; Brown, Jason M.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    A simple, scalable, and fast procedure for the isolation of Chlamydomonas flagella is described. Chlamydomonas can be synchronously deflagellated by treatment with chemicals, pH shock, or mechanical shear. The Basic Protocol describes the procedure for flagellar isolation using dibucaine to induce flagellar abscission; we also describe the pH shock method as an Alternate Protocol when flagellar regeneration is desirable. Sub-fractionation of the isolated flagella into axonemes and the membrane + matrix fraction is described in a Support Protocol. PMID:23728744

  10. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  11. Particles causing lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response, appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. The insidious and probably most important human lung disease due to particles is bronchiolar obstruction and obliteration, producing progressive impairment of air flow. The responsible particle is the complex combination of poorly digestive lipids and complex carbohydrates with active chemicals which we call cigarette smoke. More research is needed to perfect, correct and

  12. A solvent tolerant isolate of Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshu; Singh, Rajni; Khare, S K; Gupta, M N

    2006-01-01

    A solvent tolerant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from soil by cyclohexane enrichment. Presence of cyclohexane (20%) in culture media prolonged the lag phase and caused reduction in biomass. Transmission electron micrographs showed convoluted cell membrane and accumulation of solvent in case of the cells grown in cyclohexane. The Enterobacter isolate was able to grow in the range of organic solvents having log P above 3.2 and also in presence of mercury, thus showing potential for treatment of solvent rich wastes.

  13. Geographically isolated wetlands: Rethinking a misnomer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, David M.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Alexander, Laurie C.; Cohen, Matthew J.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie G.; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Walls, Susan

    2015-01-01

    We explore the category “geographically isolated wetlands” (GIWs; i.e., wetlands completely surrounded by uplands at the local scale) as used in the wetland sciences. As currently used, the GIW category (1) hampers scientific efforts by obscuring important hydrological and ecological differences among multiple wetland functional types, (2) aggregates wetlands in a manner not reflective of regulatory and management information needs, (3) implies wetlands so described are in some way “isolated,” an often incorrect implication, (4) is inconsistent with more broadly used and accepted concepts of “geographic isolation,” and (5) has injected unnecessary confusion into scientific investigations and discussions. Instead, we suggest other wetland classification systems offer more informative alternatives. For example, hydrogeomorphic (HGM) classes based on well-established scientific definitions account for wetland functional diversity thereby facilitating explorations into questions of connectivity without an a priori designation of “isolation.” Additionally, an HGM-type approach could be used in combination with terms reflective of current regulatory or policymaking needs. For those rare cases in which the condition of being surrounded by uplands is the relevant distinguishing characteristic, use of terminology that does not unnecessarily imply isolation (e.g., “upland embedded wetlands”) would help alleviate much confusion caused by the “geographically isolated wetlands” misnomer.

  14. Chorea caused by toxins.

    PubMed

    Miyasaki, Janis M

    2011-01-01

    Chorea is uncommonly caused by toxins. Anecdotal evidence from cases of toxin-induced chorea assists in our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases associated with chorea. Beginning in medieval Europe with ergotism and the "fire that twisted people," spanning to crack dancing in contemporary times and the coexistence of alcohol abuse with chorea, toxins may exert direct effects to enhance mesolimbic dopamine transmission or indirect effects through gamma-aminobutyric acid modulation. The following chapter will discuss toxins associated with chorea and the presumed pathophysiology underlying the movement disorders in these case series.

  15. Iatrogenic causes of infertility.

    PubMed

    Schoysman, R; Segal, L

    1990-01-01

    The Authors review the list of the iatrogenic causes of infertility. In their opinion the more delicate the structure, the more heavy the price paid to clumsy or erroneous investigation. Such eventual incompetence may lead to further damage of the already existing situation. The Authors however look at the future with relative optimism: incidents become rarer, specialists in gynecology and infertility pay more attention to the delicacy of genital structures and there is an encouraging tendency to refer to infertility specialists those cases who need adequate work-up of their condition.

  16. Appendicitis: a rare cause.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Muhammad; Simha, Shruti

    2011-07-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common acute surgical condition in children. Parasitic infestations are ubiquitous on a worldwide basis and are seen in the United States because of increasing international travel and emigration from developing countries. These infestations may produce symptoms of acute appendicitis, although the role of parasitic infestation in relation to appendicitis is controversial. Intestinal parasites may cause significant morbidity and mortality. We report a patient with symptoms of acute appendicitis in whom intramural parasites were found during laparoscopic surgery. Histology of the appendix specimen revealed a normal appendix. The pertinent literature is also reviewed.

  17. Homology and causes.

    PubMed

    Van Valen, L M

    1982-09-01

    Homology is resemblance caused by a continuity of information. In biology it is a unified developmental phenomenon. Homologies among and within individuals intergrade in several ways, so historical homology cannot be separated sharply from repetitive homology. Nevertheless, the consequences of historical and repetitive homologies can be mutually contradictory. A detailed discussion of the rise and fall of the "premolar-analogy" theory of homologies of mammalian molar-tooth cusps exemplifies such a contradiction. All other hypotheses of historical homology which are based on repetitive homology, such as the foliar theory of the flower considered phyletically, are suspect.

  18. Causes of preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Gravett, M G

    1984-10-01

    Although major advances have been made in both obstetric care of the high-risk patient and in neonatal care, prematurity and its consequences remain the major contributor to perinatal mortality. The identification of maternal or obstetric risk factors associated with preterm delivery has enhanced our ability to provide special obstetric care to gravidas at increased risk. The selective management of patients at increased risk for preterm delivery may ultimately reduce the incidence of preterm births. Maternal genital infections are also associated with preterm delivery. Further research is needed to explore the pathogenesis of preterm delivery associated with genital infections, since infections may represent a potentially preventable cause of prematurity.

  19. Base isolation: Fresh insight

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, V.

    1993-07-15

    The objective of the research is a further development of the engineering concept of seismic isolation. Neglecting the transient stage of seismic loading results in a widespread misjudgement: The force of resistance associated with velocity is mostly conceived as a source of damping vibrations, though it is an active force at the same time, during an earthquake type excitation. For very pliant systems such as base isolated structures with relatively low bearing stiffness and with artificially added heavy damping mechanism, the so called `damping`` force may occur even the main pushing force at an earthquake. Thus, one of the two basic pillars of the common seismic isolation philosophy, namely, the doctrine of usefulness and necessity of a strong damping mechanism, is turning out to be a self-deception, sometimes even jeopardizing the safety of structures and discrediting the very idea of seismic isolation. There is a way out: breaking with damping dependancy.

  20. Pharmacological causes of hyperprolactinemia

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Daria La; Falorni, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is a common endocrinological disorder that may be caused by several physiological and pathological conditions. Several drugs may determine a significant increase in prolactin serum concentration that is frequently associated with symptoms. The so-called typical antipsychotics are frequently responsible for drug-related hyperprolactinemia. Risperidone is one of the atypical neuroleptics most likely to induce hyperprolactinemia, while other atypical drugs are unfrequenlty and only transiently associated with increase of prolactin levels. Women are more sensitive than men to the hyperprolactinemic effect of antipsychotics. Classical and risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia may be revert when a gradual antipsychotic drug discontinuation is combined with olanzapine or clozapine initiation. Antidepressant drugs with serotoninergic activity, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO-I) and some tricyclics, can cause hyperprolactinemia. A long list of other compounds may determine an increase in prolactin levels, including prokinetics, opiates, estrogens, anti-androgens, anti-hypertensive drugs, H2-receptor antagonists, anti-convulsivants and cholinomimetics. Finally, hyperprolactinemia has also been documented during conditioning and after autologous blood stem-cell transplantation and during chemotherapy, even though disturbances of prolactin seem to occur less frequently than impairments of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad/thyroid axis after intensive treatment and blood marrow transplantation. PMID:18473017

  1. Occupational Causes of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Kira L.; Newman, Lee S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Sarcoidosis, the multiorgan, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology, remains mysterious. Several important investigations in the past two years add to accumulating evidence for both occupational and environmental causes of granulomatous inflammation. Recent findings This review considers the most recent studies that contribute to the hypothesis that sarcoidosis occurs when individuals are exposed to foreign antigens and to inorganic particulates that promote inflammation. Major recent findings, such as those emerging from the study of World Trade Center responders, the study of nanoparticles, and cases of work-associated sarcoidosis support the probability that occupational, as well as environmental, exposures to inflammatory stimuli trigger sarcoidosis-like illness. Major recent studies of microbially-rich indoor environments, including moldy indoor workplaces and mycobacterially-contaminated settings, contribute to the evidence that a variety of microbial antigens serve as targets for the hypersensitivity immune response in an inflammatory milieu. Summary There is increasing evidence that sarcoidosis can occur in workplace settings in which there is exposure to both foreign antigens and inorganic triggers of inflammation that promote an exuberant granulomatous immune response. It is likely that sarcoidosis has more than one cause. PMID:22314258

  2. Fetal akinesia sequence caused by nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lammens, M; Moerman, P; Fryns, J P; Lemmens, F; van de Kamp, G M; Goemans, N; Dom, R

    1997-04-01

    Nine patients with the characteristic signs of fetal akinesia sequence (polyhydramnion, multiple joint contractures and lung hypoplasia) are described. In 8 of the 9 patients nemaline myopathy could be demonstrated with histology. The ninth patient presented the same phenotype as his 4 affected siblings in whom the nemaline myopathy could be histologically proven. Seven of the patients belonged to 2 families; the other 2 patients were isolated cases. In one fetal case nemaline myopathy was documented at week 22 of gestation. These observations demonstrate that nemaline myopathy can cause the fetal akinesia sequence, with onset of first symptoms as early as the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy.

  3. Intestinal myiasis caused by Muscina stabulans.

    PubMed

    Shivekar, S; Senthil, K; Srinivasan, R; Sureshbabu, L; Chand, P; Shanmugam, J; Gopal, R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal maggots were isolated from a patient, who had reported to the Department of General Medicine of Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Puducherry, in southern India with complaints of abdominal distress, bloating of abdomen and intestinal hurry following a meal. He was diagnosed as a case of intestinal myiasis. Maggots obtained from his stool were identified to be Muscina stabulans based on characteristic patterns of posterior spiracles. He was treated with purgatives and albendazole. This intestinal myiasis case caused by M. stabulans is reported here because of its rare occurrence and the need to establish a correct diagnosis.

  4. Pituitary gigantism: Causes and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism are very rare conditions resulting from excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary gigantism occurs when GH excess overlaps with the period of rapid linear growth during childhood and adolescence. Until recently, its etiology and clinical characteristics have been poorly understood. Genetic and genomic causes have been identified in recent years that explain about half of cases of pituitary gigantism. We describe these recent discoveries and focus on some important settings in which gigantism can occur, including familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and the newly described X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome.

  5. Isolated sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Neena S; Parkar, Shubhangi R; Tambe, Ravindra

    2005-10-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a cardinal symptom of narcolepsy. However, little is available in the literature about isolated sleep paralysis. This report discusses the case of a patient with isolated sleep paralysis who progressed from mild to severe SP over 8 years. He also restarted drinking alcohol to be able to fall asleep and allay his anxiety symptoms. The patient was taught relaxation techniques and he showed complete remission of the symptoms of SP on follow up after 8 months.

  6. Allovahlkampfia spelaea Causing Keratitis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tolba, Mohammed Essa Marghany; Huseein, Enas Abdelhameed Mahmoud; Farrag, Haiam Mohamed Mahmoud; Mohamed, Hanan El Deek; Kobayashi, Seiki; Suzuki, Jun; Ali, Tarek Ahmed Mohamed; Sugano, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    Background Free-living amoebae are present worldwide. They can survive in different environment causing human diseases in some instances. Acanthamoeba sp. is known for causing sight-threatening keratitis in humans. Free-living amoeba keratitis is more common in developing countries. Amoebae of family Vahlkampfiidae are rarely reported to cause such affections. A new genus, Allovahlkampfia spelaea was recently identified from caves with no data about pathogenicity in humans. We tried to identify the causative free-living amoeba in a case of keratitis in an Egyptian patient using morphological and molecular techniques. Methods Pathogenic amoebae were culture using monoxenic culture system. Identification through morphological features and 18S ribosomal RNA subunit DNA amplification and sequencing was done. Pathogenicity to laboratory rabbits and ability to produce keratitis were assessed experimentally. Results Allovahlkampfia spelaea was identified as a cause of human keratitis. Whole sequence of 18S ribosomal subunit DNA was sequenced and assembled. The Egyptian strain was closely related to SK1 strain isolated in Slovenia. The ability to induce keratitis was confirmed using animal model. Conclusions This the first time to report Allovahlkampfia spelaea as a human pathogen. Combining both molecular and morphological identification is critical to correctly diagnose amoebae causing keratitis in humans. Use of different pairs of primers and sequencing amplified DNA is needed to prevent misdiagnosis. PMID:27415799

  7. Comparative Studies of Delignification Caused by Ganoderma Species †

    PubMed Central

    Adaskaveg, J. E.; Gilbertson, R. L.; Blanchette, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    Isolates of six species of Ganoderma in the G. lucidum complex were evaluated for their ability to decay wood of Quercus hypoleucoides A. Camus and Abies concolor (Gord. and Glend.) Lindl. ex. Hildebr. by using in vitro agar block decay tests. Morphological, ultrastructural, and chemical studies of decayed wood were used to determine the extent of delignification or simultaneous decay caused by each species of Ganoderma. All species decayed both white fir and oak wood; however, less percent weight loss (%WL) occurred in white fir than oak. In white fir, isolates of two undescribed Ganoderma species (RLG16161, RLG16162, JEA615, and JEA625) caused significantly higher%WL (21 to 26%) than that in G. colossum, G. oregonense, G. meredithiae, and G. zonatum (10 to 16%). Only Ganoderma sp. isolates JEA615 and JEA625 caused delignification, with JEA615 causing a lignin-to-glucose gram loss ratio of 1.6:1. Morphological and ultrastructural studies confirmed delignification by this fungus and showed that some delignification had occurred by all of the species, although areas of delignification were limited to small regions adjacent to simultaneously decayed cells. In oak, G. colossum caused significantly less%WL (22 to 35%) than the other species (38 to 52%). All of the species, except G. meredithiae, caused delignification with lignin-to-glucose gram loss ratios ranging from 1.4 to 4.9:1. Extensive delignification by isolates of G. colossum and G. oregonense was observed; moderate delignification was caused by the other species. Ganoderma meredithiae caused a simultaneous decay, with only small localized regions of cells delignified, while delignification by G. zonatum was irregular, with specific zones within the cell wall delignified. The thermophilic and chlamydosporic G. colossum has the capacity to cause extensive delignification and appears ideally suited for use in lignin degradation studies and biotechnological applications of lignin-degrading fungi. Images PMID

  8. Comparative studies of delignification caused by ganoderma species.

    PubMed

    Adaskaveg, J E; Gilbertson, R L; Blanchette, R A

    1990-06-01

    Isolates of six species of Ganoderma in the G. lucidum complex were evaluated for their ability to decay wood of Quercus hypoleucoides A. Camus and Abies concolor (Gord. and Glend.) Lindl. ex. Hildebr. by using in vitro agar block decay tests. Morphological, ultrastructural, and chemical studies of decayed wood were used to determine the extent of delignification or simultaneous decay caused by each species of Ganoderma. All species decayed both white fir and oak wood; however, less percent weight loss (%WL) occurred in white fir than oak. In white fir, isolates of two undescribed Ganoderma species (RLG16161, RLG16162, JEA615, and JEA625) caused significantly higher%WL (21 to 26%) than that in G. colossum, G. oregonense, G. meredithiae, and G. zonatum (10 to 16%). Only Ganoderma sp. isolates JEA615 and JEA625 caused delignification, with JEA615 causing a lignin-to-glucose gram loss ratio of 1.6:1. Morphological and ultrastructural studies confirmed delignification by this fungus and showed that some delignification had occurred by all of the species, although areas of delignification were limited to small regions adjacent to simultaneously decayed cells. In oak, G. colossum caused significantly less%WL (22 to 35%) than the other species (38 to 52%). All of the species, except G. meredithiae, caused delignification with lignin-to-glucose gram loss ratios ranging from 1.4 to 4.9:1. Extensive delignification by isolates of G. colossum and G. oregonense was observed; moderate delignification was caused by the other species. Ganoderma meredithiae caused a simultaneous decay, with only small localized regions of cells delignified, while delignification by G. zonatum was irregular, with specific zones within the cell wall delignified. The thermophilic and chlamydosporic G. colossum has the capacity to cause extensive delignification and appears ideally suited for use in lignin degradation studies and biotechnological applications of lignin-degrading fungi.

  9. Causes of obesity.

    PubMed

    Wright, Suzanne M; Aronne, Louis J

    2012-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been rising steadily over the last several decades and is currently at unprecedented levels: more than 68% of US adults are considered overweight, and 35% are obese (Flegal et al., JAMA 303:235-241, 2010). This increase has occurred across every age, sex, race, and smoking status, and data indicate that segments of individuals in the highest weight categories (i.e., BMI > 40 kg/m(2)) have increased proportionately more than those in lower BMI categories (BMI < 35 kg/m(2)). The dramatic rise in obesity has also occurred in many other countries, and the causes of this increase are not fully understood (Hill and Melanson, Med Sci Sports Exerc 31:S515-S521, 1999).

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Isolate Staphylococcus aureus LHSKBClinical, Isolated from an Infected Hip

    PubMed Central

    Stipetic, Laurence H.; Hamilton, Graham; Dalby, Matthew J.; Davies, Robert L.; Meek, R. M. Dominic; Ramage, Gordon; Smith, David G. E.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus from an orthopedic infection. Phenotypically diverse Staphylococcus aureus strains are associated with orthopedic infections and subsequent implant failure, and some are highly resistant to antibiotics. This genome sequence will support further analyses of strains causing orthopedic infections. PMID:25931597

  11. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Sometimes doctors can find out what is causing pulmonary fibrosis (lung scarring). For example, exposure to environmental pollutants ...

  12. Fish Tank Granuloma Caused by Mycobacterium marinum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting-Shu; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Chang, Pi-Yueh; Su, Lin-Hui; Kuo, An-Jing; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Lu, Chia-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mycobacterium marinum causes skin and soft tissue, bone and joint, and rare disseminated infections. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between treatment outcome and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. A total of 27 patients with M. marinum infections were enrolled. Methods Data on clinical characteristics and therapeutic methods were collected and analyzed. We also determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 7 antibiotics against 30 isolates from these patients. Results Twenty-seven patients received antimycobacterial agents with or without surgical debridement. Eighteen patients were cured, 8 failed to respond to treatment, and one was lost to follow-up. The duration of clarithromycin (147 vs. 28; p = 0.0297), and rifampicin (201 vs. 91; p = 0.0266) treatment in the cured patients was longer than that in the others. Surgical debridement was performed in 10 out of the 18 cured patients, and in 1 of another group (p = 0.0417). All the 30 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin, amikacin, and linezolid; 29 (96.7%) were susceptible to ethambutol; 28 (93.3%) were susceptible to sulfamethoxazole; and 26 (86.7%) were susceptible to rifampicin. However, only 1 (3.3%) isolate was susceptible to doxycycline. Discussion Early diagnosis of the infection and appropriate antimicrobial therapy with surgical debridement are the mainstays of successful treatment. Clarithromycin and rifampin are supposed to be more effective agents. PMID:22911774

  13. Flywheel vibration isolation test using a variable-damping isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyun-Ung; Taniwaki, Shigemune; Kinjyo, Naofumi; Izawa, Katsuhiko

    2006-04-01

    This study demonstrates the isolation performance of a variable-damping isolator using a bio-metal fiber (BMF) valve to enhance the pointing performance of observation satellites by isolating disturbances induced by reaction wheel assemblies. Vibration isolation tests of the variable-damping isolator were performed using an air-floating wheel disturbance detector to investigate whether the isolator can actually isolate flywheel vibration. In this paper, we first present a recently developed variable-damping isolator with low power consumption, and a reaction wheel disturbance detector, fabricated in a previous study, which detects low-frequency disturbances. Next, we describe the effectiveness of the variable-damping isolator based on flywheel vibration isolation test results.

  14. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  15. Isolation of Plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Christine; Bayer, Emmanuelle M F

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are plasma membrane lined pores that cross the plant cell wall and connect adjacent cells. Plasmodesmata are composed of elements of the endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, cytosol, and cell wall and thus, as multicomposite structures that are embedded in the cell wall, they are notoriously difficult to isolate from whole plant tissue. However, understanding PD structure, function, and regulation necessitates identification of their molecular components and therefore proteomic and lipidomic analyses of PD fractions are an essential strategy for plasmodesmal biology. Here we outline a simple two-step purification procedure that allows isolation of PD-derived membranes from Arabidopsis suspension cells. The method involves isolation of purified cell wall fragments containing intact PD which is followed by enzymatic degradation of the cell wall to release the PD. This membrane-rich fraction can be subjected to protein and lipid extraction for molecular characterization of PD components. The first step of this procedure involves the isolation of cell wall fragments containing intact PD, free from contamination from other cellular compartments. Purified PD membranes are then released from the cell wall matrix by enzymatic degradation. Isolated PD membranes provide a suitable starting material for the analysis of PD-associated proteins and lipids.

  16. Infectious causes of equine respiratory disease on Ontario standardbred racetracks.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Thorsen, J; Barnum, D A; Mitchell, W R; Ingram, D G

    1977-01-01

    Upper respiratory disease has been a serious problem in Standardbred horses on racetracks in Ontario, with outbreaks occurring once or twice annually in late winter and early spring seasons. To determine the causes of these epidemics, a 3-year investigation was carried out in which nasal swabs and serum samples were obtained at intervals from apparently healthy horses and from horses suffering from upper respiratory disease. The nasal swabs were used to isolate bacteria and viruses. The serum samples were examined for the presence and level of antibodies to equine influenza viruses and equine herpesvirus 1. None of the bacteria isolated were associated with the outbreaks of disease. Equine herpesvirus 2 was isolated 72 times from both diseased and apparently healthy horses. Equine herpesvirus 1 was isolated 10 times from horses with respiratory disease, both during and between epidemics. Influenza equine/1 virus was isolated seven times and influenza equine/2 was isolated once during severe outbreaks of upper respiratory disease. Serological evidence confirmed that influenza viruses were the causes of the major epidemics, with the equine/1 strain being involved most often. PMID:192757

  17. The causes of epistasis.

    PubMed

    de Visser, J Arjan G M; Cooper, Tim F; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-12-22

    Since Bateson's discovery that genes can suppress the phenotypic effects of other genes, gene interactions-called epistasis-have been the topic of a vast research effort. Systems and developmental biologists study epistasis to understand the genotype-phenotype map, whereas evolutionary biologists recognize the fundamental importance of epistasis for evolution. Depending on its form, epistasis may lead to divergence and speciation, provide evolutionary benefits to sex and affect the robustness and evolvability of organisms. That epistasis can itself be shaped by evolution has only recently been realized. Here, we review the empirical pattern of epistasis, and some of the factors that may affect the form and extent of epistasis. Based on their divergent consequences, we distinguish between interactions with or without mean effect, and those affecting the magnitude of fitness effects or their sign. Empirical work has begun to quantify epistasis in multiple dimensions in the context of metabolic and fitness landscape models. We discuss possible proximate causes (such as protein function and metabolic networks) and ultimate factors (including mutation, recombination, and the importance of natural selection and genetic drift). We conclude that, in general, pleiotropy is an important prerequisite for epistasis, and that epistasis may evolve as an adaptive or intrinsic consequence of changes in genetic robustness and evolvability.

  18. [Ergotism caused by automedication].

    PubMed

    Enríquez, E; Rangel, A; Velasco, C E; Basave, M N; López-Rodríguez, R

    2000-01-01

    The authors report 7 cases of gangrenous ergotism (six women and one man) secondary to an overdose of ergotamine ingested in order to relieve migraine crisis. In all cases, patients presented symptoms and signs of severe arterial constriction confirmed by echography and angiography. Hallucinations were absent. Ergotamine ingestion was discontinued and treatment was based on vasodilators and sympathectomy. After treatment, all seven patients showed clinical improvement with disappearance of the vasospastic symptoms and signs, and an increase in the plethysmographic index of blood perfusion, measured by Doppler echography. These changes were observed even in a patient who lost two toes of the right foot. Although, none of the patients presented hallucinations, the authors made reference to the historical first use of the ergot in magic and religious rites that took place in Eleusis, at the time of classic Greece, as well as the more recent mystic use of ergot in Salem, New England, in 1692. Migraine is indeed a serious disease, frequently causing despair to the patient, who attempts to alleviate the migraneous crisis with an overdose of ergotamine. Accordingly, physicians must be aware of prophylactic vasodilating drugs, reducing the risk of ergotism.

  19. Low-loss, high-isolation, fiber-optic isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, George F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A low-loss, high-isolation, fiber-optic isolator for use in single-mode fiber systems utilizes a Faraday rotator and two polarizers, one at each end angularly oriented from each other at the angle of rotation for isolation, and two aspheric lens connectors to couple optical fibers to the Faraday isolator to reduce forward loss to about 2.5 dB and improve isolation to greater than 70 dB.

  20. Strain isolated ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolokan, R. P.; Brady, J. B.; Jarrabet, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are used in gas turbine engines to improve component temperature capability and cooling air efficiency. A compliant metal fiber strain isolator between a plasma sprayed ceramic coating and a metal substrate improves ceramic durability while allowing thicker coatings for better insulation. Development of strain isolated coatings has concentrated on design and fabrication of coatings and coating evaluation via thermal shock testing. In thermal shock testing, five types of failure are possible: buckling failure im compression on heat up, bimetal type failure, isothermal expansion mismatch failure, mudflat cracking during cool down, and long term fatigue. A primary failure mode for thermally cycled coatings is designated bimetal type failure. Bimetal failure is tensile failure in the ceramic near the ceramic-metal interface. One of the significant benefits of the strain isolator is an insulating layer protecting the metal substrate from heat deformation and thereby preventing bimetal type failure.

  1. Nucleic acid isolation process

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lewis, Annette K.; Hildebrand, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduce the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without affect on the protocol.

  2. Nucleic acid isolation

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, J.L.; Lewis, A.K.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1988-01-21

    A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduces the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without effect on the protocol.

  3. Isolated ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Okçün Baniş; Tekin, Abdullah; Oz, Büge; Küçükoğlu, M Serdar

    2004-04-01

    Isolated ventricular noncompaction of myocardium is a rare congenital disease due to an arrest of myocardial morphogenesis during foetal development. It is characterized by a thin compacted epicardial and an extremely thickened endocardial layer with prominent trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses. The persistence of myocardial noncompaction is usually an associated anomaly in patients with congenital left or right ventricular outflow tract obstruction. However, isolated noncompaction of myocardium is not associated with any factors that would explain it apart from the foetal arrest of compaction of the ventricular myocardium. The disease results in systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction, systemic embolism and ventricular arrhythmias. We describe a case of isolated noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium in a 20-year-old man who presented initially with ventricular tachycardia.

  4. Isolated giant molluscum contagiosum mimicking epidermoid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Uzuncakmak, Tugba K.; Kuru, Burce C.; Zemheri, Ebru I.; Zindanci, Ilkin; Turkoglu, Zafer; Kavala, Mukaddes

    2016-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a benign cutaneous viral infection which is caused by double- stranded DNA poxvirus. It affects mainly children and young adults and usually presents with single or multiple umblicated papules or nodules on face, arms, legs and anogenital regions. It may present in atypical size and clinical appearance in patients with altered or impaired immunity and rarely in immuncompetent patients. Herein we present an immuncompetent young adult patient with isolated giant molluscum contagiosum, which was mimicking epidermoid cyst clinically. PMID:27648389

  5. Staphylococcus capitis isolated from prosthetic joint infections.

    PubMed

    Tevell, S; Hellmark, B; Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Å; Söderquist, B

    2017-01-01

    Further knowledge about the clinical and microbiological characteristics of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) caused by different coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) may facilitate interpretation of microbiological findings and improve treatment algorithms. Staphylococcus capitis is a CoNS with documented potential for both human disease and nosocomial spread. As data on orthopaedic infections are scarce, our aim was to describe the clinical and microbiological characteristics of PJIs caused by S. capitis. This retrospective cohort study included three centres and 21 patients with significant growth of S. capitis during revision surgery for PJI between 2005 and 2014. Clinical data were extracted and further microbiological characterisation of the S. capitis isolates was performed. Multidrug-resistant (≥3 antibiotic groups) S. capitis was detected in 28.6 % of isolates, methicillin resistance in 38.1 % and fluoroquinolone resistance in 14.3 %; no isolates were rifampin-resistant. Heterogeneous glycopeptide-intermediate resistance was detected in 38.1 %. Biofilm-forming ability was common. All episodes were either early post-interventional or chronic, and there were no haematogenous infections. Ten patients experienced monomicrobial infections. Among patients available for evaluation, 86 % of chronic infections and 70 % of early post-interventional infections achieved clinical cure; 90 % of monomicrobial infections remained infection-free. Genetic fingerprinting with repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR; DiversiLab®) displayed clustering of isolates, suggesting that nosocomial spread might be present. Staphylococcus capitis has the potential to cause PJIs, with infection most likely being contracted during surgery or in the early postoperative period. As S. capitis might be an emerging nosocomial pathogen, surveillance of the prevalence of PJIs caused by S. capitis could be recommended.

  6. Genetic characterization of Shigella flexneri isolates in Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Shijun; Sun, Qiangzheng; Wei, Xiaoyu; Klena, John D; Wang, Jianping; Liu, Ying; Tian, Kecheng; Luo, Xia; Ye, Changyun; Xu, Jianguo; Wang, Dingming; Tang, Guangpeng

    2015-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is one of the major etiologic causes of shigellosis in Guizhou Province, China. However, the genetic characteristics of circulating isolates are unknown. Phenotypic and molecular profiles of 60 S. flexneri isolates recovered in Guizhou between 1972 to 1982 and 2008 to 2010 were determined. Nine serotypes (1a, 2a, 3a, 1b, 2b, X, Y, 4av and Yv) were identified. Multi-locus sequence typing differentiated the isolates into 20 sequence types (STs); 18 were novel. Four STs, ST 129, ST 100, ST 126 and ST 18, were most abundant, accounting for 65% of the isolates. Thirty-nine NotI-pulsed field gel electrophoresis patterns (pulsotypes, PTs) were observed; eight PTs were represented by more than one isolate with six isolates sharing the PT 13 profile. Multi-locus variable-nucleotide tandem-repeat analysis recognized 44 different types (MTs); seven MTs were represented by more than one isolate and MT 1 was most commonly encountered. Correlation between genetic relationships and serotypes was observed among the isolates studied; the majority of isolates belonging to the same serotype from different years clustered together based on the molecular data. These clustered isolates were also from similar geographical origins. These results enhance our understanding of genetic relationships between S. flexneri in Guizhou Province and can be used to help understand the changing etiology of shigellosis in China.

  7. Isolated index finger palsy due to cortical infarction.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yuichi; Miyaji, Yosuke; Joki, Hideto; Seki, Syunsuke; Mori, Kentaro; Kamide, Tomoya; Tamase, Akira; Nomura, Motohiro; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    The case of an 86-year-old man presenting with isolated left index finger palsy caused by infarction on the lateral side of the right precentral knob is presented. Embolization from aortic atheroma was considered the cause of infarction. Cases with selective palsy of a particular group of fingers without sensory deficits due to cortical infarction of the precentral knob have been reported by several authors, and predominant weakness of radial-side fingers is known to be usually caused by laterally located infarction of the precentral knob. Among the previous reports, only 1 case involved isolated index finger palsy by an atypical, medially located infarction of the precentral knob in association with a concurrent nonrelated lesion. This is the first reported isolated index finger palsy caused by a single lateral precentral knob infarction.

  8. Legionella spp. isolation and quantification from greywater.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Blanky, Marina; Friedler, Eran; Halpern, Malka

    2015-01-01

    Legionella, an opportunistic human pathogen whose natural environment is water, is transmitted to humans through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Legionella has been isolated from a high diversity of water types. Due its importance as a pathogen, two ISO protocols have been developed for its monitoring. However, these two protocols are not suitable for analyzing Legionella in greywater (GW). GW is domestic wastewater excluding the inputs from toilets and kitchen. It can serve as an alternative water source, mainly for toilet flushing and garden irrigation; both producing aerosols that can cause a risk for Legionella infection. Hence, before reuse, GW has to be treated and its quality needs to be monitored. The difficulty of Legionella isolation from GW strives in the very high load of contaminant bacteria. Here we describe a modification of the ISO protocol 11731:1998 that enables the isolation and quantification of Legionella from GW samples. The following modifications were made:•To enable isolation of Legionella from greywater, a pre-filtration step that removes coarse matter is recommended.•Legionella can be isolated after a combined acid-thermic treatment that eliminates the high load of contaminant bacteria in the sample.

  9. Legionella spp. isolation and quantification from greywater

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Blanky, Marina; Friedler, Eran; Halpern, Malka

    2015-01-01

    Legionella, an opportunistic human pathogen whose natural environment is water, is transmitted to humans through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Legionella has been isolated from a high diversity of water types. Due its importance as a pathogen, two ISO protocols have been developed for its monitoring. However, these two protocols are not suitable for analyzing Legionella in greywater (GW). GW is domestic wastewater excluding the inputs from toilets and kitchen. It can serve as an alternative water source, mainly for toilet flushing and garden irrigation; both producing aerosols that can cause a risk for Legionella infection. Hence, before reuse, GW has to be treated and its quality needs to be monitored. The difficulty of Legionella isolation from GW strives in the very high load of contaminant bacteria. Here we describe a modification of the ISO protocol 11731:1998 that enables the isolation and quantification of Legionella from GW samples. The following modifications were made:•To enable isolation of Legionella from greywater, a pre-filtration step that removes coarse matter is recommended.•Legionella can be isolated after a combined acid-thermic treatment that eliminates the high load of contaminant bacteria in the sample. PMID:26740925

  10. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1993-01-01

    Erroneous measurements in multisensor navigation systems must be detected and isolated. A recursive estimator can find fast growing errors; a least squares batch estimator can find slow growing errors. This process is called fault detection. A protection radius can be calculated as a function of time for a given location. This protection radius can be used to guarantee the integrity of the navigation data. Fault isolation can be accomplished using either a snapshot method or by examining the history of the fault detection statistics.

  11. [Isolated anterior cervical hypertrichosis].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, B; Cabanillas, M; de las Heras, C; Cacharrón, J M

    2009-01-01

    Anterior cervical hypertrichosis was described by Trattner and coworkers in 1991. It consists of a of hair at the anterior cervical level just above the laryngeal prominence. To date, only 28 cases of anterior cervical hypertrichosis have been reported. Although it is normally an isolated finding, it may be associated with mental retardation, hallux valgus, retinal disorders, other hair disorders, facial dysmorphism, or sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy. We report the case of a 27-year-old woman who presented with this condition as an isolated finding.

  12. Bacteremia Caused by Comamonas kerstersii in a Patient with Diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Opota, Onya; Ney, Barbara; Zanetti, Giorgio; Jaton, Katia; Prod'hom, Guy

    2014-01-01

    We report for the first time a case of bacteremia caused by Comamonas kerstersii in a 65-year-old patient with sign of diverticulosis. In addition, we review the isolation of Comamonas sp. and related organisms in our hospital over 25 years. PMID:24371242

  13. Tuberculosis in Alpacas (Lama pacos) Caused by Mycobacterium bovis▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Bocanegra, I.; Barranco, I.; Rodríguez-Gómez, I. M.; Pérez, B.; Gómez-Laguna, J.; Rodríguez, S.; Ruiz-Villamayor, E.; Perea, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report three cases of tuberculosis in alpacas from Spain caused by Mycobacterium bovis. The animals revealed two different lesional patterns. Mycobacterial culture and PCR assay yielded positive results for M. bovis. Molecular typing of the isolates identified spoligotype SB0295 and identical variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) allele sizes. PMID:20237097

  14. Caseous lymphadenitis caused by Corynebacterium ulcerans in the dromedary camel.

    PubMed Central

    Tejedor, M T; Martin, J L; Lupiola, P; Gutierrez, C

    2000-01-01

    Caseous lymphadenitis that affected the dorsal and ventral superficial lymph nodes in the left cervicothoracic region of a young dromedary camel is described. The agent isolated was Corynebacterium ulcerans. To our knowledge, this is the first description of purulent lymphadenitis caused by C. ulcerans in a species belonging to the Camelidae. Images p127-a PMID:10723599

  15. Causes for "ghost" manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borok, S.; Goldfarb, I.; Gol'dshtein, V.

    2009-05-01

    ;71:359-82; Flockerzi D. Tutorial: intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds and slow attractors. Magdeburg: Max-Planck-Institut; 2001-2005. ; Flockerzi D, Heineken W. Comment on "Identification of low order manifolds: validating the algorithm of Maas and Pope". Chaos 1999;9:108-23; Flockerzi D, Heineken W. Comment on "Identification of low order manifolds: validating the algorithm of Maas and Pope". Chaos 2006;16:048101]. The present work studies the causes for the "ghost" manifolds appearance for the case of a two-dimensional singularly perturbed system.

  16. Absence of trichothecenes in toxigenic isolates of Fusarium moniliforme.

    PubMed Central

    Mirocha, C J; Abbas, H K; Vesonder, R F

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-four isolates of Fusarium moniliforme were obtained from cereal grains collected in various parts of the world. The isolates were grown on rice and tested as a diet for toxicity to rats. Of these isolates, 53% caused death, 12% caused congestion and hemorrhage of the stomach and intestine as well as hematuria, 21% caused diarrhea, 38% caused weight loss, and 9% were nontoxic. The cultures were tested to T-2, HT-2, neosolaniol, acetyl-T-2, T-2-tetraol, iso-T-2, diacetoxyscirpenol, monoacetoxyscirpenol, deoxynivalenol, nivalenol, fusarenone-X, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, zearalenone, moniliformin, fusarochromanone, fusarin-C, and wortmannin; all were negative. In addition, F. moniliforme NRRL A25820 was grown on corn and banana fruit as solid substrates as well as on a defined liquid medium; none of the above toxins were found. When F. moniliforme NRRL A25820 was incorporated into a rat diet, no toxicity was noted. Twenty-eight additional isolates of F. moniliforme, isolated from feed associated with equine leukoencephalomalacia, were grown on cracked corn for 2 weeks. The cultures were negative when tested for deoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, diacetoxyscirpenol, monoacetoxyscirpenol, nivalenol, and fusarenone X. Seventy-five percent of the isolates were toxic to ducklings, indicating the presence of a toxin other than trichothecenes. Our results support the conclusion that F. moniliforme does not produce trichothecenes. PMID:2306091

  17. Fatal sepsis caused by an unusual Klebsiella species that was misidentified by an automated identification system.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masafumi; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Shota; Akeda, Yukihiro; Yoshii, Tadashi; Miyaguchi, Shinichi; Inohara, Hidenori; Horii, Toshihiro; Oishi, Kazunori; Iida, Tetsuya; Tomono, Kazunori

    2013-05-01

    This is a description of fatal sepsis caused by infection with Klebsiella variicola, which is an isolate genetically related to Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient's condition was incorrectly diagnosed as common sepsis caused by K. pneumoniae, which was identified using an automated identification system, but next-generation sequencing and the non-fermentation of adonitol finally identified the cause of sepsis as K. variicola.

  18. Isolation of Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Nabbi, Arash; Riabowol, Karl

    2015-08-03

    The isolation of nuclei is often the first step in studying processes such as nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, subcellular localization of proteins, and protein-chromatin or nuclear protein-protein interactions in response to diverse stimuli. Therefore, rapidly obtaining nuclei from cells with relatively high purity and minimal subcellular contamination, protein degradation, or postharvesting modification is highly desirable. Historically, the isolation of nuclei involved a homogenization step followed by centrifugation through high-density glycerol or sucrose. Although clean nuclei with little cytoplasmic contamination can be prepared using this method, it is typically time consuming and can allow protein degradation, protein modification, and leaching of components from the nuclei to occur. We have developed a rapid and simple fractionation method that is based on the selective dissolution of the cytoplasmic membrane (but not the nuclear membrane) using a low concentration of a nonionic detergent and rapid centrifugation steps. Here we describe important considerations when isolating nuclei from cells, introduce our rapid method, and compare this method to a more traditional protocol for isolating nuclei, noting the strengths and limitations of each approach.

  19. Broadband Faraday isolator.

    PubMed

    Berent, Michał; Rangelov, Andon A; Vitanov, Nikolay V

    2013-01-01

    Driving on an analogy with the technique of composite pulses in quantum physics, we theoretically propose a broadband Faraday rotator and thus a broadband optical isolator, which is composed of sequences of ordinary Faraday rotators and achromatic quarter-wave plates rotated at the predetermined angles.

  20. Biological Isolation Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A spinoff of astronaut's biological garment will allow hospital patients who are highly vulnerable to infection to leave their sterile habitats for several hours, carrying their germ free environment with them. Garments can be used in any of some 200 hospitals where isolation rooms are installed to treat leukemia.

  1. Biological isolation garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spross, F. R.

    1968-01-01

    Biological Isolation Garment /BIG/ is a one-piece loose fitting garment fabricated from a tightly woven, permeable, 100 percent-cotton fabric. Its headpiece, incorporates an integral oronsal respirator with 0.3-micron-particle filters, and a full width visor. All fabrication seams are sealed on the inside of the garment.

  2. Phylogenetic grouping, epidemiological typing, analysis of virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy broilers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to investigate the possible etiology of avian colibacillosis by examining Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers. Findings Seventy-eight E. coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers in Japan were subjected to analysis of phylogenetic background, virulence-associated gene profiling, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and antimicrobial resistance profiling. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 35 of the 78 isolates belonged to group A, 28 to group B1, one to group B2, and 14 to group D. Virulence-associated genes iutA, iss, cvaC, tsh, iroN, ompT, and hlyF were found in 23 isolates (29.5%), 16 isolates (20.5%), nine isolates (11.5%), five isolates (6.4%), 19 isolates (24.4%), 23 isolates (29.5%), and 22 isolates (28.2%) respectively. Although the genetic diversity of group D isolates was revealed by MLST, the group D isolates harbored iutA (10 isolates, 71.4%), iss (6 isolates, 42.9%), cvaC (5 isolates, 35.7%), tsh (3 isolates, 21.4%), hlyF (9 isolates, 64.3%), iroN (7 isolates, 50.0%), and ompT (9 isolates, 64.3%). Conclusions Our results indicated that E. coli isolates inhabiting the intestines of healthy broilers pose a potential risk of causing avian colibacillosis. PMID:25061511

  3. Characterization of Bacteroides forsythus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, T; Kurihara, H; Dahlen, G

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen Bacteroides forsythus strains freshly isolated from patients with periodontitis were used together with three collection strains and one type strain for characterization of growth on various media; determination of enzymatic profiles, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, 16S rRNA ribotypes, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) outer membrane protein profiles, and pathogenicity; and gas chromatography analysis by using a wound chamber model in rabbits. All strains were stimulated by N-acetylmuramic acid, while one strain needed a further supplement such as yeast extract for optimal growth. All strains showed trypsin-like activity. While 10 different ribotypes were found, the SDS-PAGE profiles revealed similar patterns for all strains. All strains were sensitive to penicillin G (MICs, <0.5 microg/ml), ampicillin (MICs, <1.0 microg/ml), amoxicillin (MICs, <0.38 microg/ml), metronidazole (MICs, <0.005 microg/ml), tetracycline (MICs, <0.19 microg/ml), doxycycline (MICs, 0.05 microg/ml), erythromycin (MICs, <0.4 microg/ml), and clindamycin (MICs, <0.016 microg/ml), while they were less sensitive to ciprofloxacin (MICs, <4 microg/ml). B. forsythus did not cause abscess formation by monoinoculation. B. forsythus coinoculated with Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 caused abscess formation in 75% of rabbits, while it caused abscess formation in 100% of rabbits when it was coinoculated with Porphyromonas gingivalis FDC 381. In the case of the latter combination, four of six rabbits died of sepsis after 6 to 7 days, and P. gingivalis and B. forsythus were recovered from the heart blood at a proportion of 10:1. B. forsythus strains were highly virulent and invasive in combination with P. gingivalis. PMID:9163447

  4. Isolation and molecular characterization of a new Neospora caninum isolate from cattle in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Campero, L M; Venturini, M C; Moore, D P; Massola, L; Lagomarsino, H; García, B; Bacigalupe, D; Rambeaud, M; Pardini, L; Leunda, M R; Schares, G; Campero, C M

    2015-08-01

    Neospora caninum is one of the most important causes of bovine abortion, but isolation of live parasites from infected tissue is difficult. The aims of the present study were to obtain new isolates of N. caninum from congenitally infected asymptomatic newborn cattle in Argentina and to perform characterization by multilocus-microsatellite analysis. Five clinically normal born calves, with demonstrable N. caninum antibodies in precolostrum serum by indirect fluorescent antibody test, were euthanized and their brain samples were processed for histopathological, immunohistochemical, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, and for bioassay in γ-interferon knockout (GKO) mice. Although N. caninum DNA was detected in brain from all the calves by PCR, viable N. caninum was isolated in GKO mice from only one calf. Neospora caninum tachyzoites of this Argentinean isolate, designated NC-Argentina LP1, were propagated in VERO cell cultures seeded with tachyzoites from the infected GKO mice tissues. Multilocus-microsatellite typing on DNA derived from cell cultured tachyzoites revealed a unique genetic pattern, different from reported isolates. This is the first bovine isolation and genetic characterization of N. caninum in Argentina.

  5. Genetic defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease maps on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    St. George-Hyslop, P.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Polinsky, R.J.; Haines, J.L.; Nee, L.; Watkins, P.C.; Myers, R.H.; Feldman, R.G.; Pollen, D.; Drachman, D.; Growdon, J.

    1987-02-20

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Several families have been described in which Alzheimer's disease is caused by an autosomal dominant gene defect. The chromosomal location of this defective gene has been discovered by using genetic linkage to DNA markers on chromosome 21. The localization on chromosome 21 provides an explanation for the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in Down syndrome. Isolation and characterization of the gene at this locus may yield new insights into the nature of the defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease and possibly, into the etiology of all forms of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Statins: Do They Cause ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Do they cause ALS? Do statins cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. ... D. References Sorensen HT, et al. Statins and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: The level of evidence for an association. Journal ...

  7. Drugs that may cause impotence

    MedlinePlus

    Impotence caused by medications; Drug-induced erectile dysfunction; Prescription medicines and impotence ... Many medicines and recreational drugs can affect a man's sexual arousal and sexual performance. What causes impotence in one ...

  8. What Causes Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors ... Microvascular Disease? The same risk factors that cause atherosclerosis may cause coronary microvascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a ...

  9. What Causes Sickle Cell Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Sickle Cell Disease? Abnormal hemoglobin, called hemoglobin S , causes sickle cell ... that hemoglobin works. ( See Overview. ) How Is Sickle Cell Disease Inherited? When the hemoglobin S gene is inherited ...

  10. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... which cause borna disease , an infectious neurological syndrome Mycoplasma, a cause of atypical pneumonia Ross River virus, ... patients and in persons with related disorders like fibromyalgia. Cortisol suppresses inflammation and cellular immune activation, and ...

  11. A New System for Determining the Causes of Stillbirth

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Donald J.; Goldenberg, Robert; Conway, Deborah; Silver, Robert M.; Saade, George R.; Varner, Michael W.; Pinar, Halit; Coustan, Donald; Bukowski, Radek; Stoll, Barbara; Koch, Matthew A.; Parker, Corette B.; Reddy, Uma M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the methods for assigning the cause of death for stillbirths enrolled in the Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network (SCRN). METHODS A complete evaluation, including postmortem examination, placental pathology, medical record abstraction, and maternal interview was available on 512 stillbirths among 500 women. These 512 stillbirths were evaluated for cause of death using the definitions outlined in this report. Using the best available evidence, SCRN investigators developed a new methodology to assign the cause of death of stillbirths using clinical, postmortem, and placental pathology data. This new tool, designated the Initial Causes of Fetal Death, incorporates known causes of death and assigns them as possible or probable based on strict diagnostic criteria, derived from published references and pathophysiologic sequences that lead to stillbirth. RESULTS Six broad categories of causes of death are accounted for, including maternal medical conditions; obstetric complications; maternal or fetal hematologic conditions; fetal genetic, structural, and karyotypic abnormalities; placental infection, fetal infection, or both; and placental pathologic findings. Isolated histologic chorioamnionitis and small for gestational age were not considered causes of death. CONCLUSION A new system, Initial Causes of Fetal Death, to assign cause of death in stillbirths was developed by the SCRN investigators for use in this study but has broader applicability. Initial Causes of Fetal Death is a standardized method to assign probable and possible causes of death of stillbirths based on information routinely collected during prenatal care and the clinical evaluation of fetal death. PMID:20664383

  12. Infectious causes of chronic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Lisa; Surawicz, Christina M

    2012-10-01

    Infections are an uncommon cause of chronic diarrhoea. Parasites are most likely, including protozoa like giardia, cryptosporidia and cyclospora. Bacteria are unlikely to cause chronic diarrhoea in immunocompetent individuals with the possible exception of Yersinia, Plesiomonas and Aeromonas. Infectious diarrhoea can trigger other causes of chronic diarrhoea, including inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and "Brainerd-type" diarrhoea. A thorough evaluation should detect most infections causing chronic diarrhoea.

  13. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  14. Pump isolation valve

    DOEpatents

    Kinney, Calvin L.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-08-02

    The pump isolation valve provides a means by which the pump may be selectively isolated from the remainder of the coolant system while being compatible with the internal hydraulic arrangement of the pump during normal operation of the pump. The valve comprises a valve cylinder disposed around the pump and adjacent to the last pump diffuser with a turning vane attached to the lower end of the valve cylinder in a manner so as to hydraulically match with the discharge diffuser. The valve cylinder is connected to a drive means for sliding the valve cylinder relative to the diffuser support cylinder so as to block flow in either direction through the discharge diffuser when the valve is in the closed position and to aid in the flow of the coolant from the discharge diffuser by means of the turning vane when the valve is in the open position.

  15. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C.

    2009-07-15

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  16. Bacillus odysseyi isolate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri (Inventor); La Duc, Myron Thomas (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to discovery and isolation of a biologically pure culture of a Bacillus odysseyi isolate with high adherence and sterilization resistant properties. B. odysseyi is a round spore forming Bacillus species that produces an exosporium. This novel species has been characterized on the basis of phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. According to the results of these analyses, this strain belongs to the genus Bacillus and the type strain is 34hs-1.sup.T (=ATCC PTA-4993.sup.T=NRRL B-30641.sup.T=NBRC 100172.sup.T). The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of strain 34hs-1.sup.T is AF526913.

  17. Ultrasonic thermometer isolation standoffs

    DOEpatents

    Arave, Alvin E.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for minimizing sticking of the transmission line to the protective sheath and preventing noise echoes from interfering with signal echoes in an improved high temperature ultrasonic thermometer which includes an ultrasonic transmission line surrounded by a protective sheath. Small isolation standoffs are mounted on the transmission line to minimize points of contact between the transmission line and the protective sheath, the isolation standoffs serving as discontinuities mounted on the transmission line at locations where a signal echo is desired or where an echo can be tolerated. Consequently any noise echo generated by the sticking of the standoff to the protective sheath only adds to the amplitude of the echo generated at the standoff and does not interfere with the other signal echoes.

  18. High voltage isolation transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Ruitberg, A. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage isolation transformer is provided with primary and secondary coils separated by discrete electrostatic shields from the surfaces of insulating spools on which the coils are wound. The electrostatic shields are formed by coatings of a compound with a low electrical conductivity which completely encase the coils and adhere to the surfaces of the insulating spools adjacent to the coils. Coatings of the compound also line axial bores of the spools, thereby forming electrostatic shields separating the spools from legs of a ferromagnetic core extending through the bores. The transformer is able to isolate a high constant potential applied to one of its coils, without the occurrence of sparking or corona, by coupling the coatings, lining the axial bores to the ferromagnetic core and by coupling one terminal of each coil to the respective coating encasing the coil.

  19. Offset trench isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, S. S.; Cooper, K. J.; Ray, W.; Kirsch, H. C.; Grove, Charlotte

    1994-08-01

    Feasibility of a new, recessed isolation technique that utilizes an offset, shallow trench in combination with thermal oxidation for achieving near zero final encroachment with excellent planarity is demonstrated. Etch of the shallow trench is offset from the original hardmask by an oxide sidewall spacer. After trench etch, HF is used to remove the hardmask oxide and sidewall spacers and to form a cavity which is self-aligned to the nitride edge. Exposed silicon regions are then reoxidized and encapsulated with polysilicon. Field oxide is then grown. The final field oxide profile exhibits steep sidewall angles without inducing substrate defects as evidenced by low diode leakage. Other isolation sensitive device parametrics such as gate oxide quality and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor threshold voltage stability are presented and exhibit good characteristics.

  20. Optical isolator based on mode conversion in magnetic garnet films.

    PubMed

    Hemme, H; Dötsch, H; Menzler, H P

    1987-09-15

    Calculations are presented describing a novel optical isolator which works by complete TE(0)-TM(0) mode conversion in magnetic garnet films caused by stress-induced optical anisotropy (50%) and by Faraday rotation (50%). These conversions take place along two different, perpendicular light paths in the same crystal that are connected by an integrated mirror. Possible tolerances of the film parameters are given so that a 30-dB isolation is still guaranteed.

  1. Freshwater Cyanobacteria (Blue-Green Algae) Toxins: Isolation and Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-15

    exclusively caused by strains of species that are members of the L division Cyanophyta , commonly called blue -green algae or cyanobacteria . Although...0 0 Lfl (NAD FRESHWATER CYANOBACTERIA ( BLUE -GREEN ALGAE ) TOXINS: ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION ANNCUAL REPORT Wayne W. Carmichael Sarojini Bose...Frederick, Maryland 21701-5012 62770A 6277GA871 AA 378 11 TITLE &who* Secwn~y C11mrfaon) Freshwater Cyanobacteria ( blue -green algae ) Toxins: Isolation

  2. Neglected isolated scaphoid dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong-Ryoon; Cho, Seung Hyun; Lee, Yong Seuk; Roh, Young Hak

    2016-01-01

    The authors present a case of isolated scaphoid dislocation in a 40-year-old male that was undiagnosed for 2 months. The patient was treated by open reduction, Kirschner wire fixation, interosseous ligament repair using a suture anchor and Blatt's dorsal capsulodesis. At 6 years followup, his radiographs of wrist showed a normal carpal alignment with a scapholunate gap of 3 mm and no evidence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the scaphoid. PMID:27904228

  3. Isolation of Human Basophils.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, John T; Bieneman, Anja P

    2016-02-02

    Isolating human basophils from blood has long been hampered by the fact that these granulocytes represent just 1% or less of the circulating leukocyte population. We describe herein laboratory protocols that have been refined over the past ∼25 years that now enable investigators to prepare basophils for use in a variety of assays to assess the in vitro biology of these immune cells, both in IgE -dependent and -independent responses.

  4. Far East Scarlet-Like Fever Caused by a Few Related Genotypes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Russia.

    PubMed

    Timchenko, Nelly F; Adgamov, Ruslan R; Popov, Alexander F; Psareva, Ekaterina K; Sobyanin, Konstantin A; Gintsburg, Alexander L; Ermolaeva, Svetlana A

    2016-03-01

    We used multivirulence locus sequence typing to analyze 68 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis isolates from patients in Russia during 1973-2014, including 41 isolates from patients with Far East scarlet-like fever. Four genotypes were found responsible, with 1 being especially prevalent. Evolutionary analysis suggests that epidemiologic advantages could cause this genotype's dominance.

  5. Far East Scarlet-Like Fever Caused by a Few Related Genotypes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Timchenko, Nelly F.; Adgamov, Ruslan R.; Popov, Alexander F.; Psareva, Ekaterina K.; Sobyanin, Konstantin A.; Gintsburg, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    We used multivirulence locus sequence typing to analyze 68 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis isolated in Russia during 1973–2014, including 41 isolates from patients with Far East scarlet-like fever. Four genotypes were found responsible, with 1 being especially prevalent. Evolutionary analysis suggests that epidemiologic advantages could cause this genotype’s dominance. PMID:26889961

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Campylobacter jejuni Strains That Cause Abortion in Livestock

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Allison M.; Clothier, Kristin A.; Huang, Bihua C.; Kong, Nguyet

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an intestinal bacterium that can cause abortion in livestock. This publication announces the public release of 15 Campylobacter jejuni genome sequences from isolates linked to abortion in livestock. These isolates are part of the 100K Pathogen Genome Project and are from clinical cases at the University of California (UC) Davis. PMID:27908990

  7. Infective endocarditis caused by Klebsiella oxytoca in an intravenous drug user with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Connor; Hatch, Michael; Ayan, Mohamed; Winn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by Klebsiella species is rare, with most isolates being K. pneumoniae. We report the case of a 24-year-old intravenous drug user with newly diagnosed seminoma who developed K. oxytoca endocarditis. In addition to having K. oxytoca isolated from blood culture, cultures of that species were obtained from a retroperitoneal metastasis found on original presentation. PMID:27034562

  8. Genetic identification of rickettsiae isolated from ticks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Fujita, Hiromi; Takada, Nobuhiro; Raoult, Didier

    2002-06-01

    Following the description in Japan of Japanese spotted fever, caused by Rickettsia japonica, a search for the vector of this disease led to the isolation of several rickettsiae from various tick species. Sixty-three rickettsial isolates were obtained from six different tick species, and six type strains were described by PCR and monoclonal antibody testing. We identified these six strains by amplification and sequencing of the genes encoding 16S rRNA and citrate synthase. We confirmed that the isolates from Dermacentor taiwanensis and Haemaphysalis flava ticks were R. japonica isolates. In Ixodes ovatus, Ixodes persulcatus, and Ixodes monospinosus, we identified a Rickettsia identical or closely related to Rickettsia helvetica, a species that is pathogenic for humans and that to date has only been found in Europe. Finally, we identified a new genotype of unknown pathogenicity, genotype AT, that was isolated from Amblyomma testudinarium ticks and that is closely related to a Slovakian genotype obtained from Ixodes ricinus ticks.

  9. Distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Fenyö, E M; Morfeldt-Månson, L; Chiodi, F; Lind, B; von Gegerfelt, A; Albert, J; Olausson, E; Asjö, B

    1988-01-01

    According to their capacity to replicate in vitro, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates can be divided into two major groups, rapid/high and slow/low. Rapid/high viruses can easily be transmitted to a variety of cell lines of T-lymphoid (CEM, H9, and Jurkat) and monocytoid (U937) origin. In contrast, slow/low viruses replicate transiently, if at all, in these cell lines. Except for a few isolates, the great majority of slow/low viruses replicate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and Jurkat-tatIII cells constitutively expressing the tatIII gene of HIV-1. The viruses able to replicate efficiently cause syncytium formation and are regularly isolated from immunodeficient patients. Poorly replicating HIV isolates, often obtained from individuals with no or mild disease, show syncytium formation and single-cell killing simultaneously or, with some isolates, cell killing only. Images PMID:2459416

  10. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  11. Vibrios associated with red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Romalde, J L; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1990-01-01

    Vibrios were isolated from red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum and also throughout the year in the Ria de Pontevedra, Spain. The isolates were grouped into 14 phena by numerical toxonomy. Strains associated with red tides were restricted to four phena: phena I and II were Vibrio alginolyticus, and phena III and IV were Vibrio tubiashii and Vibrio anguillarum, respectively. V. anguillarum-like strains (phena V through XI) predominated throughout the year outside the red tide areas. Cytotoxicity assays conducted in different poikilothermic and homoiothermic cell lines showed that cytotoxin production was not necessarily associated with the species selected during the red tides. PMID:2268167

  12. Diversity of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis mycobacteria causing lymphadenitis, France.

    PubMed

    Despierres, L; Cohen-Bacrie, S; Richet, H; Drancourt, M

    2012-07-01

    The knowledge of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) genotypes responsible for lymphadenitis is limited. We retrospectively characterized all of the MAC isolates made in our laboratory in the last 18 years by sequence-based identification and genotyping, and compared the clinical and laboratory data for lymphadenitis-associated and non-lymphadenitis-associated MAC isolates. Of 67 MAC-infected patients, 25 lymphadenitis patients were significantly younger than 42 non-lymphadenitis patients, while the male/female ratio did not significantly differ between the two groups. Cervical topography found in 76.5% of lymphadenitis patients was significantly more frequent in non-immunocompromised patients (p=0.04). M. avium subsp. hominissuis was identified in 53 patients (24 lymphadenitis, 29 non-lymphadenitis), M. colombiense in six patients (five non-lymphadenitis, one lymphadenitis), M. intracellulare in four non-lymphadenitis patients, and M. chimaera in three non-lymphadenitis patients, while negative controls remained negative. M. hominissuis was significantly associated with lymphadenitis (p=0.03). M. hominissuis isolates yielded 15 genotypes in 29 non-lymphadenitis isolates (molecular diversity, 0.622) versus 11 genotypes in 24 lymphadenitis isolates (molecular diversity, 0.578), demonstrating a non-significant lower diversity of M. hominissuis isolates cultured from lymphadenitis. The genotypes did not correlate with the clinical features. These data suggest the presence of several environmental reservoirs for M. hominissuis causing lymphadenitis in France.

  13. Isolation of encephalomyocarditis virus from dormice (Myoxus glis) in Italy.

    PubMed

    Amaddeo, D; Cardeti, G; Autorino, G L

    1995-04-01

    Two isolates of encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus (ZRC 276RA/90 and ZRC 292RA/90) were isolated from two dormice (Myoxus glis) in Tuscany, Italy. The two isolates were lethal for laboratory mice and caused a rapid cytopathic effect characterized by rounded and wrinkled cells in both baby hamster kidney cells (BHK21) and African green monkey kidney cells (Vero). We found neutralizing antibodies against EMC virus in 408 (77%) of 529 domestic pigs (Sus scrofa scrofa) and in 165 (49%) of 338 wild boars (S. scrofa ferus majori) in Tuscany.

  14. Characterization of Fusobacterium necrophorum isolated from llama and alpaca.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Anderson, David; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Narayanan, Sanjeev K

    2013-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium, is an opportunistic animal and human pathogen that causes a variety of infections termed necrobacillosis. There are 2 subspecies of F. necrophorum (subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme) that differ morphologically and biochemically and in virulence. Leukotoxin, a secreted protein, is considered to be the major virulence factor. In camelids, F. necrophorum causes a variety of infections, generally involving the lips, tongue, pharynx, interdigital spaces, foot pad, larynx, mandible, or maxillary bones. The objective of the current study was to characterize the presumptive Fusobacterium isolates from a variety of necrotic infections in llama (Lama glama) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) and determine whether the strains possess leukotoxin activities. A total of 7 isolates from alpaca and 2 isolates from llama were characterized. Based on growth characteristics in broth culture, and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analyses, all 9 isolates belonged to subsp. necrophorum and possessed the putative hemagglutinin gene. Western blot analysis with antileukotoxin antibodies raised in rabbit showed the presence of leukotoxin protein in the culture supernatant of all isolates. Furthermore, flow cytometry of the culture supernatants demonstrated cytotoxicity to bovine and alpaca polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The extent of cytotoxicity to either alpaca or bovine PMNs differed among camelid strains. The cytotoxicity of many of the camelid strains was higher (P < 0.05) toward alpaca PMNs compared to bovine PMNs. Fusobacterium necrophorum isolates from llama and alpaca are similar to bovine isolates, and leukotoxin may be a major virulence factor.

  15. Phaeohyphomycotic Cyst Caused by Colletotrichum crassipes

    PubMed Central

    Martins Castro, Luiz Guilherme; da Silva Lacaz, Carlos; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa; Heins-Vaccari, Elisabeth Maria; de Freitas Leite, Roseli Santos; Hernández Arriagada, Giovana Letícia; Ozaki Reguera, Márcia Maria; Ito, Eunice Miki; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai; Spina Nunes, Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    A case of phaeohyphomycosis is reported in a male renal transplant recipient with a nodular lesion in the right leg who was treated with immunosuppressing drugs. The lesion consisted of a purulent cyst with thick walls. The cyst was excised surgically, and the patient did not receive any antifungal therapy. One year later he remains well. Histological study of the lesion showed a granulomatous reaction of epithelioid and multinucleate giant cells, with a central area of necrosis and pus. Fontana-Masson staining demonstrated the presence of pigmented hyphal elements. The fungus Colletotrichum crassipes was grown in different cultures from the cyst. The in vitro inhibitory activities of eight antifungal drugs against the isolate were tested. Clotrimazole and UR-9825 were the most active drugs. This case represents the first known reported infection caused by this rare species. PMID:11376082

  16. Occupational asthma caused by guar gum.

    PubMed

    Lagier, F; Cartier, A; Somer, J; Dolovich, J; Malo, J L

    1990-04-01

    Some vegetable gums have been reported to cause asthma. We describe three subjects who were exposed at work to guar gum, which is derived from the outer part of Cyanopsis tetragonolobus, a vegetable that grows in India. The first subject worked for a pharmaceutical company; the second and third subjects worked at a carpet-manufacturing plant. All three subjects developed symptoms of rhinitis and asthma after the onset of exposure to guar gum. All subjects were atopic and demonstrated mild bronchial hyperresponsiveness to inhaled histamine at the time they were observed. Skin prick tests demonstrated an immediate skin reaction to guar gum. All three subjects had high levels of serum IgE antibodies to guar gum. Specific inhalation challenges in which the three subjects were exposed for short intervals (less than or equal to 4 minutes) to powder of guar gum elicited isolated immediate bronchospastic reactions in two subjects and a dual reaction in the other subject.

  17. Expression of SAP5 and SAP9 in Candida albicans biofilms: comparison of bloodstream isolates with isolates from other sources.

    PubMed

    Joo, Min Young; Shin, Jong Hee; Jang, Hee-Chang; Song, Eun Song; Kee, Seung Jung; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2013-11-01

    Secreted aspartic proteases (Sap), encoded by a family of 10 SAP genes, are key virulence determinants in Candida albicans. Although biofilm-associated bloodstream infections (BSIs) are frequently caused by C. albicans, SAP gene expression in C. albicans biofilms formed by BSI isolates has not been evaluated. We compared the expression of two SAP genes, SAP5 and SAP9, in C. albicans biofilms formed by BSI isolates with those formed by isolates from other body sites. Sixty-three C. albicans isolates were analyzed, comprising 35 BSI isolates and 28 from other sites. A denture-strip biofilm model was used, and expression of the two SAP genes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR during planktonic or biofilm growth. Mean SAP5 expression levels of the BSI isolates were 3.59-fold and 3.86-fold higher in 24-h and 48-h biofilms, respectively, than in planktonic cells. These results did not differ from those for isolates from other sites (2.71-fold and 2.8-fold for 24-h and 48-h biofilms, respectively). By contrast, mean SAP9 expression during biofilm formation was higher in BSI isolates (2.89-fold and 3.29-fold at 24 and 48 h, respectively) than in isolates from other sites (1.27-fold and 1.32-fold at 24 and 48 h, respectively; both, P < 0.001). These results show, for the first time, that both SAP5 and SAP9 are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms formed by BSI isolates, and that BSI isolates may have a greater capacity to express SAP9 under biofilm conditions than isolates from other sites.

  18. Mortality of adult Stomoxys calcitrans fed isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Lysyk, T J; Kalischuk-Tymensen, L D; Selinger, L B

    2012-10-01

    We examined the ability of five isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner to cause mortality in adult stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Isolates Bacillus thuringiensis tolworthi 4L3 (serotype 9), Bacillus thuringiensis darmstadiensis 4M1 (serotype 10a10b), Bacillus thuringiensis thompsoni 401 (serotype 12), Bacillus thuringiensis thuringiensis HD2 (serotype 1), and Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki HD945 (serotype 3a3b3c) were administered to adult flies in diets containing blood only, sugar only, and both sugar and blood combined. B. t. tolworthi 4L3 had no effect on adult mortality regardless of the feeding substrate. The remaining isolates tended to cause the greatest mortality when administered in blood alone. B. t. thompsoni 401 was the only isolate that consistently caused adult mortality when fed in blood at concentrations ranging from 0.21 to 50.0 microg of protein per ml of blood. This isolate also caused mortality when applied topically. The time to 50% mortality declined with dose and reached a lower asymptote at approximately equal to 1.3 d at an oral dose of 8.75 microg/ml and at a topical dose of 0.14 microg per fly.

  19. New Pyrenochaeta Species Causing Keratitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Consuelo; Pérez-Santonja, Juan J.; Rodríguez, Alejandra E.; Colom, M. Francisca; Gené, Josepa; Alio, Jorge L.; Verkley, Gerard J. M.; Guarro, Josep

    2009-01-01

    We report a new fungus as an agent of fungal keratitis in a diabetic woman. The fungal etiology was established by classic microbiology and PCR following 3 months of antibacterial therapy. The morphological features of the isolate and sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region indicate a new species of Pyrenochaeta (Coelomycetes). PMID:19297598

  20. Isolator fragmentation and explosive initiation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Peter; Rae, Philip John; Foley, Timothy J.; Novak, Alan M.; Armstrong, Christopher Lee; Baca, Eva V.; Gunderson, Jake Alfred

    2015-09-30

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of firing an isolator in proximity to a barrier or explosive charge. The tests with explosive were conducted without barrier, on the basis that since any barrier will reduce the shock transmitted to the explosive, bare explosive represents the worst-case from an inadvertent initiation perspective. No reaction was observed. The shock caused by the impact of a representative plastic material on both bare and cased PBX9501 is calculated in the worst-case, 1-D limit, and the known shock response of the HE is used to estimate minimum run-to-detonation lengths. The estimates demonstrate that even 1-D impacts would not be of concern and that, accordingly, the divergent shocks due to isolator fragment impact are of no concern as initiating stimuli.

  1. Spontaneous Isolated Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Kousha, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    A true isolated superior mesenteric artery (SMA) dissection is a rare occurrence. The increasing use of diagnostic imaging studies has resulted in this rare disease being more recognized. A 68-year-old Caucasian female presented with sharp upper abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed dissection with thrombosis in the proximal SMA. Conservative management with bowel rest, blood pressure control, and anticoagulation relieved her symptoms. Follow-up CT showed stable dissection. Physicians should consider the diagnosis of isolated spontaneous SMA dissection after excluding more common causes. The optimal management pathway has not been firmly established. Conservative management with anticoagulation appears to be a safe first-line therapy in selected patients. PMID:28203123

  2. Isolator fragmentation and explosive initiation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Peter; Rae, Philip John; Foley, Timothy J.; Novak, Alan M.; Armstrong, Christopher Lee; Baca, Eva V.; Gunderson, Jake Alfred

    2016-09-19

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of firing an isolator in proximity to a barrier or explosive charge. The tests with explosive were conducted without a barrier, on the basis that since any barrier will reduce the shock transmitted to the explosive, bare explosive represents the worst-case from an inadvertent initiation perspective. No reaction was observed. The shock caused by the impact of a representative plastic material on both bare and cased PBX 9501 is calculated in the worst-case, 1-D limit, and the known shock response of the HE is used to estimate minimum run-to-detonation lengths. The estimates demonstrate that even 1-D impacts would not be of concern and that, accordingly, the divergent shocks due to isolator fragment impact are of no concern as initiating stimuli.

  3. Antigenicity of two turkey astrovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Saif, Y M

    2004-12-01

    Astroviruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. These viruses cause gastroenteritis in humans and in a variety of animal species, including turkey poults. Only human astroviruses are well characterized antigenically. In the current study, two turkey astrovirus isolates, TAstV1987 and TAstV2001, were antigenically compared using cross-neutralization tests in turkey embryos, as well as cross-reactivity of the two isolates by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antigenic relatedness values (R) were calculated using the Archetti and Horsfall formula. The R value based on the cross-neutralization tests was 0.56%, which indicates that TAstV1987 and TAstV2001 belong to different serotypes; the R value of the two viruses based on ELISA was 70.7%, which suggests these two viruses share common antigen(s).

  4. The Four Causes of Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, Peter R.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehension of a phenomenon involves identifying its origin, structure, substrate, and function, and representing these factors in some formal system. Aristotle provided a clear specification of these kinds of explanation, which he called efficient causes (triggers), formal causes (models), material causes (substrates or mechanisms), and final causes (functions). In this article, Aristotle's framework is applied to conditioning and the computation-versus-association debate. The critical empirical issue is early versus late reduction of information to disposition. Automata theory provides a grammar for models of conditioning and information processing in which that constraint can be represented. PMID:19081757

  5. [Isolated Ledderhose fibromatosis plantaris].

    PubMed

    Runkel, N; Göhring, U; Friedl, W; Roeren, T

    1993-07-01

    Plantar fibromatosis or Ledderhose syndrome has rarely been discussed in the medical literature. This clinical entity includes nodular Dupuytren-like indurations of the plantar aponeurosis. We present a case of a young man with isolated disease of his right foot and describe the clinical and pathomorphological features of this disease as well as its characteristic findings at magnetic resonance tomography. The therapy of choice is a subtotal resection of the plantar aponeurosis to prevent irreversible contractions of the toes. The prognosis following fascietomy is good.

  6. Highly isolated photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bluzer, N.; Borsuk, G.M.; Kub, F.J.; Turley, A.P.

    1984-12-11

    An array of photodetectors is described incorporating a PNP vertical structure in a monosilicon substrate with individual photodetectors optically and electrically isolated from one another by open or oxide filled grooves. Both PN junctions of the PNP structure or originally reverse biased with one junction acting as the photodetector may operate in the forward biased photovoltaic mode with high radiant energy intensity. The minority carriers injected into the N region are absorbed by the other PN junction providing base-collector transistor action to prevent blooming.

  7. "Isolated" postinfectious myoclonus.

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, K; Thompson, P D; Marsden, C D

    1992-01-01

    Two cases are reported who developed myoclonus as the only manifestation of a post-infectious syndrome without evidence of encephalitis or the opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. Case 1 had generalised myoclonus following an influenza-like illness, while case 2 had right upper limb segmental myoclonus following uncomplicated chicken pox. Neither had any localising neurological signs or abnormality on investigation. Both recovered completely within six months of the onset. Similar cases are reviewed from the literature and it is suggested that such cases be called "isolated" post-infectious myoclonus. PMID:1469409

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio alginolyticus isolated from oyster in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Shin, YuJin; Jang, SeokCheol; Jung, Yeojung; So, Jae-Seong

    2016-10-01

    Pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus, a cause of severe infection in shellfish, as well as in humans, has been found at high frequency around all coastal areas of Korea. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of V. alginolyticus, to identify the strains isolated from oysters in West Sea, and to investigate their antimicrobial resistance profiles. Biochemical analyses of the 90 initially recovered presumptive V. alginolyticus colonies indicated that 16 isolates were V. alginolyticus. PCR analysis to detect the presence of the gyrB gene confirmed that 15 (93.8 %) of the 16 isolates were V. alginolyticus. These 15 isolates had the following profiles of resistance against 16 antibiotics: all isolates were resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin, and 26.7 % of the isolates exhibited resistance to cephalothin. A large number of isolates showed intermediate resistance to erythromycin (100 %) and rifampin (73.3 %). Five (33.3 %) of the V. alginolyticus isolates demonstrated multiple resistance to at least three antimicrobials.

  9. Investigation of mercury thruster isolators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Mercury ion thruster isolator lifetime tests were performed using different isolator materials and geometries. Tests were performed with and without the flow of mercury through the isolators in an oil diffusion pumped vacuum facility and cryogenically pumped bell jar. The onset of leakage current in isolators occurred in time intervals ranging from a few hours to many hundreds of hours. In all cases, surface contamination was responsible for the onset of leakage current and subsequent isolator failure. Rate of increase of leakage current and the leakage current level increased approximately exponentially with isolator temperature. Careful attention to shielding techniques and the elimination of sources of metal oxides appear to have eliminated isolator failures as a thruster life limiting mechanism.

  10. Isolation of Trichosporon in a hematology ward.

    PubMed

    Pini, Gabriella; Faggi, Elisabetta; Donato, Rosa; Fanci, Rosa

    2005-01-01

    During mycologic monitoring of the air in a hematology ward, we found massive air contamination caused by Trichosporon asahii, both in the room where neutropenic patients were staying and the corridor immediately outside the room. This fungal species had never been isolated in previous samplings. The urine culture taken from one of the patients in this room, whose urinary catheter had been removed immediately prior to air sampling, resulted positive for T. asahii. Both macroscopic and microscopic morphologic observation was insufficient for confirming the hypothesis of a close relationship between the strains isolated from the patient, from the air in the room and corridor. Therefore, we used genomic typing with random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The five primers used, (GTG)(5), (GACA)(4), M13, OPE01, RC08, produced different patterns of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products; the genomic profiles obtained with the same primer, however, resulted perfectly superimposable for all the strains. This result led us to conclude that the massive air contamination caused by T. asahii can have effectively been determined by the removal of the urinary catheter from the patient who presented an asymptomatic infection caused by this microorganism.

  11. Genotypic analyses and virulence characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii).

    PubMed

    Li, Jinquan; Du, Pujun; Li, Zhi; Zhou, Yang; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Si; Chen, Fusheng; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause invasive illness in humans and farm animals. It is frequently isolated from dairy products and poultry. However, there have been few literatures on the genetic diversity and virulence potential of L. monocytogenes from freshwater animal. Thirty-nine L. monocytogenes strains from crayfish were isolated and identified in this study. Molecular subtyping and polymorphism of each isolate were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). MLST divided the isolates into eight sequence types (STs), six of which from crayfish were the same with the isolates from environment and clinic. PCR detection of the eight genes related to virulence and multiplex PCR for serotyping showed that the eight virulence factors were present in the isolates and all the isolates belonged to four major L. monocytogenes serotype groups (1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 4b) frequently isolated from patients. In vivo pathogenicity of isolates was also evaluated in murine model and survival curve of infected mice suggested that ST1, ST4, and ST9 isolates were as virulent as the reference strain EGDe. This study provides preliminary insights into the genetic diversity of L. monocytogenes from crayfish and the genetic correlation between crayfish and clinical L. monocytogenes isolates. The results indicate the contamination in aquaculture could be the source of Listeria contamination and the isolates are likely to cause human listeriosis.

  12. Mechanical strain isolator mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Gordon E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Certain devices such as optical instruments must preserve their alignmental integrity while being subjected to mechanical strain. A mechanical strain isolator mount is provided to preserve the alignmental integrity of an alignment sensitive instrument. An alignment sensitive instrument is mounted on a rectangular base. Flexural legs are connected at their proximal ends to the rectangular base. Flexural legs are also spaced parallel to the sides. Mounting pads are connected to the legs at the distal end and the mechanical strain isolator mount is attached to the substrate by means of threaded bolts. When a mounting pad and its respective leg is subjected to lateral strain in either the X or Y direction via the substrate, the respective leg relieves the strain by bending in the direction of the strain. An axial strain on a mounting pad in the Z direction is relieved by a rotational motion of the legs in the direction of the strain. When the substrate is stress free, the flexural legs return to their original condition and thus preserve the original alignment integrity of the alignment sensitive instrument.

  13. Recombinant Baculovirus Isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3 ), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac(®) or BaculoDirect™, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Previously, many methods required a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. Fortunately, this step is no longer required for most systems currently available. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay or real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac(®) system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  14. Methanogenic archaea isolated from Taiwan's Chelungpu fault.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sue-Yao; Lai, Mei-Chin

    2011-02-01

    Terrestrial rocks, petroleum reservoirs, faults, coal seams, and subseafloor gas hydrates contain an abundance of diverse methanoarchaea. However, reports on the isolation, purification, and characterization of methanoarchaea in the subsurface environment are rare. Currently, no studies investigating methanoarchaea within fault environments exist. In this report, we succeeded in obtaining two new methanogen isolates, St545Mb(T) of newly proposed species Methanolobus chelungpuianus and Methanobacterium palustre FG694aF, from the Chelungpu fault, which is the fault that caused a devastating earthquake in central Taiwan in 1999. Strain FG694aF was isolated from a fault gouge sample obtained at 694 m below land surface (mbls) and is an autotrophic, mesophilic, nonmotile, thin, filamentous-rod-shaped organism capable of using H(2)-CO(2) and formate as substrates for methanogenesis. The morphological, biochemical, and physiological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that this isolate belongs to Methanobacterium palustre. The mesophilic strain St545Mb(T), isolated from a sandstone sample at 545 mbls, is a nonmotile, irregular, coccoid organism that uses methanol and trimethylamine as substrates for methanogenesis. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain St545Mb(T) was 99.0% similar to that of Methanolobus psychrophilus strain R15 and was 96 to 97.5% similar to the those of other Methanolobus species. However, the optimal growth temperature and total cell protein profile of strain St545Mb(T) were different from those of M. psychrophilus strain R15, and whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization revealed less than 20% relatedness between these two strains. On the basis of these observations, we propose that strain St545Mb(T) (DSM 19953(T); BCRC AR10030; JCM 15159) be named Methanolobus chelungpuianus sp. nov. Moreover, the environmental DNA database survey indicates that both Methanolobus chelungpuianus and Methanobacterium palustre are widespread in the

  15. Antibiotic resistance among Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Valdivieso, Manuel; Bussalleu, Alejandro; Sexton, Rachael; Thompson, Kathryn C; Osorio, Soledad; Reyes, Italo Novoa; Crowley, John J; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Gastric carcinoma is the most common cancer and cause of cancer mortality in Peru. Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach, is a Group 1 carcinogen due to its causal relationship to gastric carcinoma. While eradication of H. pylori can help prevent gastric cancer, characterizing regional antibiotic resistance patterns is necessary to determine targeted treatment for each region. Thus, we examined primary antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of H. pylori in Lima, Peru. Materials and methods H. pylori strains were isolated from gastric biopsies of patients with histologically proven H. pylori infection. Primary antibiotic resistance among isolates was examined using E-test strips. Isolates were examined for the presence of the cagA pathogenicity island and the vacA m1/m2 alleles via polymerase chain reaction. Results Seventy-six isolates were recovered from gastric biopsies. Clinical isolates showed evidence of antibiotic resistance to 1 (27.6%, n=21/76), 2 (28.9%, n=22/76), or ≥3 antibiotics (40.8%). Of 76 isolates, eight (10.5%) were resistant to amoxicillin and clarithromycin, which are part of the standard triple therapy for H. pylori infection. No trends were seen between the presence of cagA, vacA m1, or vacA m2 and antibiotic resistance. Conclusion The rate of antibiotic resistance among H. pylori isolates in Lima, Peru, is higher than expected and presents cause for concern. To develop more targeted eradication therapies for H. pylori in Peru, more research is needed to better characterize antibiotic resistance among a larger number of clinical isolates prospectively. PMID:28331349

  16. Isolation of a goose parvovirus from swan and its molecular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shao, H; Lv, Y; Ye, J; Qian, K; Jin, W; Qin, A

    2014-01-01

    Goose parvovirus (GPV) causes high mortality and morbidity in goslings and Muscovy ducklings. In this study, a GPV was isolated from a 20-day old swan in Shanghai, China. Complete genome of the swan isolate contained 5,050 nt and showed the highest homology with Taiwanese GPV isolates from 1982. In comparison with the Chinese mainland GPV isolates reported previously, the swan isolate shows two deletions, particularly at positions 67-80 and 334-347 in inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). These findings suggest that the swan could serve as a potential host for GPV and provide insights into molecular characteristics and etiology of GPV.

  17. Fatal cerebral mycoses caused by the ascomycete Chaetomium strumarium.

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, S P; Sigler, L; McAleer, R; McGough, D A; Rinaldi, M G; Mizell, G

    1995-01-01

    Three cases of fatal cerebral mycosis in males with prior histories of intravenous drug use from the United States and Australia are reported. Infection in each case was limited to brain abscess; no other sites of infection were observed. The fungus seen by histopathology and isolated from the brain tissue in each case was identified as Chaetomium strumarium. This is the first report of human infection by this species, and C. strumarium is the second species of Chaetomium known to cause primary brain infection. Chaetomium strumarium is unusual among members of the genus Chaetomium in forming ascocarps covered with pale, thin-walled, flexuous hairs, a feature leading to its original placement in the genus Achaetomium. Presence of pinkish exudate droplets and/or crystals associated with hyphae or ascocarps, sometimes accompanied by a pinkish diffusible pigment; good growth at 42 degrees C; and production of small conidia further distinguish this species. The brain abscess isolates were compared with isolates from prior cases of cerebral infection which had been identified as either Chaetomium atrobrunneum or Chaetomium globosum. With reidentification of one isolate originally identified as C. globosum to C. atrobrunneum, only C. strumarium and C. atrobrunneum have been confirmed to cause infection involving the brain. PMID:8567907

  18. Isolated sphenoid sinus lesion: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Alazzawi, Sarmad; Shahrizal, Tengku; Prepageran, Narayanan; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Isolated sphenoid sinus lesions are an uncommon entity and present with non-specific symptoms. In this case report, the patient presented with a history of headaches for a duration of one month without sinonasal symptoms. A computed tomography scan showed a soft tissue mass occupying the sphenoid sinus. An endoscopic biopsy revealed fungal infection. Endoscopic wide sphenoidotomy with excision of the sphenoid sinus lesion was then performed however, the microbiological examination post-surgery did not show any fungal elements. Instead, Citrobacter species was implicated to be the cause of infection. PMID:25320694

  19. Isolated resonator gyroscope with isolation trimming using a secondary element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention discloses a resonator gyroscope including an isolated resonator. One or more flexures support the isolated resonator and a baseplate is affixed to the resonator by the flexures. Drive and sense elements are affixed to the baseplate and used to excite the resonator and sense movement of the gyroscope. In addition, at least one secondary element (e.g., another electrode) is affixed to the baseplate and used for trimming isolation of the resonator. The resonator operates such that it transfers substantially no net momentum to the baseplate when the resonator is excited. Typically, the isolated resonator comprises a proof mass and a counterbalancing plate.

  20. Fusarium avenaceum causes burn spot disease syndrome in noble crayfish (Astacus astacus).

    PubMed

    Makkonen, J; Jussila, J; Koistinen, L; Paaver, T; Hurt, M; Kokko, H

    2013-06-01

    Burn spot disease has been causing epidemics both in the Estonian mainland and in Saaremaa Island in the threatened noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) stocks. To study the cause of the disease, we isolated several Fusarium spp. from Estonian noble crayfish (A. astacus) populations suffering from burn spot disease syndrome. We first identified fungi directly from melanised cuticle by their ITS sequences. Then we isolated Fusarium spp. from melanised spots of crayfish showing burn spot disease symptoms, such as melanisation and shell erosion, from two different crayfish populations and watercourses in Estonia. The isolates were then identified based on ITS and EF1α-gene sequences. Isolates of Fusarium spp. taken from two separate Estonian noble crayfish populations were used in infection studies. Koch postulates confirmed that the studied agent was causing burn spot disease symptoms including shell erosion in the noble crayfish, which were significantly more severe after molts. After the infection period, an identical Fusarium spp. was re-isolated from carapace lesions and was thus shown to be the disease agent causing burn spot disease syndrome and shell erosion in noble crayfish. Based on GenBank database searches, the isolates causing burn spot disease symptoms were identified as Fusarium avenaceum in mainland Estonia and F. solani in Saaremaa crayfish.

  1. Phaeoacremonium krajdenii, a Cause of White Grain Eumycetoma▿

    PubMed Central

    Hemashettar, B. M.; Siddaramappa, B.; Munjunathaswamy, B. S.; Pangi, A. S.; Pattan, Jayashree; Andrade, A. T.; Padhye, A. A.; Mostert, Lizel; Summerbell, R. C.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the first case of white grain pedal eumycetoma caused by Phaeoacremonium krajdenii in a 41-year-old man from Goa, India. Based on histological examination of biopsy tissue showing serpentine granules, a culture of the granules yielding phaeoid fungal colonies, and morphological characteristics and sequence comparison of the partial β-tubulin gene with the ex-type isolate of P. krajdenii, the causal agent was identified as P. krajdenii. PMID:17005754

  2. Meningitis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tena, D; Solís, S; Lainez, S; Torralba, M; Chacón, P; Valdezate, S; Sáez-Nieto, J A; Bisquert, J

    2013-04-01

    The genus Abiotrophia comprises fastidious Gram-positive bacteria previously classified as nutritionally variant streptococci (NVS). The isolation of NVS from the central nervous system (CNS) is very rare. We describe a case of meningitis due to Abiotrophia defectiva in a patient who underwent a total hip arthroplasty 4 days previously. It is possible that the organism could be introduced through the spinal anesthesia. We also review all cases of CNS infections caused by NVS.

  3. Externa otitis caused by the Graphium stage of Pseudallescheria apiosperma

    PubMed Central

    Neji, Sourour; Ines, Hadrich; Houaida, Trabelsi; Malek, Mnejja; Fatma, Cheikhrouhou; Hayet, Sellami; Fattouma, Makni; Mounôm, Ghorbel; Ali, Ayadi

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of otomycosis caused by the Graphium stage of Pseudallescheria apiosperma in an immunocompetent 32 years old man who was suffering from hypoacusia and purulent otorrhea. Isolates were identified as Graphium stage of Pseudallescheria sp. on the basis of macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. Pseudallescheria apiosperma was correctly identified by PCR sequencing of ITS regions and β-tubulin gene. In this case the contamination could be due to intensive activity of gardening with poor hygiene. PMID:24432231

  4. Severe Chromoblastomycosis-Like Cutaneous Infection Caused by Chrysosporium keratinophilum

    PubMed Central

    Mijiti, Juhaer; Pan, Bo; de Hoog, Sybren; Horie, Yoshikazu; Matsuzawa, Tetsuhiro; Yilifan, Yilixiati; Liu, Yong; Abliz, Parida; Pan, Weihua; Deng, Danqi; Guo, Yun; Zhang, Peiliang; Liao, Wanqing; Deng, Shuwen

    2017-01-01

    Chrysosporium species are saprophytic filamentous fungi commonly found in the soil, dung, and animal fur. Subcutaneous infection caused by this organism is rare in humans. We report a case of subcutaneous fungal infection caused by Chrysosporium keratinophilum in a 38-year-old woman. The patient presented with severe chromoblastomycosis-like lesions on the left side of the jaw and neck for 6 years. She also got tinea corporis on her trunk since she was 10 years old. Chrysosporium keratinophilum was isolated from the tissue on the neck and scales on the trunk, respectively. The patient showed satisfactory response to itraconazole therapy, although she discontinued the follow-up. PMID:28179902

  5. Zika Virus, a Cause of Fever in Central Java, Indonesia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    ZIKA VIRUS, A CAUSE OF FEVER IN CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA J.G. Olson, T.G. Ksiazek, Suhandiman and Triwibowo REPORT NO. TR-879 NAMRU- DT1 &, AUG 0 9...75, No. 3, 1981 Zika virus, a cause of fever in Central Java, Indonesia J. G. OLSON’, T. G. KSIAZEK’, SUHANDIMAN 2 AND TRIwIBOWO 2 ’U.S. Naval...clinical history was taken and a involvement. Three additional isolations of ZIKA check list of signs and symptoms was completed were made from

  6. Invasive Aspergillosis Caused by Aspergillus ustus: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, Paul E.; van den Bergh, Marjolein F. Q.; Rath, Peter M.; de Pauw, Ben E.; Voss, Andreas; Meis, Jacques F. G. M.

    1999-01-01

    A case of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in an allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipient caused by Aspergillus ustus is presented. A. ustus was also recovered from the hospital environment, which may indicate that the infection was nosocomially acquired. A literature review revealed seven cases of invasive infections caused by A. ustus, and three of these were primarily cutaneous infections. In vitro susceptibility testing of 12 A. ustus isolates showed that amphotericin B and terbinafine had fungicidal activity and that itraconazole and voriconazole had fungistatic activity. PMID:10203536

  7. Treatment of infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Cisneros, José Miguel; Gudiol, Carlota; Martínez, José Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Treatment of infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) is currently one of the most important challenges of infectious diseases. The available information is based on in vitro studies, some animal model data and a few case studies and retrospective cohorts; appropriate data are lacking or are very scarce for some old antibiotics that are still occasionally used. Because of the heterogeneity in clinical situations, in specific carbapenemases and in the susceptibility of isolates, individualized treatment decisions must usually be made. Here we review the different antibiotics that might be useful for treating infections caused by CPE.

  8. Material isolation enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Martell, C.J.; Dahlby, J.W.; Gallimore, B.F.; Comer, B.E.; Stone, W.A.; Carlson, D.O.

    1993-04-27

    An enclosure is described, similar to a glove box, for isolating materials from the atmosphere, yet allowing a technician to manipulate the materials and also apparatus which is located inside the enclosure. A portion of a wall of the enclosure is comprised of at least one flexible curtain. An opening defined by a frame is provided for the technician to insert his hands and forearms into the enclosure. The frame is movable in one plane, so that the technician has access to substantially all of the working interior of the enclosure. As the frame is moved by the technician, while he accomplishes work inside the enclosure, the curtain moves such that the only opening through the enclosure wall is the frame. In a preferred embodiment, where a negative pressure is maintained inside the enclosure, the frame is comprised of airfoils so that turbulence is reduced, thereby enhancing material retention within the box.

  9. Material isolation enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Martell, Calvin J.; Dahlby, Joel W.; Gallimore, Bradford F.; Comer, Bob E.; Stone, Water A.; Carlson, David O.

    1993-01-01

    An enclosure similar to a glovebox for isolating materials from the atmosphere, yet allowing a technician to manipulate the materials and also apparatus which is located inside the enclosure. A portion of a wall of the enclosure is comprised of at least one flexible curtain. An opening defined by a frame is provided for the technician to insert his hands and forearms into the enclosure. The frame is movable in one plane, so that the technician has access to substantially all of the working interior of the enclosure. As the frame is moved by the technician, while he accomplishes work inside the enclosure, the curtain moves such that the only opening through the enclosure wall is the frame. In a preferred embodiment, where a negative pressure is maintained inside the enclosure, the frame is comprised of airfoils so that turbulence is reduced, thereby enhancing material retention within the box.

  10. Isolation of chromaffin granules.

    PubMed

    Creutz, Carl E

    2010-09-01

    Adrenal medullary chromaffin granules (dense core secretory vesicles) have been a valuable model system for the study of the proteins and membrane components involved in the process of exocytosis. Because of the abundance of chromaffin granules in a readily available tissue source, bovine adrenal medullae, and their unique sedimentation properties, it is possible to obtain large quantities of highly purified granules and granule membranes in a short period of time. Two protocols are presented here for the isolation of chromaffin granules: a basic protocol based on differential centrifugation in an iso-osmotic medium that yields intact chromaffin granules, and an alternate protocol based on sedimentation through a density step gradient that provides a greater yield of more highly purified chromaffin granules. Since in the latter case the granules cannot be returned to a medium of physiological osmolarity without lysis after purification on the step gradient, the alternate protocol is more useful to obtain the granule membranes or contents for further study.

  11. Isolation of Mitochondrial Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Translation of mitochondrial encoded mRNAs by mitochondrial ribosomes is thought to play a major role in regulating the expression of mitochondrial proteins. However, the structure and function of plant mitochondrial ribosomes remains poorly understood. To study mitochondrial ribosomes, it is necessary to separate them from plastidic and cytosolic ribosomes that are generally present at much higher concentrations. Here, a straight forward protocol for the preparation of fractions highly enriched in mitochondrial ribosomes from plant cells is described. The method begins with purification of mitochondria followed by mitochondrial lysis and ultracentrifugation of released ribosomes through sucrose cushions and gradients. Dark-grown Arabidopsis cells were used in this example because of the ease with which good yields of pure mitochondria can be obtained from them. However, the steps for isolation of ribosomes from mitochondria could be applied to mitochondria obtained from other sources. Proteomic analyses of resulting fractions have confirmed strong enrichment of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins.

  12. Magnetically coupled signal isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Jr., William C. (Inventor); Hermann, Theodore M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A current determiner having an output at which representations of input currents are provided having an input conductor for the input current and a current sensor supported on a substrate electrically isolated from one another but with the sensor positioned in the magnetic fields arising about the input conductor due to any input currents. The sensor extends along the substrate in a direction primarily perpendicular to the extent of the input conductor and is formed of at least a pair of thin-film ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-magnetic conductive layer. The sensor can be electrically connected to electronic circuitry formed in the substrate including a nonlinearity adaptation circuit to provide representations of the input currents of increased accuracy despite nonlinearities in the current sensor, and can include further current sensors in bridge circuits.

  13. Acoustic trauma caused by lightning.

    PubMed

    Mora-Magaña, I; Collado-Corona, M A; Toral-Martiñòn, R; Cano, A

    1996-03-01

    Lesions produced by exposure to noise are frequent in everyday life. Injuries may be found in all systems of the human body, from the digestive to the endocrine, from the cardiovascular to the nervous system. Many organs may be damaged, the ear being one of them. It is known that noise produced by factories, airports, musical instruments and even toys can cause auditory loss. Noises in nature can also cause acoustic trauma. This report is the case history of acoustic trauma caused by lightning. The patient was studied with CAT scan, electroencephalogram, and brain mapping, impedance audiometry with tympanogram and acoustic reflex, audiometry and evoked otoacoustics emissions: distortion products and transients.

  14. Bacteraemia caused by Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Ladrón de Guevara, C; Gonzalez, J; Peña, P

    1994-01-01

    The genus Campylobacter has become increasingly recognised as the cause of various infections. Campylobacter jejuni and C coli cause acute gastroenteritis in man all over the world. C jejuni enteritis can lead to bacteraemia, but its actual incidence remains unknown. Seven cases of bacteraemia caused by C jejuni or C coli are reported, from the blood of seven patients: five immune deficient adults; a newborn baby; and a patient who had had abdominal surgery. Patients who develop diarrhoea as a result of Campylobacter infection are at risk of bacteraemia thereafter. PMID:8132835

  15. Haematuria: classification, causes and investigations.

    PubMed

    Bagnall, Pauline

    The majority of patients who attend haematuria clinics for investigation of blood in their urine will be found to have either no cause or a benign cause. Between 20% and 25% of people with visible blood in their urine and 5-10% of people with non-visible blood in their urine will be diagnosed with a urological malignancy, i.e. bladder, kidney or prostate cancer. Haematuria is therefore a significant symptom that should be investigated promptly and thoroughly to exclude cancer as quickly as possible. This article gives an overview of the causes of haematuria and the investigations that patients will undergo when referred to a haematuria clinic.

  16. Isolated Northern Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    This VIS image was taken at 81 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. In this region, the dunes are isolated from each other. The dunes are just starting to emerge from the winter frost covering appearing dark with bright crests. These dunes are located on top of ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 82.1, Longitude 191.3 East (168.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. The Neuroendocrinology of Social Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, John T.; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Capitanio, John P.; Cole, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter of a century. Although the focus of research has been on objective social roles and health behavior, the brain is the key organ for forming, monitoring, maintaining, repairing, and replacing salutary connections with others. Accordingly, population-based longitudinal research indicates that perceived social isolation (loneliness) is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality independent of objective social isolation and health behavior. Human and animal investigations of neuroendocrine stress mechanisms that may be involved suggest that (a) chronic social isolation increases the activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical axis, and (b) these effects are more dependent on the disruption of a social bond between a significant pair than objective isolation per se. The relational factors and neuroendocrine, neurobiological, and genetic mechanisms that may contribute to the association between perceived isolation and mortality are reviewed. PMID:25148851

  18. The neuroendocrinology of social isolation.

    PubMed

    Cacioppo, John T; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Capitanio, John P; Cole, Steven W

    2015-01-03

    Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter of a century. Although the focus of research has been on objective social roles and health behavior, the brain is the key organ for forming, monitoring, maintaining, repairing, and replacing salutary connections with others. Accordingly, population-based longitudinal research indicates that perceived social isolation (loneliness) is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality independent of objective social isolation and health behavior. Human and animal investigations of neuroendocrine stress mechanisms that may be involved suggest that (a) chronic social isolation increases the activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical axis, and (b) these effects are more dependent on the disruption of a social bond between a significant pair than objective isolation per se. The relational factors and neuroendocrine, neurobiological, and genetic mechanisms that may contribute to the association between perceived isolation and mortality are reviewed.

  19. Protein loss during nuclear isolation

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Cryomicrodissection makes possible the measurement of the entire in vivo protein content of the amphibian oocyte nucleus and provides a heretofore missing baseline for estimating protein loss during nuclear isolation by other methods. When oocyte nuclei are isolated into an aqueous medium, they lose 95% of their protein with a half-time of 250 s. This result implies an even more rapid loss of protein from aqueously isolated nuclei of ordinary-size cells. PMID:6619193

  20. Nucleotide diversity of Japanese isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) based on the glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, T; Kinoshita, S; Kim, W S; Higashi, S; Yoshimizu, M

    2006-08-30

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus, causes a highly lethal disease of salmonid fish. In the present study, G gene nucleotide sequences of 9 Japanese IHNV isolates obtained from 1971 to 1996 were analyzed to evaluate the genetic diversity and compared with IHNV isolates from North America and Europe. A radial phylogenetic tree revealed 5 major clusters including 3 genogroups (U, M and L) for North American isolates and 1 genogroup for European isolates. Five Japanese isolates from 1971 to 1982 appeared in the cluster for genogroup U, while the remaining Japanese isolates from 1980 to 1996 formed a new genogroup, JRt (Japanese rainbow trout). Maximum nucleotide diversity among the Japanese isolates was 4.5%, which was greater than that within the North American isolates (3.6%), and the degree of nucleotide diversity within Japanese isolates was increased by inclusion of the genogroup JRt isolates. It was concluded that Japanese isolates shared a common source with the genogroup U of the North American isolates and that there were large divergences between Japanese isolates before and after the 1980s.

  1. What Causes High Blood Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes High Blood Cholesterol? Many factors can affect the cholesterol levels in your blood. You can control some ... but not others. Factors You Can Control Diet Cholesterol is found in foods that come from animal ...

  2. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Valve Disease? Heart conditions and other disorders, age-related changes, ... valve disease. Other Conditions and Factors Linked to Heart Valve Disease Many other conditions and factors are linked to ...

  3. What Causes Overweight and Obesity?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the endocrine system can cause overweight and obesity. Hypothyroidism . People with this condition have low levels of ... even when food intake is reduced. People with hypothyroidism also produce less body heat, have a lower ...

  4. What Causes Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is involved in blood clotting. Not having enough enzyme activity causes overactive blood clotting. In TTP, blood clots ... make a normal ADAMTS13 enzyme. As a result, enzyme activity is lacking or changed. "Inherited" means that the ...

  5. Addison's Disease: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... these problems. Causes Addison's disease results when your adrenal glands are damaged, producing insufficient amounts of the hormone ... every organ and tissue in your body. Your adrenal glands are composed of two sections. The interior (medulla) ...

  6. Nursing malpractice: cause for consideration.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1999-02-01

    Because so many factors influence a patient's health, it's difficult to know with certainty that a nurse's error actually caused the negative outcome. In nursing malpractice cases, causation can be a successful defense strategy.

  7. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Causes of High Blood Pressure Changes, either from genes or the environment, in ... vessel structure and function. Biology and High Blood Pressure Researchers continue to study how various changes in ...

  8. Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162793.html Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss? Iron deficiency might keep ear cells from getting oxygen ... HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss may be linked to iron deficiency anemia -- a combination of low levels of ...

  9. What Causes Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes of SCA and how to prevent them. Coronary Heart Disease CHD is a disease in which a waxy substance called plaque (plak) builds up in the coronary arteries. These arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to ...

  10. Pressure injuries: causes and prevention.

    PubMed

    Bliss, M R

    1998-11-01

    Pressure injuries are caused by peripheral circulatory failure in acutely ill or traumatized patients, which is exacerbated by increased tissue deformability over bony prominences as a result of hypotension, dehydration or poor muscle tone.

  11. Research Areas: Causes of Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Understanding the exposures and risk factors that cause cancer, as well as the genetic abnormalities associated with the disease, has helped us to reduce certain exposures and to ameliorate their harmful effects.

  12. Dementia due to metabolic causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a medical condition causing the dementia may include: Ammonia level in the blood Blood chemistry , electrolytes Blood ... Liver disease Low blood sugar Low sodium level Metabolism Pellagra Pheochromocytoma Porphyria Prerenal azotemia Vitamin B12 Review ...

  13. Foods That May Cause Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... many dietetic foods and sugarfree candies and gums. Starches Most starches, including potatoes, corn, noodles, and wheat, produce gas ... in the large intestine. Rice is the only starch that does not cause gas. Fiber Dietary fiber ...

  14. Draft genome sequence of Penicillium expansum (R19) that cause postharvest decay of apple fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among the species that cause blue mold, isolates of P. expansum are the most prevalent and virulent species causing more than 50 percent of postharvest decay. We report the draft genome sequence of P. expansum (R19) in order to identify fungal virulence factors and to understand the mechanism of inf...

  15. Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    TI FLE CY N Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 SWES% Ot DNA-TR-89-45 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes A. Laupa G. H. Anno...0104 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes PE - 62715H PR - RM 6 AUTHOR(S) TA -RH A. Laupa: G. H. Anno WU - DH026130 7 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...vi 1 INTRODUCTION .......................................... 1I DATA SOURCES ON CHERNOBYL VICTIMS ............... 3 CHERNOBYL

  16. Large rhinolith causing nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dincer Kose, Onur; Kose, Taha Emre; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Cankaya, Abdulkadir Burak

    2015-01-01

    Rhinoliths are calcified masses located in the nasal cavity and may cause symptoms such as nasal obstruction, fetid odour and facial pain. They are usually diagnosed incidentally on radiographic examinations or depending on the symptoms. In this paper we report a 27-year-old Caucasian woman with a calcified mass in the right nasal cavity causing nasal obstruction, anosmia and facial pain. The calcified mass was removed by endonasal approach. PMID:25759270

  17. Science 101: What Causes Wind?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William C.

    2010-01-01

    There's a quick and easy answer to this question. The Sun causes wind. Exactly how the Sun causes wind takes a bit to explain. We'll begin with what wind is. You've no doubt heard that wind is the motion of air molecules, which is true. Putting aside the huge leap of faith it takes for us to believe that we are experiencing the motion of millions…

  18. Isolation and characterization of pigmented algicidal bacteria from seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaima, A.; Gires, U.; Asmat, A.

    2014-09-01

    Some dinoflagellate species are toxic and widely distributed in Malaysian marines ecosystems. They can cause many problems to aquatic life due to the production of various potential and natural toxins that accumulate in filter feeding shellfish and cause food poisoning to human. In recent decades, bacteria have been widely used as a biological control against these harmful algae. In the present study, pigmented bacteria isolated from marine water of Port Dickson beach was studied for their anti-algal activity towards toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum. Four isolates were studied and only one was capable of inhibiting algal growth when treated with bacterial culture. The algilytic effect on dinoflagellate was evaluated based on direct cell count under the microscope. Results showed that only isolate Sdpd-310 with orange colour has an inhibitory effect on A. minutum growth. This study demonstrated the rapid algicidal activity of a marine pigmented bacteria against the toxic dinoflagellate A. minutum.

  19. Molecular analysis of Vibrio vulnificus isolated from cockles and patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Mala, Wanida; Chomvarin, Chariya; Alam, Munirul; Rashed, Shah M; Faksri, Kiatichai; Angkititrakul, Sunpetch

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus can cause septicemia, wound infection and gastroenteritis. The most severe infections are related to consumption of raw or undercooked seafood. Virulence genes, biomarkers, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic relationships among V vulnificus isolated from clinical and environmental sources in Thailand have not hitherto been investigated. ViuB encoding vulnibactin siderophore was detected in 33% and 50% of clinical and environmental (cockle) V. vulnificus isolates, respectively, and capsular polysaccharide allele 1 in 67% and 75% of clinical and environmental isolates, respectively. Analysis of the 16 S rDNA gene revealed that type B was the most frequent in both clinical and environmental isolates (67%) whereas the non type-able (30%) was detected only in environmental isolates. The virulence-correlated gene (vcg) with both type C and E together was the most frequently found among the clinical (67%) and environmental (72%) isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis differentiated V vulnificus into 2 clusters; most cockle samples (83%) and all clinical isolates grouped into cluster II, indicating a possible clonal relationship between V. vulnificus isolated from patients and cockles. Only 20% of environmental isolates were resistant to ampicillin. These studies suggest that V vulnificus isolated from cockles has virulence genes similar to those in clinical isolates and thus may have the potential of causing disease.

  20. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PaperClip PMID:26871628

  1. Process fault isolation based on transfer entropy algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hajihosseini, Payman; Salahshoor, Karim; Moshiri, Behzad

    2014-03-01

    Complexity of industrial plants and their stringent environmental and safety regulations have necessitated early detection and isolation of process faults. All the existing fault isolation methods can be categorized into two general groups: model-based and data-based. Transfer entropy is a data-based method for measuring propagation direction of disturbance and finding its root cause. In this paper, a new transfer entropy-based method is proposed to isolate different process faults. The novelty of this paper lies in using the transfer entropy idea to generate distinct patterns of information flow among process variables, recognize their correlations in the context of the transferred information in any abnormal condition, and finally isolate different process faults. The experimental results clearly demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method to the conventional methods.

  2. Isolation of five Rubrobacter strains from biodeteriorated monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiz, L.; Miller, A. Z.; Jurado, V.; Akatova, E.; Sanchez-Moral, S.; Gonzalez, J. M.; Dionísio, A.; Macedo, M. F.; Saiz-Jimenez, C.

    2009-01-01

    In the last few years, the microbial colonisation of mural paintings in ancient monuments has been attracting the attention of microbiologists and conservators. The genus Rubrobacter is commonly found in biodeteriorated monuments, where it has been reported to cause rosy discolouration. However, to date, only three species of this genus have been isolated, all from thermophilic environments. In this paper, we studied three monuments: the Servilia and Postumio tombs in the Roman Necropolis of Carmona (Spain), and Vilar de Frades church (Portugal), in search of Rubrobacter strains. In all cases, biodeterioration and the formation of efflorescences were observed, and five Rubrobacter strains were isolated. These isolates showed different physiology and migration in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, suggesting they might represent new species within this genus. The isolates reproduced some biodeterioration processes in the laboratory and revealed their biomediation in crystal formation.

  3. [The first report of Kadipiro virus isolation in China].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-hong; Meng, Wei-shan; Fu, Shi-hong; Feng, Yun; Zhai, You-gang; Wang, Jing-lin; Wang, Huan-qin; Lv, Xin-jun; Liang, Guo-dong

    2009-05-01

    5 strains of virus isolated from Culex tritaeniorhynchus, Anopheles sinensis and Armigeres subalbatus, which caused cytopathic effect in C6/36 cells, had been obtained in the survey of arboviruses in Northwestern Yunnan Province. China. The virus particles displayed 70 nanometers diameter (n=7) with no envelope but spikes on the surfaces. RNA-PAGE of the genomes of the isolates showed 6-5-1 profile. A fragment of the 12th segment sequence was amplified by a pair of specific primers for Kadipiro virus strain JKT-7075 in RT-PCR. The full length of the 12th segment was 758 nucleotides, BLAST analysis revealed the highest identity was 90% to JKT-7075. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the isolates appeared to be Kadipiro viruses (Family Reoviridae). It was the first report of kadipiro virus isolation in China.

  4. Human Streptococcus agalactiae isolate in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Evans, Joyce J; Klesius, Phillip H; Pasnik, David J; Bohnsack, John F

    2009-05-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B streptococcus (GBS) long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging concern with regard to fish. We show that a GBS serotype Ia multilocus sequence type ST-7 isolate from a clinical case of human neonatal meningitis caused disease and death in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

  5. Complete genome sequence of Providencia stuartii clinical isolate MRSN 2154.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Robert J; Hang, Jun; Riley, Matthew C; Onmus-Leone, Fatma; Kuschner, Robert A; Lesho, Emil P; Waterman, Paige E

    2012-07-01

    Here we present the complete genome sequence of Providencia stuartii MRSN 2154, isolated from an Afghan national. P. stuartii is a Gram-negative bacillus capable of causing infections in a wide variety of human tissues. Because Providencia readily acquires plasmids bearing drug resistance loci, it is of growing clinical significance.

  6. Isolation of a Bacterial Inhibitor from Green Olives1

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, H. P.; Walter, W. M.; Etchells, J. L.

    1969-01-01

    A compound inhibitory to lactic acid bacteria was isolated from green Manzanillo olives. The inhibitor is a phenolic compound, is devoid of acid-hydrolyzable reducing sugar, and has a bitter taste. Freezing the olives prior to extraction caused chemical changes which greatly increased the level of the inhibitor, whereas heating prior to freezing prevented its formation. Images PMID:16349868

  7. Human Streptococcus agalactiae isolate in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B Streptococcus (GBS), long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging pathogen to fish. We show that a GBS serotype Ia, multilocus sequence type ST-7 isolate from a human neonatal meningitis clinical case causes disease signs and mortality in N...

  8. Novel Arenavirus Isolates from Namaqua Rock Mice, Namibia, Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Peter T; Kallies, René; Hoveka, Julia; Auste, Brita; Ithete, Ndapewa L; Šoltys, Katarína; Szemes, Tomáš; Drosten, Christian; Preiser, Wolfgang; Klempa, Boris; Mfune, John K E; Kruger, Detlev H

    2015-07-01

    Arenaviruses are feared as agents that cause viral hemorrhagic fevers. We report the identification, isolation, and genetic characterization of 2 novel arenaviruses from Namaqua rock mice in Namibia. These findings extend knowledge of the distribution and diversity of arenaviruses in Africa.

  9. Novel Arenavirus Isolates from Namaqua Rock Mice, Namibia, Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kallies, René; Hoveka, Julia; Auste, Brita; Ithete, Ndapewa L.; Šoltys, Katarína; Szemes, Tomáš; Drosten, Christian; Preiser, Wolfgang; Klempa, Boris; Mfune, John K.E.; Kruger, Detlev H.

    2015-01-01

    Arenaviruses are feared as agents that cause viral hemorrhagic fevers. We report the identification, isolation, and genetic characterization of 2 novel arenaviruses from Namaqua rock mice in Namibia. These findings extend knowledge of the distribution and diversity of arenaviruses in Africa. PMID:26079174

  10. Complete genome sequence of chikungunya virus isolated in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Kent D; Suarez, Lady-Anne C; Labayo, Hannah Karen M; Liles, Veni R; Salvoza, Noel C; Klinzing, David C; Daroy, Maria Luisa G; Matias, Ronald R; Natividad, Filipinas F

    2014-06-26

    Chikungunya virus is an alphavirus of the Togaviridae family, which causes a febrile illness with arthralgia in humans. We report here on the complete genome sequence of chikungunya virus strain CHIKV-13-112A isolated from a patient in the Philippines who was suspected to have dengue virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain is of the Asian genotype.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Chikungunya Virus Isolated in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Kent D.; Suarez, Lady-Anne C.; Labayo, Hannah Karen M.; Liles, Veni R.; Salvoza, Noel C.; Klinzing, David C.; Natividad, Filipinas F.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is an alphavirus of the Togaviridae family, which causes a febrile illness with arthralgia in humans. We report here on the complete genome sequence of chikungunya virus strain CHIKV-13-112A isolated from a patient in the Philippines who was suspected to have dengue virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain is of the Asian genotype. PMID:24970822

  12. Characterization and phylogenic analysis of Mexican Newcastle disease virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was isolated in Mexico for the first time in 1946 and the last report of a field outbreak caused by a highly virulent strain dates from year 2000, when 13.6 million birds were slaughtered and 93 farms quarantined. Mean Death Time test resulted in velogenic classificati...

  13. Isolated Horner Syndrome From an Elongated Styloid Process (Eagle Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Chang, Caitlin A; Lin, Tony; Fung, Kevin; Sharma, Manas; Fraser, J Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Eagle syndrome occurs when an elongated styloid process causes otolaryngological or neurological symptoms or signs. We report a patient who had an isolated asymptomatic Horner syndrome that resulted from a pinned internal carotid artery being dynamically injured by an elongated styloid process during chiropractic neck manipulation. There was no evidence of arterial dissection.

  14. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis Disease-Causing Strains in Argentina, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sorhouet-Pereira, Cecilia; Efron, Adriana; Gagetti, Paula; Faccone, Diego; Regueira, Mabel; Corso, Alejandra; Gabastou, Jean-Marc; Ibarz-Pavón, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of 133 isolates of Neisseria meningitidis obtained from meningococcal disease cases in Argentina during 2010 were performed by the National Reference Laboratory as part of a project coordinated by the PAHO within the SIREVA II network. Serogroup, serotype, serosubtype and MLST characterization were performed. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration to penicillin, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, rifampin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were determined and interpreted according to CLSI guidelines. Almost 49% of isolates were W135, and two serotype:serosubtype combinations, W135∶2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 and W135∶2a:P1.2:ST-11 accounted for 78% of all W135 isolates. Serogroup B accounted for 42.1% of isolates, and was both phenotypically and genotypically diverse. Serogroup C isolates represented 5.3% of the dataset, and one isolate belonging to the ST-198 complex was non-groupable. Isolates belonged mainly to the ST-11 complex (48%) and to a lesser extent to the ST-865 (18%), ST-32 (9,8%) and the ST-35 complexes (9%). Intermediate resistance to penicillin and ampicillin was detected in 35.4% and 33.1% of isolates respectively. Two W135∶2a:P1.5,2:ST-11:ST-11 isolates presented resistance to ciprofloxacin associated with a mutation in the QRDR of gyrA gene Thr91-Ile. These data show serogroup W135 was the first cause of disease in Argentina in 2010, and was strongly associated with the W135∶2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 epidemic clone. Serogroup B was the second cause of disease and isolates belonging to this serogroup were phenotypically and genotypically diverse. The presence of isolates with intermediate resistance to penicillin and the presence of fluorquinolone-resistant isolates highlight the necessity and importance of maintaining and strengthening National Surveillance Programs. PMID:23483970

  15. Epidemiological investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bacteraemia isolates by PCR-based DNA fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Davin-Regli, A; Bosi, C; Charrel, R N; Bollet, C

    1996-11-01

    Between July 1994 and March 1995, 64 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were implicated in bacteraemia in 25 cancer patients in five wards of two hospitals. These, together with 24 environmental isolates and one isolate from a bacteraemia in a non-cancer patient were examined by three PCR-based DNA fingerprinting methods: random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), enterobacterial-repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR, and 16S-23S spacer region-based RAPD. These methods were reproducible, discriminatory and showed close agreement; all indicated that 47 isolates that had caused bacteraemia in 19 cancer patients were indistinguishable. Seventeen other isolates that had caused bacteraemia in 10 cancer patients were discriminated into eight further groups, and the 24 environmental and non-cancer patient isolates into further distinct groups. No environmental source of the epidemic strain was found, but it was suspected that the outbreak was related to infusion implants.

  16. [Viridans streptococci isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. Clinical significance of 9 cases].

    PubMed

    Alba, D; Guerra, A; Peña, P; Molina, F

    1997-02-01

    Viridans streptococci (VS) are often isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, the significance of such isolates is poorly understood. In the present study we carry out a retrospective analysis of 9 patients in whom VS were isolated from CSF during a 1-year period at La Paz Hospital. Two patients (22.2%) had meningitis diagnosed through clinical, laboratory and bacteriologic findings. Both patients had predisposition diseases (previous difficult spinal tap, ventriculo-peritoneal shunt). The other isolations were considered as contaminants. Three patients (33.3%) with no VS meningitis had other different serious disease (sepsis without bacteriologic confirmation). VS are isolated with relative frequency from CSF, although they cause meningitis in less than one-quarter of the cases (those who have a predisposition disease). In the other cases, VS are isolated as contaminants of CSF and other disease should be search as cause of patient symptoms.

  17. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  18. SELECTIVE EXTRACTION OF ISOLATED MITOTIC APPARATUS

    PubMed Central

    Bibring, Thomas; Baxandall, Jane

    1971-01-01

    Mitotic apparatus isolated from sea urchin eggs has been treated with meralluride sodium under conditions otherwise resembling those of its isolation. The treatment causes a selective morphological disappearance of microtubules while extracting a major protein fraction, probably consisting of two closely related proteins, which constitutes about 10% of mitotic apparatus protein. Extraction of other cell particulates under similar conditions yields much less of this protein. The extracted protein closely resembles outer doublet microtubule protein from sea urchin sperm tail in properties considered typical of microtubule proteins: precipitation by calcium ion and vinblastine, electrophoretic mobility in both acid and basic polyacrylamide gels, sedimentation coefficient, molecular weight, and, according to a preliminary determination, amino acid composition. An antiserum against a preparation of sperm tail outer doublet microtubules cross-reacts with the extract from mitotic apparatus. On the basis of these findings it appears that microtubule protein is selectively extracted from isolated mitotic apparatus by treatment with meralluride, and is a typical microtubule protein. PMID:5543404

  19. Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Bernal, Patricia; Roca, Amalia; de la Torre, Jesús; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host’s immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26820467

  20. The AMIGA sample of isolated galaxies. X. A first look at isolated galaxy colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Lorenzo, M.; Sulentic, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Ruiz, J. E.; Sabater, J.; Sánchez, S.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The basic properties of galaxies can be affected by both nature (internal processes) or nurture (interactions and effects of environment). Deconvolving the two effects is an important current effort in astrophysics. Observed properties of a sample of isolated galaxies should be mainly the result of internal (natural) evolution. It follows that nurture-induced galaxy evolution can only be understood through a comparative study of galaxies in different environments. Aims: We take a first look at SDSS (g - r) colors of galaxies in the AMIGA sample, which consists of many of the most isolated galaxies in the local Universe. This alerted us at the same time to the pitfalls of using automated SDSS colors. Methods: We focused on median values for the principal morphological subtypes found in the AMIGA sample (E/S0 and Sb-Sc) and compared them with equivalent measures obtained for galaxies in denser environments. Results: We find a weak tendency for AMIGA spiral galaxies to be redder than objects in close pairs. We find no clear difference when we compared this with galaxies in other (e.g. group) environments. However, the (g - r) color of isolated galaxies shows a Gaussian distribution, as might be expected assuming nurture-free evolution. We find a smaller median absolute deviation in colors for isolated galaxies compared to both wide and close pairs. The majority of the deviation on median colors for spiral subtypes is caused by a color-luminosity correlation. Surprisingly, isolated and non-isolated early-type galaxies show similar (g - r). We see little evidence for a green valley in our sample because most spirals redder than (g - r) = 0.7 have spurious colors. Conclusions: The redder colors of AMIGA spirals and lower color dispersions for AMIGA subtypes - compared with close pairs - are likely caused by a more passive star formation in very isolated galaxies. Full Tables 1 and 2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130

  1. Serovar identification, antimicrobial sensitivity, and virulence of Avibacterium paragallinarum isolated from chickens in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chukiatsiri, Kridda; Sasipreeyajan, Jiroj; Blackall, Patrick J; Yuwatanichsampan, Sommai; Chansiripornchai, Niwat

    2012-06-01

    Avibacterium paragallinarum causes infectious coryza in chickens, an acute respiratory disease that has worldwide economic significance. The objectives of this study were to determine the serovars, antimicrobial resistance, and pathogenicity of A. paragallinarum isolated from chickens in Thailand. Eighteen field isolates of A. paragallinarum were confirmed by PCR. When examined by serotyping in a hemagglutination inhibition test, 10 isolates were serovar A, five isolates were serovar B, and three isolates were serovar C. The susceptibility of the isolates to 16 antimicrobial agents was tested by a disk diffusion method. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. There was a high level of resistance to lincomycin and erythromycin. All isolates were resistant to cloxacillin and neomycin. A study of bacterial entry into, and survival within, chicken macrophages showed variation between isolates but no clear connection to serovar. A virulence test was performed by challenging 4-wk-old layers via the nasal route with 400 dl of bacteria (10(8) colony-forming units/ml). Clinical signs were observed daily for 7 days, and the birds were subjected to a postmortem necropsy at 7 days postchallenge. All 18 field isolates caused the typical clinical signs of infectious coryza and could be re-isolated at 7 days after challenge. There was no significant difference in the clinical scores of the isolates except that two isolates (112179 and 102984, serovars A and B, respectively) gave a significantly higher score than did isolate CMU1009 (a serovar A isolate). No correlation between serovar and severity of clinical signs was found.

  2. Social Isolation in Community-Dwelling Seniors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    loneliness. Research into interventions for social isolation in seniors has not been broadly based, relative to the diverse personal, social, health, economic, and environmentally interrelated factors potentially affecting isolation. Although rehabilitation for hearing-related disability was evaluated, the systematic review did not locate research on interventions for other common causes of aging-related disability and loneliness, such as vision loss or mobility declines. Despite recent technological advances in e-health or telehealth, controlled studies evaluating technology-assisted interventions for social isolation have examined only basic technologies such as phone- or computer-mediated support groups. Conclusions Although effective interventions were identified for social isolation and loneliness in community-dwelling seniors, they were directed at specifically targeted groups and involved only a few of the many potential causes of social isolation. Little research has been directed at identifying effective interventions that influence the social isolation and other burdens imposed upon caregivers, in spite of the key role that caregivers assume in caring for seniors. The evidence on technology-assisted interventions and their effects on the social health and well-being of seniors and their caregivers is limited, but increasing demand for home health care and the need for efficiencies warrant further exploration. Interventions for social isolation in community-dwelling seniors need to be researched more broadly in order to develop effective, appropriate, and comprehensive strategies for at-risk populations. PMID:23074510

  3. Causes of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the causes of spinal cord injury (SCI) and associated factors is critical in the development of successful prevention programs. Objective: This study analyzed data from the National SCI Database (NSCID) and National Shriners SCI Database (NSSCID) in the United States to examine specific etiologies of SCI by age, sex, race, ethnicity, day and month of injury, and neurologic outcomes. Methods: NSCID and NSSCID participants who had a traumatic SCI from 2005 to 2011 with known etiology were included in the analyses (N=7,834). Thirty-seven causes of injury documented in the databases were stratified by personal characteristics using descriptive analysis. Results: The most common causes of SCI were automobile crashes (31.5%) and falls (25.3%), followed by gunshot wounds (10.4%), motorcycle crashes (6.8%), diving incidents (4.7%), and medical/surgical complications (4.3%), which collectively accounted for 83.1% of total SCIs since 2005. Automobile crashes were the leading cause of SCI until age 45 years, whereas falls were the leading cause after age 45 years. Gunshot wounds, motorcycle crashes, and diving caused more SCIs in males than females. The major difference among race/ethnicity was in the proportion of gunshot wounds. More SCIs occurred during the weekends and warmer months, which seemed to parallel the increase of motorcycle- and diving-related SCIs. Level and completeness of injury are also associated with etiology of injury. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that prevention strategies should be tailored to the targeted population and major causes to have a meaningful impact on reducing the incidence of SCI. PMID:23678280

  4. Whole genome sequence of an unusual Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato isolate

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W. G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    Human Lyme disease is caused by a number of related Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species. We report here the complete genome sequence of Borrelia sp. isolate SV1 from Finland. This isolate is to date the closest known relative of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, but it is sufficiently genetically distinct from that species that it and its close relatives warrant its candidacy for new-species status. We suggest that this isolate should be named 'Borrelia finlandensis.'

  5. Flooding Frequency Alters Vegetation in Isolated Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.

    2006-01-01

    Many isolated wetlands in central Florida occur as small, shallow depressions scattered throughout the karst topography of the region. In these wetlands, the water table approaches land surface seasonally, and water levels and flooding frequency are largely determined by differences between precipitation and evapotranspiration. Because much of the region is flat with little topographic relief, small changes in wetland water levels can cause large changes in wetland surface area. Persistent changes in wetland flooding frequencies, as a result of changes in rainfall or human activity, can cause a substantial change in the vegetation of thousands of acres of land. Understanding the effect that flooding frequency has on wetland vegetation is important to assessing the overall ecological status of wetlands. Wetland bathymetric mapping, when combined with water-level data and vegetation assessments, can enable scientists to determine the frequency of flooding at different elevations in a wetland and describe the effects of flooding frequency on wetland vegetation at those elevations. Five cypress swamps and five marshes were studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during 2000-2004, as part of an interdisciplinary study of isolated wetlands in central Florida (Haag and others, 2005). Partial results from two of these marshes are described in this report.

  6. Isolation of active regulatory elements from eukaryotic chromatin using FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements)

    PubMed Central

    Giresi, Paul G.; Lieb, Jason D.

    2009-01-01

    The binding of sequence-specific regulatory factors and the recruitment of chromatin remodeling activities cause nucleosomes to be evicted from chromatin in eukaryotic cells. Traditionally, these active sites have been identified experimentally through their sensitivity to nucleases. Here we describe the details of a simple procedure for the genome-wide isolation of nucleosome-depleted DNA from human chromatin, termed FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements). We also provide protocols for different methods of detecting FAIRE-enriched DNA, including use of PCR, DNA microarrays, and next-generation sequencing. FAIRE works on all eukaryotic chromatin tested to date. To perform FAIRE, chromatin is crosslinked with formaldehyde, sheared by sonication, and phenol-chloroform extracted. Most genomic DNA is crosslinked to nucleosomes and is sequestered to the interphase, whereas DNA recovered in the aqueous phase corresponds to nucleosome-depleted regions of the genome. The isolated regions are largely coincident with the location of DNaseI hypersensitive sites, transcriptional start sites, enhancers, insulators, and active promoters. Given its speed and simplicity, FAIRE has utility in establishing chromatin profiles of diverse cell types in health and disease, isolating DNA regulatory elements en masse for further characterization, and as a screening assay for the effects of small molecules on chromatin organization. PMID:19303047

  7. Infections Caused by Scedosporium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Roilides, Emmanuel; Quiroz-Telles, Flavio; Meletiadis, Joseph; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Knudsen, Tena; Buchanan, Wendy; Milanovich, Jeffrey; Sutton, Deanna A.; Fothergill, Annette; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Shea, Yvonne R.; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Kottilil, Shyam; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Scedosporium spp. are increasingly recognized as causes of resistant life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Scedosporium spp. also cause a wide spectrum of conditions, including mycetoma, saprobic involvement and colonization of the airways, sinopulmonary infections, extrapulmonary localized infections, and disseminated infections. Invasive scedosporium infections are also associated with central nervous infection following near-drowning accidents. The most common sites of infection are the lungs, sinuses, bones, joints, eyes, and brain. Scedosporium apiospermum and Scedosporium prolificans are the two principal medically important species of this genus. Pseudallescheria boydii, the teleomorph of S. apiospermum, is recognized by the presence of cleistothecia. Recent advances in molecular taxonomy have advanced the understanding of the genus Scedosporium and have demonstrated a wider range of species than heretofore recognized. Studies of the pathogenesis of and immune response to Scedosporium spp. underscore the importance of innate host defenses in protection against these organisms. Microbiological diagnosis of Scedosporium spp. currently depends upon culture and morphological characterization. Molecular tools for clinical microbiological detection of Scedosporium spp. are currently investigational. Infections caused by S. apiospermum and P. boydii in patients and animals may respond to antifungal triazoles. By comparison, infections caused by S. prolificans seldom respond to medical therapy alone. Surgery and reversal of immunosuppression may be the only effective therapeutic options for infections caused by S. prolificans. PMID:18202441

  8. Vibration isolation mounting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Sam D. (Inventor); Bastin, Paul H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A system is disclosed for mounting a vibration producing device onto a spacecraft structure and also for isolating the vibration forces thereof from the structure. The system includes a mount on which the device is securely mounted and inner and outer rings. The rings and mount are concentrically positioned. The system includes a base (secured to the structure) and a set of links which are interconnected by a set of torsion bars which allow and resist relative rotational movement therebetween. The set of links are also rotatably connected to a set of brackets which are rigidly connected to the outer ring. Damped leaf springs interconnect the inner and outer rings and the mount allow relative translational movement therebetween in X and Y directions. The links, brackets and base are interconnected and configured so that they allow and resist translational movement of the device in the Z direction so that in combination with the springs they provide absorption of vibrational energy produced by the device in all three dimensions while providing rotational stiffness about all three axes to prevent undesired rotational motions.

  9. Efficacy of epiphytic bacteria to prevent northern leaf blight caused by Exserohilum turcicum in maize.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Melina; Nesci, Andrea; García, Julián; Passone, María A; Montemarani, Analía; Etcheverry, Miriam

    Eight potential biological control agents (BCAs) were evaluated in planta in order to assess their effectiveness in reducing disease severity of northern leaf blight caused by Exserohilum turcicum. The assay was carried out in greenhouse. Twenty-six-day-old plants, V4 phenological stage, were inoculated with antagonists by foliar spray. Only one biocontrol agent was used per treatment. Ten days after this procedure, all treatments were inoculated with E. turcicum by foliar application. Treatments performed were: C-Et: control of E. turcicum; T1: isolate 1 (Enterococcus genus)+E. turcicum; T2: isolate 2 (Corynebacterium genus)+E. turcicum; T3: isolate 3 (Pantoea genus)+E. turcicum; T4: isolate 4 (Corynebacterium genus)+E. turcicum; T5: isolate 5 (Pantoea genus)+E. turcicum; T6: isolate 6 (Bacillus genus)+E. turcicum; T7: isolate 7 (Bacillus genus)+E. turcicum; T8: isolate 8 (Bacillus genus)+E. turcicum. Monitoring of antagonists on the phyllosphere was performed at different times. Furthermore, the percentage of infected leaves and, plant and leaf incidence were determined. Foliar application of different bacteria significantly reduced the leaf blight between 30-78% and 39-56% at 20 and 39 days respectively. It was observed that in the V10 stage of maize plants, isolate 8 (Bacillus spp.) caused the greatest effect on reducing the severity of northern leaf blight. Moreover, isolate 8 was the potential BCA that showed more stability in the phyllosphere. At 39 days, all potential biocontrol agents had a significant effect on controlling the disease caused by E. turcicum.

  10. Expect the Unexpected: A Case of Isolated Eosinophilic Meningitis in Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Sick, Christian; Hennerici, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young police officer suffering from headache without other neurological symptoms caused by isolated eosinophilic meningitis, which resulted from an infection with Toxocara cati, along with a discussion of the differential diagnosis. PMID:25535488

  11. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROMONAS ISOLATES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Members of the bacterial genus Aeromonas are commonly isolated from both fresh and salt waters worldwide and some are believed to cause infections in humans, including gastroenteritis and wound infections. Currently, aeromonads are on the United States Environmental Protection A...

  12. Invasion Assays and Genomotyping to Investigate Differences in Virulence of Campylobacter spp. Isolates from Iceland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter spp. are the leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Epithelial cell invasion is thought to be essential for Campylobacter spp. infection. Previous invasion studies with intestinal epithelial cells revealed that the ability of different Campylobacter jejuni isolates to inva...

  13. Virulence, transmission, and heterologous protection of four isolates of Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis causes Glässer's disease, a syndrome of polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis in swine. Previous studies with H. parasuis have revealed virulence disparity among isolates and inconsistent heterologous protection. In this study, virulence, direct transmission, and heterologous...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Field Isolate Brucella melitensis Strain Bm IND1 from India.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sashi Bhushan; Gupta, Vivek K; Kumar, Mukesh; Hegde, Nagendra R; Splitter, Gary A; Reddanna, Pallu; Radhakrishnan, Girish K

    2014-05-29

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens causing the zoonotic disease brucellosis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the Brucella melitensis strain from India designated Bm IND1, isolated from stomach contents of an aborted goat fetus.

  15. Draft genome sequences of three Aeromonas hybrophila isolates from catfish and tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a Gram-negative bacteria that is particularly adapted to freshwater environments and can cause severe infections in fish and humans. Here we report the draft genomes of three A. hydrophila catfish and tilapia isolates....

  16. Nile Tilapia Infectivity by Genomically Diverse Streptoccocus agalactiae Isolates from Multiple Hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae, Lancefield group B Streptococcus (GBS), is recognized for causing cattle mastitis, human neonatal meningitis, and fish meningo-encephalitis. We investigated the genomic diversity of GBS isolates from different phylogenetic hosts and geographical regions using serological t...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the First Pathogenic Leptospira Isolates from Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Barragan, Veronica; Sahl, Jason W.; Wiggins, Kristin; Chiriboga, Jorge; Salinas, Ana; Cantos, Nancy E.; Loor, Mariana N.; Intriago, Bertha I.; Morales, Melba; Trueba, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. cause leptospirosis upon contact with mucosa through wounds or ingestion, leading to headaches, fever, jaundice, kidney or liver failure, or death in about 1.3 million people each year. Here, we present the draft genomes of one L. santarosai isolate and two L. interrogans isolates from Ecuador. PMID:27151788

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the First Pathogenic Leptospira Isolates from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Barragan, Veronica; Sahl, Jason W; Wiggins, Kristin; Chiriboga, Jorge; Salinas, Ana; Cantos, Nancy E; Loor, Mariana N; Intriago, Bertha I; Morales, Melba; Trueba, Gabriel; Pearson, Talima

    2016-05-05

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. cause leptospirosis upon contact with mucosa through wounds or ingestion, leading to headaches, fever, jaundice, kidney or liver failure, or death in about 1.3 million people each year. Here, we present the draft genomes of one L. santarosai isolate and two L. interrogans isolates from Ecuador.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of an Environmental trh+ Vibrio parahaemolyticus K23 Strain Isolated from Kerala, India

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Divya Meparambu; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja Perumal; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of seafood-related gastroenteritis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a trh+ strain, V. parahaemolyticus K23, isolated from seafood. The sequence will be useful for comparative analysis between environmental and clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:27081143

  20. Carbapenem resistance via the blaKPC-2 gene in Enterobacter cloacae blood culture isolate.

    PubMed

    Lo, Andy; Verrall, Rosemary; Williams, John; Stratton, Charles; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2010-05-01

    An Enterobacter cloacae blood culture isolate expressing carbapenem resistance via the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase KPC-2 gene is reported. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a nosocomial isolate with carbapenemase-mediated resistance causing infection in a patient from Tennessee.

  1. From Teacher Isolation to Teacher Collaboration: Theoretical Perspectives and Empirical Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostovar-Nameghi, Seyyed Ali; Sheikhahmadi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at: (1) reviewing the underlying causes of teacher isolation; (2) unrevealing the negative effects of isolation on teachers' professional and personal life; (2) illustrating different modes of voluntary collaboration among teachers; (4) presenting substantive evidence is support of collaboration as an efficient mode of professional…

  2. Immunodeficiencies caused by infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jane E

    2010-05-01

    Immunodeficiencies caused by infectious agents may result from disruption of normal host barriers or dysregulation of cellular immunity, the latter serving to promote survival of the infectious agent through immune evasion. Such infections may be followed by opportunistic infections with a variety of other microorganisms. Classic infectious causes of immunodeficiency in companion animals are the immunodeficiency retroviruses, including feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus. Other important causes include canine distemper virus; canine parvovirus 2; feline infectious peritonitis virus; rickettsial organisms that infect leukocytes; Leishmania; and fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus. Considerable research effort has been invested in understanding the mechanisms of pathogen-induced immunosuppression, with the hope that effective therapies may be developed that reverse the immunodeficiencies developed and in turn assist the host to clear persistent or life-threatening infectious diseases.

  3. Polyhydramnios: Causes, Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamza, A; Herr, D; Solomayer, E F; Meyberg-Solomayer, G

    2013-12-01

    Polyhydramnios is defined as a pathological increase of amniotic fluid volume in pregnancy and is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality. Common causes of polyhydramnios include gestational diabetes, fetal anomalies with disturbed fetal swallowing of amniotic fluid, fetal infections and other, rarer causes. The diagnosis is obtained by ultrasound. The prognosis of polyhydramnios depends on its cause and severity. Typical symptoms of polyhydramnios include maternal dyspnea, preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), abnormal fetal presentation, cord prolapse and postpartum hemorrhage. Due to its common etiology with gestational diabetes, polyhydramnios is often associated with fetal macrosomia. To prevent the above complications, there are two methods of prenatal treatment: amnioreduction and pharmacological treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, prenatal administration of NSAIDs to reduce amniotic fluid volumes has not been approved in Germany. In addition to conventional management, experimental therapies which would alter fetal diuresis are being considered.

  4. Antimicrobial potential of Halophilic actinomycetes against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Sana; Sajid, Imran

    2016-03-01

    A collection of forty halophilic actinomycetes isolated from water and mud samples of the saline lake at Kalar Kahar, salt range, Pakistan, was screened to investigate their antimicrobial potential against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens. The isolates exhibited significant tolerance to alkaline conditions and grew well at pH 9-11. The taxonomic status of the isolated strains was determined by morphological, biochemical and physiological characterization and by 16s rRNA gene sequencing. The results revealed that majority of the isolates (90%) belong to the genus Streptomyces. Most of the isolates exhibited remarkable antimicrobial activity up to 20mm zone of inhibition against MDR ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter and Acinetobacter spp. Additionally the isolates showed moderate to high cytotoxicity in the range of 40 to 80% larval mortality against Artemia salina in a micro well cytotoxicity assay. The chemical screening or the so called metabolic fingerprinting of the methanolic extracts of each isolate, by thin layer chromatography (TLC) using various staining reagents and by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV), indicated an impressive diversity of the compounds produced by these strains. The study reveals that these halophilic actinomycetes are a promising source of bioactive compounds. The preparative scale fermentation, isolation, purification and structure elucidation of the compounds produced by them may yield novel antimicrobial or chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  6. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Franklin E.

    1992-01-01

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  7. High performance rotational vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderland, Andrew; Blair, David G.; Ju, Li; Golden, Howard; Torres, Francis; Chen, Xu; Lockwood, Ray; Wolfgram, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We present a new rotational vibration isolator with an extremely low resonant frequency of 0.055 ± 0.002 Hz. The isolator consists of two concentric spheres separated by a layer of water and joined by very soft silicone springs. The isolator reduces rotation noise at all frequencies above its resonance which is very important for airborne mineral detection. We show that more than 40 dB of isolation is achieved in a helicopter survey for rotations at frequencies between 2 Hz and 20 Hz. Issues affecting performance such as translation to rotation coupling and temperature are discussed. The isolator contains almost no metal, making it particularly suitable for electromagnetic sensors.

  8. High performance rotational vibration isolator.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Andrew; Blair, David G; Ju, Li; Golden, Howard; Torres, Francis; Chen, Xu; Lockwood, Ray; Wolfgram, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We present a new rotational vibration isolator with an extremely low resonant frequency of 0.055 ± 0.002 Hz. The isolator consists of two concentric spheres separated by a layer of water and joined by very soft silicone springs. The isolator reduces rotation noise at all frequencies above its resonance which is very important for airborne mineral detection. We show that more than 40 dB of isolation is achieved in a helicopter survey for rotations at frequencies between 2 Hz and 20 Hz. Issues affecting performance such as translation to rotation coupling and temperature are discussed. The isolator contains almost no metal, making it particularly suitable for electromagnetic sensors.

  9. Hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Legionella pneumophila in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Lai, C-C; Tan, C-K; Chou, C-H; Hsu, H-L; Huang, Y-T; Liao, C-H; Hsueh, P-R

    2010-04-01

    The Legionella species is an important cause of communityand hospital-acquired pneumonia. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila is rarely reported. We describe the first reported case of hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by L. pneumophila from Taiwan in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who received steroid treatment. The patient was successfully treated with ceftazidime and clindamycin initially, followed by ciprofloxacin for 14 days. The blood isolate was further confirmed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

  10. Experimental susceptibility of European sea bass and Senegalese sole to different betanodavirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Souto, S; Lopez-Jimena, B; Alonso, M C; García-Rosado, E; Bandín, I

    2015-05-15

    The susceptibility of juvenile European sea bass and Senegalese sole to three VNNV isolates (a reassortant RGNNV/SJNNV, as well as the parental RGNNV and SJNNV genotypes) has been evaluated by challenges using two inoculation ways (bath and intramuscular injection). The results demonstrate that these two fish species are susceptible to all the VNNV isolates tested. In European sea bass, RGNNV caused the highest cumulative mortality, reaching maximum values of viral RNA and titres. Although the SJNNV isolate did not provoke mortality or clinical signs of disease in this fish species, viral production in survivor fish was determined; on the other hand the reassortant isolate did cause mortality and clinical signs of disease, although less evident than those recorded after RGNNV infection. These results suggest that the changes suffered by the SJNNV RNA2 segment of the reassortant isolate, compared to the parental SJNNV, may have involved host-specificity and/or virulence determinants for European sea bass. Regarding Senegalese sole, although the three isolates caused 100% mortality, the reassortant strain provoked the most acute symptoms, and more quickly, especially in the bath challenge. This was also the isolate showing less difference between the number of RNA copies and viral titre, reaching the highest titres of infective viral particles in nervous tissue of infected animals. The RGNNV isolate produced the lowest values of infective viral particles. All these results suggest that the RGNNV and the reassortant isolates are the most suited for infecting European sea bass and Senegalese sole, respectively.

  11. Recent Advances in Understanding Audiovestibular Loss of a Vascular Cause

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2017-01-01

    Acute audiovestibular loss is characterized by abrupt onset of prolonged (lasting days) vertigo and hearing loss. Acute ischemic stroke in the distribution of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) is known to be the leading cause of acute audiovestibular loss. So far, eight subgroups of AICA territory infarction have been identified according to the patterns of audiovestibular dysfunctions, among which the most common pattern is the combined loss of auditory and vestibular functions. Unlike inner ear dysfunction of a viral cause, which can commonly present as an isolated vestibular (i.e., vestibular neuritis) or cochlear loss (i.e., sudden deafness), labyrinthine dysfunction of a vascular cause rarely results in isolated loss of vestibular or auditory function. As audiovestibular loss may precede the central symptoms or signs of an ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation, early diagnosis and proper management of audiovestiubular loss may provide a window to prevent the progression of infarction to larger areas of the posterior circulation. A clinician should consider the possibility that acute audiovestibular loss may herald impending AICA territory infarction, especially when patients have basilar artery occlusive disease close to the origin of the AICA on brain MRA. This review aims to highlight the recent advances in understanding audiovestibular loss of a vascular cause and to address its clinical significance. PMID:28030893

  12. Clinical management of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Valverde, Mercedes; Sojo-Dorado, Jesús; Pascual, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae showing resistance to cephalosporins due to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) or plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes, and those producing carbapenemases have spread worldwide during the last decades. Many of these isolates are also resistant to other first-line agents such as fluoroquinolones or aminoglycosides, leaving few available options for therapy. Thus, older drugs such as colistin and fosfomycin are being increasingly used. Infections caused by these bacteria are associated with increased morbidity and mortality compared with those caused by their susceptible counterparts. Most of the evidence supporting the present recommendations is from in vitro data, animal studies, and observational studies. While carbapenems are considered the drugs of choice for ESBL and AmpC producers, recent data suggest that certain alternatives may be suitable for some types of infections. Combined therapy seems superior to monotherapy in the treatment of invasive infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Optimization of dosage according to pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics data is important for the treatment of infections caused by isolates with borderline minimum inhibitory concentration due to low-level resistance mechanisms. The increasing frequency and the rapid spread of multidrug resistance among the Enterobacteriaceae is a true and complex public health problem. PMID:25165544

  13. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  14. Analysis of structures causing instabilities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    We present a simple new method to systematically identify all topological structures (e.g., positive feedback loops) potentially leading to locally unstable steady states: ICSA-The instability causing structure analysis. Systems without any instability causing structure (i.e., not fulfilling the necessary topological condition for instabilities) cannot have unstable steady states. It follows that common bistability or multistability and Hopf bifurcations are excluded and sustained oscillations and deterministic chaos are most unlikely. The ICSA leads to new insights into the topological organization of chemical and biochemical systems, such as metabolic, gene regulatory, and signal transduction networks.

  15. Seismic shock and vibration isolation 1995. Part I: Theory, analysis, and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, G.C.; Chung, H.H.

    1995-07-11

    Two basic engineering strategies for the protection of equipment and structures from damages caused by seismic shock and vibration loadings are, namely, strengthening and isolation. They work on almost totally different principles; the strengthening strategy aims primarily at increasing the capacity or the ability of the structure to withstand the dynamic loading by incorporating additional structural materials and components, while the isolation strategy focuses on reducing the demand or the transmitted loading on the structure by adding an isolator or isolation system between the structure and the source of the loading. The isolation strategy is often used for filtering out unwanted vibrations and noises. In practice, the isolation strategy has the advantage of not depending on alterations to the isolated structure and is often the preferred method for applications in equipment and in some structures.

  16. New Paenibacillus larvae bacterial isolates from honey bee colonies infected with American foulbrood disease in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Masry, Saad Hamdy Daif; Kabeil, Sanaa Soliman; Hafez, Elsayed Elsayed

    2014-01-01

    The American foulbrood disease is widely distributed all over the world and causes a serious problem for the honeybee industry. Different infected larvae were collected from different apiaries, ground in phosphate saline buffer (PSB) and bacterial isolation was carried out on nutrient agar medium. Different colonies were observed and were characterized biologically. Two bacterial isolates (SH11 and SH33) were subjected to molecular identification using 16S rRNA gene and the sequence analysis revealed that the two isolates are Paenibacillus larvae with identity not exceeding 83%. The DNA sequence alignment between the other P. larvae bacterial strains and the two identified bacterial isolates showed that all the examined bacterial strains have the same ancestor, i.e. they have the same origin. The SH33 isolate was closely related to the P. larvae isolated from Germany, whereas the isolate SH11 was close to the P. larvae isolated from India. The phylogenetic tree constructed for 20 different Bacillus sp. and the two isolates SH11 and SH33 demonstrated that the two isolates are Bacillus sp. and they are new isolates. The bacterial isolates will be subjected to more tests for more confirmations. PMID:26740757

  17. Comparison of atypical Brachyspira spp. clinical isolates and classic strains in a mouse model of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, Eric; Strait, Erin; Kinyon, Joann; Bower, Leslie; Madson, Darin; Schwartz, Kent; Frana, Timothy; Songer, J Glenn

    2012-12-07

    Multiple Brachyspira spp. can colonize the porcine colon, and the presence of the strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is typically associated with clinical swine dysentery. Recently, several Brachyspira spp. have been isolated from the feces of pigs with clinical disease suggestive of swine dysentery, yet these isolates were not identified as B. hyodysenteriae by genotypic or phenotypic methods. This study used a mouse model of swine dysentery to compare the pathogenic potential of seventeen different Brachyspira isolates including eight atypical clinical isolates, six typical clinical isolates, the standard strain of B. hyodysenteriae (B204), and reference strains of Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira innocens. Results revealed that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates induced significantly greater cecal inflammation than weakly beta-hemolytic isolates regardless of the genetic identification of the isolate, and that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates identified as 'Brachyspira sp. SASK30446' and B. intermedia by PCR produced lesions indistinguishable from those caused by B. hyodysenteriae in this model.

  18. Muscular abscess caused by Cupriavidus gilardii in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Tena, Daniel; Losa, Cristina; Medina, María José; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Cupriavidus gilardii is a rare cause of human infection. We report a muscular abscess on the right thigh caused by this organism in a renal transplant recipient, who had suffered a septic shock associated with an extensive cellulitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. The patient was successfully treated with surgical drainage and intravenous ciprofloxacin for 13 days. This is the first time that C. gilardii is isolated from a human abscess. C. gilardii should be considered as a cause of human infection, especially in immunocompromised patients. Infection caused by this organism may be underdiagnosed because the identification is very difficult.

  19. Molecular and Pathogenic Characterization of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Isolates from Spain

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Raquel; Barral, Marta; Pérez, Azucena; Vitutia, M. Mar; García-Pérez, Ana L.; Jiménez, Santos; Sellek, Ricela E.; Anda, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    Fifteen Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato isolates from questing ticks and skin biopsy specimens from erythema migrans patients in three different areas of Spain were characterized. Four different genospecies were found (nine Borrelia garinii, including the two human isolates, three B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, two B. valaisiana, and one B. lusitaniae), showing a diverse spectrum of B. burgdorferi sensu lato species. B. garinii isolates were highly variable in terms of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern and OspA serotype, with four of the seven serotypes described. One of the human isolates was OspA serotype 5, the same found in four of seven tick isolates. The second human isolate was OspA serotype 3, which was not present in ticks from the same area. Seven B. garinii isolates were able to disseminate through the skin of C3H/HeN mice and to cause severe inflammation of joints. One of the two B. valaisiana isolates also caused disease in mice. Only one B. burgdorferi sensu stricto isolate was recovered from the urinary bladder. One isolate each of B. valaisiana and B. lusitaniae were not able to disseminate through the skin of mice or to infect internal organs. In summary, there is substantial diversity in the species and in the pathogenicity of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in areas in northern Spain where Lyme disease is endemic. PMID:11060064

  20. Water Pollution (Causes, Mechanisms, Solution).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strandberg, Carl

    Written for the general public, this book illustrates the causes, status, problem areas, and prediction and control of water pollution. Water pollution is one of the most pressing issues of our time and the author communicates the complexities of this problem to the reader in common language. The purpose of the introductory chapter is to show what…