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Sample records for isolated ankle osteoarthritis

  1. Treatment of Isolated Ankle Osteoarthritis with Arthrodesis or the Total Ankle Replacement: A Comparison of Early Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Charles L.; Kadoko, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Ankle arthrodesis and replacement are two common surgical treatment options for end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. However, the relative value of these alternative procedures is not well defined. This study compared the clinical and radiographic outcomes as well as the early perioperative complications of the two procedures. Methods Between January 2, 1998 and May 31, 2002, 138 patients were treated with ankle fusion or replacements. Seventy one patients had isolated posttraumatic or primary ankle arthritis. However, patients with inflammatory arthritis, neuropathic arthritis, concomitant hind foot fusion, revision procedures and two component system ankle replacement were excluded. Among them, one group of 42 patients had a total ankle replacement (TAR), whereas the other group of 29 patients underwent ankle fusion. A complete follow-up could be performed on 89% (37/42) and 73% (23/29) of the TAR and ankle fusion group, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 4.2 years (range, 2.2 to 5.9 years). Results The outcomes of both groups were compared using a student's t-test. Only the short form heath survery mental component summary score and Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale pain scale showed significantly better outcomes in the TAR group (p < 0.05). In the radiographic evaluation, there was no significant difference in preoperative and postoperative osteoarthritis between the TAR and fusion groups. Conclusions The clinical results of TAR are similar to those of fusion at an average follow-up of 4 years. However, the arthroplasty group showed better pain relief and more postoperative complications that required surgery. PMID:20190994

  2. Ankle osteoarthritis: etiology, diagnostics, and classification.

    PubMed

    Barg, Alexej; Pagenstert, Geert I; Hügle, Thomas; Gloyer, Marcel; Wiewiorski, Martin; Henninger, Heath B; Valderrabano, Victor

    2013-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is defined as the syndrome of joint pain and dysfunction caused by substantial joint degeneration. In general, OA is the most common joint disease and is one of the most frequent and symptomatic health problems for middle-aged and older people: OA disables more than 10% of people who are older than 60 years. This article reviews the etiology of ankle OA, and describes the onset and development of posttraumatic ankle OA, the most common form of OA in the tibiotalar joint. Various methods of clinical and radiographic assessment are described in detail.

  3. Evaluation of the foot and ankle outcome score in patients with osteoarthritis of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Mani, S B; Do, H; Vulcano, E; Hogan, M V; Lyman, S; Deland, J T; Ellis, S J

    2015-05-01

    The foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS) has been evaluated for many conditions of the foot and ankle. We evaluated its construct validity in 136 patients with osteoarthritis of the ankle, its content validity in 37 patients and its responsiveness in 39. Data were collected prospectively from the registry of patients at our institution. All FAOS subscales were rated relevant by patients. The Pain, Activities of Daily Living, and Quality of Life subscales showed good correlation with the Physical Component score of the Short-Form-12v2. All subscales except Symptoms were responsive to change after surgery. We concluded that the FAOS is a weak instrument for evaluating osteoarthritis of the ankle. However, some of the FAOS subscales have relative strengths that allow for its limited use while we continue to seek other satisfactory outcome instruments. PMID:25922461

  4. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteoarthritis develops as a result of abnormal foot mechanics such as flat feet or high arches. A ... prescribed to provide support to improve the foot’s mechanics or cushioning to help minimize pain. Bracing. Bracing, ...

  5. Extraarticular Supramalleolar Osteotomy for Managing Varus Ankle Osteoarthritis, Alternatives for Osteotomy: How and Why?

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Chun

    2016-03-01

    The supramalleolar osteotomy has been reported to be a joint preserving surgery with good clinical outcome for asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis, especially varus ankle osteoarthritis. Conventional supramalleolar osteotomy of the tibia and fibula creates angulation and translation of the ankle joint without changing the width of the ankle mortise. Distal tibial oblique osteotomy improved the preoperative clinical and radiological parameters; however, mean talar tilt angle did not decrease. Assessment of the ankle arthritis in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes may be helpful to achieve a decrease of the talar tilt in ankle osteoarthritis.

  6. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain. PMID:26776564

  7. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-18

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain.

  8. Validating a new computed tomography atlas for grading ankle osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael M; Vela, Nathan D; Levine, Jason E; Barnoy, Eran A

    2015-01-01

    As the most common joint disease, osteoarthritis (OA) poses a significant source of pain and disability. It can be defined by classic radiographic findings, particular symptoms, or a combination of the 2. Although specific grading scales have been developed to evaluate OA in various joints, such as the shoulder, hip, and knee, no definitive classification system is available for grading OA in the ankle. The purpose of the present study was to create and validate a standardized atlas for grading (or staging) ankle osteoarthritis using computed tomography (CT) and "hallmark" findings noted on coronal, sagittal, and axial views extrapolated from the Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic scale. The CT scans of 226 patients at the Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center were reviewed. An atlas was derived from a retrospective review of 30 remaining CT scans taken from July 2008 to November 2011. After this review, 3 orthogonal static CT images, obtained from 11 remaining patients, were chosen to represent the various stages on the OA scale and were used to test the validity of the atlas developed by 2 of us (M.M.C. and N.D.V.). A multispecialty panel of 9 examiners, excluding ourselves, independently rated the 11 CT scan subjects. The differences among examiners and specialties were calculated, including an intra-examiner agreement for 2 separate readings spaced 9 months apart. Although the small number of subspecialty examiners made the intraspecialty comparisons difficult to validate, the findings nevertheless indicated excellent agreement among all specialty groups, with good intra-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.962 and 1) inter-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.851) values. These results appeared to validate the CT ankle OA atlas, which we believe will be a valuable clinical and research tool, one that will likely be more beneficial than less relevant generalized OA grading scales in use today.

  9. Total Ankle Replacement for Treatment of End-Stage Osteoarthritis in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hintermann, Beat; Knupp, Markus; Zwicky, Lukas; Barg, Alexej

    2012-01-01

    End-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle is a disabling problem, particularly in elderly patients who experience an overall loss of mobility and functional impairment and who then need compensatory adaption. Ankle arthrodesis, which has been demonstrated to provide postoperative pain relief and hindfoot stability, leaves the patient with a stiff foot and gait changes. For elderly patient, these changes may be more critical than generally believed. Additionally, the long duration of healing and rehabilitation process needed for ankle arthrodesis may be problematic in the elderly. In contrast to ankle arthrodesis, total ankle replacement has significant advantages including a less strenuous postoperative rehabilitation and preservation of ankle motion which supports physiological gait. Recently, total ankle replacement has evolved as a safe surgical treatment in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis with reliable mid- to long-term results. Total ankle replacement needs less immobilization than arthrodesis and does allow for early weight-bearing and should be considered as a treatment option of first choice in many elderly patients with end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle, especially in elderly patients with lower expectations and physical demands. PMID:22720158

  10. Intermediate-Term Follow-up After Ankle Distraction for Treatment of End-Stage Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mai P.; Pedersen, Douglas R.; Gao, Yubo; Saltzman, Charles L.; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis remains challenging, especially in young patients. Initial reports have shown early benefits of joint distraction for the treatment of ankle osteoarthritis. We report the five to ten-year results of a previously described patient cohort following ankle distraction surgery. Methods: All thirty-six patients who had undergone ankle distraction surgery between December 2002 and October 2006 were contacted. Patients were evaluated by a clinical investigator and completed the Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale (AOS) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) surveys. Radiographs as well as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the ankles were obtained at the follow-up visits. Results: Twenty-nine patients (81%) were followed for a minimum of five years (mean and standard deviation, 8.3 ± 2.2 years). Sixteen (55%) of the twenty-nine patients still had the native ankle joint whereas thirteen patients (45%) had undergone either ankle arthrodesis or total ankle arthroplasty. Positive predictors of ankle survival included a better AOS score at two years (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.048, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.0028 to 0.84, p = 0.04), older age at surgery (HR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.83 to 0.99, p = 0.04), and fixed distraction (HR = 0.094, 95% CI = 0.017 to 0.525, p < 0.01). Radiographs and advanced imaging revealed progression of ankle osteoarthritis at the time of final follow-up. Conclusions: Ankle function following joint distraction declines over time. Patients should be well informed of the commitment that they must make during the treatment period as well as the long-term results after surgery. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:25834084

  11. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain.

  12. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale for use in French-speaking populations

    PubMed Central

    Angers, Magalie; Svotelis, Amy; Balg, Frederic; Allard, Jean-Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background The Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale (AOS) is a self-administered score specific for ankle osteoarthritis (OA) with excellent reliability and strong construct and criterion validity. Many recent randomized multicentre trials have used the AOS, and the involvement of the French-speaking population is limited by the absence of a French version. Our goal was to develop a French version and validate the psychometric properties to assure equivalence to the original English version. Methods Translation was performed according to American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) 2000 guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation. Similar to the validation process of the English AOS, we evaluated the psychometric properties of the French version (AOS-Fr): criterion validity (AOS-Fr v. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index [WOMAC] and SF-36 scores), construct validity (AOS-Fr correlation to single heel-lift test), and reliability (AOS-Fr test–retest). Sixty healthy individuals tested a prefinal version of the AOS-Fr for comprehension, leading to modifications and a final version that was approved by C. Saltzman, author of the AOS. We then recruited patients with ankle OA for evaluation of the AOS-Fr psychometric properties. Results Twenty-eight patients with ankle OA participated in the evaluation. The AOS-Fr showed strong criterion validity (AOS:WOMAC r = 0.709 and AOS:SF-36 r = −0.654) and construct validity (r = 0.664) and proved to be reliable (test–retest intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.922). Conclusion The AOS-Fr is a reliable and valid score equivalent to the English version in terms of psychometric properties, thus is available for use in multicentre trials. PMID:27007093

  13. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your ... it affects your hands, knees, hips or spine. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joints. Cartilage ...

  14. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with the aging process. Osteoarthritis is a chronic disease causing the deterioration of the cartilage within a ... is roughened and becomes worn down. As the disease progresses, the cartilage becomes completely worn down and ...

  15. Psychometric Properties of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score in a Community-Based Study of Adults with and without Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Golightly, Yvonne M.; DeVellis, Robert F.; Nelson, Amanda E.; Hannan, Marian T.; Lohmander, L. Stefan; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Foot and ankle problems are common in adults, and large observational studies are needed to advance our understanding of the etiology and impact of these conditions. Valid and reliable measures of foot and ankle symptoms and physical function are necessary for this research. This study examined psychometric properties of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) subscales (pain, other symptoms, activities of daily living [ADL], sport and recreational function [Sport/Recreation], and foot and ankle related quality of life [QOL]) in a large, community-based sample of African American and Caucasian men and women 50+ years old. Methods Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project participants (N=1670) completed the 42-item FAOS (mean age 69 years, 68% women, 31% African American, mean body mass index [BMI] 31.5 kg/m2). Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent validity, and structural validity of each subscale were examined for the sample and for subgroups according to race, gender, age, BMI, presence of knee or hip osteoarthritis, and presence of knee, hip or low back symptoms. Results For the sample and each subgroup, Cronbach’s alphas were 0.95–0.97 (pain), 0.97–0.98 (ADL), 0.94–0.96 (Sport/Recreation), 0.89–0.92(QOL), and 0.72–0.82 (symptoms). Correlation coefficients were 0.24–0.52 for pain and symptoms subscales with foot and ankle symptoms and 0.30–0.55 for ADL and Sport/Recreation subscales with Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index function subscale. Intraclass correlation coefficients for test-retest reliability were 0.63–0.81. Items loaded on a single factor for each subscale except symptoms (2 factors). Conclusions The FAOS exhibited sufficient reliability and validity in this large cohort study. PMID:24023029

  16. Trapeziectomy and ligament reconstruction tendon interposition for isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Langenhan, R; Hohendorff, B; Probst, A

    2014-10-01

    Isolated osteoarthritis of the scaphotrapeziotrapezoid joint is rather rare compared with thumb trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of 15 consecutive patients treated with trapeziectomy/ligament reconstruction tendon interposition for isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis of the wrist. After a mean follow-up of 54 months, 14 patients (15 wrists) were available for clinical and radiological examination. The median pain intensity was 0 on a 0-10 visual analogue scale, both at rest and with activity, mean grip strength averaged 24 kg, pinch strength 5 kg. The disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score was 16, and a modified Mayo Wrist Score 84. Correlation between the degree of scaphotrapezoid osteoarthritis and pain at rest, pain with activity, and DASH score was not significant. The findings from our study suggest that trapeziectomy/ligament reconstruction tendon interposition is an effective procedure for treating isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis, and that additional partial trapezoid excision is not necessary.

  17. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  18. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections ...

  19. Ankle arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle surgery; Arthroscopy - ankle; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopy; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopic ... You will likely receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means you will be asleep and unable ...

  20. Effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle osteoarthritis commonly involves sagittal malalignment with anterior translation of the talus relative to the tibia. Total ankle arthroplasty has become an increasingly popular treatment for patients with symptomatic ankle osteoarthritis. However, no comprehensive study has been conducted on the outcomes of total ankle arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with preoperative sagittal malalignment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty. Methods One hundred and four osteoarthritic ankles in 104 patients who underwent three-component total ankle arthroplasty were included in this study. The 104 ankles were divided into 2 groups: ankles with anteriorly translated talus (50 ankles), and ankles with non-translated talus (54 ankles). Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed in both groups. The mean follow-up duration was 42.8 ± 17.9 months (range, 24 to 95 months). Results Forty-six (92%) of 50 ankles with anterior translation of the talus showed relocation of the talus within the mortise at 6 months, and 48 (96%) ankles were relocated at 12 months after total ankle arthroplasty. But, 2 (4%) ankles were not relocated until the final follow-up. The AOFAS scores, ankle range of motion, and radiographic outcomes showed no significant difference between the two groups at the final follow-up (p > 0.05 for each). Conclusions In majority of cases, the anteriorly translated talus in osteoarthritic ankles was restored to an anatomical position within 6 months after successful three-component total ankle arthroplasty. The clinical and radiographic outcomes in the osteoarthritic ankles with anteriorly translated talus group were comparable with those in non-translated talus group. PMID:24007555

  1. [Chronic ankle instability in sports -- a review for sports physicians].

    PubMed

    Valderrabano, V; Leumann, A; Pagenstert, G; Frigg, A; Ebneter, L; Hintermann, B

    2006-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability represents a typical sports injury which can mostly be seen in basketball, soccer, orienteering and other high risk sports. 20 to 40 % of the acute ankle sprains develop into chronic ankle instability. From a sports orthopaedic point of view, chronic ankle instability can be subdivided into a lateral, medial or a combination of both so called rotational ankle instability. From a pathophysiological point of view, chronic ankle instability can be either mechanical with a structural ligament lesion or functional with loss of the neuromuscular control. For the sports physician, the chronic ankle instability is a difficult entity as the diagnosis is usually complex and the therapy usually surgical. This review on chronic ankle instability addresses pathomechanism, diagnostics, indications for conservative and surgical treatments, and possible long-term sequelae, as ligamentous osteoarthritis.

  2. Foot and Ankle Injuries in Runners.

    PubMed

    Tenforde, Adam S; Yin, Amy; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-02-01

    Foot and ankle injuries account for nearly one-third of running injuries. Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciopathy, and ankle sprains are 3 of the most common types of injuries sustained during training. Other common injuries include other tendinopathies of the foot and ankle, bone stress injuries, nerve conditions including neuromas, and joint disease including osteoarthritis. This review provides an evidence-based framework for the evaluation and optimal management of these conditions to ensure safe return to running participation and reduce risk for future injury. PMID:26616180

  3. Ankle Sprains.

    PubMed

    1986-02-01

    In brief: Ankle sprain is a risk for many athletes, especially those in the jumping sports (eg, volleyball and basketball) as well as football and soccer, where players tend to roll over on the ankle. Lateral sprains occur much more frequently than medial eversion sprains, but the latter are more devastating. In addition to types of sprains, this panel of specialists discussed surgical vs nonsurgical treatment, tape vs brace for support, rehabilitation and exercise, and ways to prevent ankle sprains.

  4. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's the Treatment for a Sprained Ankle? More Serious Sprains en español Esguinces de tobillo As a field hockey player, Jill was used to twisting her ankle. She'd always been able to walk it off and get back in the game. But one day she stepped on another player's ...

  5. Ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Kyle P; McHale, Kevin J; Rossy, William H; Theodore, George

    2016-01-01

    Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed. PMID:27608626

  6. Ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Kyle P; McHale, Kevin J; Rossy, William H; Theodore, George

    2016-09-09

    Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed.

  7. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  8. Simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement using a 3-component prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle replacement is an established surgical procedure in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. We analyzed complications and medium-term results in patients with simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement. Patients and methods 10 women and 16 men, mean age 60 (SD 13) years, were followed for a median of 5 (2–10) years. Results There were no intraoperative or perioperative complications, with the exception of 1 patient with prolonged wound healing. Major revision surgery was necessary in 6 of the 52 ankles, including 4 revisions of prosthetic components. The average pain score decreased from 6.9 (4−10) to 1.8 (0−4) points. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score increased from 32 (SD 14) points preoperatively to 74 (SD 12) points postoperatively. The average range of motion increased from 28° (SD 12) preoperatively to 38° (SD 9) postoperatively. All 8 categories of SF-36 score improved. Interpretation Simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement is a suitable method for restoration of function and attainment of pain relief in patients with bilateral end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. The results of this procedure, including complication rates, revision rates, and functional outcome, are comparable to those reported in patients with unilateral total ankle replacement. PMID:21999622

  9. Salvage arthrodesis for failed total ankle arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zürcher, Arthur W

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has gained popularity in recent years. If it fails, however, salvage arthrodesis must be reliable as a rescue procedure. We therefore investigated the clinical, radiographic, and subjective outcome after salvage arthrodesis in a consecutive group of patients, and concentrated on the influence of the method of fixation on union rate and on salvage in inflammatory joint disease. Patients and methods Between 1994 and 2005, salvage arthrodesis was performed on 18 ankles (18 patients). Diagnosis was inflammatory joint disease (IJD) in 15 cases and osteoarthritis (OA) in 3. Tibio-talar fusion was performed in 7 ankles, and tibio-talocalcaneal fusion in 11. Serial radiographs were studied for time to union. Clinical outcome at latest follow-up was measured by the AOFAS score, the foot function index (FFI) and by VAS scores for pain, function, and satisfaction. Results Blade plates were used in 7 ankles (4 IJD, 3 OA); all united. Nonunion developed in 7 of the 11 rheumatic ankles stabilized by other methods. 11 patients (8 fused ankles, 3 nonunions) were available for clinical evaluation. Their mean AOFAS score was 62 and mean overall FFI was 70. VAS score for pain was 20, for function 64, and for satisfaction 74. The scores were similar in united and non-united ankles. Interpretation Blade plate fixation is successful in salvage arthrodesis for failed TAA. A high nonunion rate was found after salvage ankle arthrodesis in IJD with other methods of fixation. Clinical results were fair to good. PMID:20175648

  10. Managing osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shirley P; Hunter, David J

    2015-08-01

    Management of osteoarthritis should be based on a combination of non-drug and drug treatments targeted towards prevention, modifying risk and disease progression. Obesity is the most important modifiable risk factor, so losing weight in addition to land- and water-based exercise and strength training is important. While paracetamol can be tried, guidelines recommend non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as first-line treatment for osteoarthritis. If there are concerns about the adverse effects of oral treatment, particularly in older patients or those with comorbidities, topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be used. Glucosamine does not appear to be any better than placebo for pain. Its effect on the structural progression of disease when taken alone or in combination with chondroitin is uncertain. Fish oil has not been found to reduce the structural progression of knee arthritis. Surgical interventions should be avoided in the first instance, with arthroscopic procedures not showing benefit over sham procedures or optimised physical and medical therapy. Joint replacement surgery should be considered for severe osteoarthritis.

  11. Total ankle joint replacement.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  12. Wrist osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Laulan, J; Marteau, E; Bacle, G

    2015-02-01

    Painful wrist osteoarthritis can result in major functional impairment. Most cases are related to posttraumatic sequel, metabolic arthropathies, or inflammatory joint disease, although wrist osteoarthritis occurs as an idiopathic condition in a small minority of cases. Surgery is indicated only when conservative treatment fails. The main objective is to ensure pain relief while restoring strength. Motion-preserving procedures are usually preferred, although residual wrist mobility is not crucial to good function. The vast array of available surgical techniques includes excisional arthroplasty, limited and total fusion, total wrist denervation, partial and total arthroplasty, and rib-cartilage graft implantation. Surgical decisions rest on the cause and extent of the degenerative wrist lesions, degree of residual mobility, and patient's wishes and functional demand. Proximal row carpectomy and four-corner fusion with scaphoid bone excision are the most widely used surgical procedures for stage II wrist osteoarthritis secondary to scapho-lunate advanced collapse (SLAC) or scaphoid non-union advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist. Proximal row carpectomy is not indicated in patients with stage III disease. Total wrist denervation is a satisfactory treatment option in patients of any age who have good range of motion and low functional demands; furthermore, the low morbidity associated with this procedure makes it a good option for elderly patients regardless of their range of motion. Total wrist fusion can be used not only as a revision procedure, but also as the primary surgical treatment in heavy manual labourers with wrist stiffness or generalised wrist-joint involvement. The role for pyrocarbon implants, rib-cartilage graft implantation, and total wrist arthroplasty remains to be determined, given the short follow-ups in available studies.

  13. Osteoarthritis: What is Osteoarthritis? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis Basics: The Joint and Its Parts Past Issues / ... and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) A Joint With Severe Osteoarthritis With osteoarthritis, the cartilage wears away. Spurs grow ...

  14. Imaging in Foot and Ankle Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Victoria H; Rowbotham, Emma L; Grainger, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    The foot and ankle are commonly involved in a range of arthritides that affect the joints, bones, and soft tissues. Accurate plain film interpretation can often aid the diagnosis and monitor disease progression and treatment response. Ultrasound and MRI afford superior depiction of the soft tissues, and advances over recent years have centered on early detection of synovitis, enabling earlier diagnosis and treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques of radiography, multidetector computed tomography, ultrasound, and MRI are discussed, as is optimization of these modalities for the assessment of the anatomically complex joints of the foot and ankle. Diagnostic features enabling differentiation between rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, osteoarthritis, gout, crystal deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, Charcot arthropathy, septic arthritis, synovial osteochondromatosis, hemophilia, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are also reviewed. PMID:27336451

  15. Ankle replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Murphy GA. Total ankle arthroplasty. In: Canale ST, Beatty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 10. Wexler D, Grosser DM. Ankle arthrtitis. ...

  16. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  17. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a cost-effective option for many patients with posttraumatic arthritis of the ankle joint. Rehabilitation is generally quicker than conventional open techniques, and rates of fusion are comparable or better than traditional open techniques. Unless the arthroscopic surgeon has considerable experience, the best results are seen in patients with very little deformity in the ankle joint. PMID:27599442

  18. Ankle sprains and instability.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Cory M; Tran, Elaine; Cai, Andrew N; DiPreta, John A

    2014-03-01

    Ankle injuries are among the most common injuries presenting to primary care providers and emergency departments and may cause considerable time lost to injury and long-term disability. Inversion injuries about the ankle involve about 25% of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and 50% of all sports-related injuries. Medial-sided ankle sprains occur less frequently than those on the lateral side. High ankle sprains occur less frequently in the general population, but do occur commonly in collision sports. Providers should apply the Ottawa ankle rules when radiography is indicated and refer fractures and more severe injuries to orthopedic surgery as needed. PMID:24559877

  19. Hypoxia Modulates the Phenotype of Osteoblasts Isolated From Knee Osteoarthritis Patients, Leading to Undermineralized Bone Nodule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joan; Jackson, Sonya G; Wardale, John; Jones, Simon W

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of hypoxia in the pathology of osteoarthritic (OA) bone by exploring its effect on the phenotype of isolated primary osteoblasts from patients with knee OA. Methods OA bone samples were collected at the time of elective joint replacement surgery for knee or hip OA. Normal bone samples were collected postmortem from cadaver donors. Primary osteoblasts were isolated from knee OA bone chips and cultured under normoxic or hypoxic (2% O2) conditions. Alkaline phosphatase activity was quantified using an enzymatic assay, and osteopontin and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total RNA was extracted from bone and osteoblasts, and gene expression was profiled by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results Human OA bone tissue sections stained positively for carbonic anhydrase IX, a biomarker of hypoxia, and exhibited differential expression of genes that mediate the vasculature and blood coagulation as compared to those found in normal bone. Culture of primary osteoblasts isolated from knee OA bone under hypoxic conditions profoundly affected the osteoblast phenotype, including the expression of genes that mediate bone matrix, bone remodeling, and bone vasculature. Hypoxia also increased the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and the production of PGE2 by OA osteoblasts. Osteoblast expression of type II collagen α1 chain, angiopoietin-like 4, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 was shown to be mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α. Chronic hypoxia reduced osteoblast- mineralized bone nodule formation. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that hypoxia can induce pathologic changes in osteoblast functionality consistent with an OA phenotype, providing evidence that hypoxia is a key driver of OA pathology. PMID:24574272

  20. The sprained ankle.

    PubMed

    Puffer, J C

    2001-01-01

    The sprained ankle is the most common musculoskeletal injury seen by physicians caring for active youngsters and adults. It accounts for approximately one fourth of all sports-related injuries and is commonly seen in athletes participating in basketball, soccer, or football. It has been shown that one third of West Point cadets suffer an ankle sprain during their 4 years at the military academy. While diagnosis and management of the sprained ankle is usually straightforward, several serious injuries can masquerade as an ankle sprain, and it is important for the clinician to recognize these to prevent long-term morbidity. In this article the basic anatomy of the ankle, mechanisms by which the ankle is injured, and the differential diagnosis of the acutely injured ankle are reviewed. Appropriate evaluation of the injured ankle and the criteria that should be utilized for determining the necessity of radiographs are discussed as well as management of the acutely sprained ankle and the role of prevention in reducing the risk of ankle injury.

  1. Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Philip J; Sperry, Morgan; Wilson, Amy Friedman

    2008-01-15

    A large number of dietary supplements are promoted to patients with osteoarthritis and as many as one third of those patients have used a supplement to treat their condition. Glucosamine-containing supplements are among the most commonly used products for osteoarthritis. Although the evidence is not entirely consistent, most research suggests that glucosamine sulfate can improve symptoms of pain related to osteoarthritis, as well as slow disease progression in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Chondroitin sulfate also appears to reduce osteoarthritis symptoms and is often combined with glucosamine, but there is no reliable evidence that the combination is more effective than either agent alone. S-adenosylmethionine may reduce pain but high costs and product quality issues limit its use. Several other supplements are promoted for treating osteoarthritis, such as methylsulfonylmethane, Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw), Curcuma longa (turmeric), and Zingiber officinale (ginger), but there is insufficient reliable evidence regarding long-term safety or effectiveness. PMID:18246887

  2. Lateral ankle stabilization. Modified Lee and Chrisman-Snook.

    PubMed

    Saltrick, K R

    1991-07-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is not always a severe disability, but surgical reconstruction may be necessary in patients with instability or when conservative measures fail. Although recent articles by Ahlgren and Larsson and Bergsten et al provide evidence of satisfactory results with late ligamentous repair of chronic ankle instability via imbrication, lateral ankle stabilization procedures that use tenodesing of fasciodesing techniques continue to provide good results. Prolonged disability after acute lateral ankle ligament disruption has been reported in 20% of patients. With long-term instability, uneven stress distribution with recurrent sprains can lead to osteoarthritis. Various methods for evaluation of the chronically unstable ankle include inversion stress testing, anterior drawer sign, arthrography, and tenography. All of these methods are controversial with false negative results, unreliability, and variations in measurements and interpretation being cited. With this in mind, radiographic instability must be correlated with mechanical and clinical instability. Once all of these findings are correlated the physician can determine the appropriate procedure that will provide the patient with long-term stability. Although more recent studies have addressed repair of chronic instability with ligamentous reinforcement or imbrication, these procedures remain controversial in lieu of Freeman's deafferentiation theory with loss of proprioception. There is also mechanical instability of the subtalar joint, which may also require stabilization. Use of the modified Lee and the Chrisman-Snook techniques as described have provided good results.

  3. Prevention of ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Walsh, W M; Blackburn, T

    1977-01-01

    Ankles are sprained when supported on an unstable foundation, while too rididly fixed to the playing surface, or when forced into unnatural positions by extrinsic muscle tightness. The unstable foundation may be the shoe itself, a chuck-hole, or another player's foot. Undue fixation may be by 1-inch mud cleats, baseball spikes, or a modern wrestling mat. When these circumstances occur, heel cord tightness may alter the ankle's response. Thus, prevention of ankle sprains may be by modification of any of these factors.

  4. Is End-Stage Ankle Arthrosis Best Managed with Total Ankle Replacement or Arthrodesis? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Robert W.; Chahal, Gurdip S.; Chapman, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. End-stage ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition. Traditionally, ankle arthrodesis (AA) has been the surgical intervention of choice but the emergence of total ankle replacement (TAR) has challenged this concept. This systematic review aims to address whether TAR or AA is optimal in terms of functional outcomes. Methods. We conducted a systematic review according to PRISMA checklist using the online databases Medline and EMBASE after January 1, 2005. Participants must be skeletally mature and suffering from ankle arthrosis of any cause. The intervention had to be an uncemented TAR comprising two or three modular components. The comparative group could include any type of ankle arthrodesis, either open or arthroscopic, using any implant for fixation. The study must have reported at least one functional outcome measure. Results. Of the four studies included, two reported some significant improvement in functional outcome in favour of TAR. The complication rate was higher in the TAR group. However, the quality of studies reviewed was poor and the methodological weaknesses limited any definitive conclusions being drawn. Conclusion. The available literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. Further research is indicated and should be in the form of an adequately powered randomised controlled trial. PMID:25215242

  5. Management and prevention of acute and chronic lateral ankle instability in athletic patient populations

    PubMed Central

    McCriskin, Brendan J; Cameron, Kenneth L; Orr, Justin D; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic lateral ankle instability are common in high-demand patient populations. If not managed appropriately, patients may experience recurrent instability, chronic pain, osteochondral lesions of the talus, premature osteoarthritis, and other significant long-term disability. Certain populations, including young athletes, military personnel and those involved in frequent running, jumping, and cutting motions, are at increased risk. Proposed risk factors include prior ankle sprain, elevated body weight or body mass index, female gender, neuromuscular deficits, postural imbalance, foot/ankle malalignment, and exposure to at-risk athletic activity. Prompt, accurate diagnosis is crucial, and evidence-based, functional rehabilitation regimens have a proven track record in returning active patients to work and sport. When patients fail to improve with physical therapy and external bracing, multiple surgical techniques have been described with reliable results, including both anatomic and non-anatomic reconstructive methods. Anatomic repair of the lateral ligamentous complex remains the gold standard for recurrent ankle instability, and it effectively restores native ankle anatomy and joint kinematics while preserving physiologic ankle and subtalar motion. Further preventative measures may minimize the risk of ankle instability in athletic cohorts, including prophylactic bracing and combined neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programs. These interventions have demonstrated benefit in patients at heightened risk for lateral ankle sprain and allow active cohorts to return to full activity without adversely affecting athletic performance. PMID:25793157

  6. Knee osteoarthritis: a review of management options.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S M; Neilly, D W; Baliga, S; Patil, S; Meek, Rmd

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is a complex peripheral joint disorder with multiple risk factors. The molecular basis of osteoarthritis has been generally accepted; however, the exact pathogenesis is still not known. Management of patients with osteoarthritis involves a comprehensive history, thorough physical examination and appropriate radiological investigation. The relative slow progress in the disease allows a stepwise algorithmic approach in treatment. Non-surgical treatment involves patient education, lifestyle modification and the use of orthotic devises. These can be achieved in the community. Surgical options include joint sparing procedures such as arthroscopyando osteotomy or joint-replacing procedures. Joint-replacing procedures can be isolated to a single compartment such as patellofemoral arthroplasty or unicompartmental knee replacement or total knee arthroplasty. The key to a successful long-term outcome is optimal patient selection, preoperative counselling and good surgical technique. PMID:27330013

  7. Ankle injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Nemeth, G; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the frequency of ankle sprains in basketball players. A questionnaire about previous ankle injuries, time off after such injuries, current ankle problems, personal data, number of practice hours and the use of prophylactic measures was sent out to 102 basketball players in a second division league in Sweden. Ninety-six players answered. 92% of them had suffered an ankle sprain while playing basketball, and of these 83% reported repeated sprains of one ankle. In the last two seasons, 78% of the players had injured at least one ankle. The injury frequency in the investigation was 5.5 ankle injuries per 1000 activity hours. 22% of the players used some kind of prophylactic support of their ankle joints. Because of the great number of ankle sprains and the disability in terms of time away from sports that they cause, prevention of these injuries is essential.

  8. Running and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Willick, Stuart E; Hansen, Pamela A

    2010-07-01

    The overall health benefits of cardiovascular exercise, such as running, are well established. However, it is also well established that in certain circumstances running can lead to overload injuries of muscle, tendon, and bone. In contrast, it has not been established that running leads to degeneration of articular cartilage, which is the hallmark of osteoarthritis. This article reviews the available literature on the association between running and osteoarthritis, with a focus on clinical epidemiologic studies. The preponderance of clinical reports refutes an association between running and osteoarthritis.

  9. Genetics in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Rego, Ignacio; Carreira-Garcia, Vanessa; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative articular disease with complex pathogeny because diverse factors interact causing a process of deterioration of the cartilage. Despite the multifactorial nature of this pathology, from the 50’s it´s known that certain forms of osteoarthritis are related to a strong genetic component. The genetic bases of this disease do not follow the typical patterns of mendelian inheritance and probably they are related to alterations in multiple genes. The identification of a high number of candidate genes to confer susceptibility to the development of the osteoarthritis shows the complex nature of this disease. At the moment, the genetic mechanisms of this disease are not known, however, which seems clear is that expression levels of several genes are altered, and that the inheritance will become a substantial factor in future considerations of diagnosis and treatment of the osteoarthritis. PMID:19516961

  10. HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by elimination or redesign of processes and use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age, and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  11. 10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis. Patients and methods Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint—excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus. Results Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79–0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67–0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons. Interpretation The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements—even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results. PMID:22066551

  12. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Painless swelling may affect both legs and may include the calves or ... of gravity makes the swelling most noticeable in the lower ...

  13. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  14. Vascularized iliac bone graft in cases of ankle tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Akio; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2009-02-01

    Ankle tuberculosis is a very rare occurrence. Because the ankle is a weightbearing joint, the affected ankle tends to become damaged. Consequently, the surgical procedure of arthrodesis is necessary, which usually proves effective. We report two cases of ankle tuberculosis, in patients 53 and 71 years of age. The former case had been diagnosed initially as osteoarthritis and then later as pyogenic osteomyelitis; the latter case had been diagnosed as pigmented villonodular synovitis, a benign but aggressive lesion that involves the joints. In addition to antitubercular medicine, these cases were treated with debridement for necrotic tissue and arthrodesis. In the former case, an iliac osteocutaneous flap was performed, and arthrodesis between the tibia, talus, and calcaneus was obtained. In the other case, a vascularized iliac bone graft was performed that resulted in arthrodesis between the tarsal bones, talus, and calcaneus but with pseudoarthrosis between the tibia and the talus. Settlement of the joint tuberculosis and gait ability without resorption or corruption of the grafted bone was obtained in both cases. Vascularized bone graft offers the benefits of achieving bone defect reconstruction with promotion of bone union, and the infection can be expected to resolve through medication delivered via the circulation.

  15. Which Are the Most Frequently Used Outcome Instruments in Studies on Total Ankle Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Impellizzeri, Franco M.; Rippstein, Pascal F.

    2009-01-01

    The number of studies reporting on outcomes after total ankle arthroplasty is continuously increasing. As the use of valid outcome measures represents the cornerstone for successful clinical research, we aimed to identify the most frequently used outcome instruments in ankle arthroplasty studies and to analyze the evidence to support their use in terms of different quality criteria. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 outcome instruments reported in 79 original studies. The most commonly used measures were the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score (n = 41), the Kofoed ankle score (n = 21), a visual analog scale assessing pain (n = 15), and the generic SF-36 (n = 6). Eight additional instruments were used only once or twice. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and Kofoed instruments include a clinical examination and score up to 100 points. Evidence to support their use in terms of validity, reliability, responsiveness, and interpretability is limited, raising the question whether their use is justified. Self-reported questionnaires related to ankle osteoarthritis or arthroplasty are rather disregarded in the current literature, and only the Foot Function Index is associated with evidence in terms of the above-mentioned quality criteria. Future research is warranted to improve the outcome assessment after total ankle arthroplasty. PMID:19672670

  16. Early knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Favero, Marta; Ramonda, Roberta; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Concepts regarding osteoarthritis, the most common joint disease, have dramatically changed in the past decade thanks to the development of new imaging techniques and the widespread use of arthroscopy that permits direct visualisation of intra-articular tissues and structure. MRI and ultrasound allow the early detection of pre-radiographic structural changes not only in the peri-articular bone but also in the cartilage, menisci, synovial membrane, ligaments and fat pad. The significance of MRI findings such as cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, synovial inflammation/effusions and meniscal tears in patients without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, early joint tissue changes are associated with symptoms and, in some cases, with progression of disease. In this short review, we discuss the emerging concept of early osteoarthritis localised to the knee based on recently updated knowledge. We highlight the need for a new definition of early osteoarthritis that will permit the identification of patients at high risk of osteoarthritis progression and to initiate early treatment interventions. PMID:26557380

  17. Total ankle replacement versus arthrodesis (TARVA): protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Andrew J; Zaidi, Razi; Thomson, Claire; Doré, Caroline J; Cro, Suzie; Round, Jeff; Molloy, Andrew; Davies, Mark; Karski, Michael; Kim, Louise; Cooke, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Total ankle replacement (TAR) or ankle arthrodesis (fusion) is the main surgical treatments for end-stage ankle osteoarthritis (OA). The popularity of ankle replacement is increasing while ankle fusion rates remain static. Both treatments have efficacy but to date all studies comparing the 2 have been observational without randomisation, and there are no published guidelines as to the most appropriate management. The TAR versus arthrodesis (TARVA) trial aims to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of TAR against ankle arthrodesis in the treatment of end-stage ankle OA in patients aged 50–85 years. Methods and analysis TARVA is a multicentre randomised controlled trial that will randomise 328 patients aged 50–85 years with end-stage ankle arthritis. The 2 arms of the study will be TAR or ankle arthrodesis with 164 patients in each group. Up to 16 UK centres will participate. Patients will have clinical assessments and complete questionnaires before their operation and at 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks after surgery. The primary clinical outcome of the study is a validated patient-reported outcome measure, the Manchester Oxford foot questionnaire, captured preoperatively and 12 months after surgery. Secondary outcomes include quality-of-life scores, complications, revision, reoperation and a health economic analysis. Ethics and dissemination The protocol has been approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee (London, Bloomsbury 14/LO/0807). This manuscript is based on V.5.0 of the protocol. The trial findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT02128555. PMID:27601503

  18. Posterior Ankle and Hind Foot Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gökkuş, Kemal; Aydın, Ahmet Turan

    2014-01-01

    ) Results: The mean pre operative AOFAS score was 50.75, the mean post operative AOFAS score was 93.75. Complications were noted. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and oedema was diagnosed during early post operative period in one patient (%4.7), resolved with physical therapy. Conclusion: The most common procedures were osteochondral lesion debritement and curettage with multidrilling /microfracture (10), isolated os trigonum excision (2), tenolysis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon with os trigonum excision (6 ), debritment of the thickened posterior talofibular ligament (2), endoscopic partial calcanectomy for Haglund’s deformity (1) . Our experience demostrated that posterior ankle and hind foot arthroscopy can be performed with low rate of major postoperative complication.

  19. Combined medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy, subtalar joint arthrodesis, and ankle arthrodiastasis for end-stage posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, John J; Belczyk, Ronald; Zgonis, Thomas; Polyzois, Vasilios D

    2009-04-01

    Combining an ankle arthrodiastasis with a medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy and a subtalar joint arthrodesis offers surgeons a joint-sparing procedure for young and active patients who have end-stage posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and ankle joint involvement. An isolated subtalar joint arthrodesis or triple arthrodesis combined with an ankle arthrodiastasis is an option that can be used in certain case scenarios. Delaying the need for a joint destructive procedure through an ankle arthrodiastasis, however, may have a great impact in the near future, as advancements are underway to improve the use of ankle endoprosthesis. PMID:19389602

  20. Simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty as a single surgical procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Simultaneous osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint complicates primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In such cases, rehabilitation of TKA is limited by debilitating ankle pain, but varus or valgus ankle arthritis may even compromise placement of knee prosthetic components. Case presentation We present a patient with simultaneous bilateral valgus and patellofemoral OA of the knees and bilateral varus OA of the ankle joints that equally contributed to overall disability. This 63 years old, motivated and otherwise healthy patient was treated by simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty (quadruple total joint arthroplasty, TJA) during the same anesthesia. Two years outcome showed excellent alignment and function of all four replaced joints. Postoperative time for rehabilitation, back to work (6th week) and hospital stay (12 days) of this special patient was markedly reduced compared to the usual course of separate TJA. Conclusions Simultaneous quadruple TJA in equally disabling OA of bilateral deformed knees and ankles resulted in a better functional outcome and faster recovery compared to the average reported results after TKA and TAA in literature. However, careful preoperative planning, extensive patient education, and two complete surgical teams were considered essential for successful performance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report in literature about quadruple major total joint arthroplasty implanted during the same anesthesia in the same patient. PMID:21995682

  1. [Ankle braces prevent ligament injuries].

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jon

    2002-09-01

    The Cochrane collaboration has performed a meta-analysis of all studies found on the prevention of ankle ligament injuries, frequent in sports like soccer, European handball and basketball. Interventions include the use of modified footwear and associated supports, training programmes and health education. Five randomized trials totalling 3,954 participants were included. With the exception of ankle disc training, all prophylactic interventions entailed the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis, air-cast or high top shoes. The studies showed a significant reduction in the number of ankle sprains in individuals allocated to external ankle support. This reduction was greater for those with a previous history of ankle sprains.

  2. Osteoarthritis of weight bearing joints of lower limbs in former élite male athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, U. M.; Kaprio, J.; Sarna, S.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the cumulative 21 year incidence of admission to hospital for osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, and ankle in former élite athletes and control subjects. DESIGN--National population based study. SETTING--Finland. SUBJECTS--2049 male athletes who had represented Finland in international events during 1920-65 and 1403 controls who had been classified healthy at the age of 20. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Hospital admissions for osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, and ankle joints identified from the national hospital discharge registry between 1970 and 1990. RESULTS--Athletes doing endurance sports, mixed sports, and power sports all had higher incidences of admission to hospital for osteoarthritis than controls. Age adjusted odds ratios compared with controls were 1.73 (95% confidence interval 0.99 to 3.01, P = 0.063) in endurance, 1.90 (1.24 to 2.92, P = 0.003) in mixed sports athletes, and 2.17 (1.41 to 3.32, P = 0.0003) in power sports athletes. The mean age at first admission to hospital was higher in endurance athletes (70.6) than in other groups (58.2 in mixed sports, 61.9 in power sports, and 61.2 in controls). Among the 2046 respondents to a questionnaire in 1985, the odds ratios for admission to hospital were similar in all three groups after adjusting for age, occupation, and body mass index at 20 (2.37, 2.42, 2.68). CONCLUSIONS--Athletes from all types of competitive sports are at slightly increased risk of requiring hospital care because of osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, or ankle. Mixed sports and power sports lead to increased admissions for premature osteoarthritis, but in endurance athletes the admissions are at an older age. PMID:8111258

  3. Is osteoarthritis a metabolic disease?

    PubMed

    Sellam, Jérémie; Berenbaum, Francis

    2013-12-01

    Obesity, together with aging and injury, is among the main risk factors for osteoarthritis. Obesity-related osteoarthritis can affect not only the weight-bearing joints, but also the hands, suggesting a role for circulating mediators released by the adipose tissue and known as adipokines. Thus, osteoarthritis may have a systemic metabolic component. Evidence from both epidemiological and biological studies support the concept of metabolic osteoarthritis, defined as a broad clinical phenotype that includes obesity-related osteoarthritis. Thus, osteoarthritis can be related to metabolic syndrome or to an accumulation of metabolic abnormalities. In addition, studies have demonstrated associations linking osteoarthritis to several components of the metabolic syndrome, such as hypertension and type 2 diabetes, independently from obesity or any of the other known risk factors for osteoarthritis. Both in vitro and in vitro findings indicate a deleterious effect of lipid and glucose abnormalities on cartilage homeostasis. Chronic low-grade inflammation is a feature shared by osteoarthritis and metabolic disorders and may contribute to the genesis of both. Thus, osteoarthritis is emerging as a disease that has a variety of phenotypes including a metabolic phenotype, in addition to the age-related and injury-related phenotypes.

  4. Update on acute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Tiemstra, Jeffrey D

    2012-06-15

    Ankle sprains are a common problem seen by primary care physicians, especially among teenagers and young adults. Most ankle sprains are inversion injuries to the lateral ankle ligaments, although high sprains representing damage to the tibiofibular syndesmosis are becoming increasingly recognized. Physicians should apply the Ottawa ankle rules to determine whether radiography is needed. According to the Ottawa criteria, radiography is indicated if there is pain in the malleolar or midfoot zone, and either bone tenderness over an area of potential fracture (i.e., lateral malleolus, medial malleolus, base of fifth metatarsal, or navicular bone) or an inability to bear weight for four steps immediately after the injury and in the emergency department or physician's office. Patients with ankle sprain should use cryotherapy for the first three to seven days to reduce pain and improve recovery time. Patients should wear a lace-up ankle support or an air stirrup brace combined with an elastic compression wrap to reduce swelling and pain, speed recovery, and protect the injured ligaments as they become more mobile. Early mobilization speeds healing and reduces pain more effectively than prolonged rest. Pain control options for patients with ankle sprain include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and mild opioids. Because a previous ankle sprain is the greatest risk factor for an acute ankle sprain, recovering patients should be counseled on prevention strategies. Ankle braces and supports, ankle taping, a focused neuromuscular training program, and regular sport-specific warm-up exercises can protect against ankle injuries, and should be considered for patients returning to sports or other high-risk activities. PMID:22962897

  5. US in ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stephane; Meyer, Philippe; Hauger, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Ankle impingement is a common condition occurring secondary to sprain or repeated microtrauma. Clinical symptoms are chronic pain located in the affected region and limited range of ankle motion. There are three types of ankle impingement syndrome: anterior impingement, which can be subdivided into anterolateral, anteromedial and purely anterior impingement; posterior impingement, which can be subdivided into posterior and posteromedial impingement; and calcaneal peroneal impingement which is secondary to planovalgus foot deformity. This paper evaluates physiological and clinical elements of these three types of ankle impingement syndrome as well as the role of ultrasound (US) imaging and US-guided treatment.

  6. Sex-specific age associations of ankle proprioception test performance in older adults: results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Uk; Simonsick, Eleanor; Deshpande, Nandini; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: this study was aimed to test the hypothesis that ankle proprioception assessed by custom-designed proprioception testing equipment changes with ageing in men and women. Methods: ankle proprioception was assessed in 289 participants (131 women) of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA); the participants aged 51–95 years and were blinded during testing. Results: the average minimum perceived ankle rotation was 1.11° (SE = 0.07) in women and 1.00° (SE = 0.06) in men, and it increased with ageing in both sexes (P < 0.001, for both). Ankle tracking performance, which is the ability to closely follow with the left ankle, a rotational movement induced on the right ankle by a torque motor, declines with ageing in both men and women (P = 0.018 and P = 0.011, respectively). Conclusions: a simple, standardised method for assessing ankle proprioception was introduced in this study using a customized test instrument, software and test protocol. Age-associated reduction in ankle proprioception was confirmed from two subtests of threshold and tracking separately for women and men. Findings in this study prompt future studies to determine whether these age-associated differences in the threshold for passive motion detection and movement tracking are evident in longitudinal study and how these specific deficits in ankle proprioception are related to age-associated chronic conditions such as knee or hip osteoarthritis and type II diabetes and affect daily activities such as gait. PMID:25637144

  7. Back pain: osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bandilla, K K

    1977-02-01

    Back pain is one of the chief complaints of the elderly. It may be either a chronic deep skeletal muscular pain or an acute circumscribed pain arising from nerve-root irritation. The main causes of back pain in older people are: 1) degenerative changes (spondylosis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing hyperostosis); 2) malignancy (multiple myeloma, metastases from carcinoma or lymphoma); and 3) metabolic disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia, chondrocalcinosis, Paget's disease). Mechanisms and variations are discussed in detail.

  8. Osteoarthritis. A continuing challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Sack, K E

    1995-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a disorder of cartilage that affects almost 85% of the population by age 75. A lack of rigorous clinical and radiographic criteria for defining the disorder makes precise determination of its prevalence impossible. The process of wear and tear explains many manifestations of osteoarthritis, but it does not account for some of the clinical findings or the biochemical changes in osteoarthritic cartilage. Thus, other factors such as heredity, hormones, and diet may play a role. Treatment consists of teaching patients about their disease, alleviating pain, and preserving joint function. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be no more effective than simple analgesics in relieving the pain of this disorder. Moreover, some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can adversely affect cartilage metabolism, and most are possibly dangerous in elderly patients. Drugs that inhibit the production or activity of chondrolytic enzymes can slow the degeneration of cartilage in some animals, but their effects on humans with osteoarthritis are unproved. The surgical repair of severely damaged joints can have gratifying results. Images Figure 2. PMID:8553653

  9. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  10. Total ankle replacement or ankle fusion in painful advanced hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2015-12-01

    In advanced painful hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle, the last resort is surgical treatment (ankle arthrodesis [AA] or total ankle replacement [TAR]). There is a controversy in the literature on which of the two procedures is more appropriate. A review of the literature was performed to clarify such a controversy. The first search engine was MedLine (keywords: total ankle replacement, ankle arthrodesis). Seventy articles were found in MedLine. Of these, only 16 were selected and reviewed because they were strictly focused on the topic of this article. The second search engine was the Cochrane Library, where only nine systematic reviews were found on the role of TAR and AA in non-hemophilia patients. TAR and AA provide pain relief and patient satisfaction in hemophilia patients in the short term. The available non-hemophilia literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. My current view is that AA may be preferable in most hemophilia patients.

  11. Arthroscopic Repair of Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Matthew D; Baca, John; Arbuckle, Keith

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization procedures have been described for many years. New technological advances and a deeper understanding of the pathobiomechanics involved in chronic lateral ankle instability have allowed an expansion of arthroscopic approaches to this common pathology. As experience is gained and outcomes within the patient profile are understood, the authors feel that the arthroscopic approach to lateral ankle stabilization may prove superior to traditional methods secondary to the risk and traditional complications that are mitigated within minimally invasive arthroscopic approaches. Additionally, the arthroscopic approach may allow a quicker return to ballistic sport and decrease time for rehabilitation. PMID:27599440

  12. Risk of degenerative ankle joint disease in volleyball players: study of former elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Gross, P; Marti, B

    1999-01-01

    To estimate the influence of long-term, high-intensity volleyball playing on premature osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint, we examined a group of 22 former elite volleyball-players age (34 +/- 6 yrs.) who had played for at least 3 years in the highest volleyball league in Switzerland, and 19 normal healthy untrained controls (35 +/- 6 yrs.). Volleyball-athletes had played during an average of 5.5 (+/- 2) h/wk for 8.5 (+/- 3) yrs. Twenty of the 22 players had suffered from at least one ankle sprain (average: 3.5), 10 had had ruptures of the lateral ligaments (8 of them operated). Four players had severe mechanical instability, 5 a talar varus tilt in the stress X-ray of more than 8 degrees. Subchondral sclerosis and osteophytes were more prevalent in volleyballers than in controls (p < 0.001), while the difference in joint space was not significant. No severe grades of OA could be observed in these former elite volleyball players. Yet, a radiologic score of degenerative ankle disease was elevated in 19/22 of them, but only in 2/19 controls (p<0.001). In multiple regression analysis among athletes, the anterior drawer sign and a feeling of instability were the only significant and independent predictors of an increased radiological index (p = 0.003 and p = 0.02, respectively) from an initial set of 9 variables covering career length and intensity as volleyball player, clinical signs of ankle instability and age. Even if in the present study, athletes had clearly more radiologic findings than controls--such as spur formation and subchondral sclerosis--long-term, high-intensity volleyball playing alone could not be confirmed as an independent risk factor for OA of the ankle joint however, a combination of chronic lateral ankle instability with intensive volleyball playing could marginally increase the risk of ankle OA. PMID:10090465

  13. Radiographic patterns and associations of osteoarthritis of the knee in patients referred to hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Ledingham, J; Regan, M; Jones, A; Doherty, M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate differing patterns and associations of osteoarthritis of the knee in patients referred to hospital. METHODS--Two hundred and fifty two consecutive patients (161 women, 91 men; mean age 70 years, range 34-91 years) referred to hospital with osteoarthritis of the knee underwent clinical, radiographic, and synovial fluid screening. RESULTS--Radiographic changes of osteoarthritis of the knee (definite narrowing with or without osteoarthritic features) were bilateral in 85% of patients. Of 470 knees affected, 277 (59%) were affected in two compartments and 28 (6%) in three compartments. Unilateral and isolated medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis were more common in men. Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition was common (synovial fluid identification in 132 (28%) knees; knee chondrocalcinosis in 76 (30%) patients) and associated with disability, bilateral, multicompartmental and severe radiographic osteoarthritis, marked osteophytosis, attrition, and cysts. Multiple clinical nodes (58 (23%) patients) and radiographic polyarticular interphalangeal osteoarthritis (66 (26%) patients) were associated with a higher frequency of inactivity pain, disability, multicompartmental and severe radiographic change. Forestier's disease predominated in men but showed no other associations. CONCLUSIONS--In a group of patients referred to hospital osteoarthritis of the knee is usually bilateral and affects more than one compartment. Severe and multicompartmental radiographic changes are associated with calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition, nodal change, and polyarticular interphalangeal osteoarthritis. PMID:8346979

  14. Understanding risks and complications in the management of ankle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Saurabh Sagar; Rees, Kishan; Cutler, Lucy; Mangwani, Jitendra

    2014-01-01

    Ankle fracture (AF) is a common injury with potentially significant morbidity associated with it. The most common age groups affected are young active patients, sustaining high energy trauma and elderly patients with comorbidities. Both these groups pose unique challenges for appropriate management of these injuries. Young patients are at risk of developing posttraumatic osteoarthritis, with a significant impact on quality of life due to pain and impaired function. Elderly patients, especially with poorly controlled diabetes and osteoporosis are at increased risk of wound complications, infection and failure of fixation. In the most severe cases, this can lead to amputation and mortality. Therefore, individualized approach to the management of AF is vital. This article highlights commonly encountered complications and discusses the measures needed to minimize them when dealing with these injuries. PMID:25298549

  15. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the ankle. This condition often... Barefoot Running Barefoot running is running while barefoot, without wearing any shoes on the feet. Running in thin-soled, flexible shoes is related but ...

  16. Resistance Exercise for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kevin R.; Vincent, Heather K.

    2013-01-01

    The initiation, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been associated with decreased muscular strength and alterations in joint biomechanics. Chronic OA pain may lead to anxiety, depression, fear of movement, and poor psychological outlook. The fear of movement may prevent participation in exercise and social events which could lead to further physical and social isolation. Resistance exercise (RX) has been shown to be an effective intervention both for decreasing pain and for improving physical function and self-efficacy. RX may restore muscle strength and joint mechanics while improving physical function. RX may also normalize muscle firing patterns and joint biomechanics leading to reductions in joint pain and cartilage degradation. These physical adaptations could lead to improved self-efficacy and decreased anxiety and depression. RX can be prescribed and performed by patients across the OA severity spectrum. When designing and implementing an RX program for a patient with knee OA, it is important to consider both the degree of OA severity as well as the level of pain. RX, either in the home or at a fitness facility, is an important component of a comprehensive regimen designed to offset the physical and psychological limitations associated with knee OA. Unique considerations for this population include: 1) monitoring pain during and after exercise, 2) providing days of rest when disease flares occur, and 3) infusing variety into the exercise regimen to encourage adherence. PMID:22632702

  17. Pre-Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brittberg, Mats; Eriksson, Karl; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Lindahl, Anders; Marlovits, Stefan; Möller, Per; Richardson, James B.; Steinwachs, Matthias; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2015-01-01

    Objective An attempt to define pre-osteoarthritis (OA) versus early OA and definitive osteoarthritis. Methods A group of specialists in the field of cartilage science and treatment was formed to consider the nature of OA onset and its possible diagnosis. Results Late-stage OA, necessitating total joint replacement, is the end stage of a biological process, with many previous earlier stages. Early-stage OA has been defined and involves structural changes identified by arthroscopy or radiography. The group argued that before the “early-stage OA” there must exist a stage where cellular processes, due to the presence of risk factors, have kicked into action but have not yet resulted in structural changes. The group suggested that this stage could be called “pre-osteoarthritis” (pre-OA). Conclusions The group suggests that defining points of initiation for OA in the knee could be defined, for example, by traumatic episodes or surgical meniscectomy. Such events may set in motion metabolic processes that could be diagnosed by modern MRI protocols or arthroscopy including probing techniques before structural changes of early OA have developed. Preventive measures should preferably be applied at this pre-OA stage in order to stop the projected OA “epidemic.” PMID:26175861

  18. Emerging drugs for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent form of joint disease, affecting as much as 13% of the world’s population. In the United States, it is the leading cause of disability in people over age 65 and is characterized by progressive cartilage loss, bone remodeling, osteophyte formation and synovial inflammation with resultant joint pain and disability. There are no treatments marketed for structural disease modification; current treatments mainly target symptoms, with >75% of patients reporting need for additional symptomatic treatment. Areas covered Drugs in later development (Phase II-III) for osteoarthritis pain and joint structural degeneration are reviewed. Not covered are procedural (e.g. arthrocentesis, physical therapy), behavioral (e.g. weight loss, pain coping techniques) or device (e.g. knee braces, surgical implants) based treatments. Expert opinion More in depth understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as elucidation of the link between clinical symptomatology and structural changes in the joint will likely lead to development of novel target classes with promising efficacy in the future. Efficacy notwithstanding, there remain significant hurdles to overcome in clinical development of these therapeutics, inherent in the progression pattern of the disease as well as challenges with readouts for both pain and structure modification trials. PMID:21542666

  19. The treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A C; Doherty, M

    1992-01-01

    1. The treatment of osteoarthritis is currently purely symptomatic. To enable rational therapy, careful clinical assessment is necessary to identify the origin of symptoms. Often, effective therapy can result from a biomechanical approach such as surgery, orthotics, physiotherapy and dieting. If drugs are required, there is little evidence that the current over-reliance on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is justified. Full dose regular paracetamol should be the first line of analgesic therapy. In the majority of patients, simple analgesics are probably as effective as NSAIDs. If NSAIDs are used it is necessary to review regularly their use and to be aware of potential toxicity. 2. Many alternative strategies of pain management such as topical preparations, intra-articular steroid injections, acupuncture, radiosynovectomy, transcutaneous nerve stimulation and anti-depressants, may be effective but their precise place in the armamentarium is not yet fully established. 3. The realisation that osteoarthritis is not a passive 'wear and tear' phenomenon but an active process that may be potentially modified, has led to interest in 'chondroprotective' agents, which may beneficially affect the osteoarthritic process. To date there are no convincing data available that such agents are, in fact, chondroprotective in humans. PMID:1576063

  20. Exercise for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Baker, K; McAlindon, T

    2000-09-01

    Adverse outcomes in knee osteoarthritis include pain, loss of function, and disability. These outcomes can have devastating effects on the quality of life of those suffering from the disease. Treatments have generally targeted pain, assuming that disability would improve as a direct result of improvements in pain. However, there is evidence to suggest that determinants of pain and disability differ. In general, treatments have been more successful at decreasing pain rather than disability. Many of the factors that lead to disability can be improved with exercise. Exercise, both aerobic and strength training, have been examined as treatments for knee osteoarthritis, with considerable variability in the results. The variability between studies may be due to differences in study design, exercise protocols, and participants in the studies. Although there is variability among studies, it is notable that a majority of the studies had a positive effect on pain and or disability. The mechanism of exercise remains unclear and merits future studies to better define a concise, clear exercise protocol that may have the potential for a public health intervention.

  1. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability. PMID:26311206

  2. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability.

  3. Differences in injury pattern and prevalence of cartilage lesions in knee and ankle joints: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-10-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints.

  4. Medical management of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Manek, N J

    2001-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common articular disease, and it continues to be a major public health problem related to pain, disability, loss of time from work, and economics. Most patients with OA seek medical attention because of pain. In the past few years, changes in the treatment of OA have been substantial. More effective nonnarcotic analgesics, cyclooxygenase-2-specific inhibitors, nutraceuticals, and intra-articular hyaluronates are some of the new medications and agents that are now available. The understanding and use of nonpharmacological interventions, including patient education, exercise programs, and weight reduction when appropriate, have also improved. Relief of pain and restoration of function can be accomplished in many patients, particularly with an integrated approach. This article focuses on medical treatment approaches for OA, both pharmacological and nonpharmacological.

  5. Genetics of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease caused by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. This review focuses on the studies that have contributed to the discovery of genetic susceptibility factors in OA. The most relevant associations discovered until now are discussed in detail: GDF-5, 7q22 locus, MCF2L, DOT1L, NCOA3 and also some important findings from the arcOGEN study. Moreover, the different approaches that can be used to minimize the specific problems of the study of OA genetics are discussed. These include the study of microsatellites, phenotype standardization and other methods such as meta-analysis of GWAS and gene-based analysis. It is expected that these new approaches contribute to finding new susceptibility genetic factors for OA.

  6. The origin of the ankle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codino, Antonio; Plouin, Francois

    2007-03-01

    The differential intensity of cosmic radiation shows a sequence of depressions referred to as knees in a large energy band above 1015eV. The global depression entailed in the complete spectrum with respect to the extrapolated intensity based on low energy data, amounts to a maximum factor of 8, occurring at 5×10eV, where flux measurements exhibit a relative minimum, referred to as the ankle. It is demonstrated by a full simulation of cosmic ray trajectories in the Galaxy that the intensity minimum around the ankle energy is primarily due to the nuclear interactions of the cosmic ions with the interstellar matter and to the galactic magnetic field. Ankles signal the onset energies of the rectilinear propagation in the Milky Way at Earth, being for example, 4×10eV for helium and 6×10eV for iron. The ankle, in spite of its notable importance at Earth, is a local perturbation of the universal spectrum which, between the knee and the ankle, decreases by a round factor 109 regaining its unperturbed status above 1019eV.

  7. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management. PMID:27291681

  8. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management.

  9. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  10. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  11. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain.

  12. Acupuncture Treatment for Acute Ankle Injury in the Emergency Department: A Preliminary Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tantivesruangdet, Nopmanee

    2016-02-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient medical treatment that is increasingly attracting the interest of the public. It is a complementary therapy that is widely used for management of pain, especially chronic discomfort caused by migraine, low-back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee(¹⁻³). The evidence base for the effectiveness of acupuncture and its clinical applications is controversial, and although its efficacy and safety in the management of acute pain have been demonstrated, the quality of this modality is still questionable. The present study reports a case of acute ankle injury, which was treated with acupuncture. A 33-year-old man presented with acute twisted ankle injury. He had pain with swelling around the ankle, and he was experiencing difficulty in walking. His clinical diagnosis was acute ankle sprain with severe pain. Several drug treatments are used for pain control, but in this case, we used acupuncture. After treatment, his pain diminished significantly with a decrease in VAS pain level from 8 to 4 in 20 minutes. At follow-up after one month, we found no skin infection in this case. PMID:27266242

  13. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes.

  14. Failure to restore sagittal tibiotalar alignment in total ankle arthroplasty: Its relationship to the axis of the tibia and the positioning of the talar component.

    PubMed

    Cho, J; Yi, Y; Ahn, T K; Choi, H J; Park, C H; Chun, D I; Lee, J S; Lee, W C

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the change in sagittal tibiotalar alignment after total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) for osteoarthritis and to investigate factors affecting the restoration of alignment. This retrospective study included 119 patients (120 ankles) who underwent three component TAA using the Hintegra prosthesis. A total of 63 ankles had anterior displacement of the talus before surgery (group A), 49 had alignment in the normal range (group B), and eight had posterior displacement of the talus (group C). Ankles in group A were further sub-divided into those in whom normal alignment was restored following TAA (41 ankles) and those with persistent displacement (22 ankles). Radiographic and clinical results were assessed. Pre-operatively, the alignment in group A was significantly more varus than that in group B, and the posterior slope of the tibial plafond was greater (p < 0.01 in both cases). The posterior slope of the tibial component was strongly associated with restoration of alignment: ankles in which the alignment was restored had significantly less posterior slope (p < 0.001). An anteriorly translated talus was restored to a normal position after TAA in most patients. We suggest that surgeons performing TAA using the Hintegra prosthesis should aim to insert the tibial component at close to 90° relative to the axis of the tibia, hence reducing posterior soft-tissue tension and allowing restoration of normal tibiotalar alignment following surgery.

  15. Lateral ankle sprains and instability problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, S H; Jason, W J

    1994-10-01

    The lateral ankle complex is the most frequently injured single structure in athletes, consisting of 38% to 45% of all injuries. One-sixth of all sports injury loss time is from ankle sprains. In North America, ankle inversion sprains are considered "de rigeur" for basketball participation.

  16. Chondroitin for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Noorbaloochi, Shahrzad; MacDonald, Roderick; Maxwell, Lara J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis, a common joint disorder, is one of the leading causes of disability. Chondroitin has emerged as a new treatment. Previous meta-analyses have shown contradictory results on the efficacy of chondroitin. This, in addition to the publication of more trials, necessitates a systematic review. Objectives To evaluate the benefit and harm of oral chondroitin for treating osteoarthritis compared with placebo or a comparator oral medication including, but not limited to, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), analgesics, opioids, and glucosamine or other “herbal” medications. Search methods We searched seven databases up to November 2013, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Science Citation Index (Web of Science) and Current Controlled Trials. We searched the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMEA) websites for adverse effects. Trial registers were not searched. Selection criteria All randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials lasting longer than two weeks, studying adults with osteoarthritis in any joint, and comparing chondroitin with placebo, an active control such as NSAIDs, or other “herbal” supplements such as glucosamine. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently performed all title assessments, data extractions, and risk of bias assessments. Main results Forty-three randomized controlled trials including 4,962 participants treated with chondroitin and 4,148 participants given placebo or another control were included. The majority of trials were in knee OA, with few in hip and hand OA. Trial duration varied from 1 month to 3 years. Participants treated with chondroitin achieved statistically significantly and clinically meaningful better pain scores (0–100) in studies less than 6 months than those given placebo with an absolute risk difference of 10% lower (95% confidence interval (CI), 15% to 6% lower

  17. Biomechanical Analysis of Stair Descent in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics. PMID:24926119

  18. Biomechanical analysis of stair descent in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics.

  19. The foot and ankle examination.

    PubMed

    Papaliodis, Dean N; Vanushkina, Maria A; Richardson, Nicholas G; DiPreta, John A

    2014-03-01

    Most foot and ankle disorders can be diagnosed after a proper history and clinical examination and can be effectively managed in a primary care setting. It is important to assess the entirety of patient disorders that present as they can be multifactorial in cause. A broad differential should include disorders of bones, joints, muscles, neurovasculature, and surrounding soft tissue structures. Physical examination should be thorough and focused on inspection, palpation, range of motion, and appropriate special tests when applicable. This article highlights some of the salient features of the foot and ankle examination and diagnostic considerations.

  20. Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the unaffected leg during level-ground walking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background People with a lower-extremity amputation that use conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prostheses encounter a series of stress-related challenges during walking such as greater forces on their unaffected leg, and may thus be predisposed to secondary musculoskeletal injuries such as chronic joint disorders. Specifically, people with a unilateral transtibial amputation have an increased susceptibility to knee osteoarthritis, especially in their unaffected leg. Previous studies have hypothesized that the development of this disorder is linked to the abnormally high peak knee external adduction moments encountered during walking. An ankle-foot prosthesis that supplies biomimetic power could potentially mitigate the forces and knee adduction moments applied to the unaffected leg of a person with a transtibial amputation, which could, in turn, reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that compared to using a passive-elastic prosthesis, people with a transtibial amputation using a powered ankle-foot prosthesis would have lower peak resultant ground reaction forces, peak external knee adduction moments, and corresponding loading rates applied to their unaffected leg during walking over a wide range of speeds. Methods We analyzed ground reaction forces and knee joint kinetics of the unaffected leg of seven participants with a unilateral transtibial amputation and seven age-, height- and weight-matched non-amputees during level-ground walking at 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, and 1.75 m/s. Subjects with an amputation walked while using their own passive-elastic prosthesis and a powered ankle-foot prosthesis capable of providing net positive mechanical work and powered ankle plantar flexion during late stance. Results Use of the powered prosthesis significantly decreased unaffected leg peak resultant forces by 2-11% at 0.75-1.50 m/s, and first peak knee external adduction moments by 21 and 12% at 1.50 and 1.75 m/s, respectively. Loading rates were not

  1. Osteoarthritis: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Kentaro; Utturkar, Amol; Chang, Eric; Panush, Richard; Hata, Justin; Perret-Karimi, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) are faced with a barrage of treatment options, from recommendations from friends and social media to medications prescribed by the primary care physician. The purpose of this article is to critically review current approaches to generalized or monoarticular OA based on available evidence and to illustrate multidisciplinary and multimodal treatment strategies for the management of OA. Treatment options assessed for efficacy include patient education; oral and topical pharmacological agents; complementary and alternative medicine; surgery; manual medicine; acupuncture; interventional procedures (corticosteroid injection, viscosupplementation, and pulsed radiofrequency); bracing; assistive devices; physical therapy; and physical modalities. Multidisciplinary and multimodal treatment strategies combined with early detection and prevention strategies provide the best benefit to patients. This review also illustrates that traditional and alternative modalities of treatment can be both synergistic and beneficial. Physicians should be aware of the variety of tools available for the management of OA and the associated symptoms. Those healthcare providers who can best individualize treatment plans for specific patients and inspire their patients to embrace healthy lifestyle modifications will achieve the best results. PMID:25750483

  2. Chondroitin for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Noorbaloochi, Shahrzad; MacDonald, Roderick; Maxwell, Lara J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis, a common joint disorder, is one of the leading causes of disability. Chondroitin has emerged as a new treatment. Previous meta-analyses have shown contradictory results on the efficacy of chondroitin. This, in addition to the publication of more trials, necessitates a systematic review. Objectives To evaluate the benefit and harm of oral chondroitin for treating osteoarthritis compared with placebo or a comparator oral medication including, but not limited to, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), analgesics, opioids, and glucosamine or other “herbal” medications. Search methods We searched seven databases up to November 2013, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Science Citation Index (Web of Science) and Current Controlled Trials. We searched the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMEA) websites for adverse effects. Trial registers were not searched. Selection criteria All randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials lasting longer than two weeks, studying adults with osteoarthritis in any joint, and comparing chondroitin with placebo, an active control such as NSAIDs, or other “herbal” supplements such as glucosamine. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently performed all title assessments, data extractions, and risk of bias assessments. Main results Forty-three randomized controlled trials including 4,962 participants treated with chondroitin and 4,148 participants given placebo or another control were included. The majority of trials were in knee OA, with few in hip and hand OA. Trial duration varied from 1 month to 3 years. Participants treated with chondroitin achieved statistically significantly and clinically meaningful better pain scores (0–100) in studies less than 6 months than those given placebo with an absolute risk difference of 10% lower (95% confidence interval (CI), 15% to 6% lower

  3. Predicting Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Woodhouse, Francis G; Besier, Thor F; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Lloyd, David G; Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) beyond pain relief or total knee replacement are very limited. Because of this, attention has shifted to identifying which factors increase the risk of OA in vulnerable populations in order to be able to give recommendations to delay disease onset or to slow disease progression. The gold standard is then to use principles of risk management, first to provide subject-specific estimates of risk and then to find ways of reducing that risk. Population studies of OA risk based on statistical associations do not provide such individually tailored information. Here we argue that mechanistic models of cartilage tissue maintenance and damage coupled to statistical models incorporating model uncertainty, united within the framework of structural reliability analysis, provide an avenue for bridging the disciplines of epidemiology, cell biology, genetics and biomechanics. Such models promise subject-specific OA risk assessment and personalized strategies for mitigating or even avoiding OA. We illustrate the proposed approach with a simple model of cartilage extracellular matrix synthesis and loss regulated by daily physical activity. PMID:26206679

  4. DNA Methylation in Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Wouter; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disease of articular joints and primarily characterized by degradation and calcification of articular cartilage. Presently, no effective treatment other than pain relief exists and patients ultimately need to undergo replacement surgery of the affected joint. During disease progression articular chondrocytes, the single cell type present in articular cartilage, show altered transcriptional profiles and undergo phenotypic changes that resemble the terminal differentiation route apparent in growth plate chondrocytes. Hence, given its prominent function in both regulating gene expression and maintaining cellular phenotypes, DNA methylation of CpG dinucleotides is intensively studied in the context of OA. An increasing number of studies have been published that employed a targeted approach on genes known to play a role in OA pathophysiology. As of such, it has become clear that OA responsive DNA methylation changes seem to mediate disease associated aberrant gene expression. Furthermore, established OA susceptibility alleles such as GDF5 and DIO2 appear to confer OA risk via DNA methylation and respective pathophysiological expression changes. In more recent years, genome wide profiling of DNA methylation in OA affected articular cartilage has emerged as a powerful tool to address the epigenetic changes in their entirety, which has resulted in the identification of putative patient subgroups as well as generic OA associated pathways. PMID:27019616

  5. Basic science of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, Magali; de Girolamo, Laura; Filardo, Giuseppe; Oliveira, J Miguel; Orth, Patrick; Pape, Dietrich; Reboul, Pascal

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent, disabling disorder of the joints that affects a large population worldwide and for which there is no definitive cure. This review provides critical insights into the basic knowledge on OA that may lead to innovative end efficient new therapeutic regimens. While degradation of the articular cartilage is the hallmark of OA, with altered interactions between chondrocytes and compounds of the extracellular matrix, the subchondral bone has been also described as a key component of the disease, involving specific pathomechanisms controlling its initiation and progression. The identification of such events (and thus of possible targets for therapy) has been made possible by the availability of a number of animal models that aim at reproducing the human pathology, in particular large models of high tibial osteotomy (HTO). From a therapeutic point of view, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a promising option for the treatment of OA and may be used concomitantly with functional substitutes integrating scaffolds and drugs/growth factors in tissue engineering setups. Altogether, these advances in the fundamental and experimental knowledge on OA may allow for the generation of improved, adapted therapeutic regimens to treat human OA. PMID:27624438

  6. Epigenetics and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingcai; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease and the leading cause of chronic disability in middle-aged and older populations. The development of disease-modifying therapy for OA currently faces major obstacles largely because the regulatory mechanisms for the function of joint tissue cells remain unclear. Previous studies have found that the alterations in gene expression of specific transcription factors (TFs), pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines, matrix proteinases and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in articular cartilage may be involved in the development of OA. However, the regulatory mechanisms for the expression of those genes in OA chondrocytes are largely unknown. The recent advances in epigenetic studies have shed lights on the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the development of OA. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent studies on the regulatory roles of various epigenetic mechanisms in the expression of genes for specific TFs, cytokines, ECM proteins and matrix proteinases, as well the significance of these epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:25961070

  7. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations.

  8. Benefits of antioxidant supplements for knee osteoarthritis: rationale and reality.

    PubMed

    Grover, Ashok Kumar; Samson, Sue E

    2016-01-05

    Arthritis causes disability due to pain and inflammation in joints. There are many forms of arthritis, one of which is osteoarthritis whose prevalence increases with age. It occurs in various joints including hip, knee and hand with knee osteoarthritis being more prevalent. There is no cure for it. The management strategies include exercise, glucosamine plus chondroitin sulfate and NSAIDs. In vitro and animal studies provide a rationale for the use of antioxidant supplements for its management. This review assesses the reality of the benefits of antioxidant supplements in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Several difficulties were encountered in examining this issue: poorly conducted studies, a lack of uniformity in disease definition and diagnosis, and muddling of conclusions from attempts to isolate the efficacious molecules. The antioxidant supplements with most evidence for benefit for pain relief and function in knee osteoarthritis were based on curcumin and avocado-soya bean unsaponifiables. Boswellia and some herbs used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine may also be useful. The benefits of cuisines with the appropriate antioxidants should be assessed because they may be more economical and easier to incorporate into the lifestyle.

  9. Benefits of antioxidant supplements for knee osteoarthritis: rationale and reality.

    PubMed

    Grover, Ashok Kumar; Samson, Sue E

    2016-01-01

    Arthritis causes disability due to pain and inflammation in joints. There are many forms of arthritis, one of which is osteoarthritis whose prevalence increases with age. It occurs in various joints including hip, knee and hand with knee osteoarthritis being more prevalent. There is no cure for it. The management strategies include exercise, glucosamine plus chondroitin sulfate and NSAIDs. In vitro and animal studies provide a rationale for the use of antioxidant supplements for its management. This review assesses the reality of the benefits of antioxidant supplements in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Several difficulties were encountered in examining this issue: poorly conducted studies, a lack of uniformity in disease definition and diagnosis, and muddling of conclusions from attempts to isolate the efficacious molecules. The antioxidant supplements with most evidence for benefit for pain relief and function in knee osteoarthritis were based on curcumin and avocado-soya bean unsaponifiables. Boswellia and some herbs used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine may also be useful. The benefits of cuisines with the appropriate antioxidants should be assessed because they may be more economical and easier to incorporate into the lifestyle. PMID:26728196

  10. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A J; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C Niek

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the ankle are grouped, depending on their anatomic orientation, and each of the ankle ligaments is discussed in detail.

  11. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  12. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain.

  13. Ankle arthroplasty in a patient with bleeding diathesis and the mid-term clinical outcome of the case

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Barış; Kömür, Baran; Özdemir, Güzelali; Heybeli, Nurettin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this report was to present the case of a patient with bleeding diathesis on whom we performed ankle arthroplasty for the first time. Materials and methods A 29-year old male patient with bleeding diathesis, who had been treated and followed up over a long period, underwent ankle arthroplasty because of osteoarthritis of the ankle. The patient was prepared for surgery by the haematology department in accordance with the guidelines for surgical preparation, diagnosis and management of haemophilia. After ankle arthroplasty was performed, the preoperative and two-year postoperative clinical outcomes were evaluated using a subjective foot score and Maryland foot score. Results Preoperative factor VIII levels were raised to the target level of haemostasis prior to the surgical procedure. The factor VIII levels were maintained within the normal range up to postoperative day 14. The subjective foot score of the patient was 40 preoperatively and 85 postoperatively, whereas their Maryland foot scores were 33 preoperatively and 90 postoperatively. Both scoring systems indicate an excellent clinical outcome. Conclusion As observed, the early and mid-term functional outcomes are promising for patients with bleeding diathesis who undergo ankle arthroplasty. PMID:26635956

  14. Apparent spontaneous joint restoration in hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Gregory P; Brand, Richard A

    2002-11-01

    Dramatic spontaneous restoration of the joint space in osteoarthritis of the hip is rare, although limited fibrocartilaginous repair is common. Regeneration of the apparent radiographic joint space seems to be associated with peripheral osteophyte formation, but it is difficult to isolate other well-defined factors that promote it. Previous documentation of the phenomenon exists in scattered case reports before the era of widespread total hip replacement. Two recent cases are presented in which patients with bilateral disease had unilateral total hip replacement with simultaneous diminished pain in the contralateral hip accompanied by restoration of the radiographic joint space. Secondary stability, unloading, peripheral osteophyte formation, and other possible factors likely contribute to these unusual natural outcomes of coxarthrosis.

  15. Musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle: assessments and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rao, Smita; Riskowski, Jody L; Hannan, Marian T

    2012-06-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle are an important public health challenge due to their increasing incidence combined with their substantial negative impact on patients' quality of life. Non-pharmacological treatments serve as the first line of treatment and are frequently used for patients with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle. This review provides a summary of the assessments and non-invasive treatment options based upon available evidence. Recent studies show that individuals with foot and ankle pain have multiple co-existing impairments in alignment, motion, load distribution and muscle performance that may be evident in static and/or dynamic tasks. In addition, both clinical and epidemiological studies support the inter-dependence between the foot and proximal joints. For instance, aberrant foot structure has been linked to foot osteoarthritis (OA), as well as OA and pain at the knee and hip. Most recently, advances in motion capture technology and plantar load distribution measurement offer opportunities for precise dynamic assessments of the foot and ankle. In individuals with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle, the chief objectives of treatment are to afford pain relief, restore mechanics (alignment, motion and/or load distribution) and return the patient to their desired level of activity participation. Given that most patients present with multiple impairments, combinational therapies that target foot-specific as well as global impairments have shown promising results. In particular, in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases, comprehensive rehabilitation strategies including early detection, foot-based interventions (such as orthoses) and wellness-based approaches for physical activity and self-management have been successful. While significant improvements have been made in the last decade to the assessment and treatment of foot and ankle conditions, few randomised clinical trials

  16. Musculoskeletal Conditions of the Foot and Ankle: Assessments and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Smita; Riskowski, Jody; Hannan, Marian T.

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle are an important public health challenge due to their increasing incidence combined with their substantial negative impact on patients’ quality of life. Non-pharmacological treatments serve as the first line of treatment and are frequently used for patients with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle. This review provides a summary of the assessments and non-invasive treatment options based upon available evidence. Recent studies show that individuals with foot and ankle pain have multiple co-existing impairments in alignment, motion, load distribution and muscle performance that may be evident in static and/or dynamic tasks. Additionally, both clinical and epidemiological studies support the inter-dependence between the foot and proximal joints. For instance, aberrant foot structure has been linked to foot osteoarthritis (OA), as well as OA and pain at the knee and hip. Most recently, advances in motion capture technology and plantar load distribution measurement offer opportunities for precise dynamic assessments of the foot and ankle. In individuals with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle, the chief objectives of treatment are to afford pain relief, restore mechanics (alignment, motion and/or load distribution) and return the patient to their desired level of activity participation. Given that most patients present with multiple impairments, combinational therapies that target foot-specific as well as global impairments have shown promising results. In particular, in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases, comprehensive rehabilitation strategies including early detection, foot-based interventions (such as orthoses) and wellness-based approaches for physical activity and self-management have been successful. While significant improvements have been made in the last decade to the assessment and treatment of foot and ankle conditions, few randomized clinical

  17. Salvage of Failed Total Ankle Replacement Using a Custom Titanium Truss.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; White, Amari M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Subsidence of the talar component results in significant morbidity after total ankle replacement. When recognized, prompt revision could be needed to preserve the function of the implant; however, this is not always the case. In situations in which the implant cannot be revised, tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis might be necessary to salvage the extremity. The purpose of the present report is to describe the use of a custom titanium alloy truss to fill a bony void created by explantation of the implant components. Total ankle replacement was performed as the initial surgery to address end-stage osteoarthritis. Two years after the index procedure, the patient underwent revision of the polyethylene and talar components with subtalar arthrodesis secondary to progressive subtalar osteoarthritis and talar subsidence. The implant subsequently became infected and was removed. The patient underwent re-implantation after the infection had resolved, but significant talar subsidence required conversion to a tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with a custom titanium alloy truss and retrograde intramedullary nail. At the most recent follow-up appointment, the patient was weightbearing on a stable extremity and pain free. Radiographic examination confirmed appropriate implant alignment and evidence of bone formation throughout the titanium truss. Although our results are restricted to a single case with initial, limited follow-up data, combining sound structural mechanics with an open architecture and unique texture, the custom titanium truss appears to maintain the limb length and promote healing across a large void.

  18. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports. PMID:17190537

  19. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports.

  20. Treating Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteotomy may need knee replacement surgery in the future. Arthroplasty is also called joint or knee replacement therapy. A surgeon removes the part of the knee damaged by osteoarthritis and replaces it with an artificial joint made from metals and plastic. All or part of the knee joint may ...

  1. Ankle motion influences the external knee adduction moment and may predict who will respond to lateral wedge insoles?: an ancillary analysis from the SILK trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, G.J.; Parkes, M.J.; Forsythe, L.; Felson, D.T.; Jones, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Lateral wedge insoles are a potential simple treatment for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients by reducing the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). However in some patients, an increase in their EKAM is seen. Understanding the role of the ankle joint complex in the response to lateral wedge insoles is critical in understanding and potentially identifying why some patients respond differently to lateral wedge insoles. Method Participants with medial tibiofemoral OA underwent gait analysis whilst walking in a control shoe and a lateral wedge insole. We evaluated if dynamic ankle joint complex coronal plane biomechanical measures could explain and identify those participants that increased (biomechanical non-responder) or decreased (biomechanical responder) EKAM under lateral wedge conditions compared to the control shoe. Results Of the 70 participants studied (43 male), 33% increased their EKAM and 67% decreased their EKAM. Overall, lateral wedge insoles shifted the centre of foot pressure laterally, increased eversion of the ankle/subtalar joint complex (STJ) and the eversion moment compared to the control condition. Ankle angle at peak EKAM and peak eversion ankle/STJ complex angle in the control condition predicted if individuals were likely to decrease EKAM under lateral wedge conditions. Conclusions Coronal plane ankle/STJ complex biomechanical measures play a key role in reducing EKAM when wearing lateral wedge insoles. These findings may assist in the identification of those individuals that could benefit more from wearing lateral wedge insoles. PMID:25749010

  2. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    MedlinePlus

    ... AOFAS / FootCareMD / Find a Surgeon Find an Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeon Page Content The Orthopaedic Distinction Who are Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeons? Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons are ...

  3. Which ankle fractures require syndesmotic stabilization?

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Lamme, Bas; Hogervorst, Mike; Bolhuis, Hugo W

    2007-01-01

    Syndesmotic ruptures associated with ankle fractures are most commonly caused by external rotation of the foot, eversion of the talus within the ankle mortise, and excessive dorsiflexion. The distal tibiofibular syndesmosis consists of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and interosseous ligament, and it is essential for stability of the ankle mortise. Despite the numerous biomechanical and clinical studies pertaining to ankle fractures, there are no uniform recommendations regarding the use of the syndesmotic screw for specific injury patterns and fracture types. The objective of this review was to formulate recommendations for clinical practice related to the use of syndesmotic screw placement. PMID:17980843

  4. Combined Posterior and Anterior Ankle Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Peter E.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of combined anterior and posterior ankle pathology usually consists of either combined anterior and posterior arthrotomies or anterior ankle arthroscopy with an additional posterolateral portal. The first technique bears the risk of complications associated with the extensive exposure, the latter technique provides limited access to the posterior ankle joint. A case is described of combined anterior and posterior arthroscopy, with the patient lying prone and then turned supine, addressing both anterior and posterior ankle pathologies in one tempo. This minimally invasive combined approach allows quick recovery and early return to work and sports activities. PMID:23227391

  5. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Rae; Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E.; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice. PMID:27134529

  6. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview.

    PubMed

    Kim, Da-Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Potter, Hollis G; Li, Angela E; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  7. Nonoperative management of athletic ankle injuries.

    PubMed

    Vegso, J J; Harmon, L E

    1982-03-01

    Few injuries in sports are more ubiquitous than those involving the ankle. Athletes in some endeavors, notably football and basketball, routinely have their ankles prophylactically taped at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars and, probably, millions of man hours. Other sports, such as skiing, involve encasement of the foot, ankle and lower leg in plastic and foam to the extent of almost complete exclusion of motion. In spite of these rather heroic measures, ankle injuries continue to constitute a significant threat to athletes in these and most other activities.

  8. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint. PMID:26252560

  9. Sport and early osteoarthritis: the role of sport in aetiology, progression and treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vannini, F; Spalding, T; Andriolo, L; Berruto, M; Denti, M; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Menetrey, J; Peretti, G M; Seil, R; Filardo, G

    2016-06-01

    Sports activities are considered favourable for general health; nevertheless, a possible influence of sports practice on the development of early osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause for concern. A higher incidence of OA in knees and ankles of former high-impact sports players than in those of the normal population has been shown and it is still debatable whether the cause is either to be recognized generically in the higher number of injuries or in a joint overload. The possibility to address knee OA in its early phases may be strictly connected to the modification of specific extrinsic or intrinsic factors, related to the patient in order to save the joint from further disease progression; these include sport practice, equipment and load. Non-surgical therapies such as continuative muscles reinforce and training play a strong role in the care of athletes with early OA, particularly if professional. There is an overall agreement on the need of an early restoring of a proper meniscal, ligament and cartilage integrity in order to protect the knee and resume sports safely, whereas alignment is a point still strongly debatable especially for professional athletes. Remaining questions still to be answered are the risks of different sports in relation to one another, although an actual protective effect of low-impact sports, such as walking, swimming or cycling, has been recognized on the appearance or worsening of OA, the effect of continuing or ceasing to practice a sport on the natural history of early OA, and even following appropriate treatment is still unknown. PMID:27043343

  10. Sport and early osteoarthritis: the role of sport in aetiology, progression and treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vannini, F; Spalding, T; Andriolo, L; Berruto, M; Denti, M; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Menetrey, J; Peretti, G M; Seil, R; Filardo, G

    2016-06-01

    Sports activities are considered favourable for general health; nevertheless, a possible influence of sports practice on the development of early osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause for concern. A higher incidence of OA in knees and ankles of former high-impact sports players than in those of the normal population has been shown and it is still debatable whether the cause is either to be recognized generically in the higher number of injuries or in a joint overload. The possibility to address knee OA in its early phases may be strictly connected to the modification of specific extrinsic or intrinsic factors, related to the patient in order to save the joint from further disease progression; these include sport practice, equipment and load. Non-surgical therapies such as continuative muscles reinforce and training play a strong role in the care of athletes with early OA, particularly if professional. There is an overall agreement on the need of an early restoring of a proper meniscal, ligament and cartilage integrity in order to protect the knee and resume sports safely, whereas alignment is a point still strongly debatable especially for professional athletes. Remaining questions still to be answered are the risks of different sports in relation to one another, although an actual protective effect of low-impact sports, such as walking, swimming or cycling, has been recognized on the appearance or worsening of OA, the effect of continuing or ceasing to practice a sport on the natural history of early OA, and even following appropriate treatment is still unknown.

  11. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture: a rare injury mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Serbest, Sancar; Tiftikçi, Uğur; Tosun, Haci Bayram; Kesgin, Engin; Karataş, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Sprain of the ankle is undoubtedly a common injury during athletic activity, and the sprain can be also associated with fracture of the ankle. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture is a very rare condition, which is usually missed. Here, we are presenting a 37 years old female patient, who suffered injury secondary pressing on brake pedal during collision in a traffic accident. Clinical evaluation is based on Ottawa Ankle Rules and a fracture is diagnosed; patient is started on daily activities at postoperative Week 8. This study aims to emphasize that Ottawa Ankle Rules are usually efficient for evaluating fractures of ankle, but clinicians should always make a detailed physical examination. PMID:26097627

  12. [Treatment of patients with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Vargas Negrín, Francisco; Medina Abellán, María D; Hermosa Hernán, Juan Carlos; de Felipe Medina, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis aims to decrease pain and inflammation, improve physical function, and to apply safe and effective treatments. A patient-centered approach implies the active participation of the patient in the design of the treatment plan and in timely and informed decision-making at all stages of the disease. The nucleus of treatment is patient education, physical activity and therapeutic exercise, together with weight control in overweight or obese patients. Self-care by the individual and by the family is fundamental in day-to-day patient management. The use of physical therapies, technical aids (walking sticks, etc.) and simple analgesics, opium alkaloids, and antiinflammatory drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in controlling pain, improving physical function and quality of life and their use is clearly indicated in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Conservative surgery and joint replacement is indicated when treatment goals are not achieved in specific patients.

  13. [Treatment of patients with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Vargas Negrín, Francisco; Medina Abellán, María D; Hermosa Hernán, Juan Carlos; de Felipe Medina, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis aims to decrease pain and inflammation, improve physical function, and to apply safe and effective treatments. A patient-centered approach implies the active participation of the patient in the design of the treatment plan and in timely and informed decision-making at all stages of the disease. The nucleus of treatment is patient education, physical activity and therapeutic exercise, together with weight control in overweight or obese patients. Self-care by the individual and by the family is fundamental in day-to-day patient management. The use of physical therapies, technical aids (walking sticks, etc.) and simple analgesics, opium alkaloids, and antiinflammatory drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in controlling pain, improving physical function and quality of life and their use is clearly indicated in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Conservative surgery and joint replacement is indicated when treatment goals are not achieved in specific patients. PMID:24467960

  14. Balance assessments for predicting functional ankle instability and stable ankles.

    PubMed

    Ross, Scott E; Linens, Shelley W; Wright, Cynthia J; Arnold, Brent L

    2011-10-01

    A number of instrumented and non-instrumented measures are used to detect balance deficits associated with functional ankle instability (FAI). Determining outcome measures that detect balance deficits associated with FAI might assist clinicians in identifying impairments that may otherwise go undetected with less responsive balance measures. Thus, our objective was to determine the balance measure that best predicted ankle group membership (FAI or stable ankle). Participants included 17 subjects without a history of ankle sprains (168±9 cm, 66±14 kg, 24±5 yr) and 17 subjects with FAI (172±9 cm, 71±11 kg, 22±3 yr). Balance trials were performed without vision and subjects stood on a single leg as motionless as possible for 20s. Balance was quantified with center-of-pressure measures (velocity, area) and error score. Measures were positively correlated with each other (r range: 0.60-0.76). The multifactorial model with all three measures best predicted group membership (F((3,30))=7.20, P=0.001; R(2)=0.42; percent classified correctly=77%), and was followed by the multifactorial model with resultant center-of-pressure velocity and error score (F((2,31))=8.73, P=0.001; R(2)=0.36; percent classified correctly=74%). The resultant center-of-pressure velocity (F((1,32))=13.46, P=0.001; R(2)=0.30; percent classified correctly=74%; unique variance=12.7%) and error score (F((1,32))=12.51, P=0.001; R(2)=0.28; percent classified correctly=71%; unique variance=12.0%) predicted group membership; however, 95th percentile center-of-pressure area ellipse did not (F((1,32))=4.16, P=0.05; R(2)=0.12; percent classified correctly=65%; unique variance=5.8%). A multifactorial single leg balance assessment is best for predicting group membership. COPV is the best single predictor of group membership, but clinicians may use error score to identify deficits associated with FAI if force plates are not available. PMID:21868225

  15. [The disability associated with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease and a potentially disabling illness, whose prevalence has increased in recent years alongside the aging population. The disability associated with this condition generates a brutal impact on individuals who are limited in their basic daily living activities. The increase in life expectancy is not correlated with an increase in quality of life, since the years of life increase, but characterized for living with disabilities.

  16. Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis Exhibit Widespread Hyperalgesia to Pressure and Cold.

    PubMed

    Moss, Penny; Knight, Emma; Wright, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli are characteristics of a range of disorders such as tennis elbow, whiplash and fibromyalgia. This study evaluated the presence of local and widespread mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, compared to healthy control subjects. Twenty-three subjects with knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and body mass index, were recruited for the study. Volunteers with any additional chronic pain conditions were excluded. Pain thresholds to pressure, cold and heat were tested at the knee, ipsilateral heel and ipsilateral elbow, in randomized order, using standardised methodology. Significant between-groups differences for pressure pain and cold pain thresholds were found with osteoarthritic subjects demonstrating significantly increased sensitivity to both pressure (p = .018) and cold (p = .003) stimuli, compared with controls. A similar pattern of results extended to the pain-free ipsilateral ankle and elbow indicating widespread pressure and cold hyperalgesia. No significant differences were found between groups for heat pain threshold, although correlations showed that subjects with greater sensitivity to pressure pain were also likely to be more sensitive to both cold pain and heat pain. This study found widespread elevated pain thresholds in subjects with painful knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that altered nociceptive system processing may play a role in ongoing arthritic pain for some patients. PMID:26809009

  17. Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis Exhibit Widespread Hyperalgesia to Pressure and Cold

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Penny; Knight, Emma; Wright, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli are characteristics of a range of disorders such as tennis elbow, whiplash and fibromyalgia. This study evaluated the presence of local and widespread mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, compared to healthy control subjects. Twenty-three subjects with knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and body mass index, were recruited for the study. Volunteers with any additional chronic pain conditions were excluded. Pain thresholds to pressure, cold and heat were tested at the knee, ipsilateral heel and ipsilateral elbow, in randomized order, using standardised methodology. Significant between-groups differences for pressure pain and cold pain thresholds were found with osteoarthritic subjects demonstrating significantly increased sensitivity to both pressure (p = .018) and cold (p = .003) stimuli, compared with controls. A similar pattern of results extended to the pain-free ipsilateral ankle and elbow indicating widespread pressure and cold hyperalgesia. No significant differences were found between groups for heat pain threshold, although correlations showed that subjects with greater sensitivity to pressure pain were also likely to be more sensitive to both cold pain and heat pain. This study found widespread elevated pain thresholds in subjects with painful knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that altered nociceptive system processing may play a role in ongoing arthritic pain for some patients. PMID:26809009

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic ankle pain.

    PubMed

    Wukich, Dane K; Tuason, Dominick A

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for chronic ankle pain is quite broad. Ankle pain can be caused by intra-articular or extra-articular pathology and may be a result of a traumatic or nontraumatic event. A detailed patient history and physical examination, coupled with judicious selection of the appropriate imaging modalities, are vital in making an accurate diagnosis and providing effective treatment. Chronic ankle pain can affect all age groups, ranging from young athletes to elderly patients with degenerative joint and soft-tissue disorders. It has been estimated that 23,000 ankle sprains occur each day in the United States, representing approximately 1 sprain per 10,000 people per day. Because nearly one in five ankle injuries result in chronic symptoms, orthopaedic surgeons are likely to see patients with chronic ankle pain. Many patients with chronic ankle pain do not recall any history of trauma. Reviewing the management of the various disorders that can cause chronic ankle pain will help orthopaedic surgeons provide the best treatment for their patients. PMID:21553785

  19. Ankle and Other Signatures in Uhecr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, Veniamin

    2015-03-01

    The interaction signatures of UHE protons propagating through CMB are discussed. Much attention is given to ankle, which starting from 1963 is usually interpreted as a feature of transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. We argue here that this interpretation is now excluded. It gives more credit to alternative explanation of the ankle as an intrinsic part of the pair-production dip.

  20. Basketball injuries of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    McDermott, E P

    1993-04-01

    Foot and ankle injuries in basketball are discussed in three unrelated categories in this article. This includes a practical differential diagnosis of ankle sprains, acute conditions of the mid and hindfoot, overuse syndromes of nerve entrapment, fascial strain, synovitis, joint subluxation, and inflammation resulting from repetitive stress. The diagnosis and treatment of tendon inflammation of the extrinsic foot musculature is also reviewed.

  1. Ipsilateral Tibiotalar Joint Osteoarthritis Transferred to the Contralateral Tibiotalar Joint.

    PubMed

    Dugarte, Anthony; Bharwani, Sahil; Yoo, HoJun; Boiwka, Alexander Vondra; Tang, Jonathan E; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2016-07-01

    Classically, it is thought that pain or disability in one leg can stress the contralateral leg, leading to similar symptoms. The mechanism of action for subsequent dysfunction in the healthy limb is thought to involve compensatory changes that are used as a means to reduce stance phase time on the injured limb. This is believed to increase the forces distributed across the healthy limb, ultimately leading to injury. This belief has been challenged, as supportive literature is sparse. The goal of this study was to determine whether an association between tibiotalar (TT) osteoarthritis (OA) in the right vs left lower extremity exists, and whether injury to one lower extremity leads to degeneration in the contralateral lower extremity. The authors evaluated 704 TT joints to determine the presence of OA. A multiple linear regression was performed using a standard P value cutoff (P<.05) and 95% confidence interval. The absolute value of the difference between right and left TT OA was compared for specimens in each decade of life. Multiple regression analysis revealed a positive correlation between right and left TT OA, after correcting for age, sex, and race. Right TT vs left TT had a slope of 0.489 with a P value approaching 0. Findings indicated the absolute value of the difference between right and left TT OA was not zero, and this difference remains significant throughout life. Based on these findings, OA in one ankle does not appear to lead to accelerated OA in the contralateral ankle. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e664-e667.]. PMID:27286049

  2. Current concepts review: ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Arastu, M H; Demcoe, R; Buckley, R E

    2012-01-01

    Ankle fractures are common injuries that require meticulous technique in order to optimise outcome. The Lauge-Hansen and Danis-Weber classifications in addition to careful evaluation of the injury mechanism can help guide treatment but surgeons must be aware that there are injury patterns that will not always fit the afore mentioned patterns. The principles of atraumatic soft tissue handling, rigid internal fixation and early range of motion exercises are critical for successfully treating these injuries. There are still areas of treatment uncertainty and future directed research is needed in order to address some of these questions.

  3. Tumours of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Hussain, Shakir; Carter, Simon R

    2015-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare tumours and particularly rarer in the foot and ankle region. The complex anatomy of the foot and ankle makes it unique and hence poses a challenge to the surgeon for limb salvage surgery. Other lesions found in the foot and ankle region are benign bone and soft tissue tumours, metastasis and infection. The purpose of this article is to discuss the relevance of the complex anatomy of the foot and ankle in relation to tumours, clinical features, their general management principles and further discussion about some of the more common bone and soft tissue lesions. Discussion of every single bone and soft tissue lesion in the foot and ankle region is beyond the scope of this article.

  4. An Epidemiologic Perspective. Does Running Cause Osteoarthritis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of literature on exercise and arthritis considers relevant epidemiologic and experimental studies of animals and humans, focusing on the relationship between running and osteoarthritis. No conclusive evidence exists that running causes osteoarthritis; research trends suggest that running may slow the functional aspects of musculoskeletal…

  5. Therapeutic exercise for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Semble, E L; Loeser, R F; Wise, C M

    1990-08-01

    Therapeutic exercise in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis may be useful in improving aerobic capacity, strengthening muscles, improving endurance and increasing flexibility. This article reviews the major studies of exercise in these conditions and summarizes the authors recommendations regarding the use of therapeutic exercise in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis osteoarthritis.

  6. The role of ankle bracing for prevention of ankle sprain injuries.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael T; Liu, Hsin-Yi

    2003-10-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries incurred in recreational and competitive athletics. These injuries have a significant impact in terms of cost, athletic participation, and activities of daily living. Prophylactic ankle braces are often used to reduce the risk of injury recurrence when individuals return to athletic participation. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the literature and provide our own experience relative to the use of prophylactic ankle bracing. Relatively high incidence rates of ankle sprain injury have been reported for basketball and soccer athletes, military trainees, and individuals with a previous history of ankle sprain injury. Semirigid and laced ankle braces have significantly reduced the incidence of initial and recurrent ankle sprain injuries in athletic and military samples. With few exceptions, these braces do not appear to affect functional performance adversely. The prophylactic use of semirigid ankle braces appears warranted to reduce the incidence of initial and, in particular, recurrent ankle sprain injuries for individuals who participate in activities that have the highest risk for these injuries. Additional research is needed to evaluate the many new braces that are available and in use and their influence on the incidence of ankle sprain injury and functional performance.

  7. Footwear and ankle stability in the basketball player.

    PubMed

    Petrov, O; Blocher, K; Bradbury, R L; Saxena, A; Toy, M L

    1988-04-01

    Ankle stability in basketball players is affected by footwear. Athletic shoe manufacturers have introduced specialized lacing systems and high-top performance shoes to improve ankle stability. These performance shoes not only aid in preventing ankle injuries, but also protect injured ankles.

  8. Obesity, knee osteoarthritis and knee arthroplasty: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of obesity is rising worldwide. Obesity is a risk factor for developing osteoarthritis in the knee. Obesity and knee osteoarthritis are independently disabling conditions and in combination pose difficult therapeutic challenges. This review will discuss obesity, osteoarthritis, and the problems associated with knee osteoarthritis in an obese population. Treatment options including surgery and its success will be discussed. PMID:24304704

  9. Knee osteoarthritis image registration: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a very common disease, in early stages, changes in joint structures are shown, some of the most common symptoms are; formation of osteophytes, cartilage degradation and joint space reduction, among others. Based on a joint space reduction measurement, Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale, is a very extensive used tool to asses radiological OA knee x-ray images, based on information obtained from these assessments, the objective of this work is to correlate the Kellgren-Lawrence score to the bilateral asymmetry between knees. Using public data from the Osteoarthritis initiative (OAI), a set of images with different Kellgren-Lawrencescores were used to determine a relationship of Kellgren-Lawrence score and the bilateral asymmetry, in order to measure the asymmetry between the knees, the right knee was registered to match the left knee, then a series of similarity metrics, mutual information, correlation, and mean squared error where computed to correlate the deformation (mismatch) of the knees to the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Radiological information was evaluated and scored by OAI radiologist groups. The results of the study suggest an association between Radiological Kellgren-Lawrence score and image registration metrics, mutual information and correlation is higher in the early stages, and mean squared error is higher in advanced stages. This association can be helpful to develop a computer aided grading tool.

  10. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  11. Conversion of ankle autofusion to total ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Emilie R C; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-09-01

    Few reports in the literature have described the conversion of a surgically fused ankle to a total ankle replacement. The takedown of an autofusion and conversion to a prosthesis has not been described. We report the case of a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis with an ankle autofusion fixed in equinus and severe talonavicular arthritis that was converted to ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision system. We describe the reasons why the decision was made to perform total ankle arthroplasty while concomitantly fusing the talonavicular joint, and discuss the rationale of the various surgical treatment options considered. We describe the clinical and radiographic outcomes achieved in this case. At 12 months post-operatively the patient reported significant reduction of pain, increased FAOS scores and had increased ankle range of motion.

  12. The Split Second Effect: The Mechanism of How Equinus Can Damage the Human Foot and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Amis, James

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in the process of discovering that many, if not the majority, of the non-traumatic acquired adult foot and ankle problems are caused by a singular etiology: non-neuromuscular equinus or the isolated gastrocnemius contracture. There is no question that this biomechanical association exists and in time much more will be uncovered. There are three basic questions that must be answered: why would our calves tighten as we normally age, how does a tight calf, or equinus, actually cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle, and how do the forces produced by equinus cause so many seemingly unrelated pathologies in the foot and ankle? The purpose of this paper is to address the second question: how does a tight calf mechanically cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle? There has been little evidence in the literature addressing the biomechanical mechanisms by which equinus creates damaging forces upon the foot and ankle, and as a result, a precise, convincing mechanism is still lacking. Thus, the mere concept that equinus has anything to do with foot pathology is generally unknown or disregarded. The split second effect, described here, defines exactly how the silent equinus contracture creates incremental and significant damage and injury to the human foot and ankle resulting in a wide variety of pathological conditions. The split second effect is a dissenting theory based on 30 years of clinical and academic orthopedic foot and ankle experience, keen clinical observation along the way, and review of the developing literature, culminating in examination of many hours of slow motion video of normal and abnormal human gait. To my knowledge, no one has ever described the mechanism in detail this precise. PMID:27512692

  13. The Split Second Effect: The Mechanism of How Equinus Can Damage the Human Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Amis, James

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in the process of discovering that many, if not the majority, of the non-traumatic acquired adult foot and ankle problems are caused by a singular etiology: non-neuromuscular equinus or the isolated gastrocnemius contracture. There is no question that this biomechanical association exists and in time much more will be uncovered. There are three basic questions that must be answered: why would our calves tighten as we normally age, how does a tight calf, or equinus, actually cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle, and how do the forces produced by equinus cause so many seemingly unrelated pathologies in the foot and ankle? The purpose of this paper is to address the second question: how does a tight calf mechanically cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle? There has been little evidence in the literature addressing the biomechanical mechanisms by which equinus creates damaging forces upon the foot and ankle, and as a result, a precise, convincing mechanism is still lacking. Thus, the mere concept that equinus has anything to do with foot pathology is generally unknown or disregarded. The split second effect, described here, defines exactly how the silent equinus contracture creates incremental and significant damage and injury to the human foot and ankle resulting in a wide variety of pathological conditions. The split second effect is a dissenting theory based on 30 years of clinical and academic orthopedic foot and ankle experience, keen clinical observation along the way, and review of the developing literature, culminating in examination of many hours of slow motion video of normal and abnormal human gait. To my knowledge, no one has ever described the mechanism in detail this precise. PMID:27512692

  14. [Biomechanics of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H

    1989-03-01

    According to Fick, the tree-dimensional patterns of foot motion are best characterized as jawlike movement. Anatomically and biomechanically, this process represents conjoined, synchronous motion within the three mobile segments of the hindfoot: the ankle joint, the posterior subtalar joint, and the anterior subtalar joint. Foot kinematics can be described more completely if the anterior subtalar joint is defined not only as the talocalcaneal navicular joint, but as including the calcaneocuboid joint, thus representing the transverse joint of the tarsus, i.e., the Chopart joint. The axes of these three joints can be defined precisely. In some parts they represent a screwlike motion, clockwise or counter-clockwise, around the central ligamentous structures (fibulotibial ligament, talocalcaneal interosseous ligament, bifurcate ligament). The individual anatomy and structure of these ligaments provide variations in the degree and direction of foot motion. A precise knowledge of foot kinematics is important in surgical ligament and joint reconstruction and in selective foot arthrodeses.

  15. Sonographic anatomy of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Precerutti, M; Bonardi, M; Ferrozzi, G; Draghi, F

    2014-06-01

    Ankle sonography is one of the most commonly ordered examinations in the field of osteoarticular imaging, and it requires intimate knowledge of the anatomic structures that make up the joint. For practical purposes, the examination can be divided into four compartments, which are analyzed in this pictorial essay: the anterior compartment, which includes the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, and extensor digitorum longus tendons; the accessory peroneus tertius tendon; and the extensor retinaculum; the medial compartment (tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus tendons; the flexor retinaculum; the medial collateral-or deltoid-ligament, and the neurovascular bundle); the lateral compartment (peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, and peroneus quartus tendons; superior and inferior peroneal retinacula, lateral collateral ligament); and the posterior compartment (Achilles tendon, plantaris tendon, Kagar's triangle, superficial, and deep retrocalcaneal bursae). Scanning techniques are briefly described to ensure optimal visualization of the various anatomic structures.

  16. Sonographic anatomy of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Precerutti, M; Bonardi, M; Ferrozzi, G; Draghi, F

    2014-06-01

    Ankle sonography is one of the most commonly ordered examinations in the field of osteoarticular imaging, and it requires intimate knowledge of the anatomic structures that make up the joint. For practical purposes, the examination can be divided into four compartments, which are analyzed in this pictorial essay: the anterior compartment, which includes the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, and extensor digitorum longus tendons; the accessory peroneus tertius tendon; and the extensor retinaculum; the medial compartment (tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus tendons; the flexor retinaculum; the medial collateral-or deltoid-ligament, and the neurovascular bundle); the lateral compartment (peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, and peroneus quartus tendons; superior and inferior peroneal retinacula, lateral collateral ligament); and the posterior compartment (Achilles tendon, plantaris tendon, Kagar's triangle, superficial, and deep retrocalcaneal bursae). Scanning techniques are briefly described to ensure optimal visualization of the various anatomic structures. PMID:24883130

  17. Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Daniëlle AWM; Berman, Brian M; Bouter, Lex M

    2011-01-01

    Background Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. Objectives To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (both through December 2007), and scanned reference lists of articles. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing needle acupuncture with a sham, another active treatment, or a waiting list control group in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, or hand. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We calculated standardized mean differences using the differences in improvements between groups. Main results Sixteen trials involving 3498 people were included. Twelve of the RCTs included only people with OA of the knee, 3 only OA of the hip, and 1 a mix of people with OA of the hip and/or knee. In comparison with a sham control, acupuncture showed statistically significant, short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (standardized mean difference -0.28, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.11; 0.9 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 4.59%; relative percent change 10.32%; 9 trials; 1835 participants) and function (-0.28, -0.46 to -0.09; 2.7 point greater improvement on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 3.97%; relative percent change 8.63%); however, these pooled short-term benefits did not meet our predefined thresholds for clinical relevance (i.e. 1.3 points for pain; 3.57 points for function) and there was substantial statistical heterogeneity. Additionally, restriction to sham-controlled trials using shams judged most likely to adequately blind participants to treatment assignment (which were also the same shams judged most

  18. Does diabetes hide osteoarthritis pain?

    PubMed

    Leaverton, Paul E; Peregoy, Jennifer; Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Barrett, John P

    2012-04-01

    Clinical practice and research efforts related to the highly prevalent and disabling disease, osteoarthritis (OA), have long been hampered by an inadequate case definition. Much of the difficulty is due to a lack of agreement between X-rays evidence of OA and a patient's report of pain at that site. Such discordance between reported pain and radiographic evidence of OA has been attributed to several factors. This paper proposes another possible explanation, for at least a portion of such patients. It is hypothesized that an insidiously increasing diabetic neuropathy, particularly in the lower extremity, while first causing some pain, may gradually inhibit the ability to feel pain which might have otherwise been reported by those patients without neuropathy. Many of these patients with early stage glucose dysmetabolism will proceed to develop overt type 2 diabetes; however, the pain-inhibiting neuropathy caused by glucose metabolism dysfunction may manifest long before such a diagnosis. The high prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetic conditions, especially among the aged population, could mean that a substantial number of individuals with osteoarthritis will have both diseases to varying degrees over time. Validating and quantifying this hypothesized association would be useful to millions of persons and would significantly impact both research and clinical practice dealing with these major diseases of older persons.

  19. Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle: Lichen simplex chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. A minor itch may encourage scratching which increases the irritation, leading to more scratching. This ...

  20. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Field Hockey Football Injuries Golf Injuries Lacrosse Rugby Running Soccer Softball Tennis Volleyball Find an ACFAS Physician ... Foot and Ankle Although golf does not involve running or jumping, injuries can occur to the foot ...

  1. Better Way to Treat Seniors' Ankle Fractures?

    MedlinePlus

    ... quality of life can suffer as they lose mobility," added Willett. He is a professor of orthopedics, ... two groups in terms of pain, ankle motion, mobility or quality of life, the study found. Patients ...

  2. Fibular osteochondroma presenting as chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Montella, B J; O'Farrell, D A; Furr, W S; Harrelson, J M

    1995-04-01

    A 19-year-old baseball player was referred for assessment of recurrent sprains of the right ankle. This was found to be secondary to a palsy of the common peroneal nerve that was compressed by an osteochondroma of the fibular neck. The lesion was resected from the fibula and the patient made a complete recovery. We present this case as an example of a rare underlying problem in a patient who was initially diagnosed as having a sports-related ankle injury.

  3. Endoscopic Ankle Lateral Ligament Graft Anatomic Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Michels, Frederick; Cordier, Guillaume; Guillo, Stéphane; Stockmans, Filip

    2016-09-01

    Chronic instability is a common complication of lateral ankle sprains. If nonoperative treatment fails, a surgical repair or reconstruction may be indicated. Today, endoscopic techniques to treat ankle instability are becoming more popular. This article describes an endoscopic technique, using a step-by-step approach, to reconstruct the ATFL and CFL with a gracilis graft. The endoscopic technique is reproducible and safe with regard to the surrounding anatomic structures. Short and midterm results confirm the benefits of this technique. PMID:27524711

  4. Knee and ankle joint torque-angle relationships of multi-joint leg extension.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Daniel; Olvermann, Matthias; Richtberg, Jan; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2011-07-28

    The force-length-relation (F-l-r) is an important property of skeletal muscle to characterise its function, whereas for in vivo human muscles, torque-angle relationships (T-a-r) represent the maximum muscular capacity as a function of joint angle. However, since in vivo force/torque-length data is only available for rotational single-joint movements the purpose of the present study was to identify torque-angle-relationships for multi-joint leg extension. Therefore, inverse dynamics served for calculation of ankle and knee joint torques of 18 male subjects when performing maximum voluntary isometric contractions in a seated leg press. Measurements in increments of 10° knee angle from 30° to 100° knee flexion resulted in eight discrete angle configurations of hip, knee and ankle joints. For the knee joint we found an ascending-descending T-a-r with a maximum torque of 289.5° ± 43.3 Nm, which closely matches literature data from rotational knee extension. In comparison to literature we observed a shift of optimum knee angle towards knee extension. In contrast, the T-a-r of the ankle joint vastly differed from relationships obtained for isolated plantar flexion. For the ankle T-a-r derived from multi-joint leg extension subjects operated over different sections of the force-length curve, but the ankle T-a-r derived from isolated joint efforts was over the ascending limb for all subjects. Moreover, mean maximum torque of 234.7 ± 56.6 Nm exceeded maximal strength of isolated plantar flexion (185.7 ± 27.8 Nm). From these findings we conclude that muscle function between isolated and more physiological multi-joint tasks differs. This should be considered for ergonomic and sports optimisation as well as for modelling and simulation of human movement.

  5. Ankle flexibility and injury patterns in dancers.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, E R; Hunter, D M; Martin, D F; Curl, W W; Hoen, H

    1996-01-01

    Lower-extremity injuries are common among dancers and cause significant absences from rehearsals and performances. For this study of lower-extremity injuries in 101 ballet and 47 modern dance students, injuries requiring medical attention sustained over 1 academic year were associated with the following data obtained at the beginning of the school year: ankle flexibility, sex, dance discipline, previous injury, body mass index, and years of training. Eighty-three of the 148 students (age range, 12 to 28 years) reported prior lower-limb injuries, the most common being ankle sprains (28% of all dancers). Previous leg injuries correlated significantly with lower dorsiflexion measurements and with more new injuries. Female students had greater ankle and first metatarsophalangeal flexibility. Modern dancers had greater ankle inversion. Ninety-four students sustained 177 injuries during the study, including 75 sprains or strains and 71 cases of tendinitis. Thirty-nine percent (N = 69) were ankle injuries; 18% (N = 33) were knee injuries; 23% (N = 40) were foot injuries; and 20% (N = 35) were either hip or thigh injuries. Sixty-seven percent (N = 78) of the injured students were ballet dancers. Age, years of training, body mass index, sex, and ankle range of motion measurement had no predictive value for injury; previous injury and dance discipline both correlated with increased risk of injury. PMID:8947396

  6. Complex ankle arthrodesis: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Remy V; Haleem, Amgad M; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2015-01-01

    Complex ankle arthrodesis is defined as an ankle fusion that is at high risk of delayed and nonunion secondary to patient comorbidities and/or local ankle/hindfoot factors. Risk factors that contribute to defining this group of patients can be divided into systemic factors and local factors pertaining to co-existing ankle or hindfoot pathology. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of these risk factors and their association with patients’ outcomes after complex ankle fusions. Both external and internal fixations have demonstrated positive outcomes with regards to achieving stable fixation and minimizing infection. Recent innovations in the application of biophysical agents and devices have shown promising results as adjuncts for healing. Both osteoconductive and osteoinductive agents have been effectively utilized as biological adjuncts for bone healing with low complication rates. Devices such as pulsed electromagnetic field bone stimulators, internal direct current stimulators and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound bone stimulators have been associated with faster bone healing and improved outcomes scores when compared with controls. The aim of this review article is to present a comprehensive approach to the management of complex ankle fusions, including the use of biophysical adjuncts for healing and a proposed algorithm for their treatment. PMID:26396936

  7. Total ankle replacement for posttraumatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Weme, Rebecca A Nieuwe; van Solinge, Guido; N Doornberg, Job; Sierevelt, Inger; Haverkamp, Daniël; Doets, H Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Most studies on total ankle replacement (TAR) have used a case mix of patients. We evaluated the outcome of TAR performed for end-stage arthritis either because of fracture or ligamentous injury. Patients and methods We prospectively followed 88 consecutive patients (50 postfracture ankles and 40 ankles with instability arthritis (2 bilateral)) who underwent TAR between 2001 and 2009. Mean follow-up for both groups was 5 years. Results Preoperative varus deformity of 10° or more was present in 23 ankles in the instability group. At 6 years, survival with revision or salvage fusion as an endpoint was 87% (95% CI: 74–99) in the postfracture group and 79% (95% CI: 63–94) in the instability group. Progressive periprosthetic osteolysis was seen in 23 ankles, and required salvage fusion in 6. The number of reoperations was similar in both groups. Clinical outcome, as assessed with 2 ankle scores and 2 questionnaires, showed good results and was similar at the latest follow-up. Interpretation The outcome was similar in the postfracture and instability groups and also similar to that reported in series including a case mix of patients. In contrast to earlier reports, preoperative frontal plane deformity in this series was not identified as a risk factor for failure. PMID:25772269

  8. TOTAL ANKLE REPLACEMENT: WHY, WHEN AND HOW?

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Dettoni, Federico; Femino, John E; Phisitkul, Phinit; Germano, Margherita; Amendola, Annunziato

    2010-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) was first attempted in the 1970s, but poor results led to its being considered inferior to ankle fusion until the late 1980s and early 1990s. By that time, newer designs which more closely replicated the natural anatomy of the ankle, showed improved clinical outcomes.1 Currently, even though controversy still exists about the effectiveness of TAR compared to ankle fusion, TAR has shown promising mid-term results and should no longer be considered an experimental procedure. Factors related to improved TAR outcomes include: 1) better patient selection, 2) more precise knowledge and replication of ankle biomechanics, 3) the introduction of less-constrained designs with reduced bone resection and no need for cementation, and 4) greater awareness of soft-tissue balance and component alignment. When TAR is performed, a thorough knowledge of ankle anatomy, pathologic anatomy and biomechanics is needed along with a careful pre-operative plan. These are fundamental in obtaining durable and predictable outcomes. The aim of this paper is to outline these aspects through a literature review. PMID:21045984

  9. Humeral surface replacement for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Humeral resurfacing has shown promising results for osteoarthritis, but revisions for glenoid erosion have been reported frequently. We investigated the hypothesis that preoperative glenoid wear and postoperative progress of glenoid erosion would influence the clinical outcome. Methods We reviewed 61 resurfacing hemiarthroplasties (55 patients) for primary osteoarthritis. 6 patients were lost to follow-up and 5 had undergone revision arthroplasty. This left 50 shoulders in 44 patients (mean age 66 years) that were followed for mean 30 (12–44) months. Complications, revisions, and the age- and sex-related Constant score were assessed. Radiographs were evaluated for loosening and glenoid erosion according to Walch. Results Of the 50 shoulders that were functionally assessed, the average age- and sex-related Constant score was 73%. In patients with preoperative type-B2 glenoids, at 49% it was lower than in type-A1 glenoids (81%, p = 0.03) and in type-B1 glenoids (84%, p = 0.02). The average age- and sex-related Constant score for patients with type-A2 glenoids (60%) was lower than for type-A1 and -B1 glenoids and higher than for type-B2 glenoids, but the differences were not statistically significant. In the total population of 61 shoulders, the radiographs showed postoperative glenoid erosion in 38 cases and no humeral prosthetic loosening. Revision arthroplasty was performed in 11 cases after 28 (7–69) months. The implant size had no statistically significant influence on the functional outcome. The size was considered to be adequate in 28 of the 50 functionally assessed shoulders. In 21 cases, the implant size was too large and in 1 case it was too small. Interpretation We found frequent postoperative glenoid erosion and a high rate of revision arthroplasty after humeral resurfacing for primary osteoarthritis. Oversizing of the implants was common, but it had no statistically significant influence on the functional outcome. Inferior

  10. Dietary polyphenols and mechanisms of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Smith, Brenda J; Lo, Di-Fan; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Dunn, Dale M; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Kwun, In-Sook

    2012-11-01

    Osteoarthritis is a condition caused in part by injury, loss of cartilage structure and function, and an imbalance in inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. It primarily affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone of synovial joints and results in joint failure, leading to pain upon weight bearing including walking and standing. There is no cure for osteoarthritis, as it is very difficult to restore the cartilage once it is destroyed. The goals of treatment are to relieve pain, maintain or improve joint mobility, increase the strength of the joints and minimize the disabling effects of the disease. Recent studies have shown an association between dietary polyphenols and the prevention of osteoarthritis-related musculoskeletal inflammation. This review discusses the effects of commonly consumed polyphenols, including curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate and green tea extract, resveratrol, nobiletin and citrus fruits, pomegranate, as well as genistein and soy protein, on osteoarthritis with an emphasis on molecular antiosteoarthritic mechanisms. PMID:22832078

  11. Effect of treadmill walking with ankle stretching orthosis on ankle flexibility and gait

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-ki; Kim, Si-hyun; Jeon, In-cheol; Ahn, Sun-hee; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematics of the ankle in the lunge to estabilish effectiveness of an ankle stretching orthosis (ASO) on the ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of individuals with limited dorsiflexion ROM. [Subjects and Methods] Forty ankles with decreased dorsiflexion ROM of 20 participants were evaluated in this study. After wearing the ASO, participants walked on a treadmill for 15 minutes. Participants walked on the treadmill at a self-selected comfortable speed. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM, maximum dorsiflexion ROM before heel-off, and time to heel-off during the stance phase of gait were measured before and after 15 minutes of treadmill walking with the ASO. The differences in all variables between before and after treadmill walking with ASO were analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] Ankle active and passive ROM, and dorsiflexion ROM during lunge increased significantly after treadmill walking with ASO. Treadmill walking with the ASO significantly increased the angle of maximal dorsiflexion before heel-off and time to heel-off during the stance phase. [Conclusion] The results of this study show that treadmill walking with the ASO effectively improved ankle flexibility and restored the normal gait pattern of the ankle joint by increasing dorsiflexion ROM, maximal angle of dorsiflexion, and time to heel-off in the stance phase. PMID:25995601

  12. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  13. [Arthroscopic treatment for osteoarthritis: knee and shoulder].

    PubMed

    Almazán, Arturo; Cruz, Francisco; Pérez, Francisco; Bravo, César; Ibarra, Clemente

    2007-10-01

    We discuss the role of arthroscopy in the treatment of knee and shoulder osteoarthritis. The most widely used arthroscopic techniques used in these joints for the treatment of osteoarthritis are arthroscopic lavage, arthroscopic debridement, abrasion arthrosplasty and microfractures. Even though arthroscopic techniques are only useful for a specific group of patients and that the procedure does not modify disease's natural history, it is an accessible therapeutic option.

  14. Emerging Targets in Osteoarthritis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Mary B.; Berenbaum, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a destructive joint disease in which the initiation may be attributed to direct injury and mechanical disruption of joint tissues, but the progressive changes are dependent on active cell-mediated processes that can be observed or inferred during the generally long time-course of the disease. Based on clinical observations and experimental studies, it is now recognized a that it is possible for individual patients to exhibit common sets of symptoms and structural abnormalities due to distinct pathophysiological pathways that act independently or in combination. Recent research that has focused on the underlying mechanisms involving biochemical cross talk among the cartilage, synovium, bone, and other joint tissues within a background of poorly characterized genetic factors will be addressed in this review. PMID:25863583

  15. The subclinical phase of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, G E

    1987-05-01

    The clinical diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) generally requires x-ray confirmation, fastening upon features such as narrowing of the joint and proliferative changes at the joint margins. In the formative phases, because of simple structural reasons, the joint may well not be narrowed and the proliferative changes and geodes may not as yet be apparent. Even symptomatic joint disease at this time may fail of diagnosis because the customary criteria have not yet been met. I submit that all OA is secondary, the inception being remote in time and, unless dramatic, being forgotten or never even noticed. An understanding of some of the mechanical features that characterize the progression to OA and the mechanism of pathogenesis should lead to earlier diagnosis and possible application of preventive measures.

  16. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA.

  17. [Nonpharmacological and nonsurgical therapies for osteoarthritis: orthosis, exercises].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Katherine; Eloumri, Amine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2010-11-01

    Unloading valgus knee braces may be more effective than knee sleeves, to improve pain and disability for medial knee osteoarthritis, but have more adverse effects. A lateral-wedge insole could reduce pain in medial knee osteoarthritis. Cushioning insoles and footwear with shock absorbance could be proposed for hip osteoarthritis by authors' recommendations. Nocturnal splints for base-of-thumb osteoarthritis are recommended to reduce pain and disability. Aerobic, strengthening, range-of-motion and proprioceptive exercise are recommended to decrease pain and improve function and quality of life in knee and hip osteoarthritis. Strengthening and range-of-motion exercise is recommended for hand osteoarthritis.

  18. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of “personalized prevention” for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26954784

  19. Moxibustion Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Yi; Li, Bo; Guo, Xing; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine whether the administration of moxibustion is an effective treatment for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We conducted a search of relevant articles using Medline, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library published before October 2015. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities’ Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scale) and the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36 scale) were assessed. Evidence grading was evaluated according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Four studies containing 746 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria in the final analysis. In terms of quality of life (QOL), the meta-analysis of 2 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) showed significantly effects of moxibustion only in bodily pain (BP) compared with those in the control group (n = 348; weighted mean difference [WMD], 4.36; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 2.27–6.44; P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: χ2 = 1.53, P = 0.22, I2 = 34%) in all of the subcategories of the SF-36 scale, with moderate quality. The meta-analysis of the 2 included trials showed that there was not a statistically significant difference in the pain or function subscale for the WOMAC scale when the 2 groups were compared (n = 322; WMD, 17.63; 95% CI, −23.15–58.41; P = 0.40; heterogeneity: χ2 = 19.42, P < 0.0001, I2 = 95%), with low or moderate quality separately. The administration of moxibustion can to some extent alleviate the symptoms of KOA. More rigorous, randomized controlled trials are required in the future. PMID:27057863

  20. Osteoarthritis. Joint anatomy, physiology, and pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S A

    1997-07-01

    Normal cartilage is a complex material consisting of a solid matrix composed primarily of collagen and proteoglycan, which is saturated with water. It is not a homogenous material. The interaction of the physical and biochemical structures of cartilage is necessary to allow the normal function of providing nearly frictionless motion, wear resistance, joint congruence, and transmission of load to subchondral bone. Chondrocytes are responsible for synthesizing and maintaining this material. Osteoarthritis occurs when there is disruption of normal cartilage structure and homeostasis. Osteoarthritis results from a complex interaction of biochemical and biomechanical factors that occur concurrently and serve to perpetuate degradative change. The progressive pathologic change that occurs in osteoarthritis has been characterized, not only for articular cartilage but also for periarticular tissues. The occurrence of mechanical and biochemical changes is well established, but the role of each in the etiopathogenesis of osteoarthritis is not rigidly defined. It is likely that there are multiple etiologies sharing common pathways of physical and chemical disruption. (see Fig. 1). The changes associated with osteoarthritis ultimately have an impact on the patient through decreased ability to use the joint or the production of pain, or both. Unfortunately, once these changes are severe enough to be recognized clinically, they are likely to be irreversible with current treatments. Nevertheless, understanding the basic mechanisms involved in the development and progression of osteoarthritis provides a basis for establishing a reasonable expectation for the patient and a rational plan for medical and surgical treatment of this condition. PMID:9243777

  1. Self-management pivotal in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Negoescu, Andra; Ostör, Andrew J K

    2014-04-01

    Osteoarthritis is not caused by ageing per se, although prevalence does increase with age, and does not necessarily deteriorate over time. However, with the ageing population the incidence and prevalence of osteoarthritis will continue to rise. Osteoarthritis remains a clinical diagnosis and importantly radiographic changes and joint symptoms may be poorly correlated. The most commonly affected peripheral joints are the knees, hips and small joints of the hand especially the distal interphalangeal joints. A diagnosis of osteoarthritis should be reached clinically, without the need for investigations, in those older than 45 years, with mechanical joint pain, and/or with morning joint-related stiffness lasting less than 30 minutes. However, in unclear situations, blood tests and imaging can be very helpful to exclude other conditions such as gout, pseudogout, post-traumatic pain, inflammatory or septic arthritis. All patients with clinical osteoarthritis should be advised about activity and exercise irrespective of age, comorbidity, pain severity or disability. An effective exercise routine may include local muscle strengthening and general aerobic fitness and referral to physiotherapy should be considered. A rheumatological opinion should be sought if there is doubt regarding the diagnosis or symptoms persist despite treatment. NICE recommends yearly follow-up forall osteoarthritis patients who suffer from troublesome joint pain, have more than one symptomatic joint, more than one comorbidity and/or those patients taking regular medication for the condition.

  2. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause joint damage, stiffness, and pain. ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese treatment. It is thought that when acupuncture needles stimulate certain points on the body, chemicals ...

  3. Epidemiology of Total Ankle Arthroplasty: Trends in New York State.

    PubMed

    Seaworth, Christine M; Do, Huong T; Vulcano, Ettore; Mani, Sriniwasan B; Lyman, Stephen L; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-05-01

    The rate of total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is increasing in the United States as its popularity and indications expand. There currently is no national joint registry available to monitor outcomes, and few studies have addressed the challenges faced with TAA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence, complications, and survival rates associated with TAA using a large statewide administrative discharge database. Individuals who underwent primary TAA from 1997 to 2010 were identified in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database from the New York State Department of Health. The age, sex, comorbidities, state of residence, primary diagnosis, and readmissions within 90 days were analyzed for patients with an ICD-9-CM procedure code of 81.56 (TAA). Failure of a TAA implant was defined as revision, tibiotalar arthrodesis, amputation, or implant removal. During the 14-year period, 420 patients underwent 444 TAAs (mean patient age of 61 years, 59% women, mean Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score of 0.45, and 86% New York State residents). The primary diagnosis was 37.4% osteoarthritis, 34.3% traumatic arthritis, and 15.5% rheumatoid arthritis. Surgery for failure was associated only with a younger age (56.5 vs 62 years, P=.005). The rate of subsequent failure procedures following TAAs performed in New York State was 13.8%. The incidence of TAAs is steadily increasing. The overall survival rate in New York State is better than rates reported in other national registries, but it is not yet comparable to those of hip and knee replacements. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):170-176.]. PMID:27135448

  4. Epidemiology of Total Ankle Arthroplasty: Trends in New York State.

    PubMed

    Seaworth, Christine M; Do, Huong T; Vulcano, Ettore; Mani, Sriniwasan B; Lyman, Stephen L; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-05-01

    The rate of total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is increasing in the United States as its popularity and indications expand. There currently is no national joint registry available to monitor outcomes, and few studies have addressed the challenges faced with TAA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence, complications, and survival rates associated with TAA using a large statewide administrative discharge database. Individuals who underwent primary TAA from 1997 to 2010 were identified in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database from the New York State Department of Health. The age, sex, comorbidities, state of residence, primary diagnosis, and readmissions within 90 days were analyzed for patients with an ICD-9-CM procedure code of 81.56 (TAA). Failure of a TAA implant was defined as revision, tibiotalar arthrodesis, amputation, or implant removal. During the 14-year period, 420 patients underwent 444 TAAs (mean patient age of 61 years, 59% women, mean Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score of 0.45, and 86% New York State residents). The primary diagnosis was 37.4% osteoarthritis, 34.3% traumatic arthritis, and 15.5% rheumatoid arthritis. Surgery for failure was associated only with a younger age (56.5 vs 62 years, P=.005). The rate of subsequent failure procedures following TAAs performed in New York State was 13.8%. The incidence of TAAs is steadily increasing. The overall survival rate in New York State is better than rates reported in other national registries, but it is not yet comparable to those of hip and knee replacements. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):170-176.].

  5. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  6. Unsupported standing with minimized ankle muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, Matjaz; Munih, Marko

    2004-08-01

    In the past, limited unsupported standing has been restored in patients with thoracic spinal cord injury through open-loop functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed knee extensor muscles and the support of intact arm musculature. Here an optimal control system for paralyzed ankle muscles was designed that enables the subject to stand without hand support in a sagittal plane. The paraplegic subject was conceptualized as an underactuated double inverted pendulum structure with an active degree of freedom in the upper trunk and a passive degree of freedom in the paralyzed ankle joints. Control system design is based on the minimization of a cost function that estimates the effort of ankle joint muscles via observation of the ground reaction force position, relative to ankle joint axis. Furthermore, such a control system integrates voluntary upper trunk activity and artificial control of ankle joint muscles, resulting in a robust standing posture. Figures are shown for the initial simulation study, followed by disturbance tests on an intact volunteer and several laboratory trials with a paraplegic person. Benefits of the presented methodology are prolonged standing sessions and in the fact that the subject is able to maintain voluntary control over upper body orientation in space, enabling simple functional standing. PMID:15311817

  7. Unsupported standing with minimized ankle muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, Matjaz; Munih, Marko

    2004-08-01

    In the past, limited unsupported standing has been restored in patients with thoracic spinal cord injury through open-loop functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed knee extensor muscles and the support of intact arm musculature. Here an optimal control system for paralyzed ankle muscles was designed that enables the subject to stand without hand support in a sagittal plane. The paraplegic subject was conceptualized as an underactuated double inverted pendulum structure with an active degree of freedom in the upper trunk and a passive degree of freedom in the paralyzed ankle joints. Control system design is based on the minimization of a cost function that estimates the effort of ankle joint muscles via observation of the ground reaction force position, relative to ankle joint axis. Furthermore, such a control system integrates voluntary upper trunk activity and artificial control of ankle joint muscles, resulting in a robust standing posture. Figures are shown for the initial simulation study, followed by disturbance tests on an intact volunteer and several laboratory trials with a paraplegic person. Benefits of the presented methodology are prolonged standing sessions and in the fact that the subject is able to maintain voluntary control over upper body orientation in space, enabling simple functional standing.

  8. Osteoarthritis: Research Findings | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements Education to help people better manage their osteoarthritis Exercise and weight loss to improve mobility and decrease pain Researchers are learning about sex differences that explain why ... to osteoarthritis. These include structural differences of the knee joint ...

  9. What role do periodontal pathogens play in osteoarthritis and periprosthetic joint infections of the knee?

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Garth D; Hu, Fen Z; Sotereanos, Nicholas; Sewicke, Jeffrey; Parvizi, Javad; Nara, Peter L; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2014-01-01

    Through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-electron spray ionization (ESI)-time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS), we identified multiple periodontal pathogens within joint tissues of individuals undergoing replacement arthroplasties of the knee. The most prevalent of the periodontal pathogens were Treponema denticola and Enterococcus faecalis, the latter of which is commonly associated with apical periodontitis. These findings were unique to periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the knee and were never observed for PJIs of other lower extremity joints (hip and ankle) or upper extremity joints (shoulder and elbow). These data were confirmed by multiple independent methodologies including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) which showed the bacteria deeply penetrated inside the diseased tissues, and 454-based deep 16S rDNA sequencing. The site-specificity, the tissue investment, and the identical findings by multiple nucleic-acid-based techniques strongly suggests the presence of infecting bacteria within these diseased anatomic sites. Subsequently, as part of a control program using PCR-ESI-TOF-MS, we again detected these same periodontal pathogens in aspirates from patients with osteoarthritis who were undergoing primary arthroplasty of the knee and thus who had no history of orthopedic implants. This latter finding raises the question of whether hematogenic spread of periodontal pathogens to the knee play a primary or secondary-exacerbatory role in osteoarthritis. PMID:24921460

  10. Measurement of passive ankle stiffness in subjects with chronic hemiparesis using a novel ankle robot

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anindo; Bever, Christopher T.; Forrester, Larry W.; Macko, Richard F.; Hogan, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Our objective in this study was to assess passive mechanical stiffness in the ankle of chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors and to compare it with those of healthy young and older (age-matched) individuals. Given the importance of the ankle during locomotion, an accurate estimate of passive ankle stiffness would be valuable for locomotor rehabilitation, potentially providing a measure of recovery and a quantitative basis to design treatment protocols. Using a novel ankle robot, we characterized passive ankle stiffness both in sagittal and in frontal planes by applying perturbations to the ankle joint over the entire range of motion with subjects in a relaxed state. We found that passive stiffness of the affected ankle joint was significantly higher in chronic stroke survivors than in healthy adults of a similar cohort, both in the sagittal as well as frontal plane of movement, in three out of four directions tested with indistinguishable stiffness values in plantarflexion direction. Our findings are comparable to the literature, thus indicating its plausibility, and, to our knowledge, report for the first time passive stiffness in the frontal plane for persons with chronic stroke and older healthy adults. PMID:21346215

  11. Arthrometric Measurement of Ankle-Complex Motion: Normative Values

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Neil A.; Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Gubler-Hanna, Coral

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Valid and reliable measurements of ankle-complex motion have been reported using the Hollis Ankle Arthrometer. No published normative data of ankle-complex motion obtained from ankle arthrometry are available for use as a reference for clinical decision making. Objective: To describe the distribution variables of ankle-complex motion in uninjured ankles and to establish normative reference values for use in research and to assist in clinical decision making. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Both ankles of 50 men and 50 women (age = 21.78 ± 2.0 years [range, 19–25 years]) were tested. Intervention(s): Each ankle underwent anteroposterior (AP) and inversion-eversion (I-E) loading using an ankle arthrometer. Main Outcome Measure(s): Recorded anterior, posterior, and total AP displacement (millimeters) at 125 N and inversion, eversion, and total I-E rotation (degrees) at 4 Nm. Results: Women had greater ankle-complex motion for all variables except for posterior displacement. Total AP displacement of the ankle complex was 18.79 ± 4.1 mm for women and 16.70 ± 4.8 mm for men (U = 3742.5, P < .01). Total I-E rotation of the ankle complex was 42.10° ± 9.0° for women and 34.13° ± 10.1° for men (U = 2807, P < .001). All variables were normally distributed except for anterior displacement, inversion rotation, eversion rotation, and total I-E rotation in the women's ankles and eversion rotation in the men's ankles; these variables were skewed positively. Conclusions: Our study increases the available database on ankle-complex motion, and it forms the basis of norm-referenced clinical comparisons and the basis on which quantitative definitions of ankle pathologic conditions can be developed. PMID:21391797

  12. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    PubMed Central

    Reilingh, Mikel L.; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone plate. The ankle joint has a high congruency. During loading, compressed cartilage forces its water into the microfractured subchondral bone, leading to a localized high increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone. This will result in local osteolysis and can explain the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion, but is most probably caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking, which results in stimulation of the highly innervated subchondral bone underneath the cartilage defect. Understanding the natural history of osteochondral defects could lead to the development of strategies for preventing progressive joint damage. PMID:20151110

  13. Interpretation of the ankle in UHECR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, Veniamin

    Ankle is a flattening in CR spectrum observed first in Volcano Ranch experiment in 1963 at E _{a} ˜ 10 EeV, and it was interpreted as transition from galactic to extragalactic CRs. Since that time the ankle was observed in all large UHECR detectors and most recently in HiRes, TA and Auger detectors at E _{a} ˜ 4 - 5 EeV. At present there are two interpretations of the ankle: as transition from galactic to extragalactic CRs (the conventional interpretation) and as a part of the dip, produced by extragalactic protons interacting with the CMB photons. These two interpretations will be discussed in the light of recent observations and models of UHECR origin.

  14. Treatment of ankle sprains in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R W; Reischl, S F

    1986-01-01

    To study the incidence of fibulocollateral ligament ankle sprains in the young male athlete, a survey of 84 varsity basketball players was done. Seventy percent of the players had a history of an ankle sprain. Eighty percent of those with a positive history had multiple sprains. Most of the injuries were mild, but in 32% of the injuries, the athlete missed more than 2 weeks of play. No medical attention was sought in 55% of the cases. About 50% of the athletes with a sprain had residual symptoms from their injuries; 15% of the injured athletes felt that their residual symptoms compromised their playing performance. This article emphasizes the potential seriousness of the ankle sprain in the young athlete and presents a recommended method of management, including assessment of severity, treatment, and rehabilitation.

  15. Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ankle Exercises (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Ankle Sprain 踝部扭傷 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations French (français) Ankle Exercises Exercices pour la cheville - ...

  16. Management of Osseous and Soft-Tissue Ankle Equinus During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Simonson, Devin C

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining functional alignment of a total ankle replacement, including physiologic sagittal plane range of motion, is paramount for a successful outcome. This article reviews the literature on techniques available for correction of osseous and soft-tissue equinus at the time of index total ankle replacement. These techniques include anterior tibiotalar joint cheilectomy, posterior superficial muscle compartment lengthening, posterior ankle capsule release, and release of the posterior portions of the medial and lateral collateral ligament complexes. The rationale for these procedures and the operative sequence of events for these procedures are presented.

  17. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with incident knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, with knee osteoarthritis being the leading cause of lower extremity disability among older adults in the US. There are no treatments available to prevent the structural pathology of osteoarthritis. Because of vitamin K’s role in regulating skeleta...

  18. Correlation between Gene Expression and Osteoarthritis Progression in Human

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease characterized by gradual degradation of joint cartilage. This study aimed to quantify major pathogenetic factors during OA progression in human cartilage. Cartilage specimens were isolated from OA patients and scored 0–5 according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) guidelines. Protein and gene expressions were measured by immunohistochemistry and qPCR, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to detect apoptotic cells. Cartilage degeneration in OA is a gradual progress accompanied with gradual loss of collagen type II and a gradual decrease in mRNA expression of SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1. Expression of WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB was lost, while hypertrophic markers (RUNX2, COL10A1 and IHH) increased during OA progression. Moreover, DKK1 and FRZB negatively correlated with OA grading, while RUNX2 and IHH showed a significantly positive correlation with OA grading. The number of apoptotic cells was increased with the severity of OA. Taken together, our results suggested that genetic profiling of the gene expression could be used as markers for staging OA at the molecular level. This helps to understand the molecular pathology of OA and may lead to the development of therapies based on OA stage. PMID:27428952

  19. An unusual cause of an ankle mass

    PubMed Central

    Prinja, Aditya; Roberts, Catherine; Doherty, Tom; Oddy, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who presented with a 7-year history of a mass over the medial aspect of his right ankle, which had been gradually increasing in size. He had given up his occupation as a bus driver due to decreased movement of his ankle. An initial diagnosis of endemic syphilis was made after treponemal antibody and treponema pallidum particle agglutination tests were positive. However, following surgical debulking, cultures grew Fusarium solani and the diagnosis was changed to eumycetoma. He received prolonged treatment with antifungal agents and at 18 months follow-up remains well. PMID:25260425

  20. Ankle injuries and the family physician.

    PubMed

    Birrer, R B

    1988-01-01

    In transmitting the body's weight, the ankle is subject to frequent static and dynamic injury due to concentrated stresses during standing and movement. The frequency of athletic ankle injuries ranges from 10 to 90 percent, with the highest rate occurring in basketball players. There is prolonged disability and recurrent instability for months to years for 25 to 40 per cent of these patients. Because most of this trauma is handled by primary care physicians, this review presents the mechanism of injury, relevant anatomy, physical examination, and appropriate therapeutic intervention in the acute and rehabilitative phases.

  1. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: biology.

    PubMed

    Malfait, A M

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights a selection of recently published literature in the area of osteoarthritis biology. Major themes transpiring from a PubMed search covering the year between the 2014 and the 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) World Congress are explored. Inflammation emerged as a significant theme, revealing complex pathways that drive dramatic changes in cartilage homeostasis and in the synovium. Highlights include a homeostatic role for CXC chemokines in cartilage, identification of the zinc-ZIP8-MTF1 axis as an essential regulator of cartilage catabolism, and the discovery that a small aggrecan fragment can have catabolic and pro-inflammatory effects through Toll-like receptor 2. Synovitis can promote joint damage, partly through alarmins such as S100A8. Synovitis and synovial expression of the pro-algesic neurotrophin, Nerve Growth Factor, are associated with pain. Increasingly, researchers are considering specific pathogenic pathways that may operate in distinct subsets of osteoarthritis associated with distinct risk factors, including obesity, age, and joint injury. In obesity, the contribution of metabolic factors and diet is under intense investigation. The role of autophagy and oxidative stress in age-related osteoarthritis has been further explored. This approach may open avenues for targeted treatment of distinct phenotypes of osteoarthritis. Finally, a small selection of novel analgesic targets in the periphery is briefly discussed, including calcitonin gene-related peptide and the neuronal sodium voltage-gated channels, Nav1.7 and Nav1.8. PMID:26707989

  2. Targets, models and challenges in osteoarthritis research.

    PubMed

    Thysen, Sarah; Luyten, Frank P; Lories, Rik J U

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative disorder of the joint and represents one of the most common diseases worldwide. Its prevalence and severity are increasing owing to aging of the population, but treatment options remain largely limited to painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs, which only provide symptomatic relief. In the late stages of the disease, surgical interventions are often necessary to partially restore joint function. Although the focus of osteoarthritis research has been originally on the articular cartilage, novel findings are now pointing to osteoarthritis as a disease of the whole joint, in which failure of different joint components can occur. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in the field, including data from novel 'omics' technologies and from a number of preclinical and clinical trials. We describe different in vitro and in vivo systems that can be used to study molecules, pathways and cells that are involved in osteoarthritis. We illustrate that a comprehensive and multisystem approach is necessary to understand the complexity and heterogeneity of the disease and to better guide the development of novel therapeutic strategies for osteoarthritis.

  3. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: biology.

    PubMed

    Malfait, A M

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights a selection of recently published literature in the area of osteoarthritis biology. Major themes transpiring from a PubMed search covering the year between the 2014 and the 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) World Congress are explored. Inflammation emerged as a significant theme, revealing complex pathways that drive dramatic changes in cartilage homeostasis and in the synovium. Highlights include a homeostatic role for CXC chemokines in cartilage, identification of the zinc-ZIP8-MTF1 axis as an essential regulator of cartilage catabolism, and the discovery that a small aggrecan fragment can have catabolic and pro-inflammatory effects through Toll-like receptor 2. Synovitis can promote joint damage, partly through alarmins such as S100A8. Synovitis and synovial expression of the pro-algesic neurotrophin, Nerve Growth Factor, are associated with pain. Increasingly, researchers are considering specific pathogenic pathways that may operate in distinct subsets of osteoarthritis associated with distinct risk factors, including obesity, age, and joint injury. In obesity, the contribution of metabolic factors and diet is under intense investigation. The role of autophagy and oxidative stress in age-related osteoarthritis has been further explored. This approach may open avenues for targeted treatment of distinct phenotypes of osteoarthritis. Finally, a small selection of novel analgesic targets in the periphery is briefly discussed, including calcitonin gene-related peptide and the neuronal sodium voltage-gated channels, Nav1.7 and Nav1.8.

  4. Targets, models and challenges in osteoarthritis research

    PubMed Central

    Thysen, Sarah; Luyten, Frank P.; Lories, Rik J. U.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative disorder of the joint and represents one of the most common diseases worldwide. Its prevalence and severity are increasing owing to aging of the population, but treatment options remain largely limited to painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs, which only provide symptomatic relief. In the late stages of the disease, surgical interventions are often necessary to partially restore joint function. Although the focus of osteoarthritis research has been originally on the articular cartilage, novel findings are now pointing to osteoarthritis as a disease of the whole joint, in which failure of different joint components can occur. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in the field, including data from novel ‘omics’ technologies and from a number of preclinical and clinical trials. We describe different in vitro and in vivo systems that can be used to study molecules, pathways and cells that are involved in osteoarthritis. We illustrate that a comprehensive and multisystem approach is necessary to understand the complexity and heterogeneity of the disease and to better guide the development of novel therapeutic strategies for osteoarthritis. PMID:25561745

  5. Ginger compress therapy for adults with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Therkleson, Tessa

    2010-01-01

    therkleson t. (2010) Ginger compress therapy for adults with osteoarthritis. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(10), 2225–2233. Aim This paper is a report of a study to explicate the phenomenon of ginger compresses for people with osteoarthritis. Background Osteoarthritis is claimed to be the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in Western society. Management ideally combines non-pharmacological strategies, including complementary therapies and pain-relieving medication. Ginger has been applied externally for over a thousand years in China to manage arthritis symptoms. Method Husserlian phenomenological methodology was used and the data were collected in 2007. Ten purposively selected adults who had suffered osteoarthritis for at least a year kept daily diaries and made drawings, and follow-up interviews and telephone conversations were conducted. Findings Seven themes were identified in the data: (1) Meditative-like stillness and relaxation of thoughts; (2) Constant penetrating warmth throughout the body; (3) Positive change in outlook; (4) Increased energy and interest in the world; (5) Deeply relaxed state that progressed to a gradual shift in pain and increased interest in others; (6) Increased suppleness within the body and (7) More comfortable, flexible joint mobility. The essential experience of ginger compresses exposed the unique qualities of heat, stimulation, anti-inflammation and analgesia. Conclusion Nurses could consider this therapy as part of a holistic treatment for people with osteoarthritis symptoms. Controlled research is needed with larger numbers of older people to explore further the effects of the ginger compress therapy. PMID:20626491

  6. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA.

  7. Viscosupplementation for Osteoarthritis: a Primer for Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) constitutes a growing public health burden and the most common cause of disability in the United States. Non-pharmacologic modalities and conservative pharmacologic therapies are recommended for the initial treatment of OA, including acetaminophen, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, safety concerns continue to mount regarding the use of these treatments and none have been shown to impact disease progression. Viscosupplementation with injections of hyaluronans (HAs) are indicated when non-pharmacologic and simple analgesics have failed to relieve symptoms (e.g., pain, stiffness) associated with knee OA. This review evaluates literature focusing on the efficacy and/or safety of HA injections in treating OA of the knee and in other joints, including the hip, shoulder, and ankle. Methods Relevant literature on intra-articular (IA) HA injections as a treatment for OA pain in the knee and other joints was identified through PubMed database searches from inception until January 2013. Search terms included “hyaluronic acid” or “hylan”, and “osteoarthritis”. Discussion Current evidence indicates that HA injections are beneficial and safe for patients with OA of the knee. IA injections of HAs treat the symptoms of knee OA and may also have disease-modifying properties, potentially delaying progression of OA. Although traditionally reserved for second-line treatment, evidence suggests that HAs may have value as a first-line therapy in the treatment of knee OA as they have been shown to be more effective in earlier stages and grades of disease, more recently diagnosed OA, and in less severe radiographic OA. Conclusion For primary care physicians who treat and care for patients with OA of the knee, IA injection with HAs constitutes a safe and effective treatment that can be routinely administered in the office setting. PMID:24203348

  8. Biomechanics of the normal and arthritic ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Snedeker, Jess G; Wirth, Stephan H; Espinosa, Norman

    2012-12-01

    Understanding biomechanics of the normal and arthritic ankle joint can aid in analysis of an underlying clinical problem and provide a strategic basis for a more optimal management. The challenge to the clinician and the biomechanist is that the mechanical complexity of the ankle joint still clouds current understanding. This article provides an overview of current understanding of functional ankle anatomy, how this function can be altered in the degenerated ankle, and how surgical intervention further affects foot and ankle biomechanics. The focus is on how altered loading of neighboring joints in the midfoot and hindfoot may induce postoperative joint remodeling and can manifest in secondary clinical problems.

  9. Sprained ankles as they relate to the basketball player.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Teasdall, R D

    1993-04-01

    Concepts based on newer medical information concerning ankle injuries have changed in recent years. With these changing concepts, the method of treatment has also changed. It is the purpose of this article to review some of the commonly known information concerning ankle sprains, to emphasize the association of subtalar injury with the ankle sprain complex, to outline new information concerning the static stabilizers on the lateral aspect of the ankle, and finally, to utilize this information in producing a rationale for a new type of surgical treatment for chronic instability of the ankle.

  10. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique.

  11. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. PMID:24169227

  12. [Exercise therapy in hip or knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Dekker, Joost; Peter, Wilfred; van der Leeden, Marike; Lems, Willem F

    2011-01-01

    "Exercise is medicine": exercise therapy reduces pain and activity limitations in osteoarthritis of the knee and is likely to have the same effects in osteoarthritis of the hip. Further research into exercise therapy is needed, since disease-modifying drugs are not available, pain medication can cause side effects, and surgical interventions are preferably applied in an advanced stage of disease. Classical exercise therapy is aimed at improving muscle strength, aerobic capacity, range of joint motion, and training of walking and activities of daily living. New modalities of targeted exercise therapy are currently being developed, aimed at the correction of low levels of activity and to correct instability of the knee. Weight loss, preferably combined with exercise therapy, reduces pain and activity limitations in osteoarthritis patients who are overweight. Modalities of exercise therapy adapted to comorbid conditions are currently being developed.

  13. Clinical Examination Results in Individuals With Functional Ankle Instability and Ankle-Sprain Copers

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cynthia J.; Arnold, Brent L.; Ross, Scott E.; Ketchum, Jessica; Ericksen, Jeffrey; Pidcoe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Context: Why some individuals with ankle sprains develop functional ankle instability and others do not (ie, copers) is unknown. Current understanding of the clinical profile of copers is limited. Objective: To contrast individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI), copers, and uninjured individuals on both self-reported variables and clinical examination findings. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Participants consisted of 23 individuals with a history of 1 or more ankle sprains and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI: Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool [CAIT] score = 20.52 ± 2.94, episodes of giving way = 5.8 ± 8.4 per month), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers: CAIT score = 27.74 ± 1.69), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain and no instability (uninjured: CAIT score = 28.78 ± 1.78). Intervention(s): Self-reported disability was recorded using the CAIT and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports. On clinical examination, ligamentous laxity and tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and pain at end ROM were recorded. Main Outcome Measure(s): Questionnaire scores for the CAIT, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports, ankle inversion and anterior drawer laxity scores, pain with palpation of the lateral ligaments, ankle ROM, and pain at end ROM. Results: Individuals with FAI had greater self-reported disability for all measures (P < .05). On clinical examination, individuals with FAI were more likely to have greater talar tilt laxity, pain with inversion, and limited sagittal-plane ROM than copers (P < .05). Conclusions: Differences in both self-reported disability and clinical examination variables distinguished individuals with FAI from copers at least 1 year after injury. Whether the deficits could be detected

  14. Effectiveness of an outside-the-boot ankle brace in reducing parachuting related ankle injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M; Sulsky, S; Amoroso, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the efficacy of an outside-the-boot parachute ankle brace (PAB) in reducing risk of ankle injury to army paratrooper trainees and to identify inadvertent risks associated with PAB use. Design: The authors compared hospitalization rates for ankle, musculoskeletal, and other traumatic injury among 223 172 soldiers trained 1985–2002 in time periods defined by presence/absence of PAB use protocols. Multiple logistic regression analysis estimated adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for injury outcomes, comparing pre and post brace periods to the brace protocol period. Setting: A research database consisting of training rosters from the US Army Airborne training facility (Fort Benning, GA) occupational, demographic, and hospitalization information. Main outcome measures: Injuries were considered training related if they occurred during a five week period starting with first scheduled static line parachute jump and a parachuting cause of injury code appeared in the hospital record. Results: Of 939 parachuting related hospitalizations during the defined risk period, 597 (63.6%) included an ankle injury diagnosis, 198 (21.1%) listed a musculoskeletal (non-ankle) injury, and 69 (7.3%) cited injuries to multiple body parts. Risk of ankle injury hospitalization was higher during both pre-brace (adjusted OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.92 to 2.95) and post-brace (adjusted OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.32) periods compared with the brace protocol period. Odds of musculoskeletal (non-ankle) injury or injury to multiple body parts did not change between the brace and post-brace periods. Conclusion: Use of a PAB during airborne training appears to reduce risk of ankle injury without increasing risk of other types of traumatic injury. PMID:15933409

  15. An examination of ankle, knee, and hip torque production in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Phillip A; Robinson, Richard H

    2009-03-01

    There is some debate in the literature as to whether strength deficits exist at the ankle in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Additionally, there is evidence to suggest that knee and hip performance is altered in those with CAI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether CAI is associated with deficits in ankle, knee, and hip torque. Fifteen subjects with unilateral CAI and fifteen subjects with healthy ankles participated. Subjects reported to the laboratory for one session during which the torque production of ankle plantar flexion/dorsiflexion, knee flexion/extension, and hip flexion/extension were measured with an isokinetic device. Subjects performed 5 maximum-effort repetitions of a concentric/concentric protocol at 60 degrees .s for both extremities. Average peak torque (APT) values were calculated. The subjects with CAI demonstrated significantly less APT production for knee flexion (F1,28 = 5.40; p = 0.03) and extension (F1,28 = 5.34; p = 0.03). Subjects with CAI exhibited significantly less APT for ankle plantar flexion in the injured limb compared with their noninjured limb (F1,28 = 6.51; p = 0.02). No significant difference in ankle dorsiflexion or hip flexion/extension APT production existed between the 2 groups. Individuals with CAI, in addition to deficits in ankle plantar flexion torque, had deficits in knee flexor and extensor torque, suggesting that distal joint instability may lead to knee joint neuromuscular adaptations. There were no similar deficits at the hip. Future research should determine what implications this has for prevention and rehabilitation of lower-extremity injury. Clinicians may need to consider including rehabilitation efforts to address these deficits when rehabilitating patients with CAI.

  16. Ankle impingement syndromes: a review of etiology and related implications.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gregory William

    2011-10-01

    Ankle injuries are common occurrences in athletics involving and requiring extreme ranges of motion. Ankle sprains specifically occur with a 1 in 10,000 person rate in active individuals each day. If trauma is repetitive, the ankle structures have potential to experience secondary injury and dysfunction. Included in this category of dysfunction are both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes where disruption of the bony structures, joint capsule, ligaments, and tendons typically occurs. Ankle impingement is described as ankle pain that occurs during athletic activity, with recurrent, extreme dorsiflexion or plantar flexion with the joint under a load. Ankle impingements can be classified according to what structures become involved both anteriorly and posteriorly. Osseous impingement, soft tissue impingement, impingement of the distal fascicle of anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and meniscoid lesions are all documented causes of ankle impingement. These changes tend to be brought about and exacerbated by extreme ranges of motion. Understanding various impingement types will better enable the clinician to prevent, identify, treat, and rehabilitate affected ankles. Acknowledging activities that predispose to ankle impingement syndrome will enhance prevention and recovery processes. Description of ankle impingement etiology and pathology is the objective of the current review.

  17. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Overview of the Canadian Experience.

    PubMed

    Latham, Warren C W; Lau, Johnny T C

    2016-06-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty use has increased across Canada over the last two decades. Multiple implant designs are readily available and implanted across Canada. Although arthrodesis is a reliable procedure for treating end-stage ankle arthritis, ankle replacement is often the preferred surgical treatment by patients. A recent prospective study evaluated intermediate-term outcomes of ankle replacement and arthrodesis at multiple centers across Canada, with variability in prosthesis type, surgeon, and surgical technique. Intermediate-term clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis were comparable in a diverse cohort in which treatment was tailored to patient presentation; however, rates of reoperation and major complications were higher after ankle replacement.

  18. Ankle muscle strength influence on muscle activation during dynamic and static ankle training modalities.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Baltich, Jennifer; Enders, Hendrik; Nigg, Sandro; Nigg, Benno

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is considered a risk factor for ankle injury. Balance training and barefoot running have been used in an attempt to strengthen the muscles crossing the ankle. It is expected that training tasks that successfully strengthen the ankle would elicit increased muscular activity. However, it is unknown how an individual's ankle strength will influence the muscle activity used during a given task. Twenty-six participants performed dynamic (shod, barefoot running) and static tasks (squat on ground, squat on ®Bosu Ball) believed to strengthen the muscles surrounding the ankle. Electromyographic signals of the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) were recorded and analysed using a non-linearly scaled wavelet analysis. Participants were divided into a strong group and a weak group according to their isometric plantar-flexion torque. The weak group required more relative GL and GM muscle activity during each training task compared to the strong group. No difference was observed between shod and barefoot running. There was a significant effect of training task on muscle activation level for the weak group. Differences in ankle strength had a significant impact on muscle activation.

  19. Invariant ankle moment patterns when walking with and without a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-01-19

    To guide development of robotic lower limb exoskeletons, it is necessary to understand how humans adapt to powered assistance. The purposes of this study were to quantify joint moments while healthy subjects adapted to a robotic ankle exoskeleton and to determine if the period of motor adaptation is dependent on the magnitude of robotic assistance. The pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton provided plantar flexor torque controlled by the wearer's soleus electromyography (EMG). Eleven naïve individuals completed two 30-min sessions walking on a split-belt instrumented treadmill at 1.25m/s while wearing the ankle exoskeleton. After two sessions of practice, subjects reduced their soleus EMG activation by approximately 36% and walked with total ankle moment patterns similar to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.98+/-0.02, THSD, p>0.05). They had substantially different ankle kinematic patterns compared to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.79+/-0.12, THSD, p<0.05). Not all of the subjects reached a steady-state gait pattern within the two sessions, in contrast to a previous study using a weaker robotic ankle exoskeleton (Gordon and Ferris, 2007). Our results strongly suggest that humans aim for similar joint moment patterns when walking with robotic assistance rather than similar kinematic patterns. In addition, greater robotic assistance provided during initial use results in a longer adaptation process than lesser robotic assistance. PMID:19878952

  20. Invariant ankle moment patterns when walking with and without a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-01-19

    To guide development of robotic lower limb exoskeletons, it is necessary to understand how humans adapt to powered assistance. The purposes of this study were to quantify joint moments while healthy subjects adapted to a robotic ankle exoskeleton and to determine if the period of motor adaptation is dependent on the magnitude of robotic assistance. The pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton provided plantar flexor torque controlled by the wearer's soleus electromyography (EMG). Eleven naïve individuals completed two 30-min sessions walking on a split-belt instrumented treadmill at 1.25m/s while wearing the ankle exoskeleton. After two sessions of practice, subjects reduced their soleus EMG activation by approximately 36% and walked with total ankle moment patterns similar to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.98+/-0.02, THSD, p>0.05). They had substantially different ankle kinematic patterns compared to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.79+/-0.12, THSD, p<0.05). Not all of the subjects reached a steady-state gait pattern within the two sessions, in contrast to a previous study using a weaker robotic ankle exoskeleton (Gordon and Ferris, 2007). Our results strongly suggest that humans aim for similar joint moment patterns when walking with robotic assistance rather than similar kinematic patterns. In addition, greater robotic assistance provided during initial use results in a longer adaptation process than lesser robotic assistance.

  1. Imaging of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, H

    1990-09-01

    The foot and ankle are subjected to daily stresses and strains ranging from normal walking activities to the excessive forces encountered in the active sports enthusiast. These traumatic events as well as systemic and local arthritic conditions and tumors can be temporarily or permanently disabling. Early, expedited, and cost-efficient diagnosis is the daily challenge for the radiologist, clinician, and patient. PMID:1975109

  2. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control.

    PubMed

    Choi, Julia T; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2013-07-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased cutaneous sensory function as evidenced by increased touch threshold. Absolute dorsiflexion force error increased without visual feedback during peroneal nerve stimulation. This was not a general effect of stimulation because force error did not increase during plantar nerve stimulation. The effects of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases.

  3. Managing the pain of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hrnack, Scott A; Barber, F Alan

    2014-09-01

    Pain from knee osteoarthritis creates a significant burden for symptomatic patients, who are often forced to change their lifestyle because of their symptoms. Activity modification, therapy, weight loss, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, shoe orthotics, bracing, and injections are the nonoperative options available. New technologies are also emerging in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, these therapeutic modalities should reduce pain and increase the overall functioning of patients. These nonoperative modalities give the clinician several effective options before surgical management is considered. PMID:25295768

  4. Managing lifestyle factors in adults with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah

    2015-07-15

    Osteoarthritis is a major cause of disability in older people in the UK. The symptoms of joint pain and stiffness can lead to reduced joint function and deformity. Addressing lifestyle factors, namely exercise and maintaining an optimum weight, can reduce pain and improve joint function. This article focuses on how, by using the concept of goal setting, nurses can work with patients to develop a plan for becoming more active and for losing weight - if the patient is overweight - to reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis. PMID:26174284

  5. Surrogates of Large Artery versus Small Artery Stiffness and Ankle-Brachial Index

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Päivi; Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral artery tonometry (PAT) is a novel method for assessing arterial stiffness of small digital arteries. Pulse pressure can be regarded as a surrogate of large artery stiffness. When ankle-brachial index (ABI) is calculated using the higher of the two ankle systolic pressures as denominator (ABI-higher), leg perfusion can be reliably estimated. However, using the lower of the ankle pressures to calculate ABI (ABI-lower) identifies more patients with isolated peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in ankle arteries. We aimed to compare the ability of PAT, pulse pressure, and different calculations of ABI to detect atherosclerotic disease in lower extremities. We examined PAT, pulse pressure, and ABI in 66 cardiovascular risk subjects in whom borderline PAD (ABI 0.91 to 1.00) was diagnosed 4 years earlier. Using ABI-lower to diagnose PAD yielded 2-fold higher prevalence of PAD than using ABI-higher. Endothelial dysfunction was diagnosed in 15/66 subjects (23%). In a bivariate correlation analysis, pulse pressure was negatively correlated with ABI-higher (r = −0.347, p = 0.004) and with ABI-lower (r = −0.424, p < 0.001). PAT hyperemic response was not significantly correlated with either ABI-higher (r = −0.148, p = 0.24) or with ABI-lower (r = −0.208, p = 0.095). Measurement of ABI using the lower of the two ankle pressures is an efficient method to identify patients with clinical or subclinical atherosclerosis and worth performing on subjects with pulse pressure above 65 mm Hg. The usefulness of PAT measurement in detecting PAD is vague. PMID:22942632

  6. Pulmonary embolism following ankle fractures treated without an operation - an analysis using National Health Service data.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Simon S; Rankin, Kenneth S; Desira, Nicola L; James, Philip; Muller, Scott D; Reed, Mike R; Rangan, Amar

    2014-08-01

    The majority of ankle fractures are stable and can be treated without an operation, most commonly with cast immobilisation. Based on concerns regarding the risk of a venous thromboembolic event (VTE) while immobilised, there is currently debate as to whether these patients should receive VTE prophylaxis for the duration of treatment. Rates of pulmonary embolism (PE) in this patient group are unknown. This retrospective cohort study was designed to identify patients treated without an operation for ankle fracture and determine the occurrence of PE and inpatient mortality within 90 days of injury using the English National Health Service administrative databases. Logistic regression models were used to assess the influence of age, gender and Charlson co-morbidity score on these outcomes. We identified 14777 adult patients over a 54-month period (April 2007-September 2011) that met our linkage and inclusion criteria (isolated, unilateral closed ankle fracture that did not require hospitalisation). Mean age was 46.4 years (range 18-99) and the majority had a Charlson 0 score (97.7%). There were 32 (0.22%) PEs within 90 days of the fracture (including in one patient who subsequently died). After adjustment, Charlson score of ≥1 was associated with a greater risk of PE (Odds ratio = 11.97, p < 0.001) compared to Charlson 0. Risk for these patients was 2.08%. In total, fifteen patients (0.11%) died in hospital within 90 days. Pulmonary embolism is rare following ankle fractures treated without an operation. Patients with multiple co-morbidities are at a higher risk. Based on this evidence, an ankle fracture treated without an operation does not appear to be an indication for routine VTE prophylaxis.

  7. An Orthopedic Perspective. Does Running Cause Osteoarthritis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascale, Mark; Grana, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the development of osteoarthritis and whether running and other impact loading sports promote it. Although these sports do not cause arthritis in normal weight bearing limbs, they can accelerate it in damaged joints. It is important to identify people with preeexisting joint disease so they can choose nonimpact-loading aerobic exercise.…

  8. Pain Coping Strategies in Osteoarthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated the relation of pain coping strategies to pain, health status, and psychological distress in a group of osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain. Patients completed various questionnaires. Medical status variables were also used. The Pain Control and Rational Thinking factor derived from the Coping Strategies Questionnaire proved to…

  9. Obesity versus osteoarthritis: beyond the mechanical overload

    PubMed Central

    Sartori-Cintra, Angélica Rossi; Aikawa, Priscila; Cintra, Dennys Esper Correa

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is currently considered a major public health problem in the world, already reaching epidemic characteristics, according to the World Health Organization. Excess weight is the major risk factor associated with various diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia and osteometabolic diseases, including osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent rheumatic disease and the leading cause of physical disability and reduced quality of life of the population over 65 years. It mainly involves the joints that bear weight - knees and hips. However, along with the cases of obesity, its prevalence is increasing, and even in other joints, such as hands. Thus, it is assumed that the influence of obesity on the development of OA is beyond mechanical overload. The purpose of this review was to correlate the possible mechanisms underlying the genesis and development of these two diseases. Increased fat mass is directly proportional to excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids, responsible for systemic low-grade inflammation condition and insulin and leptin resistance. At high levels, leptin assumes inflammatory characteristics and acts in the articular cartilage, triggering the inflammatory process and changing homeostasis this tissue with consequent degeneration. We conclude that obesity is a risk factor for osteoarthritis and that physical activity and changes in diet composition can reverse the inflammatory and leptin resistance, reducing progression or preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. PMID:25184806

  10. Osteoarthritis year 2012 in review: clinical.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, M C

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical research in osteoarthritis (OA) continues to focus on analytic and descriptive epidemiology, and the role of both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies in the management of OA, respectively. A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed for the period between September 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012. Selected articles in these areas are discussed in this narrative review article.

  11. Intra-articular therapy in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, I; Raynauld, J; Haraoui, B

    2003-01-01

    The medical literature was reviewed from 1968–2002 using Medline and the key words "intra-articular" and "osteoarthritis" to determine the various intra-articular therapies used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are the most frequently used intra-articular therapies in osteoarthritis. Other intra-articular substances such as orgotein, radiation synovectomy, dextrose prolotherapy, silicone, saline lavage, saline injection without lavage, analgesic agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucosamine, somatostatin, sodium pentosan polysulfate, chloroquine, mucopolysaccharide polysulfuric acid ester, lactic acid solution, and thiotepa cytostatica have been investigated as potentially therapeutic in the treatment of arthritic joints. Despite the lack of strong, convincing, and reproducible evidence that any of the intra-articular therapies significantly alters the progression of osteoarthritis, corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are widely used in patients who have failed other therapeutic modalities for lack of efficacy or toxicity. As a practical approach for a knee with effusion, steroid injections should be considered while the presence of symptomatic "dry" knees may favour the hyaluronic acid approach. The virtual absence of serious side effects, coupled with the perceived benefits, make these approaches attractive. PMID:12954956

  12. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  13. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  14. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liang, Yuting; Li, Hong; Li, Haibo; He, Quanze; Xue, Ying; Shen, Cong; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiang, Jingjing; Ding, Jie; Qiao, Longwei; Zheng, Qiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disorder characterized by degenerative articular cartilage and is largely attributed to genetic risk factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are common DNA variants that have shown promising and efficiency, compared with positional cloning, to map candidate genes of complex diseases, including OA. In this study, we aim to provide an overview of multiple SNPs from a number of genes that have recently been linked to OA susceptibility. We also performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate the association of SNP rs7639618 of double von Willebrand factor A domains (DVWA) gene with OA susceptibility. A systematic search of studies on the association of SNPs with susceptibility to OA was conducted in PubMed and Google scholar. Studies subjected to meta-analysis include human and case-control studies that met the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium model and provide sufficient data to calculate an odds ratio (OR). A total of 9500 OA cases and 9365 controls in 7 case-control studies relating to SNP rs7639618 were included in this study and the ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Over 50 SNPs from different genes have been shown to be associated with either hip (23), or knee (20), or both (13) OA. The ORs of these SNPs for OA and the subtypes are not consistent. As to SNP rs7639618 of DVWA, increased knee OA risk was observed in all genetic models analyzed. Specifically, people from Asian with G-allele showed significantly increased risk of knee OA (A versus G: OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.13–1.46; AA versus GG: OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.25–2.05; GA versus GG: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.18–1.44; AA versus GA+GG: OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.12–1.61; AA+GA versus GG: OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.19–1.64), but not in Caucasians or with hip OA. Our results suggest that multiple SNPs play different roles in the pathogenesis of OA and its subtypes; SNP rs7639618 of DVWA gene is associated with a significantly increased

  15. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Maddah, Shahpoor; Mahdizadeh, Jamileh

    2015-12-01

    The association of obesity and other metabolic conditions with osteoarthritis is under debate; however, a strong link between metabolic disturbances is suggested to contribute to increased incidences and progression of osteoarthritis. We examined the association of metabolic syndrome and its components with the incidence of knee osteoarthritis in Iranian population. A community-based study was conducted on a total of 625 Iranian volunteers with the complaint of knee pain. Weight-bearing and anteroposterior plain radiographs of both knees were taken on the day of admission. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the modified Adult Treatment Panel III of the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome were 22.5% in males and 11.6% in females (P=0.002). The prevalence rate of knee osteoarthritis was 20.0% in males and 43.8% of females (P<0.001). In both genders, osteoarthritis group had higher serum levels of triglyceride and systolic blood pressure in comparison with non-osteoarthritis group. Women with osteoarthritis had higher Body Mass Index (BMI), however, this association was not observed in men. In females, the presence of osteoarthritis was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome, with the risk of metabolic syndrome in the osteoarthritis group at 2.187 fold the risk in the non-osteoarthritis group. But, the presence of osteoarthritis was not associated with metabolic syndrome in males. Metabolic syndrome mainly through high BMI is associated with knee osteoarthritis in the Iranian women, but neither metabolic syndrome nor any related components are associated with knee osteoarthritis in men.

  16. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have demonstrated altered neuromuscular function and decreased muscle strength when compared with healthy counterparts without a history of ankle sprain. Up to this point, muscle volumes have not been analyzed in patients with CAI to determine whether deficits in muscle size are present following recurrent sprain. Purpose: To analyze intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle muscle volumes and 4-way ankle strength in young adults with and without CAI. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with CAI (mean age, 23.0 ± 4 years; 1 male, 4 females) and 5 healthy controls (mean age, 23.8 ± 4.5 years; 1 male, 4 females) volunteered for this study. Novel fast-acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan from above the femoral condyles through the foot and ankle. The perimeter of each muscle was outlined on each axial slice and then the 2-dimensional area was multiplied by the slice thickness (5 mm) to calculate the muscle volume. Plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion isometric strength were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Patients with CAI were compared with healthy controls on all measures of muscle volume and strength. Extrinsic muscle volumes of patients with CAI were also compared with a normative database of healthy controls (n = 24) by calculating z scores for each muscle individually for each CAI subject. Results: The CAI group had smaller total shank, superficial posterior compartment, soleus, adductor hallucis obliqus, and flexor hallucis brevis muscle volumes compared with healthy controls as indicated by group means and associated 90% CIs that did not overlap. Cohen d effect sizes for the significant group differences were all large and ranged from 1.46 to 3.52, with 90% CIs that did not cross zero. The CAI group had lower eversion, dorsiflexion, and 4-way composite ankle strength, all with group means and associated 90

  17. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost. PMID:26696703

  18. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted. PMID:23777376

  19. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost.

  20. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  1. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost. PMID:26696703

  2. Mechanics of knee and ankle bandages.

    PubMed

    Viljakka, T

    1986-02-01

    Different types of bandages were tested mechanically and clinically. Four elastic and three elastic adhesive bandages were mechanically tested. The former proved better. Seven different ankle bandages and three knee bandages were tested in a simulated clinical situation, measuring the pressure which developed while walking for 15, 50 and 100 min, and immediately after application of the bandage. The bandages slackened most markedly during the first period of walking. The compression pressure of the padded adhesive ankle bandage was lower than that produced by most other bandages. The padded adhesive and elastic bandages proved to be most suitable for clinical use. The padded knee bandage produced a lower compression load than the elastic bandage tested. On the basis of this trial we recommend the use of a padded knee bandage.

  3. Total ankle replacement. Early experiences with STAR prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Murnaghan, J. M.; Warnock, D. S.; Henderson, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Early designs of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) had a high failure rate. More recent experience with the 3-piece, meniscal bearing, total ankle replacement has been more promising. We report a review of the early results of our first 22 prostheses in 20 patients undergoing Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) in Northern Ireland. There was a mean follow-up time of 26 months. Seventeen patients are pain-free at the ankle joint during normal daily activities. Two of the early cases have required revision surgery due to technical errors. Other complications have included malleolar fractures, poor wound healing and postoperative stiffness. These early results show high levels of patient satisfaction, and we are encouraged to continue with total ankle arthroplasty. There is a steep initial learning curve and use of TAR should be restricted to foot and ankle surgeons. Images Fig 1 Figs 2a and b Figs 2 c and d PMID:16022128

  4. Participation in sports after arthrodesis of the foot or ankle.

    PubMed

    Vertullo, Christopher J; Nunley, James A

    2002-07-01

    Currently no data or guidelines exist for the surgeon on how to advise patients about returning to sports participation after arthrodesis within the foot or ankle. Sequelae of inappropriate activity after arthrodesis includes periarticular arthrosis, arthrodesis failure and stress fracture. Some arthrodeses will preclude certain sports because it limits the patient's ability to perform movement vital to the game, for example, ankle arthrodesis preventing basketball players from jumping. Questionnaires were sent to members of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and to trainers of professional basketball and American football teams. This paper reports on the responses of orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons about return to sports participation, after arthrodeses within the foot and ankle, and suggests guidelines for sports participation after an arthrodesis of the lower extremity. A selective sports participation policy is advised. Patients with an ankle or triple fusion should avoid high-impact sports, while those with more distal arthrodeses should be monitored for arthrosis and stress fracture.

  5. Pediatric Ankle Fractures: Concepts and Treatment Principles.

    PubMed

    Su, Alvin W; Larson, A Noelle

    2015-12-01

    Current clinical concepts are reviewed regarding the epidemiology, anatomy, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric ankle fractures. Correct diagnosis and management relies on appropriate examination, imaging, and knowledge of fracture patterns specific to children. Treatment is guided by patient history, physical examination, plain film radiographs and, in some instances, computed tomography. Treatment goals are to restore acceptable limb alignment, physeal anatomy, and joint congruency. For high-risk physeal fractures, patients should be monitored for growth disturbance as needed until skeletal maturity. PMID:26589088

  6. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-07-11

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required.

  7. Forces predicted at the ankle during running.

    PubMed

    Burdett, R G

    1982-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the ankle joint was developed and was used to predict the forces at the ankle during the stance phase of running. Measurements from five cadavers were averaged to obtain insertion points and directions of pull of equivalent tendons with respect to the assumed center of the ankle joint. A minimum joint force solution was obtained by assuming that only two equivalent muscle groups could exert force at one time. Three subjects ran at 4.47 m/s across a force platform that recorded the external forces and moments acting on the foot. Cinematography was used to measure the foot and leg positions during stance. Peak resultant joint forces ranging from 9.0 to 13.3 times body weight and peak Achilles tendon forces ranging from 5.3 to 10.0 times body weight were predicted. Small variations in some cases resulted in large differences in predicted forces. The highest tendon forces predicted exceeded those reported to cause damage to cadaver tendons in other studies. PMID:7132650

  8. Developing a Framework for Ankle Function: A Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Kelli R.; Evans, Todd A.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Addressing clinical outcomes is paramount to providing effective health care, yet there is no consensus regarding the appropriate outcomes to address after ankle injuries. Compounding the problem is the repetitive nature of lateral ankle sprains, referred to as functional (FAI) or chronic (CAI) ankle instability. Although they are commonly used terms in practice and research, FAI and CAI are inconsistently defined and assessed. Objective: To establish definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, FAI, and CAI, as well as their characteristics and assessment techniques. Design: Delphi study. Setting: Telephone interviews and electronic surveys. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen experts representing the fields of ankle function and treatment, ankle research, and outcomes assessment and research were selected as panelists. Data Collection and Analysis: A telephone interview produced feedback regarding the definition of, functional characteristics of, and assessment techniques for a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and FAI/CAI. Those data were compiled, reduced, and returned through electronic surveys and were either included by reaching consensus (80% agreement) or excluded. Results: The definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI reached consensus. Experts did not agree on a definition of CAI. Eleven functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, 32 functional characteristics of an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and 13 characteristics of FAI were agreed upon. Conclusions: Although a consensus was reached regarding the definitions and functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI, the experts could only agree on 1 characteristic to include in the FAI definition. Several experts did, however, provide additional comments that reinforced the differences in the interpretation of those concepts. Although the experts could not agree on the definition of CAI, its

  9. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  10. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon following ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Keith, Troy; Robinson, Andrew H N

    2016-03-01

    Impingement following arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis has not been reported in the literature previously. We present a case report of a 68-year-old male 9 months following an uncomplicated arthroscopic ankle fusion presenting with persistent posteromedial ankle pain. Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon impingement resulting from a prominent os trigonum was identified. This was successfully treated utilising hindfoot endoscopy with excision of the os trigonum and FHL release.

  11. Biglycan and Fibromodulin Have Essential Roles in Regulating Chondrogenesis and Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mildred C.; Kilts, Tina M.; Ono, Mitsuaki; Inkson, Colette A.; Syed-Picard, Fatima; Karsdal, Morten A.; Oldberg, Åke; Bi, Yanming; Young, Marian F.

    2010-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint is critical for jaw movements and allows for mastication, digestion of food, and speech. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that is marked by permanent cartilage destruction and loss of extracellular matrix (ECM). To understand how the ECM regulates mandibular condylar chondrocyte (MCC) differentiation and function, we used a genetic mouse model of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis that is deficient in two ECM proteins, biglycan and fibromodulin (Bgn−/0Fmod−/−). Given the unavailability of cell lines, we first isolated primary MCCs and found that they were phenotypically unique from hyaline articular chondrocytes isolated from the knee joint. Using Bgn−/0 Fmod−/− MCCs, we discovered the early basis for temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis arises from abnormal and accelerated chondrogenesis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 is a growth factor that is critical for chondrogenesis and binds to both biglycan and fibromodulin. Our studies revealed the sequestration of TGF-β1 was decreased within the ECM of Bgn−/0 Fmod−/− MCCs, leading to overactive TGF-β1 signal transduction. Using an explant culture system, we found that overactive TGF-β1 signals induced chondrogenesis and ECM turnover in this model. We demonstrated for the first time a comprehensive study revealing the importance of the ECM in maintaining the mandibular condylar cartilage integrity and identified biglycan and fibromodulin as novel key players in regulating chondrogenesis and ECM turnover during temoporomandibular joint osteoarthritis pathology. PMID:20035055

  12. Gait patterns during different walking conditions in older adults with and without knee osteoarthritis--results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung-uk; Ling, Shari M; Schreiber, Catherine; Nesbitt, Mark; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2011-02-01

    Biomechanical analysis of lower extremity activities while walking at different speeds and in challenging conditions may help to identify specific gait patterns associated with knee osteoarthritis (knee-OA). We hypothesized that individuals with asymptomatic knee-OA have lower ankle activity, while individuals with symptomatic knee-OA have similar or higher ankle activity compared to individuals without knee-OA, and that such differences are enhanced during challenging gait tasks. We tested this hypothesis by examining gait characteristics in multiple gait tasks using data from 153 Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) participants (112 without knee-OA, 41 with knee-OA; 53-87 years, 52% women). All participants who could walk unassisted were evaluated in the BLSA gait lab while walking at self-selected speed (usual-walking), at maximum speed (fast-walking) and again at self-selected speed after 30-min of walking activities (usual-walking-after-30 min). Knee range of motion was lower for knee-OA participants in the fast-walking and usual-walking-after-30 min tasks (p<0.030). Ankle range of motion for symptomatic knee-OA was greater compared to asymptomatic knee-OA for all walking tasks (p<0.050). Symptomatic knee-OA had greater generative MWE of the ankle compared to asymptomatic knee-OA (p=0.034), while keeping similar absorptive MWE of the knee when compared to no-OA controls (p=0.151). Symptomatic knee-OA individuals seem to adapt an ankle kinematic gait pattern aimed at avoiding knee pain, by enhancing forward propulsion so to minimize knee joint load. Whether these conditions represent subsequent steps in the causal pathway from knee-OA to changes in gait is still not clear.

  13. Ankle-Knee prosthesis with powered ankle and energy transfer for CYBERLEGs α-prototype.

    PubMed

    Geeroms, J; Flynn, L; Jimenez-Fabian, R; Vanderborght, B; Lefeber, D

    2013-06-01

    Restoring natural walking for amputees has been increasingly investigated because of demographic evolution, leading to increased number of amputations, and increasing demand for independence. The energetic disadvantages of passive pros-theses are clear, and active prostheses are limited in autonomy. This paper presents the simulation, design and development of an actuated knee-ankle prosthesis based on a variable stiffness actuator with energy transfer from the knee to the ankle. This approach allows a good approximation of the joint torques and the kinematics of the human gait cycle while maintaining compliant joints and reducing energy consumption during level walking. This first prototype consists of a passive knee and an active ankle, which are energetically coupled to reduce the power consumption.

  14. Mechanisms of Osteoarthritis in the Knee: MR Imaging Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lauren M.; McWalter, Emily J.; Son, Min-Sun; Levenston, Marc; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Gold, Garry E.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis has grown to become a widely prevalent disease that has major implications in both individual and public health. Although originally considered to be a degenerative disease driven by “wear and tear” of the articular cartilage, recent evidence has led to a consensus that osteoarthritis pathophysiology should be perceived in the context of the entire joint and multiple tissues. MRI is becoming an increasingly more important modality for imaging osteoarthritis, due to its excellent soft tissue contrast and ability to acquire morphological and biochemical data. This review will describe the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis as it is associated with various tissue types, highlight several promising MR imaging techniques for osteoarthritis and illustrate the expected appearance of osteoarthritis with each technique. PMID:24677706

  15. Imaging the hip joint in osteoarthritis: A place for ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Sudula, S N

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis has traditionally been imaged with conventional radiographs; this has been regarded as the reference technique in osteoarthritis for a long time. However, in recent years, innovative imaging techniques such as ultrasonography have been used to obtain a better understanding of this disease. This is mainly due to tremendous technical advances and progressive developments of ultrasound equipment occurring over the past decade. Ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be a valuable imaging technique in the diagnosis and management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Application of this imaging methodology for osteoarthritis has improved the understanding of the disease process and may aid in the assessment of the efficacy of future therapies. The execution of ultrasound-guided procedures with safety and reliability has a relevant significance in patient management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. This paper reviews the use of ultrasound as an imaging technique for the evaluation and treatment of osteoarthritis hip joint.

  16. Imaging the hip joint in osteoarthritis: A place for ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Sudula, S N

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis has traditionally been imaged with conventional radiographs; this has been regarded as the reference technique in osteoarthritis for a long time. However, in recent years, innovative imaging techniques such as ultrasonography have been used to obtain a better understanding of this disease. This is mainly due to tremendous technical advances and progressive developments of ultrasound equipment occurring over the past decade. Ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be a valuable imaging technique in the diagnosis and management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Application of this imaging methodology for osteoarthritis has improved the understanding of the disease process and may aid in the assessment of the efficacy of future therapies. The execution of ultrasound-guided procedures with safety and reliability has a relevant significance in patient management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. This paper reviews the use of ultrasound as an imaging technique for the evaluation and treatment of osteoarthritis hip joint. PMID:27482280

  17. Reducing premature osteoarthritis in the adolescent through appropriate screening.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Shannon; Dickman, Kathy; Maradiegue, Ann

    2009-02-01

    Osteoarthritis affects all ages. The etiology of this debilitating disease is multifactorial; however, several genes are linked to osteoarthritis. Sports participation, injury to the joint, obesity, and genetic susceptibility predispose adolescent athletes to the development of premature osteoarthritis. Assessment for the risk of osteoarthritis includes obtaining a family history to detect any genetic predisposition, obtaining body weight and body mass index, and identifying the patient's exercise regime and sports participation. Strategies to prevent the development of osteoarthritis in the adolescent include patient education, exercises to build quadriceps strength, low-impact activities, and the maintenance of a healthy weight. The devastating effects of premature osteoarthritis can be reduced if an assessment for risk of the disease is performed during adolescence.

  18. [Measurement ofthe ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI)].

    PubMed

    Kulisić, Sandra Marinović

    2012-10-01

    Measurement of the ankle-brachial pressure index, also known as ankle-brachial index or ankle-arm index is a ratio of the ankle blood pressure and brachial blood pressure. It is easy to perform and allows for diagnosis and further definition of the severity of peripheral arterial disease with sensitivity 90% and specificity 98%. The test is not appropriate for mild arterial changes as in case of comorbidity. Its further objectives are to identify patients at an higher risk of cardiovascular events. PMID:23193828

  19. Ankle arthritis: review of diagnosis and operative management.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, Robert; Aydogan, Umur; Juliano, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic options for ankle arthritis are reviewed. The current standard of care for nonoperative options include the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections, orthotics, and ankle braces. Other modalities lack high-quality research studies to delineate their appropriateness and effectiveness. The gold standard for operative intervention in end-stage degenerative arthritis remains arthrodesis, but evidence for the superiority in functional outcomes of total ankle arthroplasty is increasing. The next few years will enable more informed decisions and, with more prospective high-quality studies, the most appropriate patient population for total ankle arthroplasty can be identified.

  20. [Degenerative osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and fractures: controversies and evidences].

    PubMed

    Pagès-Castellà, Aina; Prieto Alhambra, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Osteoarthritis and osteoporosis are both common conditions in the elderly but their association has long remained obscure. Recently published studies show that patients with osteoarthritis have higher bone mass but no corresponding decrease in fracture risk. This has been proposed to be due to an increased rate of falls in these patients. Multi-disciplinary interventions, vitamin D supplementation and bisphosphonates can play a role on preventing fractures among osteoarthritis patients, but evidence on their efficacy is scarce and of poor quality.

  1. Short-term ankle motor performance with ankle robotics training in chronic hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindo; Forrester, Larry W; Macko, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accident (stroke) often results in impaired motor control and persistent weakness that may lead to chronic disability, including deficits in gait and balance function. Finding ways to restore motor control may help reduce these deficits; however, little is known regarding the capacity or temporal profile of short-term motor adaptations and learning at the hemiparetic ankle. Our objective was to determine the short-term effects of a single session of impedance-controlled ankle robot ("anklebot") training on paretic ankle motor control in chronic stroke. This was a double-arm pilot study on a convenience sample of participants with chronic stroke (n = 7) who had residual hemiparetic deficits and an equal number of age- and sex-matched nondisabled control subjects. Training consisted of participants in each group playing a target-based video game with the anklebot for an hour, for a total of 560 movement repetitions in dorsiflexion/plantar flexion ranges followed by retest 48 hours later. Task difficulty was adjusted to ankle range of motion, with robotic assistance decreased incrementally across training. Assessments included robotic measures of ankle motor control on unassisted trials before and after training and at 48 hours after training. Following exposure to the task, subjects with stroke improved paretic ankle motor control across a single training session as indexed by increased targeting accuracy (21.6 +/- 8.0 to 31.4 +/- 4.8, p = 0.05), higher angular speeds (mean: 4.7 +/- 1.5 degrees/s to 6.5 +/- 2.6 degrees/s, p < 0.01, peak: 42.8 +/- 9.0 degrees/s to 45.6 +/- 9.4 degrees/s, p = 0.03), and smoother movements (normalized jerk: 654.1 +/- 103.3 s(-2) to 537.6 +/- 86.7 s(-2), p < 0.005, number of speed peaks: 27.1 +/- 5.8 to 23.7 +/- 4.1, p < 0.01). In contrast, nondisabled subjects did not make statistically significant gains in any metric after training except in the number of successful passages (32.3 +/- 7.5 to 36.5 +/- 6.4, p = 0

  2. Nonoperative Treatment Approach to Knee Osteoarthritis in the Master Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Huleatt, Joel B.; Campbell, Kevin J.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Middle-age and elderly participants in athletic activities frequently encounter the chronic disabling process of osteoarthritis. Knowledge of the treatment of knee osteoarthritis is needed to keep the master athlete active. Objective: This article reviews the current scientific evidence regarding recommendations for the maturing athlete, specifically discussing the strengths and weaknesses of dietary and lifestyle modifications, physical therapy, bracing, supplements, pharmacotherapies, and biologics in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Conclusion: These treatment modalities can help keep the aging athlete active, which in itself plays an important role in reducing the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24427443

  3. Platelet-rich plasma for osteoarthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Knop, Eduardo; Paula, Luiz Eduardo de; Fuller, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive and systematic search of the literature on the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of osteoarthritis, using the Medline, Lilacs, Cochrane and SciELO databases, from May 2012 to October 2013. A total of 23 studies were selected, with nine being controlled trials and, of these, seven randomized, which included 725 patients. In this series, the group receiving PRP showed improvement in pain and joint function compared to placebo and hyaluronic acid. The response lasted up to two years and was better in milder cases. However it was found that there is no standardization in the PRP production method, neither in the number, timing, and volume of applications. Furthermore, the populations studied were not clearly described in many studies. Thus, these results should be analyzed with caution, and further studies with more standardized methods would be necessary for a more consistent conclusion about the PRP role in osteoarthritis. PMID:27267529

  4. Lessons from the proteomic study of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Calamia, Valentina; Blanco, Francisco J

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic pathology and one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. It is a very complex disease whose etiopathogenesis is not fully understood. Furthermore, there are serious limitations for its management, since it lacks specific and sensitive biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring. Proteomic approaches performed in the last few decades have contributed to the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that participate in this pathology and they have also led to interesting panels of putative biomarker candidates. In the next few years, further efforts should be made for translating these findings into the clinical routines. It is expected that targeted proteomics strategies will be highly valuable for the verification and qualification of biomarkers of osteoarthritis.

  5. Surgical treatment of trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    TACCARDO, GIUSEPPE; DE VITIS, ROCCO; PARRONE, GIUSEPPE; MILANO, GIUSEPPE; FANFANI, FRANCESCO

    2013-01-01

    Trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis is a common cause of radial-sided wrist pain that prevalently affects women. It is diagnosed on the basis of a thorough history, physical examination, and radiographic evaluation. While radiographs are used to determine the stage of disease, treatment is dependent on the severity of the symptoms. Non-surgical treatment frequently consists of activity modification, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, splinting and corticosteroid injections. After failure of conservative treatment, various surgical options exist depending on the stage of the disease. These options range from ligament reconstruction or osteotomy, for early painful laxity, to trapeziectomy, arthrodesis and arthroplasty for more severe osteoarthritis. This article reviews the literature supporting the various surgical treatment options and analyzes the surgical techniques most frequently used in the different disease stages. PMID:25606524

  6. Osteoarthritis: understanding the pathophysiology, genetics, and treatments.

    PubMed Central

    Sinkov, Vladamir; Cymet, Tyler

    2003-01-01

    Risk factors for developing osteoarthritis include age, previous joint injury, obesity, and a genetic predisposition. An imbalance of joint functioning initiates the disease process, which is then worsened through biochemical changes in the collagen in the joint. Joint pain is the cardinal clinical presentation. Radiographic and lab testing do not correlate well with the disease; therefore, diagnosis is made by clinical findings. Treatment focuses on maintaining joint function through the use of directed activity, physical therapy, and medications. PMID:12856913

  7. Predictive Factors for Lateral Ankle Sprains: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Beynnon, Bruce D.; Murphy, Darlene F.; Alosa, Denise M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To review the prospective studies of ankle-ligament-injury risk factors. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE from 1978 to 2001 using the terms ankle, ligament, injury, risk factor, and epidemiology. Data Synthesis: The results included many studies on the treatment and prevention of ankle injuries. There were, however, very few prospective studies focusing on identifying the risk factors that predispose an athlete to ankle-ligament trauma. Conclusions/Recommendations: There is some agreement among authors with regard to the risk factors for ankle-ligament injury; however, considerable controversy remains. Although female athletes are at significantly greater risk of suffering a serious knee sprain, such as disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament, this does not appear to be the case for ankle-ligament sprains. Therefore, sex does not appear to be a risk factor for suffering an ankle-ligament sprain. Athletes who have suffered a previous sprain have a decreased risk of reinjury if a brace is worn, and the consensus is that generalized joint laxity and anatomical foot type are not risk factors for ankle sprains. However, the literature is divided with regard to whether or not height, weight, limb dominance, ankle-joint laxity, anatomical alignment, muscle strength, muscle-reaction time, and postural sway are risk factors for ankle sprains. Future research is needed on this topic to develop a consensus on all ankle-injury risk factors. This will allow future intervention studies to be designed that will reduce the incidence and severity of this common injury. PMID:12937558

  8. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: clinical.

    PubMed

    Sharma, L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight clinical research in osteoarthritis (OA). A literature search was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND treatment [All Fields]" and the following limits activated: humans, English language, all adult 19+ years, published between April 1, 2014 and April 1, 2015. A second literature search was then conducted with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND epidemiology [All Fields]", with the same limits. Reports of surgical outcome, case series, surgical technique, tissue sample or culture studies, trial protocols, and pilot studies were excluded. Of 1523, 150 were considered relevant. Among epidemiologic and observational clinical studies, themes included physical activity, early knee OA, and confidence/instability/falls. Symptom outcomes of pharmacologic treatments were reported for methotrexate, adalimumab, anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibodies, strontium ranelate, bisphosphonates, glucosamine, and chondroitin sulfate, and structural outcomes of pharmacologic treatments for strontium ranelate, recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18, and glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. Symptom outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for: neuromuscular exercise, quadriceps strengthening, weight reduction and maintenance, TENS, therapeutic ultrasound, stepped care strategies, cognitive behavior therapy for sleep disturbance, acupuncture, gait modification, booster physical therapy, a web-based therapeutic exercise resource center for knee OA; hip physical therapy for hip OA; and joint protection and hand exercises for hand OA. Structure outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for patellofemoral bracing. PMID:26707991

  9. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: clinical.

    PubMed

    Sharma, L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight clinical research in osteoarthritis (OA). A literature search was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND treatment [All Fields]" and the following limits activated: humans, English language, all adult 19+ years, published between April 1, 2014 and April 1, 2015. A second literature search was then conducted with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND epidemiology [All Fields]", with the same limits. Reports of surgical outcome, case series, surgical technique, tissue sample or culture studies, trial protocols, and pilot studies were excluded. Of 1523, 150 were considered relevant. Among epidemiologic and observational clinical studies, themes included physical activity, early knee OA, and confidence/instability/falls. Symptom outcomes of pharmacologic treatments were reported for methotrexate, adalimumab, anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibodies, strontium ranelate, bisphosphonates, glucosamine, and chondroitin sulfate, and structural outcomes of pharmacologic treatments for strontium ranelate, recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18, and glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. Symptom outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for: neuromuscular exercise, quadriceps strengthening, weight reduction and maintenance, TENS, therapeutic ultrasound, stepped care strategies, cognitive behavior therapy for sleep disturbance, acupuncture, gait modification, booster physical therapy, a web-based therapeutic exercise resource center for knee OA; hip physical therapy for hip OA; and joint protection and hand exercises for hand OA. Structure outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for patellofemoral bracing.

  10. Cutaneous innervation of the ankle: an anatomical study showing danger zones for ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Dominik; Wenny, Raphael; Entenfellner, Johanna; Weninger, Patrick; Hirtler, Lena

    2014-05-01

    Three nerves innervate the skin in the foot and ankle region: the saphenous, sural, and superficial peroneal nerves. Because they are close to the medial and lateral malleoli, these nerves are at significant risk during orthopedic interventions. The aims of this study were to investigate the distal courses of the three cutaneous nerves of the ankle and to determine their exact relationships with easily identifiable bony landmarks. Ten freshly frozen and 40 embalmed lower extremities of adults were dissected. The positions of the superficial peroneal, sural, and saphenous nerves were determined using reference lines based on easily palpable osseous landmarks. The frequencies and distributions of all three nerves and their branches were converted into absolute numbers. A danger zone for each nerve was established on the basis of the distribution of crossings between the nerves and the different reference lines. Determination of the exact orientation of the nerves around the ankle should help minimize the nerve injury rate during surgical approaches in this area. Using this easily translatable new grid system, the course and danger zones of each cutaneous nerve around the ankle can be estimated clinically.

  11. Cutaneous innervation of the ankle: an anatomical study showing danger zones for ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Dominik; Wenny, Raphael; Entenfellner, Johanna; Weninger, Patrick; Hirtler, Lena

    2014-05-01

    Three nerves innervate the skin in the foot and ankle region: the saphenous, sural, and superficial peroneal nerves. Because they are close to the medial and lateral malleoli, these nerves are at significant risk during orthopedic interventions. The aims of this study were to investigate the distal courses of the three cutaneous nerves of the ankle and to determine their exact relationships with easily identifiable bony landmarks. Ten freshly frozen and 40 embalmed lower extremities of adults were dissected. The positions of the superficial peroneal, sural, and saphenous nerves were determined using reference lines based on easily palpable osseous landmarks. The frequencies and distributions of all three nerves and their branches were converted into absolute numbers. A danger zone for each nerve was established on the basis of the distribution of crossings between the nerves and the different reference lines. Determination of the exact orientation of the nerves around the ankle should help minimize the nerve injury rate during surgical approaches in this area. Using this easily translatable new grid system, the course and danger zones of each cutaneous nerve around the ankle can be estimated clinically. PMID:24343871

  12. Four Weeks of Balance Training does not Affect Ankle Joint Stiffness in Subjects with Unilateral Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarang Kumar; Wauneka, Clayton N.; Liu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Balance training has been shown to be effective in preventing ankle sprain recurrences in subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI) but the biomechanical pathways underlying the clinical outcomes are still unknown. This study was conducted to determine if a 4-week balance training intervention can alter the mechanical characteristics in ankles with CAI. Methods Twenty-two recreationally active subjects with unilateral CAI were randomized to either a control (n = 11, 35.1 ± 9.3 years) or intervention (n = 11, 33.5 ± 6.6 years) group. Subjects in the intervention group were trained on the affected limb with static and dynamic components using a Biodex balance stability system for 4-weeks. The ankle joint stiffness and neutral zone in inversion and eversion directions on the involved and uninvolved limbs was measured at baseline and post-intervention using a dynamometer. Results At baseline, the mean values of the inversion stiffness (0.69 ± 0.37 Nm/degree) in the involved ankle was significantly lower (p < 0.011, 95% CI [0.563, 0.544]) than that of uninvolved contralateral ankle (0.99 ± 0.41 Nm/degree). With the available sample size, the eversion stiffness, inversion neutral zone, and eversion neutral zone were not found to be significantly different between the involved and uninvolved contralateral ankles. The 4-week balance training intervention failed to show any significant effect on the passive ankle stiffness and neutral zones in inversion and eversion. Conclusion Decreased inversion stiffness in the involved chronic unstable ankle was found that of uninvolved contralateral ankle. The 4-week balance training program intervention was ineffective in altering the mechanical characteristics of ankles with CAI. Level of evidence Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1. PMID:27642647

  13. Multivariable Static Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Ho, Patrick; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports quantification of multivariable static ankle mechanical impedance when muscles were active. Repetitive measurements using a highly backdrivable therapeutic robot combined with robust function approximation methods enabled reliable characterization of the nonlinear torque-angle relation at the ankle in two coupled degrees of freedom simultaneously, a combination of dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion, and how it varied with muscle activation. Measurements on 10 young healthy seated subjects quantified the behavior of the human ankle when muscles were active at 10% of maximum voluntary contraction. Stiffness, a linear approximation to static ankle mechanical impedance, was estimated from the continuous vector field. As with previous measurements when muscles were maximally relaxed, we found that ankle stiffness was highly direction-dependent, being weakest in inversion/eversion. Predominantly activating a single muscle or co-contracting antagonistic muscles significantly increased ankle stiffness in all directions but it increased more in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane, accentuating the relative weakness of the ankle in the inversion-eversion direction. Remarkably, the observed increase was not consistent with simple superposition of muscle-generated stiffness, which may be due to the contribution of unmonitored deep ankle muscles. Implications for the assessment of neuro-mechanical disorders are discussed.

  14. Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Steven H.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and “recycles” it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost. PMID:20174659

  15. Rehabilitation of the Ankle after Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines rehabilitation concepts applicable to acute and chronic ankle injury, providing evidence for current techniques used in ankle rehabilitation and describing a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into account empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. The article notes that…

  16. Independent ankle motion control improves robotic balance simulator.

    PubMed

    Pospisil, Eric R; Luu, Billy L; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Croft, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    We present a validation study for the effectiveness of an additional ankle-tilt platform to enhance somatosensory ankle feedback available to subjects actuating a 6-axis robotic balance simulator platform. To address this need, we have developed and integrated a device to permit independent manipulation of ankle rotation while the whole-body is actuated by the balance simulator. The addition of ankle rotation is shown to provide both quantitative and qualitative improvements to the balance simulation experience compared to when the ankle joint is referenced to the motion of the balance simulator. Eight out of ten subjects reported that balancing on the simulator with ankle motion required less conscious effort. This self-reported improvement corresponded to a 32% decrease in the mean-removed RMS amplitude for sway angle, demonstrating better balance control for subjects actuating the simulator. The new ankle-tilt platform enables examination of the contributions of ankle proprioception to the control of standing balance in human subjects.

  17. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed. PMID:24320195

  18. Ankle moment generation and maximum-effort curved sprinting performance.

    PubMed

    Luo, Geng; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2012-11-15

    Turning at high speed along acute curves is crucial for athletic performance. One determinant of curved sprinting speed is the ground reaction force that can be created by the supporting limb; the moment generated at the ankle joint may influence such force generation. Body lean associated with curved sprints positions the ankle joints in extreme in-/eversion, and may hinder the ankle moment generation. To examine the influence of ankle moment generation on curved sprinting performance, 17 male subjects performed maximum-effort curved sprints in footwear with and without a wedge. The wedged footwear was constructed with the intention to align the ankle joints closer to their neutral frontal-plane configuration during counter-clockwise curved sprints so greater joint moments might be generated. We found, with the wedged footwear, the average eversion angle of the inside leg ankle was reduced, and the plantarflexion moment generation increased significantly. Meanwhile, the knee extension moment remained unchanged. With the wedged footwear, stance-average centripetal ground reaction force increased significantly while no difference in the vertical ground reaction force was detected. The subjects created a greater centripetal ground reaction impulse in the wedged footwear despite a shortened stance phase when compared to the control. Stance-average curved sprinting speed improved by 4.3% with the wedged footwear. The changes in ankle moment and curved sprinting speed observed in the current study supports the notion that the moment generation at the ankle joint may be a performance constraint for curved sprinting. PMID:23022207

  19. Adaptive sports ankle prosthetics. Interview by Sarah A. Curran.

    PubMed

    Lyle, David K

    2012-09-01

    Participating in sport at all levels is gaining a dedicated following and this is also apparent in individuals with an amputation. Currently, there is a wide variety of ankle prostheses available which attempt to provide function, control, and comfort, as well as good aesthetic appeal. Participation in sport, however, increases the demands placed upon ankle prostheses. This can compromise function and performance, and constrain the opportunities of participation in various outdoor and water sports. In acknowledging this limitation and the need to develop more versatile ankle prostheses, this article introduces the evolution of a prototype ankle prosthesis referred to as "Adaptive Sports Ankle." The ankle prosthesis, which is compatible with any foot pyramid adapter, offers the same range of motion as the normal human ankle joint and is made up of components that are chemical and corrosion resistant. These design features that are specifically created to accommodate below-the-knee amputees provide an ideal prosthesis for those wishing to lead an active lifestyle and participate in aquatic (i.e. swimming, surfing, and scuba diving), snowboarding, and equestrian activities. Although it is acknowledged that there is a need to establish research on the Adaptive Sports Ankle, its introduction to the market will enhance and expand opportunities of those individuals with a lower limb amputation to lead an active and healthy lifestyle.

  20. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed.

  1. Imaging of Common Arthroscopic Pathology of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopy of the ankle is used in the treatment and diagnosis of a spectrum of intra-articular pathology including soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, arthrofibrosis, and synovitis. To help identify the correct pathology, imaging techniques are often used to aid the surgeon in diagnosing pathology and determining best treatment options. This article discusses the use of imaging in various ankle pathologies.

  2. Dislocated ankle fracture complicated by near total distal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Duygun, Fatih; Sertkaya, Omer; Aldemir, Cengiz; Dogan, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Total arterial ischaemia is rarely seen following a dislocated ankle fracture but if it does and intervention is not made, it can lead to serious morbidity. We present a 39-year-old woman with almost total occlusion in the arteria tibialis and arteria dorsalis pedis following a dislocated ankle fracture as a result of a bicycle fall. PMID:24248319

  3. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Combination with Hyaluronic Acid for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chiang, En-Rung; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Wang, Jung-Pan; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies may aid in the repair of articular cartilage defects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of intraarticular injection of allogeneic MSCs in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model of osteoarthritis in rabbits. Allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs were isolated and cultured under hypoxia (1% O2). After 8 weeks following ACLT, MSCs suspended in hyaluronic acid (HA) were injected into the knees, and the contralateral knees were injected with HA alone. Additional controls consisted of a sham operation group as well as an untreated osteoarthritis group. The tissues were analyzed by macroscopic examination as well as histologic and immunohistochemical methods at 6 and 12 weeks post-transplantation. At 6 and 12 weeks, the joint surface showed less cartilage loss and surface abrasion after MSC injection as compared to the tissues receiving HA injection alone. Significantly better histological scores and cartilage content were observed with the MSC transplantation. Furthermore, engraftment of allogenic MSCs were evident in surface cartilage. Thus, injection of the allogeneic MSCs reduced the progression of osteoarthritis in vivo.

  4. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Combination with Hyaluronic Acid for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, En-Rung; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Wang, Jung-Pan; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies may aid in the repair of articular cartilage defects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of intraarticular injection of allogeneic MSCs in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model of osteoarthritis in rabbits. Allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs were isolated and cultured under hypoxia (1% O2). After 8 weeks following ACLT, MSCs suspended in hyaluronic acid (HA) were injected into the knees, and the contralateral knees were injected with HA alone. Additional controls consisted of a sham operation group as well as an untreated osteoarthritis group. The tissues were analyzed by macroscopic examination as well as histologic and immunohistochemical methods at 6 and 12 weeks post-transplantation. At 6 and 12 weeks, the joint surface showed less cartilage loss and surface abrasion after MSC injection as compared to the tissues receiving HA injection alone. Significantly better histological scores and cartilage content were observed with the MSC transplantation. Furthermore, engraftment of allogenic MSCs were evident in surface cartilage. Thus, injection of the allogeneic MSCs reduced the progression of osteoarthritis in vivo. PMID:26915044

  5. Total ankle prostheses in rheumatoid arthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Bernard; Louwerens, Jan Willem K; van den Hoogen, Frank H J; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose The first generations of total ankle replacements (TARs) showed a high rate of early failure. In the last decades, much progress has been made in the development of TARs, with the newer generation showing better results. We evaluated TARs implanted with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or juvenile inflammatory arthritis (JIA) as indication. Patients and methods 58 total ankle prostheses (Buechel-Pappas and STAR type) were implanted in patients with RA (n = 53) or JIA (n = 5) in 54 patients (4 bilateral). After a mean follow-up of 2.7 (1–9) years, all patients were reviewed by two orthopedic surgeons who were not the surgeons who performed the operation. Standard AP and lateral radiographs were taken and a Kofoed ankle score was obtained; this is a clinical score ranging from 0–100 and consists of sub-scores for pain, disability, and range of motion. Results 2 patients died of unrelated causes. Of the 52 patients who were alive (56 prostheses), 51 implants were still in place and showed no signs of loosening on the most recent radiographs. The mean Kofoed score at follow-up was 73 points (SD 16, range 21–92). 4 patients showed a poor result (score < 50) with persistent pain for which no obvious reason could be found. 5 implants were removed, 4 because of infection and 1 because of aseptic loosening. Interpretation Medium-term results of the STAR and BP types of TAR in RA were satisfactory. The main reason for failure of the implant was infection. PMID:19634020

  6. Functional analysis of the foot and ankle myology of gibbons and bonobos

    PubMed Central

    Vereecke, Evie E; D'Août, Kristiaan; Payne, Rachel; Aerts, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the foot and ankle myology of gibbons and bonobos, and compares it with the human foot. Gibbons and bonobos are both highly arboreal species, yet they have a different locomotor behaviour. Gibbon locomotion is almost exclusively arboreal and is characterized by speed and mobility, whereas bonobo locomotion entails some terrestrial knuckle-walking and both mobility and stability are important. We examine if these differences in locomotion are reflected in their foot myology. Therefore, we have executed detailed dissections of the lower hind limb of two bonobo and three gibbon cadavers. We took several measurements on the isolated muscles (mass, length, physiological cross sectional area, etc.) and calculated the relative muscle masses and belly lengths of the major muscle groups to make interspecific comparisons. An extensive description of all foot and ankle muscles is given and differences between gibbons, bonobos and humans are discussed. No major differences were found between the foot and ankle musculature of both apes; however, marked differences were found between the ape and human foot. The human foot is specialized for solely one type of locomotion, whereas ape feet are extremely adaptable to a wide variety of locomotor modes. Apart from providing interesting anatomical data, this study can also be helpful for the interpretation of fossil (pre)hominids. PMID:15857366

  7. Removal of osteoblastoma of the talar neck using standard anterior ankle Arthroscopy:A case report

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiao-jun; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Osteoblastoma of the talus, a benign tumor, is rare in orthopedics. The choice of treatment is usually open surgery for excision of tumor. Limited data is available concerning arthroscopic approaches. Presentation of case A 36-year-old male patient was evaluated for pain and swelling of the left ankle joint. Based on the findings of physical examination, X-rays and MRI investigations, the tumor was isolated. Standard anterior arthroscopic surgery was performed due to ankle pain. A diagnosis of osteoblastoma of the talar neck was made following the pathological survey. He had no recurrent pain and normal joint mobility 5 years postoperatively during he was regularly followed up. Discussion Osteoblastoma of the talar neck is slowly progressive and it is a palpable painful mass. Open or arthroscopic surgery can be performed. Treatment strategies are decided on according to the tumor's location, extent and size. Some advantages of arthroscopic surgery are wide visualization areas, minimally invasion, low morbidity, no necessity for casting and immobilization, early rehabilitation and quick recovery. Conclusion In conclusion, arthroscopic management can be successful in selected patients with small benign tumor localized to the ankle joint. PMID:27100951

  8. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  9. Foot and Ankle Stress Fractures in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Greaser, Michael C

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of stress fractures in the general athletic population is less than 1%, but may be as high as 15% in runners. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle account for almost half of bone stress injuries in athletes. These injuries occur because of repetitive submaximal stresses on the bone resulting in microfractures, which may coalesce to form complete fractures. Advanced imaging such as MRI and triple-phase bone scans is used to evaluate patients with suspected stress fracture. Low-risk stress fractures are typically treated with rest and protected weight bearing. High-stress fractures more often require surgical treatment. PMID:27637667

  10. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  11. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes.

  12. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes. PMID:27599438

  13. Finite element analysis of a composite artificial ankle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Leigh Ann; Johnston, Lawrence; Denniston, Charles; Czekalski, Blaise E.

    1993-01-01

    Ultra-light carbon fiber composite materials are being utilized in artificial limbs with increasing frequency in recent years. Dr. Arthur Copes, an orthotist from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has developed a graphite expoxy composite material artificial ankle (Copes/Bionic Ankle) that is intended to be used by amputees who require the most advanced above-and-below-the-knee prosthetic devices. The Copes/Bionic Ankle is designed to reproduce the function of the natural ankle joint by allowing the composite material to act as a spring mechanism without the use of metal mechanical parts. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has agreed to participate in the design effort by providing the structural analysis of the artificial ankle design.

  14. Functional Design in Rehabilitation: Modular Mechanisms for Ankle Complex

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an innovative ankle rehabilitation device based on a parallel mechanism. A functional analysis and design are described to obtain a device able to guarantee ankle movement while patient's body remains stationary. Human ankle is a challenging context where a series of joints are highly integrated. The proposed rehabilitation device permits a patient with walking defects to improve his or her gait. The research focuses on plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion movement. The robust design starts from an accurate modelling of ankle movements during walking, assessing motion data from healthy individuals and patients. The kinematics analysis and functional evaluations lead the study and development of the articulated system. In particular, results of simulations support the effectiveness of the current design. A 3D prototype is presented highlighting that the ankle motion is successfully demonstrated. PMID:27524881

  15. Functional Design in Rehabilitation: Modular Mechanisms for Ankle Complex.

    PubMed

    Aggogeri, Francesco; Pellegrini, Nicola; Adamini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an innovative ankle rehabilitation device based on a parallel mechanism. A functional analysis and design are described to obtain a device able to guarantee ankle movement while patient's body remains stationary. Human ankle is a challenging context where a series of joints are highly integrated. The proposed rehabilitation device permits a patient with walking defects to improve his or her gait. The research focuses on plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion movement. The robust design starts from an accurate modelling of ankle movements during walking, assessing motion data from healthy individuals and patients. The kinematics analysis and functional evaluations lead the study and development of the articulated system. In particular, results of simulations support the effectiveness of the current design. A 3D prototype is presented highlighting that the ankle motion is successfully demonstrated.

  16. Total ankle replacement – surgical treatment and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting. PMID:27407223

  17. Technique of Arthroscopic Treatment of Impingement After Total Ankle Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christopher E; Neumann, Julie A; Godin, Jonathan A; DeOrio, James K

    2016-04-01

    Rates of medial and/or lateral gutter impingement after total ankle replacement are not insignificant. If impingement should occur, it typically arises an average of 17 months after total ankle replacement. Our patient underwent treatment for right ankle medial gutter bony impingement with arthroscopic debridement 5 years after her initial total ankle replacement. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals and a 30° 2.7-mm-diameter arthroscope were used. An aggressive soft-tissue and bony resection was performed using a combination of curettes, a 3.5-mm shaver, a 5.5-mm unsheathed burr, a drill, and a radiofrequency ablator. This case shows that arthroscopic treatment is an effective and potentially advantageous alternative to open treatment of impingement after total ankle replacement. In addition, symptoms of impingement often improve in a short amount of time after arthroscopic debridement of the medial and/or lateral gutter.

  18. Functional Design in Rehabilitation: Modular Mechanisms for Ankle Complex.

    PubMed

    Aggogeri, Francesco; Pellegrini, Nicola; Adamini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an innovative ankle rehabilitation device based on a parallel mechanism. A functional analysis and design are described to obtain a device able to guarantee ankle movement while patient's body remains stationary. Human ankle is a challenging context where a series of joints are highly integrated. The proposed rehabilitation device permits a patient with walking defects to improve his or her gait. The research focuses on plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion movement. The robust design starts from an accurate modelling of ankle movements during walking, assessing motion data from healthy individuals and patients. The kinematics analysis and functional evaluations lead the study and development of the articulated system. In particular, results of simulations support the effectiveness of the current design. A 3D prototype is presented highlighting that the ankle motion is successfully demonstrated. PMID:27524881

  19. Relationship of bone mineral density to progression of knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. To evaluate the longitudinal relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and BMD changes and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), as measured by cartilage outcomes. Methods. We used observational cohort data from the Vitamin D for Knee Osteoarthritis trial. Bilateral femoral ...

  20. Editorial Commentary: Knee Hyaluronic Acid Viscosupplementation Reduces Osteoarthritis Pain.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the AAOS knee osteoarthritis guidelines, systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that viscosupplementation with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection reduces knee osteoarthritis pain and improves function according to the highest level of evidence. PMID:26433240

  1. Lateral and syndesmotic ankle sprain injuries: a narrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Joshua C.; Comeau, Doug; McClelland, Rebecca I.; Dubin, Rachel A.; Ferrel, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to review the literature that discusses normal anatomy and biomechanics of the foot and ankle, mechanisms that may result in a lateral ankle sprain or syndesmotic sprain, and assessment and diagnostic procedures, and to present a treatment algorithm based on normal ligament healing principles. Methods Literature was searched for years 2000 to 2010 in PubMed and CINAHL. Key search terms were ankle sprain$, ankle injury and ankle injuries, inversion injury, proprioception, rehabilitation, physical therapy, anterior talofibular ligament, syndesmosis, syndesmotic injury, and ligament healing. Discussion Most ankle sprains respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment, such as those offered by physical therapists, doctors of chiropractic, and rehabilitation specialists. A comprehensive history and examination aid in diagnosing the severity and type of ankle sprain. Based on the diagnosis and an understanding of ligament healing properties, a progressive treatment regimen can be developed. During the acute inflammatory phase, the goal of care is to reduce inflammation and pain and to protect the ligament from further injury. During the reparative and remodeling phase, the goal is to progress the rehabilitation appropriately to facilitate healing and restore the mechanical strength and proprioception. Radiographic imaging techniques may need to be used to rule out fractures, complete ligament tears, or instability of the ankle mortise. A period of immobilization and ambulating with crutches in a nonweightbearing gait may be necessary to allow for proper ligament healing before commencing a more active treatment approach. Surgery should be considered in the case of grade 3 syndesmotic sprain injuries or those ankle sprains that are recalcitrant to conservative care. Conclusion An accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment can minimize an athlete's time lost from sport and prevent future reinjury. Most ankle sprains can be successfully

  2. The role of series ankle elasticity in bipedal walking

    PubMed Central

    Zelik, Karl E.; Huang, Tzu-Wei P.; Adamczyk, Peter G.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    The elastic stretch-shortening cycle of the Achilles tendon during walking can reduce the active work demands on the plantarflexor muscles in series. However, this does not explain why or when this ankle work, whether by muscle or tendon, needs to be performed during gait. We therefore employ a simple bipedal walking model to investigate how ankle work and series elasticity impact economical locomotion. Our model shows that ankle elasticity can use passive dynamics to aid push-off late in single support, redirecting the body's center-of-mass (COM) motion upward. An appropriately timed, elastic push-off helps to reduce dissipative collision losses at contralateral heelstrike, and therefore the positive work needed to offset those losses and power steady walking. Thus, the model demonstrates how elastic ankle work can reduce the total energetic demands of walking, including work required from more proximal knee and hip muscles. We found that the key requirement for using ankle elasticity to achieve economical gait is the proper ratio of ankle stiffness to foot length. Optimal combination of these parameters ensures proper timing of elastic energy release prior to contralateral heelstrike, and sufficient energy storage to redirect the COM velocity. In fact, there exist parameter combinations that theoretically yield collision-free walking, thus requiring zero active work, albeit with relatively high ankle torques. Ankle elasticity also allows the hip to power economical walking by contributing indirectly to push-off. Whether walking is powered by the ankle or hip, ankle elasticity may aid walking economy by reducing collision losses. PMID:24365635

  3. Are there any relationships among ankle proprioception acuity, pre-landing ankle muscle responses, and landing impact in man?

    PubMed

    Fu, Siu Ngor; Hui-Chan, Christina Wan Ying

    2007-05-01

    Proprioceptive input has been suggested to contribute to the pre-landing muscle responses associated with drop-landing, but its precise role has yet to be delineated. This study set out to examine the relationships among ankle proprioception, pre-landing muscle responses, and landing impact on drop-landing in healthy man. Fifteen healthy male basketball players aged 18 to 26 participated in this study. Passive ankle joint repositioning errors were used to examine ankle joint proprioception. Pre-landing EMG responses in the ankle muscles and the impact force on landing were recorded while the players performed self-initiated drops from a height of 30 cm. Results demonstrated that averaged ankle repositioning errors were significantly correlated with the co-contraction indexes between left tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius muscles (TA/MG CoI) (r=0.67, p=0.006), and showed a trend towards a relationship with the right TA/MG CoI (r=0.47, p=0.079). TA/MG CoI from both ankles were further related to the magnitude of the total impact force on landing (r=0.54 and 0.53, respectively; p<0.05). We concluded that male basketball players with less accurate ankle joint sense adopted greater co-contraction of ankle dorsiflexors and platarflexors, which was in turn associated with greater impact force at the moment of landing.

  4. Osteoarthritis disease progression model using six year follow-up data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    PubMed

    Passey, Chaitali; Kimko, Holly; Nandy, Partha; Kagan, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    The objective was to develop a quantitative model of disease progression of knee osteoarthritis over 6 years using the total WOMAC score from patients enrolled into the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) study. The analysis was performed using data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. The time course of the total WOMAC score of patients enrolled into the progression cohort was characterized using non-linear mixed effect modeling in NONMEM. The effect of covariates on the status of the disease and the progression rate was investigated. The final model provided a good description of the experimental data using a linear progression model with a common baseline (19 units of the total WOMAC score). The WOMAC score decreased by 1.77 units/year in 89% of the population or increased by 1.74 units/year in 11% of the population. Multiple covariates were found to affect the baseline and the rate of progression, including BMI, sex, race, the use of pain medications, and the limitation in activity due to symptoms. A mathematical model to describe the disease progression of osteoarthritis in the studied population was developed. The model identified two sub-populations with increasing or decreasing total WOMAC score over time, and the effect of important covariates was quantified.

  5. Therapy of the osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Machon, Vladimir; Hirjak, Dusan; Lukas, Jindrich

    2011-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common condition of the mandible. The treatment of osteoarthritis primarily consists of rest therapy (restricting jaw movements), the use of pharmaceuticals (analgesics, antiinflammatories), splint therapy, thermotherapy or mini-invasive therapy. Our study investigated the effectiveness of the various therapeutic options in the treatment of osteoarthritis. We compared the effectiveness of rest therapy (restricting mouth opening, analgesic therapy), splints, arthrocentesis of the upper joint space, and arthrocentesis in combination with splint therapy. We looked at 80 patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. We only included patients with symptoms in one temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This 3 months long-term study shows that arthrocentesis combined with the use of a splint is an effective first-stage treatment method for patients with osteoarthritis of the TMJ (80% patients with good outcome 3 months after commencement of therapy).

  6. Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

    2014-10-01

    Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided.

  7. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. PMID:27599433

  8. Gait Kinematics After Taping in Participants With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Lisa; Dicharry, Jay; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan; Wilder, Robert; Hertel, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Context: Chronic ankle instability is characterized by repetitive lateral ankle sprains. Prophylactic ankle taping is a common intervention used to reduce the risk of ankle sprains. However, little research has been conducted to evaluate the effect ankle taping has on gait kinematics. Objective: To investigate the effect of taping on ankle and knee kinematics during walking and jogging in participants with chronic ankle instability. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Motion analysis laboratory. Patients or Participants: A total of 15 individuals (8 men, 7 women; age = 26.9 ± 6.8 years, height = 171.7 ± 6.3 cm, mass = 73.5 ± 10.7 kg) with self-reported chronic ankle instability volunteered. They had an average of 5.3 ± 3.1 incidences of ankle sprain. Intervention(s): Participants walked and jogged in shoes on a treadmill while untaped and taped. The tape technique was a traditional preventive taping procedure. Conditions were randomized. Main Outcome Measure(s): Frontal-plane and sagittal-plane ankle and sagittal-plane knee kinematics were recorded throughout the entire gait cycle. Group means and 90% confidence intervals were calculated, plotted, and inspected for percentages of the gait cycle in which the confidence intervals did not overlap. Results: During walking, participants were less plantar flexed from 64% to 69% of the gait cycle (mean difference = 5.73° ± 0.54°) and less inverted from 51% to 61% (mean difference = 4.34° ± 0.65°) and 76% to 81% (mean difference = 5.55° ± 0.54°) of the gait cycle when taped. During jogging, participants were less dorsiflexed from 12% to 21% (mean difference = 4.91° ± 0.18°) and less inverted from 47% to 58% (mean difference = 6.52° ± 0.12°) of the gait cycle when taped. No sagittal-plane knee kinematic differences were found. Conclusions: In those with chronic ankle instability, taping resulted in a more neutral ankle position during walking and jogging in shoes on a treadmill. This change in

  9. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  11. Osteoarthritis in the elderly: clinical and radiological findings in 79 and 85 year olds.

    PubMed Central

    Bagge, E; Bjelle, A; Edén, S; Svanborg, A

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of joint complaints and clinical and radiological findings of osteoarthritis in wrist, hand, and knee joints was studied in representative population subsamples of 79 and 85 year olds. Joint complaints, clinical findings of osteoarthritis, and radiographic osteoarthritis were more common in women. Age related differences in the prevalence of osteoarthritis were not found. Although there was a correlation between clinical signs of osteoarthritis and radiographic osteoarthritis, clinical signs were often present without radiographic evidence and moderate and severe radiographic osteoarthritis was often present without clinical signs. PMID:1888194

  12. Osteoarthritis year 2012 in review: biology.

    PubMed

    van der Kraan, P M

    2012-12-01

    This review focuses on recent findings in pathobiology of osteoarthritis (OA). The progress in this field will be illustrated based on three questions; 1. What factors maintain or alter the articular chondrocyte phenotype? 2. What is the role of inflammation in OA? 3. Is there a role for aging-related genes in OA? Recent findings make it more and more obvious that OA is not a single tissue disease, but that development and progression of OA is the resulted of an integrated complex of local and systemic factors that contribute to the pathobiology of this widespread disease.

  13. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Ryan P; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI), interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27042147

  14. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  15. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Ryan P; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI), interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27042147

  16. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  17. Seasonality of Ankle Swelling: Population Symptom Reporting Using Google Trends.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangwei; Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Kolber, Michael; Flook, Nigel; Sternberg, Harvey; Garrison, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In our experience, complaints of ankle swelling are more common in summer, typically from patients with no obvious cardiovascular disease. Surprisingly, this observation has never been reported. To objectively establish this phenomenon, we sought evidence of seasonality in the public's Internet searches for ankle swelling. Our data, obtained from Google Trends, consisted of all related Google searches in the United States from January 4, 2004, to January 26, 2016. Consistent with our expectations and confirmed by similar data for Australia, Internet searches for information on ankle swelling are highly seasonal (highest in midsummer), with seasonality explaining 86% of search volume variability.

  18. Seasonality of Ankle Swelling: Population Symptom Reporting Using Google Trends.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangwei; Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Kolber, Michael; Flook, Nigel; Sternberg, Harvey; Garrison, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In our experience, complaints of ankle swelling are more common in summer, typically from patients with no obvious cardiovascular disease. Surprisingly, this observation has never been reported. To objectively establish this phenomenon, we sought evidence of seasonality in the public's Internet searches for ankle swelling. Our data, obtained from Google Trends, consisted of all related Google searches in the United States from January 4, 2004, to January 26, 2016. Consistent with our expectations and confirmed by similar data for Australia, Internet searches for information on ankle swelling are highly seasonal (highest in midsummer), with seasonality explaining 86% of search volume variability. PMID:27401424

  19. Ultrasound-guided interventions of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) provides excellent delineation of tendons and ligaments in the foot and ankle and provides real-time visualization of a needle during interventions, yielding greater accuracy and efficacy than the traditional blind approach using anatomical landmarks. For this reason, US is rapidly gaining acceptance as the preferred modality for guiding interventions in the foot and ankle where the anatomy is complex, neurovascular structures should be identified, and precise technique is demanded. In the foot and ankle, US is especially useful to guide tendon sheath, bursal, and Achilles paratenon injections, Morton neuroma injections, plantar fascial injections, and joint aspirations and injections.

  20. Outcome of unilateral ankle arthrodesis and total ankle replacement in terms of bilateral gait mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Swati; Rouhani, Hossein; Assal, Mathieu; Aminian, Kamiar; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies assessed the outcome of ankle arthrodesis (AA) and total ankle replacement (TAR) surgeries; however, the extent of postoperative recovery towards bilateral gait mechanics (BGM) is unknown. We evaluated the outcome of the two surgeries at least 2 years post rehabilitation, focusing on BGM. 36 participants, including 12 AA patients, 12 TAR patients, and 12 controls were included. Gait assessment over 50 m distance was performed utilizing pressure insoles and 3D inertial sensors, following which an intraindividual comparison was performed. Most spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters in the TAR group were indicative of good gait symmetry, while the AA group presented significant differences. Plantar pressure symmetry among the AA group was also significantly distorted. Abnormality in biomechanical behavior of the AA unoperated, contralateral foot was observed. In summary, our results indicate an altered BGM in AA patients, whereas a relatively fully recovered BGM is observed in TAR patients, despite the quantitative differences in several parameters when compared to a healthy population. Our study supports a biomechanical assessment and rehabilitation of both operated and unoperated sides after major surgeries for ankle osteoarthrosis.

  1. Use of a trabecular metal implant in ankle arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement is complicated and delayed union, nonunion, and shortening of the leg often occur—especially with large bone defects. We investigated the use of a trabecular metal implant and a retrograde intramedullary nail to obtain fusion. Patients and methods 13 patients with a migrated or loose total ankle implant underwent arthrodesis with the use of a retrograde intramedullary nail through a trabecular metal Tibial Cone. The mean follow-up time was 1.4 (0.6–3.4) years. Results At the last examination, 7 patients were pain-free, while 5 had some residual pain but were satisfied with the procedure. 1 patient was dissatisfied and experienced pain and swelling when walking. The implant-bone interfaces showed no radiographic zones or gaps in any patient, indicating union. Interpretation The method is a new way of simplifying and overcoming some of the problems of performing arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement. PMID:21067435

  2. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in osteoarthritis pain.

    PubMed

    La Porta, Carmen; Bura, Simona A; Negrete, Roger; Maldonado, Rafael

    2014-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease associated with articular cartilage degradation. The major clinical outcome of osteoarthritis is a complex pain state that includes both nociceptive and neuropathic mechanisms. Currently, the therapeutic approaches for osteoarthritis are limited as no drugs are available to control the disease progression and the analgesic treatment has restricted efficacy. Increasing evidence from preclinical studies supports the interest of the endocannabinoid system as an emerging therapeutic target for osteoarthritis pain. Indeed, pharmacological studies have shown the anti-nociceptive effects of cannabinoids in different rodent models of osteoarthritis, and compelling evidence suggests an active participation of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of this disease. The ubiquitous distribution of cannabinoid receptors, together with the physiological role of the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of pain, inflammation and even joint function further support the therapeutic interest of cannabinoids for osteoarthritis. However, limited clinical evidence has been provided to support this therapeutic use of cannabinoids, despite the promising preclinical data. This review summarizes the promising results that have been recently obtained in support of the therapeutic value of cannabinoids for osteoarthritis management.

  3. Arthroscopically Assisted Open Reduction-Internal Fixation of Ankle Fractures: Significance of the Arthroscopic Ankle Drive-through Sign.

    PubMed

    Schairer, William W; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Dare, David M; Drakos, Mark C

    2016-04-01

    Standalone open reduction-internal fixation (ORIF) of unstable ankle fractures is the current standard of care. Intraoperative stress radiographs are useful for assessing the extent of ligamentous disruption, but arthroscopic visualization has been shown to be more accurate. Concomitant arthroscopy at the time of ankle fracture ORIF is useful for accurately diagnosing and managing syndesmotic and deltoid ligament injuries. The arthroscopic ankle drive-through sign is characterized by the ability to pass a 2.9-mm shaver (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA) easily through the medial ankle gutter during arthroscopy, which is not usually possible with both an intact deltoid ligament and syndesmosis. This arthroscopic maneuver indicates instability after ankle reduction and fixation and is predictive of the need for further stabilization. Furthermore, when this sign remains positive after fracture fixation, it may guide the surgeon to further evaluate the adequacy of fixation for the possible need for further fixation of the syndesmosis or deltoid. We present the case of an ankle fracture managed with arthroscopy-assisted ORIF and describe the clinical utility of the arthroscopic ankle drive-through sign. PMID:27462542

  4. Effects of hip and head position on ankle range of motion, ankle passive torque, and passive gastrocnemius tension.

    PubMed

    Andrade, R J; Lacourpaille, L; Freitas, S R; McNair, P J; Nordez, A

    2016-01-01

    Ankle joint range of motion (ROM) is notably influenced by the position of the hip joint. However, this result remains unexplained. Thus, the aim of this study was to test if the ankle passive torque and gastrocnemius muscle tension are affected by the hip and the head positions. The torque and the muscle shear elastic modulus (measured by elastography to estimate muscle tension) were collected in nine participants during passive ankle dorsiflexions performed in four conditions (by combining hip flexion at 90 or 150°, and head flexed or neutral). Ankle maximum dorsiflexion angle significantly decreased by flexing the hip from 150 to 90° (P < 0.001; mean difference 17.7 ± 2.5°), but no effect of the head position was observed (P > 0.05). Maximal passive torque and shear elastic modulus were higher with the hip flexed at 90° (P < 0.001). During submaximal ROM, no effects of the head and hip positioning (P > 0.05) were found for both torque and shear elastic modulus at a given common ankle angle among conditions. Shifts in maximal ankle angle due to hip angle manipulation are not related neither to changes in passive torque nor tension of the gastrocnemius. Further studies should be addressed to better understand the functional role of peripheral nerves and fasciae in the ankle ROM limits.

  5. Chondroprotective effects of Salubrinal in a mouse model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hamamura, K.; Nishimura, A.; Iino, T.; Takigawa, S.; Sudo, A.; Yokota, H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Salubrinal is a synthetic agent that elevates phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) and alleviates stress to the endoplasmic reticulum. Previously, we reported that in chondrocytes, Salubrinal attenuates expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) through downregulating nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signalling. We herein examine whether Salubrinal prevents the degradation of articular cartilage in a mouse model of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods OA was surgically induced in the left knee of female mice. Animal groups included age-matched sham control, OA placebo, and OA treated with Salubrinal or Guanabenz. Three weeks after the induction of OA, immunoblotting was performed for NFκB p65 and p-NFκB p65. At three and six weeks, the femora and tibiae were isolated and the sagittal sections were stained with Safranin O. Results Salubrinal suppressed the progression of OA by downregulating p-NFκB p65 and MMP13. Although Guanabenz elevates the phosphorylation level of eIF2α, it did not suppress the progression of OA. Conclusions Administration of Salubrinal has chondroprotective effects in arthritic joints. Salubrinal can be considered as a potential therapeutic agent for alleviating symptoms of OA. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:84–92 PMID:25977571

  6. [Ankle fractures in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Crevoisier, Xavier; Baalbaki, Rayan; Dos Santos, Tiago; Assal, Mathieu

    2014-12-17

    Ankle fractures in adults are usually managed by open reduction internal fixation. In elderly patients the surgical dilemma relates to bone quality. Osteoporosis is the enemy of internal fixation, and secure purchase of screws in osteopenic bone may be difficult to achieve. Insufficient screw purchase may lead to loss of reduction, wound breakdown, and infection. Postoperative management after osteosynthesis usually requires an extended period of restricted weight bearing. However, this is not feasible in older patients as a result of their lack of strength in the upper extremities and frequent comorbidities. Therefore, augmen- ted methods of internal fixation and specific surgical techniques have been developed using metal and bone cement. This permits this fragile population to begin early full weight bearing in a removable brace. PMID:25752013

  7. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    PubMed Central

    Porter, David A; Jaggers, Ryan R; Barnes, Adam Fitzgerald; Rund, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains), and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid) and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on controlling swelling and recovery from surgery. The protocols then progress to restoration of motion, early protected weight bearing, restoration of strength, and eventually a

  8. Epidemiology of osteoarthritis: Zoetermeer survey. Comparison of radiological osteoarthritis in a Dutch population with that in 10 other populations.

    PubMed Central

    van Saase, J L; van Romunde, L K; Cats, A; Vandenbroucke, J P; Valkenburg, H A

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence of mild and severe radiological osteoarthritis was investigated in a random sample of 6585 inhabitants of a Dutch village. Radiographs were graded 0-4 according to the criteria described by Kellgren and Lawrence. The prevalence of radiological osteoarthritis increased strongly with age and was highest for cervical spine (peak: men 84.8%, women 84.3%), lumbar spine (peak: 71.9%, women 67.3%), and distal interphalangeal joints of the hands (peak: men 64.4%, women 76%). Prevalence did not exceed 10% in sacroiliac joints, lateral carpometacarpal joints, and tarsometatarsal joints. Severe radiological osteoarthritis (grade 3 or grade 4) was uncommon under age 45; in elderly persons the prevalence of severe radiological osteoarthritis did not exceed 20% except for the cervical and lumbar spine, distal interphalangeal joints of the hands and, in women only, metacarpophalangeal joints, first carpometacarpal joints, first metatarsophalangeal joints, and knees. Overall, differences between men and women were small except for hips and knees; however, severe radiological osteoarthritis was found in a higher proportion in most of the joints in women. Our data were compared with data from similar population surveys. The slope between joint involvement and age was strikingly constant for most of the joints. Differences between populations were mainly differences in level. These differences of prevalence of radiological osteoarthritis may be attributed to interobserver differences--that is, different criteria used to establish radiological osteoarthritis, in addition to genetic or environmental factors, or both. PMID:2712610

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Split Peroneal Tendon Lateral Ankle Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Bazán, D Issac; Evans, Andrew M; Agarwal, Monica R; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is a common condition. Split peroneal tendon lateral ankle stabilization, a modification of the Chrisman-Snook procedure, is biomechanically stable and often used for severe and/or recurrent chronic lateral ankle instability. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this technique. Specifically, the midterm recurrence of instability and postoperative complications, such as stiffness, neurologic pain, and wound healing complications, were evaluated. We evaluated 30 consecutive procedures with a minimal follow-up period of 1 year. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 13 (median 19, range 13 to 62) months. Five patients (17%) developed recurrent ankle instability, of whom 4 underwent revision surgery. One superficial infection and two wound disruptions developed. Two patients experienced stiffness and eight (27%) surgically induced neurologic complaints, such as sural neuritis. Finally, 2 patients developed complex regional pain syndrome.

  10. Argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa L; Steinberg, John S

    2011-01-01

    In this brief report, we introduce the principles, indications, advantages, disadvantages, and surgical techniques involved in the use of argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery. PMID:21907597

  11. Open and arthroscopic surgical anatomy of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Frank, Rachel M; Hsu, Andrew R; Gross, Christopher E; Walton, David M; Lee, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Ankle-related complaints are among the most commonly encountered problems for musculoskeletal clinicians. Ankle pathology is widely variable, including, but not limited to, fractures, deformity, infection, oncologic diseases, neuromuscular conditions, and arthritis. While nonoperative management with activity modification, bracing and/or shoe modifications, and medications is usually indicated as first line of treatment, surgical intervention may become necessary. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle, and in particular, the potential neurovascular structures that may be encountered, is important to reduce complications and obtain good surgical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most common open and arthroscopic exposures to the ankle with a focus on surgically relevant anatomy for each approach. PMID:24288614

  12. Design of a portable hydraulic ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Brett C; Nath, Jonathan; Durfee, William K

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale hydraulics is ideal for powered human assistive devices including powered ankle foot orthoses because a large torque can be generated with an actuator that is small and light. A portable hydraulic ankle foot orthosis has been designed and is undergoing preliminary prototyping and engineering bench test evaluation. The device provides 90 Nm of ankle torque and has an operating pressure of 138 bar (2,000 psi). The battery-operated hydraulic power supply weighs about 3 kg and is worn at the waist. The ankle component weighs about 1.2 Kg and connects to the power supply with two hoses. Performance simulation and preliminary bench testing suggests that the device could be useful in certain rehabilitation applications. PMID:25570175

  13. How to Strengthen Your Ankle After a Sprain

    MedlinePlus

    ... back to the starting position. Repeat 10 times. Tie the resistance bands around a fixed object and ... starting position and cycle your ankle 10 times. Tie the bands around an object to the outer ...

  14. Clinical anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle in dance.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jeffrey A; McEwan, Islay M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2008-01-01

    The ankle is an important joint to understand in the context of dance because it is the connection between the leg and the foot that establishes lower extremity stability. Its function coordinates with the leg and foot and, thus, it is crucial to the dancer's ability to perform. Furthermore, the ankle is one of the most commonly injured body regions in dance. An understanding of ankle anatomy and biomechanics is not only important for healthcare providers working with dancers, but for dance scientists, dance instructors, and dancers themselves. The bony architecture, the soft tissue restraints, and the locomotive structures all integrate to allow the athletic artistry of dance. Yet, there is still much research to be carried out in order to more completely understand the ankle of the dancer.

  15. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Anatomy of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Hsu, Andrew R.; Gross, Christopher E.; Walton, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Ankle-related complaints are among the most commonly encountered problems for musculoskeletal clinicians. Ankle pathology is widely variable, including, but not limited to, fractures, deformity, infection, oncologic diseases, neuromuscular conditions, and arthritis. While nonoperative management with activity modification, bracing and/or shoe modifications, and medications is usually indicated as first line of treatment, surgical intervention may become necessary. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle, and in particular, the potential neurovascular structures that may be encountered, is important to reduce complications and obtain good surgical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most common open and arthroscopic exposures to the ankle with a focus on surgically relevant anatomy for each approach. PMID:24288614

  16. Design of a portable hydraulic ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Brett C; Nath, Jonathan; Durfee, William K

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale hydraulics is ideal for powered human assistive devices including powered ankle foot orthoses because a large torque can be generated with an actuator that is small and light. A portable hydraulic ankle foot orthosis has been designed and is undergoing preliminary prototyping and engineering bench test evaluation. The device provides 90 Nm of ankle torque and has an operating pressure of 138 bar (2,000 psi). The battery-operated hydraulic power supply weighs about 3 kg and is worn at the waist. The ankle component weighs about 1.2 Kg and connects to the power supply with two hoses. Performance simulation and preliminary bench testing suggests that the device could be useful in certain rehabilitation applications.

  17. Posteromedial dislocation of the ankle without fracture or diastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L C; Love, M B

    1993-02-01

    This case report describes a patient with posteromedial dislocation of the ankle without fracture and without disruption of the tibiofibular syndesmosis. The pathogenesis of this uncommon lesion is discussed.

  18. Average symptom trajectories following incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Rebecca; Jordan, Kelvin P; Thomas, Elaine; Peat, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous research has identified the existence of a prodromal phase of symptom worsening beginning on average 2–3 years prior to the first appearance of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). The current study extends these observations to investigate the trajectory of self-reported pain, stiffness, function and other symptoms following the incidence of radiographic OA. Methods Data were from the incidence cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative public use data sets. Cases were defined as knees without symptoms at enrolment, which developed incident radiographic OA (Kellgren and Lawrence grade ≥2) at any of the first 4 annual follow-up visits. Symptoms investigated were knee-specific Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score subscale scores and individual items, available up to 3 years before and 5 years after the incidence of radiographic OA. Trajectories of having at least one of the symptoms from a subscale, and for each individual symptom over time, were fitted using multilevel logistic regression models. Results The probability of symptoms following the initial prodromal phase generally stabilised, whereas the probability of moderate, severe or extreme symptoms was consistently low. Two exceptions were pain frequency, which increased greatly in the lead up to incidence, then decreased slightly, and audible joint sounds, which had a much higher overall probability, and after increasing prior to incident radiographic OA, stabilised then started to increase again at 5 years. Conclusions Following an increase in the risk of symptoms during the prodromal phase, this risk does not continue to increase in the period up to 5 years after the incidence of radiographic OA. PMID:27486528

  19. Ultrasound-guided intervention in the ankle and foot.

    PubMed

    Drakonaki, Eleni E; Allen, Gina M; Watura, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In this comprehensive review, we discuss the main interventions performed in the foot and ankle for Achilles tendinopathy, Morton's neuromas and Plantar fasciitis as well as techniques for intra-articular and peritendinous injections. We present the different imaging techniques and injectable agents that can be used in clinical practice, trying to help the reader decide the most appropriate way of managing the patient with a problem in the ankle and foot. PMID:26537692

  20. Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance with relaxed muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2014-11-01

    Neurological or biomechanical disorders may distort ankle mechanical impedance and thereby impair locomotor function. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of multivariable ankle mechanical impedance of young healthy subjects when their muscles were relaxed, to serve as a baseline to compare with pathophysiological ankle properties of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. Measurements using a highly backdrivable wearable ankle robot combined with multi-input multi-output stochastic system identification methods enabled reliable characterization of ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) simultaneously, the sagittal and frontal planes. The characterization included important ankle properties unavailable from single DOF studies: coupling between DOFs and anisotropy as a function of frequency. Ankle impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both seated (knee flexed) and standing (knee straightened) postures. Stiffness in the sagittal plane was greater than in the frontal plane and furthermore, was greater when standing than when seated, most likely due to the stretch of bi-articular muscles (medial and lateral gastrocnemius). Very low off-diagonal partial coherences implied negligible coupling between dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion. The directions of principal axes were tilted slightly counterclockwise from the original joint coordinates. The directional variation (anisotropy) of ankle impedance in the 2-D space formed by rotations in the sagittal and frontal planes exhibited a characteristic "peanut" shape, weak in inversion-eversion over a wide range of frequencies from the stiffness dominated region up to the inertia dominated region. Implications for the assessment of neurological and biomechanical impairments are discussed.

  1. Mechanics and energetics of incline walking with robotic ankle exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    We examined healthy human subjects wearing robotic ankle exoskeletons to study the metabolic cost of ankle muscle-tendon work during uphill walking. The exoskeletons were powered by artificial pneumatic muscles and controlled by the user's soleus electromyography. We hypothesized that as the demand for net positive external mechanical work increased with surface gradient, the positive work delivered by ankle exoskeletons would produce greater reductions in users' metabolic cost. Nine human subjects walked at 1.25 m s(-1) on gradients of 0%, 5%, 10% and 15%. We compared rates of O(2) consumption and CO(2) production, exoskeleton mechanics, joint kinematics, and surface electromyography between unpowered and powered exoskeleton conditions. On steeper inclines, ankle exoskeletons delivered more average positive mechanical power (P<0.0001; +0.37+/-0.03 W kg(-1) at 15% grade and +0.23+/-0.02 W kg(-1) at 0% grade) and reduced subjects' net metabolic power by more (P<0.0001; -0.98+/-0.12 W kg(-1) at 15% grade and -0.45+/-0.07 W kg(-1) at 0% grade). Soleus muscle activity was reduced by 16-25% when wearing powered exoskeletons on all surface gradients (P<0.0008). The ;apparent efficiency' of ankle muscle-tendon mechanical work decreased from 0.53 on level ground to 0.38 on 15% grade. This suggests a decreased contribution from previously stored Achilles' tendon elastic energy and an increased contribution from actively shortening ankle plantar flexor muscle fibers to ankle muscle-tendon positive work during walking on steep uphill inclines. Although exoskeletons delivered 61% more mechanical work at the ankle up a 15% grade compared with level walking, relative reductions in net metabolic power were similar across surface gradients (10-13%). These results suggest a shift in the relative distribution of mechanical power output to more proximal (knee and hip) joints during inclined walking. PMID:19088208

  2. Deep Vein Thrombosis in Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chao, John

    2016-04-01

    The routine use of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients undergoing foot and ankle procedures is not well supported in the literature. Multiple studies draw conclusions from heterogeneous populations, and specific studies have small numbers of specific pathologic conditions. Depending on the study, recommendations for and against venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in foot and ankle surgery can be made. The identification of risk factors for venous thromboembolism is paramount in the decision making of postoperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis.

  3. Imaging of Common Arthroscopic Pathology of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopy of the ankle is used in the treatment and diagnosis of a spectrum of intra-articular pathology including soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, arthrofibrosis, and synovitis. To help identify the correct pathology, imaging techniques are often used to aid the surgeon in diagnosing pathology and determining best treatment options. This article discusses the use of imaging in various ankle pathologies. PMID:27599435

  4. Ankle dislocation without fracture in a young athlete.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J; Burzotta, J; Brunetti, V

    1998-01-01

    This is a case report of a 34-year-old male who sustained an ankle dislocation injury without any associated fractures to the foot, ankle, or leg while playing basketball. After an extensive review of the literature, it was found that this type of injury without any associated fractures is an extremely rare occurrence. A case report and a review of the literature are presented in this paper.

  5. Topical herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Background Before extraction and synthetic chemistry were invented, musculoskeletal complaints were treated with preparations from medicinal plants. They were either administered orally or topically. In contrast to the oral medicinal plant products, topicals act in part as counterirritants or are toxic when given orally. Objectives To update the previous Cochrane review of herbal therapy for osteoarthritis from 2000 by evaluating the evidence on effectiveness for topical medicinal plant products. Search methods Databases for mainstream and complementary medicine were searched using terms to include all forms of arthritis combined with medicinal plant products. We searched electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL),MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to February 2013, unrestricted by language. We also searched the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of herbal interventions used topically, compared with inert (placebo) or active controls, in people with osteoarthritis were included. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted data. Main results Seven studies (seven different medicinal plant interventions; 785 participants) were included. Single studies (five studies, six interventions) and non-comparable studies (two studies, one intervention) precluded pooling of results. Moderate evidence from a single study of 174 people with hand osteoarthritis indicated that treatment with Arnica extract gel probably results in similar benefits as treatment with ibuprofen (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) with a similar number of adverse events. Mean pain in the ibuprofen group was 44.2 points on a 100 point scale; treatment with Arnica gel reduced the pain by 4 points after three weeks: mean difference (MD

  6. A novel assessment technique for measuring ankle orientation and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Davies, T Claire; Nandakumar, Anoop; Quan Xie, Sheng

    2015-09-18

    The measurement of ankle orientation and stiffness can provide insight into improvements and allows for effective monitoring during a rehabilitation program. Existing assessment techniques have a variety of limitations. Dynamometer based methods rely on manual manipulation. The use of torque meter is usually for single degree-of-freedom (DOF) devices. This study proposes a novel ankle assessment technique that can be used for multiple DOFs devices working in both manual and automatic modes using the position sensor and the multi-axis load cell. As a preliminary evaluation, an assessment device for ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion was constructed. Nine subjects participated to evaluate the effectiveness of the assessment device in determining ankle orientation and stiffness. The measured ankle orientation was consistent with that from the NDI Polaris optical tracking system. The measured ankle torque and stiffness compared well with published data. The test-retest reliability was high with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2, 1) values greater than 0.846 and standard error of measurement (SEM) less than 1.38. PMID:26159061

  7. Conservative management of posterior ankle impingement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, Isabelle; Richer, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the pain and functional improvements of a patient with posterior ankle impingement following a treatment plan incorporating soft tissue therapy, chiropractic adjustment and a progressive rehabilitation program. Clinical Features: A 37-year- old male presented with posterolateral ankle pain exacerbated by plantar flexion two weeks after sustaining an inversion ankle sprain. Oedema was present and the patient was describing a sensation of instability while walking. The initial diagnosis of lateral ankle sprain was found to be complicated by a posterior ankle impingement caused by a tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus sheath suspected during the physical examination and confirmed by MRI. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was treated over a 14-week period. Soft tissue therapy, a rehabilitation program and cortisone injection were used to treat this condition. A precise description of the rehabilitation program that contains open kinetic chain, closed kinetic chain, proprioception, and conditioning exercises prescribed to the patient is given. After the treatment plan, the patient returned to play pain free and had no daily living restrictions. Summary: A protocol including rest, soft tissue therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises, sport-specific exercises and cortisone injection appeared to facilitate complete recovery of this patient’s posterior ankle impingement. PMID:27385836

  8. Influence of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Park, Tae-Jin; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2013-08-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. [Subjects] Fifteen ankles with limited DF PROM were examined. [Methods] After rigid strapping tape was applied to the ankles from the talus to the calcaneus, progressing posteriorly and inferiorly, the subjects walked on a walkway for 10 min. Using a goniometer, the ankle DF PROM was measured with the knee extended before and after walking with talus taping. The difference in ankle DF PROM between before and after walking with talus taping was analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] The ankle DF PROM was significantly increased after walking with talus taping. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that walking with talus taping is effective for increasing the ankle DF PROM in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. PMID:24259905

  9. Influence of Walking with Talus Taping on the Ankle Dorsiflexion Passive Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Park, Tae-Jin; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. [Subjects] Fifteen ankles with limited DF PROM were examined. [Methods] After rigid strapping tape was applied to the ankles from the talus to the calcaneus, progressing posteriorly and inferiorly, the subjects walked on a walkway for 10 min. Using a goniometer, the ankle DF PROM was measured with the knee extended before and after walking with talus taping. The difference in ankle DF PROM between before and after walking with talus taping was analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] The ankle DF PROM was significantly increased after walking with talus taping. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that walking with talus taping is effective for increasing the ankle DF PROM in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. PMID:24259905

  10. Osteoarthritis: No Pills Yet | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... colleagues are studying stem cells in specially bred mice to determine whether there is a correlation between ... genes, for cartilage repair and osteoarthritis in these mice, and target these genes in the development of ...

  11. The Effect of Lateral Ankle Ligament Repair in Muscle Reaction Time in Patients with Mechanical Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Li, H-Y; Zheng, J-J; Zhang, J; Hua, Y-H; Chen, S-Y

    2015-11-01

    Studies have shown that functional ankle instability can result in prolonged muscle reaction time. However, the deficit in muscle reaction time in patients with mechanical ankle instability (MAI) and the effect of lateral ankle ligament repair on muscle reaction time are unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the deficit in muscle reaction time, and to evaluate the role of lateral ligament repair in improving muscle reaction time in MAI patients. Sixteen MAI patients diagnosed with lateral ankle ligament tears by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging underwent arthroscopic debridement and open lateral ankle ligament repair with a modified Broström procedure. One day before the operation, reaction times of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles were recorded following sudden inversion perturbation while walking on a custom walkway, and anterior drawer test (ADT) and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale score were evaluated. Six months postoperatively, muscle reaction time, ADT and AOFAS scale score were reevaluated, and muscle reaction times in 15 healthy controls were also recorded. Preoperatively, the affected ankles in the MAI group had significantly delayed tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles reaction times compared with controls. Six months after the operation, median AOFAS scale scores were significantly greater than preoperatively, and ADT was negative in the MAI group. However, the affected ankles in the MAI group showed no difference in muscle reaction time compared with preoperative values. MAI patients had prolonged muscle reaction time. The modified Broström procedure produced satisfactory clinical outcomes in MAI patients, but did not shorten reaction times of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles.

  12. Osteoarthritis and articular chondrocalcinosis in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, E; Dieppe, P; Maddison, P; Evison, G

    1983-01-01

    One hundred consecutive admissions to an acute geriatric unit were examined for clinical and radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis (OA) and articular chondrocalcinosis (ACC). Thirty-four patients had ACC. This was age related, the prevalence rising from 15% in patients aged 65-74 years to 44% in patients over 84 years. The commonly involved joints were the knee (25%), public symphysis (15%), and wrist (9%). No other aetiological factors predisposing to ACC were found. Of the 25 patients with ACC in the knee 7 had no symptoms or signs and no radiographic evidence of OA at that site. However, the combination of ACC and radiographic OA was characterised by an increase in clinical joint disease. Features of inflammation (joint swelling and joint line tenderness) involving the knee, wrist, and elbow were particularly common in ACC. It is concluded that ACC is common in the elderly and is associated with an increased incidence of joint disease. PMID:6859960

  13. Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis: A Review of Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bingjiang; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jushi; Hu, Songfeng; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent chronic joint disease, increases in prevalence with age, and affects majority of individuals over the age of 65 and is a leading musculoskeletal cause of impaired mobility in the elderly. Because the precise molecular mechanisms which are involved in the degradation of cartilage matrix and development of OA are poorly understood and there are currently no effective interventions to decelerate the progression of OA or retard the irreversible degradation of cartilage except for total joint replacement surgery. In this paper, the important molecular mechanisms related to OA pathogenesis will be summarized and new insights into potential molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of OA will be provided. PMID:25311420

  14. Occupational activities and osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is rising and the search for interventions to mitigate risk is intensifying. This review considers the contribution of occupational activities to disease occurrence and the lessons for prevention. Sources Systematic search in Embase and Medline covering the period 1996 to November 2011. Areas of agreement Reasonably good evidence exists that physical work activities (especially kneeling, squatting, lifting, and climbing) can cause and/or aggravate knee OA. These exposures should be reduced where possible. Obese workers with such exposures are at additional risk of knee OA and should therefore particularly be encouraged to lose weight. Areas of uncertainty/research need Workplace interventions and policies to prevent knee OA have seldom been evaluated. Moreover, their implementation can be problematic. However, the need for research to optimise the design of work in relation to knee OA is pressing, given population trends towards extended working life. PMID:22544778

  15. Unraveling the role of Mg(++) in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiang; Yue, Jiaji; Yang, Chunxi

    2016-02-15

    Mg(++) is widely involved in human physiological processes that may play key roles in the generation and progression of diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage degradation, abnormal mineralization and inflammation. Magnesium deficiency is considered to be a major risk factor for OA development and progression. Magnesium deficiency is active in several pathways that have been implicated in OA, including increased inflammatory mediators, cartilage damage, defective chondrocyte biosynthesis, aberrant calcification and a weakened effect of analgesics. Abundant in vitro and in vivo evidence in animal models now suggests that the nutritional supplementation or local infiltration of Mg(++) represent effective therapies for OA. The goal of this review is to summarize the current understanding of the role of Mg(++) in OA with particular emphasis on the related molecular mechanisms involved in OA progression. PMID:26800786

  16. [Leptin: a link between obesity and osteoarthritis?].

    PubMed

    Terlain, Bernard; Presle, Nathalie; Pottie, Pascale; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    In addition to aging, obesity is one of the most common underlying causes of osteoarthritis (OA). Mechanical loading, together with biochemical and systemic factors linked to altered lipid metabolism, are thought to contribute to the onset of OA. It has been suggested that OA is a systemic metabolic disease associated with lipid disorders affecting joint homeostasis. These gradual changes may be due to the local effect of adipokines, and especially leptin. Indeed, their relative levels in joints differ from that found in plasma. In particular, leptin levels are increased and adiponectin and resistin levels are reduced This hypothesis is supported by--leptin overexpression in OA cartilage and its correlation with the degree of cartilage destruction,--abundant leptin synthesis by osteophytes, and--the high leptin levels found in OA joints from female patients. This link between OA and adipokines provides new leads regarding the prevention of OA and the identification of new drug targets.

  17. Osteoarthritis in Young, Active, and Athletic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Amoako, Adae O; Pujalte, George Guntur A

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most devastating chronic conditions that affect people around the world. Although the usual population associated with the condition is the elderly, who are mostly inactive, athletes and younger individuals are also susceptible. Depending on the population, the etiology may differ; injuries, occupational activities, and obesity appear to be the most common causes of OA in young and athletic populations. Diagnosing OA in athletes and young individuals is sometimes challenging because of their increased pain tolerance. However, the treatment of OA in these populations does not differ from its management in the general population. Several considerations need to be taken into account when choosing a treatment modality. The purpose of this review is to address OA in athletes and younger individuals and to discuss its presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24899825

  18. Hand osteoarthritis, menopause and menopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Watt, Fiona E

    2016-01-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the commonest musculoskeletal conditions, primarily affecting women over the age of 50, typically around the age of the menopause. Symptomatic disease can give rise to substantial pain, impairment of hand function and quality of life, leading to significant socioeconomic cost. There is currently no disease-modifying therapy, representing a huge unmet clinical need. The evidence for a relationship between hand OA and the menopause is summarised. Whether there is evidence for an effect of menopausal hormonal therapy on the incidence, prevalence or severity of symptomatic hand OA is critically reviewed, and gaps in our knowledge identified. Lastly, the potential mechanisms by which estrogen, or newer agents such as SERMs, might act to interfere with disease pathogenesis are overviewed. The need for specifically designed, controlled trials of agents in cohorts with symptomatic hand OA, refractory to standard symptomatic management is highlighted.

  19. Oral herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicinal plant products are used orally for treating osteoarthritis. Although their mechanisms of action have not yet been elucidated in full detail, interactions with common inflammatory mediators provide a rationale for using them to treat osteoarthritic complaints. Objectives To update a previous Cochrane review to assess the benefits and harms of oral medicinal plant products in treating osteoarthritis. Search methods We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to 29 August 2013, unrestricted by language, and the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of orally consumed herbal interventions compared with placebo or active controls in people with osteoarthritis were included. Herbal interventions included any plant preparation but excluded homeopathy or aromatherapy products, or any preparation of synthetic origin. Data collection and analysis Two authors used standard methods for trial selection and data extraction, and assessed the quality of the body of evidence using the GRADE approach for major outcomes (pain, function, radiographic joint changes, quality of life, withdrawals due to adverse events, total adverse events, and serious adverse events). Main results Forty-nine randomised controlled studies (33 interventions, 5980 participants) were included. Seventeen studies of confirmatory design (sample and effect sizes pre-specified) were mostly at moderate risk of bias. The remaining 32 studies of exploratory design were at higher risk of bias. Due to differing interventions, meta-analyses were restricted to Boswellia serrata (monoherbal) and avocado-soyabean unsaponifiables (ASU) (two herb combination) products. Five studies of three different extracts from Boswellia serrata were included. High-quality evidence from two studies (85 participants) indicated that 90 days treatment with 100

  20. The mid-term outcome of total ankle arthroplasty and ankle fusion in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While arthrodesis is the standard treatment of a severely arthritic ankle joint, total ankle arthroplasty has become a popular alternative. This review provides clinical outcomes and complications of both interventions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Studies were obtained from Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science (January 1980 – June 2011) and additional manual search. Inclusion criteria: original clinical study, > 5 rheumatoid arthritis (population), internal fixation arthrodesis or three-component mobile bearing prosthesis (intervention), ankle scoring system (outcome). The clinical outcome score, complication- and failure rates were extracted and the methodological quality of the studies was analysed. Results 17 observational studies of 868 citations were included. The effect size concerning total ankle arthroplasty ranged between 1.9 and 6.0, for arthrodesis the effect sizes were 4.0 and 4.7. Reoperation due to implant failure or reoperation due to non-union, was 11% and 12% for respectively total ankle arthroplasty and arthrodesis. The methodological quality of the studies was low (mean 6.4 out of a maximum of 14 points) and was lower for arthrodesis (mean 4.8) as compared to arthroplasty (mean 7.8) (p = 0.04). Conclusions 17 observational and no (randomized) controlled clinical trials are published on the effectiveness of arthroplasty or arthrodesis of the ankle in rheumatoid arthritis. Regardless of the methodological limitations it can be concluded that both interventions show clinical improvement and in line with current literature neither procedure is superior to the other. PMID:24161014

  1. Pelvic Incidence in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Ibrahim J.; Rasouli, Mohammad R.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Restrepo, Santiago; Albert, Todd J.; Radcliff, Kris E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain and disability that results in considerable social and medical costs. Mechanics such as posture, alignment and orientation of the hips and the spinal column and the relationship between these factors have been implicated in the development of both hip and spine pathologies. This study aims to test the hypothesis if pelvic incidence varies in patients with and without osteoarthritis. We assessed the relationship between spinopelvic alignment as measured by pelvic incidence (PI) and the presence of hip OA. Methods: We collected supine pelvis CT scans of 1,012 consecutive patients not known to have hip OA. Our first group consisted of 95 patients with moderate to severe hip OA as per radiology reports. The second group included 87 patients with no evidence of hip OA. Power analysis revealed the need for 77 patients per group to find a mean difference in PI of 5° or less between both groups. Two trained physicians independently measured the PI to account for inter-observer reliability. Results: Patients with moderate to severe hip OA had a mean PI of 56.5°±12.8°. The mean PI for patients without hip OA was 57.2°±7.5°. An independent samples t-test revealed no significant difference between the PI values of the two groups. Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.754 demonstrated a high inter-observer reliability. Conclusion: There was no difference in PI angle of hip OA patients and “healthy” patients. Our measurements of patients without OA were almost identical to the reported normal PI values in the literature. It appears that hip OA is not associated with PI angle, refuting the hypothesis made in previous studies, stating that elevated PI contributes to the future development of hip arthritis. CT scan seems to be a reliable and accurate way of assessing pelvic incidence. PMID:27200390

  2. Early diagnosis to enable early treatment of pre-osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a prevalent and disabling disease affecting an increasingly large swathe of the world population. While clinical osteoarthritis is a late-stage condition for which disease-modifying opportunities are limited, osteoarthritis typically develops over decades, offering a long window of time to potentially alter its course. The etiology of osteoarthritis is multifactorial, showing strong associations with highly modifiable risk factors of mechanical overload, obesity and joint injury. As such, characterization of pre-osteoarthritic disease states will be critical to support a paradigm shift from palliation of late disease towards prevention, through early diagnosis and early treatment of joint injury and degeneration to reduce osteoarthritis risk. Joint trauma accelerates development of osteoarthritis from a known point in time. Human joint injury cohorts therefore provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of pre-osteoarthritic conditions and potential interventions from the earliest stages of degeneration. This review focuses on recent advances in imaging and biochemical biomarkers suitable for characterization of the pre-osteoarthritic joint as well as implications for development of effective early treatment strategies. PMID:22682469

  3. Osteoarthritis accelerates and exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate whether localized peripheral inflammation, such as osteoarthritis, contributes to neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative disease in vivo. Methods We employed the inducible Col1-IL1βXAT mouse model of osteoarthritis, in which induction of osteoarthritis in the knees and temporomandibular joints resulted in astrocyte and microglial activation in the brain, accompanied by upregulation of inflammation-related gene expression. The biological significance of the link between peripheral and brain inflammation was explored in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) whereby osteoarthritis resulted in neuroinflammation as well as exacerbation and acceleration of AD pathology. Results Induction of osteoarthritis exacerbated and accelerated the development of neuroinflammation, as assessed by glial cell activation and quantification of inflammation-related mRNAs, as well as Aβ pathology, assessed by the number and size of amyloid plaques, in the APP/PS1; Col1-IL1βXAT compound transgenic mouse. Conclusion This work supports a model by which peripheral inflammation triggers the development of neuroinflammation and subsequently the induction of AD pathology. Better understanding of the link between peripheral localized inflammation, whether in the form of osteoarthritis, atherosclerosis or other conditions, and brain inflammation, may prove critical to our understanding of the pathophysiology of disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21899735

  4. Mechanics and energetics of level walking with powered ankle exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2008-05-01

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons that can alter joint mechanical power output are novel tools for studying the relationship between the mechanics and energetics of human locomotion. We built pneumatically powered ankle exoskeletons controlled by the user's own soleus electromyography (i.e. proportional myoelectric control) to determine whether mechanical assistance at the ankle joint could reduce the metabolic cost of level, steady-speed human walking. We hypothesized that subjects would reduce their net metabolic power in proportion to the average positive mechanical power delivered by the bilateral ankle exoskeletons. Nine healthy individuals completed three 30 min sessions walking at 1.25 m s(-1) while wearing the exoskeletons. Over the three sessions, subjects' net metabolic energy expenditure during powered walking progressed from +7% to -10% of that during unpowered walking. With practice, subjects significantly reduced soleus muscle activity (by approximately 28% root mean square EMG, P<0.0001) and negative exoskeleton mechanical power (-0.09 W kg(-1) at the beginning of session 1 and -0.03 W kg(-1) at the end of session 3; P=0.005). Ankle joint kinematics returned to similar patterns to those observed during unpowered walking. At the end of the third session, the powered exoskeletons delivered approximately 63% of the average ankle joint positive mechanical power and approximately 22% of the total positive mechanical power generated by all of the joints summed (ankle, knee and hip) during unpowered walking. Decreases in total joint positive mechanical power due to powered ankle assistance ( approximately 22%) were not proportional to reductions in net metabolic power ( approximately 10%). The ;apparent efficiency' of the ankle joint muscle-tendon system during human walking ( approximately 0.61) was much greater than reported values of the ;muscular efficiency' of positive mechanical work for human muscle ( approximately 0.10-0.34). High ankle joint

  5. Expedited Patient-Specific Assessment of Contact Stress Exposure in the Ankle Joint Following Definitive Articular Fracture Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Andrew M.; Anderson, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    Acute injury severity, altered joint kinematics, and joint incongruity are three important mechanical factors linked to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Finite element analysis (FEA) was previously used to assess the influence of increased contact stress due to joint incongruity on PTOA development. While promising agreement with PTOA development was seen, the inherent complexities of contact FEA limited the numbers of subjects that could be analyzed. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a simplified methodology for contact stress computation, which idealizes contact surfaces as a bed of independent linear springs. In this study, DEA was explored as an expedited alternative to FEA contact stress exposure computation. DEA was compared to FEA using results from a previously completed validation study of two cadaveric human ankles, as well as a previous study of post-operative contact stress exposure in 11 patients with tibial plafond fracture. DEA-computed maximum contact stresses were within 19% of those experimentally measured, with 90% of the contact area having computed contact stress values within 1 MPa of those measured. In the 11 fractured ankles, maximum contact stress and contact area differences between DEA and FEA were 0.85±0.64 MPa and 22.5±11.5 mm2. As a predictive measure for PTOA development, both DEA and FEA had 100% concordance with presence of OA (KL grade ≥ 2) and >95% concordance with KL grade at 2 years. These results support DEA as a reasonable alternative to FEA for computing contact stress exposures following surgical reduction of a tibial plafond fracture. PMID:26105660

  6. Expedited patient-specific assessment of contact stress exposure in the ankle joint following definitive articular fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Kern, Andrew M; Anderson, Donald D

    2015-09-18

    Acute injury severity, altered joint kinematics, and joint incongruity are three important mechanical factors linked to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Finite element analysis (FEA) was previously used to assess the influence of increased contact stress due to joint incongruity on PTOA development. While promising agreement with PTOA development was seen, the inherent complexities of contact FEA limited the numbers of subjects that could be analyzed. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a simplified methodology for contact stress computation, which idealizes contact surfaces as a bed of independent linear springs. In this study, DEA was explored as an expedited alternative to FEA contact stress exposure computation. DEA was compared to FEA using results from a previously completed validation study of two cadaveric human ankles, as well as a previous study of post-operative contact stress exposure in 11 patients with tibial plafond fracture. DEA-computed maximum contact stresses were within 19% of those experimentally measured, with 90% of the contact area having computed contact stress values within 1MPa of those measured. In the 11 fractured ankles, maximum contact stress and contact area differences between DEA and FEA were 0.85 ± 0.64 MPa and 22.5 ± 11.5mm(2). As a predictive measure for PTOA development, both DEA and FEA had 100% concordance with presence of OA (KL grade ≥ 2) and >95% concordance with KL grade at 2 years. These results support DEA as a reasonable alternative to FEA for computing contact stress exposures following surgical reduction of a tibial plafond fracture.

  7. The efficacy of a semirigid ankle stabilizer to reduce acute ankle injuries in basketball. A randomized clinical study at West Point.

    PubMed

    Sitler, M; Ryan, J; Wheeler, B; McBride, J; Arciero, R; Anderson, J; Horodyski, M

    1994-01-01

    This randomized clinical study was designed to prospectively determine the efficacy of a semirigid ankle stabilizer in reducing the frequency and severity of acute ankle injuries in basketball. Athletic shoe, playing surface, athlete-exposure, ankle injury history, and brace assignment were either statistically or experimentally controlled. Participants in the study were 1601 United States Military Academy cadets with no preparticipation, clinical, functional, or radiographic evidence of ankle instability. Subjects experienced a total of 13,430 athlete-exposures in the 1990 and 1991 intramural basketball seasons. Ankle injury was defined as acute trauma to the ankle ligaments that resulted in an athlete's inability to participate in basketball 1 day after the injury. Use of ankle stabilizers significantly reduced the frequency of ankle injuries. Reduction in ankle injuries, however, depended on the nature of injury (fewer contact injuries occurred among those who wore braces). Injury severity was not statistically reduced, and wearing the ankle stabilizer did not affect the frequency of knee injuries. Attitude toward ankle stabilizer use improved as use of the stabilizer increased.

  8. Time-Varying Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Human Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Hogan, Neville

    2015-09-01

    In human locomotion, we continuously modulate joint mechanical impedance of the lower limb (hip, knee, and ankle) either voluntarily or reflexively to accommodate environmental changes and maintain stable interaction. Ankle mechanical impedance plays a pivotal role at the interface between the neuro-mechanical system and the physical world. This paper reports, for the first time, a characterization of human ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom simultaneously as it varies with time during walking. Ensemble-based linear time-varying system identification methods implemented with a wearable ankle robot, Anklebot, enabled reliable estimation of ankle mechanical impedance from the pre-swing phase through the entire swing phase to the early-stance phase. This included heel-strike and toe-off, key events in the transition from the swing to stance phase or vice versa. Time-varying ankle mechanical impedance was accurately approximated by a second order model consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both inversion-eversion and dorsiflexion-plantarflexion directions, as observed in our previous steady-state dynamic studies. We found that viscosity and stiffness of the ankle significantly decreased at the end of the stance phase before toe-off, remained relatively constant across the swing phase, and increased around heel-strike. Closer investigation around heel-strike revealed that viscosity and stiffness in both planes increased before heel-strike occurred. This finding is important evidence of "pretuning" by the central nervous system. In addition, viscosity and stiffness were greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane across all subgait phases, except the early stance phase. Comparison with previous studies and implications for clinical study of neurologically impaired patients are provided.

  9. Prophylactic Ankle Taping and Bracing: A Numbers-Needed-to-Treat and Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    PubMed

    Olmsted, Lauren C.; Vela, Luzita I.; Denegar, Craig R.; Hertel, Jay

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: Taping and bracing are thought to decrease the incidence of ankle sprains; however, few investigators have addressed the effect of preventive measures on the rate of ankle sprains. Our purpose was to examine the effectiveness of ankle taping and bracing in reducing ankle sprains by applying a numbers-needed-to-treat (NNT) analysis to previously published studies. DATA SOURCES: We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SPORT Discus, and PEDro for original research from 1966 to 2002 with key words ankle taping, ankle sprains, injury incidence, prevention, ankle bracing, ankle prophylaxis, andnumbers needed to treat. We eliminated articles that did not address the effects of ankle taping or bracing on ankle injury rates using an experimental design. DATA SYNTHESIS: The search produced 8 articles, of which 3 permitted calculation of NNT, which addresses the clinical usefulness of an intervention by providing estimates of the number of treatments needed to prevent 1 injury occurrence. In a study of collegiate intramural basketball players, the prevention of 1 ankle sprain required the taping of 26 athletes with a history of ankle sprain and 143 without a prior history. In a military academy intramural basketball program, prevention of 1 sprain required bracing of 18 athletes with a history of ankle sprain and 39 athletes with no history. A study of ankle bracing in competitive soccer players produced an NNT of 5 athletes with a history of previous sprain and 57 without a prior injury. A cost- benefit analysis of ankle taping versus bracing revealed taping to be approximately 3 times more expensive than bracing. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Greater benefit is achieved in applying prophylactic ankle taping or bracing to athletes with a history of ankle sprain, compared with those without previous sprains. The generalizability of these results to other physically active populations is unknown.

  10. Range of Motion of the Ankle According to Pushing Force, Gender and Knee Position

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Hee; Lee, Hyunkeun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference of range of motion (ROM) of ankle according to pushing force, gender and knee position. Methods One hundred and twenty-eight healthy adults (55 men, 73 women) between the ages of 20 and 51, were included in the study. One examiner measured the passive range of motion (PROM) of ankle by Dualer IQ Inclinometers and Commander Muscle Testing. ROM of ankle dorsiflexion (DF) and plantarflexion (PF) according to change of pushing force and knee position were measured at prone position. Results There was significant correlation between ROM and pushing force, the more pushing force leads the more ROM at ankle DF and ankle PF. Knee flexion of 90° position showed low PF angle and high ankle DF angle, as compared to the at neutral position of knee joint. ROM of ankle DF for female was greater than for male, with no significant difference. ROM of ankle PF for female was greater than male regardless of the pushing force. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the relationship between pushing force and ROM of ankle joint. There was significant correlation between ROM of ankle and pushing force. ROM of ankle PF for female estimated greater than male regardless of the pushing force and the number of measurement. The ROM of the ankle is measured differently according to the knee joint position. Pushing force, gender and knee joint position are required to be considered when measuring the ROM of ankle joint. PMID:27152277

  11. Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle in osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae-Soo; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) lesions are a common cause of shoulder complaints that can be treated successfully with both conservative and surgical methods. There are several operative techniques, including both open and arthroscopic surgery, for excising the distal end of the clavicle. Here, we present a new modified arthroscopic technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ and evaluate its clinical outcomes. Our hypothesis was that 4- to 7-mm resection of the distal clavicle in an en bloc fashion would have several advantages, including no bony remnants, maintenance of stability of the ACJ, and reduced prevalence of heterotopic ossification, in addition to elimination of the pathologic portion of the distal clavicle. Materials and Methods: 20 shoulders of 20 consecutive patients with painful and isolated osteoarthritis of the ACJ who were treated by arthroscopic en bloc resection of the distal clavicle were included in the study. There were 10 males and 10 females with an average age of 56 years (range 42–70 years). The mean duration of followup was 6 years and 2 months (range 4–8 years 10 months). The results were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating score. Results: The overall UCLA score was 13.7 preoperatively, which improved to 33.4 postoperatively. All subscores were improved significantly (P < 0.001). There were no specific complications at the latest followup. Conclusion: It is critical in this procedure to resect the distal clavicle evenly from superior to inferior in an en bloc fashion without any small bony remnants and to preserve the capsule and acromioclavicular ligament superoposteriorly. This arthroscopic procedure is a reliable and reproducible technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ lesions in active patients engaged in overhead throwing sports and heavy labor. PMID:27512219

  12. Topical herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Background Before extraction and synthetic chemistry were invented, musculoskeletal complaints were treated with preparations from medicinal plants. They were either administered orally or topically. In contrast to the oral medicinal plant products, topicals act in part as counterirritants or are toxic when given orally. Objectives To update the previous Cochrane review of herbal therapy for osteoarthritis from 2000 by evaluating the evidence on effectiveness for topical medicinal plant products. Search methods Databases for mainstream and complementary medicine were searched using terms to include all forms of arthritis combined with medicinal plant products. We searched electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL),MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to February 2013, unrestricted by language. We also searched the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of herbal interventions used topically, compared with inert (placebo) or active controls, in people with osteoarthritis were included. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted data. Main results Seven studies (seven different medicinal plant interventions; 785 participants) were included. Single studies (five studies, six interventions) and non-comparable studies (two studies, one intervention) precluded pooling of results. Moderate evidence from a single study of 174 people with hand osteoarthritis indicated that treatment with Arnica extract gel probably results in similar benefits as treatment with ibuprofen (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) with a similar number of adverse events. Mean pain in the ibuprofen group was 44.2 points on a 100 point scale; treatment with Arnica gel reduced the pain by 4 points after three weeks: mean difference (MD

  13. Quality measures for total ankle replacement, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates within 1 year of surgery: a data linkage study using the NJR data set

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Razi; Macgregor, Alexander J; Goldberg, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report on the rate of 30-day readmission and the rate of additional or revision surgery within 12 months following total ankle replacement (TAR). Design A data-linkage study of the UK National Joint Registry (NJR) data and Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) database. These two databases were linked in a deterministic fashion. HES episodes 12 months following the index procedure were isolated and analysed. Logistic regression was used to model predictors of reoperation and revision for primary ankle replacement. Participants All patients who underwent primary and revision ankle replacements according to the NJR between February 2008 and February 2013. Results The rate of 30-day readmission following primary and revision ankle replacement was 2.2% and 1.3%, respectively. In the 12 months following primary and revision ankle replacements, the revision rate (where implants needed to be removed) was 1.2% with increased odds in those orthopaedic units preforming <20 ankle replacements per year and patients with a preoperative fixed equinus deformity. The reoperation other than revision (where implants were not removed) in the 12 months following primary and revision TARs was 6.6% and 9.3%, respectively. Rheumatoid arthritis, cemented prosthesis and high ASA grade significantly increased the odds of reoperation. Conclusions TAR has a 30-day readmission rate of 2.2%, which is similar to that of knee replacement but lower than that of total hip replacement. 6.6% of patients undergoing primary TAR require a reoperation within 12 months of the index procedure. Early revision rates are significantly higher in low-volume centres. PMID:27217286

  14. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brendan; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Study Selection Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings. Data Syntheses Most studies (n=7) had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants. Conclusions It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control) and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely. PMID

  15. Effects of repeated ankle stretching on calf muscle-tendon and ankle biomechanical properties in stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fan; Ren, Yupeng; Roth, Elliot J.; Harvey, Richard; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate changes in active and passive biomechanical properties of the calf muscle-tendon unit induced by controlled ankle stretching in stroke survivors. Methods Ten stroke survivors with ankle spasticity/contracture and ten healthy control subjects received intervention of 60-min ankle stretching. Joint biomechanical properties including resistance torque, stiffness and index of hysteresis were evaluated pre- and post-intervention. Achilles tendon length was measured using ultrasonography. The force output of the triceps surae muscles was characterized via the torque-angle relationship, by stimulating the calf muscles at a controlled intensity across different ankle positions. Findings Compared to healthy controls, the ankle position corresponding to the peak torque of the stroke survivors was shifted towards plantar flexion (P<0.001). Stroke survivors showed significantly higher resistance torques and joint stiffness (P<0.05), and these higher resistances were reduced significantly after the stretching intervention, especially in dorsiflexion (P = 0.013). Stretching significantly improved the force output of the impaired calf muscles in stroke survivors under matched stimulations (P<0.05). Ankle range of motion was also increased by stretching (P<0.001). Interpretation At the joint level, repeated stretching loosened the ankle joint with increased passive joint range of motion and decreased joint stiffness. At the muscle-tendon level, repeated stretching improved calf muscle force output, which might be associated with decreased muscle fascicle stiffness, increased fascicle length and shortening of the Achilles tendon. The study provided evidence of improvement in muscle tendon properties through stretching intervention. PMID:21211873

  16. Relationship between ankle stiffness structure and muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Wang, Shuo; Hogan, Neville

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a characterization of the structure of ankle stiffness under multiple levels of muscle activation and the relationship between them. A multi-variable impedance estimation method using a wearable ankle robot enabled clear identification of ankle stiffness structure in the space consisting of the sagittal and frontal planes. With visual feedback showing current and target muscle activation levels, all subjects could successfully maintain multiple target levels (5%∼30% of the maximum voluntary contraction level). Stiffness increased with muscle activation, but the increase was more pronounced in the dorsiflexion-plantarflexion direction than in the inversion-eversion direction, which resulted in a characteristic "peanut" shape. The relation between measured muscle activation level and ankle stiffness was evaluated. All subjects showed a highly linear relation not only for the two principal axis directions of the ankle, i.e., dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion, but also for the average stiffness value of all directions. These major findings were consistent both for the tibialis anterior and triceps surae activation.

  17. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  18. Is Hardware Removal Recommended after Ankle Fracture Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Jin-Il; Park, Jae-Yong; Park, Jong-Tae; Eom, Joon-Sang

    2016-01-01

    The indications and clinical necessity for routine hardware removal after treating ankle or distal tibia fracture with open reduction and internal fixation are disputed even when hardware-related pain is insignificant. Thus, we determined the clinical effects of routine hardware removal irrespective of the degree of hardware-related pain, especially in the perspective of patients' daily activities. This study was conducted on 80 consecutive cases (78 patients) treated by surgery and hardware removal after bony union. There were 56 ankle and 24 distal tibia fractures. The hardware-related pain, ankle joint stiffness, discomfort on ambulation, and patient satisfaction were evaluated before and at least 6 months after hardware removal. Pain score before hardware removal was 3.4 (range 0 to 6) and decreased to 1.3 (range 0 to 6) after removal. 58 (72.5%) patients experienced improved ankle stiffness and 65 (81.3%) less discomfort while walking on uneven ground and 63 (80.8%) patients were satisfied with hardware removal. These results suggest that routine hardware removal after ankle or distal tibia fracture could ameliorate hardware-related pain and improves daily activities and patient satisfaction even when the hardware-related pain is minimal.

  19. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    PubMed

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off. PMID:23465319

  20. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    PubMed

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off.

  1. Systematic ankle stabilization and the effect on performance.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J R; Frederick, E C; Cooper, L B

    1986-12-01

    Stabilization of the ankle joint is used as a deterrent to injury, however, insufficient or excessive ankle control can cause negative effects. This study determined the effects of systematic changes in ankle and subtalar joint stabilization on performance through an obstacle course. Data were collected on six subjects as they completed two test procedures. Ankle range of motion in the sagittal and frontal planes was determined using a modified Inman apparatus. Completion time through an obstacle course, set up on a basketball court, was used as a measure of performance. High-top basketball shoes were constructed with pockets which allowed strips of plastic (stiffeners) to be positioned just anterior and posterior to the medial and lateral malleoli. Four shoe conditions were used including the shoe with no stiffeners. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) in eversion, flexion, and inversion were found between the shoe conditions. A general trend of decreased range of motion with increased restriction was observed. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) in performance were found between the shoe conditions, with a general trend of increased times with increased restriction. These results indicate that systematic changes in the range of motion of the ankle and subtalar joints can measurably affect performance. PMID:3784875

  2. Rehabilitation after anatomical ankle ligament repair or reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher J; Tourné, Yves; Zellers, Jennifer; Terrier, Romain; Toschi, Pascal; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2016-04-01

    The selection, implementation of and adherence to a post-operative regimen are all essential in order to achieve the best outcomes after ankle ligament surgery. The purpose of this paper is to present a best-evidence approach to this, with grounding in basic science and a consensus opinion from the members of the ESSKA-AFAS Ankle Instability Group. Basic science and clinical evidence surrounding tissue healing after surgical repair or reconstruction of the ligaments as well as around the re-establishment of sensorimotor control are reviewed. A consensus opinion based on this evidence as to the recommended rehabilitation protocol after ankle ligament surgery was then obtained from the members of the ESSKA-AFAS Ankle Instability Group. Rehabilitation recommendations are presented for the initial post-operative period, the early recovery phase and a goal-orientated late rehabilitation and return-to-sport phase. This paper presents practical, evidenced-based guidelines for rehabilitation and return to activity after lateral ankle ligament surgery.

  3. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    PubMed

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients.

  4. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Christiaan Ja; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim Tm; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2015-12-18

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available.

  5. Systematic ankle stabilization and the effect on performance.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J R; Frederick, E C; Cooper, L B

    1986-12-01

    Stabilization of the ankle joint is used as a deterrent to injury, however, insufficient or excessive ankle control can cause negative effects. This study determined the effects of systematic changes in ankle and subtalar joint stabilization on performance through an obstacle course. Data were collected on six subjects as they completed two test procedures. Ankle range of motion in the sagittal and frontal planes was determined using a modified Inman apparatus. Completion time through an obstacle course, set up on a basketball court, was used as a measure of performance. High-top basketball shoes were constructed with pockets which allowed strips of plastic (stiffeners) to be positioned just anterior and posterior to the medial and lateral malleoli. Four shoe conditions were used including the shoe with no stiffeners. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) in eversion, flexion, and inversion were found between the shoe conditions. A general trend of decreased range of motion with increased restriction was observed. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) in performance were found between the shoe conditions, with a general trend of increased times with increased restriction. These results indicate that systematic changes in the range of motion of the ankle and subtalar joints can measurably affect performance.

  6. Assessment of AK (Above Knee) Prosthesis with Different Ankle Assembly Using GRF Pattern in Stance Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Sung-Jae; Bae, Ha-Suk

    In this study, ground reaction force (GRF), absolute symmetry index (ASI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assemblies were investigated by biomechanical evaluation of above knee amputees. In the experiments, 37 normal male volunteers, two male and two female Above Knee (AK) amputees GRF data were tested with fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assembly. A gait analysis was carried out to derive the ratio of GRF to weight as the percentage of total stance phase for ten points. The results showed that fixed-axis ankle assembly was superior to other two ankle assemblies for forwarding and braking forces. Multi-axis ankle was relatively superior to other two ankle assemblies for gait balancing and movement of the mass center. Single-axis ankle was relatively superior to the other two ankle assemblies for CV and ASI of GRF.

  7. Comparison of foot pressure in stretching exercises according to the type of ankle ramp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Keun; Yoo, Won-Gyu; Shin, Seung-Je

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study compared and analyzed use of an existing ankle ramp and a newly developed ankle ramp for stretching exercises. [Subjects] Fourteen subjects were included; they were stroke patients more than 6 months after onset, with no orthopedic or biological problems in the legs, so independent gait was possible. [Methods] The subjects performed stretching exercises for 5 min with an existing ankle ramp and a newly developed ankle ramp; foot pressure was then measured. [Results] The averaged percentage and kilopascal data for weight bearing and foot pressure on the affected side with the newly developed ankle ramp for stretching exercises were significantly higher than those with the existing ankle ramp. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that stretching exercises using the newly developed ankle ramp more effectively increase foot pressure than the existing ankle ramp.

  8. 78 FR 68908 - Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB... Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie, Enterprise Records... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Ankle Conditions Disability...

  9. 78 FR 34708 - Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... Control No. 2900--NEW (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-2. OMB Control Number: 2900--NEW...

  10. Risk factors for lateral ankle sprain: a prospective study among military recruits.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Shlamkovitch, N; Finestone, A; Eldad, A; Laor, A; Danon, Y L; Lavie, O; Wosk, J; Simkin, A

    1991-08-01

    In a prospective study of risk factors for lateral ankle sprain among 390 male Israeli infantry recruits, a 18% incidence of lateral ankle sprains was found in basic training. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of lateral ankle sprains between recruits who trained in modified basketball shoes or standard lightweight infantry boots. By multivariate stepwise logistic regression a statistically significant relationship was found between body weight x height (a magnitude which is proportional to the mass moment of inertia of the body around a horizontal axis through the ankle), a previous history of ankle sprain, and the incidence of lateral ankle sprains. Recruits who were taller and heavier and thus had larger mass moments of inertia (P = 0.004), and those with a prior history of ankle sprain (P = 0.01) had higher lateral ankle sprain morbidity in basic training.

  11. Current nutraceuticals in the management of osteoarthritis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Nahid

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative joint disease that has a major impact on joint function and quality of life. Nutraceuticals and dietary supplements derived from herbs have long been used in traditional medicine and there is considerable evidence that nutraceuticals may play an important role in inflammation and joint destruction in OA. We review the biological effects of some medicinal fruits and herbs – pomegranate, green tea, cat’s claw, devil’s claw, ginger, Indian olibaum, turmeric and ananas – in an attempt to understand the pivotal molecular targets involved in inflammation and the joint destruction process and to summarize their toxicities and efficacy for OA management. So far there is insufficient reliable evidence on the effectiveness of ginger, turmeric and ananas. Pomegranate and green tea only have preclinical evidence of efficacy due to the lack of clinical data. In vivo and clinical studies are required to understand their targets and efficacy in OA. Limited in vitro and in vivo evidence is available for cat’s claw and Indian olibaum. More extensive studies are required before long-term controlled trials of whole cat’s claw and Indian olibaum extracts, or isolated active compounds, are carried out in patients with OA to determine their long-term efficacy and safety. Devil’s claw has not been rigorously tested to determine its antiarthritic potential in in vitro and in vivo models. There is strong clinical evidence of the effectiveness of devil’s claw in pain reduction. However, high-quality clinical trials are needed to determine its effectiveness. No serious side effects have been reported for any fruits and herbs. Overall, these studies identify and support the use of nutraceuticals to provide symptomatic relief to patients with OA and to be used as adjunct therapy for OA management. More high-quality trials are needed to provide definitive answers to questions related to their efficacy and safety for OA prevention

  12. Current nutraceuticals in the management of osteoarthritis: a review.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nahid; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2012-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative joint disease that has a major impact on joint function and quality of life. Nutraceuticals and dietary supplements derived from herbs have long been used in traditional medicine and there is considerable evidence that nutraceuticals may play an important role in inflammation and joint destruction in OA. We review the biological effects of some medicinal fruits and herbs - pomegranate, green tea, cat's claw, devil's claw, ginger, Indian olibaum, turmeric and ananas - in an attempt to understand the pivotal molecular targets involved in inflammation and the joint destruction process and to summarize their toxicities and efficacy for OA management. So far there is insufficient reliable evidence on the effectiveness of ginger, turmeric and ananas. Pomegranate and green tea only have preclinical evidence of efficacy due to the lack of clinical data. In vivo and clinical studies are required to understand their targets and efficacy in OA. Limited in vitro and in vivo evidence is available for cat's claw and Indian olibaum. More extensive studies are required before long-term controlled trials of whole cat's claw and Indian olibaum extracts, or isolated active compounds, are carried out in patients with OA to determine their long-term efficacy and safety. Devil's claw has not been rigorously tested to determine its antiarthritic potential in in vitro and in vivo models. There is strong clinical evidence of the effectiveness of devil's claw in pain reduction. However, high-quality clinical trials are needed to determine its effectiveness. No serious side effects have been reported for any fruits and herbs. Overall, these studies identify and support the use of nutraceuticals to provide symptomatic relief to patients with OA and to be used as adjunct therapy for OA management. More high-quality trials are needed to provide definitive answers to questions related to their efficacy and safety for OA prevention and

  13. Association of physical activity measured by accelerometer, knee joint abnormalities and cartilage T2-measurements obtained from 3T MRI: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, M.; Lin, W.; Nardo, L.; Joseph, G. B.; Dunlop, D. D.; Heilmeier, U.; Nevitt, M. C.; Alizai, H.; McCulloch, C. E.; Lynch, J. A.; Link, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the cross-sectional association between physical activity measured with an accelerometer, structural knee abnormalities and cartilage T2-values assessed with 3T MRI. Methods We included 274 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort without definite radiographic osteoarthritis (KL 0 and 1) and at most mild pain, stiffness and functional limitation in the study knee (WOMAC 0–1), which had not limited their activity due to knee pain. Physical activity was measured over seven days with an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer. Subjects were categorized by quartile of physical activity based on the average daily minutes of moderate/vigorous activity (mv-PA). MR images of the right knee (at 48-months visit) were assessed for structural abnormalities using a modified WORMS score and for T2-relaxation times derived from segmented cartilage of 4 femorotibial regions and the patella. WORMS-grades and T2-measurements were compared between activity quartiles using a linear regression model. Covariates included age, sex, BMI, knee injury, family history of knee replacement, knee symptoms, hip and ankle pain and daily wear time of the accelerometer. Results Higher mv-PA was associated with increased severity (p=0.0087) and number of lesions of the medial meniscus (p=0.0089) and severity of bone marrow edema lesions (p=0.0053). No association between cartilage lesions and mv-PA was found. T2-values of cartilage (loss, damage, abnormalities) tended to be greater in the higher quartiles of mv-PA, but the differences were non-significant. Conclusion In knees without radiographic osteoarthritis in subjects with no or mild knee pain, higher physical activity levels were associated with increases in meniscal and BMEP lesions. PMID:25777255

  14. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  15. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  16. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  17. Foot-Ankle Fractures and Injury Probability Curves from Post-mortem Human Surrogate Tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Chirvi, Sajal; Pintar, Frank A; Uppal, Harmeeth; Schlick, Michael; Banerjee, Anjishnu; Voo, Liming; Merkle, Andrew; Kleinberger, Michael

    2016-10-01

    This purpose of this study was to replicate foot-ankle injuries seen in the military and derive human injury probability curves using the human cadaver model. Lower legs were isolated below knee from seventeen unembalmed human cadavers and they were aligned in a 90-90 posture (plantar surface orthogonal to leg). The specimens were loaded along the tibia axis by applying short-time duration pulses, using a repeated testing protocol. Injuries were documented using pre- and post-test X-rays, computed tomography scans, and dissection. Peak force-based risk curves were derived using survival analysis and accounted for data censoring. Fractures were grouped into all foot-ankle (A), any calcaneus (B), and any tibia injuries (C), respectively. Calcaneus and/or distal tibia/pilon fractures occurred in fourteen tests. Axial forces were the greatest and least for groups C and B, respectively. Times attainments of forces for all groups were within ten milliseconds. The Weibull function was the optimal probability distribution for all groups. Age was significant (p < 0.05) for groups A and C. Survival analysis-based probability curves were derived for all groups. Data are given in the body of paper. Age-based, risk-specific, and continuous distribution probability curves/responses guide in the creation of an injury assessment capability for military blast environments.

  18. Chinese adaptation and validation of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Roy T H; Ngai, Shirley P C; Ho, Kevin K W

    2016-10-01

    Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) is a commonly used instrument to assess the symptoms and functional status in people with knee injuries, including knee osteoarthritis. While China ranked the top country in the absolute number of people aged 65 or above, yet there is no validated Chinese version of this outcome measurement. This study translated and validated the KOOS into Chinese version. Chinese KOOS was translated from the original English version following standard forward and backward translation procedures recommended by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. Survey was then conducted in clinical settings by a questionnaire comprised Chinese KOOS, WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, and Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36). One hundred Chinese reading patients with knee osteoarthritis were recruited from the orthopaedic out-patient department in hospitals. Internal consistency of the instrument was measured by Cronbach alpha. Construct validity was examined by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (ρ) tests by comparing its score with the validated Chinese version of WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index and SF-36, while the test-retest reliability was evaluated by administering the questionnaires twice. Cronbach alpha values of individual questions and its overall value were above 0.70. Fairly strong association was found between the Chinese KOOS and the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index (ρ = -0.37 to -0.86, p < 0.001). Diverse relationship was observed between Chinese KOOS and SF-36. Excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.89-0.92) was demonstrated. The Chinese translated version of KOOS is a reliable and valid instrument for patients with knee osteoarthritis. The findings of current study might promote multinational investigations in this patient group.

  19. Chinese adaptation and validation of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Roy T H; Ngai, Shirley P C; Ho, Kevin K W

    2016-10-01

    Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) is a commonly used instrument to assess the symptoms and functional status in people with knee injuries, including knee osteoarthritis. While China ranked the top country in the absolute number of people aged 65 or above, yet there is no validated Chinese version of this outcome measurement. This study translated and validated the KOOS into Chinese version. Chinese KOOS was translated from the original English version following standard forward and backward translation procedures recommended by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. Survey was then conducted in clinical settings by a questionnaire comprised Chinese KOOS, WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, and Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36). One hundred Chinese reading patients with knee osteoarthritis were recruited from the orthopaedic out-patient department in hospitals. Internal consistency of the instrument was measured by Cronbach alpha. Construct validity was examined by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (ρ) tests by comparing its score with the validated Chinese version of WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index and SF-36, while the test-retest reliability was evaluated by administering the questionnaires twice. Cronbach alpha values of individual questions and its overall value were above 0.70. Fairly strong association was found between the Chinese KOOS and the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index (ρ = -0.37 to -0.86, p < 0.001). Diverse relationship was observed between Chinese KOOS and SF-36. Excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.89-0.92) was demonstrated. The Chinese translated version of KOOS is a reliable and valid instrument for patients with knee osteoarthritis. The findings of current study might promote multinational investigations in this patient group. PMID:27449346

  20. Prosthetic ankle push-off work reduces metabolic rate but not collision work in non-amputee walking

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Joshua M.; Collins, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with unilateral below-knee amputation expend more energy than non-amputees during walking and exhibit reduced push-off work and increased hip work in the affected limb. Simple dynamic models of walking suggest a possible solution, predicting that increasing prosthetic ankle push-off should decrease leading limb collision, thereby reducing overall energy requirements. We conducted a rigorous experimental test of this idea wherein ankle-foot prosthesis push-off work was incrementally varied in isolation from one-half to two-times normal levels while subjects with simulated amputation walked on a treadmill at 1.25 m·s−1. Increased prosthesis push-off significantly reduced metabolic energy expenditure, with a 14% reduction at maximum prosthesis work. In contrast to model predictions, however, collision losses were unchanged, while hip work during swing initiation was decreased. This suggests that powered ankle push-off reduces walking effort primarily through other mechanisms, such as assisting leg swing, which would be better understood using more complete neuromuscular models. PMID:25467389

  1. A Biomechanical Comparison of Locking Versus Conventional Plate Fixation for Distal Fibula Fractures in Trimalleolar Ankle Injuries.

    PubMed

    Nguyentat, Annie; Camisa, William; Patel, Sandeep; Lagaay, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Previous biomechanical studies have advocated the use of locking plates for isolated distal fibula fractures in osteoporotic bone. Complex rotational ankle injuries involve an increased number of fractures, which can result in instability, potentially requiring the same fixed angle properties afforded by locking plates. However, the mechanical indication for locking plate technology has not been tested in this fracture model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of locking and conventional plate fixation for distal fibula fractures in trimalleolar ankle injuries. Fourteen (7 matched pairs) fresh-frozen cadaver leg specimens were used. The bone mineral density of each was obtained using dual x-ray absorptiometry scans. The fracture model simulated an OTA 44-B3.3 fracture. The syndesmosis was not disrupted. Each fracture was fixated in the same fashion, except for the distal fibula plate construct: locking (n = 7) and one-third tubular (n = 7). The specimens underwent axial and torsional cyclic loading, followed by torsional loading to failure. No statistically significant differences were found between the locking and conventional plate constructs during both fatigue and torque to failure testing (p > .05). Our specimen bone mineral density averages did not represent poor bone quality. The clinical implication of the present study is that distal fibular locking plates do not provide a mechanical advantage for trimalleolar ankle injuries in individuals with normal bone density and in the absence of fracture comminution.

  2. Prosthetic ankle push-off work reduces metabolic rate but not collision work in non-amputee walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Joshua M.; Collins, Steven H.

    2014-12-01

    Individuals with unilateral below-knee amputation expend more energy than non-amputees during walking and exhibit reduced push-off work and increased hip work in the affected limb. Simple dynamic models of walking suggest a possible solution, predicting that increasing prosthetic ankle push-off should decrease leading limb collision, thereby reducing overall energy requirements. We conducted a rigorous experimental test of this idea wherein ankle-foot prosthesis push-off work was incrementally varied in isolation from one-half to two-times normal levels while subjects with simulated amputation walked on a treadmill at 1.25 m.s-1. Increased prosthesis push-off significantly reduced metabolic energy expenditure, with a 14% reduction at maximum prosthesis work. In contrast to model predictions, however, collision losses were unchanged, while hip work during swing initiation was decreased. This suggests that powered ankle push-off reduces walking effort primarily through other mechanisms, such as assisting leg swing, which would be better understood using more complete neuromuscular models.

  3. When something is not quite right: an ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    da Encarnação, António Paulo Martins

    2014-10-01

    Ankle sprains are a common musculoskeletal injury in sport. Older people are increasingly participating in sports such as running. The specificities of musculoskeletal injuries in older people pose a different diagnostic challenge from that in young people participating in the same activities. A clinical case is presented of a 64-year-old patient diagnosed with a grade 1, plantar flexion/inversion ankle sprain that was later diagnosed as a quite different and rare injury. Fractures of the fibular malleolus, talar neck and dome are possible differential diagnoses for an ankle sprain, as are talar dome chondral defects. Response to treatment may help to guide the diagnostic procedure when pain persists after appropriate treatment.

  4. Evaluation and management of posterior ankle pain in dancers.

    PubMed

    Luk, Pamela; Thordarson, David; Charlton, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Posterior ankle pain is a common complaint in dancers. There are multiple structures in the posterior ankle that have the potential to be the source of pain. The objective of this article is to review several of the most common causes of posterior ankle pain: peroneal tendon subluxation, posterior impingement syndrome secondary to a painful os trigonum, posterior talus osteochondritis dissecans, flexor hallucis longus tendinopathy, and posterior tibial tendinopathy. For dancers, we offer typical clinical presentations of these disorders to increase awareness and provide guidance regarding when to seek professional medical attention. For medical personnel who are responsible for optimizing dancers' health and training, we include a discussion of pertinent physical exam findings, diagnostic imaging options, non-operative and operative management, as well as surgical suggestions and postoperative rehabilitation guidelines.

  5. Dedicated extremity MR imaging of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Hottya, G A; Péterfy, C G; Uffmann, M; Häckl, F O; LeHir, P; Rédei, J; Gindele, A U; Dion, E; Genant, H K

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide illustrative examples of diseases of the foot and ankle when imaged with a low-field MR imaging system. A retrospective review of 268 foot and ankle examinations, performed in our institution within the past 3 years with a 0.2-T (Artoscan Esaote, Genoa, Italy) dedicated extremity MR system was done. Additionally, illustrative comparison with conventional radiography and high-field MR imaging is presented in patients in whom these examinations were also performed. Although motion artifact limited the value of a few studies, in the majority of examinations low-field MR imaging provided diagnostic image quality for the full spectrum of disorders affecting the foot and ankle and seemed to be a feasible alternative to high-field MR imaging in establishing an accurate diagnosis.

  6. Surgical treatment of ankle and foot fractures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kettunen, J; Kröger, H

    2005-03-01

    Ankle fractures are the most common lower extremity fractures. In younger age groups these fractures occur more often in men than in women, but after menopause there is a female predominance. Foot fractures show a similar trend. The primary goal in the treatment of ankle and foot fractures is to obtain exact reduction and stable fixation to facilitate early mobilization and good functional recovery. However, the need for internal fixation to secure fracture reduction must be weighed against the risk of operating on osteoporotic bone which lacks the strength to hold screws and plates. In the elderly, the preoperative evaluation of the peripheral blood supply is essential to avoid wound healing complications. We review here the surgical treatment of ankle and foot fractures with special reference to elderly patients.

  7. Peroneal muscle weakness in female basketballers following chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Rottigni, S A; Hopper, D

    1991-01-01

    Female A-grade basketballers were examined for invertor and evertor muscle strength. Two test groups participated. The injured group were players who had persisting disability following ankle sprains. The control group were players who had never sustained an ankle sprain. Test apparatus was the Orthotron isokinetic dynamometer at contraction speed of 180° per second. Trends towards higher invertor and evertor strength in uninjured group when compared with the injured group found in the present study have been supported by one other report. Invertors were found to be significantly stronger than evertors in both injured and uninjured groups, with the exception of the dominant leg of the uninjured group. A significant weakness in non-dominant evertors of the uninjured group was detected. Dominance did not significantly alter strength differences in the invertor or evertor muscle groups within the uninjured population. The clinical importance of strengthening the peroneal muscles in ankle sprain rehabilitation is discussed, and further research considerations provided.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  14. Common fractures and injuries of the ankle and foot: functional anatomy, imaging, classification and management.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wasim; Oragui, Emeka; Akagha, Edwin

    2010-07-01

    The ankle and foot are functionally important and complex joints. Bony fractures and ligamentous injuries are common. In this review paper we will discuss the functional anatomy, imaging, classification and the management of common ankle and foot injuries including ankle fractures, Achilles tendon ruptures, Lisfranc joint injuries, calcaneo fractures and fractures of the metatarsals and phalanges.

  15. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  2. Vitamin E slows down the progression of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, XI; DONG, ZHONGLI; ZHANG, FUHOU; DONG, JUNJIE; ZHANG, YUAN

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative joint disorder with the characteristics of articular cartilage destruction, subchondral bone alterations and synovitis. Clinical signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, restricted motion and crepitus. It is the major cause of joint dysfunction in developed nations and has enormous social and economic consequences. Current treatments focus on symptomatic relief, however, they lack efficacy in controlling the progression of this disease, which is a leading cause of disability. Vitamin E is safe to use and may delay the progression of osteoarthritis by acting on several aspects of the disease. In this review, how vitamin E may promote the maintenance of skeletal muscle and the regulation of nucleic acid metabolism to delay osteoarthritis progression is explored. In addition, how vitamin E may maintain the function of sex organs and the stability of mast cells, thus conferring a greater resistance to the underlying disease process is also discussed. Finally, the protective effect of vitamin E on the subchondral vascular system, which decreases the reactive remodeling in osteoarthritis, is reviewed. PMID:27347011

  3. What influences seniors’ choice of medications for osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Kelly Nicol; Frail, Dawn; Twohig, Peter L.; Putnam, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore with seniors what influences their choice of medication for osteoarthritis. DESIGN Qualitative study using semistructured in-depth interviews. SETTING Interviews were conducted in patients’ homes in two cities in Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS Seniors with a physician-confirmed diagnosis of osteoarthritis. METHOD Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A grounded-theory approach was used. Key words and phrases were identified independently by all members of the research team who then collectively grouped the data into conceptual categories. MAIN FINDINGS Four themes emerged from discussions about medication choices: the role of family physicians in influencing use of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, the effect of fear of making medication choices, the reasons for discontinuing cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and views on other information sources. Distribution of free samples, family physicians’ recommendations, and fear of side effects influenced seniors’ choices of osteoarthritis medications. They claimed not to be influenced by direct-to-consumer advertising or the fact that cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors are more expensive than other classes of drugs for osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION Because seniors’ choice of medications for osteoarthritis is often influenced by physicians’ recommendations and distribution of free samples, further research into how distribution of free samples affects medication choices in family practice is needed. PMID:16926961

  4. Effect of an Ankle Compression Garment on Fatigue and Performance.

    PubMed

    Šambaher, Nemanja; Aboodarda, Saied J; Silvey, Dustin B; Button, Duane C; Behm, David G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an ankle compression garment (CG) on muscle performance and physiological variables associated with recovery from fatigue. Fifteen participants took part in a randomized crossover study design with 2 experimental conditions (ankle CG and control). The dependent variables skin temperature, evoked muscle contractile properties, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, electromyography (EMG), drop jump performance (20, 35, and 50 cm box heights), continuous drop jump (30 cm), time to fatigue (TTF), and blood lactate concentration were measured pre- and post-warm-up and postfatigue. Compared with control condition, ankle CG condition had significantly reduced half-relaxation times (p = 0.043) and higher skin temperatures at post-warm-up and post-fatigue protocol (p < 0.001, Δ3.2 and Δ4%, respectively). Participants also exhibited significantly lower ground reaction forces (GRFs) for 50-cm drop jumps (p = 0.044, Δ9.9%) with ankle CG at post-warm-up. There were no significant differences between conditions for muscle contractile properties, MVC force or EMG, jump height, take-off velocity, contact time, and jumping TTF. Independent of group, there was a threefold increase in blood lactate (p < 0.01) from pre-warm-up to post-fatigue and a significant decrease in MVC force (p = 0.048, Δ8.1%) from post-warm-up to postfatigue. Results suggest that ankle CG increased and maintained skin temperature during recovery, decreased twitch half-relaxation times, and reduced GRF from a 50-cm drop height. However, ankle CG did not improve other performance measures, aid in recovery, or affect blood lactate clearance. PMID:25992662

  5. Comparison of two main treatment modalities for acute ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Serkan; Durusu, Murat; Aliyev, Bahtiyar; Akpancar, Serkan; Ersen, Omer; Yasar, S.Mehmet; Ardic, Sukru

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Acute ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in emergency departments. Immobilization is widely accepted as the basic treatment modality for acute ankle sprains; however, immobilization method remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to compare two treatment modalities: splint and elastic bandage for the management of acute ankle sprains. Methods: This prospective study was conducted in the emergency department. Fifty-one consecutive patients who were admitted to the emergency department owing to the complaint of ankle sprain and who were treated with an elastic bandage or a splint were included in the study. After bone injury was ruled out, treatment choice was left to the on-shift physicians’ discretion. The extent of edema was evaluated before and after the treatment by using a small, graduated container filled with warm water. Volume differences were calculated by immersing both lower extremities in a container filled to a constant level. Pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale. Results: There were 25 patients in the elastic bandage group and 26 patients in the splint group. VAS scores of these groups before and after the treatment were similar. Although edema size before and after the treatment were similar between the groups, edema size reduction was significantly more in the elastic bandage group [p=0,025]. Conclusions: This study showed that treatment of acute ankle sprains with an elastic bandage was more effective than splint in reducing edema. Therefore, an elastic bandage could be preferred over a splint for the treatment of acute ankle sprains. PMID:26870123

  6. Intraoperative Radiation Exposure During Revision Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Iceman, Kelli; Elliott, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative C-arm image intensification is required for primary total ankle replacement implantation. Significant radiation exposure has been linked to these procedures; however, the radiation exposure during revision total ankle replacement remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the radiation exposure encountered during revision total ankle replacement. The data from 41 patients were retrospectively analyzed from a prospective database: 19 Agility(™) to Agility(™); 4 Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™); 9 Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II; 5 Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT; 2 Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT; and 2 INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II revision total ankle replacements were performed. Two broad categories were identified: partial revision (Agility(™) to Agility(™), Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™), INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II) and complete conversion (Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT, Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT). The mean radiation exposure per case was significant at 3.49 ± 2.21 mGy. Complete conversions, specifically Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, exhibited the greatest radiation exposure and C-arm time. Revision implant selection and revision type (complete or partial) directly contributed to radiation exposure. Accordingly, revision systems requiring less radiation exposure are preferable. Surgeons should strive to minimize intraoperative complications and limit additional procedures to those necessary, because both lead to additional radiation exposure.

  7. Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Ewa M; Arden, Nigel K

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has been thought of as a disease of cartilage that can be effectively treated surgically at severe stages with joint arthroplasty. Today, OA is considered a whole-organ disease that is amenable to prevention and treatment at early stages. OA develops slowly over 10-15 years, interfering with activities of daily living and the ability to work. Many patients tolerate pain, and many health-care providers accept pain and disability as inevitable corollaries of OA and ageing. Too often, health-care providers passively await final 'joint death', necessitating knee and hip replacements. Instead, OA should be viewed as a chronic condition, where prevention and early comprehensive-care models are the accepted norm, as is the case with other chronic diseases. Joint injury, obesity and impaired muscle function are modifiable risk factors amenable to primary and secondary prevention strategies. The strategies that are most appropriate for each patient should be identified, by selecting interventions to correct--or at least attenuate--OA risk factors. We must also choose the interventions that are most likely to be acceptable to patients, to maximize adherence to--and persistence with--the regimes. Now is the time to begin the era of personalized prevention for knee OA. PMID:26439406

  8. Fish Oil and Osteoarthritis: Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Boe, Chelsea; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2015-07-01

    According to the 2005 US census, osteoarthritis (OA) was the leading cause of disability in the United States, affecting more than 50 million people. Current treatments are targeted at reducing symptoms of the inflammatory reaction that occurs after destruction of essential joint cartilage. However, these treatments do not prevent significant pain and activity restriction. We reviewed the literature to address claims that fish oil supplementation can prevent or decrease severity of OA. Our extensive search of databases covered all relevant terms related to omega-3-containing supplements and their effects on OA. We hypothesized there would be insufficient clinical studies to justify recommending supplementation to patients.Laboratory studies have shown that eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid reduce proinflammatory mediators and increase joint lubrication in vitro. In addition, canine trials have shown clinically significant reductions in various symptom parameters. Results of human clinical trials have not been consistently significant. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to substantiate or refute the potential benefit of fish oils in OA treatment. Long-term studies are needed to assess the possibility of prevention. In addition, standardization of the fish oil industry is needed for consistency of therapy. PMID:26161757

  9. Conservative biomechanical strategies for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Neil D; Bowling, Frank L

    2011-02-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent forms of this disease, with the medial compartment most commonly affected. The direction of external forces and limb orientation during walking results in an adduction moment that acts around the knee, and this parameter is regarded as a surrogate measure of medial knee compression. The knee adduction moment is intimately linked with the development and progression of knee OA and is, therefore, a target for conservative biomechanical intervention strategies, which are the focus of this Review. We examine the evidence for walking barefoot and the use of lateral wedge insoles and thin-soled, flexible shoes to reduce the knee adduction moment in patients with OA. We review strategies that directly affect the gait, such as walking with the foot externally rotated ('toe-out gait'), using a cane, lateral trunk sway and gait retraining. Valgus knee braces and muscle strengthening are also discussed for their effect upon reducing the knee adduction moment. PMID:21289615

  10. Joint and bone assessment in hand osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ramonda, Roberta; Frallonardo, Paola; Musacchio, Estella; Vio, Stefania; Punzi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease frequently affecting middle-aged women. Prevalence estimates for OA vary widely depending on the age and sex of the population studied, the assessment tools used, and the specific joint sites analyzed OA is characterized by the degradation of articular cartilage, subchondral bone changes and osteophyte formation at the joint margins leading to joint failure. The pathogenesis of the disease and its evolution are multifactorial involving biomechanical, metabolic, hormonal, and genetic factors. Moreover, the role of inflammation has recently been advanced as pivotal in OA onset and progression. In particular, an uncommon variant of hand OA, erosive hand OA, is characterized by inflammatory and degenerative interphalangeal proximal and distal joints. The diagnosis of different types of hand OA is centered on clinical and laboratory investigations which can distinguish the peculiar aspects of these forms. Joint and bone assessments in hand OA are widely studied but there is no agreement with regard to established parameters to make a definitive diagnosis. This report focuses on the laboratory and clinimetric assessments that can be used to distinguish hand OA subtypes and addresses the debatable association with low bone mineral density in osteoporosis.

  11. MR features of osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Madrid, F; Karvonen, R L; Teitge, R A; Miller, P R; Negendank, W G

    1994-01-01

    A group of patients with idiopathic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee was surveyed using weight-bearing radiographs and MR imaging to compare the relative value of these methods in disease evaluation. Fifty-two patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of OA of the knee of relatively short duration (87%: < or = 4 yr) were compared to a reference group of 40 age- and sex-comparable subjects with no knee symptoms. All patients had a complete history, physical examination, standard anterior-posterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, T1-weighted, and FLASH MR images in both knees. The prevalence of MRI abnormalities was significantly greater in patients with OA of the knee in all radiographic grades (Kellgren and Lawrence) compared to the reference subjects. Significant differences were encountered for synovial thickening (OA, 73%; reference, 0%), synovial fluid (60%; 7%), meniscal degeneration (52%; 7%), osteophytes (67%; 12%), and subchondral bone involvement (65%; 7%), even in the patients at the mild end of the osteoarthritic spectrum, indicating the exquisite sensitivity of MRI compared with weight-bearing radiographs. PMID:7934656

  12. TMJ osteoarthritis: a new approach to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rando, Carolyn; Waldron, Tony

    2012-05-01

    Disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), including TMJ osteoarthritis (TMJ OA), are the topic of intensive clinical research; however, this is not the case in the archaeological literature, with the majority of work on the subject ceasing with the early 1990s. The methods employed in the diagnosis of TMJ OA within the archaeological work appear nonrepresentative of the disease and may have led to erroneous assumptions about the pattern and prevalence of OA. This current work presents a new method for evaluating OA specifically for the TMJ, considering both the biomechanics of the joint and the mechanisms of the disease. Totally, 496 specimens (including a group of modern documented specimens) were analyzed for the presence of TMJ OA using the following criteria: eburnation, osteophytes (marginal and new bone on joint surface), porosity, and alteration to joint contour. The results suggest that eburnation occurs rarely in the TMJ, so should not be used as an exclusive criterion. Rather a combination of at least two of the other criteria should be used, with osteophytes and porosity occurring the most frequently on both the mandibular condyle and articular eminence. Additionally, the prevalence of TMJ OA in the modern assemblage was similar to that observed in current clinical research, suggesting that the method employed here was able to produce a reasonable approximation of what is found in contemporary living populations. PMID:22371124

  13. Exercise and osteoarthritis: cause and effects.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V; Creaby, Mark W; Hodges, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic joint condition predominantly affecting the knee, hip, and hand joints. Exercise plays a role in the development and treatment of OA but most of the literature in this area relates to knee OA. While studies indicate that exercise and physical activity have a generally positive effect on healthy cartilage metrics, depending upon the type of the activity and its intensity, the risk of OA development does appear to be moderately increased with sporting participation. In particular, joint injury associated with sports participation may be largely responsible for this increased risk of OA with sport. Various repetitive occupational tasks are also linked to greater likelihood of OA development. There are a number of physical impairments associated with OA including pain, muscle weakness and altered muscle function, reduced proprioception and postural control, joint instability, restricted range of motion, and lower aerobic fitness. These can result directly from the OA pathological process and/or indirectly as a result of factors such as pain, effusion, and reduced activity levels. These impairments and their underlying physiology are often targeted by exercise interventions and evidence generally shows that many of these can be modified by specific exercise. There is currently little clinical trial evidence to show that exercise can alter mechanical load and structural disease progression in those with established OA, although a number of impairments, that are amenable to change with exercise, appears to be associated with increased mechanical load and/or disease progression in longitudinal studies.

  14. Exercise in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Clyman, B

    2001-12-01

    Few medical professionals would dispute the obvious health benefits afforded by regular exercise if pursued judiciously and in moderation. Cardiovascular disease, hypertension, osteoporosis, diabetes, depression, and fibromyalgia are a few of the many disorders in which exercise plays a key role in management. Less well-appreciated until recently is the beneficial effect exercise may have in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Previously, rest and inactivity seemed to be the prevailing treatment strategy until it was recognized that this approach was ineffective and contributed further to the patient's disability and loss of function. New trial data support the value of physical exercise whether it involves aerobic or resistance-type training. The studies are not without statistical and methodologic imperfections. Still, the evidence favoring an exercise intervention as part of the OA treatment plan is impressive. It remains for the clinician to select an appropriate exercise routine that meets the strength, balance, flexibility, and aerobic needs of the patient. The clinician then monitors and evaluates the patient's response to this activity with the same exactness used in following pharmacologic therapy.

  15. Design and functional evaluation of a quasi-passive compliant stance control knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Shamaei, Kamran; Napolitano, Paul C; Dollar, Aaron M

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present the mechanical design, control algorithm, and functional evaluation of a quasi-passive compliant stance control knee-ankle-foot orthosis. The orthosis implements a spring in parallel with the knee joint during the stance phase of the gait and allows free rotation during the swing phase. The design is inspired by the moment-angle analysis of the knee joint revealing that the knee function approximates that of a linear torsional spring in the stance phase of the gait. Our orthosis aims to restore the natural function of a knee that is impaired by injury, stroke, post-polio, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, patellofemoral pain syndrome, osteoarthritis, and others. Compared with state-of-the-art stance control orthoses, which rigidly lock the knee during the stance phase, the described orthosis intends to provide the natural shock absorption function of the knee in order to reduce compensatory movements both in the affected and unaffected limbs. Preliminary testing on three unimpaired subjects showed that compliant support of the knee provided by the orthosis explained here results in higher gait speed as well as more natural kinematic profiles for the lower extremities when compared with rigid support of the knee provided by an advanced commercial stance control orthosis.

  16. Clinical Assessment of Low-dose Osteoinductive Protein as a Stand-alone Regimen in Self-reported Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, Katherine; Walker, Matthew; Scaffidi, James

    2015-01-01

    Context Osteoarthritis, sometimes called degenerative joint disease, is the most common form of arthritis. It affects more than 20 million people in the United States, who mostly are older than age 45 y. No specific treatment exists to halt the progressive cartilage degeneration of osteoarthritis or to repair the damaged cartilage. Alternatives to pharmaceuticals include natural therapies and nutritional supplements. Objective The present study examined the clinical response to daily supplementation with bioactive protein complex containing a collagen type 2 network, with associated growth factors, and osteoinductive proteins, known as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Design The research team designed an open-label preliminary study. Setting Joint evaluations were self-administered by participants at their residences. Participants Participants were 44 individuals with self-reported osteoarthritis in the hip, knee, or ankle (ie, in weight-bearing joints). Intervention Participants self-administered orally a low-dose form of the ingredient (ie, 150 mg of Cyplexinol® Standard, once daily for 4 wk). Outcome Measures Four parameters—pain intensity, frequency of pain, activity level, and strength—were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS), both at baseline and at the end of the 4-wk period. Results Pain intensity decreased 45% on a 10-cm VAS from 2.85 cm (P = .0001; 95% CI, 2.54, 3.16) at baseline to 1.41 cm (P = .0001; 95% CI, 1.18, 1.64) at wk 4. Pain frequency decreased 55% from 3.16 cm (P = .0001; 95% CI, 2.88, 3.44) at baseline to 1.22 cm (P = .0001; 95% CI, 0.85, 1.59) at wk 4. Activity level increased from 1.58 cm (P = .0001; 95% CI, 1.34, 1.82) at baseline to 2.91 cm (P = .0001; 95% CI, 2.71, 3.11) at wk 4. Strength increased 80% from 1.24 cm (P = .0001; 95% CI, 0.91, 1.57) at baseline to 2.10 cm (P = .0001; 95% CI, 1.73, 2.47) at wk 4. Conclusions The 44 participants reported subjective improvements in pain frequency and intensity as well as in

  17. Effects of tai chi program on neuromuscular function for patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability as well as a burden on healthcare resources. Tai chi has been proposed as an alternative and complementary treatment for the management of knee osteoarthritis, but there appears to be no consensus on its usefulness. This study aims to develop an innovative tai chi rehabilitation program (ITCRP) for patients with knee OA, and to investigate the effect of ITCRP intervention on a range of outcomes including pain, function, balance, neuromuscular response, and biomechanics in knee OA. Methods/Design We will conduct a prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled trial of 140 individuals with symptomatic knee OA. Patients will be randomly assigned into either an ITCRP group or a control group. The ITCRP group will participate in tai chi two or three times a week for 6 months. The control group will receive health education. After the 6-month intervention period, there will be a 6-month follow-up period with no active intervention in either group. The primary and secondary outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Primary outcome measures will be a visual analog scale for pain, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index,and the Lequesne Knee Score. The secondary outcome measures will include the Berg balance scale, knee and ankle proprioception, neuromuscular response, and 3D functional biomechanics. Furthermore, adverse events will be recorded and analyzed. If any participants withdraw from the trial, intention-to-treat analysiswill be performed. Discussion Important features of this trial include the randomization procedures, large sample size, and a standardized protocol for ITCRP for knee OA. This study aims to determine the feasibility of ITCRP for knee OA and provide data on the effects of ITCRP. Hence, our results will be useful for patients with knee OA as well as for medical staff and healthcare decision makers. Trial registration Chinese

  18. Ankle sprain and postural sway in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Wykman, A; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    The present study compares postural ankle stability between previously injured basketball players, uninjured players and a control/group. Postural sway was recorded and analysed by stabilometry using a specially designed computer-assisted forceplate. Recordings were obtained for 60 s on each foot. The stabilometric results in the players with no previous injuries did not differ from those in the controls. Players with a previously injured ankle differed significantly from the control group. These players had a larger mean postural sway and used a larger sway area.

  19. The axial injury tolerance of the human foot/ankle complex and the effect of Achilles tension.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Crandall, Jeff R; Tourret, Lisa J; MacMahon, Conor B; Bass, Cameron R; Patrie, James T; Khaewpong, Nopporn; Eppinger, Rolf H

    2002-12-01

    Axial loading of the foot/ankle complex is an important injury mechanism in vehicular trauma that is responsible for severe injuries such as calcaneal and tibial pilon fractures. Axial loading may be applied to the leg externally, by the toepan and/or pedals, as well as internally, by active muscle tension applied through the Achilles tendon during pre-impact bracing. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of Achilles tension on fracture mode and to empirically model the axial loading tolerance of the foot/ankle complex. Blunt axial impact tests were performed on forty-three (43) isolated lower extremities with and without experimentally simulated Achilles tension. The primary fracture mode was calcaneal fracture in both groups. However, fracture initiated at the distal tibia more frequently with the addition of Achilles tension (p < 0.05). Acoustic sensors mounted to the bone demonstrated that fracture initiated at the time of peak local axial force. A survival analysis was performed on the injury data set using a Weibull regression model with specimen age, gender, body mass, and peak Achilles tension as predictor variables (R2 = 0.90). A closed-form survivor function was developed to predict the risk of fracture to the foot/ankle complex in terms of axial tibial force. The axial tibial force associated with a 50% risk of injury ranged from 3.7 kN for a 65 year-old 5th percentile female to 8.3 kN for a 45 year-old 50th percentile male, assuming no Achilles tension. The survivor function presented here may be used to estimate the risk of foot/ankle fracture that a blunt axial impact would pose to a human based on the peak tibial axial force measured by an anthropomorphic test device. PMID:12596644

  20. Oral herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicinal plant products are used orally for treating osteoarthritis. Although their mechanisms of action have not yet been elucidated in full detail, interactions with common inflammatory mediators provide a rationale for using them to treat osteoarthritic complaints. Objectives To update a previous Cochrane review to assess the benefits and harms of oral medicinal plant products in treating osteoarthritis. Search methods We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to 29 August 2013, unrestricted by language, and the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of orally consumed herbal interventions compared with placebo or active controls in people with osteoarthritis were included. Herbal interventions included any plant preparation but excluded homeopathy or aromatherapy products, or any preparation of synthetic origin. Data collection and analysis Two authors used standard methods for trial selection and data extraction, and assessed the quality of the body of evidence using the GRADE approach for major outcomes (pain, function, radiographic joint changes, quality of life, withdrawals due to adverse events, total adverse events, and serious adverse events). Main results Forty-nine randomised controlled studies (33 interventions, 5980 participants) were included. Seventeen studies of confirmatory design (sample and effect sizes pre-specified) were mostly at moderate risk of bias. The remaining 32 studies of exploratory design were at higher risk of bias. Due to differing interventions, meta-analyses were restricted to Boswellia serrata (monoherbal) and avocado-soyabean unsaponifiables (ASU) (two herb combination) products. Five studies of three different extracts from Boswellia serrata were included. High-quality evidence from two studies (85 participants) indicated that 90 days treatment with 100

  1. The role of external nonrigid ankle bracing in limiting ankle inversion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L; Sanderson, D J; Hennig, E M

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of the nonrigid subtalar stabilizer (STS) ankle brace under conditions similar to an unexpected fall that could lead to a lateral ligament injury. The calcaneal inversion angles, times, and ground reaction forces were measured when the subject's right foot, bearing body weight, was suddenly inverted to a side slope of 22 degrees. Thirty subjects, 15 women and 15 men, participated in the study. The overall inversion drop was divided into two phases, free fall and loading. Based on the data of this study it is suggested that the major function of a brace is to restrict the amount of foot inversion during the fall before actual landing occurs rather than functioning as a force bypass for the lateral ligaments during loading after foot contact. The results showed that the brace significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the maximum calcaneal inversion angle from 27.4 +/- 6.1 to 18.3 +/- 6.0 degrees for the overall drop, significantly lengthened the inversion time from 0.14 +/- 0.04 to 0.18 +/- 0.04 s for the overall drop, and significantly reduced the calcaneal peak inversion velocity from 324.6 +/- 111.9 to 165.2 +/- 66.5 degrees/s during loading, and from 278.7 +/- 120.0 to 183.0 +/- 108.7 degrees/s for the overall drop. Following exercise, which incorporated lateral movements and sprinting, the STS ankle brace continued to provide significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the calcaneal inversion angle and velocity, although some of its effectiveness was reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7614076

  2. Personalized medicine for osteoarthritis: where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a much talked about subject that is a timely and important development to healthcare in general and also specifically for patients affected by osteoarthritis. This review uses biomarker examples pertinent to osteoarthritis to highlight the current status of the field, while also highlighting probable future developments. It is not meant to be an exhaustive account. The BIPED(s) [Burden of disease, Investigative, Prognosis, Efficacy, Diagnosis (safety)] classification system is used to organize the discussion of examples. Biomarkers pertaining to burden, investigation, prognosis, efficacy, diagnosis and safety are highlighted. The examples are followed by a discussion of issues related to interpretation and application of biomarker results and approaches to solve the challenges interpretation faces, including graphical, mathematical and synthetic representations. Through this review, it is hoped that a better appreciation can be gained of the potential and pitfalls of personal medicine in the care of patients with osteoarthritis. PMID:23641258

  3. Personalized medicine for osteoarthritis: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Sawitzke, Allen Dale

    2013-04-01

    Personalized medicine is a much talked about subject that is a timely and important development to healthcare in general and also specifically for patients affected by osteoarthritis. This review uses biomarker examples pertinent to osteoarthritis to highlight the current status of the field, while also highlighting probable future developments. It is not meant to be an exhaustive account. The BIPED(s) [Burden of disease, Investigative, Prognosis, Efficacy, Diagnosis (safety)] classification system is used to organize the discussion of examples. Biomarkers pertaining to burden, investigation, prognosis, efficacy, diagnosis and safety are highlighted. The examples are followed by a discussion of issues related to interpretation and application of biomarker results and approaches to solve the challenges interpretation faces, including graphical, mathematical and synthetic representations. Through this review, it is hoped that a better appreciation can be gained of the potential and pitfalls of personal medicine in the care of patients with osteoarthritis.

  4. Long-distance running, bone density, and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, N.E.; Bloch, D.A.; Jones, H.H.; Marshall, W.H. Jr.; Wood, P.D.; Fries, J.F.

    1986-03-07

    Forty-one long-distance runners aged 50 to 72 years were compared with 41 matched community controls to examine associations of repetitive, long-term physical impact (running) with osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Roentgenograms of hands, lateral lumbar spine, and knees were assessed without knowledge of running status. A computed tomographic scan of the first lumbar vertebra was performed to quantitate bone mineral content. Runners, both male and female, have approximately 40% more bone mineral than matched controls. Female runners, but not male runners, appear to have somewhat more sclerosis and spur formation in spine and weight-bearing knee x-ray films, but not in hand x-ray films. There were no differences between groups in joint space narrowing, crepitation, joint stability, or symptomatic osteoarthritis. Running is associated with increased bone mineral but not, in this cross-sectional study, with clinical osteoarthritis.

  5. Assessment of quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Marcio Massao; Araújo, Ivan Luis Andrade; Castro, Martha Cavalcante; Matos, Marcos Almeida

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To assess the quality of life of knee osteoarthritis patients using the SF-36 questionnaire METHODS : Cross-sec-tional study with 93 knee osteoarthritis patients. The sample was categorized according to Ahlbӓck score. All individuals were interviewed with the SF-36 questionnaire RESULTS : The main finding of the study is related to the association of edu-cation level with the functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. Patients with higher education level had better functional capacity when they were compared to patients with basic level of education CONCLUSION : Individuals with osteoarthritis have a low perception of their quality of life in functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. There is a strong association between low level of education and low perception of quality of life. Level of Evidence IV, Clinical Case Series. PMID:27057143

  6. International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB): past, present and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Nester, Christopher J; Leardini, Alberto; Cavanagh, Peter R; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Burns, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB) is an international collaborative activity which will have an important impact on the foot and ankle biomechanics community. It was launched on July 2nd 2007 at the foot and ankle session of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) meeting in Taipei, Taiwan. i-FAB is driven by the desire to improve our understanding of foot and ankle biomechanics as it applies to health, disease, and the design, development and evaluation of foot and ankle surgery, and interventions such as footwear, insoles and surfaces. PMID:19531239

  7. Lateral ankle instability: MR imaging of associated injuries and surgical treatment procedures.

    PubMed

    Alparslan, Leyla; Chiodo, Christopher P

    2008-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability has been defined as the development of recurrent ankle sprains and persistent symptoms after initial lateral ankle sprain. The diagnosis of ankle instability is usually established on the patient's history, physical examination, and radiographic assessment. Patients have signs of both functional and mechanical instability, and the repetitive, chronic nature of the injury may lead to intra-articular and periarticular pathologies. This article discusses the incidence, etiology, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of these pathologies, reviews the surgical treatment procedures for lateral ankle instability, and presents the postoperative MR imaging findings.

  8. Obesity and osteoarthritis: disease genesis and nonpharmacologic weight management

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis The mechanisms by which obesity affects osteoarthritis are of great concern to osteoarthritis researchers and clinicians who manage this disease. Inflammation and joint loads are pathways commonly thought to cause or to exacerbate the disease process. This paper reviews the physiologic and mechanical consequences of obesity on older adults with knee OA; the effects of long-term exercise and weight-loss interventions, the most effective non-pharmacological treatments for obesity; and the utility and feasibility of translating these results to clinical practice. PMID:18687279

  9. Prophylactic ankle bracing vs. taping: effects on functional performance in female basketball players.

    PubMed

    MacKean, L C; Bell, G; Burnham, R S

    1995-08-01

    Ankle support devices are commonly used for prevention and treatment of ankle injury, but the effect of these on sport performance has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different ankle support devices on four basketball-related performance tests. Eleven female basketball players underwent four performance tests (vertical jump, jump shot, sprint drill, and submaximal treadmill run) while wearing five different types of ankle support on both ankles (no support, tape, Swede-O-Universal, Active Ankle, and Aircast). Ankle support effect on overall performance was assessed using Friedman's analysis of variance (ANOVA) by ranks and on specific performance parameters using one-way ANOVA for repeated measures. Overall performance was impaired by ankle support. The Active Ankle brace impaired performance the least out of the support devices. Vertical jump was less with ankle tape as compared with no tape (p < .05), whereas jump shot accuracy was better with tape as compared with the Swede-O-Universal (p < .05). Oxygen consumption (VO2) and energy expenditure were higher with the Aircast as compared with tape (p < .05). It was concluded that the use of ankle support by female basketball players does adversely affect basketball-related performance tests, and the prophylactic benefit of bracing needs to be weighed against performance impairment.

  10. CD146 as a new marker for an increased chondroprogenitor cell sub-population in the later stages of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinlin; Zuo, Wei; Wu, Zhihong; Chen, Jun; Wu, Nan; Ma, Pei; Xia, Zenan; Jiang, Chao; Ye, Zixing; Liu, Sen; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhou, Guangqian; Wan, Chao; Qiu, Guixing

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated with different methods. In this study lateral and medial femoral condyles were respectively collected from patients with late-stage osteoarthritis during the total knee arthroplasty. After digestion of the cartilage tissues with type II collagenase and analysis by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) with CD146, a chondroprogenitor cell sub-population were isolated and purified. The expression of other MSC-associated markers in the CD146+ chondroprogenitors was analyzed by flow cytometry. Multi-lineage differentiation capacity of CD146+ chondroprogenitors was compared with that of unsorted chondrocytes and adipose-derived MSCs (ADMSCs). Higher percentage of CD146+ chondroprogenitors isolated from the medial femoral condyles was observed than that from the lateral. CD146+ chondroprogenitors expressed high levels of MSC-specific surface antigens, and showed higher chondrogenesis capacity than ADMSCs and unsorted chondrocytes in a 3D cell pellet culture model. Thus CD146 might be a new cell surface marker for cartilage progenitor cell population in the late-stage osteoarthritis. PMID:25266708

  11. The postoperative COFAS end-stage ankle arthritis classification system: interobserver and intraobserver reliability.

    PubMed

    Krause, Fabian G; Di Silvestro, Matthew; Penner, Murray J; Wing, Kevin J; Glazebrook, Mark A; Daniels, Timothy R; Lau, Johnny T C; Younger, Alastair S E

    2012-02-01

    End-stage ankle arthritis is operatively treated with numerous designs of total ankle replacement and different techniques for ankle fusion. For superior comparison of these procedures, outcome research requires a classification system to stratify patients appropriately. A postoperative 4-type classification system was designed by 6 fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeons. Four surgeons reviewed blinded patient profiles and radiographs on 2 occasions to determine the interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the classification. Excellent interobserver reliability (κ = .89) and intraobserver reproducibility (κ = .87) were demonstrated for the postoperative classification system. In conclusion, the postoperative Canadian Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (COFAS) end-stage ankle arthritis classification system appears to be a valid tool to evaluate the outcome of patients operated for end-stage ankle arthritis.

  12. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  13. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: mechanics.

    PubMed

    Varady, N H; Grodzinsky, A J

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the conceptual framework of multi-scale biomechanics, this narrative review highlights recent major advances with a focus on gait and joint kinematics, then tissue-level mechanics, cell mechanics and mechanotransduction, matrix mechanics, and finally the nanoscale mechanics of matrix macromolecules. A literature review was conducted from January 2014 to April 2015 using PubMed to identify major developments in mechanics related to osteoarthritis (OA). Studies of knee adduction, flexion, rotation, and contact mechanics have extended our understanding of medial compartment loading. In turn, advances in measurement methodologies have shown how injuries to both the meniscus and ligaments, together, can alter joint kinematics. At the tissue scale, novel findings have emerged regarding the mechanics of the meniscus as well as cartilage superficial zone. Moving to the cell level, poroelastic and poro-viscoelastic mechanisms underlying chondrocyte deformation have been reported, along with the response to osmotic stress. Further developments have emerged on the role of calcium signaling in chondrocyte mechanobiology, including exciting findings on the function of mechanically activated cation channels newly found to be expressed in chondrocytes. Finally, AFM-based nano-rheology systems have enabled studies of thin murine tissues and brush layers of matrix molecules over a wide range of loading rates including high rates corresponding to impact injury. With OA acknowledged to be a disease of the joint as an organ, understanding mechanical behavior at each length scale helps to elucidate the connections between cell biology, matrix biochemistry and tissue structure/function that may play a role in the pathomechanics of OA.

  14. Femoroacetabular impingement and osteoarthritis of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Charlie; Li, Linda; Forster, Bruce B.; Kopec, Jacek A.; Ratzlaff, Charles; Halai, Lalji; Cibere, Jolanda; Esdaile, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To outline the clinical presentation, physical examination findings, diagnostic criteria, and management options of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Sources of information PubMed was searched for relevant articles regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of FAI. Main message In recent years, FAI has been increasingly recognized as a potential precursor and an important contributor to hip pain in the adult population and idiopathic hip osteoarthritis later in life. Femoroacetabular impingement is a collection of bony morphologic abnormalities of the hip joint that result in abnormal contact during motion. Cam-type FAI relates to a non-spherical osseous prominence of the proximal femoral neck or head-neck junction. Pincer-type FAI relates to excessive acetabular coverage over the femoral head, which can occur owing to several morphologic variants. Patients with FAI present with chronic, deep, or aching anterior groin pain most commonly in the sitting position, or during or after activity. Patients might also experience occasional sharp pains during activity. A thorough history should be taken that includes incidence of trauma and exercise frequency. A physical examination should be performed that includes a full hip, low back, and abdominal examination to assess for alternate causes of anterior groin pain. Diagnosis of FAI should be confirmed with radiography. Femoroacetabular impingement can be managed conservatively with rest, modification of activities, medications, and physiotherapy, or it can be treated surgically. Conclusion Femoroacetabular impingement is an important cause of anterior groin pain. Early recognition and intervention by the primary care provider might be critical to alleviating morbidity and preventing FAI progression. PMID:26668284

  15. Integrating lifestyle approaches into osteoarthritis care

    PubMed Central

    Garver, Matthew J; Focht, Brian C; Taylor, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    As the lifetime risk, societal cost, and overall functional impact of osteoarthritis (OA) is imposing, it is imperative that clinicians provide an individualized care model for patients. Patients must be offered a multiplicity of care strategies and encouraged to embrace lifestyle approaches for self-managing the effects and symptoms of OA. Certainly, the attitude of the clinician and patient will directly influence receptivity and implementation of lifestyle approaches. This work proposes how the use of structured and routine assessments and cognitive therapy ideologies may complement a comprehensive treatment plan. Assessments described herein include objective and/or self-report measures of physical function, pain, attitude about social support, and sleep quality. Baseline assessments followed by systematic monitoring of the results may give patients and clinicians valuable insight into the effectiveness of the care plan. Empirical evidence from randomized trials with OA patients highlights the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral change strategies for addressing salient concerns for OA (pain control, mobility performance, and sleep quality). Cognitive restructuring can provide patients with renewed power in managing their disease. Cognitive therapy topics discussed presently include: 1) what is OA?, 2) effectiveness of exercise and FITT (frequency, intensity, time, and type) principles for OA patients, 3) goal-setting and barriers, and 4) translating to independent care. Woven within the discussion about cognitive therapy are ideas about how the results from baseline assessments and group-mediated dynamics might assist more favorable outcomes. There are a plethora of assessments and cognitive therapy topics that could be utilized in the care strategy that we are promoting, but the present topics were selected for their low clinician and patient burden and promising results in trials with OA patients. Clinicians who are comfortable and knowledgeable about a

  16. Physical therapy in persons with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Brakke, Rachel; Singh, Jaspal; Sullivan, William

    2012-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. According to a study by Lawrence et al, an estimated 27 million Americans were living with OA in 2008. This number will continue to increase as the population of persons older than 65 years grows. Because of the increasing number of persons who have this chronic condition that causes pain and decreases function, the prevalence of this diagnosis in primary care and musculoskeletal clinics likely will increase. The reduction of pain and improvement in function should be goals of providers who treat these patients. Physical therapy (PT) is a commonly used treatment modality for persons with OA. Many treatment modalities are available within the scope of PT, including strength training, manual therapy, aquatic therapy, electrical stimulation, and balance and perturbation training. A review of the most recent and highest-quality literature regarding these modalities found that strength training, aquatic therapy, and balance and perturbation therapy were the most beneficial with respect to reducing pain and improving function. Evidence clearly indicates that electrical stimulation likely has very little impact on these variables, and evidence regarding manual therapy is equivocal. Literature reviewing prognostic indicators for persons with OA who will likely respond to PT reveal that persons with milder disease (ie, unilateral OA, symptoms for less than 1 year, and a 40-m self-paced walking test of less than 25.9 seconds) and those who have pain of 6 or greater on the numerical pain rating scale are likely to have better outcomes with PT, which suggests that earlier referral is preferable. Barriers to the acceptance of PT as a therapeutic treatment for OA include fatalistic patient and provider perspectives, inadequate analgesia, and a fear among some patients and providers that increased activity will lead to progression of their OA.

  17. Complementary therapies for osteoarthritis: are they effective?

    PubMed

    Shengelia, Rouzi; Parker, Samantha J; Ballin, Mary; George, Teena; Reid, M Carrington

    2013-12-01

    Increasing interest has focused on complementary management modalities, including tai chi, acupuncture, yoga, and massage therapy, as treatments for osteoarthritis (OA). This review article synthesizes evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews (SRs) that examined one or more of the above as treatments for OA. Medline, Pubmed, and Cinahl databases were searched to identify English-language articles using an RCT design or that conducted a SR of published studies and presented data on symptom or functional outcomes. Two authors independently abstracted relevant information (e.g., study sample, intervention characteristics, treatment effects, safety data). Retained articles (n = 29) included those that evaluated tai chi (8 RCTs, 2 SRs), acupuncture (11 RCTs, 4 SRs), yoga (2 RCTs), and massage therapy (2 RCTs). Available evidence indicates that tai chi, acupuncture, yoga, and massage therapy are safe for use by individuals with OA. Positive short-term (≤6 months) effects in the form of reduced pain and improved self-reported physical functioning were found for all 4 treatments. Limited information exists regarding the relative effectiveness of the therapies (e.g., yoga vs. tai chi vs. acupuncture), as well as treatment effects in persons with joint involvement besides the knee and in distinct patient subgroups (e.g., older vs. younger adults, persons with mild vs. moderate vs. advanced disease). Complementary therapies can reduce pain and improve function in adults with OA. Research is needed to evaluate long-term benefits of the treatments, as well as their relative effects among diverse patient subgroups. PMID:24315281

  18. Radiographic evaluation of foot and ankle injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Rettig, A C; Shelbourne, K D; Beltz, H F; Robertson, D W; Arfken, P

    1987-10-01

    Injuries of the ankle and foot in athletes are quite common. They range from the extremely simple sprain to the difficult stress fracture, and may result in long-term disability. In all cases, the athlete is best treated after an accurate diagnosis is achieved.

  19. Ultrasound Findings of the Painful Ankle and Foot

    PubMed Central

    Artul, Suheil; Habib, George

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To document the prevalence and spectrum of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS) findings at different parts of the foot. Materials and Methods: All MSKUS studies conducted on the foot during a 2-year period (2012-2013) at the Department of Radiology were reviewed. Demographic parameters including age, gender, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Three hundred and sixty-four studies had been conducted in the 2-year period. Ninety-three MSKUS evaluations were done for the ankle, 30 studies for the heel, and 241 for the rest of the foot. The most common MSKUS finding at the ankle was tenosynovitis, mostly in female patients; at the heel it was Achilles tendonitis, also mostly in female patients; and for the rest of the foot it was fluid collection and presence of foreign body, mainly in male patients. The number of different MSKUS abnormalities that were reported was 9 at the ankle, 9 at the heel, and 21 on the rest of the foot. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing a huge spectrum of abnormalities. The most common finding was collection/hematoma and foreign bodies at the foot, tenosynovitis at the ankle, and Achilles tendinitis at the heel. PMID:24991476

  20. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least 9 training sessions for 3 neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood. PMID:25769168

  1. Ankle fractures in the elderly: an overlooked burden.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christopher W; Dahal, Luna; Rogers, Benedict A; Harry, Lorraine E

    2015-10-01

    Ankle fractures in the elderly are a complex under-recognized burden which require a multidisciplinary approach to management. This article discusses the holistic approach required, including the up-to-date surgical management options and the areas for future development.

  2. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Faress, Ahmed; Luong, Wilson P.; Amin, Khizer; Eid, Joanne; Abdelshaheed, Tamer; Russell, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs). A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers) and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action) that may affect an athlete’s decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36), as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37). Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players’ willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs. PMID:26236986

  3. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; Del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  4. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  5. A Solitary Fibrous Tumor (Cellular Form) of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Seo, Kyung-Jin; Jung, Sung-No

    2016-01-01

    A solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare type of mesenchymal tumor composed of uniform spindle cells that is classically described as a patternless feature. SFT normally originates from the pleura, with an SFT originating from skin rarely reported. We report what we believe to be the first case of an SFT arising from the ankle. Our case was confirmed histopathologically with immunohistochemical staining.

  6. Adjustments after an ankle dorsiflexion perturbation during human running.

    PubMed

    Scohier, M; De Jaeger, D; Schepens, B

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of a mechanical perturbation of unexpected timing during human running. With the use of a powered exoskeleton, we evoked a dorsiflexion of the right ankle during its swing phase while subjects ran on a treadmill. The perturbation resulted in an increase of the right ankle dorsiflexion of at least 5°. The first two as well as the next five steps after the perturbation were analyzed to observe the possible immediate and late biomechanical adjustments. In all cases subjects continued to run after the perturbation. The immediate adjustments were the greatest and the most frequent when the delay between the right ankle perturbation and the subsequent right foot touch-down was the shortest. For example, the vertical impact peak force was strongly modified on the first step after the perturbations and this adjustment was correlated to a right ankle angle still clearly modified at touch-down. Some late adjustments were observed in the subsequent steps predominantly occurring during left steps. Subjects maintained the step length and the step period as constant as possible by adjusting other step parameters in order to avoid stumbling and continue running at the speed imposed by the treadmill. To our knowledge, our experiments are the first to investigate perturbations of unexpected timing during human running. The results show that humans have a time-dependent, adapted strategy to maintain their running pattern. PMID:21872474

  7. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least nine training sessions for three neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood.

  8. Dorsiflexion deficit during jogging with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Lindsay K; McKeon, Patrick O; Kerrigan, D Casey; Hertel, Jay

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) demonstrate altered dorsiflexion/plantar flexion range of motion (ROM) compared to controls during jogging. The case control study took place in a university motion analysis laboratory. Fourteen volunteers participated in the study, seven suffered from CAI (age 25+/-4.2 years, height 173+/-9.4 cm, mass 71+/-8.1kg) and seven were healthy, matched controls (age 25+/-4.5 years, height 168+/-5.9 cm, mass 67+/-9.8kg). All subjects jogged on an instrumented treadmill while a ten-camera motion analysis system collected three-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremities. The main outcome measure was sagittal plane (dorsiflexion/plantar flexion) range of motion of the ankle throughout the gait cycle. CAI subjects had significantly less dorsiflexion compared to the control group from 9% to 25% during jogging (4.83+/-0.55 degrees ). CAI subjects demonstrated limited ankle dorsiflexion ROM during the time of maximal dorsiflexion during jogging. Limited dorsiflexion ROM during gait among individuals with CAI may be a risk factor for recurrent ankle sprains. These deficits should be treated appropriately by rehabilitation clinicians.

  9. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Faress, Ahmed; Luong, Wilson P; Amin, Khizer; Eid, Joanne; Abdelshaheed, Tamer; Russell, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs). A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers) and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action) that may affect an athlete's decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36), as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37). Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players' willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs. PMID:26236986

  10. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2010-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years.

  11. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least nine training sessions for three neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood. PMID:25769168

  12. Ankle dislocation without accompanying malleolar fracture. A case report.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Masahito; Kotajima, Satoshi; Smith, Richard A; Kokubun, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Dislocation of the tibiotalar joint without associated fracture is rare. We present here a 21-year-old man who sustained open posteromedial dislocation of the left ankle without malleolar facture when he jumped and sprained his right ankle while playing basketball. The most likely mechanism is forced flexion applied to the ankle joint leading to a rupture of the anterior capsule and lateral structures of the ankle followed by an accelerating inversion stress leading to a posteromedial dislocation of the talus from the tibial condyle. Transient paresthesia was noted in the area of the superficial peroneal nerve. At surgery, the anterior part of the tibiotalar joint capsule and anterior talofibular ligament were detached from their original sites. The calcaneofibular ligament was also detached with its associated periosteum and a tiny avulsed bony fragment. The articular facets of the tibia and talus were intact. The treatment consisted of wound irrigation, debridement, reduction and capsular suture followed by immobilization with a short leg cast. About 10 degrees of loss in the range of dorsiflexion was observed. The patient achieved good long-term functional results.

  13. Tibiofemoral angle and its relation to ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Karagounis, Panagiotis; Tsiganos, Georgios; Armenis, Elias; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-12-01

    The lack of a normal joint orientation generates translational or shear forces across the joint. These forces can put abnormally high strain on the cartilage and the surrounding capsuloligamentous tissues. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the tibiofemoral (TFA) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains because its value provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). TFA measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type followed by body mass index (BMI) and age. On the contrary, TFA was proven to be statistically nonsignificant. When the BMI variable was substituted with body inertia propensity, a derived variable, the TFA remained statistically nonsignificant. TFA magnitude does not seem to be a determinant factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle.

  14. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Faress, Ahmed; Luong, Wilson P; Amin, Khizer; Eid, Joanne; Abdelshaheed, Tamer; Russell, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs). A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers) and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action) that may affect an athlete's decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36), as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37). Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players' willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs.

  15. Defining and evaluating a novel outcome measure representing end-stage knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn; Lynch, John; Nevitt, Michael; Lo, Grace H; Eaton, Charles B; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2016-10-01

    We described a definition of end-stage knee osteoarthritis (esKOA) and evaluated its association with health outcomes and osteoarthritis risk factors. We included Osteoarthritis Initiative participants with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis who had complete baseline data. We defined esKOA by adapting a validated appropriateness algorithm for total knee replacement based on data from baseline and the first four follow-up visits. We performed person-based analyses, including both knees from all participants. Participants met the definition of esKOA at the visit at which ≥1 knee reached the esKOA criteria. We assessed differences in individual characteristics between groups at baseline and over time and tested if incident esKOA (outcome) was associated with osteoarthritis risk factors (e.g., age, maximum adult weight, and quadriceps strength). The cohort consisted of 3916 participants with mean age of 61 (SD = 9) years and mean body mass index of 28.4 (4.7) kg/m(2); 59 % were female and 9.7 % developed incident esKOA. Those with incident esKOA had poorer health outcomes at baseline and greater declines in health outcomes, with the exception of SF-12 mental health score. Five out of nine tested risk factors were associated with incident esKOA in unadjusted analyses, with older age (≥65 years; odds ratio = 1.44, 95 % confidence interval = 1.19 to 1.83) and quadriceps weakness (odds ratio = 0.78, 95 % confidence interval = 0.71 to 0.86) remaining significant in adjusted models. Older age and quadriceps weakness predicted esKOA. esKOA is also characterized by poor health-related outcomes. This definition of esKOA could be a new clinically relevant outcome measure for osteoarthritis research.

  16. Comparison of Functional Ankle Motion Measures in Modern Dancers.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Danelle; Hollman-Gage, Kendra; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Bronner, Shaw

    2012-09-01

    Ankle injuries are the most common lower extremity injury in dance and sports, often resulting in limitation of dorsiflexion or plantar flexion. Accurate assessment of any limitation in range of motion is an important factor in implementing effective preventative and rehabilitative regimens. Ankle range of motion has traditionally been quantified with goniometers. However, standard goniometry may not be an adequate method of assessing plantar flexion range of motion in dancers. An alternative technique using inclinometers to quantify ankle plantar flexion has been reported, but reliability and inter-instrument correlations for this method are limited. The dorsiflexion lunge distance method has been used to assess ankle dorsiflexion. Although shown to be reliable, this method has not been objectively correlated. The purpose of this study was to determine the most clinically appropriate tool for assessing functional ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion in dancers. The aims were to: 1. determine reliability of the weightbearing ankle dorsiflexion lunge method using inclinometer, goniometer, and distance; 2. assess the reliability of inclinometer and goniometer measurements of non-weightbearing active plantar flexion; 3. conduct inter-method and experienced versus novice rater correlations; and 4. determine if a relationship exists between dorsiflexion distance (cm) and dorsiflexion inclinometer angle (degrees) measurements. Twenty-six modern dancers (age: 20.2 ± 1.8 years) participated in the study. Four raters measured weightbearing dorsiflexion in a lunge position using a goniometer, two inclinometer placements, and a distance measurement. They also measured active ankle plantar flexion using an inclinometer placed on the anterior talonavicular joint and a goniometer placed at the lateral ankle. Intra- and inter-rater reliability and inter-method correlations were calculated with Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM

  17. [AGING AND OSTEOARTHRITIS. CHRONIC NONSPECIFIC INFLAMMATION AS A LINK BETWEEN AGING AND OSTEOARTHRITIS (REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Mendel, O I; Luchihina, L V; Mendel, W

    2015-01-01

    This article presents review on the processes underlying aging and the most common age-associated diseases. Special attention is given to the role of chronic nonspecific inflammation. Based on the literature data it was demonstrated that aging and osteoarthritis have the same basic molecular and cellular mechanisms, among which general are cascades intracellular transcription chronic nonspecific inflammation and metabolic disturbances plays an important role. It is concluded that the process of normal aging is not a disease, but makes the human body, and particularly the musculoskeletal system, susceptible to age-associated changes. Number of changes in the human body that accompany the aging process, and play a role in the development and progression of OA, are potentially reversible, regardless of age (eg, chronic non-specific inflammation), and can be considered as a possible entry points for the effective prevention and complex therapy of OA in elderly people.

  18. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries. PMID:19825746

  19. Treatment of common deficits associated with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Alison; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are amongst the most common injuries incurred by athletes, with the high rate of reoccurrence after initial injury becoming of great concern. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) refers to the development of repetitive ankle sprains and persistent residual symptoms post-injury. Some of the initial symptoms that occur in acute sprains may persist for at least 6 months post-injury in the absence of recurrent sprains, despite the athlete having returned to full functional activity. CAI is generally thought to be caused by mechanical instability (MI) or functional instability (FI), or both. Although previously discussed as separate entities, recent research has demonstrated that deficits associated with both MI and FI may co-exist to result in CAI. For clinicians, the main deficits associated with CAI include deficits in proprioception, neuromuscular control, strength and postural control. Based on the literature reviewed, it does seem that subjects with CAI have a deficit in frontal plane ankle joint positional sense. Subjects with CAI do not appear to exhibit any increased latency in the peroneal muscles in response to an external perturbation. Preliminary data suggest that feed-forward neuromuscular control may be more important than feed-back neuromuscular control and interventions are now required to address deficits in feed-forward neuromuscular control. Balance training protocols have consistently been shown to improve postural stability in subjects with CAI. Subjects with CAI do not experience decreased peroneus longus strength, but instead may experience strength deficits in the ankle joint invertor muscles. These findings are of great clinical significance in terms of understanding the mechanisms and deficits associated with CAI. An appreciation of these is vital to allow clinicians to develop effective prevention and treatment programmes in relation to CAI.

  20. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques.

    PubMed

    Runge, C F; Shupert, C L; Horak, F B; Zajac, F E

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  1. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  2. Reflex ankle stiffness is inversely correlated with natural body sway.

    PubMed

    Julien, Brianna L; Bendrups, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine whether effective ankle stiffness (EAS), measured during slow unperceived perturbations of stance, is related to natural anterior-posterior body sway. Because the perturbations are not perceived, any neural component of the response to perturbation is assumed to be "reflex", in the broad sense of an involuntary response to a stimulus. Subjects stood on a force platform for three 10-min trials. EAS was obtained from the average slope (Δτ/Δα) of the relation between ankle torque (τ) and ankle angle (α), recorded during repeated perturbations delivered at the waist by a weak spring. EAS was normalised using the subject's "load stiffness" (LS), calculated from mass (m) and height (h) above the ankle joint (m·g·h). Sway was obtained from fluctuations in ankle angle prior to perturbation. Variation in EAS and sway between subjects provided spread of data for correlation. There were no significant changes in EAS or sway across trials. All subjects had higher EAS than LS and mean EAS (1124 N m/rad) was significantly greater (p<0.01) than mean LS (531 N m/rad). There was a strong significant inverse correlation between mean sway and mean normalised EAS (r=-0.68, p=0.03). We conclude that the body, in response to slow unperceived perturbations, simulates an inverted pendulum with a stiffness of about twice LS and that EAS is largely generated by neural modulation of postural muscles. The inverse correlation between EAS and body sway suggests that the reflex mechanisms responding to perturbation also influence the extent of natural sway. PMID:27004645

  3. Long-term Results After Ankle Syndesmosis Injuries.

    PubMed

    van Vlijmen, Nicole; Denk, Katharina; van Kampen, Albert; Jaarsma, Ruurd L

    2015-11-01

    Syndesmotic disruption occurs in more than 10% of ankle fractures. Operative treatment with syndesmosis screw fixation has been successfully performed for decades and is considered the gold standard of treatment. Few studies have reported the long-term outcomes of syndesmosis injuries. This study investigated long-term patient-reported, radiographic, and functional outcomes of syndesmosis injuries treated with screw fixation and subsequent timed screw removal. A retrospective cohort study was carried out at a Level I trauma center. The study group included 43 patients who were treated for ankle fractures with associated syndesmotic disruptions between December 2001 and May 2011. The study included case file reviews, self-reported questionnaires, radiologic reviews, and clinical assessments. At 5.1 (±1.76) years after injury, 60% of participants had pain, 26% had degenerative changes, 51% had loss of tibiofibular overlap, and 33% showed medial clear space widening. Retained syndesmotic positions on radiographs were linked to better self-reported outcomes. There is an inversely proportional relation between age at the time of injury and satisfaction with the outcome of the ankle fracture as well as a directly proportional relation between age at the time of injury and pain compared with the preinjury state. Optimal restoration and preservation of the syndesmosis is crucial. Syndesmotic disruption is associated with poor long-term outcomes after ankle fracture. Greater age is a risk factor for chronic pain and dissatisfaction with the outcome of ankle fracture and syndesmosis injury. Therefore, patient education to facilitate realistic expectations about recovery is vital, especially in older patients. PMID:26558664

  4. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries.

  5. Meniscal Extrusion or Subchondral Damage Characterize Incident Accelerated Osteoarthritis: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Driban, Jeffrey B.; Ward, Robert J.; Eaton, Charles B.; Lo, Grace H.; Price, Lori Lyn; Lu, Bing; McAlindon, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is typically a slowly progressive disorder; however, a subset of knees progress with dramatic rapidity. We aimed to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings that are associated with accelerated KOA. Materials and Methods We conducted a longitudinal descriptive study in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) cohort. We selected participants who had no radiographic KOA at baseline with one of the following in the most severe knee: 1) accelerated KOA (progressed to end-stage KOA within 48 months), 2) common KOA, and 3) no KOA at all visits. We enriched the sample by selecting knees with a self-reported or suspected knee injury. A musculoskeletal radiologist blinded to group assignments but not to time sequence performed MRI readings for the visit before and after an injury. Results We assessed 38 participants (knees), 66% were female, mean age 61 (9) years, and mean body mass index 28.5 (4.9) kg/m2. Fifteen of 20 knees with no or common KOA, had no incident findings consistent with acute damage. Among the 18 knees with accelerated KOA most had incident findings: 13 (72%) had incident medial meniscal pathology with extrusion and 5 (28%) knees had subchondral damage. Conclusions Incident MRI findings that are associated with incident accelerated KOA are characterized by structural damage that compromises subchondral bone or the function of the meniscus. Recognizing meniscal extrusion and/or change in shape, lateral meniscal tear, or acute subchondral damage may be vital for identifying individuals at risk for accelerated KOA. PMID:26149125

  6. Soft drink intake and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bing; Ahmad, Oneeb; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Driban, Jeffrey B; Duryea, Jeffrey; Lapane, Kate L; McAlindon, Timothy; Eaton, Charles B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examine the prospective association of soft drink consumption with radiographic progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design Prospective cohort study. Setting This study used data from the osteoarthritis initiative (OAI). Participants In OAI, 2149 participants with radiographic knee OA and having dietary data at baseline were followed up to 12, 24, 36 and 48 months. Measures The soft drink consumption was assessed with a Block Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire completed at baseline. To evaluate knee OA progression, we used quantitative medial tibiofemoral joint space width (JSW) based on plain radiographs. The multivariate linear models for repeated measures were used to test the independent association between soft drink intake and the change in JSW over time, while adjusting for body mass index and other potential confounding factors. Results In stratified analyses by gender, we observed a significant dose–response relationship between baseline soft drink intake and adjusted mean change of JSW in men. With increasing levels of soft drink intake (none, ≤1, 2–4 and ≥5 times/week), the mean decreases of JSW were 0.31, 0.39, 0.34 and 0.60 mm, respectively. When we further stratified by obesity, a stronger dose–response relationship was found in non-obese men. In obese men, only the highest soft drink level (≥5 times/week) was associated with increased change in JSW compared with no use. In women, no significant association was observed. Conclusions Our results suggest that frequent consumption of soft drinks may be associated with increased OA progression in men. Replication of these novel findings in other studies demonstrating the reduction in soft drink consumption leads to delay in OA progression is needed. PMID:23872291

  7. A Review on the Management of Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Alexander MacDonald; Brock, Timothy M.; Heil, Kieran; Holmes, Rachel; Weusten, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is the most common chronic condition affecting patients over the age of 70. The prevalence of osteoarthritis increases with age, and with an aging population, the effect of this disease will represent an ever-increasing burden on health care. The knee is the most common joint affected in osteoarthritis, with up to 41% of limb arthritis being located in the knee, compared to 30% in hands and 19% in hips. We review the current concepts with regard to the disease process and risk factors for developing hip and knee osteoarthritis. We then explore the nonsurgical management of osteoarthritis as well as the operative management of hip and knee arthritis. We discuss the indications for surgical treatment of hip and knee arthritis, looking in particular at the controversies affecting young and obese patients in both hip and knee replacements. Patient and implant related outcomes along with survivorships are addressed as well as the experiences and controversies described in national joint registries. PMID:26464847

  8. [Osteoarthritis and patient therapeutic education, learning to move more].

    PubMed

    Coudeyre, Emmanuel; Gay, Chloé; Bareyre, Loïc; Coste, Nicolas; Chérillat, Marie-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    As part of the prevention strategies offered to people with osteoarthritis, therapeutic education plays a key role. It seeks to help the patient become a player in their own care and focuses in particular on the factors influencing regular participation in suitable physical activity. PMID:27633694

  9. cGMP levels in chronic cadmium disease and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Kagamimori, S.; Williams, W. R.; Watanabe, M.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the effect of cadmium on guanyl cyclase activity, urine levels of the nucleotide cGMP were measured in patients with bone and renal lesions resulting from chronic cadmium exposure, in patients with osteoarthritis and in a normal age-matched control population. The effects of cadmium, zinc and mercury salts on blood mononuclear cell cGMP production were also studied in vitro. The two patient groups exhibited clear differences in cGMP excretion. Lower urine cGMP (59%, P less than 0.01) and creatinine values (43%, P less than 0.01) were found in cadmium-exposed patients and higher cGMP values (56%, P less than 0.05) in patients with osteoarthritis, compared to the control group. Creatinine adjusted cGMP values were also lower in cadmium-exposed patients (28%, P less than 0.05) and higher in patients with osteoarthritis (130%, P less than 0.01). In vitro, a 10 h exposure of mononuclear cells to cadmium or mercury salts depressed guanyl cyclase activity in most experiments. At 10(-4) M, mercury was consistently more inhibitory in all cultures (95%, P less than 0.01). As cadmium has a potential for inhibiting guanyl cyclase activity in human tissue, the low urine cGMP values found in patients with cadmium disease may be attributable to chronic cadmium exposure. High guanyl cyclase activity in patients with osteoarthritis may be associated with inflammation. PMID:2874827

  10. CCR2 chemokine receptor signaling mediates pain in experimental osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachel E.; Tran, Phuong B.; Das, Rosalina; Ghoreishi-Haack, Nayereh; Ren, Dongjun; Miller, Richard J.; Malfait, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of chronic pain, but almost nothing is known about the mechanisms and molecules that mediate osteoarthritis-associated joint pain. Consequently, treatment options remain inadequate and joint replacement is often inevitable. Here, we use a surgical mouse model that captures the long-term progression of knee osteoarthritis to longitudinally assess pain-related behaviors and concomitant changes in the innervating dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We demonstrate that monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (CCL2) and its high-affinity receptor, chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2), are central to the development of pain associated with knee osteoarthritis. After destabilization of the medial meniscus, mice developed early-onset secondary mechanical allodynia that was maintained for 16 wk. MCP-1 and CCR2 mRNA, protein, and signaling activity were temporarily up-regulated in the innervating DRG at 8 wk after surgery. This result correlated with the presentation of movement-provoked pain behaviors, which were maintained up to 16 wk. Mice that lack Ccr2 also developed mechanical allodynia, but this started to resolve from 8 wk onwards. Despite severe allodynia and structural knee joint damage equal to wild-type mice, Ccr2-null mice did not develop movement-provoked pain behaviors at 8 wk. In wild-type mice, macrophages infiltrated the DRG by 8 wk and this was maintained through 16 wk after surgery. In contrast, macrophage infiltration was not observed in Ccr2-null mice. These observations suggest a key role for the MCP-1/CCR2 pathway in establishing osteoarthritis pain. PMID:23185004

  11. Cartilage Degeneration and Alignment in Severe Varus Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Shogo; Yabumoto, Hiromitsu; Tarumi, Eri; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cartilage, ligament, and meniscus degeneration and radiographic alignment in severe varus knee osteoarthritis in order to understand the development of varus knee osteoarthritis. Design Fifty-three patients (71 knees) with primary varus knee osteoarthritis and who underwent total knee arthroplasty were selected for this study. There were 6 men and 47 women, with 40 right knees and 31 left knees studied; their mean age at operation was 73.5 years. The ligament, meniscus, degeneration of joint cartilage, and radiographic alignments were examined visually. Results The tibial plateau–tibial shaft angle was larger if the condition of the cartilage in the lateral femoral condyle was worse. The femorotibial angle and tibial plateau–tibial shaft angle were larger if the conditions of the lateral meniscus or the cartilage in the lateral tibial plateau were worse. Conclusion Based on the results of this study, progression of varus knee osteoarthritis may occur in the following manner: medial knee osteoarthritis starts in the central portion of the medial tibial plateau, and accompanied by medial meniscal extrusion and anterior cruciate ligament rupture, cartilage degeneration expands from the anterior to the posterior in the medial tibial plateau. Bone attrition occurs in the medial tibial plateau, and the femoro-tibial angle and tibial plateau–tibial shaft angle increase. Therefore, the lateral intercondylar eminence injures the cartilage of the lateral femoral condyle in the longitudinal fissure type. Thereafter, the cartilage degeneration expands in the whole of the knee joints. PMID:26425258

  12. Manual for guided home exercises for osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Carvalho, Nilza Aparecida; Bittar, Simoni Teixeira; de Souza Pinto, Flávia Ribeiro; Ferreira, Mônica; Sitta, Robson Roberto

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Physiotherapy is one of the most important components of therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee. The objective of this prospective case series was to assess the efficiency of a guidance manual for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee in relation to pain, range of movement , muscle strength and function, active goniometry, manual strength test and function. METHODS: Thirty-eight adults with osteoarthritis of the knee (≥ 45 years old) who were referred to the physiotherapy service at the university hospital (Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo) were studied. Patients received guidance for the practice of specific physical exercises and a manual with instructions on how to perform the exercises at home. They were evaluated for pain, range of movement, muscle strength and function. These evaluations were performed before they received the manual and three months later. Patients were seen monthly regarding improvements in their exercising abilities. RESULTS: The program was effective for improving muscle strength, controlling pain, maintaining range of movement of the knee joint, and reducing functional incapacity. DISCUSSION: A review of the literature showed that there are numerous clinical benefits to the regular practice of physical therapy exercises by patients with osteoarthritis of the knee(s) in a program with appropriate guidance. This study shows that this guidance can be attained at home with the use of a proper manual. CONCLUSIONS: Even when performed at home without constant supervision, the use of the printed manual for orientation makes the exercises for osteoarthritis of the knee beneficial. PMID:20835554

  13. Current concepts in the therapeutic management of osteoarthritis with glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Reginster, Jean-Yves; Bruyere, Olivier; Fraikin, Genevieve; Henrotin, Yves

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, several studies have investigated the ability of glucosamine sulfate to improve the symptoms (pain and function) and to delay the structural progression of osteoarthritis. There is now a large, convergent body of evidence that glucosamine sulfate, given at a daily oral dose of 1,500 mg, is able to significantly reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the lower limbs and spine. This effect is usually seen with a minimal time for the onset of significant action - around 2 weeks. A similar dose of glucosamine sulfate has also been shown, in two independent studies, to prevent the joint space narrowing observed at the femorotibial compartment in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. This effect, which is not affected by the radiographic technique used for the assessment of joint space width, also translated into a 50% reduction in the incidence of osteoarthritis-related surgery of the lower limbs during a 5-year period following the withdrawal of the treatment. There is a high degree of consistency in the literature showing that when glucosamine sulfate is used for the treatment of osteoarthritis, an efficacious response with minimum side effects can be expected. Since some discrepancies have been described between the results of studies performed with a patent-protected formulation of glucosamine sulfate distributed as a drug and those having used glucosamine preparations purchased from global suppliers, packaged, and sold over-the-counter as nutritional supplements (not regulated as drugs and with some potential issues concerning the reliability of their content), caution should be used when extrapolating conclusive results obtained with prescription drugs to over-the-counter or food supplements. PMID:16536216

  14. A Novel Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Treatment for Recovery of Ankle Dorsiflexion in Chronic Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Jayme S.; Chae, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of improving active ankle dorsiflexion with contralaterally controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (CCNMES). Design CCNMES dorsiflexes the paretic ankle with a stimulation intensity that is directly proportional to the degree of voluntary dorsiflexion of the unimpaired contralateral ankle, which is detected by an instrumented sock. Three subjects with chronic (>6-mo poststroke) dorsiflexor paresis participated in a 6-wk CCNMES treatment, which consisted of self-administering CCNMES-assisted ankle dorsiflexion exercises at home daily and practicing an ankle motor control task in the research laboratory twice a week. Results For subjects 1 and 2, respectively, maximum voluntary ankle dorsiflexion increased by 13 and 17 degrees, ankle movement tracking error decreased by ~57% and 57%, and lower limb Fugl-Meyer score (maximum score is 34) increased by 4 and 5 points. Subject 3 had no appreciable improvement in these measures. Both subjects 1 and 2 maintained their performance in ankle movement tracking through the 3-mo follow-up; subject 2 also maintained the gains in maximum ankle dorsiflexion and Fugl-Meyer score. Conclusions These results suggest that CCNMES may have a positive effect on ankle motor impairment in some stroke survivors. Further investigation of the effect of CCNMES on gait is warranted. PMID:20531158

  15. Early-developed hand osteoarthritis in treated HIV-positive patients: Four cases.

    PubMed

    Larcher, Romaric; Mauboussin, Jean-Marc; Rouanet, Isabelle; Sotto, Albert

    2015-10-01

    We describe four cases of hand osteoarthritis in patients with HIV infection under antiretroviral treatment. A 36-year-old HIV-infected man came for consultation in 2007 with hand osteoarthritis. He was diagnosed HIV positive by sexual transmission in 1997. A 52-year-old HIV-infected woman came for consultation with hand osteoarthritis started in 2006. She was diagnosed HIV positive in 1986 by sexual transmission. A 57-year-old man presented hand osteoarthritis. This former IV drug user was diagnosed HIV positive in 1989. A 61-year-old HIV-infected man presented with hand osteoarthritis started in 2010. He had been contaminated with HIV in 1990 by sexual transmission. For all patients, there were neither clinical nor biological manifestations suggesting inflammatory arthritis. X-rays showed signs of hand osteoarthritis. CD4 cell count was over 500/mm(3) and the viral load was below 20 copies/mL under treatments. These four cases show osteoarthritis in HIV-infected patients. Hand osteoarthritis did not seem to be linked to aging or to an antiretroviral treatment's side effect, but rather to the HIV infection itself, and it may pass through a metabolic syndrome. We described a possible association between early-developed hand osteoarthritis and HIV-infected patients. Clinicians should consider osteoarthritis when they are confronted with HIV-infected patients with chronic hand pain.

  16. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: [1] Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, [2] Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, [3] ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and [4] ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors. PMID:21658224

  17. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) in Persian Speaking Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Makhmalbaf, Hadi; Birjandinejad, Ali; Keshtan, Farideh Golhasani; Hoseini, Hosein A; Mazloumi, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee is the most common chronic joint disease that involves middle aged and elderly persons. There are different clinical instruments to quantify the health status of patients with knee osteoarthritis and one example is the WOMAC score that has been translated and adapted into different languages. The purpose of this study was cultural adaptation, validation and reliability testing of the Persian version of the WOMAC index in Iranians with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: We translated the original WOMAC questionnaire into Persian by the forward and backward technique, and then its psychometric study was done on 169 native Persian speaking patients with knee degenerative joint disease. Mean age of patients was 53.9 years. The SF-36 and KOOS were used to assess construct validity. Results: Reliability testing resulted in a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.917, showing the internal consistency of the questionnaire to be a reliable tool. Inter-correlation matrix among different scales of the Persian WOMAC index yielded a highly significant correlation between all subscales including stiffness, pain, and physical function. In terms of validity, Pearson`s correlation coefficient was significant between three domains of the WOMAC with PF, RP, BP, GH, VT, and PCS dimensions of the SF-36 health survey (P<0.005) and KOOS (P<0.0001) . Conclusions: The Persian WOMAC index is a valid and reliable patient- reported clinical instrument for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25207315

  18. Population based epidemiology of ankle sprains attending accident and emergency units in the West Midlands of England, and a survey of UK practice for severe ankle sprains

    PubMed Central

    Bridgman, S; Clement, D; Downing, A; Walley, G; Phair, I; Maffulli, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incidence of ankle sprains and severe ankle sprains attending accident and emergency (A&E) units; to describe current practice for severe ankle sprains in A&E units in the United Kingdom. Methods: Crude age and sex specific incidence rates were calculated for four health districts from cases ascertained from data on seven A&E clinical information systems. Case records of patients with ankle sprains at an A&E unit in another health district were audited and the proportion of severe ankle sprains calculated. UK A&E units were surveyed about their usual treatment of patients with severe ankle sprains. Results: The estimate of the crude incidence rate of ankle sprains was a minimum of 52.7 per 10 000, rising to 60.9 (95% CI 59.4 to 62.4) when figures were adjusted for the proportion of patients without a diagnostic code (13.7%). There were important age-sex differences with unadjusted rates observed from 127.8 per 10 000 (CI 115.5 to 140.0) in girls aged 10–14 years to 8.2 (CI 4.2 to 12.3) in men aged 70–74 years. As 14% of ankle sprains attending A&E were classed as severe, this would equate to 42 000 severe ankle sprains per year in the UK. In the UK wide survey, there was a response rate of 79% (211 of 266). Among the responders, Tubigrip was used routinely in 55%, below knee casts in 3%, and braces in 2%. Boots were not used routinely in any unit. Conclusion: While there is considerable variation in severe ankle sprain management in UK A&E units, most are treated with the minimal mechanical support of Tubigrip. PMID:14623833

  19. Fractures and Soft Tissue Injuries of the Feet and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    English, Edward

    1985-01-01

    An accurate clinical diagnosis of foot and ankle pain can be made by a history, physical examination and routine X-rays of the affected part. Each problem has a specific treatment; however, fractures and dislocations around the foot and ankle can be thought of in an organized fashion by proper physical examination and then the appropriate treatment. Fractures and soft tissue injuries can be treated rationally by understanding the mechanism of injury and the possibility of subsequent deformity. This article classifies specific injuries as a group and indicates a treatment program for each problem. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7aFig. 7bFig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:21274230

  20. Running with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Amanda H; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a running control architecture for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that enables a transfemoral amputee to run with a biomechanically appropriate running gait and to intentionally transition between a walking and running gait. The control architecture consists firstly of a coordination level controller, which provides gait biomechanics representative of healthy running, and secondly of a gait selection controller that enables the user to intentionally transition between a running and walking gait. The running control architecture was implemented on a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints, and the efficacy of the controller was assessed in a series of running trials with a transfemoral amputee subject. Specifically, treadmill trials were conducted to assess the extent to which the coordination controller provided a biomechanically appropriate running gait. Separate trials were conducted to assess the ability of the user to consistently and reliably transition between walking and running gaits.