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Sample records for isolated brain capillaries

  1. Alkamides from Echinacea angustifolia Interact with P-glycoprotein of primary brain capillary endothelial cells isolated from porcine brain blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Mahringer, Anne; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bauer, Rudolf; Fricker, Gert; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of toxic compounds from blood circulation into brain tissue. Unfortunately, drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, brain tumors, and other diseases also do not cross the blood-brain barrier. In the present investigation, we used isolated porcine brain capillary endothelial cells and a flow cytometric calcein-AM assay to analyze inhibition of P-glycoprotein, a major constituent of the blood-brain barrier. We tested 8 alkamides isolated from Echinacea angustifolia and found that four of them inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated calcein transport in porcine brain capillary endothelial cells.

  2. Absorptive-mediated endocytosis of cationized albumin and a beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide by isolated brain capillaries. Model system of blood-brain barrier transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, A.K.; Eisenberg, J.B.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1987-11-05

    Cationized albumin (pI greater than 8), unlike native albumin (pI approximately 4), enters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rapidly from blood. This suggests that a specific uptake mechanism for cationized albumin may exist at the brain capillary wall, i.e. the blood-brain barrier. Isolated bovine brain capillaries rapidly bound cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin and approximately 70% of the bound radioactivity was resistant to mild acid wash, which is assumed to represent internalized peptide. Binding was saturable and a Scatchard plot gave a maximal binding capacity (Ro) = 5.5 +/- 0.7 micrograms/mgp (79 +/- 10 pmol/mgp), and a half-saturation constant (KD) = 55 +/- 8 micrograms/ml (0.8 +/- 0.1 microM). The binding of cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin (pI = 8.5-9) was inhibited by protamine, protamine sulfate, and polylysine (molecular weight = 70,000) with a Ki of approximately 3 micrograms/ml for all three proteins. The use of cationized albumin in directed delivery of peptides through the blood-brain barrier was examined by coupling (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin to unlabeled cationized albumin (pI = 8.5-9) using the bifunctional reagent, N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)proprionate. The (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was rapidly bound and endocytosed by isolated bovine brain capillaries, and this was inhibited by unlabeled cationized albumin but not by unconjugated beta-endorphin or native bovine albumin. Cationized albumin provides a new tool for studying absorptive-mediated endocytosis at the brain capillary and may also provide a vehicle for directed drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.

  3. In-capillary derivatization and capillary electrophoresis separation of amino acid neurotransmitters from brain microdialysis samples.

    PubMed

    Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine; Renaud, Louis; Renaud, Bernard; Zimmer, Luc

    2008-09-26

    A new in-capillary derivatization method with naphtalene-2,3-dicarboxyaldehyde (NDA)/CN(-) has been developed for capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection of brain microdialysate amino acids. Samples are sandwiched between two plugs of reagent mixture at the capillary inlet and subsequently separated. Highest derivatization yields are obtained by using a reagent to sample plug length ratio equal to 4, performing a first electrophoretic mixing followed by a zero potential amplification step before applying the separation voltage and using a NaCN to NDA concentration ratio equal to 1. This new single-step methodology allows the analysis of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat brain microdialysis samples.

  4. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  5. Aluminum permeation of the blood-brain barrier occurs primarily across brain capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.D.; Yokel, R.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Aluminum has been demonstrated to be neurotoxic and has been implicated in several neurobehavioral disorders. The primary site(s) and mechanism(s) of Al flux across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) have not been elucidated. Aluminum (Al) permeation of the BBB was assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Utilizing the in vivo microdialysis technique, unbound extracellular Al concentrations were ascertained at the two potential sites of flux across the BBB; the choroid plexus and brain capillaries. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the lateral ventricle and in the frontal cortex to elucidate flux across the choroid plexus and brain capillaries, respectively. A microdialysis probe was also implanted in the jugular vein to reveal blood Al concentrations. Aluminum citrate was administered via the femoral vein. Peak frontal cortex and blood Al concentration were seen within the first two 5 minute sampling periods. When concentrations were measurable for lateral ventricle, the peak concentrations were also seen within the first two 5 minute sampling periods. Area under the curve (AUC) (concentrations vs. time to last sample time point) values were calculated using RSTRIP. Brain and cerebrospinal fluid AUCs were divided by blood AUC within animal to calculate tissue/blood ratios (TBRs). Frontal cortex TBRs were significantly higher than those calculated for lateral ventricle. The results indicate that the primary site of Al flux across the BBB occurs at brain capillaries.

  6. Capillary-force-induced clustering of micropillar arrays: is it caused by isolated capillary bridges or by the lateral capillary meniscus interaction force?

    PubMed

    Chandra, Dinesh; Yang, Shu

    2009-09-15

    Because of their increased mechanical compliance, arrays of high-aspect-ratio microstructures are susceptible to deformation by capillary forces. In the literature, the collapse of a 1D array of tall line patterns during liquid evaporation off of their surface has been attributed to the Laplace pressure difference due to isolated capillary bridges. The same argument has often been simply extended to 2D arrays of tall microstructures to explain the collapse behavior. Using a short-chain polystyrene (PS) melt as a wetting liquid on a 2D array of epoxy micropillars, we showed that the collapse occurred while the micropillars were still completely surrounded by liquid, thus the clustering of micropillars should be caused by the lateral capillary meniscus interaction force rather than by often-reported isolated capillary bridges. We showed that the capillary meniscus interaction force was more than an order of magnitude smaller than that calculated from the Laplace pressure difference due to isolated capillary bridges. This result suggested a much lower critical elastic modulus for stable micropillar arrays, which agreed well with our experimental observation. PMID:19735125

  7. Monolithic molecularly imprinted polymeric capillary columns for isolation of aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Szumski, Michał; Grzywiński, Damian; Prus, Wojciech; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2014-10-17

    Monolithic molecularly imprinted polymers extraction columns have been prepared in fused-silica capillaries by UV or thermal polymerization in a two-step process. First, a poly-(trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) (polyTRIM) core monolith was synthesized either by UV or thermal polymerization. Then it was grafted with the mixture of methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as a cross-linking agent, 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (DMC) as an aflatoxin-mimicking template, toluene as a porogen solvent and 2,2-azobis-(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN) as an initiator of the polymerization reaction. Different thermal condition of the photografting and different concentrations of the grafting mixture were tested during polymerization. The extraction capillary columns were evaluated in the terms of their hydrodynamic and chromatographic properties. Retention coefficients for aflatoxin B1 and DMC were used for assessment of the selectivity and imprinting factor. The obtained results indicate that the temperature of photografting and concentration of the grafting mixture are key parameters that determine the quality of the prepared MIPs. From the MIP columns characterized by the highest permeability the column of the highest imprinting factor was applied for isolation of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 from the model aqueous sample followed by on-line chromatographic separation. The process was performed using a micro-MISPE-microLC-LIF system of a novel design, which allowed for detection of the eluates from the sample preparation part as well as from the chromatographic separation.

  8. Extraction of brain capillary membrane proteins using Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, J F; Béliveau, R

    1994-12-01

    Brain capillaries contain a great variety of membrane proteins involved in the transport of hydrophilic nutrients or in the reception of hormonal signals. The use of Triton X-114 fractionation to purify membrane proteins according to their degree of hydrophobicity was investigated. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a distinct polypeptide composition for each fraction. Most of the proteins (68%) were solubilized by Triton X-114 and, of these proteins, the majority (74%) was found in the detergent-poor phase. Alkaline phosphatase which possesses a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor partitioned in the pellet of insoluble proteins where it was enriched 2.3-fold. In contrast, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, the GLUT1 glucose transporter and P-glycoprotein, three integral membrane proteins, and p21ras and a 42 kDa G protein alpha subunit, both covalently modified by lipids, were efficiently solubilized and fractionated in the detergent-rich fraction where they were enriched 3.5-, 4.8-, 4.4-, 4.5- and 4.7-fold, respectively. Triton X-114 fractionation could therefore be used as a first step in the purification of many blood-brain barrier membrane proteins.

  9. Scaling of brain metabolism and blood flow in relation to capillary and neural scaling.

    PubMed

    Karbowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Brain is one of the most energy demanding organs in mammals, and its total metabolic rate scales with brain volume raised to a power of around 5/6. This value is significantly higher than the more common exponent 3/4 relating whole body resting metabolism with body mass and several other physiological variables in animals and plants. This article investigates the reasons for brain allometric distinction on a level of its microvessels. Based on collected empirical data it is found that regional cerebral blood flow CBF across gray matter scales with cortical volume V as CBF ~ V(-1/6), brain capillary diameter increases as V(1/12), and density of capillary length decreases as V(-1/6). It is predicted that velocity of capillary blood is almost invariant (~V(ε)), capillary transit time scales as V(1/6), capillary length increases as V(1/6+ε), and capillary number as V(2/3-ε), where ε is typically a small correction for medium and large brains, due to blood viscosity dependence on capillary radius. It is shown that the amount of capillary length and blood flow per cortical neuron are essentially conserved across mammals. These results indicate that geometry and dynamics of global neuro-vascular coupling have a proportionate character. Moreover, cerebral metabolic, hemodynamic, and microvascular variables scale with allometric exponents that are simple multiples of 1/6, rather than 1/4, which suggests that brain metabolism is more similar to the metabolism of aerobic than resting body. Relation of these findings to brain functional imaging studies involving the link between cerebral metabolism and blood flow is also discussed.

  10. Internalization of targeted quantum dots by brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Paris-Robidas, Sarah; Brouard, Danny; Emond, Vincent; Parent, Martin; Calon, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Receptors located on brain capillary endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier are the target of most brain drug delivery approaches. Yet, direct subcellular evidence of vectorized transport of nanoformulations into the brain is lacking. To resolve this question, quantum dots were conjugated to monoclonal antibodies (Ri7) targeting the murine transferrin receptor. Specific transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis of Ri7-quantum dots was first confirmed in N2A and bEnd5 cells. After intravenous injection in mice, Ri7-quantum dots exhibited a fourfold higher volume of distribution in brain tissues, compared to controls. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that Ri7-quantum dots were sequestered throughout the cerebral vasculature 30 min, 1 h, and 4 h post injection, with a decline of signal intensity after 24 h. Transmission electron microscopic studies confirmed that Ri7-quantum dots were massively internalized by brain capillary endothelial cells, averaging 37 ± 4 Ri7-quantum dots/cell 1 h after injection. Most quantum dots within brain capillary endothelial cells were observed in small vesicles (58%), with a smaller proportion detected in tubular structures or in multivesicular bodies. Parenchymal penetration of Ri7-quantum dots was extremely low and comparable to control IgG. Our results show that systemically administered Ri7-quantum dots complexes undergo extensive endocytosis by brain capillary endothelial cells and open the door for novel therapeutic approaches based on brain endothelial cell drug delivery.

  11. Glutamate-Mediated Down-Regulation of the Multidrug-Resistance Protein BCRP/ABCG2 in Porcine and Human Brain Capillaries.

    PubMed

    Salvamoser, Josephine D; Avemary, Janine; Luna-Munguia, Hiram; Pascher, Bettina; Getzinger, Thekla; Pieper, Tom; Kudernatsch, Manfred; Kluger, Gerhard; Potschka, Heidrun

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) functions as a major molecular gatekeeper at the blood-brain barrier. Considering its impact on access to the brain by therapeutic drugs and harmful xenobiotics, it is of particular interest to elucidate the mechanisms of its regulation. Excessive glutamate concentrations have been reported during epileptic seizures or as a consequence of different brain insults including brain ischemia. Previously, we have demonstrated that glutamate can trigger an induction of the transporter P-glycoprotein. These findings raised the question whether other efflux transporters are affected in a comparable manner. Glutamate exposure proved to down-regulate BCRP transport function and expression in isolated porcine capillaries. The reduction was efficaciously prevented by coincubation with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801. The involvement of the NMDA receptor in the down-regulation of BCRP was further confirmed by experiments showing an effect of NMDA exposure on brain capillary BCRP transport function and expression. Pharmacological targeting of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2) using the nonselective inhibitor indomethacin, COX-1 inhibitor SC-560, and COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib revealed a contribution of COX-2 activity to the NMDA receptor's downstream signaling events affecting BCRP. Translational studies were performed using human capillaries isolated from surgical specimens of epilepsy patients. The findings confirmed a glutamate-induced down-regulation of BCRP transport activity in human capillaries, which argued against major species differences. In conclusion, our data reveal a novel mechanism of BCRP down-regulation in porcine and human brain capillaries. Moreover, together with previous data sets for P-glycoprotein, the findings point to a contrasting impact of the signaling pathway on the regulation of BCRP and P-glycoprotein. The effect of glutamate and arachidonic acid signaling on BCRP function might

  12. Effect of carbon dioxide on the utilization of brain capillary reserve and flow

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, H.; Dribben, J.; Kissen, I.; Gerlock, T.; Weiss, H.R. )

    1989-12-01

    This study investigated effects of increased arterial carbon dioxide on the brain capillary perfusion pattern. Conscious rats were exposed to a 0%, 8% or 12% CO{sub 2} in air gas mixture. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, arterial blood gases and pH were recorded, and either regional cerebral blood flow or the percent of capillary volume/mm3 or number/mm2 perfused were determined in cortical, hypothalamic, pontine or medullary regions of the brain. Arterial PCO{sub 2} increased from 37 +/- 1 in control to 74 +/- 1 torr in the high CO{sub 2} group. A position linear relationship was found between cerebral blood flow and arterial PCO{sub 2} in all examined regions. Approximately half of the capillaries in the examined regions were perfused under normocapnic conditions. Increasing arterial PCO{sub 2} had no effect on the percent of the capillary bed perfused in the cortex or hypothalamus. However, there was a significant linear relationship between carbon dioxide tension and the percent of the microvasculature perfused in the hindbrain. The percent of capillaries/mm2 perfused increased significantly in the medulla (to 60 +/- 5%) and pons (70 +/- 4%) with 12% CO{sub 2} in air. These data suggest that carbon dioxide may have differential effects on diffusion distances affecting the hindbrain to a greater extent than the forebrain.

  13. Brain capillary endothelium and choroid plexus epithelium regulate transport of transferrin-bound and free iron into the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Rashid; Zheng, Wei; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Iron transport into the CNS is still not completely understood. Using a brain perfusion technique in rats, we have shown a significant brain capillary uptake of circulating transferrin (Tf)-bound and free 59Fe (1 nM) at rates of 136 ± 26 and 182 ± 23 μL/g/min, respectively, while their respective transport rates into brain parenchyma were 1.68 ± 0.56 and 1.52 ± 0.48 μL/g/min. Regional Tf receptor density (Bmax) in brain endothelium determined with 125I-holo-Tf correlated well with 59Fe-Tf regional brain uptake rates reflecting significant vascular association of iron. Tf-bound and free circulating 59Fe were sequestered by the choroid plexus and transported into the CSF at low rates of 0.17 ± 0.01 and 0.09 ± 0.02 μL/min/g, respectively, consistent with a 10-fold brain-CSF concentration gradient for 59Fe, Tf-bound or free. We conclude that transport of circulating Tf-bound and free iron could be equally important for its delivery to the CNS. Moreover, data suggest that entry of Tf-bound and free iron into the CNS is determined by (i) its initial sequestration by brain capillaries and choroid plexus, and (ii) subsequent controlled and slow release from vascular structures into brain interstitial fluid and CSF. PMID:14756801

  14. Capillary telangiectasia of the brain: imaging with various magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Gelal, F; Karakaş, L; Sarsilmaz, A; Yücel, K; Dündar, C; Apaydin, M

    2014-01-01

    Brain capillary telangiectasia is an incidental vascular malformation found usually in pons and sometimes in extra- pontine sites. Typical MRI features are enhancement on post contrast T1 weighted images and signal loss on gradient echo images. We evaluated 10 patients with various MR techniques. Susceptibility weighted imaging was superior to GRE T2 in showing decreased signal due to susceptibility effects. Diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging proved not useful in the diagnosis.

  15. Ultrastructural study and cholinesterase activity of paired capillaries in the newt brain.

    PubMed

    Ciani, F; Franceschini, V

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the ultrastructural and histochemical (AChE and BuChE) features of intracerebral vessels in newt. The blood vessels of the newt brain are paired and end in a closed loop. The two limbs, each of them has delineate the lumen by one endothelial cell, are enclosed within a single basement membrane and are separated from each other by a thin intercapillary wall. The brain capillaries are un-fenestrated and the overlapping endothelial cells were connected by clefts. Ependymal astrocytes extensively ensheath the surface of brain capillaries, but the sheats are incomplete. Pericytes and mast cells are frequently sandwiched in the endothelial basal lamina. Microglial cells are also present adjacent to cerebral vessels. The newt cerebral capillaries are characterized by high levels of AChE. This enzyme is localized in the basal membrane and in extracellular spaces between the overlapping endothelial cells. The vascular walls are instead deprived of BuChE activity. The non-nervous role of cholinesterases is discussed.

  16. Polymersomes conjugated to 83-14 monoclonal antibodies: in vitro targeting of brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Le-Ha; Wu, Dalin; Palivan, Cornelia G; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Huwyler, Jörg

    2014-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains an obstacle for many drugs to reach the brain. A strategy to cross the BBB is to modify nanocarrier systems with ligands that bind to endogenous receptors expressed at the BBB to induce receptor-mediated transport. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of polymersomes composed of the amphiphilic diblock copolymer poly(dimethylsiloxane)-block-poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline), PDMS-b-PMOXA, for active targeting of brain capillary endothelial cells. We conjugated PDMS-b-PMOXA polymersomes to the anti-human insulin receptor antibody 83-14 and studied their uptake by brain capillary endothelial cells. Transmission electron micrography and light scattering measurements revealed the self-assembly of the block copolymers into 200 nm vesicles after extrusion. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy was employed to calculate the number of antibodies coupled to one polymersome. Binding and uptake of the polymersomes conjugated to 83-14 mAb were studied in the human BBB in vitro model hCMEC/D3 expressing the human insulin receptor. Competitive inhibition with an excess of free 83-14 mAb demonstrated the specificity of cellular binding and uptake. Our results suggest that PDMS-b-PMOXA polymersomes conjugated to 83-14 mAb may be suitable nanocarriers for drug delivery to the brain.

  17. Mapping human brain capillary water lifetime: high-resolution metabolic neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Rooney, William D; Li, Xin; Sammi, Manoj K; Bourdette, Dennis N; Neuwelt, Edward A; Springer, Charles S

    2015-06-01

    Shutter-speed analysis of dynamic-contrast-agent (CA)-enhanced normal, multiple sclerosis (MS), and glioblastoma (GBM) human brain data gives the mean capillary water molecule lifetime (τ(b)) and blood volume fraction (v(b); capillary density-volume product (ρ(†)V)) in a high-resolution (1)H2O MRI voxel (40 μL) or ROI. The equilibrium water extravasation rate constant, k(po) (τ(b)(-1)), averages 3.2 and 2.9 s(-1) in resting-state normal white matter (NWM) and gray matter (NGM), respectively (n = 6). The results (italicized) lead to three major conclusions. (A) k(po) differences are dominated by capillary water permeability (P(W)(†)), not size, differences. NWM and NGM voxel k(po) and v(b) values are independent. Quantitative analyses of concomitant population-averaged k(po), v(b) variations in normal and normal-appearing MS brain ROIs confirm P(W)(†) dominance. (B) P(W)(†) is dominated (>95%) by a trans(endothelial)cellular pathway, not the P(CA)(†) paracellular route. In MS lesions and GBM tumors, P(CA)(†) increases but P(W)(†) decreases. (C) k(po) tracks steady-state ATP production/consumption flux per capillary. In normal, MS, and GBM brain, regional k(po) correlates with literature MRSI ATP (positively) and Na(+) (negatively) tissue concentrations. This suggests that the P(W)(†) pathway is metabolically active. Excellent agreement of the relative NGM/NWM k(po)v(b) product ratio with the literature (31)PMRSI-MT CMR(oxphos) ratio confirms the flux property. We have previously shown that the cellular water molecule efflux rate constant (k(io)) is proportional to plasma membrane P-type ATPase turnover, likely due to active trans-membrane water cycling. With synaptic proximities and synergistic metabolic cooperativities, polar brain endothelial, neuroglial, and neuronal cells form "gliovascular units." We hypothesize that a chain of water cycling processes transmits brain metabolic activity to k(po), letting it report neurogliovascular unit Na

  18. Mapping Human Brain Capillary Water Lifetime: High-Resolution Metabolic Neuromaging

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, William D.; Li, Xin; Sammi, Manoj K.; Bourdette, Dennis N.; Neuwelt, Edward A.; Springer, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Shutter-speed analysis of Dynamic-Contrast-Agent-(CA)-Enhanced normal, multiple sclerosis [MS], and glioblastoma [GBM] human brain data gives the mean capillary water molecule lifetime [τb] and blood volume fraction [vb; capillary density·volume product (′†·V)] in a high-resolution 1H2O MRI voxel [40 μL] or ROI. The equilibrium water extravasation rate constant, kpo [τb−1], averages 3.2 and 2.9 s−1 in resting-state normal white matter [NWM] and gray matter [NGM], respectively [n = 6]. The results {parenthesized} lead to three major conclusions. A) kpo differences are dominated by capillary water permeability [PW†], not size, differences. {NWM and NGM voxel kpo and vb values are independent. Quantitative analyses of concomitant population-averaged kpo,vb variations in normal and normal-appearing MS brain ROIs confirm PW† dominance.} B) PW† is dominated [> 95%] by a trans[endothelial]cellular pathway, not the PCA† para-cellular route. {In MS lesions and GBM tumors, PCA† increases but PW† decreases.} C) kpo tracks steady-state ATP production/consumption flux per capillary. {In normal, MS, and GBM brain, regional kpo correlates with literature MRSI ATP [positively] and Na+ [negatively] tissue concentrations. These suggest the PW† pathway is metabolically active. Excellent agreement of the relative NGM/NWM kpo·vb product ratio with the literature 31PMRSI-MT CMRoxphos ratio confirms the flux property.} We have previously shown the cellular water molecule efflux rate constant [kio] is proportional to plasma membrane P-type ATPase turnover, likely due to active trans-membrane water cycling. With synaptic proximities and synergistic metabolic co-operativities, polar brain endothelial, neuroglial, and neuronal cells form “gliovascular units.” We hypothesize a chain of water cycling processes transmits brain metabolic activity to kpo, letting it report neurogliovascular unit Na+,K+-ATPase activity. Cerebral kpo maps represent metabolic

  19. Mapping human brain capillary water lifetime: high-resolution metabolic neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Rooney, William D; Li, Xin; Sammi, Manoj K; Bourdette, Dennis N; Neuwelt, Edward A; Springer, Charles S

    2015-06-01

    Shutter-speed analysis of dynamic-contrast-agent (CA)-enhanced normal, multiple sclerosis (MS), and glioblastoma (GBM) human brain data gives the mean capillary water molecule lifetime (τ(b)) and blood volume fraction (v(b); capillary density-volume product (ρ(†)V)) in a high-resolution (1)H2O MRI voxel (40 μL) or ROI. The equilibrium water extravasation rate constant, k(po) (τ(b)(-1)), averages 3.2 and 2.9 s(-1) in resting-state normal white matter (NWM) and gray matter (NGM), respectively (n = 6). The results (italicized) lead to three major conclusions. (A) k(po) differences are dominated by capillary water permeability (P(W)(†)), not size, differences. NWM and NGM voxel k(po) and v(b) values are independent. Quantitative analyses of concomitant population-averaged k(po), v(b) variations in normal and normal-appearing MS brain ROIs confirm P(W)(†) dominance. (B) P(W)(†) is dominated (>95%) by a trans(endothelial)cellular pathway, not the P(CA)(†) paracellular route. In MS lesions and GBM tumors, P(CA)(†) increases but P(W)(†) decreases. (C) k(po) tracks steady-state ATP production/consumption flux per capillary. In normal, MS, and GBM brain, regional k(po) correlates with literature MRSI ATP (positively) and Na(+) (negatively) tissue concentrations. This suggests that the P(W)(†) pathway is metabolically active. Excellent agreement of the relative NGM/NWM k(po)v(b) product ratio with the literature (31)PMRSI-MT CMR(oxphos) ratio confirms the flux property. We have previously shown that the cellular water molecule efflux rate constant (k(io)) is proportional to plasma membrane P-type ATPase turnover, likely due to active trans-membrane water cycling. With synaptic proximities and synergistic metabolic cooperativities, polar brain endothelial, neuroglial, and neuronal cells form "gliovascular units." We hypothesize that a chain of water cycling processes transmits brain metabolic activity to k(po), letting it report neurogliovascular unit Na

  20. Mapping human brain capillary water lifetime: high‐resolution metabolic neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Sammi, Manoj K.; Bourdette, Dennis N.; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Shutter‐speed analysis of dynamic‐contrast‐agent (CA)‐enhanced normal, multiple sclerosis (MS), and glioblastoma (GBM) human brain data gives the mean capillary water molecule lifetime (τ b) and blood volume fraction (v b; capillary density–volume product (ρ † V)) in a high‐resolution 1H2O MRI voxel (40 μL) or ROI. The equilibrium water extravasation rate constant, k po (τ b −1), averages 3.2 and 2.9 s−1 in resting‐state normal white matter (NWM) and gray matter (NGM), respectively (n = 6). The results (italicized) lead to three major conclusions. (A) k po differences are dominated by capillary water permeability (P W †), not size, differences. NWM and NGM voxel k po and vb values are independent. Quantitative analyses of concomitant population‐averaged k po, vb variations in normal and normal‐appearing MS brain ROIs confirm PW † dominance. (B) P W † is dominated (>95%) by a trans(endothelial)cellular pathway, not the P CA † paracellular route. In MS lesions and GBM tumors, PCA † increases but PW † decreases. (C) k po tracks steady‐state ATP production/consumption flux per capillary. In normal, MS, and GBM brain, regional k po correlates with literature MRSI ATP (positively) and Na + (negatively) tissue concentrations. This suggests that the PW † pathway is metabolically active. Excellent agreement of the relative NGM/NWM k po vb product ratio with the literature 31PMRSI‐MT CMRoxphos ratio confirms the flux property. We have previously shown that the cellular water molecule efflux rate constant (k io) is proportional to plasma membrane P‐type ATPase turnover, likely due to active trans‐membrane water cycling. With synaptic proximities and synergistic metabolic cooperativities, polar brain endothelial, neuroglial, and neuronal cells form “gliovascular units.” We hypothesize that a chain of water cycling processes transmits brain metabolic activity to k po, letting it report neurogliovascular unit Na

  1. New aspects in fenestrated capillary and tissue dynamics in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult brains

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) generally consists of endothelial tight junction barriers that prevent the free entry of blood-derived substances, thereby maintaining the extracellular environment of the brain. However, the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which are located along the midlines of the brain ventricles, lack these endothelial barriers and have fenestrated capillaries; therefore, they have a number of essential functions, including the transduction of information between the blood circulation and brain. Previous studies have demonstrated the extensive contribution of the CVOs to body fluid and thermal homeostasis, energy balance, the chemoreception of blood-derived substances, and neuroinflammation. In this review, recent advances have been discussed in fenestrated capillary characterization and dynamic tissue reconstruction accompanied by angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis in the sensory CVOs of adult brains. The sensory CVOs, including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), subfornical organ (SFO), and area postrema (AP), have size-selective and heterogeneous vascular permeabilities. Astrocyte-/tanycyte-like neural stem cells (NSCs) sense blood- and cerebrospinal fluid-derived information through the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a mechanical/osmotic receptor, Toll-like receptor 4, a lipopolysaccharide receptor, and Nax, a Na-sensing Na channel. They also express tight junction proteins and densely and tightly surround mature neurons to protect them from blood-derived neurotoxic substances, indicating that the NSCs of the CVOs perform BBB functions while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into new neurons and glial cells. In addition to neurogliogenesis, the density of fenestrated capillaries is regulated by angiogenesis, which is accompanied by the active proliferation and sprouting of endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling may be involved in angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis, both

  2. Analysis of serotonin in brain microdialysates using capillary electrophoresis and native laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Benturquia, Nadia; Couderc, François; Sauvinet, Valérie; Orset, Cyrille; Parrot, Sandrine; Bayle, Christophe; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2005-03-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. In this work, a method for analyzing 5-HT in brain microdialysis samples using a commercially available capillary electrophoresis (CE) system has been developed. A pH-mediated in-capillary preconcentration of samples was performed, and after separation by capillary zone electrophoresis, native fluorescence of 5-HT was detected by a 266 nm solid-state laser. The separation conditions for the analysis of 5-HT in standard solutions and microdialysates have been optimized, and this method has been validated on both pharmacological and analytical bases. Separation of 5-HT was performed using a 80 mmol/L citrate buffer, pH 2.5, containing 20 mmol/L hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) and +30 kV voltage. The detection limit was 2.5 x 10(-10) mol/L. This method allows the in vivo brain monitoring of 5-HT using a simple, accurate CE measurement in underivatized microdialysis samples.

  3. Collecting peptide release from the brain using porous polymer monolith-based solid phase extraction capillaries.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Jamie M; Ren, Shifang; Hatcher, Nathan G; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2009-07-01

    Porous polymer monolithic (PPM) columns are employed to collect and concentrate neuronal release from invertebrate and vertebrate model systems, prior to their characterization with mass spectrometry. The monoliths are fabricated in fused-silica capillaries from lauryl methacrylate (LMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA). The binding capacities for fluorescein and for fluorescently labeled peptides are on the order of nanomoles per millimeter of length of monolith material for a capillary with an inner diameter of 200 microm. To evaluate this strategy for collecting peptides from physiological solutions, angiotensin I and insulin in artificial seawater are loaded onto, and then released from, the monoliths after a desalination rinse, resulting in femtomole limits of detection via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Positioned in the extracellular media near Aplysia californica bag cell neurons, upon electrical stimulation, these LMA-EDMA monoliths are also used to collect and concentrate peptide release, with egg-laying hormones and acidic peptide detected. In addition, the collection of several known peptides secreted from chemically stimulated mouse brain slices demonstrates their ability to collect releasates from a variety of neuronal tissues. When compared to collection approaches using individual beads placed on brain slices, the PPM capillaries offer greater binding capacity. Moreover, they maintain higher spatial resolution, compared to the larger-volume, solid-phase extraction collection strategies.

  4. Molecular and functional characterization of riboflavin specific transport system in rat brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-08-15

    Riboflavin is an important water soluble vitamin (B2) required for metabolic reactions, normal cellular growth, differentiation and function. Mammalian brain cells cannot synthesize riboflavin and must import from systemic circulation. However, the uptake mechanism, cellular translocation and intracellular trafficking of riboflavin in brain capillary endothelial cells are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the existence of a riboflavin-specific transport system and delineate the uptake and intracellular regulation of riboflavin in immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBE4). The uptake of [3H]-riboflavin is sodium, temperature and energy dependent but pH independent. [3H]-Riboflavin uptake is saturable with K(m) and V(max) values of 19 ± 3 μM and 0.235 ± 0.012 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The uptake process is inhibited by unlabelled structural analogs (lumiflavin, lumichrome) but not by structurally unrelated vitamins. Ca(++)/calmodulin and protein kinase A (PKA) pathways are found to play an important role in the intracellular regulation of [3H]-riboflavin. Apical and baso-lateral uptake of [3H]-riboflavin clearly indicates that a riboflavin specific transport system is predominantly localized on the apical side of RBE4 cells. A 628 bp band corresponding to a riboflavin transporter is revealed in RT-PCR analysis. These findings, for the first time report the existence of a specialized and high affinity transport system for riboflavin in RBE4 cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle limiting drug transport inside the brain as it regulates drug permeation from systemic circulation. This transporter can be utilized for targeted delivery in enhancing brain permeation of highly potent drugs on systemic administration.

  5. Preclinical pulmonary capillary endothelial dysfunction is present in brain dead subjects.

    PubMed

    Glynos, Constantinos; Athanasiou, Chariclea; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Korovesi, Ioanna; Kaziani, Katerina; Livaditi, Olga; Dimopoulou, Ioanna; Maniatis, Nikolaos A; Tsangaris, Iraklis; Roussos, Charis; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Orfanos, Stylianos E

    2013-04-01

    Pulmonary endothelium is a major metabolic organ affecting pulmonary and systemic vascular homeostasis. Brain death (BD)-induced physiologic and metabolic derangements in donors' lungs, in the absence of overt lung pathology, may cause pulmonary dysfunction and compromise post-transplant graft function. To explore the impact of BD on pulmonary endothelium, we estimated pulmonary capillary endothelium-bound (PCEB)-angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, a direct and quantifiable index of pulmonary endothelial function, in eight brain-dead patients and ten brain-injured mechanically ventilated controls. No subject suffered from acute lung injury or any other overt lung pathology. Applying indicator-dilution type techniques, we measured single-pass transpulmonary percent metabolism (%M) and hydrolysis (v) of the synthetic, biologically inactive, and highly specific for ACE substrate (3)H-benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro, under first order reaction conditions, and calculated lung functional capillary surface area (FCSA). Substrate %M (35 ± 6.8%) and v (0.49 ± 0.13) in BD patients were decreased as compared to controls (55.9 ± 4.9, P = 0.033 and 0.9 ± 0.15, P = 0.033, respectively), denoting decreased pulmonary endothelial enzyme activity at the capillary level; FCSA, a reflection of endothelial enzyme activity per vascular bed, was also decreased (BD patients: 1,563 ± 562 mL/min vs 4,235 ± 559 in controls; P = 0.003). We conclude that BD is associated with subtle pulmonary endothelial injury, expressed by decreased PCEB-ACE activity. The applied indicator-dilution type technique provides direct and quantifiable indices of pulmonary endothelial function at the bedside that may reveal the existence of preclinical lung pathology in potential lung donors. PMID:24015344

  6. Preclinical pulmonary capillary endothelial dysfunction is present in brain dead subjects

    PubMed Central

    Glynos, Constantinos; Athanasiou, Chariclea; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Korovesi, Ioanna; Kaziani, Katerina; Livaditi, Olga; Dimopoulou, Ioanna; Maniatis, Nikolaos A.; Tsangaris, Iraklis; Roussos, Charis; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Orfanos, Stylianos E.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endothelium is a major metabolic organ affecting pulmonary and systemic vascular homeostasis. Brain death (BD)-induced physiologic and metabolic derangements in donors’ lungs, in the absence of overt lung pathology, may cause pulmonary dysfunction and compromise post-transplant graft function. To explore the impact of BD on pulmonary endothelium, we estimated pulmonary capillary endothelium-bound (PCEB)-angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, a direct and quantifiable index of pulmonary endothelial function, in eight brain-dead patients and ten brain-injured mechanically ventilated controls. No subject suffered from acute lung injury or any other overt lung pathology. Applying indicator-dilution type techniques, we measured single-pass transpulmonary percent metabolism (%M) and hydrolysis (v) of the synthetic, biologically inactive, and highly specific for ACE substrate 3H-benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro, under first order reaction conditions, and calculated lung functional capillary surface area (FCSA). Substrate %M (35 ± 6.8%) and v (0.49 ± 0.13) in BD patients were decreased as compared to controls (55.9 ± 4.9, P = 0.033 and 0.9 ± 0.15, P = 0.033, respectively), denoting decreased pulmonary endothelial enzyme activity at the capillary level; FCSA, a reflection of endothelial enzyme activity per vascular bed, was also decreased (BD patients: 1,563 ± 562 mL/min vs 4,235 ± 559 in controls; P = 0.003). We conclude that BD is associated with subtle pulmonary endothelial injury, expressed by decreased PCEB-ACE activity. The applied indicator-dilution type technique provides direct and quantifiable indices of pulmonary endothelial function at the bedside that may reveal the existence of preclinical lung pathology in potential lung donors. PMID:24015344

  7. Ultrafast Capillary Electrophoresis Isolation of DNA Aptamer for the PCR Amplification-Based Small Analyte Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Emmanuelle; Dausse, Eric; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Peyrin, Eric; Ravelet, Corinne

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report a new homogeneous DNA amplification-based aptamer assay for small analyte sensing. The aptamer of adenosine chosen as the model analyte was split into two fragments able to assemble in the presence of target. Primers were introduced at extremities of one fragment in order to generate the amplifiable DNA component. The amount of amplifiable fragment was quantifiable by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) amplification and directly reliable on adenosine concentration. This approach combines the very high separation efficiency and the homogeneous format (without immobilization) of capillary electrophoresis and the sensitivity of real time PCR amplification. An ultrafast isolation of target-bound split aptamer (60 s) was developed by designing a capillary electrophoresis input/ouput scheme. Such method was successfully applied to the determination of adenosine with a LOD of 1 µM.

  8. Uptake and transport of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles through human brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L B; Linemann, T; Pondman, K M; Lichota, J; Kim, K S; Pieters, R J; Visser, G M; Moos, T

    2013-10-16

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) constitutes a firm physical, chemical, and immunological barrier, making the brain accessible to only a few percent of potential drugs intended for treatment inside the central nervous system. With the purpose of overcoming the restraints of the BBB by allowing the transport of drugs, siRNA, or DNA into the brain, a novel approach is to use superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as drug carriers. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of fluorescent SPIONs to pass through human brain microvascular endothelial cells facilitated by an external magnet. The ability of SPIONs to penetrate the barrier was shown to be significantly stronger in the presence of an external magnetic force in an in vitro BBB model. Hence, particles added to the luminal side of the in vitro BBB model were found in astrocytes cocultured at a remote distance on the abluminal side, indicating that particles were transported through the barrier and taken up by astrocytes. Addition of the SPIONs to the culture medium did not negatively affect the viability of the endothelial cells. The magnetic force-mediated dragging of SPIONs through BCECs may denote a novel mechanism for the delivery of drugs to the brain.

  9. Comparison of histamine and hyperosmotic arabinose infusion on brain capillary permeability to hydrophilic solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of bilateral intracarotid infusion of histamine (HA) on capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of two metabolically inert tracers was determined and compared to that of L(+)arabinose (ARAB) in rat brain. Ringer's solution alone, or with 1 mg/kg HA diphosphate or 1.6M ARAB added, was infused (0.9 ml over 0.5 min) into each external carotid artery (CA). Five minutes later, a bolus of /sup 14/C-sucrose and /sup 3/H-L-glucose was injected i.v. Estimates of PS for both tracers were computed by the method of Ohno et al after brain concentration was corrected for tracer within cerebral blood vessels. Brain blood volume, based on the /sup 14/C-dextran space, was the same (.016 ml/g) in discrete cortical and midbrain regions of all rats except those treated with ARAB. The latter yielded .033 ml/g, presumably due to dextran extravasation. Infusion of ARAB, HA and Ringer's increased the PS's of sucrose and L-glucose by 10x, 8x, and 3x in brain regions perfused by the internal CA's. The ratio, PS-sucrose/PS-L-glucose was unchanged by any treatment. Both ARAB and HA caused transient falls in arterial pressure, but only ARAB caused deaths (3 of 9 rats). While as effective as ARAB in opening the blood-brain barrier, HA may be safer than hyperosmotic shock to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to brain tumors.

  10. Mathematical model of the effect of ischemia-reperfusion on brain capillary collapse and tissue swelling.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Mokhtarudin, M J; Payne, S J

    2015-05-01

    Restoration of an adequate cerebral blood supply after an ischemic attack is a primary clinical goal. However, the blood-brain barrier may break down after a prolonged ischemia causing the fluid in the blood plasma to filtrate and accumulate into the cerebral tissue interstitial space. Accumulation of this filtration fluid causes the cerebral tissue to swell, a condition known as vasogenic oedema. Tissue swelling causes the cerebral microvessels to be compressed, which may further obstruct the blood flow into the tissue, thus leading to the no-reflow phenomenon or a secondary ischemic stroke. The actual mechanism of this however is still not fully understood. A new model is developed here to study the effect of reperfusion on the formation of vasogenic oedema and cerebral microvessel collapse. The formation of vasogenic oedema is modelled using the capillary filtration equation while vessel collapse is modelled using the tube law of microvessel. Tissue swelling is quantified in terms of displacement, which is modelled using poroelastic theory. The results show that there is an increase in tissue displacement and interstitial pressure after reperfusion. In addition, the results also show that vessel collapse can occur at high value of reperfusion pressure, low blood osmotic pressure, high cerebral capillary permeability and low cerebral capillary stiffness. This model provides insight on the formation of ischemia-reperfusion injury by tissue swelling and vessel collapse. PMID:25749185

  11. Distribution of capillary transit times in isolated lungs of oxygen-tolerant rats.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Madhavi; Gan, Zhuohui; Clough, Anne V; Molthen, Robert C; Roerig, David L; Audi, Said H

    2010-11-01

    Rats pre-exposed to 85% O₂ for 5-7 days tolerate the otherwise lethal effects of 100% O₂. The objective was to evaluate the effect of rat exposure to 85% O₂ for 7 days on lung capillary mean transit time t(c) and distribution of capillary transit times (h(c)(t)). This information is important for subsequent evaluation of the effect of this hyperoxia model on the redox metabolic functions of the pulmonary capillary endothelium. The venous concentration vs. time outflow curves of fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled dextran (FITC-dex), an intravascular indicator, and coenzyme Q₁ hydroquinone (CoQ₁H₂), a compound which rapidly equilibrates between blood and tissue on passage through the pulmonary circulation, were measured following their bolus injection into the pulmonary artery of isolated perfused lungs from rats exposed to room air (normoxic) or 85% O₂ for 7 days (hyperoxic). The moments (mean transit time and variance) of the measured FITC-dex and CoQ₁H₂ outflow curves were determined for each lung, and were then used in a mathematical model [Audi et al. J. Appl. Physiol. 77: 332-351, 1994] to estimate t(c) and the relative dispersion (RD(c)) of h (c)(t). Data analysis reveals that exposure to hyperoxia decreases lung t(c) by 42% and increases RD(c), a measure h(c)(t) heterogeneity, by 40%.

  12. Regulation of P-glycoprotein expression in brain capillaries in Huntington's disease and its impact on brain availability of antipsychotic agents risperidone and paliperidone.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Han; Chern, Yijuang; Yang, Hui-Ting; Chen, Hui-Mei; Lin, Chun-Jung

    2016-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease marked by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tract on the huntingtin (HTT) protein that may cause transcriptional dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the regulation and function of P-glycoprotein, an important efflux transporter, in brain capillaries in HD. The results showed that, compared with the littermate controls, R6/2 HD transgenic mice with the human mutant HTT gene had higher levels of P-glycoprotein mRNA and protein and enhanced NF-κB activity in their brain capillaries. Higher P-glycoprotein expression was also observed in the brain capillaries of human HD patients. Consistent with this enhanced P-glycoprotein expression, brain extracellular levels and brain-to-plasma ratios of the antipsychotic agents risperidone and paliperidone were significantly lower in R6/2 mice than in their littermate controls. Exogenous expression of human mutant HTT protein with expanded polyQ (mHTT-109Q) in HEK293T cells enhanced the levels of P-glycoprotein transcripts and NF-κB activity compared with cells expressing normal HTT-25Q. Treatment with the IKK inhibitor, BMS-345541, decreased P-glycoprotein mRNA level in cells transfected with mHTT-109Q or normal HTT-25Q In conclusion, mutant HTT altered the expression of P-glycoprotein through the NF-κB pathway in brain capillaries in HD and markedly affected the availability of P-glycoprotein substrates in the brain.

  13. Apical-basal membrane polarity of membrane phosphatases in isolated capillary endothelium: alteration in ultrastructural localisation under culture conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, R L; Sandra, A

    1993-01-01

    Capillaries from freshly isolated rat epididymal fat were subjected to protocols that allowed ultrastructural localisation of alkaline phosphatase and 5'-nucleotidase. Alkaline phosphatase was almost entirely restricted to the capillary luminal membrane and vesicles associated with this membrane. 5'-nucleotidase was localised on the basal or abluminal membrane and associated vesicles. Arterioles and occasional venules were also present in the cell isolates, and arteriole localisation of 5'-nucleotidase was identical to that in capillaries. In venules, 5'-nucleotidase often failed to exhibit a polarised distribution and was present on both membrane domains. In confluent cultured endothelial cells, 5'-nucleotidase was not expressed in a predominantly polarised arrangement. Alkaline phosphatase was found on apical surfaces and regions of lateral cell contact. The results of these studies show that capillary endothelial cells exhibit enzyme polarity of their surface membranes which is subject to change on introduction of the cells to tissue culture. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8226289

  14. Mechanisms and regulation of iron trafficking across the capillary endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan C.; Kosman, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The transcellular trafficking of iron from the blood into the brain interstitium depends on iron uptake proteins in the apical membrane of brain microvascular capillary endothelial cells and efflux proteins at the basolateral, abluminal membrane. In this review, we discuss the three mechanisms by which these cells take-up iron from the blood and the sole mechanism by which they efflux this iron into the abluminal space. We then focus on the regulation of this efflux pathway by exocrine factors that are released from neighboring astrocytes. Also discussed are the cytokines secreted by capillary cells that regulate the expression of these glial cell signals. Among the interstitial factors that regulate iron efflux into the brain is the Amyloid precursor protein (APP). The role of this amyliodogenic species in brain iron metabolism is discussed. Last, we speculate on the potential relationship between iron transport at the blood-brain barrier and neurological disorders associated with iron mismanagement. PMID:26236187

  15. Isolation of flavonoids from Delonix elata and determination of its rutin content using capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Al-Taweel, Areej Mohammed; Abdel-Kader, Maged Saad; Fawzy, Ghada Ahmed; Perveen, Shagufta; Maher, Hadir Mohamed; Al-Zoman, Nourah Zoman; Al-Shehri, Mona Mohamed; Al-Johar, Haya; Al-Showiman, Hessa

    2015-09-01

    Delonix elata (L.) Gamble (Fabaceae) is an important, traditionally used plant in Saudi Arabia. It is used to relieve rheumatic pain, flatulence and the seeds are employed as purgatives. The aim of the present study was to isolate chemical constituents of the n-butanol fraction (BF) of D. elata and to find out, by capillary electrophoresis (CE), percentage of rutin present in this BF. Three quercetin glycosides and one kaempferol rutinoside were isolated from the BF of aerial parts of D. elata; namely, Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside-7-O-glucoside (1), Quercetin 3,7-diglucoside (2), Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside (RUT) (3) and Kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside (4). Rutin, an active constituent has been reported to possess good pharmacological as well as therapeutic potentials. A sensitive and rapid procedure for quantitative determination of RUT by capillary electrophoresis was developed and its content was found to be 7.349 mg/gm, relative to n-butanol fraction and 18.373 mg%, relative to the dry powder of D. elata. The method could be recommended for approval and use in the pharmaceutical and food industries. PMID:26525033

  16. Endothelin stimulates phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis and DNA synthesis in brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vigne, P; Marsault, R; Breittmayer, J P; Frelin, C

    1990-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a novel vasoconstricting and cardiotonic peptide that is synthesized by the vascular endothelium. Bovine aortic endothelial cells which secrete ET in vitro lack membrane receptor sites for the peptide. Endothelial cells from rat brain microvessels that do not secrete ET in vitro express large amounts of high-affinity receptors for 125I-labelled ET-1 (Kd 0.8 nM). The ET receptor is recognized by sarafotoxin S6b and the different ET peptides with the following order of potency: ET-1 (Kd 0.5 nM) approximately equal to ET-2 (Kd 0.7 nM) greater than sarafotoxin S6b (Kd 27 nM) greater than ET-3 (Kd 450 nM). This structure-activity relationship is different from those found in vascular smooth muscle cells, renal cells and cardiac cells. ET-1 stimulates DNA synthesis in brain capillary endothelial cells. It is more potent than basic fibroblast growth factor. The action of ET on endothelial cells from microvessels involves phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. These observations suggest that brain endothelial cells might be an important target for ET. PMID:2156495

  17. Modifications in astrocyte morphology and calcium signaling induced by a brain capillary endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth J

    2002-04-15

    Astrocytes extend specialized endfoot processes to perisynaptic and perivascular regions, and thus are positioned to mediate the bidirectional flow of metabolic, ionic, and other transmissive substances between neurons and the blood stream. While mutual structural and functional interactions between neurons and astrocytes have been documented, less is known about the interactions between astrocytes and cerebrovascular cells. For example, although the ability of astrocytes to induce structural and functional changes in endothelial cells is established, the reciprocity of brain endothelial cells to induce changes in astrocytes is undetermined. This issue is addressed in the present study. Changes in primary cultures of neonatal mouse cortical astrocytes were investigated following their coculture with mouse brain capillary endothelial (bEnd3) cells. The presence of bEnd3 cells altered the morphology of astrocytes by transforming them from confluent monolayers into networks of elongated multicellular columns. These columns did not occur when either bEnd3 cells or astrocytes were cocultured with other cell types, suggesting that astrocytes undergo specific morphological consequences when placed in close proximity to brain endothelial cells. In addition to these structural changes, the pharmacological profile of astrocytes was modified by coculture with bEnd3 cells. Astrocytes in the cocultures showed an increased Ca2+ responsiveness to bradykinin and glutamate, but no change in responsiveness to ATP, as compared to controls. Coculturing the astrocytes with a neuronal cell line resulted in increased responsiveness of the glial responses to glutamate but not to bradykinin. These studies indicate that brain endothelial cells induce changes in astrocyte morphology and pharmacology.

  18. Modifications in astrocyte morphology and calcium signaling induced by a brain capillary endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth J

    2002-04-15

    Astrocytes extend specialized endfoot processes to perisynaptic and perivascular regions, and thus are positioned to mediate the bidirectional flow of metabolic, ionic, and other transmissive substances between neurons and the blood stream. While mutual structural and functional interactions between neurons and astrocytes have been documented, less is known about the interactions between astrocytes and cerebrovascular cells. For example, although the ability of astrocytes to induce structural and functional changes in endothelial cells is established, the reciprocity of brain endothelial cells to induce changes in astrocytes is undetermined. This issue is addressed in the present study. Changes in primary cultures of neonatal mouse cortical astrocytes were investigated following their coculture with mouse brain capillary endothelial (bEnd3) cells. The presence of bEnd3 cells altered the morphology of astrocytes by transforming them from confluent monolayers into networks of elongated multicellular columns. These columns did not occur when either bEnd3 cells or astrocytes were cocultured with other cell types, suggesting that astrocytes undergo specific morphological consequences when placed in close proximity to brain endothelial cells. In addition to these structural changes, the pharmacological profile of astrocytes was modified by coculture with bEnd3 cells. Astrocytes in the cocultures showed an increased Ca2+ responsiveness to bradykinin and glutamate, but no change in responsiveness to ATP, as compared to controls. Coculturing the astrocytes with a neuronal cell line resulted in increased responsiveness of the glial responses to glutamate but not to bradykinin. These studies indicate that brain endothelial cells induce changes in astrocyte morphology and pharmacology. PMID:11948807

  19. Ultrafast capillary electrophoresis isolation of DNA aptamer for the PCR amplification-based small analyte sensing

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Emmanuelle; Dausse, Eric; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Peyrin, Eric; Ravelet, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a new homogeneous DNA amplification-based aptamer assay for small analyte sensing. The aptamer of adenosine chosen as the model analyte was split into two fragments able to assemble in the presence of target. Primers were introduced at extremities of one fragment in order to generate the amplifiable DNA component. The amount of amplifiable fragment was quantifiable by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) amplification and directly reliable on adenosine concentration. This approach combines the very high separation efficiency and the homogeneous format (without immobilization) of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and the sensitivity of real time PCR amplification. An ultrafast isolation of target-bound split aptamer (60 s) was developed by designing a CE input/ouput scheme. Such method was successfully applied to the determination of adenosine with a LOD of 1 μM. PMID:26322305

  20. Ultrafast capillary electrophoresis isolation of DNA aptamer for the PCR amplification-based small analyte sensing.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Emmanuelle; Dausse, Eric; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Peyrin, Eric; Ravelet, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a new homogeneous DNA amplification-based aptamer assay for small analyte sensing. The aptamer of adenosine chosen as the model analyte was split into two fragments able to assemble in the presence of target. Primers were introduced at extremities of one fragment in order to generate the amplifiable DNA component. The amount of amplifiable fragment was quantifiable by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) amplification and directly reliable on adenosine concentration. This approach combines the very high separation efficiency and the homogeneous format (without immobilization) of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and the sensitivity of real time PCR amplification. An ultrafast isolation of target-bound split aptamer (60 s) was developed by designing a CE input/ouput scheme. Such method was successfully applied to the determination of adenosine with a LOD of 1 μM.

  1. Isolation, characterization, and long-term cultivation of porcine and murine cerebral capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tontsch, U; Bauer, H C

    1989-03-01

    We present a simple method for isolation and long-term cultivation of porcine and murine cerebral capillary endothelial cells (cEC). Two major points are made. First, that the "characteristic" morphology of the endothelial cells depends mainly on the presence of endothelial cell growth factors in the culture medium and second, that the identification of the cells as endothelial cells requires a special lectin instead of criteria used for large vessel endothelial cells, such as factor VIII staining or LDL uptake. Pure cerebral capillaries were isolated by means of a series of centrifugation steps; endothelial cells were released by collagenase treatment and cultivated on plastic petri dishes, which proved to be better for cell attachment than collagen or gelatin coating. The microvascular cells were cultivated in either the presence or absence of growth factors. Medium 199 + 10% FCS produced mainly spindle-shaped cells, growing in the "hills and valleys" pattern, which, if not passaged for weeks, showed three dimensional tubular structures. Cells of the "cobblestone" phenotype were promoted in medium 199 + 10% FCS, enriched with endothelial cell growth supplement (ECGS) and heparin (referred to as complete medium). These cells retained their phenotype for months and could be passaged up to 35 times till now. If ECGS and heparin were omitted from these cultures, the cells became elongated and resembled smooth muscle cells. This effect was reversible when the cells were transferred to complete medium. With cEC, cloned by limiting dilution, we noticed this reversal phenomenon as well. We used several markers to characterize the microvascular cells and could show that the lectin of Bandeiraea simplicifolia is a highly reliable marker for endothelial cells and that the monoclonal antibody alpha-sm-1 (anti-smooth muscle cell actin) is excellent for determining smooth muscle cells.

  2. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing of Akt Isoforms Identifies Highly Dynamic Phosphorylation in Neuronal Cells and Brain Tissue*

    PubMed Central

    Schrötter, Sandra; Leondaritis, George; Eickholt, Britta J.

    2016-01-01

    The PI3K/PTEN/Akt pathway has been established as a core signaling pathway that is crucial for the integration of neurons into neuronal circuits and the maintenance of the architecture and function of neurons in the adult brain. Akt1–3 kinases are specifically activated by two phosphorylation events on residues Thr308 and Ser473 upon growth factor signaling, which subsequently phosphorylate a vast cohort of downstream targets. However, we still lack a clear understanding of the complexity and regulation of isoform specificity within the PI3K/PTEN/Akt pathway. We utilized a capillary-based isoelectric focusing method to study dynamics of Akt phosphorylation in neuronal cells and the developing brain and identify previously undescribed features of Akt phosphorylation and activation. First, we show that the accumulation of multiple phosphorylation events on Akt forms occur concurrently with Ser473 and Thr308 phosphorylation upon acute PI3K activation and provide evidence for uncoupling of Ser473 and Thr308 phosphorylation, as well as differential sensitivities of Akt1 forms upon PI3K inhibition. Second, we detect a transient shift in Akt isoform phosphorylation and activation pattern during early postnatal brain development, at stages corresponding to synapse development and maturation. Third, we show differential sensitivities of Ser473-Akt species to PTEN deletion in mature neurons, which suggests inherent differences in the Akt pools that are accessible to growth factors as compared with the pools that are controlled by PTEN. Our study demonstrates the presence of complex phosphorylation events of Akt in a time- and signal-dependent manner in neurons. PMID:26945062

  3. Upregulation of the low density lipoprotein receptor at the blood-brain barrier: intercommunications between brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to the endothelial cells in large vessels where LDL receptors are downregulated, brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo express an LDL receptor. Using a cell culture model of the blood-brain barrier consisting of a coculture of brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes, we observed that the capacity of endothelial cells to bind LDL is enhanced threefold when cocultured with astrocytes. We next investigated the ability of astrocytes to modulate endothelial cell LDL receptor expression. We have shown that the lipid requirement of astrocytes increases the expression of endothelial cell LDL receptors. Experiments with dialysis membranes of different pore size showed that this effect is mediated by a soluble factor(s) with relative molecular mass somewhere between 3,500 and 14,000. Substituting astrocytes with smooth muscle cells or brain endothelium with endothelium from the aorta or the adrenal cortex did not enhance the luminal LDL receptor expression on endothelial cells, demonstrating the specificity of the interactions. This factor(s) is exclusively secreted by astrocytes cocultured with brain capillary endothelial cells, but it also upregulates the LDL receptor on other cell types. This study confirms the notion that the final fine tuning of cell differentiation is under local control. PMID:8034745

  4. Characterization of molds isolated from smoked paprika by PCR-RFLP and micellar electrokinetic capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Benito, María J; Martín, Alberto; Aranda, Emilio; Hernández, Alejandro; Córdoba, María G

    2009-12-01

    Molds are common contaminants of paprika meat products. The drying and storage stages of paprika processing are critical because they can provide molds with the conditions particularly appropriate for their growth and proliferation. Thus, an efficient and accurate characterization of the toxigenic molds of paprika is necessary. An RFLP analysis of the rRNA genes was performed by using a TaqI restriction enzyme. In addition, a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) method was tested to analyze secondary metabolites produced by mold strains commonly found in paprika. This study was confirmed with a 5.8S-ITS region sequence analysis. A total of 31 isolates were identified by RFLP and MECC analysis. These showed stable RFLP profiles that were clearly different for the different genera and species, and were grouped into clusters together with the profiles of the 16 reference strains. MECC analysis provided additional characteristic peak patterns for the characterization of the mold species present. The characterized isolates were species of the genera Fusarium spp., Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., Cladosporium spp., Mucor spp. and Phlebia spp. The identifications were confirmed by the 5.8S-ITS region sequence analysis and by a BLAST search of the GenBank database. RFLP patterns with TaqI restriction enzyme and MECC profiles, either singly or combined, could be of great interest to distinguish molds in paprika.

  5. Major involvement of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) in uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid by human brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasuo; Ito, Katsuaki; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the expression of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) and its contribution to the supply of biotin and pantothenic acid to the human brain via the blood-brain barrier. DNA microarray and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that SLC5A6 is expressed in microvessels of human brain. The absolute expression levels of SLC5A6 protein in isolated human and monkey brain microvessels were 1.19 and 0.597 fmol/μg protein, respectively, as determined by a quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. Using an antibody-free method established by Kubo et al. (2015), we found that SLC5A6 was preferentially localized at the luminal membrane of brain capillary endothelium. Knock-down analysis using SLC5A6 siRNA showed that SLC5A6 accounts for 88.7% and 98.6% of total [(3) H]biotin and [(3) H]pantothenic acid uptakes, respectively, by human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. SLC5A6-mediated transport in hCMEC/D3 was markedly inhibited not only by biotin and pantothenic acid, but also by prostaglandin E2, lipoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, indomethacin, ketoprofen, diclofenac, ibuprofen, phenylbutazone, and flurbiprofen. This study is the first to confirm expression of SLC5A6 in human brain microvessels and to provide evidence that SLC5A6 is a major contributor to luminal uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid at the human blood-brain barrier. In humans, it was unclear (not concluded) about what transport system at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is responsible for the brain uptakes of two vitamins, biotin and pantothenic acid, which are necessary for brain proper function. This study clarified for the first time that the solute carrier 5A6/Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter SLC5A6/SMVT is responsible for the supplies of biotin and pantothenic acid into brain across the BBB in humans. DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; NSAID, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug; PGE2, prostaglandin E2.

  6. Freeze-Drying as Sample Preparation for Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography – Electrochemical Separations of Neurochemicals in Drosophila Brains

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, E. Carina; Kuklinski, Nicholas J.; Karagündüz, Ekin; Ucar, Kubra; Hanrieder, Jörg; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with electrochemical detection has been used to quantify biogenic amines in freeze-dried Drosophila melanogaster brains. Freeze drying samples offers a way to preserve the biological sample while making dissection of these tiny samples easier and faster. Fly samples were extracted in cold acetone and dried in a rotary evaporator. Extraction and drying times were optimized in order to avoid contamination by red-pigment from the fly eyes and still have intact brain structures. Single freeze-dried fly-brain samples were found to produce representative electropherograms as a single hand-dissected brain sample. Utilizing the faster dissection time that freeze drying affords, the number of brains in a fixed homogenate volume can be increased to concentrate the sample. Thus, concentrated brain samples containing five or fifteen preserved brains were analyzed for their neurotransmitter content, and five analytes; dopamine N-acetyloctopamine, Nacetylserotonin, N-acetyltyramine, N-acetyldopamine were found to correspond well with previously reported values. PMID:23387977

  7. Isolation and culture of neurospheres from the adult newt brain.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Liyakath Ali Shahul; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) give rise to neurons in the adult brain and are possible targets in regenerative therapies. In vitro cultures of NSCs as neurospheres have been established from cells isolated from diverse species. Newts are exceptional regenerators among vertebrates. These animals are able to efficiently replace neurons following ablation of those by activation and subsequent differentiation of NSCs. Here we describe the method for isolating and culturing of NSCs from the newt brain both during self-renewing and differentiating conditions. Newt NSC culture provides a useful tool for functional studies of NSC fate with the potential of resulting in novel regenerative strategies.

  8. Presence of norepinephrine and related enzymes in isolated brain microvessels.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, F M; Udenfriend, S; Spector, S

    1975-01-01

    Norepinephrine and the enzymes involved in its synthesis and degradation were found to be associated with isolated brain microvessels. The significance of these results are discussed with respect to adrenergic innervation of the cerebral microvessels and thereby neural regulation of the cerebral microcirculation. Images PMID:678

  9. Oxysterols decrease apical-to-basolateral transport of Aß peptides via an ABCB1-mediated process in an in vitro Blood-brain barrier model constituted of bovine brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pol, Julien; Candela, Pietra; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Fenart, Laurence; Gosselet, Fabien

    2013-06-23

    It is known that activation of the liver X receptors (LXRs) by natural or synthetic agonists decreases the amyloid burden and enhances cognitive function in transgenic murine models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that LXR activation may affect the transport of amyloid ß (Aß) peptides across the blood-brain barrier (the BBB, which isolates the brain from the peripheral circulation). By using a well-characterized in vitro BBB model, we demonstrated that LXR agonists (24S-hydroxycholesterol, 27-hydroxycholesterol and T0901317) modulated the expression of target genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis (such as ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1)) and promoted cellular cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and high density lipoproteins. Interestingly, we also observed a decrease in Aß peptide influx across brain capillary endothelial cells, although ABCA1 did not appear to be directly involved in this process. By focusing on others receptors and transporters that are thought to have major roles in Aß peptide entry into the brain, we then demonstrated that LXR stimulation provoked an increase in expression of the ABCB1 transporter (also named P-glycoprotein (P-gp)). Further investigations confirmed ABCB1's involvement in the restriction of Aß peptide influx. Taken as a whole, our results not only reinforce the BBB's key role in cerebral cholesterol homeostasis but also demonstrate the importance of the LXR/ABCB1 axis in Aß peptide influx-highlighting an attractive new therapeutic approach whereby the brain could be protected from peripheral Aß peptide entry.

  10. Regional blood flow in the normal and ischemic brain is controlled by arteriolar smooth muscle cell contractility and not by capillary pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert A; Tong, Lei; Yuan, Peng; Murikinati, Sasidhar; Gupta, Shobhana; Grutzendler, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Summary The precise regulation of cerebral blood flow is critical for normal brain function and its disruption underlies many neuropathologies. The extent to which smooth muscle-covered arterioles or pericyte-covered capillaries control vasomotion during neurovascular coupling remains controversial. We found that capillary pericytes in mice and humans do not express smooth muscle actin and are morphologically and functionally distinct from adjacent precapillary smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Using optical imaging we investigated blood flow regulation at various sites on the vascular tree in living mice. Optogenetic, whisker stimulation or cortical spreading depolarization caused microvascular diameter or flow changes in SMC but not pericyte-covered microvessels. During early stages of brain ischemia, transient SMC but not pericyte constrictions were a major cause of hypoperfusion leading to thrombosis and distal microvascular occlusions. Thus, capillary pericytes are not contractile and regulation of cerebral blood flow in physiological and pathological conditions is mediated by arteriolar smooth muscle cells. PMID:26119027

  11. In-vivo blood-brain barrier transport of a novel adrenocorticotropic hormone analogue, ebiratide, demonstrated by brain microdialysis and capillary depletion methods.

    PubMed

    Shimura, T; Tabata, S; Terasaki, T; Deguchi, Y; Tsuji, A

    1992-07-01

    The transport of ebiratide, a novel adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) analogue, [H-Met-(O2)-Glu-His-Phe-D-Lys-Phe-NH(CH2)8-NH2], through the blood-brain barrier was directly demonstrated in-vivo. [125I]Ebiratide (16.9 MBq mL-1) or [14C]sucrose (29.2 MBq mL-1) known to be restrictively transported through the blood-brain barrier was infused into the rat internal carotid artery at a flow rate of 50 microL min-1 for 10 min, and after 15 min infusion the distribution volume of each compound in the brain parenchyma was determined by the capillary depletion method. The distribution volume of [125I]ebiratide was 167.8 +/- 62.2 microL (g brain)-1, which was about seven times higher than that of [14C]sucrose (24.9 +/- 4.0 microL g brain)-1, indicating the uptake of ebiratide into brain parenchymal cells. During the infusion into the internal carotid artery, brain microdialysis was simultaneously performed to directly collect the brain interstitial fluid as the dialysate. Radioactivity was detected in the dialysate during the [125I]ebiratide infusion and HPLC analysis of the dialysate revealed that the intact ebiratide accounted for greater than or equal to 80% total radioactivity. The concentrations of [125I]ebiratide and [14C]sucrose in the brain interstitial fluid were estimated based on the relative recovery obtained in the in-vitro recovery study. The brain interstitial fluid/internal carotid arterial blood concentration ratio for [125I]ebiratide was determined to be 1.47 x 10(-2) +/- 0.17 x 10(-2) and was about eight times higher than that for [14C]sucrose (1.92 x 10(-3) +/- 0.36 x 10(-3)), indicating significant transport of ebiratide to the brain interstitial fluid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Ezrin expression in stromal cells of capillary hemangioblastoma. An immunohistochemical survey of brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Böhling, T.; Turunen, O.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Carpen, O.; Sainio, M.; Wahlström, T.; Vaheri, A.; Haltia, M.

    1996-01-01

    Ezrin is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that appears to link actin filaments to the plasma membrane. Immunocytochemical studies suggest that ezrin is expressed in epithelial cells but not in mesenchymal cells. In addition, ezrin is expressed by certain epithelial tumors, such as renal cell adenocarcinomas. Ezrin serves as a tyrosine kinase substrate, and is phosphorylated in epidermal growth factor-stimulated cells. Ezrin may thus mediate regulatory signals in different cell functions. We studied the distribution of ezrin in 104 cases of primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) by immunocytochemistry. Special interest was focused on capillary hemangioblastoma, owing to its resemblance to renal cell adenocarcinoma, and on malignant gliomas, owing to their frequent epidermal growth factor receptor amplification. The stromal cells of hemangioblastomas were found to be strongly positive for ezrin. No expression was detected in gliomas and, except for hemangioblastomas, ezrin expression was restricted to those few CNS tumors that show epithelial differentiation, ie, choroid plexus papillomas, craniopharyngiomas, ependymomas, and cysts. The diffuse cytoplasmic expression of ezrin in the stromal cells of capillary hemangioblastoma may indicate that stromal cells overexpress ezrin or express ezrin with deficient binding properties. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8579099

  13. Analysis of intracranial pressure pulse waveform and brain capillary morphology in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hidetaka; Oshio, Kotaro; Uchida, Masashi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2012-06-15

    Diabetes mellitus in neurosurgical patients is known to be a disease with high risks and severe outcomes. However, the mechanism by which diabetes mellitus induces dysfunction of brain tissue is not well known. The hypothesis of this study was that the damage to brain microvasculature in diabetes mellitus results in impaired compliance of the brain. Pathological changes associated with type II diabetes were investigated using a rat model. Pathophysiological changes in diabetic brain tissue were also investigated to confirm cerebral compliance by analyzing intracranial pressure waveforms. Pathologic findings revealed thickening of the basement membrane and fibrous collagen infiltration into the inner basement membrane of the brain microvasculature in diabetes mellitus. Analysis of intracranial pressure waveforms revealed that the P2 portion increased in diabetic rats compared to the control and was increased further with the increase in intracranial pressure. Analysis of the differential pressure curve, with respect to time, demonstrated that intracranial elasticity showed a concomitant increase. Pathologic findings and intracranial pressure waveforms were consistent with changes in brain microvasculature in diabetes mellitus. The increase of elasticity of brain tissue in diabetes mellitus may exacerbate the damage of intracranial disease.

  14. Capillary Hemangioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why do capillary hemangiomas on the eyelids cause vision problems? Capillary Hemangiomas of the eyelid can cause ... a capillary hemangioma in the eye socket cause vision problems? A capillary hemangioma in the eye socket ( ...

  15. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4-5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba(2+)-sensitive inward rectifier K(+) current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca(2+) imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca(2+) entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. PMID:27235552

  16. Cooling treatment transiently increases the permeability of brain capillary endothelial cells through translocation of claudin-5.

    PubMed

    Inamura, Akinori; Adachi, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Takao; He, Yeting; Tokuda, Nobuko; Nawata, Takashi; Shirao, Satoshi; Nomura, Sadahiro; Fujii, Masami; Ikeda, Eiji; Owada, Yuji; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2013-08-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) is formed by different cell types, of which brain microvascular endothelial cells are major structural constituents. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of cooling on the permeability of the BBB with reference to tight junction formation of brain microendothelial cells. The sensorimotor cortex above the dura mater in adult male Wistar rats was focally cooled to a temperature of 5 °C for 1 h, then immunostaining for immunoglobulin G (IgG) was performed to evaluate the permeability of the BBB. Permeability produced by cooling was also evaluated in cultured murine brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) based on measurement of trans-epithelial electric resistance (TEER). Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting of proteins associated with tight junctions in bEnd3 were performed to determine protein distribution before and after cooling. After focal cooling of the rat brain cortex, diffuse immunostaining for IgG was observed primarily around the small vasculature and in the extracellular spaces of parenchyma of the cortex. In cultured bEnd3, TEER significantly decreased during cooling (15 °C) and recovered to normal levels after rewarming to 37 °C. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting showed that claudin-5, a critical regulatory protein for tight junctions, was translocated from the membrane to the cytoplasm after cooling in cultured bEnd3 cells. These results suggest that focal brain cooling may open the BBB transiently through an effect on tight junctions of brain microendothelial cells, and that therapeutically this approach may allow control of BBB function and drug delivery through the BBB.

  17. Cooling treatment transiently increases the permeability of brain capillary endothelial cells through translocation of claudin-5.

    PubMed

    Inamura, Akinori; Adachi, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Takao; He, Yeting; Tokuda, Nobuko; Nawata, Takashi; Shirao, Satoshi; Nomura, Sadahiro; Fujii, Masami; Ikeda, Eiji; Owada, Yuji; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2013-08-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) is formed by different cell types, of which brain microvascular endothelial cells are major structural constituents. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of cooling on the permeability of the BBB with reference to tight junction formation of brain microendothelial cells. The sensorimotor cortex above the dura mater in adult male Wistar rats was focally cooled to a temperature of 5 °C for 1 h, then immunostaining for immunoglobulin G (IgG) was performed to evaluate the permeability of the BBB. Permeability produced by cooling was also evaluated in cultured murine brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) based on measurement of trans-epithelial electric resistance (TEER). Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting of proteins associated with tight junctions in bEnd3 were performed to determine protein distribution before and after cooling. After focal cooling of the rat brain cortex, diffuse immunostaining for IgG was observed primarily around the small vasculature and in the extracellular spaces of parenchyma of the cortex. In cultured bEnd3, TEER significantly decreased during cooling (15 °C) and recovered to normal levels after rewarming to 37 °C. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting showed that claudin-5, a critical regulatory protein for tight junctions, was translocated from the membrane to the cytoplasm after cooling in cultured bEnd3 cells. These results suggest that focal brain cooling may open the BBB transiently through an effect on tight junctions of brain microendothelial cells, and that therapeutically this approach may allow control of BBB function and drug delivery through the BBB. PMID:23653089

  18. Simultaneous determination of vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in brain microdialysates by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Benturquia, Nadia; Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) coupled to in vivo microdialysis sampling was used in order to monitor simultaneously a drug and several neurotransmitters in the brain extracellular fluid. Determination of the antiepileptic drug vigabatrin and the amino acid neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (l-Asp) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was performed on low-concentration samples which were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and separated using a pH 9.2 75 mM sodium borate running buffer containing 60 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 5mM hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD). Glu, l-Asp and vigabatrin derivatized at a concentration of 1.0 x 10(-9) M, and GABA derivatized at a concentration of 5.0 x 10(-9) M, produced peaks with signal-to-noise ratios of 8:1, 8:1, 4:1 and 5:1, respectively. The nature of the neurotransmitter peaks found in rat brain microdialysates was confirmed by both electrophoretic and pharmacological validations. This method was used for monitoring vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in microdialysates from the rat striatum during intracerebral infusion of the drug and revealed rapid vigabatrin-induced changes in GABA and Glu levels. This original application of CE-LIFD coupled to microdialysis represents a powerful tool for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic investigations.

  19. Isolation of a large cholecystokinin precursor from canine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Eysselein, V E; Reeve, J R; Shively, J E; Miller, C; Walsh, J H

    1984-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK)-like immunoreactivity (CCK-LI) in a pool of 12 dog brains was extracted sequentially into boiling water and cold 2% trifluoroacetic acid. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 revealed three main molecular forms detected by a carboxyl-terminal antibody; one was eluted in the position of CCK-58 (58 amino acid residues long); a second, in the position of CCK-8; and a third, near the radioactive iodide marker. When the CCK-LI was purified by affinity chromatography using carboxyl-terminal CCK antibody followed by three steps of reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, three components were isolated and characterized by sequence microanalysis. The smallest component was the pentapeptide common to gastrin and CCK. The second peak was eluted in the same region as synthetic CCK octapeptide, and sequence analysis showed that the chemical structure of this biologically active region of canine CCK is identical to that found in sheep and pig brains. The 22-residue amino-terminal sequence of brain CCK-58 was: Ala-Val-Gln-Lys-Val-Asp-Gly-Glu-Pro-Arg-Ala-His-Leu-Gly -Ala-Leu-leu-Ala-Arg-Tyr-Ile-Gln-, the same as the sequence found for canine intestinal CCK-58 from this pool of dogs. This is the same sequence others have reported for porcine brain CCK-58 lacking nine amino acid residues (CCK-58 desnonapeptide) except that the porcine peptide had a serine in position 9. The canine CCK amino-terminal sequence differed from the sequence Ala-Gln-Lys-Val-Asn-Ser previously reported for intestinal CCK-58 purified from another pool of dog tissue, but the rest of the residues identified were identical in the two peptides. CCK-58 may be a molecular precursor of the smaller forms of CCK in brain as well as in gut. PMID:6093106

  20. On ultrasound-induced microbubble oscillation in a capillary blood vessel and its implications for the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemair, W.; Tuković, Ž.; Jasak, H.; Poulikakos, D.; Kurtcuoglu, V.

    2012-02-01

    The complex interaction between an ultrasound-driven microbubble and an enclosing capillary microvessel is investigated by means of a coupled, multi-domain numerical model using the finite volume formulation. This system is of interest in the study of transient blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) for drug delivery applications. The compliant vessel structure is incorporated explicitly as a distinct domain described by a dedicated physical model. Red blood cells (RBCs) are taken into account as elastic solids in the blood plasma. We report the temporal and spatial development of transmural pressure (Ptm) and wall shear stress (WSS) at the luminal endothelial interface, both of which are candidates for the yet unknown mediator of BBBD. The explicit introduction of RBCs shapes the Ptm and WSS distributions and their derivatives markedly. While the peak values of these mechanical wall parameters are not affected considerably by the presence of RBCs, a pronounced increase in their spatial gradients is observed compared to a configuration with blood plasma alone. The novelty of our work lies in the explicit treatment of the vessel wall, and in the modelling of blood as a composite fluid, which we show to be relevant for the mechanical processes at the endothelium.

  1. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited amount of blood can be drawn using this method. The procedure has some risks (see below). Capillary ...

  2. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  3. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  4. On-line two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection using a fully electric isolated mechanical valve.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Felix J; Montealegre, Cristina; Neusüß, Christian

    2016-04-01

    CE is becoming more and more important in many fields of bioanalytical chemistry. Besides optical detection, hyphenation to ESI-MS detection is increasingly applied for sensitive identification purposes. Unfortunately, many CE techniques and methods established in research and industry are not compatible to ESI-MS since essential components of the background electrolyte interfere in ES ionization. In order to identify unknown peaks in established CE methods, here, a heart-cut 2D-CE separation system is introduced using a fully isolated mechanical valve with an internal loop of only 20 nL. In this system, the sample is separated using potentially any non-ESI compatible method in the first separation dimension. Subsequently, the portion of interest is cut by the internal sample loop of the valve and reintroduced to the second dimension where the interfering compounds are removed, followed by ESI-MS detection. When comparing the separation efficiency of the system with the valve to a system using a continuous capillary only a slight increase in peak width is observed. Ultraviolet/visible detection is integrated in the first dimension for switching time determination, enabling reproducible cutting of peaks of interest. The feasibility of the system is successfully demonstrated by a 2D analysis of a BSA tryptic digest sample using a nonvolatile (phosphate based) background electrolyte in the first dimension.

  5. Staphylococcus massiliensis sp. nov., isolated from a human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Al Masalma, Mouhamad; Raoult, Didier; Roux, Véronique

    2010-05-01

    Gram-positive, catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, non-motile, non-fermentative and novobiocin-susceptible cocci were isolated from a human brain abscess sample (strain 5402776(T)). This novel strain was analysed by a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The respiratory quinones detected were MK-7 (93 %) and MK-6 (7 %) and the major fatty acids were C(15 : 0) iso (60.5 %), C(17 : 0) iso (8.96 %) C(15 : 0) anteiso (7.93 %) and C(19 : 0) iso (6.78 %). The peptidoglycan type was A3alpha l-Lys-Gly(2-3)-l-Ser-Gly. Based on cellular morphology and biochemical criteria, the new isolate was assigned to the genus Staphylococcus, although it did not correspond to any recognized species. The G+C content of the DNA was 36.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that the new isolate was most closely related to Staphylococcus piscifermentans, Staphylococcus condimenti, Staphylococcus carnosus subsp. carnosus, S. carnosus subsp. utilis and Staphylococcus simulans (97.7 %, 97.6 %, 97.6 %, 97.6 % and 96.5 % sequence similarity, respectively). Comparison of tuf, hsp60, rpoB, dnaJ and sodA gene sequences was also performed. In phylogenetic analysis inferred from tuf, dnaJ and rpoB gene sequence comparisons, strain 5402776(T) clustered with Staphylococcus pettenkoferi (93.7 %, 82.5 % and 89 % sequence similarity, respectively) and on phylogenetic analysis inferred from sodA gene sequence comparisons, it clustered with Staphylococcus chromogenes (82.8 %). On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, this isolate represents a novel species for which the name Staphylococcus massiliensis sp. nov. is proposed (type strain 5402776(T)=CCUG 55927(T)=CSUR P23(T)). PMID:19666814

  6. Transport of monocarboxylic acids at the blood-brain barrier: Studies with monolayers of primary cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, T.; Takakuwa, S.; Moritani, S.; Tsuji, A. )

    1991-09-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the transport of monocarboxylic acids (MCAs) were studied by using primary cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells. Concentration-dependent uptake of acetic acid was observed, and the kinetic parameters were estimated as follows: the Michaelis constant, Kt, was 3.41 {plus minus} 1.87 mM, the maximum uptake rate, Jmax, was 144.7 {plus minus} 55.7 nmol/mg of protein/min and the nonsaturable first-order rate constant, Kd, was 6.66 {plus minus} 1.98 microliters/mg of protein/min. At medium pH below 7.0, the uptake rate of (3H)acetic acid increased markedly with decreasing medium pH, whereas pH-independent uptake was observed in the presence of 10 mM acetic acid. An energy requirement for (3H)acetic acid uptake was also demonstrated, because metabolic inhibitors (2,4-dinitrophenol and rotenone) reduced significantly the uptake rate (P less than .05). Carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoro-methoxyphenylhydrazone, a protonophore, inhibited significantly the uptake of (3H)acetic acid at medium pH of 5.0 and 6.0, whereas 4,4{prime}-diisothiocyanostilben-2,2{prime}-disulfonic acid did not. Several MCAs inhibited significantly the uptake rate of (3H)acetic acid, whereas di- and tricarboxylic acids did not. The uptake of (3H)acetic acid was competitively inhibited by salicylic acid, with an inhibition constant, Ki, of 3.60 mM, suggesting a common transport system between acetic acid and salicylic acid. Moreover, at the medium pH of 7.4, salicylic acid and valproic acid inhibited significantly the uptake of (3H)acetic acid, demonstrating that the transport of MCA drugs could also be ascribed to the MCA transport system at the physiologic pH.

  7. Regulation of store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry activity by cell cycle dependent up-regulation of Orai2 in brain capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kito, Hiroaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hideto; Ohya, Susumu; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2015-04-10

    Store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) via Orai1 and STIM1 complex is supposed to have obligatory roles in the regulation of cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells, while little is known about the contribution of Orai2. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses indicated the expression of Orai2 and STIM2, in addition to Orai1 and STIM1 in bovine brain capillary endothelial cell line, t-BBEC117. During the exponential growth of t-BBEC117, the knockdown of Orai1 and STIM1 significantly reduced the SOCE activity, whereas Orai2 and STIM2 siRNAs had no effect. To examine whether endogenous SOCE activity contributes to the regulation of cell cycle progression, t-BBEC117 were synchronized using double thymidine blockage. At the G2/M phase, Ca{sup 2+} influx via SOCE was decreased and Orai2 expression was increased compared to the G0/G1 phase. When Orai2 was knocked down at the G2/M phase, the decrease in SOCE was removed, and cell proliferation was partly attenuated. Taken together, Orai1 significantly contributes to cell proliferation via the functional expression, which is presumably independent of the cell cycle phases. In construct, Orai2 is specifically up-regulated during the G2/M phase, negatively modulates the SOCE activity, and may contribute to the regulation of cell cycle progression in brain capillary endothelial cells. - Highlights: • Orai1 is essential for SOCE activity in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs). • Cell cycle independent expression of Orai1 regulated SOCE and cell proliferation. • Orai2 was up-regulated only at G2/M phase and this consequently reduced SOCE. • Orai2 as well as Orai1 is a key player controlling SOCE and proliferation in BCECs.

  8. Involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme in insulin- and atrial natriuretic peptide-sensitive internalization of amyloid-β peptide in mouse brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Murata, Sho; Katsukura, Yuki; Suzuki, Hiroya; Funaki, Miho; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which is implicated in Alzheimer's disease, involves elimination across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and we previously showed that an insulin-sensitive process is involved in the case of Aβ1-40. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanism of the insulin-sensitive Aβ1-40 elimination across mouse BBB. An in vivo cerebral microinjection study demonstrated that [125I]hAβ1-40 elimination from mouse brain was inhibited by human natriuretic peptide (hANP), and [125I]hANP elimination was inhibited by hAβ1-40, suggesting that hAβ1-40 and hANP share a common elimination process. Internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 into cultured mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (TM-BBB4) was significantly inhibited by either insulin, hANP, other natriuretic peptides or insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors, but was not inhibited by phosphoramidon or thiorphan. Although we have reported the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptor C (Npr-C) in hANP internalization, cells stably expressing Npr-C internalized [125I]hANP but not [125I]hAβ1-40, suggesting that there is no direct interaction between Npr-C and hAβ1-40. IDE was detected in plasma membrane of TM-BBB4 cells, and internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 by TM-BBB4 cells was reduced by IDE-targeted siRNAs. We conclude that elimination of hAβ1-40 from mouse brain across the BBB involves an insulin- and ANP-sensitive process, mediated by IDE expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells.

  9. Structural and functional effects of social isolation on the hippocampus of rats with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Khodaie, Babak; Lotfinia, Ahmad Ali; Ahmadi, Milad; Lotfinia, Mahmoud; Jafarian, Maryam; Karimzadeh, Fariba; Coulon, Philippe; Gorji, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Social isolation has significant long-term psychological and physiological consequences. Both social isolation and traumatic brain injury (TBI) alter normal brain function and structure. However, the influence of social isolation on recovery from TBI is unclear. This study aims to evaluate if social isolation exacerbates the anatomical and functional deficits after TBI in young rats. Juvenile male rats were divided into four groups; sham operated control with social contacts, sham control with social isolation, TBI with social contacts, and TBI with social isolation. During four weeks after brain injury in juvenile rats, we evaluated the animal behaviors by T-maze and open-field tests, recorded brain activity with electrocorticograms and assessed structural changes by histological procedures in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, CA1, and CA3 areas. Our findings revealed significant memory impairments and hyperactivity conditions in rats with TBI and social isolation compared to the other groups. Histological assessments showed an increase of the mean number of dark neurons, apoptotic cells, and caspase-3 positive cells in all tested areas of the hippocampus in TBI rats with and without social isolation compared to sham rats. Furthermore, social isolation significantly increased the number of dark cells, apoptotic neurons, and caspase-3 positive cells in the hippocampal CA3 region in rats with TBI. This study indicates the harmful effect of social isolation on anatomical and functional deficits induced by TBI in juvenile rats. Prevention of social isolation may improve the outcome of TBI.

  10. Extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit. Influence of blood pressure, osmolarity, and blood-brain barrier damage

    SciTech Connect

    Go, K.G.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Paans, A.M.; Vaalburg, W.; Woldring, M.G.

    1981-09-01

    By external detection, the influence of arterial blood pressure (BP), osmolarity, and cold-induced blood-brain barrier damage was assessed on the extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit in the rat. There was an inverse relation between arterial BP and extraction that was attributable to the influence of arterial BP on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the relation between CBF and extraction. Neither arterial BP nor osmolarity of the injected bolus had any direct effect on extraction of water 15O, signifying that the diffusional exchange component (determined by blood flow) of extraction greatly surpasses the convection flow contribution by hydrostatic or osmotic forces. Damage to the blood-brain barrier did not change its permeability to water.

  11. Up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kito, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Daiju; Ohya, Susumu; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. {yields} The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. {yields} The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca{sup 2+} entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. {yields} The K{sub ir}2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of K{sub ir} channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration due to Ca{sup 2+} influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  12. Preservation of mitochondrial functional integrity in mitochondria isolated from small cryopreserved mouse brain areas.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2014-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics in brain pathophysiology are often precluded by the need to isolate mitochondria immediately after tissue dissection from a large number of brain biopsies for comparative studies. Here we present a procedure of cryopreservation of small brain areas from which mitochondrial enriched fractions (crude mitochondria) with high oxidative phosphorylation efficiency can be isolated. Small mouse brain areas were frozen and stored in a solution containing glycerol as cryoprotectant. Crude mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from both cryopreserved and freshly explanted brain samples and were compared with respect to their ability to generate membrane potential and produce ATP. Intactness of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes was verified by polarographic ascorbate and cytochrome c tests and spectrophotometric assay of citrate synthase activity. Preservation of structural integrity and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was successfully obtained in crude mitochondria isolated from different areas of cryopreserved mouse brain samples. Long-term cryopreservation of small brain areas from which intact and phosphorylating mitochondria can be isolated for the study of mitochondrial bioenergetics will significantly expand the study of mitochondrial defects in neurological pathologies, allowing large comparative studies and favoring interlaboratory and interdisciplinary analyses.

  13. Reduction of L-type amino acid transporter 1 mRNA expression in brain capillaries in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Sumio; Yamaguchi, Hirofumi; Kang, Young-Sook; Hori, Satoko; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) expresses transporters that influence both dopaminergic neuronal function and drug therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of the present study was to clarify changes of transporter mRNA expression at the BBB in mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) as a model of PD, in order to understand the pathophysiological role of BBB transport function in PD. At 7 d after MPTP treatment, mice showed a motor deficit and a loss of dopaminergic neurons. At the same time, L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) mRNA expression in the brain capillary fraction of the MPTP-treated mice was significantly reduced by 62.6% compared with saline-treated mice, while no significant change was observed in the expression of glucose transporter 1, creatine transporter 1, taurine transporter, organic cation transporter 2, serotonin transporter, norepinephrine transporter and dopamine transporter. LAT1 mRNA expression in whole brain was not affected at 1, 3 and 5 d after the treatment, but was reduced by 46.3% at 7 d. LAT1 mediates the transport of large neutral amino acids, including tyrosine, as well as the PD-therapeutic drug levodopa, across the BBB. Our findings indicate that decreased LAT1 expression at the BBB in PD patients may adversely affect amino acid supply from the circulating blood and levodopa distribution into the brain.

  14. Angiopoietin 2 stimulates migration and tube-like structure formation of murine brain capillary endothelial cells through c-Fes and c-Fyn.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yasushi; Nakamura, Takao; Kanetake, Hiroshi; Kanda, Shigeru

    2002-01-01

    The angiopoietin (Ang)/Tie2 system is exclusively involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Ang2 is known to inhibit Ang1-mediated phosphorylation of Tie2 as well as cellular responses during embryonic development. Recent studies have demonstrated that Ang2 has angiogenic activities in adult tissues and cultured endothelial cells. In the present study, we examined the downstream signaling pathways involved in Ang2-mediated cellular responses by murine brain capillary cell line, IBE cells. Tie2 was tyrosine phoshorylated by Ang2. Ang2 showed no effect on proliferation, but stimulated chemotaxis and tube-like structure formation. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) was activated by Ang2 through c-Fes and was involved in chemotaxis toward Ang2. Ang2 also activated c-Fyn in IBE cells. Cells expressing kinase-inactive c-Fyn attenuated Ang2-induced tube formation, suggesting that c-Fyn was responsible for Ang-2-mediated tube formation. Collecting these data, Ang2 activates c-Fes and c-Fyn, leading to migration and tube formation by murine capillary endothelial cells.

  15. Malpighi and the discovery of capillaries.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2007-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci clearly observed and described capillaries. Using the microscope, Marcello Malpighi examined the brain and major organs to demonstrate their finer anatomical features. This led to his discovery in 1661, of capillaries that proved fundamental to our understanding of the vascular system in the brain and cord. He hypothesized that capillaries were the connection between arteries and veins that allowed blood to flow back to the heart in the circulation of the blood, as first asserted by William Harvey.

  16. Isolation and the Symptoms of Chronic Brain Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Philip; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A literature review of internal and external changes on the mental and emotional status of elderly persons reveals physical, social, and emotional isolation to be the key intervening variables which disclose functional symptoms of mental disorders. (Author)

  17. A large-scale electrophoresis- and chromatography-based determination of gene expression profiles in bovine brain capillary endothelial cells after the re-induction of blood-brain barrier properties

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form the physiological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The barrier function is (at least in part) due to well-known proteins such as transporters, tight junctions and metabolic barrier proteins (e.g. monoamine oxidase, gamma glutamyltranspeptidase and P-glycoprotein). Our previous 2-dimensional gel proteome analysis had identified a large number of proteins and revealed the major role of dynamic cytoskeletal remodelling in the differentiation of bovine BCECs. The aim of the present study was to elaborate a reference proteome of Triton X-100-soluble species from bovine BCECs cultured in the well-established in vitro BBB model developed in our laboratory. Results A total of 215 protein spots (corresponding to 130 distinct proteins) were identified by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, whereas over 350 proteins were identified by a shotgun approach. We classified around 430 distinct proteins expressed by bovine BCECs. Our large-scale gene expression analysis enabled the correction of mistakes referenced into protein databases (e.g. bovine vinculin) and constitutes valuable evidence for predictions based on genome annotation. Conclusions Elaboration of a reference proteome constitutes the first step in creating a gene expression database dedicated to capillary endothelial cells displaying BBB characteristics. It improves of our knowledge of the BBB and the key proteins in cell structures, cytoskeleton organization, metabolism, detoxification and drug resistance. Moreover, our results emphasize the need for both appropriate experimental design and correct interpretation of proteome datasets. PMID:21078152

  18. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain capillary permeability following high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: a positron emission tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.C.; Dhawan, V.; Strother, S.C.; Sidtis, J.J.; Evans, A.C.; Allen, J.C.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rate constants and blood-to-brain transport of rubidium were estimated using positron emission tomography in an adolescent patient with a brain tumor, before and after chemotherapy with intravenous high-dose methotrexate. Widespread depression of cerebral glucose metabolism was apparent 24 hours after drug administration, which may reflect reduced glucose phosphorylation, and the influx rate constant for /sup 82/Rb was increased, indicating a drug-induced alteration in blood-brain barrier function. Associated changes in neuropsychological performance, electroencephalogram, and plasma amino acid concentration were identified in the absence of evidence of systemic methotrexate toxicity, suggesting primary methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  19. Isolated cystic lesion of the callosal genu after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kato, Toru; Okumura, Akihisa; Tsuji, Takeshi; Emi, Misugi; Natsume, Jun

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of a 17-month-old infant who developed an isolated cystic lesion of the callosal genu as a unique lesion of traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Although one of the most common sites of TAI is the corpus callosum, there have been no reports describing the lesion seen in our patient. Brain computed tomography findings were normal on the day of the traffic accident. After 3 months, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed an isolated cystic lesion of the callosal genu that had the appearance of a cystic cavity. This lesion decreased in size 16 months later. The neuroimaging findings of this patient suggest that an isolated cystic lesion of the callosal genu could appear as a unique form of TAI in infants after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but it is nevertheless important to attend to such lesions in children with TBI.

  20. Targeting Cells With MR Imaging Probes: Cellular Interaction And Intracellular Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Uptake In Brain Capillary Endothelial and Choroidal Plexus Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambianica, I.; Bossi, M.; Gasco, P.; Gonzalez, W.; Idee, J. M.; Miserocchi, G.; Rigolio, R.; Chanana, M.; Morjan, I.; Wang, D.; Sancini, G.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in brain including their use as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. In delivery application, the critical step is the transport across cell layers and the internalization of NPs into specific cells, a process often limited by poor targeting specificity and low internalization efficiency. The development of the models of brain endothelial cells and choroidal plexus epithelial cells in culture has allowed us to investigate into these mechanisms. Our strategy is aimed at exploring different routes to the entrapment of iron oxide NPs in these brain related cells. Here we demonstrated that not only cells endowed with a good phagocytic activity like activated macrophages but also endothelial brain capillary and choroidal plexus epithelial cells do internalize iron oxide NPs. Our study of the intracellular trafficking of NPs by TEM, and confocal microscopy revealed that NPs are mainly internalized by the endocytic pathway. Iron oxide NPs were dispersed in water and coated with 3,4-dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) using standard procedures. Magnetic lipid NPs were prepared by NANOVECTOR: water in oil in water (W/O/W) microemulsion process has been applied to directly coat different iron based NPs by lipid layer or to encapsulate them into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs). By these coating/loading the colloidal stability was improved without strong alteration of the particle size distribution. Magnetic lipid NPs could be reconstituted after freeze drying without appreciable changes in stability. L-DOPA coated NPs are stable in PBS and in MEM (Modified Eagle Medium) medium. The magnetic properties of these NPs were not altered by the coating processes. We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these NPs with rat brain capillary endothelial (REB4) and choroidal plexus epithelial (Z310) cells. By means of widefield, confocal

  1. Quantitative Determination of Luminal and Abluminal Membrane Distributions of Transporters in Porcine Brain Capillaries by Plasma Membrane Fractionation and Quantitative Targeted Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Uchida, Yasuo; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    Abluminal or luminal localization of transporter in plasma membranes at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for their physiological and pharmacological roles. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a new method to investigate membrane localization of transporters, through quantitative measurement of protein expression levels in fractionated plasma membrane prepared from porcine brain capillaries. Luminal-abluminal distribution ratios were calculated from the results of quantitative targeted absolute proteomics of fractionated membranes, after correction for cross-contamination based on measurements of luminal and abluminal membrane markers. BCRP expression was greater at the luminal membrane than at the abluminal membrane, supporting the usefulness of the distribution ratio as a quantitative indicator of localization. The distribution ratios suggested luminal-dominant localizations of GLUT1 and OATP3A1, and abluminal-dominant localizations of ABCA1 and FATP1. For OATP3A1, ABCA1 and FATP1, these results require reconsideration of their functions at the BBB. Species differences were examined using expression levels normalized to Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase. BCRP expression is dominant over multidrug resistance 1 expression in porcine BBB, as in other primates including humans. This methodology for quantitative measurement of protein localization is expected to improve our understanding of the roles of transporters at the BBB, and should be applicable to other polarized cells.

  2. Drug-induced trafficking of p-glycoprotein in human brain capillary endothelial cells as demonstrated by exposure to mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Andrea; Maalouf, Katia; Buettner, Manuela; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Alms, Dana; Römermann, Kerstin; Naim, Hassan Y; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1/MDR1) is a major efflux transporter at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), restricting the penetration of various compounds. In other tissues, trafficking of Pgp from subcellular stores to the cell surface has been demonstrated and may constitute a rapid way of the cell to respond to toxic compounds by functional membrane insertion of the transporter. It is not known whether drug-induced Pgp trafficking also occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells that form the BBB. In this study, trafficking of Pgp was investigated in human brain capillary endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) that were stably transfected with a doxycycline-inducible MDR1-EGFP fusion plasmid. In the presence of doxycycline, these cells exhibited a 15-fold increase in Pgp-EGFP fusion protein expression, which was associated with an increased efflux of the Pgp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). The chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C (MMC) was used to study drug-induced trafficking of Pgp. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of single hCMEC/D3-MDR1-EGFP cells revealed that Pgp redistribution from intracellular pools to the cell surface occurred within 2 h of MMC exposure. Pgp-EGFP exhibited a punctuate pattern at the cell surface compatible with concentrated regions of the fusion protein in membrane microdomains, i.e., lipid rafts, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis of biotinylated cell surface proteins in Lubrol-resistant membranes. MMC exposure also increased the functionality of Pgp as assessed in three functional assays with Pgp substrates (Rho123, eFluxx-ID Gold, calcein-AM). However, this increase occurred with some delay after the increased Pgp expression and coincided with the release of Pgp from the Lubrol-resistant membrane complexes. Disrupting rafts by depleting the membrane of cholesterol increased the functionality of Pgp. Our data present the first direct evidence of drug-induced Pgp trafficking at the human BBB and indicate that Pgp has to be released from lipid

  3. Isolation of viable Neospora caninum from brains of wild gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Jenkins, M C; Ferreira, L R; Choudhary, S; Verma, S K; Kwok, O C H; Fetterer, R; Butler, E; Carstensen, M

    2014-03-17

    Neospora caninum is a common cause of abortion in cattle worldwide. Canids, including the dog and the dingo (Canis familiaris), the coyote (Canis latrans), and the gray wolf (Canis lupus) are its definitive hosts that can excrete environmentally resistant oocysts in the environment, but also can act as intermediate hosts, harboring tissue stages of the parasite. In an attempt to isolate viable N. caninum from tissues of naturally infected wolves, brain and heart tissue from 109 wolves from Minnesota were bioassayed in mice. Viable N. caninum (NcWolfMn1, NcWolfMn2) was isolated from the brains of two wolves by bioassays in interferon gamma gene knockout mice. DNA obtained from culture-derived N. caninum tachyzoites of the two isolates were analyzed by N. caninum-specific Nc5 polymerase chain reaction and confirmed diagnosis. This is the first report of isolation of N. caninum from tissues of any wild canid host. PMID:24522164

  4. One-step multiple component isolation from the oil of Crinitaria tatarica (Less.) Sojak. by preparative capillary gas with characterization by spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques and evaluation of biological activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present work multiple component isolation from the oil of Crinitaria tatarica (Less.) Sojak. by Preparative Capillary Gas Chromatography (PCGC) with characterization by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been carried out. Gas chromatography (GC-FID) ...

  5. Social isolation and brain development in the ant Camponotus floridanus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seid, Marc A.; Junge, Erich

    2016-06-01

    Social interactions play a key role in the healthy development of social animals and are most pronounced in species with complex social networks. When developing offspring do not receive proper social interaction, they show developmental impairments. This effect is well documented in mammalian species but controversial in social insects. It has been hypothesized that the enlargement of the mushroom bodies, responsible for learning and memory, observed in social insects is needed for maintaining the large social networks and/or task allocation. This study examines the impact of social isolation on the development of mushroom bodies of the ant Camponotus floridanus. Ants raised in isolation were shown to exhibit impairment in the growth of the mushroom bodies as well as behavioral differences when compared to ants raised in social groups. These results indicate that social interaction is necessary for the proper development of C. floridanus mushroom bodies.

  6. Social isolation and brain development in the ant Camponotus floridanus.

    PubMed

    Seid, Marc A; Junge, Erich

    2016-06-01

    Social interactions play a key role in the healthy development of social animals and are most pronounced in species with complex social networks. When developing offspring do not receive proper social interaction, they show developmental impairments. This effect is well documented in mammalian species but controversial in social insects. It has been hypothesized that the enlargement of the mushroom bodies, responsible for learning and memory, observed in social insects is needed for maintaining the large social networks and/or task allocation. This study examines the impact of social isolation on the development of mushroom bodies of the ant Camponotus floridanus. Ants raised in isolation were shown to exhibit impairment in the growth of the mushroom bodies as well as behavioral differences when compared to ants raised in social groups. These results indicate that social interaction is necessary for the proper development of C. floridanus mushroom bodies. PMID:27126402

  7. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes) and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes). Extracellular microvesicles contain cell-specific collections of proteins, glycoproteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecules. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by acting as carrier for essential cell-specific information to target cells. Endothelial cells in the brain form the blood–brain barrier, a specialized interface between the blood and the brain that tightly controls traffic of nutrients and macromolecules between two compartments and interacts closely with other cells forming the neurovascular unit. Therefore, brain endothelial cell extracellular microvesicles could potentially play important roles in ‘externalizing’ brain-specific biomarkers into the blood stream during pathological conditions, in transcytosis of blood-borne molecules into the brain, and in cell-cell communication within the neurovascular unit. Methods To study cell-specific molecular make-up and functions of brain endothelial cell exosomes, methods for isolation of extracellular microvesicles using mass spectrometry-compatible protocols and the characterization of their signature profiles using mass spectrometry -based proteomics were developed. Results A total of 1179 proteins were identified in the isolated extracellular microvesicles from brain endothelial cells. The microvesicles were validated by identification of almost 60 known markers, including Alix, TSG101 and the tetraspanin proteins CD81 and CD9. The surface proteins on isolated microvesicles could potentially interact with both primary

  8. Chronic social isolation affects thigmotaxis and whole-brain serotonin levels in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shams, Soaleha; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The popularity of the zebrafish has been growing in behavioral brain research. Previously utilized mainly in developmental biology and genetics, the zebrafish has turned out to possess a complex behavioral repertoire. For example, it is a highly social species, and individuals form tight groups, a behavior called shoaling. Social isolation induced changes in brain function and behavior have been demonstrated in a variety of laboratory organisms. However, despite its highly social nature, the zebrafish has rarely been utilized in this research area. Here, we investigate the effects of chronic social isolation (lasting 90 days) on locomotor activity and anxiety-related behaviors in an open tank. We also examine the effect of chronic social isolation on levels of whole-brain serotonin and dopamine and their metabolites. We found that long-term social deprivation surprisingly decreased anxiety-related behavious during open-tank testing but had no effect on locomotor activity. We also found that serotonin levels, decreased significantly in socially isolated fish, but levels of dopamine and metabolites of these neurotransmitters 5HIAA and DOPAC, respectively, remained unchanged. Our results imply that the standard high density housing employed in most zebrafish laboratories may not be the optimal way to keep these fish, and open a new avenue towards the analysis of the biological mechanisms of social behavior and of social deprivation induced changes in brain function using this simple vertebrate model organism.

  9. Distinct Patterns of Brain Function in Children with Isolated Spelling Impairment: New Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebauer, Daniela; Enzinger, Christian; Kronbichler, Martin; Schurz, Matthias; Reishofer, Gernot; Koschutnig, Karl; Kargl, Reinhard; Purgstaller, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Fink, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Studies investigating reading and spelling difficulties heavily focused on the neural correlates of reading impairments, whereas spelling impairments have been largely neglected so far. Hence, the aim of the present study was to investigate brain structure and function of children with isolated spelling difficulties. Therefore, 31 children, aged…

  10. Electron microscopic morphometry of isolated rat brain porosome complex.

    PubMed

    Zhvania, Mzia G; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Qsovreli, Mariam G; Okuneva, Vera G; Surmava, Arkadi G; Lordkipanidze, Tamar G

    2015-11-01

    Porosomes are the universal secretory portals at the cell plasma membrane where secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse via the kiss-and-run mechanism of cellular secretion, to release intravesicular cargo to the outside of the cell. During last two decades discovery of porosome and a great volume of work from different laboratories provide molecular insights on the structure, function, and composition of the porosome complex, especially the neuronal porosome. In rat neurons 12-17 nm cup-shaped lipoprotein porosomes present at presynaptic membrane. They possess a central plug and sometimes are with docked synaptic vesicles. Although earlier studies have greatly progressed our understanding of the morphology and the proteome and limited lipidome of the neuronal porosome complex, the current study was carried out to determine the morphology of the bare protein backbone of the neuronal porosome complex. Results from our study demonstrate that although the eight-fold symmetry of the immunoisolated porosome is maintained, and the central plug is preserved in the isolated structures, there is a loss in the average size of the porosome complex, possibly due to a loss of lipids from the complex. PMID:26119463

  11. [Electrophysiological features (EEG) of ethanol withdrawal syndromes on isolated perfused rat brain].

    PubMed

    Tezikov, E B; Litvicki, P F

    2015-01-01

    On isolated rat brains we studied native EEC and its derivates (mean EEC amplitude and power spectrums - Fourier transformation) during perfusion with ethanol (65 Mm/ L) and after its withdrawal. Previously rats were undergone ethanol burden for 6 days according to Majchrowicz procedures to get alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Duration perfusion without ethanol was 5, 10 and 20 min depending on the experimental schedule. Ethanol infusion between periods of withdrawal comprised 20 min. 55% of isolated brains shown epileptiform activity after 1-2 min of ethanol withdrawal but others manifested only increased mean amplitude and the power spectrums of EEC as well as an appearance of single or batch spikes. Differences between in vivo and in vitro conditions can be explained by the accelerated rate of ethanol elimination. The high positive correlation was obtained between EEC findings at the 5-th min of the first ethanol withdrawal and the same findings at the 5-th min of ethanol withdrawal in the second and the third episodes of ethanol withdrawal. Prolongation of withdrawal period more than 5th min caused brain death showing epileptiform activity. Isolated rat brain is the convenient subject to study pathogenesis of excitability of neurons and examination of drugs to treat alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

  12. Exercise reduces activation of microglia isolated from hippocampus and brain of aged mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aging is associated with low-grade neuroinflammation that includes basal increases in proinflammatory cytokines and expression of inflammatory markers on microglia. Exercise can reduce neuroinflammation following infection in aged animals, but whether exercise modulates basal changes in microglia activation is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated changes in basal microglia activation in cells isolated from the hippocampus and remaining brain following running-wheel access. Methods Adult (4 months) and aged (22 months) male and female BALB/c mice were housed with or without running wheels for 10 weeks. Microglia were isolated from the hippocampus or remaining brain. Flow cytometry was used to determine microglia (CD11b+ and CD45low) that co-labeled with CD86, CD206, and MHC II. Results Aged mice showed a greater proportion of CD86 and MHC II positive microglia. In aged females, access to a running wheel decreased proportion of CD86+ and MHC II+ microglia in the hippocampus whereas aged males in the running group showed a decrease in the proportion of CD86+ microglia in the brain and an increase in the proportion of MHC II+ microglia in hippocampus and brain. Conclusion Overall, these data indicate that running-wheel access modulates microglia activation, but these effects vary by age, sex, and brain region. PMID:24044641

  13. Binding characteristics of S fimbriated Escherichia coli to isolated brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stins, M. F.; Prasadarao, N. V.; Ibric, L.; Wass, C. A.; Luckett, P.; Kim, K. S.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the role of S fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli meningitis, transformants of E. coli strains with or without S fimbriae plasmid were compared for their binding to microvessel endothelial cells isolated from bovine brain cortices (BMEC). The BMEC's displayed a cobblestone appearance, were positive for factor VIII, carbonic anhydrase IV, took up fluorescent-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein, and exhibited gamma glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Binding of S fimbriated E. coli to BMEC was approximately threefold greater than nonfimbriated E. coli Similarly S fimbriated E. coli bound to human brain endothelial cells approximately threefold greater than nonfimbriated E. coli. Binding was reduced approximately 60% by isolated S fimbriae and about 80% by anti-S adhesin antibody. Mutating the S adhesin gene resulted in a complete loss of the binding, whereas mutagenesis of the major S fimbriae subunit gene sfaA did not significantly affect binding. Pretreatment of BMEC with neuraminidase or prior incubation of S fimbriated E. coli with NeuAc alpha 2,3-sialyl lactose completely abolished binding. These findings indicate that S fimbriated E. coli bind to NeuAc alpha 2,3-galactose containing glycoproteins on brain endothelial cells via a lectin-like activity of SfaS adhesin. This might be an important early step in the penetration of bacteria across the blood-brain barrier in the development of E. coli meningitis. Images Figure 6 PMID:7977653

  14. Isolation and purification of monosialotetrahexosylgangliosides from pig brain by extraction and liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liujiao; Yang, Jianting; Sun, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1), one of glycosphingolipids containing sialic acid, plays particularly important role in fighting against paralysis, dementia and other diseases caused by brain and nerve damage. In this work, a simple and highly efficient method with high yield was developed for isolation and purification of GM1 from pig brain. The method consisted of an extraction by chloroform-methanol-water and a two-step chromatographic separation by DEAE-Sepharose Fast Flow anion-exchange medium and Sephacryl S-100 HR size-exclusion medium. The purified GM1 was proved to be homogeneous and had a purity of >98.0% by high-performance anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The molecular weight was 30.0 kDa by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography and 1546.9 Da by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The chromogenic reaction by resorcinol-hydrochloric acid solution indicated that the purified GM1 showed a specific chromogenic reaction of sialic acid. Through this isolation and purification program, ~1.0 mg of pure GM1 could be captured from 500 g wet pig brain tissue and the yield of GM1 was around 0.022%, which was higher than the yields by other methods. The method may provide an alternative for isolation and purification of GM1 in other biological tissues.

  15. Capillary origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Py, Charlotte; Doppler, Lionel; Bico, Jose; Roman, Benoit; Reverdy, Paul; Baroud, Charles

    2006-11-01

    The wet fur of a dog coming out of a pond assembles into bunches: this is the most common effect of capillary forces on elasticity structures (the hairs). From a practical point of view, the deformation of flexible elements by surface tension forces dramatically damages mechanical microsystems or lung airways, but also allows the self-organization of nanotube carpets into well defined clump patterns. But capillary forces may generate even more complex structures when flexible sheets are brought to contact with a liquid interface. Here we present experiments where surface tension folds up an elastic sheet around a deposited water droplet, and discuss the different possible shapes obtained. These self-folding origami may be used in microsy stems design as a convenient and robust way to fold two-dimensional planar patterns into 3-dimensional structures, since surface tension effects are enhanced at small scales.

  16. Normal-appearing brain tissue analysis in radiologically isolated syndrome using 3 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, María Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-07-01

    To date, it remains largely unknown whether there is in radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) brain damage beyond visible T2 white matter lesions. We used single- voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging (3 T MRI) to analyze normal-appearing brain tissue regions in 18 RIS patients and 18 matched healthy controls. T2-hyperintense lesion volumes and structural brain volumes were also measured. The absolute metabolite concentrations and ratios of total N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartyl glutamate (NAA), choline-containing compounds, myoinositol, and glutamine-glutamate complex to creatine were calculated. Spectral analysis was performed by LCModel. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Compared with healthy controls, RIS patients did not show any significant differences in either the absolute concentration of NAA or NAA/Cr ratio in mid-parietal gray matter. A trend toward lower NAA concentrations (-3.35%) was observed among RIS patients with high risk for conversion to multiple sclerosis. No differences in the other metabolites or their ratios were observed. RIS patients showed lower fractional anisotropy only in clusters overlapping lesional areas, namely in the cingulate gyrus bilaterally and the frontal lobe subgyral bilaterally (P < 0.001). Normalized brain and cortical volumes were significantly lower in RIS patients than in controls (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). Our results suggest that in RIS, global brain and cortical atrophy are not primarily driven by significant occult microstructural normal appearing brain damage. Longitudinal MRI studies are needed to better understand the pathological processes underlying this novel entity. PMID:27399108

  17. Primary Intraventricular Brain Abscess Resulting in Isolated Dilation of the Inferior Horn and Unilateral Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Kawazoe, Yushi; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Primary intraventricular brain abscesses are rare, and there are no established treatment guidelines for this condition. We report a case in which isolated ventricular dilatation and unilateral hydrocephalus developed after seemingly successful conservative management and which required surgical diversion of the cerebrospinal fluid. A 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with high-grade fever and headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed abscesses in the bilateral posterior horn. Although surgical evacuation of the abscesses was considered, conservative management with antibiotics was selected because of the paucity of severe neurological deficits and the concern that an attempt to evacuate the intraventricular abscess might lead to inadvertent rupture of the abscess capsule and acute ventriculitis. Despite reduction in the abscess volume, the patient developed an altered mental status 4 weeks after admission. Follow-up MRI revealed isolated dilation of the left inferior horn, compressing the brainstem. Emergency fenestration of the dilated inferior horn was performed, and endoscopic observation revealed an encapsulated abscess with adhesion to the ventricular wall which was thought responsible for the ventricular dilation and unilateral hydrocephalus. Two weeks after the initial surgery, the unilateral hydrocephalus was treated by placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Eradication of the intraventricular brain abscesses without surgical evacuation may justify the conservative management of this patient. However, the possibility that earlier surgical evacuation might have prevented development of the isolated ventricular dilation cannot be denied. Additional clinical experience is required to determine which treatment (surgical vs. conservative) is more appropriate in patients with primary intraventricular brain abscesses. PMID:26351446

  18. Primary Intraventricular Brain Abscess Resulting in Isolated Dilation of the Inferior Horn and Unilateral Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Kawazoe, Yushi; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Primary intraventricular brain abscesses are rare, and there are no established treatment guidelines for this condition. We report a case in which isolated ventricular dilatation and unilateral hydrocephalus developed after seemingly successful conservative management and which required surgical diversion of the cerebrospinal fluid. A 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with high-grade fever and headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed abscesses in the bilateral posterior horn. Although surgical evacuation of the abscesses was considered, conservative management with antibiotics was selected because of the paucity of severe neurological deficits and the concern that an attempt to evacuate the intraventricular abscess might lead to inadvertent rupture of the abscess capsule and acute ventriculitis. Despite reduction in the abscess volume, the patient developed an altered mental status 4 weeks after admission. Follow-up MRI revealed isolated dilation of the left inferior horn, compressing the brainstem. Emergency fenestration of the dilated inferior horn was performed, and endoscopic observation revealed an encapsulated abscess with adhesion to the ventricular wall which was thought responsible for the ventricular dilation and unilateral hydrocephalus. Two weeks after the initial surgery, the unilateral hydrocephalus was treated by placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Eradication of the intraventricular brain abscesses without surgical evacuation may justify the conservative management of this patient. However, the possibility that earlier surgical evacuation might have prevented development of the isolated ventricular dilation cannot be denied. Additional clinical experience is required to determine which treatment (surgical vs. conservative) is more appropriate in patients with primary intraventricular brain abscesses. PMID:26351446

  19. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction induced by isoniazid: study on isolated rat liver and brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ahadpour, Morteza; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza; Mashayekhi, Vida; Haj Mohammad Ebrahim Tehrani, Kamaleddin; Jafarian, Iman; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH or isonicotinic hydrazide) is used for the treatment and prophylaxis of tuberculosis. Liver and brain are two important target organs in INH toxicity. However, the exact mechanisms behind the INH hepatotoxicity or neurotoxicity have not yet been completely understood. Considering the mitochondria as one of the possible molecular targets for INH toxicity, the aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of INH mitochondrial toxicity on isolated mitochondria. Mitochondria were isolated by differential ultracentrifugation from male Sprague-Dawley rats and incubated with different concentrations of INH (25-2000 μM) for the investigation of mitochondrial parameters. The results indicated that INH could interact with mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibit its activity. Our results showed an elevation in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial membrane potential collapse after exposure of isolated liver mitochondria in INH. However, different results were obtained in brain mitochondria. Noteworthy, significant glutathione oxidation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and lipid peroxidation were observed in higher concentration of INH, as compared to liver mitochondria. In conclusion, our results suggest that INH may initiate its toxicity in liver mitochondria through interaction with electron transfer chain, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential decline and cytochrome c expulsion which ultimately lead to cell death signaling.

  20. Membrane lipids and morphology of brain cortex synaptosomes isolated from hibernating Yakutian ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Kolomiytseva, Iskra K; Perepelkina, Natalia I; Zharikova, Alevtina D; Popov, Victor I

    2008-12-01

    Synaptosomes were isolated from Yakutian ground squirrel brain cortex of summer and winter hibernating animals in active and torpor states. Synaptosomal membrane cholesterol and phospholipids were determined. The seasonal changes of synaptosomal lipid composition were found. Synaptosomes isolated from hibernating Yakutian ground squirrel brain cortex maintained the cholesterol sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine contents 2.5, 1.8, 2.6, 1.8, 1.6, and 1.3 times less, respectively, and the content of phosphatidylcholine twice as much as the one in summer season. The synaptosomal membrane lipid composition of summer animals was shown to be markedly different from that as hibernating ground squirrels and non-hibernating rodents. It is believed that phenotypic changes of synaptosomal membrane lipid composition in summer Yakutian ground squirrel are the important preparation step for hibernation. The phosphatidylethanolamine content was increased in torpor state compared with winter-active state and the molar ratio of cholesterol/phospholipids in synaptosomal membrane of winter torpor ground squirrels was lower than that in active winter and summer animals. These events were supposed to lead to increase of the synaptosomal membrane fluidity during torpor. Synaptosomes isolated from torpor animals have larger sizes and contain a greater number of synaptic vesicles on the synaptosomal profile area. The synaptosomal membrane lipid composition and synaptosome morphology were involved in phenotypic adaptation of Yakutian ground squirrel to hibernation.

  1. Isolation of Toxoplasma gondii from the brain of a dog in Australia and its biological and molecular characterisation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from the brain of a young dog for the first time in Australia. The identity of the parasite was confirmed by PCR, Western blotting, electron microscopy and cat bioassay. Genotyping of the isolate (TgDgAu1) was determined by PCR-RFLP markers that showed it to be a Type...

  2. Isolated brain metastases as first site of recurrence in prostate cancer: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J.; Woulfe, J.; Sinclair, J.; Malone, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fewer than 2% of patients with metastatic prostate cancer (pca) develop brain metastases. Autopsy series have confirmed the rarity of brain metastases. When present, brain metastases occur in end stage, once the pca is castrate-resistant and spread to other sites is extensive. Here, we present a rare case of a patient with pca who developed a solitary parenchymal brain metastasis as first site of relapse 9 years after radical therapy. The patient underwent craniotomy and excision of the tumour. A second recurrence was also isolated to the brain. In the literature, pca patients with brain metastases have a poor mean survival of 1–7.6 months. The patient in our case report experienced a relatively favourable outcome, surviving 19 months after his initial brain relapse. PMID:26715888

  3. Brain metastases as site of first and isolated recurrence of breast cancer: the role of systemic therapy after local treatment.

    PubMed

    Niwińska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The role of systemic treatment was assessed after local therapy for breast cancer patients who developed central nervous system (CNS) metastases as a first and isolated recurrence. Subjects were 128 breast cancer patients with brain metastases as the first and isolated site of recurrence that were selected from 673 consecutive breast cancer patients with brain metastases treated at the same institution. Median survival from brain metastases in patients with and without systemic treatment after local therapy was respectively 15 and 4 months (p < 0.001). In patients with a Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70 and those <70, survival was respectively 16 and 5.5 months (p < 0.001). The median survival from brain metastasis in patients with solitary brain metastasis, with and without systemic treatment after local therapy, was respectively 22 and 7 months (p = 0.003). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that good performance status, solitary brain metastasis and systemic therapy undertaken after local treatment were factors which prolonged survival. However patient survival was adversely affected by those having leptomeningeal metastasis associated with brain parenchymal lesions. Systemic therapy, undertaken after local treatment improved survival in those patients with breast cancer and brain metastases as the site of first and isolated recurrence. Further study is required in order to fully establish the role of systemic treatment for this patient group.

  4. Intrahippocampal Infusion of Crotamine Isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus Alters Plasma and Brain Biochemical Parameters †

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rithiele; Vargas, Liane S.; Lara, Marcus V. S.; Güllich, Angélica; Mandredini, Vanusa; Ponce-Soto, Luis; Marangoni, Sergio; Dal Belo, Cháriston A.; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B.

    2014-01-01

    Crotamine is one of the main constituents of the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Here we sought to investigate the inflammatory and toxicological effects induced by the intrahippocampal administration of crotamine isolated from Crotalus whole venom. Adult rats received an intrahippocampal infusion of crotamine or vehicle and were euthanized 24 h or 21 days after infusion. Plasma and brain tissue were collected for biochemical analysis. Complete blood count, creatinine, urea, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), creatine-kinase (CK), creatine kinase-muscle B (CK-MB) and oxidative parameters (assessed by DNA damage and micronucleus frequency in leukocytes, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls in plasma and brain) were quantified. Unpaired and paired t-tests were used for comparisons between saline and crotamine groups, and within groups (24 h vs. 21 days), respectively. After 24 h crotamine infusion promoted an increase of urea, GOT, GPT, CK, and platelets values (p ≤ 0.01), while red blood cells, hematocrit and leukocytes values decreased (p ≤ 0.01). Additionally, 21 days after infusion crotamine group showed increased creatinine, leukocytes, TBARS (plasma and brain), carbonyl (plasma and brain) and micronucleus compared to the saline-group (p ≤ 0.01). Our findings show that crotamine infusion alter hematological parameters and cardiac markers, as well as oxidative parameters, not only in the brain, but also in the blood, indicating a systemic pro-inflammatory and toxicological activity. A further scientific attempt in terms of preserving the beneficial activity over toxicity is required. PMID:25380458

  5. Phocaeicola abscessus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium isolated from a human brain abscess sample.

    PubMed

    Al Masalma, Mouhamad; Raoult, Didier; Roux, Véronique

    2009-09-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain, 7401987T, was isolated from a human brain abscess sample. Cells were Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, coccoid to rod-shaped and motile by flagella in a lophotrichous arrangement. The isolate was asaccharolytic and the major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 (28.2%), C16:0 (18.0%), iso-C15:0 (12.3%) and iso-C17:0 3-OH (11.7%). 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that the isolate was distantly related to members of the genera Bacteroides (<83.6% similarity), Parabacteroides (<79.9% similarity), Tannerella (<79.8% similarity), Dysgonomonas (<79.6% similarity), Porphyromonas (<79.3% similarity) and Prevotella (<78.9% similarity). The low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values and physiological and biochemical characteristics differentiated strain 7401987T from all known species and indicate that our isolate represents a novel species in a new genus within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The name Phocaeicola abscessus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain of Phocaeicola abscessus is 7401987T (=CCUG 55929T=CSUR P22T=DSM 21584T). PMID:19620382

  6. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  7. Capillary interactions in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, J.; Tasinkevych, M.; Dietrich, S.

    2011-09-01

    The effective capillary interaction potentials for small colloidal particles trapped at the surface of liquid droplets are calculated analytically. Pair potentials between capillary monopoles and dipoles, corresponding to particles floating on a droplet with a fixed center of mass and subjected to external forces and torques, respectively, exhibit a repulsion at large angular separations and an attraction at smaller separations, with the latter resembling the typical behavior for flat interfaces. This change of character is not observed for quadrupoles, corresponding to free particles on a mechanically isolated droplet. The analytical results are compared with the numerical minimization of the surface free energy of the droplet in the presence of spherical or ellipsoidal particles.

  8. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  9. Isolation and characterisation of two cDNAs encoding the neuromedin U receptor from goldfish brain.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, K; Kaiya, H; Miyazato, M; Konno, N; Wakasugi, T; Uchiyama, M; Shioda, S; Murakami, N; Matsuda, K

    2011-03-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of neuromedin U (NMU) exerts an anorexigenic effect in a goldfish model. However, little is known about the NMU receptor and its signalling system in fish. In the present study, we isolated and cloned two cDNAs encoding different proteins comprising 429 and 388 amino acid residues from the goldfish brain based on the nucleotide sequences of human NMU receptor 1 (NMU-R1) and receptor 2 (NMU-R2). Hydropathy and phylogenetic analyses suggested that these two proteins were orthologues of NMU-R1 and -R2 of goldfish. We established two human embryonic kidney 293 cell lines stably expressing putative NMU-R1 and -R2, respectively, and showed that NMU induced an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in these cells. We examined the presence of NMU-R1 and -R2 in the goldfish brain by western blotting analysis using affinity-purified antisera raised against peptide fragments derived from these receptors. NMU-R1-specific and NMU-R2-specific antisera detected a 49-kDa and 45-kDa immunopositive bands, respectively, in the brain extract. The mass of each band corresponded to that of the deduced respective primary structures. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that NMU-R1 and -R2 transcripts were detected in several tissues. In particular, both mRNAs were strongly expressed in the goldfish brain. By contrast, NMU-R2 mRNA was also expressed in the gut. These results indicate for the first time that NMU-R orthologues exist in goldfish, and suggest physiological roles of NMU and its receptor system in fish.

  10. A comparison of mitochondrial DNA isolation methods in frozen post-mortem human brain tissue--applications for studies of mitochondrial genetics in brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Devall, Matthew; Burrage, Joe; Caswell, Richard; Johnson, Matthew; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Jeffries, Aaron R; Mill, Jonathan; Lunnon, Katie

    2015-10-01

    Given that many brain disorders are characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction, there is a growing interest in investigating genetic and epigenetic variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). One major caveat for such studies is the presence of nuclear-mitochondrial pseudogenes (NUMTs), which are regions of the mitochondrial genome that have been inserted into the nuclear genome over evolution and, if not accounted for, can confound genetic studies of mtDNA. Here we provide the first systematic comparison of methods for isolating mtDNA from frozen post-mortem human brain tissue. Our data show that a commercial method from Miltenyi Biotec, which magnetically isolates mitochondria using antibodies raised against the mitochondrial import receptor subunit TOM22, gives significant mtDNA enrichment and should be considered the method of choice for mtDNA studies in frozen brain tissue.

  11. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Poor Functioning after Isolated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Dennis R.; Koepsell, Thomas D.; Wang, Jin; Temkin, Nancy R.; Dorsch, Andrea M.; Vavilala, Monica S.; Jaffe, Kenneth M.; Rivara, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of poor 3 and 12 month quality of life outcomes in a cohort of pediatric patients with isolated mild TBI. We conducted a prospective cohort study of children and adolescents <18 years of age treated for an isolated mild TBI, defined as “no radiographically apparent intracranial injury” or “an isolated skull fracture, and no other clinically significant non-brain injuries.” The main outcome measure was the change in quality of life from baseline at 3 and 12 months following injury, as measured by the Pediatric Quality of Life index (PedsQL). Poor functioning was defined as a decrease in total PedsQL score of >15 points between baseline and follow-up scores (at 3 and 12 months). Of the 329 patients who met inclusion criteria, 11.3% (95% CI 8.3–15.3%) at 3 months and 12.9% (95% CI 9.6–17.2%) at 12 months following injury had relatively poor functioning. Significant predictors of poor functioning included less parental education, Hispanic ethnicity (at 3 months following injury, but not at 12 months); low household income (at 3 and 12 months), and Medicaid insurance (at 12 months only). Children and adolescents sustaining a mild TBI who are socioeconomically disadvantaged may require additional intervention to mitigate the effects of mild TBI on their functioning. PMID:24294826

  12. Comparative genomic analysis of human Chlamydia pneumoniae isolates from respiratory, brain and cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Roulis, Eileen; Bachmann, Nathan L; Myers, Garry S A; Huston, Wilhelmina; Summersgill, James; Hudson, Alan; Dreses-Werringloer, Ute; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is an obligate intracellular bacterium implicated in a wide range of human diseases including atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Efforts to understand the relationships between C. pneumoniae detected in these diseases have been hindered by the availability of sequence data for non-respiratory strains. In this study, we sequenced the whole genomes for C. pneumoniae isolates from atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, and compared these to previously published C. pneumoniae genomes. Phylogenetic analyses of these new C. pneumoniae strains indicate two sub-groups within human C. pneumoniae, and suggest that both recombination and mutation events have driven the evolution of human C. pneumoniae. Further fine-detailed analyses of these new C. pneumoniae sequences show several genetically variable loci. This suggests that similar strains of C. pneumoniae are found in the brain, lungs and cardiovascular system and that only minor genetic differences may contribute to the adaptation of particular strains in human disease.

  13. Disrupted topological organization of structural and functional brain connectomes in clinically isolated syndrome and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Ni; Duan, Yunyun; Xia, Mingrui; Schoonheim, Menno M.; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Sun, Zheng; Ye, Jing; Dong, Huiqing; Shi, Fu-Dong; Barkhof, Frederik; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Yaou

    2016-01-01

    The brain connectome of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been investigated by several previous studies; however, it is still unknown how the network changes in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), the earliest stage of MS, and how network alterations on a functional level relate to the structural level in MS disease. Here, we investigated the topological alterations of both the structural and functional connectomes in 41 CIS and 32 MS patients, compared to 35 healthy controls, by combining diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional MRI with graph analysis approaches. We found that the structural connectome showed a deviation from the optimal pattern as early as the CIS stage, while the functional connectome only showed local changes in MS patients, not in CIS. When comparing two patient groups, the changes appear more severe in MS. Importantly, the disruptions of structural and functional connectomes in patients occurred in the same direction and locally correlated in sensorimotor component. Finally, the extent of structural network changes was correlated with several clinical variables in MS patients. Together, the results suggested early disruption of the structural brain connectome in CIS patients and provided a new perspective for investigating the relationship of the structural and functional alterations in MS. PMID:27403924

  14. Isolation and Characterization of δ-Subspecies of Protein Kinase C from Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogita, Kouji; Miyamoto, Shin-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Koide, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Naoko; Kikkawa, Ushio; Sahara, Setsuko; Fukami, Yasuo; Nishizuka, Yasutomi

    1992-03-01

    The δ-subspecies of protein kinase C (δ PKC) was purified to near homogeneity from the Triton X-100 extract of the rat brain particulate fraction by successive chromatographies on S-Sepharose fast flow, phenyl 5PW, heparin 5PW, hydroxyapatite, and Mono Q columns. The purified enzyme was a doublet with molecular masses of 78 and 76 kDa on SDS/PAGE. The doublet proteins were separated partially by Mono Q column chromatography; both were recognized by the antibodies raised against synthetic oligopeptides, parts of the deduced amino acid sequence of the rat δ PKC. Protein phosphatase 2A treatment suggested that the 78-kDa protein was a phosphorylated form of the 76-kDa protein. To confirm the structural and genetic identity of the doublet proteins, δ PKC was expressed in COS 7 cells by transfecting its cDNA-constructed plasmid and was purified for comparison. This recombinant enzyme was also a doublet. The enzymes isolated from the brain and COS 7 cells showed identical reactivities with δ PKC-specific antibodies, chromatographic behaviors, and V8 protease peptide mappings. In addition, these two enzyme preparations were indistinguishable from each other in their responses to phosphatidylserine, diacylglycerol, phorbol esters, free fatty acids, Ca2+, and enzyme inhibitors. Comparison was also made between the enzymologic properties of δ PKC and α PKC, which were distinctly different from each other.

  15. Isolation of a multispecific organic anion and cardiac glycoside transporter from rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Noé, Birgitta; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Stieger, Bruno; Meier, Peter J.

    1997-01-01

    A novel multispecific organic anion transporting polypeptide (oatp2) has been isolated from rat brain. The cloned cDNA contains 3,640 bp. The coding region extends over 1,983 nucleotides, thus encoding a polypeptide of 661 amino acids. Oatp2 is homologous to other members of the oatp gene family of membrane transporters with 12 predicted transmembrane domains, five potential glycosylation, and six potential protein kinase C phosphorylation sites. In functional expression studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes, oatp2 mediated uptake of the bile acids taurocholate (Km ≈ 35 μM) and cholate (Km ≈ 46 μM), the estrogen conjugates 17β-estradiol-glucuronide (Km ≈ 3 μM) and estrone-3-sulfate (Km ≈ 11 μM), and the cardiac gylcosides ouabain (Km ≈ 470 μM) and digoxin (Km ≈ 0.24 μM). Although most of the tested compounds are common substrates of several oatp-related transporters, high-affinity uptake of digoxin is a unique feature of the newly cloned oatp2. On the basis of Northern blot analysis under high-stringency conditions, oatp2 is highly expressed in brain, liver, and kidney but not in heart, spleen, lung, skeletal muscle, and testes. These results provide further support for the overall significance of oatps as a new family of multispecific organic anion transporters. They indicate that oatp2 may play an especially important role in the brain accumulation and toxicity of digoxin and in the hepatobiliary and renal excretion of cardiac glycosides from the body. PMID:9294213

  16. A glass capillary microelectrode based on capillarity and its application to the detection of L-glutamate release from mouse brain slices.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kumiko; Yamagiwa, Takashi; Hirano, Ayumi; Sugawara, Masao

    2003-01-01

    A new glass capillary microelectrode for L-glutamate is described using pulled glass capillaries (tip size, approximately 12.5 microm) with a very small volume (approximately 2 microl) of inner solution containing glutamate oxidase (GluOx) and ascorbate oxidase. The operation of the electrode is based on capillary action that samples L-glutamate into the inner solution. The enzyme reaction by GluOx generates hydrogen peroxide that is detected at an Os-gel-HRP polymer modified Pt electrode in a three-electrode configuration. The amperometric response behavior of the electrode was characterized in terms of the capillarity, response time, sensitivity and selectivity for measurements of L-glutamate. The currents at 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl increased linearly with the L-glutamate concentration from 10 to 150 microM for in vitro and in situ calibrations. The response was highly selective to L-glutamate over ascorbate, dopamine, serotonin and other amino acids. The detection of L-glutamate in the extracellular fluids of different regions of mouse hippocampal slices under stimulation of KCl was demonstrated.

  17. Sympathoadrenal Activation is Associated with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy and Endotheliopathy in Isolated Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Battista, Alex P.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Lejnieks, Brandon; Min, Arimie; Shiu, Maria Y.; Peng, Henry T.; Baker, Andrew J.; Hutchison, Michael G.; Churchill, Nathan; Inaba, Kenji; Nascimento, Bartolomeu B.; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Beckett, Andrew; Rhind, Shawn G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Acute coagulopathy after traumatic brain injury (TBI) involves a complex multifactorial hemostatic response that is poorly characterized. Objectives: To examine early posttraumatic alterations in coagulofibrinolytic, endothelial, and inflammatory blood biomarkers in relation to sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation and 6-month patient outcomes, using multivariate partial least-squares (PLS) analysis. Patients and Methods: A multicenter observational study of 159 adult isolated TBI patients admitted to the emergency department at an urban level I trauma center, was performed. Plasma concentrations of 6 coagulofibrinolytic, 10 vascular endothelial, 19 inflammatory, and 2 catecholamine biomarkers were measured by immunoassay on admission and 24 h postinjury. Neurological outcome at 6 months was assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale. PLS-discriminant analysis was used to identify salient biomarker contributions to unfavorable outcome, whereas PLS regression analysis was used to evaluate the covariance between SNS correlates (catecholamines) and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation. Results: Biomarker profiles in patients with an unfavorable outcome displayed procoagulation, hyperfibrinolysis, glycocalyx and endothelial damage, vasculature activation, and inflammation. A strong covariant relationship was evident between catecholamines and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation at both admission and 24 h postinjury. Conclusions: Biomarkers of coagulopathy and endotheliopathy are associated with poor outcome after TBI. Catecholamine levels were highly correlated with endotheliopathy and coagulopathy markers within the first 24 h after injury. Further research is warranted to characterize the pathogenic role of SNS-mediated hemostatic alterations in isolated TBI. PMID:27206278

  18. Genetic similarity between cysticerci of Taenia solium isolated from human brain and from pigs.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa-Juarez, Araceli Consuelo; Sandoval-Balanzario, Miguel; McManus, Donald Peter; Monroy-Ostria, Amalia

    2008-09-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) cox1 and ribosomal ITS1 DNA sequences from Taenia solium cysticercus isolates from pigs and cysticerci (racemose and cellulose types) from patients with neurocysticercosis were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplicons were sequenced in order to determine the genetic relationship between these types of cysticerci. Phylogenetic trees were constructed and evolutionary distances were calculated. ITS1 and mt cox1 cysticerci sequence data were compared with previously published Taenia spp. sequences. The variation in the ITS1 and cox1 sequences of samples collected from Mexico was minimal, regardless of geographical origin, size or colour of cysticerci from either pigs or human brain. These results suggest that the racemose and cellulose types represent genetically identical metacestodes of T. solium. Alignment of the mt cox1 sequences of the Mexican samples with sequences of other Taenia taxa showed that most were very similar to T. solium from Mexico and T. solium from Colombia; one T. solium Mexican isolate and Taenia hydatigena were placed in the same group close to Taenia crassiceps. The ITS1 sequences for the Mexican T. solium samples indicated the majority were in the same group as the Latin American T. solium. Two Mexican T. solium samples and T. solium from Philippines were placed together in a different group.

  19. Improvement of Isolated Myoclonus Phenotype in Myoclonus Dystonia after Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramdhani, Ritesh A.; Frucht, Steven J.; Behnegar, Anousheh; Kopell, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myoclonus–dystonia is a condition that manifests predominantly as myoclonic jerks with focal dystonia. It is genetically heterogeneous with most mutations in the epsilon sarcoglycan gene (SGCE). In medically refractory cases, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to provide marked sustainable clinical improvement, especially in SGCE-positive patients. We present two patients with myoclonus–dystonia (one SGCE positive and the other SGCE negative) who have the isolated myoclonus phenotype and had DBS leads implanted in the bilateral globus pallidus internus (GPi). Methods We review their longitudinal Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale scores along with their DBS programming parameters and compare them with published cases in the literature. Results Both patients demonstrated complete amelioration of all aspects of myoclonus within 6–12 months after surgery. The patient with the SGCE-negative mutation responded just as well as the patient who was SGCE positive. High-frequency stimulation (130 Hz) with amplitudes greater than 2.5 V provided therapeutic benefit. Discussion This case series demonstrates that high frequency GPi-DBS is effective in treating isolated myoclonus in myoclonus–dystonia, regardless of the presence of SGCE mutation. PMID:26989574

  20. Social isolation stress-induced oxidative damage in mouse brain and its modulation by majonoside-R2, a Vietnamese ginseng saponin.

    PubMed

    Huong, Nguyen Thi Thu; Murakami, Yukihisa; Tohda, Michihisa; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2005-08-01

    Stressors with a physical factor such as immobilization, electric foot shock, cold swim, etc., have been shown to produce oxidative damage to membrane lipids in the brain. In this study, we investigated the effect of protracted social isolation stress on lipid peroxidation activity in the mouse brain and elucidated the protective effect of majonoside-R2, a major saponin component of Vietnamese ginseng, in mice exposed to social isolation stress. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels, one of the end products of lipid peroxidation reaction, were increased in the brains of mice subjected to 6-8 weeks of social isolation stress. Measurements of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites (NO(x)(-)) also revealed a significant increase of NO production in the brains of socially isolated mice. Moreover, the depletion of brain glutathione content, an endogenous antioxidant, in socially isolated animals occurred in association with the rise in lipid peroxidation. The intraperitoneal administration of majonoside-R2 (10-50 mg/kg) had no effect on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), NO, or glutathione levels in the brains of group-housed control mice but it significantly suppressed the increase in TBARS and NO levels and the decrease in glutathione levels caused by social isolation stress. These results suggest that mice subjected to 6-8 weeks of social isolation stress produces oxidative damage in the brain partly via enhancement of NO production, and that majonoside-R2 exerts a protective effect by modulating NO and glutathione systems in the brain.

  1. In socially isolated mice, the reversal of brain allopregnanolone down-regulation mediates the anti-aggressive action of fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Graziano; Dong, Erbo; Matsumoto, Kinzo; Costa, Erminio; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    Social isolation (SI) of male mice lasting >4 weeks is associated with aggression toward intruders and a down-regulation of brain allopregnanolone (Allo) content. SI of female mice fails to down-regulate brain Allo content or to induce aggressiveness. Fluoxetine (Prozac in clinical use) is an S- and R-fluoxetine (FLX) mixture, which in mammals is metabolized into S- and R-norfluoxetine (NFLX). The S isomers of FLX and NFLX are more active than their respective R isomers in normalizing brain Allo down-regulation and in reducing the aggressiveness induced by SI. Thus, FLX stereospecifically reduces brain Allo down-regulation and the aggressiveness induced by SI, whereas serotonin (5-HT) uptake inhibition lacks stereospecificity. The doses of S-FLX and S-NFLX that reduce aggressiveness and Allo brain content down-regulation induced by SI are at least one order of magnitude lower than the doses that block 5-HT reuptake. Doses of imipramine that inhibit 5-HT uptake neither reduce aggressiveness nor normalize brain Allo down-regulation. We conclude that Allo brain content normalization is a better candidate than 5-HT reuptake inhibition to explain the reduction of aggressiveness elicited by S-FLX and S-NFLX. PMID:12571361

  2. CBG does not restrict blood-brain barrier corticosterone transport in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Pardridge, W.M.; Eisenberg, J.; Fierer, G.; Kuhn, R.W.

    1986-08-01

    The metabolic clearance rate of corticosterone in rabbits is unrelated to the physiological concentration of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) in rabbit plasma. This suggests that corticosterone is available for transport into peripheral tissues in rabbits from the circulating CBG-bound pool, similar to what is known to occur in rat liver. This hypothesis was tested in the present studies, which investigate the transport of corticosterone into rabbit brain from the circulating rabbit or human CBG-bound pool. Corticosterone was readily exchangeable in brain capillaries in vivo from the circulating albumin-bound and rabbit or human CBG-bound pools. The involvement of specific CBG receptors on brain capillary endothelia in this process was investigated with (TH)-labeled human CBG prepared by reductive methylation. The transport of (TH)CBG across rabbit brain capillaries in vivo was immeasurably low, and no specific binding of this radiolabeled plasma protein to isolated brain capillaries in vivo was immeasurably low, and no specific binding of this radiolabeled plasma protein to isolated brain capilaries in vitro was observed at 37C during incubations up to 120 min. These studies indicate that the rabbit is a novel system for assessing the role of CBG in delivering corticosterone to peripheral tissues in vivo and that specific endothelial CBG receptors may not participate in the transport process.

  3. Serum IL-6: a candidate biomarker for intracranial pressure elevation following isolated traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is a serious, life-threatening, secondary event following traumatic brain injury (TBI). In many cases, ICP rises in a delayed fashion, reaching a maximal level 48-96 hours after the initial insult. While pressure catheters can be implanted to monitor ICP, there is no clinically proven method for determining a patient's risk for developing this pathology. Methods In the present study, we employed antibody array and Luminex-based screening methods to interrogate the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the serum of healthy volunteers and in severe TBI patients (GCS≤8) with or without incidence of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). De-identified samples and ELISAs were used to confirm the sensitivity and specificity of IL-6 as a prognostic marker of elevated ICP in both isolated TBI patients, and polytrauma patients with TBI. Results Consistent with previous reports, we observed sustained increases in IL-6 levels in TBI patients irrespective of their ICP status. However, the group of patients who subsequently experienced ICP ≥ 25 mm Hg had significantly higher IL-6 levels within the first 17 hours of injury as compared to the patients whose ICP remained ≤20 mm Hg. When blinded samples (n = 22) were assessed, a serum IL-6 cut-off of <5 pg/ml correctly identified 100% of all the healthy volunteers, a cut-off of >128 pg/ml correctly identified 85% of isolated TBI patients who subsequently developed elevated ICP, and values between these cut-off values correctly identified 75% of all patients whose ICP remained ≤20 mm Hg throughout the study period. In contrast, the marker had no prognostic value in predicting elevated ICP in polytrauma patients with TBI. When the levels of serum IL-6 were assessed in patients with orthopedic injury (n = 7) in the absence of TBI, a significant increase was found in these patients compared to healthy volunteers, albeit lower than that observed in TBI patients. Conclusions Our

  4. Exploring the Use of Isolated Expressions and Film Clips to Evaluate Emotion Recognition by People with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Barbra; Neumann, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    The current study presented 60 people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 60 controls with isolated facial emotion expressions, isolated vocal emotion expressions, and multimodal (i.e., film clips) stimuli that included contextual cues. All stimuli were presented via computer. Participants were required to indicate how the person in each stimulus was feeling using a forced-choice format. Additionally, for the film clips, participants had to indicate how they felt in response to the stimulus, and the level of intensity with which they experienced that emotion. PMID:27213280

  5. In vivo simultaneous monitoring of gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and L-aspartate using brain microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection: Analytical developments and in vitro/in vivo validations.

    PubMed

    Sauvinet, Valérie; Parrot, Sandrine; Benturquia, Nadia; Bravo-Moratón, Eva; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2003-09-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and L-aspartate (L-Asp) are three major amino acid neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. In this work, a method for the separation of these three neurotransmitters in brain microdialysis samples using a commercially available capillary electrophoresis (CE) system has been developed. Molecules were tagged on their primary amine function with the fluorogene agent naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA), and, after separation by micellar electrokinetic chromatography, were detected by laser-induced fluorescence using a 442 nm helium-cadmium laser. The separation conditions for the analysis of derivatized neurotransmitters in standard solutions and microdialysates have been optimized, and this method has been validated on both pharmacological and analytical basis. The separation of GABA, Glu, and L-Asp takes less than 10 min by using a 75 mmol/L borate buffer, pH 9.2, containing 70 mmol/L SDS and 10 mmol/L hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and + 25 kV voltage. The detection limits were 3, 15 nmol/L and, 5 nmol/L for GABA, Glu, and L-Asp, respectively. Moreover, submicroliter samples can be analyzed. This method allows a simple, rapid and accurate measurement of the three amino acid neurotransmitters for the in vivo brain monitoring using microdialysis sampling.

  6. Comparison of primary skunk brain and kidney and raccoon kidney cells with established cell lines for isolation and propagation of street rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Umoh, J U; Blenden, D C

    1983-09-01

    Cell cultures prepared from skunk kidney, raccoon kidney, and skunk brain were compared with CER, murine neuroblastoma (C1300, clone NA), baby hamster kidney (BHK-21, S-13), and dog kidney (MDCK) cell lines for virus isolation and propagation of street and fixed rabies virus. The skunk brain cells were suitable for efficient replication of all the virus isolates. They were comparable to CER and murine neuroblastoma cells for virus isolation and propagation. None of the other cell cultures was satisfactory. Further work is under way to refine the skunk brain cell cultures.

  7. [Substantiation of the choice of treatment strategy in isolated traumatic injury of the frontal lobes of the brain].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, M M; Shcherbuk, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the results of the treatment of 132 patients with isolated traumatic parenchymatous injury of the frontal lobes of the brain was made. The treatment strategy was determined in consideration of the traumatic substratum volume and a combination of neurologic status and instrumental data. There were unfavorable risk factors to the course of traumatic parenchymatous injury of the frontal lobes of the brain such as low initial GCS score, the progression of neurologic deficiency in the presence of contusion hemorrhagic foci in the frontal lobe with the volume more than 25 cm3, shifting of midline structures on 5 mm and more or signs of deformation of basilar region cisterns and the presence of mass-effect according to the tomographic data. The developed algorithm allowed improving the results of treatment and the quality of life for patients with traumatic parenchymatous injury of the frontal lobes of the brain.

  8. Malignant potential of cells isolated from lymph node or brain metastases of melanoma patients and implications for prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R D; Price, J E; Schackert, G; Itoh, K; Fidler, I J

    1991-04-15

    We studied the correlation between the formation of brain metastasis and the malignant growth potential of seven human melanoma cell lines, isolated from lymph node metastases (A375-SM, TXM-1, DM-4) or from brain metastases (TXM-13, TXM-18, TXM-34, TXM-40), and the potential of three variants of the mouse K-1735 melanoma. Growth rates in different concentrations of fetal bovine serum and colony-forming efficiency in semisolid agarose were measured, and the tumorigenicity and metastatic ability were determined in nude mice (for the human melanoma cell lines) or in C3H/HeN mice (for the K-1735 variants). The ability to form brain metastasis was tested by injection of cells into the carotid artery. A high colony-forming efficiency in agarose, especially at concentrations of agarose greater than 0.6%, corresponded with high tumor take rates, rapid tumor growth rates, and metastatic colonization of the lungs of the recipient mice. For the human melanomas, the lymph node metastasis-derived cells were more tumorigenic and metastatic than the brain metastasis-derived cells. In the K-1735 mouse melanoma, the tumorigenic and metastatic behavior of the cells after i.v. and s.c. injection corresponded with growth in agarose cultures. However, for growth in the brain after intracarotid injection, the different melanoma cell lines showed similar frequencies of tumor take, regardless of tumorigenicity in other sites of the recipient mice, although mice given injections of brain metastasis-derived cells survived longer than mice given injections of lymph node metastasis (human melanoma) or lung metastasis (K-1735 M-2)-derived cell lines. The results from the human and mouse melanoma cell lines show that the brain metastasis-derived cell lines were not more malignant than the lymph node or lung metastasis-derived cells. These data imply that the production of brain metastasis is not always the final stage of a metastatic cascade. PMID:1826230

  9. Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians Can Predict Neurologic Prognosis in Patients with Isolated Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hon-Man; Huang, Shiuh-Lin; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie; Lou, Yun-Ting; Chen, Chao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) has been proved to be a simple and effective tool for recognizing osteoporosis risk. Our previous study has demonstrated that the preoperative OSTA index was a good prognostic predictor for stage II and III colon cancer patients after surgery. We aim to evaluate the value of OSTA index in prognostication of isolated traumatic brain injury with moderate severity (GCS 9-13). Methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients visiting Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital emergency department due to isolated moderate traumatic brain injury from Jan. 2010 to Dec. 2012. Background data (including the OSTA index), clinical presentations, management and outcomes (ICU admission days, total admission days, complications, Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at discharge, mortality) of the patients were recorded for further analysis. Our major outcome was good neurologic recovery defined as GOS of 5. Pearson chi-square test and the Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare demographic features. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors. Results 107 isolated moderate TBI patients were studied. 40 patients (37.4%) showed good recovery and 10 (9.3%) died at discharge. The univariate analysis revealed that younger age, higher OSTA index, lower ISS, lower AIS-H, and avoidance to neurosurgery were associated with better neurologic outcome for all moderate TBI patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that lower ISS, higher OSTA, and the avoidance of neurosurgery were independent risk factors predicting good neurologic recovery. Conclusion Higher ISS, lower OSTA index and exposure to neurosurgery were the independent risk factors for poorer recovery from isolated moderate TBI. In addition to labeling the cohort harboring osteoporotic risk, OSTA index could predict neurologic prognosis in patients with isolated moderate traumatic brain injury. PMID:26186582

  10. Normalization of coagulopathy is associated with improved outcome after isolated traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Daniel S; Mitra, Biswadev; Cameron, Peter A; Fitzgerald, Mark; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-07-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) has been reported in the setting of isolated traumatic brain injury (iTBI) and is associated with poor outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of procoagulant agents administered to patients with ATC and iTBI during resuscitation, hypothesizing that timely normalization of coagulopathy may be associated with a decrease in mortality. A retrospective review of the Alfred Hospital trauma registry, Australia, was conducted and patients with iTBI (head Abbreviated Injury Score [AIS] ⩾3 and all other body AIS <3) and coagulopathy (international normalized ratio ⩾1.3) were selected for analysis. Data on procoagulant agents used (fresh frozen plasma, platelets, cryoprecipitate, prothrombin complex concentrates, tranexamic acid, vitamin K) were extracted. Among patients who had achieved normalization of INR or survived beyond 24hours and were not taking oral anticoagulants, the association of normalization of INR and death at hospital discharge was analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. There were 157 patients with ATC of whom 68 (43.3%) received procoagulant products within 24hours of presentation. The median time to delivery of first products was 182.5 (interquartile range [IQR] 115-375) minutes, and following administration of coagulants, time to normalization of INR was 605 (IQR 274-1146) minutes. Normalization of INR was independently associated with significantly lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.10; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.38). Normalization of INR was associated with improved mortality in patients with ATC in the setting of iTBI. As there was a substantial time lag between delivery of products and eventual normalization of coagulation, specific management of coagulopathy should be implemented as early as possible. PMID:26947341

  11. Intranasal lobular capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Dipak Ranjan; Bhandarkar, Ajay M; Shivamurthy, Archana; Joy, Jasmi

    2014-01-01

    Lobular capillary haemangioma (LCH) is a benign proliferation of capillaries with a characteristic lobular architecture on microscopy; it has an affinity for mucous membrane and skin of the head and neck. It is extremely rare in the nasal cavity. We present the case of a 45-year-old man who presented with epistaxis without any predisposing factors, which was diagnosed as lobular capillary haemangioma. PMID:25304675

  12. Capillary zone electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, J.W.; Lukacs, K.D.

    1983-10-21

    Zone electrophoresis in capillaries is a technique complementary to electrophoresis in supporting media, and each approach has its own particular advantages. Efficient heat transfer from small-diameter capillaries permits use of unusually high voltages, resulting in both high resolution and rapid analysis. Capillaries also seem well suited for automation. Our present electromigration injection technique is relatively straightforward and should be simple to automate. Capillaries are reusable, which is an advantage over gels. On-line electronic detection permits good quantification, further enhancing possibilities for fully automatic operation. The greatest obstacle to further development and utilization of capillaries is the requirement of extremely sensitive detectors, and more types of detectors with higher sensitivity are greatly needed. A better understanding of capillary surface modification will also be important, both for improved capillary surface deactivation and for better control over electroosmotic flow. Capillaries should provide an ideal system in which to explore nonaqueous separation media. The prospects for nonaqueous media in electrophoresis are similar to those in electrochemistry, and capillaries should prove an excellent system in which to begin their study. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone or Thyrotropin Deficiency Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Three Cases with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Cho-Ok; Kim, Yu Ji; Kim, Ji Hye

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical features and long-term outcomes of isolated pituitary hormone deficiencies after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such deficiencies typically present at time intervals after TBI, especially after mild injuries such as concussions, which makes their diagnosis difficult without careful history taking. It is necessary to improve diagnosis and prevent life threatening or morbid conditions such as those that may occur in deficiencies of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (as known as thyrotropin, TSH), the two most important pituitary hormones in hypopituitarism treatment. Here, we report two cases of isolated ACTH deficiency and one case of isolated TSH deficiency. These patients presented at different time points after concussion and underwent long-term follow-ups. PMID:27169080

  14. Isolation of 4,5-O-Dicaffeoylquinic Acid as a Pigmentation Inhibitor Occurring in Artemisia capillaris Thunberg and Its Validation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Nadia; Lee, Ji-Hyung; Yim, Soon-Ho; Batkhuu, Galzad Javzan

    2016-01-01

    There is a continual need to develop novel and effective melanogenesis inhibitors for the prevention of hyperpigmentation disorders. The plant Artemisia capillaris Thunberg (Oriental Wormwood) was screened for antipigmentation activity using murine cultured cells (B16-F10 malignant melanocytes). Activity-based fractionation using HPLC and NMR analyses identified the compound 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid as an active component in this plant. 4,5-O-Dicaffeoylquinic acid significantly reduced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner in the melanocytes. In addition, 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid treatment reduced the expression of tyrosinase-related protein-1. Significantly, we could validate the antipigmentation activity of this compound in vivo, using a zebrafish model. Moreover, 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid did not show toxicity in this animal model. Our discovery of 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid as an inhibitor of pigmentation that is active in vivo shows that this compound can be developed as an active component for formulations to treat pigmentation disorders. PMID:27528883

  15. Isolation of 4,5-O-Dicaffeoylquinic Acid as a Pigmentation Inhibitor Occurring in Artemisia capillaris Thunberg and Its Validation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Nadia; Lee, Ji-Hyung; Yim, Soon-Ho; Batkhuu, Galzad Javzan; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R

    2016-01-01

    There is a continual need to develop novel and effective melanogenesis inhibitors for the prevention of hyperpigmentation disorders. The plant Artemisia capillaris Thunberg (Oriental Wormwood) was screened for antipigmentation activity using murine cultured cells (B16-F10 malignant melanocytes). Activity-based fractionation using HPLC and NMR analyses identified the compound 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid as an active component in this plant. 4,5-O-Dicaffeoylquinic acid significantly reduced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner in the melanocytes. In addition, 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid treatment reduced the expression of tyrosinase-related protein-1. Significantly, we could validate the antipigmentation activity of this compound in vivo, using a zebrafish model. Moreover, 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid did not show toxicity in this animal model. Our discovery of 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid as an inhibitor of pigmentation that is active in vivo shows that this compound can be developed as an active component for formulations to treat pigmentation disorders. PMID:27528883

  16. Porosity, single-phase permeability, and capillary pressure data from preliminary laboratory experiments on selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1 of 3: Main report, appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.; Christian-Frear, T.

    1997-08-01

    Three groups of core samples from Marker Bed 139 of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were analyzed to provide data to support the development of numerical models used to predict the long-term hydrologic and structural response of the WIPP repository. These laboratory experiments, part of the FY93 Experimental Scoping Activities of the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program, were designed to (1) generate WIPP-specific porosity and single-phase permeability data, (2) provide information needed to design and implement planned tests to measure two-phase flow properties, including threshold pressure, capillary pressure, and relative permeability, and (3) evaluate the suitability of using analog correlations for the Salado Formation to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. This report contains a description of the boreholes core samples, the core preparation techniques used, sample sizes, testing procedures, test conditions, and results of porosity and single-phase permeability tests performed at three laboratories: TerraTek, Inc. (Salt Lake City, UT), RE/SPEC, Inc. (Rapid City, SD), and Core Laboratories-Special Core Analysis Laboratory (Carrollton, TX) for Rock Physics Associates. In addition, this report contains the only WIPP-specific two-phase-flow capillary-pressure data for twelve core samples. The WIPP-specific data generated in this laboratory study and in WIPP field-test programs and information from suitable analogs will form the basis for specification of single- and two-phase flow parameters for anhydrite markers beds for WIPP performance assessment calculations.

  17. High temporal resolution for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitters in awake epileptic rats using brain microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Riban, Véronique; Depaulis, Antoine; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-12-30

    A method for high temporal resolution monitoring of five neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (L-Asp), in freely-moving rats using microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) was developed. An on-line device, including microdialysis and derivatization with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde, mixes the dialysate with derivatization reagents directly in the collection tube, i.e. with no reactor. Thereafter, collected derivatized samples are analyzed off-line with an automated CE system coupled to a LIFD using a 442 nm excitation. The sampling time was limited by the minimal volume required for the analysis by the automated CE system used: neurotransmitters could be determined in 667 nl dialysates (940 nl after derivatization), i.e. in samples collected every 20 s with a flow rate of 2 microl/min. The detection limits at the dialysis probe were 3 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-9), 1.9 x 10(-8), 4.2 x 10(-7), 2.1 x 10(-7) mol/l for DA, NA, GABA, Glu and L-Asp, respectively. The protocol was validated using in vitro/in vivo tests and the performances--repeatability, linearity, characteristics of the probes--were determined. Finally, the high temporal resolution allowed the simultaneous monitoring of these neurotransmitters in rats with genetic absence epilepsy and revealed, for the first time, increases in GABA concentrations concomitantly with the seizures, detected when our new microdialysis method was combined to electroencephalographic recordings.

  18. Sleep-waking states develop independently in the isolated forebrain and brain stem following early postnatal midbrain transection in cats.

    PubMed

    Villablanca, J R; de Andrés, I; Olmstead, C E

    2001-01-01

    We report the effects of permanently separating the immature forebrain from the brain stem upon sleeping and waking development. Kittens ranging from postnatal 9 to 27 days of age sustained a mesencephalic transection and were maintained for up to 135 days. Prior to postnatal day 40, the electroencephalogram of the isolated forebrain and behavioral sleep-wakefulness of the decerebrate animal showed the immature patterns of normal young kittens. Thereafter, the isolated forebrain showed alternating sleep-wakefulness electrocortical rhythms similar to the corresponding normal patterns of intact, mature cats. Olfactory stimuli generally changed forebrain sleeping into waking activity, and in cats with the section behind the third nerve nuclei, normal correlates of eye movements-pupillary activity with electrocortical rhythms were present. Behind the transection, decerebrate animals showed wakefulness, and after 20 days of age displayed typical behavioral episodes of rapid eye movements sleep and, during these periods, the pontine recordings showed ponto-geniculo-occipital waves, which are markers for this sleep stage, together with muscle atonia and rapid lateral eye movements. Typically, but with remarkable exceptions suggesting humoral interactions, the sleep-waking patterns of the isolated forebrain were dissociated from those of the decerebrate animal. These results were very similar to our previous findings in midbrain-transected adult cats. However, subtle differences suggested greater functional plasticity in the developing versus the adult isolated forebrain. We conclude that behavioral and electroencephalographic patterns of non-rapid eye movement sleep and of rapid eye movement sleep states mature independently in the forebrain and the brain stem, respectively, after these structures are separated early postnatally. In terms of waking, the findings strengthen our concept that in higher mammals the rostral brain can independently support wakefulness

  19. Effect of socio-environmental isolation on brain biochemistry, behaviour and psychoactive drug activity.

    PubMed

    Valzelli, L

    1978-01-01

    Isolation has been widely described to induce a strong aggressive behaviour in many animal species and especially in rodents. A deeper analysis of this altered behaviour induced by isolation, allows for the identification of several other changes involving numerous peripheral, behavioural and neurochemical functions. As a consequence of the manifold aspects involved in this experimental situation, the definition "isolation syndrome" seems to be much more adequate than the simplest definition of "aggressiveness by isolation". On this framework, some similarities with psychoneurosis in men are also suggested.

  20. Gene Expression Analysis of Neurons and Astrocytes Isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection from Frozen Human Brain Tissues.

    PubMed

    Tagliafierro, Lidia; Bonawitz, Kirsten; Glenn, Omolara C; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types and multiple cellular connections characterize the human brain. Gene expression analysis using a specific population of cells is more accurate than conducting analysis of the whole tissue homogenate, particularly in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, where a specific subset of cells is affected by the different pathology. Due to the difficulty of obtaining homogenous cell populations, gene expression in specific cell-types (neurons, astrocytes, etc.) has been understudied. To leverage the use of archive resources of frozen human brains in studies of neurodegenerative diseases, we developed and calibrated a method to quantify cell-type specific-neuronal, astrocytes-expression profiles of genes implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Archive human frozen brain tissues were used to prepare slides for rapid immunostaining using cell-specific antibodies. The immunoreactive-cells were isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM). The enrichment for a particular cell-type of interest was validated in post-analysis stage by the expression of cell-specific markers. We optimized the technique to preserve the RNA integrity, so that the RNA was suitable for downstream expression analyses. Following RNA extraction, the expression levels were determined digitally using nCounter Single Cell Gene Expression assay (NanoString Technologies®). The results demonstrated that using our optimized technique we successfully isolated single neurons and astrocytes from human frozen brain tissues and obtained RNA of a good quality that was suitable for mRNA expression analysis. We present here new advancements compared to previous reported methods, which improve the method's feasibility and its applicability for a variety of downstream molecular analyses. Our new developed method can be implemented in genetic and functional genomic research of neurodegenerative diseases and has the potential to significantly

  1. Gene Expression Analysis of Neurons and Astrocytes Isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection from Frozen Human Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tagliafierro, Lidia; Bonawitz, Kirsten; Glenn, Omolara C.; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types and multiple cellular connections characterize the human brain. Gene expression analysis using a specific population of cells is more accurate than conducting analysis of the whole tissue homogenate, particularly in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, where a specific subset of cells is affected by the different pathology. Due to the difficulty of obtaining homogenous cell populations, gene expression in specific cell-types (neurons, astrocytes, etc.) has been understudied. To leverage the use of archive resources of frozen human brains in studies of neurodegenerative diseases, we developed and calibrated a method to quantify cell-type specific—neuronal, astrocytes—expression profiles of genes implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Archive human frozen brain tissues were used to prepare slides for rapid immunostaining using cell-specific antibodies. The immunoreactive-cells were isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM). The enrichment for a particular cell-type of interest was validated in post-analysis stage by the expression of cell-specific markers. We optimized the technique to preserve the RNA integrity, so that the RNA was suitable for downstream expression analyses. Following RNA extraction, the expression levels were determined digitally using nCounter Single Cell Gene Expression assay (NanoString Technologies®). The results demonstrated that using our optimized technique we successfully isolated single neurons and astrocytes from human frozen brain tissues and obtained RNA of a good quality that was suitable for mRNA expression analysis. We present here new advancements compared to previous reported methods, which improve the method's feasibility and its applicability for a variety of downstream molecular analyses. Our new developed method can be implemented in genetic and functional genomic research of neurodegenerative diseases and has the potential to

  2. Proton-coupled organic cation antiporter-mediated uptake of apomorphine enantiomers in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3.

    PubMed

    Okura, Takashi; Higuchi, Kei; Kitamura, Atsushi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    R(-)-Apomorphine is a dopamine agonist used for rescue management of motor function impairment associated with levodopa therapy in Parkinson's disease patients. The aim of this study was to examine the role of proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in uptake of R(-)-apomorphine and its S-enantiomer in human brain, using human endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 as a model. Uptake of R(-)- or S(+)-apomorphine into hCMEC/D3 cells was measured under various conditions to evaluate its time-, concentration-, energy- and ion-dependency. Inhibition by selected organic cations was also examined. Uptakes of both R(-)- and S(+)-apomorphine increased with time. The initial uptake velocities of R(-)- and S(+)-apomorphine were concentration-dependent, with similar Km and Vmax values. The cell-to-medium (C/M) ratio of R(-)-apomorphine was significantly reduced by pretreatment with sodium azide, but was not affected by replacement of extracellular sodium ion with N-methylglucamine or potassium. Intracellular alkalization markedly reduced the uptake, while intracellular acidification increased it, suggesting that the uptake is driven by an oppositely directed proton gradient. The C/M ratio was significantly decreased by amantadine, verapamil, pyrilamine and diphenhydramine (substrates or inhibitors of proton-coupled organic cation antiporter), while tetraethylammonium (substrate of organic cation transporters (OCTs)) and carnitine (substrate of carnitine/organic cation transporter 2; (OCTN2)) had no effect. R(-)-Apomorphine uptake was competitively inhibited by diphenhydramine. Our results indicate that R(-)-apomorphine transport in human blood-brain barrier (BBB) model cells is similar to S(+)-apomorphine uptake. The transport was dependent on an oppositely directed proton gradient, but was sodium- or membrane potential-independent. The transport characteristics were consistent with involvement of the previously reported proton-coupled organic cation antiporter.

  3. Capillary micro-switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, Paul; Matalanis, Claude; Hirsa, Amir; Cox, Christhopher

    2002-11-01

    A capillary surface is a liquid/liquid or liquid/gas interface whose shape is determined by surface tension. Capillary surfaces occur when the capillary length is large compared to the container scale, as happens for typical liquids against gas on the sub-millimeter scale on Earth and on the meter scale in the micro-gravity environment of space vehicles. Manipulating capillary surfaces has emerged as a leading strategy for moving liquids on the micro-scale [1]. Practitioners have yet to take advantage of capillary instability in their design of devices, though. We illustrate how the response diagram of a single switch (bi-stable device) can be constructed from that of two capillary elements, how that of a system of switches (a pair) can be built from that of a single switch and finally how understanding the response of the system guides us to observations of new behavior in the laboratory. Experiments on capillary surfaces use either a soap-film analog (10 centimeter scale) or a liquid/gas (millimeter scale) apparatus. Progress is reported on the application of an array of micro-switches to make a controllable adhesion device, with the aim of effecting droplet transport. 1. Cho, Fan, Moon and Kim, "Towards digital microfluidic circuits: creating, transporting, cutting and merging liquid droplets by electrowetting-based actuation." Proc. 15th IEEE Int'l Conf. on MEMS, January 2002.

  4. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  5. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  6. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  7. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  8. Nasal Lobular Capillary Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prashant; Singla, Saurabh; Mane, Ranoji; Jagdeesh, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nasal lobular capillary hemangioma is a rare benign tumor of the paranasal sinuses. This lesion is believed to grow rapidly in size over time. The exact etiopathogenesis is still a dilemma. We discuss a case of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma presenting with a history of epistaxis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of paranasal sinuses revealed an intensely enhancing soft-tissue mass in the left nasal cavity and left middle and inferior meati with no obvious bony remodeling or destruction. We present imaging and pathologic features of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma and differentiate it from other entities like nasal angiofibroma. PMID:24228209

  9. Exogenous superoxide dismutase and catalase promote recovery of function in isolated rat heart after regional ischemia and may be transported from capillaries into myocytes.

    PubMed

    Koke, J R; Christodoulides, N J; Chudej, L L; Bittar, N

    1990-08-10

    The effects of infusing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) into the coronary circulation were investigated in isolated, working rat hearts prior to and during a 15 minute episode of regional ischemia followed by 30 minutes reperfusion. Aortic output, left ventricular pressure and dP/dT were recorded. Compared to untreated hearts, SOD and CAT significantly improved function during reperfusion, but had no effect during the pre-ischemic or the ischemic period. To investigate possible transport of SOD and CAT into rat myocytes, cryotome sections of isolated, Langendorff perfused rat hearts were exposed to rabbit antibody prepared against the exogenous SOD and CAT. Bound antibody was detected by the indirect-fluorescent antibody test. The interior of myocytes from rat hearts exposed to SOD and CAT bound antibodies prepared against these enzymes, whereas myocytes from rat hearts not exposed to exogenous SOD and CAT only bound the CAT antibodies. This indicates the anti-SOD we prepared is specific for exogenous SOD, and also suggests exogenous SOD can gain access to the cytoplasm of myocytes from the coronary circulation. PMID:2274050

  10. Isolation from bovine brain of substances inhibiting specific binding of imipramine and serotonin uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhin, A.G.; Kladnitskii, A.V.; Kovaleva, E.S.; Kudryakova, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors search for endogenous ligands of the ''imipramine receptor'' in brain tissue. Binding of tritium-imipramine with the fraction of unpruified bovine brain synaptic membranes was carried out by the method of Raisman et'al. Uptake of tritium-serotonin by synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was estimated. The results do not give a final anser to the question of the existence of an endogenous ligand of the ''imipramine receptor'' but they can serve as the basis for research aimed at purifying the active fractions already obtained and identifying the compounds containined in them.

  11. Comparative studies on mitochondria isolated from neuron-enriched and glia-enriched fractions of rabbit and beef brain.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, A; Blomstrand, C; Lehninger, A L

    1970-05-01

    Fractions enriched in neuronal and glial cells were obtained from dispersions of whole beef brain and rabbit cerebral cortex by large-scale density gradient centrifugation procedures. The fractions were characterized by appropriate microscopic observation. Mitochondria were then isolated from these fractions by differential centrifugation of their homogenates. The two different types of mitochondria were characterized with respect to certain enzyme activities, respiratory rate, rate of protein synthesis, and their buoyant density in sucrose gradients. The mitochondria from the neuron-enriched fraction were distinguished by a higher rate of incorporation of amino acids into protein, higher cytochrome oxidase activity, and a higher buoyant density in sucrose density gradients. Mitochondria from the glia-enriched fraction showed relatively high monoamine oxidase and Na(+)- and K(+)-stimulated ATPase activities. The rates of oxidation of various substrates and the acceptor control ratios did not differ appreciably between the two types of mitochondria. The difference in the buoyant density of mitochondria isolated from the neuron-enriched and glia-enriched cell fractions was utilized in attempts to separate neuronal and glial mitochondria from the mixed mitochondria obtained from whole brain homogenates in shallow sucrose gradients. The appearance of two peaks of cytochrome oxidase, monoamine oxidase, and protein concentration in such gradients shows the potential feasibility of such an approach.

  12. Capillary rise of superspreaders.

    PubMed

    Radulovic, Jovana; Sefiane, Khellil; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2011-09-15

    Trisiloxane surfactants, known as 'superspreaders', are commonly employed in numerous applications where enhanced wetting is of the utmost importance. The underlying mechanisms of superspreader wetting have been a focus of scientific interest for ca. 2 decades, and a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the unique trisiloxane dynamics. We have studied trisiloxane behaviour in thin capillaries to get further insight into their interfacial activity. Additionally, our knowledge of the capillary rise of superspreaders is surprisingly limited, and the effect of this extraordinary group of surfactants on capillary phenomena has been largely overlooked. Diffusion was confirmed to be the limiting factor of trisiloxane behaviour. A tentative theoretical explanation for the phenomenon studied and an appropriate mathematical model are presented. It is concluded that the enhancement of wetting due to surfactant addition is also a function of geometry: the effect is clear for a sessile drop, but more complex and less beneficial in a capillary.

  13. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  14. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  15. Capillary discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, III, Howard Albert

    2003-11-25

    Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

  16. Capillary saturation and desaturation.

    PubMed

    Hilfer, R; Armstrong, R T; Berg, S; Georgiadis, A; Ott, H

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment. PMID:26764820

  17. [Differentiated treatment of isolated traumatic injury of frontal lobes of the brain].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, M M; Shcherbuk, Iu A; Morozov, S A

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of treatment results was made in 83 patients with traumatic parenchymatous injuries of frontal lobes of the brain. Surgical interventions were performed in 31 patients and the conservative therapy was carried out in 52 patients. Regular neurological examinations were completed for all the patients. The data of neurovisual methods were estimated. A strategy of treatment of frontal lobes injury depends on not only from the traumatic substratum volume, but at the same time, it is formed by clinical neurologic constellations and instrumental data in traumatic injury of frontal lobes of the brain. Risk factors of unfavorable effect of traumatic parenchymatous injury of frontal lobes of the brain were reflected in the initially low GCS score, a neurologic deficit progression with contusion haemorrhagic foci in the frontal lobe (volume greater than 25 cm3), a midline shift on 6 mm or more and signs of base cistern compression and presence of mass-effect, according to CT scan data. The developed algorithm could improve the results of treatment and makes better the quality of life of the patients with traumatic parenchymatous injuries of frontal lobes of the brain.

  18. Isolation and characterization of primary microglia from post-natal murine brain tissues: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    Jose, Shinsmon; Tan, Shi Wei; Tong, Chih Kong; Vidyadaran, Sharmili

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS). Apart from playing vital roles as sentinel cells, they are crucial in physiological processes such as synaptic pruning during brain development. CNS disorders require an understanding of the contribution of each cellular compartment to the pathogenesis. Elucidating the role of microglia in disease development and progression in the intricate CNS environment is technically challenging and requires the establishment of reliable, reproducible techniques to isolate and culture microglia. A number of different protocols have been developed for isolation of neonatal microglia and here we compare two widely used methods, namely, mild trypsinization and EasySep® magnetic separation. EasySep® magnetic separation provided higher microglia yield, and flow cytometric evaluation of CD11b and F4/80 markers revealed that EasySep® separation method also produced significantly higher purity compared to mild trypsinization. Microglia isolated using EasySep® separation method were functional, as demonstrated by the generation of nitric oxide, IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1 in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. In summary, this study has revealed that magnetic separation is superior to mild trypsinization in terms of yield and purity of microglia.

  19. Isolation and structural characterization of enkephalins in the brain of the rhynchobdellid leech Theromyzon tessulatum.

    PubMed

    Salzet, M; Bulet, P; Verger-Bocquet, M; Malecha, J

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the purification of four peptides related to enkephalins from the brain of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum. After reverse-phase HPLC purification, the sequence of the enkephalins (YGGFM, YGGFL, FM, FL) was established by a combination of automated Edman degradation, electrospray mass spectrometry measurement, and co-elution experiments in reverse-phase HPLC with synthetic peptides. ELISA titrations performed on each purified peptide indicated that the major amount was borne by the leucine-enkephalin. The ratio of leucine-enkephalin and methionine-enkephalin of 2:1 is in line with previous immunocytochemical data obtained on T. tessulatum brains. The presence of enkephalins in T. tessulatum, an animal belonging to the oldest group of coelomate metazoans (the Annelida) establishes the very ancient phylogenetic origin of opioids and their conservation in the course of evolution.

  20. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  1. Effect of Alkaloids Isolated from Phyllodium pulchellum on Monoamine Levels and Monoamine Oxidase Activity in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Wang, Chao; Huo, Xiao-Kui; Dong, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Bao-Jing; Zhang, Hou-Li; Huang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Sheng-Ming; Zhong, Ming; Ma, Xiao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodium pulchellum (P. pulchellum) is a folk medicine with a significant number of bioactivities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects displayed by alkaloids fractions, isolated from the roots of P. pulchellum, on neurotransmitters monoamine levels and on monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity. Six alkaloids, which had indolealkylamine or β-carboline skeleton, were obtained by chromatographic technologies and identified by spectroscopic methods such as NMR and MS. After treatment with alkaloids of P. pulchellum, the reduction of DA levels (54.55%) and 5-HT levels (35.01%) in rat brain was observed by HPLC-FLD. The effect of alkaloids on the monoamines metabolism was mainly related to MAO inhibition, characterized by IC50 values of 37.35 ± 6.41 and 126.53 ± 5.39 μg/mL for MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. The acute toxicity indicated that P. pulchellum extract was nontoxic. PMID:27195015

  2. Effect of Alkaloids Isolated from Phyllodium pulchellum on Monoamine Levels and Monoamine Oxidase Activity in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lu; Wang, Chao; Dong, Pei-pei; Zhang, Bao-jing; Zhang, Hou-Li; Huang, Shan-shan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Sheng-ming; Zhong, Ming; Ma, Xiao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodium pulchellum (P. pulchellum) is a folk medicine with a significant number of bioactivities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects displayed by alkaloids fractions, isolated from the roots of P. pulchellum, on neurotransmitters monoamine levels and on monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity. Six alkaloids, which had indolealkylamine or β-carboline skeleton, were obtained by chromatographic technologies and identified by spectroscopic methods such as NMR and MS. After treatment with alkaloids of P. pulchellum, the reduction of DA levels (54.55%) and 5-HT levels (35.01%) in rat brain was observed by HPLC-FLD. The effect of alkaloids on the monoamines metabolism was mainly related to MAO inhibition, characterized by IC50 values of 37.35 ± 6.41 and 126.53 ± 5.39 μg/mL for MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. The acute toxicity indicated that P. pulchellum extract was nontoxic. PMID:27195015

  3. Derivatization in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Marina, M Luisa; Castro-Puyana, María

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis is a well-established separation technique in analytical research laboratories worldwide. Its interesting advantages make CE an efficient and potent alternative to other chromatographic techniques. However, it is also recognized that its main drawback is the relatively poor sensitivity when using optical detection. One way to overcome this limitation is to perform a derivatization reaction which is intended to provide the analyte more suitable analytical characteristics enabling a high sensitive detection. Based on the analytical step where the CE derivatization takes place, it can be classified as precapillary (before separation), in-capillary (during separation), or postcapillary (after separation). This chapter describes the application of four different derivatization protocols (in-capillary and precapillary modes) to carry out the achiral and chiral analysis of different compounds in food and biological samples with three different detection modes (UV, LIF, and MS). PMID:27645730

  4. Capillary stretching of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat, C.; Protiere, S.

    2015-09-01

    We study the interaction of a finite volume of liquid with two parallel thin flexible fibers. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We report two morphologies, i.e. two types of wet adhesion: a weak capillary adhesion, where a liquid drop bridges the fibers, and a strong elastocapillary adhesion where the liquid is spread between two collapsed fibers. We show that geometry, capillarity and stretching are the key parameters at play. We describe the collapse and detachment of the fibers as a function of two nondimensional parameters, arising from the geometry of the system and a balance between capillary and stretching energies. In addition, we show that the morphology, thus the capillary adhesion, can be controlled by changing the tension within the fibers.

  5. Capillary condenser/evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer device is disclosed for transferring heat to or from a fluid that is undergoing a phase change. The heat transfer device includes a liquid-vapor manifold in fluid communication with a capillary structure thermally connected to a heat transfer interface, all of which are disposed in a housing to contain the vapor. The liquid-vapor manifold transports liquid in a first direction and conducts vapor in a second, opposite direction. The manifold provides a distributed supply of fluid (vapor or liquid) over the surface of the capillary structure. In one embodiment, the manifold has a fractal structure including one or more layers, each layer having one or more conduits for transporting liquid and one or more openings for conducting vapor. Adjacent layers have an increasing number of openings with decreasing area, and an increasing number of conduits with decreasing cross-sectional area, moving in a direction toward the capillary structure.

  6. Ca(2+) handling in isolated brain mitochondria and cultured neurons derived from the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellman, Jessica J; Hamilton, James; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2015-08-01

    We investigated Ca(2+) handling in isolated brain synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria and in cultured striatal neurons from the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease. Both synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria from 2- and 12-month-old YAC128 mice had larger Ca(2+) uptake capacity than mitochondria from YAC18 and wild-type FVB/NJ mice. Synaptic mitochondria from 12-month-old YAC128 mice had further augmented Ca(2+) capacity compared with mitochondria from 2-month-old YAC128 mice and age-matched YAC18 and FVB/NJ mice. This increase in Ca(2+) uptake capacity correlated with an increase in the amount of mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt) associated with mitochondria from 12-month-old YAC128 mice. We speculate that this may happen because of mHtt-mediated sequestration of free fatty acids thereby increasing resistance of mitochondria to Ca(2+)-induced damage. In experiments with striatal neurons from YAC128 and FVB/NJ mice, brief exposure to 25 or 100 μM glutamate produced transient elevations in cytosolic Ca(2+) followed by recovery to near resting levels. Following recovery of cytosolic Ca(2+), mitochondrial depolarization with FCCP produced comparable elevations in cytosolic Ca(2+), suggesting similar Ca(2+) release and, consequently, Ca(2+) loads in neuronal mitochondria from YAC128 and FVB/NJ mice. Together, our data argue against a detrimental effect of mHtt on Ca(2+) handling in brain mitochondria of YAC128 mice. We demonstrate that mutant huntingtin (mHtt) binds to brain synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria and the amount of mitochondria-bound mHtt correlates with increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake capacity. We propose that this may happen due to mHtt-mediated sequestration of free fatty acids thereby increasing resistance of mitochondria to Ca(2+)-induced damage.

  7. Effects of 2-substituted-4-phenylquinolines on uptake of serotonin and norepinephrine by isolated brain synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Alhaider, A.A.; Lein, E.J.; Ransom, R.W.; Bolger, M.B.

    1987-03-02

    In this present communication, the in vitro inhibition of the uptake of (/sup 3/H)-L-norepinephrine ((/sup 3/H) NE) and (/sup 3/H)-Serotonin ((/sup 3/H) 5-HT) by eleven synthesized 2-substituted-4-phenylquionlines were studied using rate brain synaptosomal preparations. Compounds with an open side chain were relatively weak inhibitors of the synaptosomal uptake of (/sup 3/H) NE and (/sup 3/H) 5HT. Compounds having a distance of three atoms between the terminal basic nitrogen of the side chain and the quinoline ring were better inhibitors of serotonin uptake than those compounds having a four-atom distance. The replacement of the side chain with a piperazine ring produced compounds which were more potent and selective inhibitors of the uptake of either (/sup 3/H) 5-HT or (/sup 3/H) NE. Further structure-activity relationships are also discussed. 13 references, 1 table.

  8. Two Rapidly Growing Mycobacterial Species Isolated from a Brain Abscess: First Whole-Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium immunogenum and Mycobacterium llatzerense

    PubMed Central

    Greninger, Alexander L.; Langelier, Charles; Cunningham, Gail; Keh, Chris; Melgar, Michael; Chiu, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria are rarely found in central nervous system infections. We describe a case of polymicrobial infection in a brain abscess including two rapidly growing Mycobacterium species, M. immunogenum and M. llatzerense. The Mycobacterium isolates were distinguishable by molecular methods, and whole-genome sequencing showed <60% pairwise nucleotide identity. PMID:25926490

  9. Capillary action liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Bergström, Edmund T; Goodall, David M; Myers, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Capillary action LC (caLC) is introduced as a technique using capillary action as the driving force to perform LC in capillary columns packed with HPLC type microparticulate materials. A dry packing method with centrifugal force was developed to prepare capillary columns in parallel (10 columns per 3 min) to support their disposable use in caLC. Using a digital microscope for real-time imaging and recording separations of components in a dye mixture, caLC was found to have flow characteristics similar to TLC. Based on the investigation of microparticulate HPLC silica gels of different size (1.5-10 microm) and a typical TLC grade irregular medium, Merck 60G silica, the van Deemter curves suggested molecular diffusion as the major contribution to band broadening in caLC. With Waters Xbridge 2.6 microm silica, plate heights down to 8.8 microm were obtained, comparable to those achievable in HPLC. Assisted by an image-processing method, the visual caLC separation was converted to a classical chromatogram for further data analysis and such a facility confirmed the observation of highly efficient bands.

  10. CD4 and MHC class I down-modulation activities of nef alleles from brain- and lymphoid tissue-derived primary HIV-1 isolates

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Gabuzda, Dana; Cowley, Daniel; Ellett, Anne; Chiavaroli, Lisa; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 nef undergoes adaptive evolution in the CNS, reflecting altered requirements for HIV-1 replication in macrophages/microglia and brain-specific immune selection pressures. The role of Nef in HIV-1 neurotropism and the pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is unclear. In this study, we characterized 82 nef alleles cloned from brain, CSF, spinal cord and blood/lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates from 7 subjects with HAD. CNS isolate-derived nef alleles were genetically compartmentalized and had reduced sequence diversity compared to those from lymphoid tissue isolates. Defective nef alleles predominated in a brain-derived isolate from one of the 7 subjects (MACS2-br). The ability of Nef to down-modulate CD4 and MHC class 1 (MHC-1) was generally conserved among nef alleles from both CNS and lymphoid tissues. However, the potency of CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation was variable, which was associated with sequence alterations known to influence these Nef functions. These results suggest that CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation are highly conserved functions among nef alleles from CNS- and lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates that may contribute to viral replication and escape from immune surveillance in the CNS. PMID:21165790

  11. Uptake and release of [3H]GABA by growth cones isolated from neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Weeks, P R; Lockerbie, R O; Pearce, B R

    1984-11-23

    A subcellular fraction highly enriched in neuronal growth cones was isolated from 5-day-old rat forebrain by a recently described method. The growth cone fraction was shown to have a sodium- and temperature-dependent, high-affinity (Km = 4.4 microM) uptake system for [3H]GABA. Electron microscopic autoradiography confirmed that this uptake was into growth cones since only these structures were heavily labelled with silver grains. High potassium induced the release of newly accumulated [3H]GABA from the growth cone fraction, about half of which was Ca2+-dependent. The presence of uptake and release systems for GABA in growth cones may simply reflect the development of growth cones into nerve terminals. Alternatively, these observations may indicate a role for neurotransmitter release in synaptogenesis.

  12. Expansion of the QARS deficiency phenotype with report of a family with isolated supratentorial brain abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Salvarinova, Ramona; Ye, Cynthia X; Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta; Roland, Elke H; Pavlidis, Paul; Ross, Colin J; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Wasserman, Wyeth W; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2015-04-01

    We describe a family with QARS deficiency due to compound heterozygous QARS mutations, including c.1387G > A (p.R463*) in the catalytic core domain and c.2226C > G (p.Q742H) in the anticodon domain, both previously unreported and predicted damaging. The phenotype of the male index further confirms this specific aminoacyl-transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase disorder as a novel genetic cause of progressive microcephaly with diffuse cerebral atrophy, severely deficient myelination, intractable seizures, and developmental arrest. However, in contrast to the two hitherto published families, the cerebellum and its myelination are not affected. An awareness that QARS mutations may cause isolated supratentorial changes is crucial for properly directing genetic analysis.

  13. Proteomic screening of glutamatergic mouse brain synaptosomes isolated by fluorescence activated sorting

    PubMed Central

    Biesemann, Christoph; Grønborg, Mads; Luquet, Elisa; Wichert, Sven P; Bernard, Véronique; Bungers, Simon R; Cooper, Ben; Varoqueaux, Frédérique; Li, Liyi; Byrne, Jennifer A; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Olaf; Brose, Nils; Herzog, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    For decades, neuroscientists have used enriched preparations of synaptic particles called synaptosomes to study synapse function. However, the interpretation of corresponding data is problematic as synaptosome preparations contain multiple types of synapses and non-synaptic neuronal and glial contaminants. We established a novel Fluorescence Activated Synaptosome Sorting (FASS) method that substantially improves conventional synaptosome enrichment protocols and enables high-resolution biochemical analyses of specific synapse subpopulations. Employing knock-in mice with fluorescent glutamatergic synapses, we show that FASS isolates intact ultrapure synaptosomes composed of a resealed presynaptic terminal and a postsynaptic density as assessed by light and electron microscopy. FASS synaptosomes contain bona fide glutamatergic synapse proteins but are almost devoid of other synapse types and extrasynaptic or glial contaminants. We identified 163 enriched proteins in FASS samples, of which FXYD6 and Tpd52 were validated as new synaptic proteins. FASS purification thus enables high-resolution biochemical analyses of specific synapse subpopulations in health and disease. PMID:24413018

  14. Serotonin binds specifically and saturably to an actin-like protein isolated from rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Small, D H; Wurtman, R J

    1984-01-01

    A soluble serotonin-binding protein was identified in a high-speed supernatant fraction of an osmotically shocked rat brain synaptosome (P2) preparation. The binding of serotonin was saturable (Bmax = 6.0 nmol per mg of protein) and was specific for serotonin and a few structurally related compounds including dopamine and norepinephrine. Binding of serotonin (1 microM) was inhibited approximately equal to 40% by chlorpromazine (10 microM). The affinity of serotonin for the binding protein was low in the crude extract (Kd = 1.7 X 10(-3)M). However, on purification by chromatography on a column of phenothiazine agarose, a higher affinity (Kd = 10(-5) M) binding component was also observed. The purified protein was greatly enriched in a polypeptide of Mr of 43,000 that comigrated on polyacrylamide gel with skeletal muscle actin. Muscle actin also bound serotonin, and the binding to actin was similar to that of the purified protein in both the specificity of the binding and the affinity for serotonin. It is likely that the serotonin-binding protein is identical to cytoplasmic G-actin or an actin-like protein of similar molecular weight. PMID:6583691

  15. Polyamine synthesis in mammalian tissues. Isolation and characterization of spermidine synthase from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Raina, A; Hyvönen, T; Eloranta, T; Voutilainen, M; Samejima, K; Yamanoha, B

    1984-01-01

    Spermidine synthase (EC 2.5.1.16) was purified to apparent homogeneity (about 11 000-fold) from bovine brain by affinity chromatography, with S-adenosyl-(5')-3-thiopropylamine linked to Sepharose as the adsorbent. The enzyme preparation was free from S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.50) and spermine synthase (EC 2.5.1.22) activities. The native enzyme had an apparent Mr of 70 000, was composed of two subunits of equal size, and had an isoelectric point at pH 5.22. The apparent Km values for putrescine and decarboxylated adenosylmethionine [S-adenosyl-(5')-3-methylthiopropylamine] were 40 microM and 0.3 microM respectively. Cadaverine and 1,6-diaminohexane could replace putrescine as the aminopropyl acceptor, although the reaction rates were only 6% and 1% respectively of that obtained with putrescine. Ethyl, propyl and carboxymethyl analogues of decarboxy-S-adenosylmethionine could act as propylamine donors. Both the reaction products, spermidine and 5'-methylthioadenosine, were mixed-type inhibitors of the enzyme. On the basis of initial-velocity and product-inhibition studies, a ping-pong reaction mechanism for the spermidine synthase reaction was ruled out. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6743257

  16. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  17. Does isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage merit a lower intensity level of observation than other traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Phelan, Herb A; Richter, Adam A; Scott, William W; Pruitt, Jeffrey H; Madden, Christopher J; Rickert, Kim L; Wolf, Steven E

    2014-10-15

    Evidence is emerging that isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (ITSAH) may be a milder form of traumatic brain injury (TBI). If true, ITSAH may not benefit from intensive care unit (ICU) admission, which would, in turn, decrease resource utilization. We conducted a retrospective review of all TBI admissions to our institution between February 2010 and November 2012 to compare the presentation and clinical course of subjects with ITSAH to all other TBI. We then performed descriptive statistics on the subset of ITSAH subjects presenting with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 13-15. Of 698 subjects, 102 had ITSAH and 596 had any other intracranial hemorrhage pattern. Compared to all other TBI, ITSAH had significantly lower injury severity scores (p<0.0001), lower head abbreviated injury scores (p<0.0001), higher emergency department GCS (p<0.0001), shorter ICU stays (p=0.007), higher discharge GCS (p=0.005), lower mortality (p=0.003), and significantly fewer head computed tomography scans (p<0.0001). Of those ITSAH subjects presenting with a GCS of 13-15 (n=77), none underwent placement of an intracranial monitor or craniotomy. One subject (1.3%) demonstrated a change in exam (worsened headache and dizziness) concomitant with a progression of his intracranial injury. His symptoms resolved with readmission to the ICU and continued observation. Our results suggest that ITSAH are less-severe brain injuries than other TBI. ITSAH patients with GCS scores of 13-15 demonstrate low rates of clinical progression, and when progression occurs, it resolves without further intervention. This subset of TBI patients does not appear to benefit from ICU admission. PMID:24926612

  18. An isolated growth cone-enriched fraction from developing rat brain has substance P binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Beaujouan, J C; Saffroy, M; Glowinski, J

    1988-05-01

    A fraction enriched in neuronal growth cones isolated from developing rat forebrain was shown to possess binding sites for the substance P analog, Bolton-Hunter substance P [( 125I]BHSP). Specific binding of this ligand reached an equilibrium after 10 min at 20 degrees C, and was reversible and temperature-dependent. Removal of extracellular Na+ did not block but rather augmented [125I]BHSP binding suggesting that the labeled analog was not transported into the growth cone fraction. Scatchard analysis of the binding indicated a single class of non-interacting binding sites in the growth cone fraction (Kd: 257 pM; Bmax: 56 fmol/mg protein). From competition studies using substance P and other tachykinins, their rank order of potency for inhibiting [125I]BHSP binding was SP greater than physalaemin much greater than eledoisin greater than kassinin greater than NKB greater than or equal to NKA. Such order is consistent with the presence of an SP receptor (Neurokinin-1) in the growth cone fraction. The N-terminal fragments of substance P, SP1-7 and SP1-11 free acids, and the C-terminal fragment, SP7-11, were devoid of affinity for the [125I]BHSP binding site. However SP6-11 and SP1-11 methyl esters showed more potency.

  19. [Venoruton and capillary permeability].

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Laurora, G; Gabini, M; Errichi, B M; Candiani, C; Belcaro, G

    1989-05-01

    A new system to evaluate capillary permeability, the vacuum suction chamber (VSC) device, was used to assess the effects of Venoruton in patients with venous hypertension. A temporary, superficial skin lesion (wheal) was produced with the VSC device by negative pressure (30 mmHg) applied for 10 minutes on the internal, perimalleolar region. Wheals disappear in less than 60 minutes in normals while in patients with venous hypertension the wheal is more persistent, requiring a significantly longer time to disappear. This new technique was used in association with laser-Doppler flowmetry to evaluate the efficacy of Venoruton (1000 mgs t.i.d.) administered for 2 weeks on venous hypertension. Results indicate a positive effect of Venoruton in reducing the abnormally increased capillary permeability in venous hypertension and are proportional to the changes observed in signs and symptoms after treatment.

  20. Expression of nucleoside transporter in freshly isolated neurons and astrocytes from mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Gu, L; Hertz, L; Peng, L

    2013-11-01

    Nucleoside transporters comprise equilibrative ENT1-4 and concentrative CNT1-3. CNTs transport against an intracellular/extracellular gradient and are essential for transmitter removal, independently of metabolic need. ENT1-4 mediate transport until intracellular/extracellular equilibrium of the transported compound, but are very efficient, when the accumulated nucleoside or nucleobase is rapidly eliminated by metabolism. Most nucleoside transporters are membrane-bound, but ENT3 is mainly intracellular. This study uses freshly isolated neurons and astrocytes from two adult mouse strains. In one transgenic strain the neuronal marker Thy1 was associated with a compound fluorescing at one wavelength, and in the other the astrocytic marker GFAP was associated with a compound fluorescent at a different wavelength. Highly purified astrocytic and neuronal populations (as determined by presence/absence of cell-specific genes) were obtained from these mice by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In each population mRNA analysis was performed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. CNT1 was absent in both cell types; all other nucleoside transporters were expressed to at least a similar degree (in relation to applied amount of RNA and to a house-keeping gene) in astrocytes as in neurons. Astrocytic ENT3 enrichment was dramatic, but it was not up-regulated after fluoxetine-mediated increase in DNA synthesis. A comparison with results obtained in cultured astrocytes shows that the latter are generally compatible with the present findings and suggests that many observations obtained in intact tissue, mainly by in situ hybridization (which also determines mRNA expression) may underestimate astrocytic nucleoside transporter expression.

  1. Enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Fanali, S; Catarcini, P; Blaschke, G; Chankvetadze, B

    2001-09-01

    The review summarizes recent developments in enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Selected fundamental aspects of CEC are discussed in order to stress those features which may allow the success of this technique in the competitive field of enantioseparations. In addition, the comparative characteristics of the different modes of chiral CEC and the stationary phases are presented. The effects of the characteristics of the stationary and liquid phases and operational conditions on the separation results are discussed. Finally, some future trends are briefly addressed.

  2. Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis: Yeast Species Isolated from Stool Samples of Children with Suspected or Diagnosed Autism Spectrum Disorders and In Vitro Susceptibility Against Nystatin and Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Kantarcioglu, A Serda; Kiraz, Nuri; Aydin, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a general term for a group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders of brain development that limits a person's ability to function normally. Etiology has not been clearly defined up to date. However, gut microbiota and the bidirectional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and brain, the so-called microbiota-gut-brain axis, are hypothesized, which may be involved in the etiology of several mental disorders. Recent reports suggest that Candida, particularly Candida albicans, growth in intestines may cause lower absorption of carbohydrates and minerals and higher toxin levels which are thought to contribute autistic behaviors. The aim of this study was to identify the 3-year deposited yeasts isolated from stool samples of children with diagnosed or suspected ASD and to determine in vitro activity of nystatin and fluconazole against these isolates using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 guidelines. A 17-year retrospective assessment was also done using our laboratory records. Among the species identified, intrinsically fluconazole-resistant Candida krusei (19.8 %) and Candida glabrata (14.8 %) with elevated MICs were remarkable. Overall, C. albicans (57.4 %) was the most commonly isolated species in 17 years. The species identification and/or antifungal susceptibility tests have to be performed using the strain isolated from stool sample, to select the appropriate antifungal agent, if antimycotic therapy is needed.

  3. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  4. In vivo and ex vivo regulation of breast cancer resistant protein (Bcrp) by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (Pparα) at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Md Tozammel; Shah, Arpit; More, Vijay; Miller, David S; Bendayan, Reina

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp/Abcg2) localized at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits permeability into the brain of many xenobiotics, including pharmacological agents. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (Pparα), a ligand-activated transcription factor, primarily involved in lipid metabolism, has been shown to regulate the functional expression of Bcrp in human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). The aim of this study was to investigate ex vivo and in vivo, the regulation of Bcrp by Pparα in an intact BBB. Ex vivo quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses showed significant up-regulation of Abcg2/Bcrp mRNA and protein levels in CD-1 mouse brain capillaries incubated with clofibrate, a Pparα ligand. Fluorescence-based transport assays in CD-1 and C57BL/6 brain capillaries showed that exposure to clofibrate significantly increased Bcrp transport activity. This increase was not observed in capillaries isolated from Pparα knockout mice. In vivo, we found: i) significant Bcrp protein up-regulation in clofibrate-dosed CD-1 and C57BL/6 capillary lysates, but no effect in Pparα knockout capillary lysates, and ii) significantly increased Bcrp transport activity in capillaries isolated from clofibrate-treated mice. These results demonstrate an increase in Bcrp functional expression by Pparα in brain capillaries, and suggest that Pparα is another nuclear receptor that can contribute to the regulation of membrane efflux transporters and drug permeability at the BBB. We propose the involvement of the following pathways in clofibrate-mediated induction of the drug transporter Abcg2/Bcrp mRNA, protein expression and function by the nuclear receptor Pparα, in mouse brain capillary endothelial cells. Upon activation with clofibrate (Pparα, ligand), Pparα complex translocates from the cytoplasm into the nucleus and further recruits coactivators and transcription machinery which induce the transcription of Abcg2 gene and

  5. Capillary pericytes regulate cerebral blood flow in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Brad A.; O’Farrell, Fergus M.; Buchan, Alastair M.; Lauritzen, Martin; Attwell, David

    2014-01-01

    Brain blood flow increases, evoked by neuronal activity, power neural computation and are the basis of BOLD functional imaging. It is controversial whether blood flow is controlled solely by arteriole smooth muscle, or also by capillary pericytes. We demonstrate that neuronal activity and the neurotransmitter glutamate evoke the release of messengers that dilate capillaries by actively relaxing pericytes. Dilation is mediated by prostaglandin E2, but requires nitric oxide release to suppress vasoconstricting 20-HETE synthesis. In vivo, when sensory input increases blood flow, capillaries dilate before arterioles and are estimated to produce 84% of the blood flow increase. In pathology, ischaemia evokes capillary constriction by pericytes. We show that this is followed by pericyte death in rigor, which may irreversibly constrict capillaries and damage the blood-brain barrier. Thus, pericytes are major regulators of cerebral blood flow and initiators of functional imaging signals. Prevention of pericyte constriction and death may reduce the long-lasting blood flow decrease which damages neurons after stroke. PMID:24670647

  6. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Stephen H.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods.

  7. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, S.H.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods. 11 figs.

  8. Stability of Constrained Capillary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, J. B.; Steen, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    A capillary surface is an interface between two fluids whose shape is determined primarily by surface tension. Sessile drops, liquid bridges, rivulets, and liquid drops on fibers are all examples of capillary shapes influenced by contact with a solid. Capillary shapes can reconfigure spontaneously or exhibit natural oscillations, reflecting static or dynamic instabilities, respectively. Both instabilities are related, and a review of static stability precedes the dynamic case. The focus of the dynamic case here is the hydrodynamic stability of capillary surfaces subject to constraints of (a) volume conservation, (b) contact-line boundary conditions, and (c) the geometry of the supporting surface.

  9. The effect of disease-modifying therapies on brain atrophy in patients with clinically isolated syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H.; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Heliopoulos, Ioannis; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Kilidireas, Constantinos; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Brain atrophy is associated with cognitive deficits in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and can predict conversion to clinical definite multiple sclerosis. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) on brain atrophy in patients with CIS. Methods: Eligible placebo-control randomized clinical trials of patients with CIS that had reported changes in brain volume during the study period were identified by searching the MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases. This meta-analysis adopted the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Results: Three eligible studies were identified, comprising 1362 patients. The mean percentage change in brain volume was found to be significantly lower in DMD-treated patients versus placebo-treated subgroups (standardized mean difference [SMD]: = −0.13, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.25, 0.01; p = 0.04). In the subgroup analysis of the two studies that provided data on brain-volume changes for the first (0–12 months) and second (13–24 months) year of treatment, DMD attenuated brain-volume loss in comparison with placebo during the second year (SMD = −0.25; 95% CI: −0.43, −0.07; p < 0.001), but not during the first year of treatment (SMD = −0.01; 95% CI: −0.27, 0.24; p = 0.93). No evidence of heterogeneity was found between estimates, while funnel-plot inspection revealed no evidence of publication bias. Conclusions: DMDs appear to attenuate brain atrophy over time in patients with CIS. The effect of DMDs on brain-volume loss is evident after the first year of treatment. PMID:26557896

  10. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  11. Capillary suspensions: Particle networks formed through the capillary force

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of a secondary fluid to a suspension can, through the attractive capillary force, lead to particle bridging and network formation. The capillary bridging phenomenon can be used to stabilize particle suspensions and precisely tune their rheological properties. This effect can even occur when the secondary fluid wets the particles less well than the bulk fluid. These materials, so-called capillary suspensions, have been the subject of recent research studying the mechanism for network formation, the properties of these suspensions, and how the material properties can be modified. Recent work in colloidal clusters is summarized and the relationship to capillary suspensions is discussed. Capillary suspensions can also be used as a pathway for new material design and some of these applications are highlighted. Results obtained to date are summarized and central questions that remain to be answered are proposed in this review. PMID:25729316

  12. Tapered capillary optics

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

  13. Capillary Electrophoresis in Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Maier, Tanja Verena; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical toolbox to describe (all) low-molecular-weight compounds in a biological system, as cells, tissues, urine, and feces, as well as in serum and plasma. To analyze such complex biological samples, high requirements on the analytical technique are needed due to the high variation in compound physico-chemistry (cholesterol derivatives, amino acids, fatty acids as SCFA, MCFA, or LCFA, or pathway-related metabolites belonging to each individual organism) and concentration dynamic range. All main separation techniques (LC-MS, GC-MS) are applied in routine to metabolomics hyphenated or not to mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis is a powerful high-resolving technique but still underused in this field of complex samples. Metabolomics can be performed in the non-targeted way to gain an overview on metabolite profiles in biological samples. Targeted metabolomics is applied to analyze quantitatively pre-selected metabolites. This chapter reviews the use of capillary electrophoresis in the field of metabolomics and exemplifies solutions in metabolite profiling and analysis in urine and plasma. PMID:27645748

  14. Integrated chip-based capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Effenhauser, C S; Bruin, G J; Paulus, A

    1997-11-01

    Integrated capillary electrophoresis (ICE) is emerging as a new analytical tool allowing fast, automated, miniaturized and multiplexed assays, thus meeting the needs of the pharmaceutical industry in drug development. The current state-of-the-art of ICE is described with an emphasis on the choice of the support material (glass or polymeric materials), electrokinetic fluid handling, and injection and detection issues. Strategies and chip designs for pre- or post-column derivatization, DNA sequencing, on-line PCR analysis, on-chip enzymatic sample digestion, fraction isolation, and immunoassays are presented. The review concludes with a brief outlook.

  15. Microsphere embolization of nerve capillaries and fiber degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Nukada, H.; Dyck, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Polystyrene microspheres, the size chosen to plug capillaries and precapillaries, were injected into the arterial supply of rat sciatic nerves. They produced widespread segmental occlusion of capillaries in lower limb nerves. The clinical and pathologic effect was dose-related. One million microspheres produced selective capillary occlusion but no nerve fiber degeneration; approximately 6 million microspheres also produced selective capillary occlusion and associated foot and leg weakness, sensory loss, and fiber degeneration, beginning in a central core of the distal sciatic nerve; 30 million microspheres caused both capillary and arterial occlusion and a greater neuropathologic deficit. From these observations it is inferred that 1) occlusion of isolated precapillaries and capillaries does not produce ischemic fiber degeneration; 2) occlusion of many microvessels results in central fascicular fiber degeneration, indicating that these cores are watershed regions of poor perfusion; and 3) stereotyped pathologic alterations of nerve fibers and Schwann cells are related to dose, anatomic site, and time elapsed since injection. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:6326580

  16. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  17. Capillary optics for radiation focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Lepel, E.A.; Stromswold, D.C.; Stoffels, J.; Sunberg, D.S.; Tenny, H.

    1996-11-01

    Capillary lens technology may ultimately bring benefits to neutron and x-ray-based science like conventional lenses with visible light. Although the technology is not yet 10 years old, these lenses have already had a significant impact in engineering, science, and medicine. Capillary lenses are advantageous when it is desirable to increase the radiation flux at a location without regard to its angular divergence. PNNL has worked to improve the technology in several ways. A single, optimally tapered capillary was manufactured, which allows intensity gains of a factor of 270 for an initially parallel, incident x-ray beam. Feasibility of constructing neutron lenses using {sup 58}Ni (particularly effective at reflecting neutrons) has been explored. Three applications for capillary optics have been identified and studied: neutron telescope, Gandolphi x-ray diffractometry, and neutron radiotherapy. A brief guide is given for determining which potential applications are likely to be helped by capillary optics.

  18. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsova, L. A.; Bessonova, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The review deals with modern analytical approaches used in capillary electrophoresis for solving medical and biological problems: search for biomarkers of various diseases and rapid diagnosis based on characteristic profiles of biologically active compounds by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection; monitoring of the residual drugs in biological fluids for evaluating the efficiency of drug therapy; testing of the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical products; the use of novel materials as components of stationary and pseudo-stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography to increase the selectivity of separation of components of complex matrices; and identification of various on-line preconcentration techniques to reduce the detection limits of biologically active analytes. A topical trend in capillary electrophoresis required in clinical practice, viz., the design of microfluidic systems, is discussed. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  19. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  20. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  1. Benign sinonasal capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Darren; Poulios, Aristotelis; Khalil, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Haemangiomas are benign fibrovascular tumours relatively that are common in the head and neck, where 60% of them occur Among the various categories of haemangiomas, lobular capillary haemangiomas (LCH) occur frequently on the skin, lips, buccal mucosa, tongue and gingiva. However, they are vanishingly rare in the paranasal sinuses. The imaging features of LCH are non-specific. The histological characteristics of LCH can also make diagnosis difficult as sometimes resemble highly vascular malignant tumours. This leads to the false preoperative diagnosis of suspected malignancy in many cases, which places the patient under unnecessary distress and anxiety. We present a case of LCH appearing as a suspicious nasal lesion of the lateral nasal wall with unilateral nasal obstruction, necrotic centre and epistaxis. The tumour was excised endoscopically in one operation including endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Further education about this lesion is deemed important as preoperative embolisation may be needed for a safe operation. PMID:25287393

  2. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  3. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  4. Capillary ratchet: Hydrodynamics of capillary feeding in shorebirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu; Quere, David; Bush, John

    2008-03-01

    Bill morphologies are highly specialized to particular foraging strategies in birds, as is apparent from the large diversity of beak shapes observed in nature. Here we present an experimental and analytical study of capillary feeding in shorebirds. We highlight the critical role of contact angle hysteresis in capillary feeding. Our study provides a simple physical rationalization for the observation of multiple mandibular spreading cycles in feeding, necessary to overcome contact line resistance. We also find a unique geometrical optima in beak opening and closing angles for the most efficient drop transport. This capillary ratchet mechanism may also find applications in micro scale fluid transport, such as valveless pumping of fluid drops.

  5. Human and mouse brain-derived endothelial cells require high levels of growth factors medium for their isolation, in vitro maintenance and survival

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) constitute the primary limitation for passage of ions and molecules from the blood into the brain through the blood brain barrier. Numerous multi-step procedures for isolating and culturing BMVECs have been described. However, each one demonstrates major limitations in purity of culture and/or low proliferation rate. Our goal was to study the efficiency of our pending patent medium, Endothelial Proliferation Medium (EndoPM), on the isolation and purification of human and murine BMVECs. Methods BMVECs, cultured in EndoPM were compared to those cultured in a commercial medium EBM. Cultures were characterized by flow cytometric analysis, lineage differentiation, the ability to form tube-like structure, immunofluorescence, molecular analyses and also in an in vivo model assay. Moreover permeability was assayed by monitoring the passage of Dextran-FITC through a tight monolayer of BMVECs grown to confluence in Boyden chambers. One way Anova two-tailed test was utilized for all statistical analyses. Results The properties of ECs in human and murine BMVECs is confirmed by the expression of endothelial markers (CD31, CD105, CD146, Tie-2 and vWF), of representative proangiogenic genes (ICAM1, VCAM1 and integrin ITGAV), of considerable tube-forming ability, with low-density lipoprotein uptake, eNOS and GLUT-1 expression. Furthermore cells are able to express markers of the junctional architecture as VE-cadherin, β-catenin and Claudin-5 and greatly reduce dextran permeability as barrier functional test. Moreover BMVECs spontaneously organize in vascular-like structures and maintain the expression of endothelial markers in an in vivo xenograft model assay. The significant effect of EndoPM is confirmed by the study of proliferation index, survival index and the behaviour of BMVECs and fibroblasts in co-culture conditions. Conclusion Herein we describe a simple and reproducible method for the isolation and expansion of

  6. Rotenone exerts similar stimulatory effects on H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Luiz G B; Figueira, Tiago R; Siqueira-Santos, Edilene S; Castilho, Roger F

    2015-03-01

    Chronic and systemic treatment of rodents with rotenone, a classical inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory complex I, results in neurochemical, behavioral, and neuropathological features of Parkinson's disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether brain mitochondria from old rats (24 months old) would be more susceptible to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and increased generation of H2O2 than mitochondria from young-adult rats (3-4 months old). Isolated brain mitochondria were incubated in the presence of different rotenone concentrations (5, 10, and 100nM), and oxygen consumption and H2O2 production were measured during respiratory states 3 (ADP-stimulated respiration) and 4 (resting respiration). Respiratory state 3 and citrate synthase activity were significantly lower in mitochondria from old rats. Mitochondria from young-adult and old rats showed similar sensitivity to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption. Similarly, H2O2 production rates by both types of mitochondria were dose-dependently stimulated to the same extent by increasing concentrations of rotenone. We conclude that rotenone exerts similar effects on oxygen consumption and H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats. Therefore, aging does not increase the mitochondrial H2O2 generation in response to complex I inhibition.

  7. Applications of capillary optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2006-10-01

    The paper updates and summarizes contemporary applications of capillary optical fibers. Some of these applications are straight consequence of the classical capillary properties and capillary devices like: rheometry, electrophoresis, column chromatography (gas and liquid). Some new applications are tightly connected with co-propagation (or counter-propagation) of micro-mass together with optical wave - evanescent or of considerable intensity. In the first case, the optical wave is propagated in a narrow (more and more frequently single-mode) optical ring core adjacent to the capillary hole. The optical propagation is purely refractive. In the second case, the intensity maximum of optical wave is on the capillary long axis, i.e. in the center of the hole. The optical propagation is purely photonic, i.e. in a Bragg waveguide (one dimensional photonic band-gap). The capillary hole is filled with vacuum or with propagated matter (gas, liquid, single atoms, continuous particle arrangement). Optical capillaries, filamentary and embedded, are turning to a fundamental component of nano- and micro-MOEMS.

  8. Instability of the capillary bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pare, Gounseti; Hoepffner, Jerome

    2014-11-01

    Capillary adhesion is a physical mechanism that maintains two bodies in contact by capillarity through a liquid ligament. The capillary bridge is an idealization of this capillary adhesion. In this study we first focus on the classical case of the stability of the capillary bridge. Secondly we study a slightly more complex configuration, imagining a flow in the capillary bridge as in the case of the dynamics of the neck of a liquid ligament, in its withdrawal under the effect of capillarity. Inspired by the experiments on soap films of Plateau, the configuration analyzed consists of an initially axisymmetric, mass of fluid held by surface tension forces between two parallel, coaxial, solid pipes of the same diameter. The results presented are obtained by numerical simulations using the free software, Gerris Flow Solver. We first focus on the capillary Venturi. In the static configuration the stability diagram of the capillary bridge obtained is in perfect agreement with the results of Lev A. Slobozhanin. In the dynamic case we develop a matlab code based on the one dimensional equations of Eggers and Dupont. The comparison of the bifurcation diagram obtained and the numerical simulations shows a good agreement.

  9. Capillary flow solder wettability test

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A test procedure was developed to assess the capillary flow wettability of solders inside of a confined geometry. The test geometry was comprised of two parallel plates with a controlled gap of constant thickness (0.008 cm, 0.018 cm, 0.025 cm, and 0.038 cm). Capillary flow was assessed by: (1) the meniscus or capillary rise of the solder within the gap, (2) the extent of void formation in the gap, and (3) the time-dependence of the risen solder film. Tests were performed with the lead-free solders.

  10. Integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Tan, Hongdong

    2002-05-14

    The present invention provides an integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system for the analysis of sample analytes. The system integrates and automates multiple components, such as chromatographic columns and separation capillaries, and further provides a detector for the detection of analytes eluting from the separation capillaries. The system employs multiplexed freeze/thaw valves to manage fluid flow and sample movement. The system is computer controlled and is capable of processing samples through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in parallel fashion. Methods employing the system of the invention are also provided.

  11. Analysis of Capillary Rise in Asymmetric Branch-Like Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Caoxiong; Shen, Yinghao; Ge, Hongkui; Yang, Zhihui; Su, Shuai; Ren, Kai; Huang, Heyu

    2016-05-01

    Transport in porous media is common in nature, attracting many attentions for a long time. Tree-like network model is often used as a simplification for porous space, expressing the complexity of pore spaces instead of capillary bundle. To investigate spontaneous imbibition characteristics in this network, a dynamic asymmetric branch-like capillary model is used to represent basic network structure, using fractal method to represent tortuosity. This work investigates the influence of parameters on imbibition process in the branch-like capillary model. An analytical equation for the imbibition mass versus time is derived. Parameters from capillary structures to liquid properties are taken into account and analyzed based on the numerical solution of the equation. It is found that the imbibition process in asymmetric branch-like capillary model can be recognized by four sections and brunching tubes are positive for imbibition process. Concomitantly, meniscus arrest event is simulated and discussed. Moreover, the influence of parameters on imbibition process is discussed. These parameters can be classified as static and dynamic. Static parameters mainly change the capillary force, which are related to the ultimate imbibition mass or imbibition ability, while dynamic parameters mainly have influence on resistance of flowing fluid, which are related to the imbibition speed in the imbibition process.

  12. Developments and applications of capillary microextraction techniques: a review.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Ishizaki, Atsushi; Nonaka, Yuko; Saito, Keita

    2009-11-23

    Sample preparation is important for isolating desired components from complex matrices and greatly influences their reliable and accurate analysis. Recent trends in sample preparation include miniaturization, automation, high-throughput performance, and reduction in solvent consumption and operation time. This review focuses on novel microextraction techniques using capillaries for off-line and on-line sample preparation. Open-tubular trapping (OTT), in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME), wire-in-tube SPME, fiber-in-tube solid-phase extraction (SPE), sorbent-packed capillary in-tube SPME and monolithic capillary in-tube SPME are critically evaluated and applications of these techniques in biological, pharmaceutical, environmental and food analyses are summarized.

  13. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  14. Liposome behavior in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M A; Locascio-Brown, L; Maccrehan, W A; Durst, R A

    1996-10-01

    The behavior of liposomes in capillary electrophoresis is studied for the purpose of developing a potential method for characterizing liposomes prepared for use in industrial and analytical applications. This study characterizes the electrophoretic behavior of liposomes under various conditions to provide information about electrophoretic mobility and liposome-capillary surface interactions. The results of this method are compared with the results obtained using traditional laser light-scattering methods to obtain size information about liposome preparations. Additionally, reactions of liposomes and the surfactant n-octyl-β-d-glucopyranoside are performed off-line in bulk solution experiments and on-line in the capillary. Automated delivery of lysis agents by multiple electrokinetic injections is demonstrated as a general method for inducing on-capillary reactions between liposomes and other reagents. Furthermore, some preliminary evidence on the use of liposomes as a hydrophobic partitioning medium for analytical separations is presented.

  15. Capillary Electrophoresis in Wine Science.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Christian; Bagala, Franck; Gougeon, Régis D; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis appeared to be a powerful and reliable technique to analyze the diversity of wine compounds. Wine presents a great variety of natural chemicals coming from the grape berry extraction and the fermentation processes. The first and more abundant after water, ethanol has been quantified in wines via capillary electrophoresis. Other families like organic acids, neutral and acid sugars, polyphenols, amines, thiols, vitamins, and soluble proteins are electrophoretically separated from the complex matrix.Here, we will focus on the different methodologies that have been employed to conduct properly capillary electrophoresis in wine analysis.Two examples informing on wine chemistry obtained by capillary electrophoresis will be detailed. They concern polyphenol analysis and protein profiling. The first category is a well-developed quantitative approach important for the quality and the antioxidant properties conferred to wine. The second aspect involves more research aspects dealing with microbiota infections in the vineyard or in the grape as well as enological practices. PMID:27645750

  16. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  17. Brain Abscess Associated with Isolated Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Left Atrium in the Absence of Coronary Sinus and Atrial Septal Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Erol, Ilknur Cetin, I. Ilker; Alehan, Fuesun; Varan, Birguel; Ozkan, Sueleyman; Agildere, A. Muhtesem; Tokel, Kursad

    2006-06-15

    A previously healthy 12-year-old girl presented with severe headache for 2 weeks. On physical examination, there was finger clubbing without apparent cyanosis. Neurological examination revealed only papiledema without focal neurologic signs. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed the characteristic features of brain abscess in the left frontal lobe. Cardiologic workup to exclude a right-to-left shunt showed an abnormality of the systemic venous drainage: presence of isolated left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium in the absence of coronary sinus and atrial septal defect. This anomaly is rare, because only a few other cases have been reported.

  18. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  19. Isolation and recovery of selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers from human serum and sheep serum: coupling reversed-phase solid-phase disk extraction and liquid-liquid extraction techniques with a capillary gas chromatographic electron capture negative ion mass spectrometric determinative technique.

    PubMed

    Loconto, Paul R; Isenga, David; O'Keefe, Michael; Knottnerus, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are isolated and recovered with acceptable percent recoveries from human serum via liquid-liquid extraction and column chromatographic cleanup and fractionation with quantitation using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron capture negative ion and selected ion monitoring. PBDEs are found in unspiked serum. An alternative sample preparation approach is developed using sheep serum that utilizes a formic acid pre-treatment followed by reversed-phase solid-phase disk extraction and normal-phase solid-phase cleanup using acidified silica gel that yields>50% recoveries. When these percent recoveries are combined with a minimized phase ratio for human serum and very low instrument detection limits, method detection limits below 500 parts-per-trillion are realized.

  20. Capillary force in high aspect-ratio micropillar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Dinesh

    High aspect-ratio (HAR) micropillar arrays are important for many applications including, mechanical sensors and actuators, tunable wetting surfaces and substrates for living cell studies. However, due to their mechanical compliance and large surface area, the micropillars are susceptible to deformation due to surface forces, such as adhesive force and capillary force. In this thesis we have explored the capillary force driven mechanical instability of HAR micropillar arrays. We have shown that when a liquid is evaporated off the micropillar arrays, the pillars bend and cluster together due to a much smaller capillary meniscus interaction force while still surrounded by a continuous liquid body, rather than due to often reported Laplace pressure difference because of isolated capillary bridges. We have studied both theoretically and experimentally, the capillary force induced clustering behavior of micropillar arrays as a function of their elastic modulus. To this end, we have developed a modified replica molding process to fabricate a wide range of hydrogel micropillar arrays, whose elastic modulus in the wet state could be tuned by simply varying the hydrogel monomer composition. By minimizing the sum of capillary meniscus interaction energy and bending energy of the pillars in a cluster, we have derived a critical micropillar cluster size, which is inversely proportional to elastic modulus of micropillars. The estimated cluster size as a function of elastic modulus agrees well with our experimental observation. We have also explored the utility of the clustered micropillar arrays as ultrathin whitening layers mimicking the structural whitening mechanism found in some insects in nature. Finally, we have theoretically studied the capillary force induced imbibition of a liquid droplet on a model rough surface consisting of micropillar arrays. Our theoretical model suggests that due to shrinking liquid droplet, the imbibition dynamics does not follow the diffusive

  1. Lack of selectivity to small ions in paracellular pathways in cerebral and muscle capillaries of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Crone, C

    1984-01-01

    Selectivity to passive permeation of small ions through capillary walls was studied by measurements of diffusion potentials in response to ionic gradients established across capillary walls in frog brain and muscle in superfusion and perfusion experiments. Average dilution potentials in response to 2:1 or 10:1 gradients of NaCl across brain capillaries were 4.2 and 10.2 mV, respectively. The 'diluted' side was negative with respect to the 'undiluted' side, reflecting higher mobility of Cl- than of Na+ ions. Bi-ionic potentials in response to isosmotic KCl:NaCl gradients averaged 5.0 mV in brain capillaries, negative on the KCl side, reflecting higher mobility of K+ than of Na+ ions. The potential variations were symmetrical across the capillary wall. From Planck-Henderson formalism, the relative permeabilities in brain capillaries of Na+, K+ and Cl- were PCl/PNa:1.54 and PK/PNa:1.56, rather close to mobility ratios in free solution. Experiments on muscle capillaries showed similar results to those in brain. Streaming potentials created with excess (200 mosmol) mannitol or sucrose were congruent to 1 mV in brain capillaries and zero in muscle capillaries. It is concluded that the transcapillary permeation pathway in muscle and brain is neutral or weakly charged. The dominant ion permeation is paracellular in all 'continuous' capillaries. The large range of ion permeability of 'continuous' capillaries may be explained by variation in the length of the effective open portion of interendothelial junctions. The very low passive permeability of the blood-brain barrier may be due to an almost closed endothelial junction, leaving only about 0.1% of the length open. The open fraction is functionally similar to that in muscle and mesentery. This interpretation is in accordance with a finite, but very low, permeability to hydrophilic non-electrolytes. Such a brain capillary would still display strong preference for lipid-soluble solutes, but its behaviour cannot be

  2. Modulatory influence of Parkia biglobosa protein isolate on testosterone and biomarkers of oxidative stress in brain and testes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic male rats

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyinka, Bolajoko Idiat; Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Osunsanmi, Foluso Oluwagbemiga; Opoku, Andrew Rowland; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2016-01-01

    Parkia biglobosa seed an important household spice commonly consumed in Nigeria is believed to possess antioxidant activity that may exert modulatory effects in diabetes and diabetic complications. This study investigated the modulatory potential of Parkia biglobosa protein isolate (PBPi) on serum testosterone (sTT) level as well as its influence on biomarkers of oxidative stress in brain and testes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic male rats. Animals were made diabetic by single intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg body weight). PBPi (200 or 400 mg/kg body weight) was given orally by gavage or insulin (5 U/kg, i.p.) was administered daily to STZ-induced diabetic rats for 28 days. The results revealed a significant elevation in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in the brain and testes of diabetic rats. This was closely associated with a concomitant reduction in levels of sTT and reduced testes weight, a noticeable decline in the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as well as total glutathione (Total GSH) level in the brain and testes of diabetic rats. Interestingly, treatment with PBPi efficiently prevented the alterations witnessed in the serum sTT and also ameliorated various alterations in the biomarkers of oxidative stress (TBARS, Total GSH, GST, SOD and CAT) in brain and testes of diabetic rats. These results provide evidence that PBPi could protect the brain and testicular tissues against oxidative stress induced by STZ, via modulation of serum testosterone concentration and also by enhancing antioxidant defence system in STZ-diabetic rats. PMID:27785334

  3. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using /sup 125/I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function.

  4. Stimulation and release from neurons via a dual capillary collection device interfaced to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Lee, Chang Young; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2013-11-01

    Neuropeptides are cell to cell signaling molecules that modulate a wide range of physiological processes. Neuropeptide release has been studied in sample sizes ranging from single cells and neuronal clusters, to defined brain nuclei and large brain regions. We have developed and optimized cell stimulation and collection approaches for the efficient measurement of neuropeptide release from neuronal samples using a dual capillary system. The defining feature is a capillary that contains octadecyl-modified silica nanoparticles on its inner wall to capture and extract releasates. This collection capillary is inserted into another capillary used to deliver solutions that chemically stimulate the cells, with solution flowing up the inner capillary to facilitate peptide collection. The efficiency of peptide collection was evaluated using six peptide standards mixed in physiological saline. The extracted peptides eluted from these capillaries were characterized via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with low femtomole detection limits. Using the capillary collection system in small custom-fabricated culturing chambers, individual cultured neurons and neuronal clusters from the model animal Aplysia californica were stimulated with distinct neuronal secretagogues and the releasates were collected and characterized using MALDI-TOF MS.

  5. A Novel Biopsy Method for Isolating Neural Stem Cells from the Subventricular Zone of the Adult Rat Brain for Autologous Transplantation in CNS Injuries.

    PubMed

    Aligholi, Hadi; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Gorji, Ali; Azari, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Despite all attempts the problem of regeneration in damaged central nervous system (CNS) has remained challenging due to its cellular complexity and highly organized and sophisticated connections. In this regard, stem cell therapy might serve as a viable therapeutic approach aiming either to support the damaged tissue and hence to reduce the subsequent neurological dysfunctions and impairments or to replace the lost cells and re-establish damaged circuitries. Adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) are one of the outstanding cell sources that can be isolated from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles. These cells can differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Implanting autologous NS/PCs will greatly benefit the patients by avoiding immune rejection after implantation, better survival, and integration with the host tissue. Developing safe and efficient methods in small animal models will provide us with the opportunity to optimize procedures required to achieve successful human autologous NS/PC transplantation in near future. In this chapter, a highly controlled and safe biopsy method for harvesting stem cell containing tissue from the SVZ of adult rat brain is introduced. Then, isolation and expansion of NS/PCs from harvested specimen as well as the techniques to verify proliferation and differentiation capacity of the resulting NS/PCs are discussed. Finally, a method for assessing the biopsy lesion volume in the brain is described. This safe biopsy method in rat provides a unique tool to study autologous NS/PC transplantation in different CNS injury models. PMID:27604747

  6. Curvature capillary migration of microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Liu, Iris B; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2015-09-14

    We address the question: how does capillarity propel microspheres along curvature gradients? For a particle on a fluid interface, there are two conditions that can apply at the three phase contact line: either the contact line adopts an equilibrium contact angle, or it can be pinned by kinetic trapping, e.g. at chemical heterogeneities, asperities, or other pinning sites on the particle surface. We formulate the curvature capillary energy for both scenarios for particles smaller than the capillary length and far from any pinning boundaries. The scale and range of the distortion made by the particle are set by the particle radius; we use singular perturbation methods to find the distortions and to rigorously evaluate the associated capillary energies. For particles with equilibrium contact angles, contrary to the literature, we find that the capillary energy is negligible, with the first contribution bounded to fourth order in the product of the particle radius and the deviatoric curvature of the host interface. For pinned contact lines, we find curvature capillary energies that are finite, with a functional form investigated previously by us for disks and microcylinders on curved interfaces. In experiments, we show microspheres migrate along deterministic trajectories toward regions of maximum deviatoric curvature with curvature capillary energies ranging from 6 × 10(3)-5 × 10(4)kBT. These data agree with the curvature capillary energy for the case of pinned contact lines. The underlying physics of this migration is a coupling of the interface deviatoric curvature with the quadrupolar mode of nanometric disturbances in the interface owing to the particle's contact line undulations. This work is an example of the major implications of nanometric roughness and contact line pinning for colloidal dynamics.

  7. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  8. Social isolation mediated anxiety like behavior is associated with enhanced expression and regulation of BDNF in the female mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Singh, Padmanabh; Baghel, Meghraj Singh; Thakur, M K

    2016-05-01

    Adverse early life experience is prominent risk factors for numerous psychiatric illnesses, including mood and anxiety disorders. It imposes serious long-term costs on the individual as well as health and social systems. Hence, developing therapies that prevent the long-term consequences of early life stress is of utmost importance, and necessitates a better understanding of the mechanisms by which early life stress triggers long-lasting alterations in gene expression and behavior. Post-weaning isolation rearing of rodents models the behavioral consequences of adverse early life experiences in humans and it is reported to cause anxiety like behavior which is more common in case of females. Therefore, in the present study, we have studied the impact of social isolation of young female mice for 8weeks on the anxiety like behavior and the underlying molecular mechanism. Elevated plus maze and open field test revealed that social isolation caused anxiety like behavior. BDNF, a well-known molecule implicated in the anxiety like behavior, was up-regulated both at the message and protein level in cerebral cortex by social isolation. CREB-1 and CBP, which play a crucial role in BDNF transcription, were up-regulated at mRNA level in cerebral cortex by social isolation. HDAC-2, which negatively regulates BDNF expression, was down-regulated at mRNA and protein level in cerebral cortex by social isolation. Furthermore, BDNF acts in concert with Limk-1, miRNA-132 and miRNA-134 for the regulation of structural and morphological plasticity. Social isolation resulted in up-regulation of Limk-1 mRNA and miRNA-132 expression in the cerebral cortex. MiRNA-134, which inhibits the translation of Limk-1, was decreased in cerebral cortex by social isolation. Taken together, our study suggests that social isolation mediated anxiety like behavior is associated with up-regulation of BDNF expression and concomitant increase in the expression of CBP, CREB-1, Limk-1 and miRNA-132, and decrease

  9. Microdialysis monitoring of catecholamines and excitatory amino acids in the rat and mouse brain: recent developments based on capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection--a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Parrot, Sandrine; Bert, Lionel; Mouly-Badina, Laurence; Sauvinet, Valérie; Colussi-Mas, Joyce; Lambás-Señas, Laura; Robert, Frédéric; Bouilloux, Jean-Pierre; Suaud-Chagny, Marie-Françoise; Denoroy, Luc; Renaud, Bernard

    2003-10-01

    1. Although microdialysis is a widely used approach for in vivo monitoring extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations, it has been previously limited in many cases by its poor temporal resolution. It is clear that when 10-30-min sampling is performed, short-lasting changes in extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations can be overlooked. Such a low sampling rate is necessary when combining microdialysis with the conventional analytical methods like high performance liquid chromatography. 2. Since capillary electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) allows the detection of attomoles of neurotransmitters, the temporal resolution of microdialysis may be significantly improved: high sampling rates, in the range of 5 s to 1 min, have been already reported by our group and others using CE-LIFD for simultaneously analyzing catecholamines and amino acids in microdialysates. 3. The power of combining microdialyis and CE-LIFD is shown, using examples of physiological and pharmacological studies dealing with the dynamics of in vivo efflux processes and/or interactions between neurotransmitters.

  10. Decay of capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Deike, Luc; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-06-01

    We report on the observation of freely decaying capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid. The capillary wave turbulence spectrum decay is found to be self-similar in time with the same power law exponent as the one found in the stationary regime, in agreement with weak turbulence predictions. The amplitude of all Fourier modes are found to decrease exponentially with time at the same damping rate. The longest wavelengths involved in the system are shown to be damped by a viscous surface boundary layer. These long waves play the role of an energy source during the decay that sustains nonlinear interactions to keep capillary waves in a wave turbulent state.

  11. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  12. Regulation of brain aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Zelenina, Marina

    2010-11-01

    Three aquaporins are expressed in the brain. AQP4, the predominant brain water channel, is expressed in astrocyte endfeet facing brain capillaries, perisynaptic spaces, and nodes of Ranvier. It is implicated in brain edema formation and resolution. It is also believed to assist clearance of K(+) released during neuronal activity. AQP1 is expressed in epithelial cells of choroid plexus and is implicated in cerebrospinal fluid formation. AQP9, which has been reported to be present in astrocytes and in subpopulations of neurons, is implicated in the brain energy metabolism. All three brain AQPs are strongly upregulated in brain tumors and in injured brain tissue. Water and solute transport via AQPs depends on concentration gradients across the membrane, but the magnitude of the transport is to a large extent determined by the single channel permeability of AQPs and by their abundance in the cell membrane. The future therapies will have to address not only the forces driving the water and solute transport (e.g. as mannitol infusion does in the treatment of brain edema), but also the regulation of AQPs, which provide the means for water entry to the brain, for water exit from the brain, and for redistribution of water and solutes within the brain compartments. This review summarizes the data concerning structure, permeability, role in the brain, short-term and long-term regulation of the three AQPs.

  13. Isolation of compound and CNS depressant activities of Mikania scandens Willd with special emphasis to brain biogenic amines in mice.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Mazumder, Upal Kanti

    2014-12-01

    Mikania scandens, a twining herb that grows as a weed in India and Bangladesh is used as vegetables and is a good source of vitamin A, C, B complex, mikanin, sesquiterpenes, betasitosterin, stigmasterol and friedelin. The present communication reports CNS depressant activities with special emphasis to brain biogenic amines in mice. Ethanol extract of leaves of M. scandens (EEMS) was prepared by Soxhalation and analyzed chemically. EEMS potentiated sleeping time induced by pentobarbitone, diazepam and meprobamate and showed significant reduction in the number of writhes and stretches. EEMS caused significant protection against pentylene tetrazole-induced convulsion and increased catecholamines and brain amino acids level significantly. Results showed that EEMS produced good CNS depressant effects in mice. PMID:25651612

  14. Revised Capillary Breakup Rheometer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Louise; Schultz, William; Solomon, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Rather than integrate the one-dimensional equation of motion for a capillary breakup rheometer, we take the axial derivative of that equation. This avoids the determination of the axial force with all of its complications and correction factors. The resulting evolutionary equation that involves either two or four derivatives of the capillary radius as a function of the axial coordinate determines the ratio of elongational viscosity to surface tension coefficient. We examine several silicone and olive oils to show the accuracy of the method for Newtonian fluids. We will discuss our surface tension measurement techniques and briefly describe measurements of viscoelastic materials, including saliva.

  15. Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Emma Jane

    2011-01-01

    Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis (CSCE) is a rapid, high-throughput screening method that can be applied to any region of a genome for detection of sequence variants. Slab gel-based conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was first described by Ganguly et al., and the transfer from slab gels to capillaries for higher throughput was reported by Rozycka et al. CSCE is based on the principle that DNA homoduplexes and heteroduplexes migrate at different rates during electrophoresis under mildly denaturing conditions. Fragments showing an altered peak morphology compared to the wild type are then sequenced to determine the precise nature of the sequence variant detected.

  16. Nonsteady Flow in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Ayako

    2000-03-01

    Surface phenomena in the field of electron devices and the problem of how long. It takes plants to absorb water during their growth in hydroponic cultivation is attraching the attention of riseachers. However, the related study of non-steady flow in capillary tubes has a number of issues that require investigation. In response to this situation, we made attempted to assess nonsteady fiow in capillary tubes, the liquid rise time and other issues, using a motion equation that takes factors including the friction force of the tube and the surface tension into consideration.

  17. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  18. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  19. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  20. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  1. Role of the hippocampal-entorhinal loop in temporal lobe epilepsy: extra- and intracellular study in the isolated guinea pig brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Paré, D; deCurtis, M; Llinás, R

    1992-05-01

    This article introduces a new experimental paradigm for the study of temporal lobe epilepsy. This approach utilizes the isolated guinea pig brain in vitro preparation, which generates a pattern of hypersynchronous neuronal activity similar to the peculiar 8-30 Hz rhythm characterizing stereoelectroencephalographic hippocampal recordings in human temporal lobe epilepsy. The present report describes an attempt to identify the functional events underlying the epileptiform activities observed in this preparation. Rhythmic epileptiform discharges (EDs), here defined as population spikes (PSs) recorded from somata or dendritic layers, were induced in the hippocampal formation of the isolated guinea pig brain maintained in vitro by tetanic stimulation of the entorhinal cortex (EC). Two patterns of EDs were distinguished by performing simultaneous field potential recordings along the dentate gyrus (DG), EC, CA1, and CA3. During stage 1, the first self-sustained EDs were isolated PSs occurring at a frequency of 2-3 Hz at all levels of the entorhinal-hippocampal loop, the only exception being the DG, where no signs of synchronized neuronal discharge could be found. Over the next 30-50 sec, the temporal organization of these EDs changed dramatically. During stage 2, at all levels of the entorhinal-hippocampal loop, EDs occurred in 0.3-0.5 sec trains of 16-25 Hz population spikes interrupted by 0.7-1.3 sec silent periods. The transition between stages 1 and 2 coincided with the occurrence of population spikes in the DG. Laminar analyses and multiple simultaneous field potential recordings revealed that the trains of EDs observed in stage 2 resulted from the repetitive, sequential activation of the hippocampal-entorhinal loop. In the transverse axis, the earliest event usually occurred in the CA3 region. Thereafter, population spikes occurred sequentially in the CA1 region, EC, DG, and back to the CA3 region. Intracellular recordings confirmed that the EDs recorded

  2. Capillary electrophoresis for drug analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Ira S.

    1999-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a high resolution separation technique which is amenable to a wide variety of solutes, including compounds which are thermally degradable, non-volatile and highly polar, and is therefore well suited for drug analysis. Techniques which have been used in our laboratory include electrokinetic chromatography (ECC), free zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). ECC, which uses a charged run buffer additive which migrates counter to osmotic flow, is excellent for many applications, including, drug screening and analyses of heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine samples. ECC approaches include the use of micelles and charged cyclodextrins, which allow for the separation of complex mixtures. Simultaneous separation of acidic, neutral and basic solutes and the resolution of optical isomers and positional isomers are possible. CZE has been used for the analysis of small ions (cations and anions) in heroin exhibits. For the ECC and CZE experiments performed in our laboratory, uncoated capillaries were used. In contrast, CEC uses capillaries packed with high performance liquid chromatography stationary phases, and offers both high peak capacities and unique selectivities. Applications include the analysis of cannabinoids and drug screening. Although CE suffers from limited concentration sensitivity, it is still applicable to trace analysis of drug samples, especially when using injection techniques such as stacking, or detection schemes such as laser induced fluorescence and extended pathlength UV.

  3. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  4. Capillary blood viscosity in microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Cortinovis, A; Crippa, A; Cavalli, R; Corti, M; Cattaneo, L

    2006-01-01

    As known, at the arteriolar level there is the highest resistance to the flow due to the section and to the velocity with an average pressure fall of 50 mmHg (from 85 to 35 mmHg). This resistance is expressed in sec(-1) by the ratio W/2r. This ratio is very high with an average value of 332 sec(-1) and viscosity at this high shear-rate is negligible. At the capillary level the pressure fall is 11.5 mmHg but the vascular resistance W/2r is much lower, on average 32 sec(-1). We can say that if a resistance of 333 sec(-1) corresponds with a pressure fall of 50 mmHg, then a resistance of 32 sec(-1) should correspond with a pressure fall of 4.8 mmHg. The highest pressure fall is due to another kind of resistance which we can define as "Capillary Blood Viscosity" because it depends on the rheological and structural characteristics of the blood. Our instrument reproduces the structure of the capillary district in an experimental model and measures the General Blood Viscosity (GBV) and the Capillary Blood Viscosity (CBV) at the same shear-rate and in particular at the low shear-rate when in non-Newtonian fluids the highest increase in viscosity appears. Consequently, at the capillary, viscosity is dominant with respect to the other geometric and physical resistances. Moreover, the percentage ratio between the GBV and the CBV gives a physical measure of erythrocyte deformability. Knowing viscosity at shear-rate present in the circulatory system, we can obtain the size of RBCs aggregates in the different circulatory districts and their characteristics expressed like "aggregation bond". Changes in CBV are the only possibility in clinical practice to improve the circulatory flow in the capillary district because it is not sure that changes in the arteriolar section can improve the capillary flow or rather open arterio-venous anastomosis. Moreover, in the systemic circulation the aggregate size allows us to point out the phenomenon of cell adhesion because the presence of

  5. Genome-wide RNAi screens in human brain tumor isolates reveal a novel viability requirement for PHF5A

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Christopher G.; Bradley, Robert K.; Ding, Yu; Toledo, Chad M.; Herman, Jacob; Skutt-Kakaria, Kyobi; Girard, Emily J.; Davison, Jerry; Berndt, Jason; Corrin, Philip; Hardcastle, Justin; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffery J.; Webb, Thomas; Pollard, Steven M.; Lee, Jeongwu; Olson, James M.; Paddison, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    To identify key regulators of human brain tumor maintenance and initiation, we performed multiple genome-wide RNAi screens in patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) stem cells (GSCs). These screens identified the plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger domain protein PHF5A as differentially required for GSC expansion, as compared with untransformed neural stem cells (NSCs) and fibroblasts. Given PHF5A's known involvement in facilitating interactions between the U2 snRNP complex and ATP-dependent helicases, we examined cancer-specific roles in RNA splicing. We found that in GSCs, but not untransformed controls, PHF5A facilitates recognition of exons with unusual C-rich 3′ splice sites in thousands of essential genes. PHF5A knockdown in GSCs, but not untransformed NSCs, astrocytes, or fibroblasts, inhibited splicing of these genes, leading to cell cycle arrest and loss of viability. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of U2 snRNP activity phenocopied PHF5A knockdown in GSCs and also in NSCs or fibroblasts overexpressing MYC. Furthermore, PHF5A inhibition compromised GSC tumor formation in vivo and inhibited growth of established GBM patient-derived xenograft tumors. Our results demonstrate a novel viability requirement for PHF5A to maintain proper exon recognition in brain tumor-initiating cells and may provide new inroads for novel anti-GBM therapeutic strategies. PMID:23651857

  6. Genome-wide RNAi screens in human brain tumor isolates reveal a novel viability requirement for PHF5A.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Christopher G; Bradley, Robert K; Ding, Yu; Toledo, Chad M; Herman, Jacob; Skutt-Kakaria, Kyobi; Girard, Emily J; Davison, Jerry; Berndt, Jason; Corrin, Philip; Hardcastle, Justin; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffery J; Webb, Thomas; Pollard, Steven M; Lee, Jeongwu; Olson, James M; Paddison, Patrick J

    2013-05-01

    To identify key regulators of human brain tumor maintenance and initiation, we performed multiple genome-wide RNAi screens in patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) stem cells (GSCs). These screens identified the plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger domain protein PHF5A as differentially required for GSC expansion, as compared with untransformed neural stem cells (NSCs) and fibroblasts. Given PHF5A's known involvement in facilitating interactions between the U2 snRNP complex and ATP-dependent helicases, we examined cancer-specific roles in RNA splicing. We found that in GSCs, but not untransformed controls, PHF5A facilitates recognition of exons with unusual C-rich 3' splice sites in thousands of essential genes. PHF5A knockdown in GSCs, but not untransformed NSCs, astrocytes, or fibroblasts, inhibited splicing of these genes, leading to cell cycle arrest and loss of viability. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of U2 snRNP activity phenocopied PHF5A knockdown in GSCs and also in NSCs or fibroblasts overexpressing MYC. Furthermore, PHF5A inhibition compromised GSC tumor formation in vivo and inhibited growth of established GBM patient-derived xenograft tumors. Our results demonstrate a novel viability requirement for PHF5A to maintain proper exon recognition in brain tumor-initiating cells and may provide new inroads for novel anti-GBM therapeutic strategies. PMID:23651857

  7. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  8. Porosity, single-phase permeability, and capillary pressure data from preliminary laboratory experiments on selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 3 of 3: Appendices C, D, E, and F

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.; Christian-Frear, T.

    1997-08-01

    This volume contains the mineralogy, porosity, and permeability results from the Marker Bed 139 anhydrite specimens evaluated by TerraTek, Inc. for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This volume also documents the brine recipe used by RE/SPEC, Inc., the parameter package submitted to Performance Assessment based on all the data, and a memo on the mixed Brooks and Corey two-phase characteristic curves.

  9. Isolation and characterization of a factor from rat liver which inhibits /sup 3/H-nicotine binding to brain nicotine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Noggle, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    In studies of /sup 3/H-nicotine binding sites in rat brain membranes, it was observed that crude rat liver homogenates are capable of inhibiting this binding. The purpose of this work was to isolate from the liver homogenate the factor (or factors) responsible for this nicotinelike activity and to identify it. Isolation procedures, including heat denaturation, ultrafiltration, and reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography, resulted in an incompletely purified substance whose chemical properties were compatible with those of dimethylaminoethyl (DMAE) carbamate, as reflected in infrared, ultraviolet, NMR, and mass spectra; in HPLC elution characteristics into mobile phases; and in IC/sub 50/'s with respect to /sup 3/H-nicotine binding to neural membranes, although additional purification and characterization will be necessary to confirm or reject this identification. This compound has not previously been described in mammalian tissue, although its two component functional moieties, dimethylaminoethanol and carbamic acid, are present in the liver. The binding properties of DMAE carbamate are compared with those of structurally and pharmacological related compounds to assess its potential as an endogenous cholinergic ligand.

  10. Selective observation of biologically important 15N-labeled metabolites in isolated rat brain and liver by 1H-detected multiple-quantum-coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.; Parivar, Farhad

    Four cerebral metabolites of importance in neurotransmission, serotonin, L-tryptophan, L-glutamine, and N-acetyl- L-aspartate, and two hepatic urea-cycle intermediates, citrulline and urea, were found to be observable by 1H- 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum-coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy in aqueous solution at physiological pH and temperature, through the protons spin-coupled to their indole, amide, or ureido nitrogen. Their 1H chemical shifts were well dispersed over a 5-10 ppm region while the 1J 15N- 1H values were 87-99 Hz. For [γ- 15N]glutamine, a 50- to 100-fold increase in sensitivity over direct 15N detection was achieved, in contrast to a 2-fold increase by the polarization-transfer method. In the isolated brain of portacaval-shunted rats, the amide protons of biologically 15N-enriched [γ- 15N]glutamine were observed in 2 min of acquisition, with suppression of proton signals from all other cerebral metabolites. In isolated liver of 15N-enriched control rats, [ 15NIurea protons were observed in 16 min. The HMQC method is likely to be effective for the in vivo study of cerebral and hepatic nitrogen metabolism.

  11. Capillary filling dynamics of viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-05-01

    We consider the filling of a capillary by a viscoelastic fluid described by the Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) constitutive behavior. By considering both vertical capillary filling and horizontal capillary filling, we demarcate the role played by gravity and fluid rheology towards long-time oscillations in the capillary penetration depth. We also consider the isothermal filling of the capillary for a closed channel and thus bring out the fundamental differences in the nature of capillary filling for PTT and Newtonian fluids for closed channels in comparison to open channels. Through a scaling analysis, we highlight a distinct viscoelastic regime in the horizontal capillary filling which is in contrast to the Washburn scaling seen in the case of Newtonian fluids. Such an analysis with a very general constitutive behavior is therefore expected to shed light on many areas of microfluidics which focus on biofluids that are often well described by the PTT constitutive behavior.

  12. Isolation, propagation, and HIV-1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and recovery of virus from brain and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Gorantla, Santhi; Che, Myhanh; Gendelman, Howard E

    2005-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MP: monocytes, dendritic cells, and tissue macrophages) are host cells for the human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2. MPs are both the first lines of defense and vehicles for viral dissemination in the infected human host. Viral infection of MP can affect the disease directly during interstitial pneumonitis and HIV encephalitis. Both revolve around MP secretions of immune regulatory and neurotoxic factors. Clearly, laboratory models that mimic disease need to include primary human MP infected with viral isolates obtained from diseased tissues. Over the past two decades our laboratory has developed state-of-the-art methods for isolation and propagation of monocytes from peripheral blood. This technology directly supports work at the University of Nebraska Medical Center as well as research performed throughout the United States, including the laboratories of Drs. Mario Stevenson, William Tyor, David Volsky, Loyda Melendez, and Mary-Jane Potash, among others. The importance of these cells as targets for virus and reservoirs of persistent infection are discussed.

  13. A rectangular capillary suction apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Hsu, Y.H. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Fluid flow and cake formation in a rectangular capillary suction apparatus (RCSA) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Water, methanol, ethanol, and ethylene glycol are used to study the effects of liquid properties, and CaCO[sub 3], kaolin, and bentonite slurries are employed for studying the effects of cake formation on capillary suction-time (CST). A theory based on a diffusion-like approach is developed. The liquid saturation under the inner cell will approach a constant value when the wet front distance is large. A method based on this experimental finding for estimating the cake specific resistance is proposed. The agreement between experiments and calculations is close. The RCSA is superior to the cylindrical CSA when treating liquids with small diffusivities or slurries with high solid concentration and/or with high averaged specific resistance.

  14. Capillary electrophoresis in food authenticity.

    PubMed

    Kvasnicka, Frantisek

    2005-06-01

    Food authenticity is a term which simply refers to whether the food purchased by the consumer matches its description. False description can occur in many forms, from the undeclared addition of water or other cheaper materials, or the wrong declaration of the amount of a particular ingredient in the product, to making false statements about the source of ingredients i.e., their geographic, plant, or animal origin. The aim of this review is to summarize applications of capillary electrophoresis in food authentication.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dorairaj, Rathissh; Keynton, Robert S.; Roussel, Thomas J.; Crain, Mark M.; Jackson, Douglas J.; Walsh, Kevin M.; Naber, John F.; Baldwin, Richard P.; Franco, Danielle B.

    2011-08-02

    An embodiment of the invention is directed to a capillary electrophoresis apparatus comprising a plurality of separation micro-channels. A sample loading channel communicates with each of the plurality of separation channels. A driver circuit comprising a plurality of electrodes is configured to induce an electric field across each of the plurality of separation channels sufficient to cause analytes in the samples to migrate along each of the channels. The system further comprises a plurality of detectors configured to detect the analytes.

  16. Ionic Liquids in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Wahl, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a great interest was drawn toward ionic liquids (ILs) in analytical separation techniques. ILs possess many properties making them excellent additives in capillary electrophoresis (CE) background electrolytes (BGE). The most important property is the charge of the dissolved ions in BGE enabling the cations to interact with deprotonated silanol groups on the capillary surface and thereby modifying the electroosmotic flow (EOF). Ionic and/or proton donor-acceptor interactions between analyte and IL are possible interactions facilitating new kinds of separation mechanisms in CE. Further advantages of ILs are the high conductivity, the environmentally friendliness, and the good solubility for organic and inorganic compounds. The most commonly used ILs in capillary electrophoresis are dialkylimidazolium-based ILs, whereas for enantioseparation a lot of innovative chiral cations and anions were investigated.ILs are reported to be additives to a normal CE background electrolyte or the sole electrolyte in CE, nonaqueous CE (NACE), micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), and in enantioseparation. An overview of applications and separation mechanisms reported in the literature is given here, in addition to the enantioseparation of pseudoephedrine using tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBAC) as IL additive to an ammonium formate buffer containing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). PMID:27645735

  17. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  18. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  19. Capillary-driven automatic packaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Hong, Lingfei; Nie, Baoqing; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-04-21

    Packaging continues to be one of the most challenging steps in micro-nanofabrication, as many emerging techniques (e.g., soft lithography) are incompatible with the standard high-precision alignment and bonding equipment. In this paper, we present a simple-to-operate, easy-to-adapt packaging strategy, referred to as Capillary-driven Automatic Packaging (CAP), to achieve automatic packaging process, including the desired features of spontaneous alignment and bonding, wide applicability to various materials, potential scalability, and direct incorporation in the layout. Specifically, self-alignment and self-engagement of the CAP process induced by the interfacial capillary interactions between a liquid capillary bridge and the top and bottom substrates have been experimentally characterized and theoretically analyzed with scalable implications. High-precision alignment (of less than 10 µm) and outstanding bonding performance (up to 300 kPa) has been reliably obtained. In addition, a 3D microfluidic network, aligned and bonded by the CAP technique, has been devised to demonstrate the applicability of this facile yet robust packaging technique for emerging microfluidic and bioengineering applications.

  20. Capillary force induced assembly of high aspect-ratio polymeric micropillar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Dinesh; Yang, Shu

    2010-03-01

    We present experimental evidence and theoretical calculations to show that when a liquid is evaporated off the surface of 2D arrays of micropillars, the micropillars cluster together due to lateral capillary meniscus interaction force rather than due to often reported Laplace pressure difference resulting from isolated capillary bridges. Experiments show that the pillars assemble while still completely surrounded by wetting liquid except at the tips and calculations reveal that the lateral capillary meniscus interaction forces are much smaller than those estimated from Laplace pressure approach. The cluster sizes of the collapsed micropillars as a function of their elastic modulus and the critical modulus for stability as estimated from capillary meniscus interaction approach agree well with the experimental observation. We also discuss the utility of such clustered micropillars as ultrathin whitening layers.

  1. Single particles accelerate final stages of capillary break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Anke; Fiscina, Jorge Eduardo; Wagner, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Droplet formation of suspensions is present in many industrial and technological processes such as coating and food engineering. Whilst the finite-time singularity of the minimum neck diameter in capillary break-up of simple liquids can be described by well-known self-similarity solutions, the pinching of non-Brownian suspension depends in a complex way on the particle dynamics in the thinning thread. Here we focus on the very dilute regime where the filament contains only isolated beads to identify the physical mechanisms leading to the pronounced acceleration of the filament thinning observed. This accelerated regime is characterized by an asymmetric shape of the filament with an enhanced curvature that depends on the size and the spatial distribution of the particles within the capillary thread.

  2. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model

    PubMed Central

    Gens, John Scott; Glazier, James A.; Burns, Stephen A.; Gast, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions. PMID:27300722

  3. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  4. Quantifying the cleanliness of glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bowman, C L

    1998-01-01

    I used capillary rise methods to investigate the lumenal surface properties of quartz (fused silica, Amersil T-08), borosilicate (Corning 7800), and high-lead glass (Corning 0010) capillaries commonly used to make patch pipets. I calculated the capillary rise and contact angle for water and methanol from weight measurements. The capillary rise was compared with the theoretical maximum value calculated by assuming each fluid perfectly wetted the lumenal surface of the glass (i.e., zero contact angle, which reflects the absence of surface contamination). For borosilicate, high-lead, and quartz capillaries, the rise for water was substantially less than the theoretical maximum rise. Exposure of the borosilicate, lead, and quartz capillaries to several cleaning methods resulted in substantially better--but not perfect--agreement between the theoretical maximum rise and calculated capillary rise. By contrast, the capillary rise for methanol was almost identical in untreated and cleaned capillaries, but less than its theoretical maximum rise. The residual discrepancy between the observed and theoretical rise for water could not be improved on by trying a variety of cleaning procedures, but some cleaning methods were superior to others. The water solubility of the surface contaminants, deduced from the effectiveness of repeated rinsing, was different for each of the three types of capillaries examined: Corning 7800 > quartz > Corning 0010. A surface film was also detected in quatz tubing with an internal filament. I conclude that these borosilicate, quartz, and high-lead glass capillaries have a film on the lumenal surface, which can be removed using appropriate cleaning methods. The surface contaminants may be unique to each type of capillary and may also be hydrophobic. Two simple methods are presented to quantitate the cleanliness of glass capillary tubing commonly used to make pipets for studies of biological membranes. It is not known if the surface film is of

  5. Capillary malformation--arteriovenous malformation syndrome: review of the literature, proposed diagnostic criteria, and recommendations for management.

    PubMed

    Orme, Charisse M; Boyden, Lynn M; Choate, Keith A; Antaya, Richard J; King, Brett A

    2013-01-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the RASA1 gene and characterized by multiple small, round to oval capillary malformations with or without arteriovenous malformations. Ateriovenous malformations occur in up to one-third of patients and may involve the brain and spine. Although making the diagnosis is straightforward in some patients, there are other patients for whom diagnostic criteria may be helpful in their evaluation. Here we review the literature regarding capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome, propose diagnostic criteria, and discuss the care of patients with this condition.

  6. Targeted drug delivery to the brain using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and conjugation of nanoparticles with antibodies that target molecules expressed by these endothelial cells may facilitate their uptake and transport into the brain. Magnetic nanoparticles can be encapsulated in liposomes and carry large molecules with therapeutic potential, for example, siRNA, cDNA and polypeptides. An additional approach to enhance the transport of magnetic nanoparticles across the BBB is the application of extracranially applied magnetic force. Stepwise targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to brain capillary endothelial cells followed by transport through the BBB using magnetic force may prove a novel mechanism for targeted therapy of macromolecules to the brain.

  7. Extracellular Vesicles Isolated from the Brains of rTg4510 Mice Seed Tau Protein Aggregation in a Threshold-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Juan Carlos; Scicluna, Benjamin James; Hill, Andrew Francis

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has a critical role in Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies. There is accumulating evidence that tau aggregates spread and replicate in a prion-like manner, with the uptake of pathological tau seeds causing misfolding and aggregation of monomeric tau in recipient cells. Here we focused on small extracellular vesicles enriched for exosomes that were isolated from the brains of tau transgenic rTg4510 and control mice. We found that these extracellular vesicles contained tau, although the levels were significantly higher in transgenic mice that have a pronounced tau pathology. Tau in the vesicles was differentially phosphorylated, although to a lower degree than in the brain cells from which they were derived. Several phospho-epitopes (AT8, AT100, and AT180) thought to be critical for tau pathology were undetected in extracellular vesicles. Despite this, when assayed with FRET tau biosensor cells, extracellular vesicles derived from transgenic mice were capable of seeding tau aggregation in a threshold-dependent manner. We also observed that the dye used to label extracellular vesicle membranes was still present during nucleation and formation of tau inclusions, suggesting either a role for membranes in the seeding or in the process of degradation. Together, we clearly demonstrate that extracellular vesicles can transmit tau pathology. This indicates a role for extracellular vesicles in the transmission and spreading of tau pathology. The characteristics of tau in extracellular vesicles and the seeding threshold we identified may explain why tau pathology develops very slowly in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:27030011

  8. Use of 3h-. gamma. -aminobutyric acid for transport studies with isolated nerve-terminals from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Halvarsson, G.B.; Karlsson, I.; Sellstroem, A.

    1985-07-22

    Isolated synaptosomes were used to study the problem of net accumulation of neurotransmitters. The time-course and the kinetics of exogenous and endogenous GABA transport were studied by liquid-scintillation counting and HPLC-amino acid analysis respectively. Different pools of GABA were suggested by a 6-fold difference in tissue-to-medium-ratio of endogenous vs. exogenous GABA. Net accumulation, exchange and net efflux of GABA was found to be a function of the GABA concentration in the incubation medium. The K/sub m/s for net accumulation and for /sup 3/H-GABA accumulation were 2.68 +/- 1.16 and 6.19 +/- 1.26 ..mu..M respectively, whereas the V/sub max/s were 5.9 +/- 4.9 and 134 +/- 13 pmol/mg w.w min respectively. This means that the transport studies which use exogenous substances (e.g. /sup 3/H-GABA) considerably overestimate the transport by overlooking the magnitude of the counter transport. 22 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Curcumin reduces oxidative damage by increasing reduced glutathione and preventing membrane permeability transition in isolated brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jat, D; Parihar, P; Kothari, S C; Parihar, M S

    2013-12-31

    Mitochondria are critical regulators of energy metabolism and programmed cell death pathways. Mitochondria are also the major site for the production of reactive oxygen species which make this organelle more susceptible to oxidative damage and impairments of mitochondrial functions. Antioxidants have been of limited therapeutic success to ameliorate the toxic effects of oxidative stress in mitochondria. One reason may be the inability of mitochondria to selectively take up antioxidants. In the present study we synthesized mitochondrially targeted curcumin with an aim of delivering this polyphenolic compound to isolated mitochondria. Our observations show the strong anti-oxidative effects of curcumin and mitochondrially targeted curcumin against the lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and mitochondrial permeability transition induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide. Both curcumin and mitochondrially targeted curcumin significantly enhanced endogenous reduced glutathione level in the mitochondria thus preserving mitochondrial defense system against oxidative stress. We concluded that curcumin and mitochondrially targeted curcumin protected mitochondria against tert-butylhydroperoxide by lowering the oxidative damage, increasing the availability of endogenous reduced glutathione and preserving the mitochondrial integrity. Importantly, mitochondrially targeted curcumin was found most effective in ameliorating oxidative stress and preserving mitochondrial integrity than curcumin.

  10. Capillary Phenomena at Nanoscales: Electrowetting and Capillary Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Theories of capillary phenomena have traditionally been based on continuum approximations that break down as dimensions shrink to nanometer scales. Molecular simulations are used to test the limits of continuum theory in electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) and capillary adhesion between solids. In EWOD, a fluid drop is separated from an electrode by a dielectric. Increasing the voltage V between drop and electrode, decreases the contact angle θ, allowing the droplet to be manipulated. Simulations of nanoscale drops show the same behavior as experiments on millimeter drops. The contact angle follows the continuum Young-Lippmann equation (YLE) at low voltages and then saturates. The saturation mechanism has been difficult to identify in experiments. Simulations show that charged molecules are pulled from the drop by large electrostatic forces near the contact line. Saturation can be delayed by increasing molecular binding, lowering temperature or increasing dielectric constant. A local force balance equation is derived that agrees with the YLE below saturation and remains valid after saturation. Simulations of capillary adhesion examined the force between a spherical tip of radius R and a flat substrate. The shape of the meniscus agrees remarkably well with continuum theory down to nanometer separations, as does the adhesive force from interfacial tension. However, the total force may deviate by factors of two or have the opposite sign. While the component of the pressure along the substrate agrees with the Laplace pressure from continuum theory, the out-of âplane component does not. There may also be significant force oscillations associated with layering near the solids. The elastic response of the solid has little affect on adhesive forces. This material is based upon work supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. CMS-0103408.

  11. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  12. Brain regional differences in social encounter-induced Fos expression in male and female rats after post-weaning social isolation.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Megan; Goodell, Dayton J; Adams, Jessica; Bland, Sondra T

    2016-01-01

    Early life adversity has been related to a number of psychological disorders including mood and other disorders that can manifest as inappropriate or aggressive responses to social challenges. The present study used post-weaning social isolation (PSI) in rats, a model of early life adversity, to examine its effects on Fos protein expression produced by exposure to a novel social encounter. We have previously reported that the social encounter-induced increase in Fos expression in the medial prefrontal cortex observed in group-housed controls (GRP) was attenuated in rats that had experienced PSI. Here we assessed Fos expression in other brain regions thought to be involved in emotion regulation and social behavior. Male and female rats were housed in same-sex groups or in isolation (ISO) for 4 weeks beginning on postnatal day (P) 21 and were exposed to a single 15 min social encounter with a novel same-sex conspecific on P49. Fos positive cells were assessed using immunohistochemistry in 16 regions within the forebrain. Exposure to a novel conspecific increased Fos expression in the forebrain of GRP rats in a region- and sex-specific fashion. This increase was blunted or absent in ISO rats within many regions including cortical regions, thalamus, habenula, dentate gyrus, lateral septum, and basolateral amygdala. In several regions, the increase in Fos was greater in male than in female group housed rats. Negative relationships were observed between social interactions and Fos in some regions. Forebrain hypofunction produced by early-life adversity may be involved in socially inappropriate behavior.

  13. Brain regional differences in social encounter-induced Fos expression in male and female rats after post-weaning social isolation.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Megan; Goodell, Dayton J; Adams, Jessica; Bland, Sondra T

    2016-01-01

    Early life adversity has been related to a number of psychological disorders including mood and other disorders that can manifest as inappropriate or aggressive responses to social challenges. The present study used post-weaning social isolation (PSI) in rats, a model of early life adversity, to examine its effects on Fos protein expression produced by exposure to a novel social encounter. We have previously reported that the social encounter-induced increase in Fos expression in the medial prefrontal cortex observed in group-housed controls (GRP) was attenuated in rats that had experienced PSI. Here we assessed Fos expression in other brain regions thought to be involved in emotion regulation and social behavior. Male and female rats were housed in same-sex groups or in isolation (ISO) for 4 weeks beginning on postnatal day (P) 21 and were exposed to a single 15 min social encounter with a novel same-sex conspecific on P49. Fos positive cells were assessed using immunohistochemistry in 16 regions within the forebrain. Exposure to a novel conspecific increased Fos expression in the forebrain of GRP rats in a region- and sex-specific fashion. This increase was blunted or absent in ISO rats within many regions including cortical regions, thalamus, habenula, dentate gyrus, lateral septum, and basolateral amygdala. In several regions, the increase in Fos was greater in male than in female group housed rats. Negative relationships were observed between social interactions and Fos in some regions. Forebrain hypofunction produced by early-life adversity may be involved in socially inappropriate behavior. PMID:26562664

  14. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  15. Measurement of Liquid Viscosities in Tapered or Parabolic Capillaries.

    PubMed

    Ershov; Zorin; Starov

    1999-08-01

    The possibility of using tapered or parabolic capillaries for measurement of liquid viscosities is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. It is demonstrated that even small deviations in capillary radius from a constant value may substantially affect measurement results. Equations are derived which allow correct analysis of the measurement results in tapered or parabolic capillaries. The following cases are analyzed: a water imbibition into a tapered or parabolic capillary and displacement of one liquid by another immiscible liquid in tapered or parabolic capillaries. Two possibilities are considered: (a) the narrow end of the capillary as capillary inlet and (b) the wide end of the capillary as capillary inlet. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Transmission of slow highly charged ions through glass capillaries: Role of the capillary shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. L.; Simon, M.; Ikeda, T.; Guillous, S.; Iskandar, W.; Méry, A.; Rangama, J.; Lebius, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Grygiel, C.; Müller, A.; Döbeli, M.; Tanis, J. A.; Cassimi, A.

    2013-11-01

    Comparison of the transmission of 27-keV Ar9+ ions through insulating funnel- and conical-shaped glass capillaries of outlet diameters of ˜22 μm is reported. Beam intensities of 1, 5, and 10 pA were injected into both capillaries. Transmission at the untilted angle of 0° was measured as well as at a tilt angle of ˜0.5° for the funnel capillary and a tilt angle of ˜1.1° for the conical capillary. For the funnel capillary, blocking of transmission was observed, whereas, the transmission was continuous for the conical capillary. These measurements suggest that conical-shaped capillaries have transport properties that are different than funnel-shaped capillaries for slow highly charged ions.

  17. Analysis of Small Ions with Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Ramandeep; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Small inorganic ions are easily separated through capillary electrophoresis because they have a high charge-to-mass ratio and suffer little from some of the undesired phenomenon affecting higher molecular weight species like adsorption to the capillary wall, decomposition, and precipitation. This chapter is focused on the analysis of small ions other than metal ions using capillary electrophoresis. Methods are described for the determination of ions of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine. PMID:27645739

  18. Transient studies of capillary-induced flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Bowman, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical and experimental results of a study performed on the transient rise of fluid in a capillary tube. The capillary tube problem provides an excellent mechanism from which to launch an investigation into the transient flow of a fluid in a porous wick structure where capillary forces must balance both adverse gravitational effects and frictional losses. For the study, a capillary tube, initially charged with a small volume of water, was lowered into a pool of water. The behavior of the column of fluid during the transient that followed as more water entered the tube from the pool was both numerically and experimentally studied.

  19. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  20. Enantiomer Separations by Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Gerhard K E; Harnisch, Henrik; Zhu, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a versatile and flexible technique for analytical enantioseparations. This is due to the large variety of chiral selectors as well as the different operation modes including electrokinetic chromatography, micellar electrokinetic chromatography, and microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography. The chiral selector, which is added to the background electrolyte, represents a pseudostationary phase with its own electrophoretic mobility allowing a variety of different separation protocols. The present chapter briefly addresses the basic fundamentals of CE enantioseparations as well as the most frequently applied chiral selectors and separation modes. The practical example illustrates the separation of the enantiomers of a positively charged analyte using native and charged cyclodextrin derivatives as chiral selectors. PMID:27645742

  1. Capillary pumped loop application guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullimore, Brent A.

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLs) have undergone extensive development since the late 1970's, and represent a maturing technology that is beginning to appear in spacecraft designs. Perhaps because most CPL literature is intended for CPL and heat pipe dedvelopers, or perhaps because of the myriad of component design and layout options available, many thermal control designers are either unfamiliar with the capabilities offered by CPLs, or are confused about their limitations. This survey paper is targeted toward thermal control designers who must decide when and where to use CPLs, or having chosen a CPL solution, must deal with system-level integration and test issues.

  2. Capillary surfaces in exotic containers

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P. ); Finn, R. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-07-01

    A survey is presented of results to date for capillary surfaces in exotic'' containers. These containers have the property that each one admits a continuum of distinct equilibrium free surfaces, all bounding with the container walls the same volume of fluid, making the same contact angle at the trip interface curve, and having identical mechanical energies. The containers can be so designed that they are themselves axially symmetric but that the fluid configurations of minimizing energy cannot be axially symmetric. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Capillary rafts and their destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Abkarian, Manouk; Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2010-11-01

    Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. The study of such particle-laden interfaces is therefore of practical as well as fundamental importance. Here we report experiments on the self-assembly of spherical particles into capillary rafts at an oil-water interface and elucidate how such rafts sink. We characterize different types of sinking behavior and show that it is possible to obtain "armored droplets," whereby the sinking oil is encapsulated within a shell of particles.

  4. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis in metallodrug development.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Hannah; Hartinger, Christian G

    2015-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a separation method based on differential migration of analytes in electric fields. The compatibility with purely aqueous separation media makes it a versatile tool in metallodrug research. Many metallodrugs undergo ligand exchange reactions that can easily be followed with this method and the information gained can even be improved by coupling the CE to advanced detectors, such as mass spectrometers. This gives the method high potential to facilitate the development of metallodrugs, especially when combined with innovative method development and experimental design. PMID:26547417

  6. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  7. Cryogenic Capillary Screen Heat Entrapment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L.G.; Hastings, L.J.; Stathman, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid acquisition devices (LADs) for space-based propulsion interface directly with the feed system, which can be a significant heat leak source. Further, the accumulation of thermal energy within LAD channels can lead to the loss of sub-cooled propellant conditions and result in feed system cavitation during propellant outflow. Therefore, the fundamental question addressed by this program was: "To what degree is natural convection in a cryogenic liquid constrained by the capillary screen meshes envisioned for LADs.?"Testing was first conducted with water as the test fluid, followed by LN2 tests. In either case, the basic experimental approach was to heat the bottom of a cylindrical column of test fluid to establish stratification patterns measured by temperature sensors located above and below a horizontal screen barrier position. Experimentation was performed without barriers, with screens, and with a solid barrier. The two screen meshes tested were those typically used by LAD designers, "200x1400" and "325x2300", both with Twill Dutch Weave. Upon consideration of both the water and LN2 data it was concluded that heat transfer across the screen meshes was dependent upon barrier thermal conductivity and that the capillary screen meshes were impervious to natural convection currents.

  8. Nonaqueous Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klampfl, Christian W; Himmelsbach, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The term nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) commonly refers to capillary electrophoresis with purely nonaqueous background electrolytes (BGE). Main advantages of NACE are the possibility to analyze substances with very low solubility in aqueous media as well as separation selectivity that can be quite different in organic solvents (compared to water)-a property that can be employed for manipulation of separation selectivities. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become more and more popular as a detector in CE a fact that applies also for NACE. In the present chapter, the development of NACE-MS since 2004 is reviewed. Relevant parameters like composition of BGE and its influence on separation and detection in NACE as well as sheath liquid for NACE-MS are discussed. Finally, an overview of the papers published in the field of NACE-MS between 2004 and 2014 is given. Applications are grouped according to the field (analysis of natural products, biomedical analysis, food analysis, analysis of industrial products, and fundamental investigations). PMID:27645734

  9. Capillary Rise in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Lago, Marcelo; Araujo, Mariela

    2001-02-01

    Capillary rise experiments were performed in columns filled with glass beads and Berea sandstones, using visual methods to register the advance of the water front. For the glass bead filled columns, early time data are well fitted by the Washburn equation. However, in the experiments, the advancing front exceeded the predicted equilibrium height. For large times, an algebraic behavior of the velocity of the front is observed (T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)). A model for studying the capillary pressure evolution in a regular assembly of spheres is proposed and developed. It is based on a quasi-static advance of the meniscus with a piston-like motion and allows us to estimate the hydraulic equilibrium height, with values very close to those obtained by fitting early time data to a Washburn equation. The change of regime is explained as a transition in the mechanism of advance of the meniscus. On the other hand, only the Washburn regime was observed for the sandstones. The front velocity was fitted to an algebraical form with an exponent close to 0.5, a value expected from the asymptotic limit of the Washburn equation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11161488

  10. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  11. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  12. Enzymophoresis of nucleic acids by tandem capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nashabeh, W; el Rassi, Z

    1992-04-10

    Enzymophoresis with coupled heterogeneous capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis was developed and evaluated in the area of nucleic acids. Ribonuclease T1, hexokinase and adenosine deaminase were successfully immobilized on the inner walls of short fused-silica capillaries through glutaraldehyde attachment. These open-tubular capillary enzyme reactors were quite stable for a prolonged period of use under operation conditions normally used in capillary zone electrophoresis. The capillary enzyme reactors coupled in series with capillary zone electrophoresis served as peak locator on the electropherogram, improved the system selectivity, and facilitated the quantitative determination of the analytes with good accuracy. Also, they allowed the on-line digestion and mapping of minute amounts of transfer ribonucleic acids, and the simultaneous synthesis and separation of nanogram quantities of oligonucleotides.

  13. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  14. Modeling capillary barriers in unsaturated fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, W.; Pan, Lehua; Hinds, Jennifer; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    2002-11-01

    This work presents a series of numerical modeling studies that investigate the hydrogeologic conditions required to form capillary barriers and the effect that capillary barriers have on fluid flow and tracer transport processes in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach is based on a dual-continuum formulation of coupled multiphase fluid and tracer transport through fractured porous rock. The numerical modeling results showed that effective capillary barriers can develop where both matrix and fracture capillary gradients tend to move water upward. Under the current hydrogeologic conceptualization of Yucca Mountain, strong capillary barrier effects exist for diverting a significant amount of moisture flow through the relatively shallow Paintbrush nonwelded unit, with major faults observed at the site serving as major downward pathways for laterally diverted percolation fluxes. In addition, we used observed field liquid saturation and goechemical isotopic data to check model results and found consistent agreement.

  15. Capillary damage in the area postrema by venom of the northern black-tailed rattlesnake (Crotalus molossus molossus)

    PubMed Central

    Meléndez-Martínez, David; Macias-Rodríguez, Eduardo; Vargas-Caraveo, Alejandra; Martínez-Martínez, Alejandro; Gatica-Colima, Ana; Plenge-Tellechea, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The Northern black-tailed rattlesnake (Crotalus molossus molossus) venom is mainly hemotoxic, hemorrhagic, and neurotoxic. Its effects in the central nervous system are unknown and only poorly described for all Viperidae species in general. This is why we are interested in describe the damage induced by C. m. molossus venom in rat brain, particularly in the area postrema capillaries. Four C. m. molossus venom doses were tested (0.02, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20mg/kg) injected intramuscularly at the lower limb, incubated by 24 hours and the brains were harvested. Area postrema coronal sections were stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin, and examined to observe the venom effect in quantity of capillaries and porphology. Starting from the 0.10mg/kg treatment we observed lysed extravasated erythrocytes and also capillary breakdown, as a consequence of hemorrhages appearance. The number of capillaries decreased significantly in response to the venom dose increment. Hemorrhages could be caused by the metalloproteinase activity on the basal membrane and the apoptosis generated by L-amino acid oxidases. Hemolysis could be caused by phospholipase A2 hemotoxic effect. We conclude that C. m. molossus crude venom produces hemolysis, capillary breakdown, hemorrhages, and the reduction in number of capillaries in the area postrema. PMID:25035793

  16. Automatic detection of the hippocampal region associated with Alzheimer's disease from microscopic images of mice brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaidhani, Tahseen; Hawkes, Cheryl; Jassim, Sabah; Al-Assam, Hisham

    2016-05-01

    The hippocampus is the region of the brain that is primarily associated with memory and spatial navigation. It is one of the first brain regions to be damaged when a person suffers from Alzheimer's disease. Recent research in this field has focussed on the assessment of damage to different blood vessels within the hippocampal region from a high throughput brain microscopic images. The ultimate aim of our research is the creation of an automatic system to count and classify different blood vessels such as capillaries, veins, and arteries in the hippocampus region. This work should provide biologists with efficient and accurate tools in their investigation of the causes of Alzheimer's disease. Locating the boundary of the Region of Interest in the hippocampus from microscopic images of mice brain is the first essential stage towards developing such a system. This task benefits from the variation in colour channels and texture between the two sides of the hippocampus and the boundary region. Accordingly, the developed initial step of our research to locating the hippocampus edge uses a colour-based segmentation of the brain image followed by Hough transforms on the colour channel that isolate the hippocampus region. The output is then used to split the brain image into two sides of the detected section of the boundary: the inside region and the outside region. Experimental results on a sufficiently number of microscopic images demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed solution.

  17. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  18. Towards new applications using capillary waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the enhancement of the sensing capabilities of glass capillaries. We exploit their properties as optical and acoustic waveguides to transform them potentially into high resolution minimally invasive endoscopic devices. We show two possible applications of silica capillary waveguides demonstrating fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging using a single 330 μm-thick silica capillary. A nanosecond pulsed laser is focused and scanned in front of a capillary by digital phase conjugation through the silica annular ring of the capillary, used as an optical waveguide. We demonstrate optical-resolution photoacoustic images of a 30 μm-thick nylon thread using the water-filled core of the same capillary as an acoustic waveguide, resulting in a fully passive endoscopic device. Moreover, fluorescence images of 1.5 μm beads are obtained collecting the fluorescence signal through the optical waveguide. This kind of silica-capillary waveguide together with wavefront shaping techniques such as digital phase conjugation, paves the way to minimally invasive multi-modal endoscopy. PMID:26713182

  19. Does optical microangiography provide accurate imaging of capillary vessels?: validation using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hequn; Baran, Utku; Li, Yuandong; Qin, Wan; Wang, Wenbo; Zeng, Haishan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical microangiography (OMAG) has been extensively utilized to study three-dimensional tissue vasculature in vivo. However, with the limited image resolution (∼10  μm) of the commonly used systems, some concerns were raised: (1) whether OMAG is capable of providing the imaging of capillary vessels that are of an average diameter of ∼6  μm; (2) if yes, whether OMAG can provide meaningful quantification of vascular density within the scanned tissue volume. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is capable of depth-resolved high-resolution (∼1  μm) imaging of biological tissue structures. With externally labeled plasma, the vascular network including single capillaries can be well visualized. We compare the vascular images of in vivo mouse brain acquired by both OMAG and MPM systems. We found that within the penetration depth range of the MPM system, OMAG is able to accurately visualize blood vessels including capillaries. Although the resolution of OMAG may not be able to 100% resolve two closely packed tiny capillaries in tissue, it is still capable of visualizing most of the capillaries because there are interstitial tissue spaces between them. We believe our validation results reinforce the application of OMAG in microvasculature-related studies. PMID:25341071

  20. Micromechanism linear actuator with capillary force sealing

    DOEpatents

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A class of micromachine linear actuators whose function is based on gas driven pistons in which capillary forces are used to seal the gas behind the piston. The capillary forces also increase the amount of force transmitted from the gas pressure to the piston. In a major subclass of such devices, the gas bubble is produced by thermal vaporization of a working fluid. Because of their dependence on capillary forces for sealing, such devices are only practical on the sub-mm size scale, but in that regime they produce very large force times distance (total work) values.

  1. Aquaporins and Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Rosario; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Fricano, Anna; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Brain primary tumors are among the most diverse and complex human cancers, and they are normally classified on the basis of the cell-type and/or the grade of malignancy (the most malignant being glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), grade IV). Glioma cells are able to migrate throughout the brain and to stimulate angiogenesis, by inducing brain capillary endothelial cell proliferation. This in turn causes loss of tight junctions and fragility of the blood–brain barrier, which becomes leaky. As a consequence, the most serious clinical complication of glioblastoma is the vasogenic brain edema. Both glioma cell migration and edema have been correlated with modification of the expression/localization of different isoforms of aquaporins (AQPs), a family of water channels, some of which are also involved in the transport of other small molecules, such as glycerol and urea. In this review, we discuss relationships among expression/localization of AQPs and brain tumors/edema, also focusing on the possible role of these molecules as both diagnostic biomarkers of cancer progression, and therapeutic targets. Finally, we will discuss the possibility that AQPs, together with other cancer promoting factors, can be exchanged among brain cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). PMID:27367682

  2. Anti-transferrin receptor antibody and antibody-drug conjugates cross the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed Central

    Friden, P M; Walus, L R; Musso, G F; Taylor, M A; Malfroy, B; Starzyk, R M

    1991-01-01

    Delivery of nonlipophilic drugs to the brain is hindered by the tightly apposed capillary endothelial cells that make up the blood-brain barrier. We have examined the ability of a monoclonal antibody (OX-26), which recognizes the rat transferrin receptor, to function as a carrier for the delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier. This antibody, which was previously shown to bind preferentially to capillary endothelial cells in the brain after intravenous administration (Jefferies, W. A., Brandon, M. R., Hunt, S. V., Williams, A. F., Gatter, K. C. & Mason, D. Y. (1984) Nature (London) 312, 162-163), labels the entire cerebrovascular bed in a dose-dependent manner. The initially uniform labeling of brain capillaries becomes extremely punctate approximately 4 hr after injection, suggesting a time-dependent sequestering of the antibody. Capillary-depletion experiments, in which the brain is separated into capillary and parenchymal fractions, show a time-dependent migration of radiolabeled antibody from the capillaries into the brain parenchyma, which is consistent with the transcytosis of compounds across the blood-brain barrier. Antibody-methotrexate conjugates were tested in vivo to assess the carrier ability of this antibody. Immunohistochemical staining for either component of an OX-26-methotrexate conjugate revealed patterns of cerebrovascular labeling identical to those observed with the unaltered antibody. Accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain parenchyma is greatly enhanced when the drug is conjugated to OX-26. Images PMID:2052557

  3. Anti-transferrin receptor antibody and antibody-drug conjugates cross the blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Friden, P.M.; Walus, L.R.; Musso, G.F.; Taylor, M.A.; Malfroy, B.; Starzyk, R.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Delivery of nonlipophilic drugs to the brain is hindered by the tightly apposed capillary endothelial cells that make up the blood-brain barrier. The authors have examined the ability of a monoclonal antibody (OX-26), which recognizes the rat transferrin receptor, to function as a carrier for the delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier. This antibody, which was previously shown to bind preferentially to capillary endothelial cells in the brain after intravenous administration, labels the entire cerebrovascular bed in a dose-dependent manner. The initially uniform labeling of brain capillaries becomes extremely punctate {approximately} 4 hr after injection, suggesting a time-dependent sequestering of the antibody. Capillary-depletion experiments, in which the brain is separated into capillary and parenchymal fractions, show a time-dependent migration of radiolabeled antibody from the capillaries into the brain parenchyma, which is consistent with the transcytosis of compounds across the blood-brain barrier. Antibody-methotrexate conjugates were tested in vivo to assess the carrier ability of this antibody. Immunohistochemical staining for either component of an OX-26-methotrexate conjugate revealed patterns of cerebrovascular labeling identical to those observed with the unaltered antibody. Accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain parenchyma is greatly enhanced when the drug is conjugated to OX-26.

  4. Brain iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  5. "Getting the best sensitivity from on-capillary fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis" - A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection is being applied to new analytical problems which challenge both the power of CE separation and the sensitivity of LIF detection. On-capillary LIF detection is much more practical than post-capillary detection in a sheath-flow cell. Therefore, commercial CE instruments utilize solely on-capillary CE-LIF detection with a Limit of Detection (LOD) in the nM range, while there are multiple applications of CE-LIF that require pM or lower LODs. This tutorial analyzes all aspects of on-capillary LIF detection in CE in an attempt to identify means for improving LOD of CE-LIF with on-capillary detection. We consider principles of signal enhancement and noise reduction, as well as relevant areas of fluorophore photochemistry and fluorescent microscopy. PMID:27543015

  6. Highly Sensitive and Multiple Enzyme Activity Assay Using Reagent-release Capillary-Isoelectric Focusing with Rhodamine 110-based Substrates.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Kenji; Nogawa, Yuto; Sugawara, Kasumi; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple and highly sensitive enzyme activity assay based on reagent-release capillary-isoelectric focusing is described. Reagent-release capillaries containing a fluorescent substrate, which produces fluorescent products possessing an isoelectric point after reaction with enzymes, provides a simple procedure. This is because it allows to spontaneously inject a sample solution into the capillary by capillary action, mixing reagents, and subsequently concentrating the fluorescent products based on isoelectric focusing. Fluorescent rhodamine 110 and its monoamide derivative, which were generated as a final product and an intermediate, respectively, were then focused and separated by reagent-release capillary-isoelectric focusing. After 30 min of enzyme reactions, two focused fluorescent bands were clearly isolated along the prepared capillaries. Employing the focused band of rhodamine 110 monoamide allowed for highly sensitive detection of enzyme activity in the 10 pg mL(-1) order, while that of the conventional assay using a microplate was in the ng mL(-1) order. Furthermore, arraying reagent-release capillaries of different substrates on a chip allowed for simultaneous multi-assay of enzyme activity with good sensitivity in the pg mL(-1) order for each protein.

  7. Accessing targeted nanoparticles to the brain: the vascular route.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, A; Azizi, M; Thomsen, M S; Thomsen, L B; Moos, T

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, prevents the entry of several drug molecules to the brain, especially molecules hydrophilic in nature. Advanced drug carriers like nanoparticles share the potential to allow entry of therapeutic proteins and genetic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Taking a targeting approach by conjugating molecules acting as ligands or monoclonal antibodies with affinity for proteins expressed on the luminal side of brain capillary endothelial cells, the nanoparticles can be designed to enable transport into the brain endothelium, or perhaps even through the endothelium leading to blood to brain transport. Currently, the iron-binding protein transferrin or antibodies raised against the transferrin receptor denote the most feasible molecule for targeting purposes at the BBB. This manuscript reviews the targetability of nanoparticles to the brain capillary endothelial cells, how nanocarriers may enter and transfer through the brain endothelium, and how likely restraints denoted by the threedimensional mesh of the extracellular proteins forming the brain capillary basement membrane challenge the possibilities for enabling transport of large molecules through the BBB encapsulated in nanoparticles.

  8. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  9. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method.

  10. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method. PMID:11669512

  11. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  12. Capillary Flow Resistors: Local and Global Resistors.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Jean; Gosselin, David; Pham, Andrew; Delapierre, Guillaume; Belgacem, Naceur; Chaussy, Didier

    2016-01-26

    The use of capillary systems in space and biotechnology applications requires the regulation of the capillary flow velocity. It has been observed that constricted sections act as flow resistors. In this work, we also show that enlarged sections temporarily reduce the velocity of the flow. In this work, the theory of the dynamics of capillary flows passing through a constricted or an enlarged channel section is presented. It is demonstrated that the physics of a capillary flow in a channel with a constriction or an enlargement is different and that a constriction acts as a global flow resistor and an enlargement as a local flow resistor. The theoretical results are checked against experimental approaches. PMID:26704147

  13. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  14. Characterising Microstructured Materials Using a Capillary Rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Christopher I.; See, Howard; Arabo, Emad Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel plate and capillary rheometer have been used to rheologically characterize an Australian hard wheat flour-water dough over an extensive range of shear rates (10-3-104 s-1). Torsional measurements showed that the shear viscosity of dough increased with strain to a maximum value then decreased, suggesting a breakdown of the dough structure. This was consistent with other published data on doughs. Capillary experiments revealed the shear thinning behavior of dough, which was described by a power-law model. The wall slip behavior of dough was examined, revealing a critical shear stress at which slip occurs for a 1 mm diameter capillary. The capillary data was best linked to the torsional data at low strain values (˜0.1) as expected given the nature of sampling in the two rheometers.

  15. ISS Update: Capillary Flow Experiments-2

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Dr. Mark Weislogel, Principal Investigator for the Capillary Flow Experiments-2 (CFE), from the Portland State University in Oregon. The CFE i...

  16. RF Liquid Measurement Of Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, Bashudev; Mazzeo, Brian; Warnick, Karl

    2009-10-01

    Electromagnetic measurements of capillary tubes containing liquids can reveal solution properties for industrial, biological, and chemical processes. An analytical model was created for a perpendicular arrangement of SMA cables and a capillary tube. Numerical simulations in Ansoft High Frequency Structural Simulator were performed on the simple arrangement. The transmission parameters of the capillary tube were simulated between two lumped ports over a frequency range from 1 GHz to 20 GHz. Sensitivity of the transmission parameters to solution conditions were calculated for DI water and other variations of conductivity and permittivity. Experiments were performed on a capillary tube in a perpendicular arrangement using an HP 8720B Network Analyzer. The transmission parameters were measured and the resulting data was compared with the simulations. This measurement method can be adapted to different tube and solution conditions.

  17. Capillary Movement in Substrates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Duffie, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the dynamics of capillary flow through an unsaturated porous medium would be useful for a number of space and terrestrial applications. Knowledge of capillary migration of liquids in granular beds in microgravity would significantly enhance the development and understanding of how a matrix based nutrient delivery system for the growth of plants would function in a microgravity environment. Thus, such information is of interest from the theoretical as well as practical point of view.

  18. Thin film capillary process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-11-18

    Method and system of forming microfluidic capillaries in a variety of substrate materials. A first layer of a material such as silicon dioxide is applied to a channel etched in substrate. A second, sacrificial layer of a material such as a polymer is deposited on the first layer. A third layer which may be of the same material as the first layer is placed on the second layer. The sacrificial layer is removed to form a smooth walled capillary in the substrate.

  19. Unusual intraosseous capillary hemangioma of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Dereci, Omur; Acikalin, Mustafa Fuat; Ay, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous hemangioma is a benign vascular neoplasm, which is mostly seen in vertebrae, maxillofacial bones, and long bones. Intraosseous hemangioma is rarely seen on jaw bones compared to other skeletal bones and usually occurs in the cavernous form. Capillary intraosseous hemangioma of jaws is an uncommon form of intraosseous hemangioma and has not been thoroughly described so far. In this study, a case of capillary intraosseous hemangioma of the mandible was presented with relevant literature review. PMID:26430377

  20. Capillary fracture of soft gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua B.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L∝t3/4. We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  1. OCT methods for capillary velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vivek J; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H; Mandeville, Emiri T; Jiang, James Y; Barry, Scott; Cable, Alex E

    2012-03-01

    TO DATE, TWO MAIN CATEGORIES OF OCT TECHNIQUES HAVE BEEN DESCRIBED FOR IMAGING HEMODYNAMICS: Doppler OCT and OCT angiography. Doppler OCT can measure axial velocity profiles and flow in arteries and veins, while OCT angiography can determine vascular morphology, tone, and presence or absence of red blood cell (RBC) perfusion. However, neither method can quantify RBC velocity in capillaries, where RBC flow is typically transverse to the probe beam and single-file. Here, we describe new methods that potentially address these limitations. Firstly, we describe a complex-valued OCT signal in terms of a static scattering component, dynamic scattering component, and noise. Secondly, we propose that the time scale of random fluctuations in the dynamic scattering component are related to red blood cell velocity. Analysis was performed along the slow axis of repeated B-scans to parallelize measurements. We correlate our purported velocity measurements against two-photon microscopy measurements of RBC velocity, and investigate changes during hypercapnia. Finally, we image the ischemic stroke penumbra during distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO), where OCT velocimetry methods provide additional insight that is not afforded by either Doppler OCT or OCT angiography.

  2. Nonlinear waves in capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Sandip; Chen, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis the sample migrates in a microcapillary in the presence of a background electrolyte. When the ionic concentration of the sample is sufficiently high, the signal is known to exhibit features reminiscent of nonlinear waves including sharp concentration ‘shocks’. In this paper we consider a simplified model consisting of a single sample ion and a background electrolyte consisting of a single co-ion and a counterion in the absence of any processes that might change the ionization states of the constituents. If the ionic diffusivities are assumed to be the same for all constituents the concentration of sample ion is shown to obey a one dimensional advection diffusion equation with a concentration dependent advection velocity. If the analyte concentration is sufficiently low in a suitable non-dimensional sense, Burgers’ equation is recovered, and thus, the time dependent problem is exactly solvable with arbitrary initial conditions. In the case of small diffusivity either a leading edge or trailing edge shock is formed depending on the electrophoretic mobility of the sample ion relative to the background ions. Analytical formulas are presented for the shape, width and migration velocity of the sample peak and it is shown that axial dispersion at long times may be characterized by an effective diffusivity that is exactly calculated. These results are consistent with known observations from physical and numerical simulation experiments. PMID:20238181

  3. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  4. Capillary pressure experiments under simulated reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, J.; Spangenberg, E.

    2012-04-01

    The contribution of residual trapping to a long-term storage of CO2 in saline aquifers mainly depends on the drainage capillary pressure of a reservoir and the hysteresis of the drainage and imbibition branches of the capillary pressure curve. However, the experimental database of capillary pressure measured at relevant pT conditions is still scarce. Here, we present an experimental set-up, which allows for the performance of capillary pressure experiments with a semi-permeable disk (porous plate) at simulated reservoir conditions. In the framework of the EU funded project CO2CARE, drainage and imbibition cycles are performed on Triassic sandstone samples. We use a temperature controlled oil pressure autoclave to apply a maximum confining pressure of 400 bar and a maximum working temperature of 150°C. The fluid displacement, and hence the sample saturation is controlled by a gear pump with a fine resolution of 0.01 ml. Additionally, the capillary pressure experiment is combined with measurements of elastic wave velocities as well as of the electrical resistivity. In this case, P and S wave velocities and the formation resistivity factor are determined as functions of the brine/ CO2 saturation. The experiment provides information about the efficiency of the capillary trapping of the sample and a calibration of the petrophysical properties on saturation.

  5. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  6. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  7. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. PMID:27261363

  8. Effect of vasopressin on ependymal and capillary permeability to tritiated water in cat

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, G.A.; Kyner, W.T.; Fenstermacher, J.D.; Patlak, C.S.

    1986-09-01

    Ependymal cells line the cerebral ventricles forming the interface that separates the cerebrospinal (CSF) and interstitial fluids (ISF). Extracellular molecules move between ependymal cells, whereas lipid soluble molecules pass both between and through cells. We measured the transfer of tritiated water (TOH) from CSF to blood across the ependymal and capillary interfaces by ventriculocisternal (VC) steady-state tissue clearance. Adult cats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium underwent VC perfusion with the extracellular marker (/sup 14/C)sucrose and TOH added to the artificial CSF. Brain tissue was analyzed for depth of penetration of the isotopes into periventricular gray matter. We found that TOH distribution space was lower than expected from water content measurements, whereas sucrose space was normal. Using VC steady-state equations we calculated an ependymal permeability that was similar to the permeability of the cerebral capillary. When arginine vasopressin (AVP) was added to the perfusate in different amounts, both capillary transfer times and ependymal permeability increased. Our results show that the ependyma may be important in water movement in the brain and support the suggestion that AVP influences water exchange in mammalian brain tissue.

  9. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-11-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  10. Blood-brain barrier transport of drugs for the treatment of brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Gabathuler, Reinhard

    2009-06-01

    The central nervous system is a sanctuary protected by barriers that regulate brain homeostasis and control the transport of endogenous compounds into the brain. The blood-brain barrier, formed by endothelial cells of the brain capillaries, restricts access to brain cells allowing entry only to amino acids, glucose and hormones needed for normal brain cell function and metabolism. This very tight regulation of brain cell access is essential for the survival of neurons which do not have a significant capacity to regenerate, but also prevents therapeutic compounds, small and large, from reaching the brain. As a result, various strategies are being developed to enhance access of drugs to the brain parenchyma at therapeutically meaningful concentrations to effectively manage disease.

  11. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  12. Microfluidic flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ling; Dutta, Debashis

    2013-04-01

    Flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis (FCCE) offers a powerful approach to realizing difficult charge based separations in compact microchip devices with application of relatively small electrical voltages. The need for dynamically controlling the pressure-gradient in the FCCE column however presents a significant challenge in implementing this technique on the microchip platform. In this article, we report the use of a simple on-chip pumping unit that allows precise introduction of a periodic pressure-driven backflow into a microfluidic separation channel enabling an FCCE analysis. The backflow in our device was produced by fabricating a shallow segment (0.5 μm deep) downstream of the analysis column (5 μm deep) and applying an electric field across it. A mismatch in the electroosmotic transport rate at the interface of this segment was shown to yield a pressure-gradient that could reverse the flow of the analyte bands without inverting the direction of the electric field. Although such a pressure-gradient also led to additional band broadening in the system, overall, the separation resolution of our device was observed to improve with an increasing number of back-and-forth sample passes through the analysis channel. For our current design, the corresponding improvement in the effective separation length was as much as 52% of the actual distance travelled by the chosen FITC-labeled amino acid samples. The reported device is well suited for further miniaturization of the FCCE method to the nanofluidic length scale which likely would improve its performance, and is easily integrable to other analytical procedures on the microchip platform for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:23420375

  13. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent. PMID:24229192

  14. Capillary adhesion at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the capillary adhesion from a nonvolatile liquid meniscus between a spherical tip and a flat substrate. The atomic structure of the tip, the tip radius, the contact angles of the liquid on the two surfaces, and the volume of the liquid bridge are varied. The capillary force between the tip and substrate is calculated as a function of their separation h. The force agrees with continuum predictions based on macroscopic theory for h down to ∼5 to 10 nm. At smaller h, the force tends to be less attractive than predicted and has strong oscillations. This oscillatory component of the capillary force is completely missed in the macroscopic theory, which only includes contributions from the surface tension around the circumference of the meniscus and the pressure difference over the cross section of the meniscus. The oscillation is found to be due to molecular layering of the liquid confined in the narrow gap between the tip and substrate. This effect is most pronounced for large tip radii and/or smooth surfaces. The other two components considered by the macroscopic theory are also identified. The surface tension term, as well as the meniscus shape, is accurately described by the macroscopic theory for h down to ∼1 nm, but the capillary pressure term is always more positive than the corresponding continuum result. This shift in the capillary pressure reduces the average adhesion by a factor as large as 2 from its continuum value and is found to be due to an anisotropy in the pressure tensor. The component in the plane of the substrate is consistent with the capillary pressure predicted by the macroscopic theory (i.e., the Young-Laplace equation), but the normal pressure that determines the capillary force is always more positive than the continuum counterpart.

  15. Critical Velocities in Open Capillary Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Langbein, Dieter; Rath, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed research program on open capillary flow and the preliminary work performed theoretically and in drop tower experiments. The work focuses on the fundamental physical understanding of the flow through capillary bound geometries, where the circumference of the cross section of the flow path contains free surfaces. Examples for such a flow configuration are capillary vanes in surface tension tanks, flow along edges and corners and flow through liquid bridges. The geometries may be classified by their cross section areas, wetted circumferences and the radii of curvature of the free surfaces. In the streaming float zone the flow path is bound by a free surface only. The ribbon vane is a model for vane types used in surface tension tanks, where a structure in proximity to the tank wall forms a capillary gap. A groove is used in heat pipes for the transportation of the condensed working fluid to the heat source and a wedge may occur in a spaceborne experiment where fluid has to be transported by the means of surface tension. The research objectives are the determination of the maximum volume flux, the observation of the free surfaces and the liquid flow inside the flow path as well as the evaluation of the limiting capillary wave speed. The restriction of the maximum volume flux is due to convective forces (flow velocity exceeding the capillary wave speed) and/or viscous forces, i.e. the viscous head loss along the flow path must be compensated by the capillary pressure due to the curved free surface. Exceeding the maximum volume flux leads to the choking of the flow path, thus the free surface collapses and.gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. The means are ground-based experimental work with plateau tanks and in a drop tower, a sounding rocket flight, and theoretical analysis with integral balances as well as full three dimensional CFD solutions for flow with free surfaces.

  16. Separation of Recombinant Therapeutic Proteins Using Capillary Gel Electrophoresis and Capillary Isoelectric Focusing.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Caitlyn A G; Risley, Jessica; Lee, Alexis K; Zhao, Shuai Sherry; Chen, David D Y

    2016-01-01

    Detailed step-by-step methods for protein separation techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) are described in this chapter. Focus is placed on two techniques, capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) and capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF). CGE is essentially gel electrophoresis, performed in a capillary, where a hydrogel is used as a sieving matrix to separate proteins or peptides based on size. cIEF separates proteins or peptides based on their isoelectric point (pI), the pH at which the protein or peptide bears no charges. Detailed protocols and steps (including capillary preparation, sample preparation, CE separation conditions, and detection) for both CGE and cIEF presented so that readers can follow the described methods in their own labs. PMID:27473487

  17. Age and diabetes related changes of the retinal capillaries: An ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Enrica; Ripandelli, Guido; Taurone, Samanta; Feher, Janos; Plateroti, Rocco; Kovacs, Illes; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Orlando, Maria Patrizia; Micera, Alessandra; Battaglione, Ezio; Artico, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Normal human aging and diabetes are associated with a gradual decrease of cerebral flow in the brain with changes in vascular architecture. Thickening of the capillary basement membrane and microvascular fibrosis are evident in the central nervous system of elderly and diabetic patients. Current findings assign a primary role to endothelial dysfunction as a cause of basement membrane (BM) thickening, while retinal alterations are considered to be a secondary cause of either ischemia or exudation. The aim of this study was to reveal any initial retinal alterations and variations in the BM of retinal capillaries during diabetes and aging as compared to healthy controls. Moreover, we investigated the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in diabetic retina.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on 46 enucleated human eyes with particular attention to alterations of the retinal capillary wall and Müller glial cells. Inflammatory cytokines expression in the retina was investigated by immunohistochemistry.Our electron microscopy findings demonstrated that thickening of the BM begins primarily at the level of the glial side of the retina during aging and diabetes. The Müller cells showed numerous cytoplasmic endosomes and highly electron-dense lysosomes which surrounded the retinal capillaries. Our study is the first to present morphological evidence that Müller cells start to deposit excessive BM material in retinal capillaries during aging and diabetes. Our results confirm the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β within the retina as a result of diabetes.These observations strongly suggest that inflammatory cytokines and changes in the metabolism of Müller glial cells rather than changes in of endothelial cells may play a primary role in the alteration of retinal capillaries BM during aging and diabetes. PMID:26604209

  18. Capillary liquid chromatography using laser-based and mass spectrometric detection. [Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE); micellar electrokinetic capillary kchromatography (MECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.; Cook, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the years following the 1986 seminal paper (J. Chromatogr. Sci., 24, 347-352) describing modern capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), the prominence of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques has grown. A related electrochromatographic technique is micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC). This report presents a brief synopsis of research efforts during the current 3-year period. In addition to a description of analytical separations-based research, results of efforts to develop and expand spectrometric detection for the techniques is reviewed. Laser fluorometric detection schemes have been successfully advanced. Mass spectrometric research was less fruitful, largely owing to personnel limitations. A regenerable fiber optic sensor was developed that can be used to remotely monitor chemical carcinogens, etc. (DLC)

  19. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-01-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function. PMID:26905751

  20. Micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Koenka, Israel Joel; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Müller, Beat; Chwalek, Thomas; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    A novel micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis for the handling of samples with volumes down to as little as 300 nL was designed and built in our laboratory for analyses in which the available volume is a limitation. The sample is placed into a small cavity located directly in front of the separation capillary, and the injection is then carried out automatically by controlled pressurization of the chamber with compressed air. The system also allows automated flushing of the injection chamber as well as of the capillary. In a trial with a capillary electrophoresis system with contactless conductivity detector, employing a capillary of 25 μm diameter, the results showed good stability of migration times and peak areas. To illustrate the technique, the fast separation of five inorganic cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH4 (+) , Ca(2+) , and Mg(2+) ) was set up. This could be achieved in less than 3 min, with good limits of detection (10 μM) and linear ranges (between about 10 and 1000 μM). The system was demonstrated for the determination of the inorganic cations in porewater samples of a lake sediment core.

  1. Passive Reactor Cooling Using Capillary Porous Wick

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher G.; Lin, Thomas F.

    2006-07-01

    Long-term reliability of actively pumped cooling systems is a concern in space-based nuclear reactors. Capillary-driven passive cooling systems are being considered as an alternative to gravity-driven systems. The high surface tension of liquid lithium makes it attractive as the coolant in a capillary-driven cooling system. A system has been conceived in which the fuel rod of a reactor is surrounded by a concentric wick through which liquid lithium flows to provide cooling under normal and emergency operating conditions. Unheated wicking experiments at three pressures using four layered screen mesh wicks of different porosities and three relatively high surface tension fluids have been conducted to gain insight into capillary phenomena for such a capillary cooling system. All fluids tested demonstrated wicking ability in each of the wick structures for all pressures, and wicking ability for each fluid increased with decreasing wick pore size. An externally heated wicking experiment with liquid lithium as the wicking fluid was also conducted. In addition to wicking experiments, a heater rod is under development to simulate the fuel rod of a space based nuclear reactor by providing a heat flux of up to 110 kW/m{sup 2}. Testing of this heater rod has shown its ability to undergo repeated cycling from below 533 K to over 1255 K without failure. This heater rod will be integrated into lithium wicking experiments to provide more realistic simulation of the proposed capillary-driven space nuclear reactor cooling system. (authors)

  2. Restructuring and aging in a capillary suspension

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin; Kannowade, Wolfgang; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The rheological properties of capillary suspensions, suspensions with small amounts of an added immiscible fluid, are dramatically altered with the addition of the secondary fluid. We investigate a capillary suspension to determine how the network ages and restructures at rest and under applied external shear deformation. The present work uses calcium carbonate suspended in silicone oil (11 % solids) with added water as a model system. Aging of capillary suspensions and their response to applied oscillatory shear is distinctly different from particulate gels dominated by the van der Waals forces. The suspensions dominated by the capillary force are very sensitive to oscillatory flow, with the linear viscoelastic regime ending at a deformation of only 0.1% and demonstrating power-law aging behavior. This aging persists for long times at low deformations or for shorter times with a sudden decrease in the strength at higher deformations. This aging behavior suggests that the network is able to rearrange and even rupture. This same sensitivity is not demonstrated in shear flow where very high shear rates are required to rupture the agglomerates returning the apparent viscosity of capillary suspensions to the same viscosity as for the pure vdW suspension. A transitional region is also present at intermediate water contents wherein the material response depends very strongly on the type, strength, and duration of the external forcing. PMID:25729113

  3. Case report of lumbar intradural capillary hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Unnithan, Ajaya Kumar Ayyappan; Joseph, T. P.; Gautam, Amol; Shymole, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangioma is a rare tumor in spinal intradural location. Despite the rarity, early recognition is important because of the risk of hemorrhage. This is a case report of a woman who had capillary hemangioma of cauda equina. Case Description: A 54 -year-old woman presented with a low backache, radiating to the left leg for 2 months. She had left extensor hallucis weakness, sensory impairment in left L5 dermatome, and mild tenderness in lower lumbar spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) LS spine showed L4/5 intradural tumor, completely occluding canal in myelogram, enhancing with contrast, s/o benign nerve sheath tumor. L4 laminectomy was done. Reddish tumor was seen originating from a single root. It was removed preserving the root. Postoperatively, she was relieved of symptoms. MRI showed no residue. Histopathology showed lobular proliferation of capillary-sized blood vessels and elongated spindle cells. Immunohistochemistry showed CD34 positivity in endothelial cell lining of blood vessel and smooth muscle actin positivity in blood vessel muscle cells. HPR-capillary hemangioma. Conclusion: Although rare, capillary hemangioma should be in the differential diagnosis of intradural tumors. It closely mimics nerve sheath tumor. PMID:27069745

  4. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  5. Capillary xray compressor: principle versus practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Barg, Bill; Brown, Frederick C.; Kim, Kyungha H.; Stern, Edward A.

    1995-09-01

    Guiding x rays down the inside of tapered capillaries is a means to increase the flux density of x rays from synchrotron light sources without some of the disadvantages inherent in other techniques. We have demonstrated that a process based on techniques for fabrication of glass fibers may be used to produce tapered capillaries with inlet diameters on the order of 150 micrometers or more, and outlets on the order of 1 micrometer or less. We present a description of the capillary fabrication and results of tests of the performance of several capillaries, along with a comparison with calculations of performance. We also summarize refinements to the fabrication process that will provide additional improvements. The transmission of x rays from linear capillaries with inlet diameters of approximately 150 micrometers and outlet diameters of 1.3 - 1.4 micrometer is on the order of 2%, with corresponding intensity gains of up to 274. Initial results indicate that the capability exists for producing convex profiles necessary for optimal transmission. Calculated and measured transmission efficiencies are in fairly good agreement, leading to the expectation that efficiencies predicted by calculations to be attainable from optimal profiles are a realistic goal, given the ability to manufacture these profiles.

  6. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  7. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  8. Capillary breakup of discontinuously rate thickening suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zimoch, Pawel J; McKinley, Gareth H; Hosoi, A E

    2013-07-19

    Using discontinuously rate thickening suspensions (DRTS) as a model system, we show that beads-on-a-string morphologies can arise as a result of external viscous drag acting during capillary-driven breakup of a non-Newtonian fluid. To minimize the perturbative effect of gravity, we developed a new experimental test platform in which the filament is supported in a horizontal position at the surface of an immiscible oil bath. We show that the evolution of thin DRTS filaments during the capillary thinning process is well described by a set of one-dimensional slender filament equations. The strongly rate-dependent rheology of the test fluid and the aspect ratio of the filament couple to control the thinning dynamics and lead to a simple criterion describing the localized arrest of the capillary thinning process and the subsequent formation of complex, high aspect ratio beads-on-a-string structures. PMID:23909338

  9. Capillary pumped loop GAS and Hitchhiker flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, J.; Kroliczek, E. J.; Butler, D.; Schweickart, R. B.; Mcintosh, R.

    1986-01-01

    Flight experiments of a capillary pumped loop (CPL) aboard the Space Shuttle on both the Get Away Special (GAS) and Hitchhiker-G (H/H-G) carriers are described. These tests have shown that a two-phase heat transfer loop utilizing a wicking material as the system pumping mechanism can operate successfully in a zero-g environment. The CPL operating modes demonstrated were start-up, heat load sharing/natural priming, liquid inventory and temperature control via the reservoir, dryout recovery, and isolation of a single pump deprime. Also investigated were high and low power limits, and inlet subcooling requirements. In these CPL flight experiments, successful system operation was demonstrated at input power levels up to 560 watts and inlet subcooling below 2 C.

  10. Photosensitive diazotized poly(ethylene glycol) covalent capillary coatings for analysis of proteins by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Chen, Xin; Cong, Hailin; Shu, Xi; Peng, Qiaohong

    2016-09-01

    A new method for the fabrication of covalently cross-linked capillary coatings of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is described using diazotized PEG (diazo-PEG) as a new photosensitive coating agent. The film of diazo-PEG depends on ionic bonding and was first prepared on the inner surface of capillary by self-assembly, and ionic bonding was converted into covalent bonding after reaction of ultraviolet light with diazo groups through unique photochemical reaction. The covalently bonded coating impedance adsorption of protein on the central surface of capillary and hence the four proteins ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, bovine serum albumin, and lysosome can be baseline separated by using capillary electrophoresis (CE). The covalently cross-linked diazo-PEG capillary column coatings not only improved the CE separation performance for proteins compared to non-covalently cross-linked coatings or bare capillary but also showed a remarkable chemical solidity and repeatability. Because photosensitive diazo-PEG took the place of the highly noxious and silane moisture-sensitive coating reagents in the fabrication of covalent coating, this technique shows the advantage of being environment-friendly and having a high efficiency for CE to make the covalently bonded capillaries. PMID:27475442

  11. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  12. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:25215822

  13. Use of Plastic Capillaries for Macromolecular Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Rachel R.; Hong, Young-Soo; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of crystallization of biomolecules in plastic capillaries (Nalgene 870 PFA tubing) are presented. These crystallization methods used batch, free-interface liquid- liquid diffusion alone, or a combination with vapor diffusion. Results demonstrated growth of crystals of test proteins such as thaumatin and glucose isomerase, as well as protein studied in our laboratory such dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Once the solutions were loaded in capillaries, they were stored in the tubes in frozen state at cryogenic temperatures until the desired time of activation of crystallization experiments.

  14. Control of electroosmosis in coated quartz capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Blair J.; Van Alstine, James; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of various coatings for controlling the electroosmotic fluid flow that hinders electrophoretic processes is studied using analytical particle microelectrophoresis. The mobilities of 2-micron diameter glass and polystyrene latex spheres (exhibiting both negative and zero effective surface charge) were measured in 2-mm diameter quartz capillaries filled with NaCl solutions within the 3.5-7.8 pH range. It is found that capillary inner surface coatings using 5000 molecular weight (or higher) poly(ethylene glycol): significantly reduced electroosmosis within the selected pH range, were stable for long time periods, and appeared to be more effective than dextran, methylcellulose, or silane coatings.

  15. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  16. A Rare Association of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgia: Pontine Capillary Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Erdal; Arslan, Sabina; Unal-Cevik, Isin; Karli Oguz, Kader; Tezer, F Irsel

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of pontine capillary telangiectasia in a 43-year-old woman with a clinical diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. The possible association with pontine capillary telangiectasia and trigeminal autonomic cephalgia is discussed. PMID:25963152

  17. Fiber optic based multisensor to brain neurons in awake animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zheng; Lin, Shuzhi

    1995-02-01

    The fibeated broptic-based multisensor was made of quartz optic fiber capillary with an outer diameter of 250 micrometers and an inner diameter of 10 micrometers through two methods: a capillary and the parallel capillary with another piece of optic fiber. There was a thin layer of tungsten membrane (thickness 1 micrometers ) around the outer surface of the optic fiber or capillary. The metal membrane worked as a micro electrode or an electro-osmosis electrode. Nitrogen laser beam and laser-fluorescent pulses were guided in two ways through optic fiber or the wall of the capillary. The advantage of one capillary was its small tip and measurement of different physiological indices in the same site, but the intensity of laser-fluorescent pulses was diminished by electro-osmosis flow; the parallel optic fiber and capillary avoided the shortage, but the device tip was bigger than a capillary. The multisensor was used to inquire into cognitive brain mechanism in awake animals by simultaneous recording of neuron activities (neuron firing), neuron metabolism rate (laser-fluorescent pulses), and biochemical events through microelectrophore in vivo and field effect electro-osmosis analysis at situ. The effects of nitric oxide biosynthesis-related compounds on neuron efficiency of the cortex were investigated by the multisensor.

  18. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Yonker, Clement R.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Franz, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube.

  19. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, J.C.; Yonker, C.R.; Zemanian, T.S.; Franz, J.A.

    1995-11-21

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube. 13 figs.

  20. Cellular pathways of energy metabolism in the brain: is glucose used by neurons or astrocytes?

    PubMed

    Nehlig, Astrid; Coles, Jonathan A

    2007-09-01

    Most techniques presently available to measure cerebral activity in humans and animals, i.e. positron emission tomography (PET), autoradiography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging, do not record the activity of neurons directly. Furthermore, they do not allow the investigator to discriminate which cell type is using glucose, the predominant fuel provided to the brain by the blood. Here, we review the experimental approaches aimed at determining the percentage of glucose that is taken up by neurons and by astrocytes. This review is integrated in an overview of the current concepts on compartmentation and substrate trafficking between astrocytes and neurons. In the brain in vivo, about half of the glucose leaving the capillaries crosses the extracellular space and directly enters neurons. The other half is taken up by astrocytes. Calculations suggest that neurons consume more energy than do astrocytes, implying that astrocytes transfer an intermediate substrate to neurons. Experimental approaches in vitro on the honeybee drone retina and on the isolated vagus nerve also point to a continuous transfer of intermediate metabolites from glial cells to neurons in these tissues. Solid direct evidence of such transfer in the mammalian brain in vivo is still lacking. PET using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose reflects in part glucose uptake by astrocytes but does not indicate to which step the glucose taken up is metabolized within this cell type. Finally, the sequence of metabolic changes occurring during a transient increase of electrical activity in specific regions of the brain remains to be clarified. PMID:17659529

  1. Cellular pathways of energy metabolism in the brain: is glucose used by neurons or astrocytes?

    PubMed

    Nehlig, Astrid; Coles, Jonathan A

    2007-09-01

    Most techniques presently available to measure cerebral activity in humans and animals, i.e. positron emission tomography (PET), autoradiography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging, do not record the activity of neurons directly. Furthermore, they do not allow the investigator to discriminate which cell type is using glucose, the predominant fuel provided to the brain by the blood. Here, we review the experimental approaches aimed at determining the percentage of glucose that is taken up by neurons and by astrocytes. This review is integrated in an overview of the current concepts on compartmentation and substrate trafficking between astrocytes and neurons. In the brain in vivo, about half of the glucose leaving the capillaries crosses the extracellular space and directly enters neurons. The other half is taken up by astrocytes. Calculations suggest that neurons consume more energy than do astrocytes, implying that astrocytes transfer an intermediate substrate to neurons. Experimental approaches in vitro on the honeybee drone retina and on the isolated vagus nerve also point to a continuous transfer of intermediate metabolites from glial cells to neurons in these tissues. Solid direct evidence of such transfer in the mammalian brain in vivo is still lacking. PET using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose reflects in part glucose uptake by astrocytes but does not indicate to which step the glucose taken up is metabolized within this cell type. Finally, the sequence of metabolic changes occurring during a transient increase of electrical activity in specific regions of the brain remains to be clarified.

  2. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, H.S.; Quesada, M.A.; Studier, F.W.

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis. 35 figs.

  3. Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Monolithic Capillary Columns: Preparation and Chiral Applications.

    PubMed

    Adly, Frady G; Antwi, Nana Yaa; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    In this review, the recently reported approaches for the preparation of cyclodextrin-functionalized capillary monolithic columns are highlighted, with few applications in chiral separations using capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Chirality 28:97-109, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Quesada, Mark A.; Studier, F. William

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis.

  5. Application of CHESS single-bounce capillaries at synchrotron beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Szebenyi, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Woll, A.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Finkelstein, K.; Dale, D.; Wang, Y.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gillilan, R.; Cook, M.; Bilderback, D. H.

    2014-03-01

    Single-bounce capillaries are achromatic X-ray focusing optics that can provide efficient and high demagnification focusing with large numerical apertures. Capillary fabrication at CHESS can be customized according to specific application requirements. Exemplary applications are reviewed in this paper, as well as recent progress on condensers for high-resolution transmission X-ray microscopy and small focal size capillaries.

  6. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials.

  12. Interaction of light particles with capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; DuBois, R. D.

    2013-04-01

    The possible similarities and differences between the transmission of slow highly charged ions and light particles, like positrons and electrons, through a single cylindrical, tapered glass capillary with large aspect ratio are studied. We address the question whether the guiding-effect is observable for low intensity positron beams.

  13. Using Capillary Flows to Pattern Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Craig, Kate; Scherer, Axel

    2006-03-01

    One can appreciate how capillary forces cause unexpected patterns and shapes by looking at a soap bubble. Pattern formation by surface tension is seen in ring patterns of coffee stains, fingering patterns in Hele-Shaw cells, ordering of two dimensional micro-sphere crystals, combing of DNA and skeleton formation in marine creatures called radiolarians. Though comman, problems involving the understanding and control of the self-assembly mechanism need to be resolved before using capillary forces as a practical lithographic tool. Here, we report capillary flows create line patterns in evaporating liquids between closely spaced parallel plates. The widths of these lines range from a few microns to a few nanometers. Deliberate patterning of such lines requires pinning of the contact line and the presence of foaming surfactants. The position and type of line can be controlled with artificial pinning points and varying solutes respectively, and large-scale photolithography can be used to guide and control the definition of nanostructures. We provide ``proof of principle'' demonstrations of this method's application by creating lines of colloidal quantum dots and micro-spheres. This represents the first step in using capillary phenomena to create controlled, self--assembling, one-dimensional wire-like structures

  14. Imbibition of ``Open Capillary'': Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Marie; Kawano, Ryuji; Kamiya, Koki; Okumura, Ko

    2015-11-01

    Control or transportation of small amount of liquid is one of the most important issues in various contexts including medical sciences or pharmaceutical industries to fuel delivery. We studied imbibition of ``open capillary'' both experimentally and theoretically, and found simple scaling laws for both statics and dynamics of the imbibition, similarly as that of imbibition of capillary tubes. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of ``precursor film,'' which developed ahead of the imbibing front, and the dynamics of it is described well by another scaling law for capillary rise in a corner. Then, to show capabilities of open capillaries, we demonstrated two experiments by fabricating micro mixing devices to achieve (1) simultaneous multi-color change of the Bromothymol blue (BTB) solution and (2) expression of the green florescent protein (GFP). This research was partly supported by ImPACT Program of Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (Cabinet Office, Government of Japan). M. T. is supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  15. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials. PMID:25646688

  16. Analytical biotechnology: Capillary electrophoresis and chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, C.; Nikelly, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The papers describe the separation, characterization, and equipment required for the electrophoresis or chromatography of cyclic nucleotides, pharmaceuticals, therapeutic proteins, recombinant DNA products, pheromones, peptides, and other biological materials. One paper, On-column radioisotope detection for capillary electrophoresis, has been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  18. Granulomatous Amebic Encephalitis in a Patient with AIDS: Isolation of Acanthamoeba sp. Group II from Brain Tissue and Successful Treatment with Sulfadiazine and Fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Seijo Martinez, M.; Gonzalez-Mediero, G.; Santiago, P.; Rodriguez de Lope, A.; Diz, J.; Conde, C.; Visvesvara, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    A patient with AIDS, treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, presented with confusion, a hemifield defect, and a mass lesion in the right occipital lobe. A brain biopsy confirmed granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) due to Acanthamoeba castellanii. The patient was treated with fluconazole and sulfadiazine, and the lesion was surgically excised. This is the first case of AIDS-associated GAE responding favorably to therapy. The existence of a solitary brain lesion, absence of other sites of infection, and intense cellular response in spite of a very low CD4 count conditioned the favorable outcome. We review and discuss the diagnostic microbiologic options for the laboratory diagnosis of infections due to free-living amebae. PMID:11015431

  19. Recent advances of ionic liquids and polymeric ionic liquids in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Liu, Shujuan; Guo, Yong; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2014-08-29

    Ionic liquids (ILs) and polymeric ionic liquids (PILs) with unique and fascinating properties have drawn considerable interest for their use in separation science, especially in chromatographic techniques. In this article, significant contributions of ILs and PILs in the improvement of capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are described, and a specific overview of the most relevant examples of their applications in the last five years is also given. Accordingly, some general conclusions and future perspectives in these areas are discussed.

  20. Dynamics of a capillary invasion in a closed-end capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hosub; Tripathi, Anubhav; Lee, Jinkee

    2014-11-01

    The position of fluid invasion in an open capillary increases as the square root of time and ceases when the capillary and hydrostatic forces are balanced, when viscous and inertia terms are negligible. Although this fluid invasion into open-end capillaries has been well described, detailed studies of fluid invasion in closed-end capillaries have not been explored thoroughly. Thus, we demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, a fluid invasion in closed-end capillaries, where the movement of the meniscus and the invasion velocity are accompanied by adiabatic gas compression inside the capillary. Theoretically, we found the fluid oscillations during invasion at short time scales by solving the one dimensional momentum balance. This oscillatory motion is evaluated in order to determine which physical forces dominate the different conditions, and is further described by a damped driven harmonic oscillator model. However, this oscillating motion is not observed in the experiments. This inconsistency is due to the following; first, a continuous decrease in the radius of the curvature caused by decreasing the invasion velocity and increasing pressure inside the close-ended capillary, and second, the shear stress increase in the short time scale by the plug like velocity profile within the entrance length. The viscous term of modified momentum equation can be written as K8/μl rc2dl/dt by using the multiplying factor K, which represents the increase of shear stress. The K is 7.3, 5.1 and 4.8 while capillary aspect ratio χc is 740, 1008 and 1244, respectively.

  1. Isolation and structural characterization of a novel peptide related to gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone from the brain of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum.

    PubMed

    Salzet, M; Wattez, C; Bulet, P; Malecha, J

    1994-07-01

    This paper reports the purification of a novel pro-opiomelanocortin derivative peptide (a gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone-like (gamma-MSH-like) molecule) from the brain of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum. After reverse-phase HPLC purification, the sequence of the gamma-MSH-like peptide (YVMGHFRWDKFamide) was established by a combination of automated Edman degradation, electrospray mass spectrometry measurement, enzymatic treatment and co-elution experiments in reverse-phase HPLC with synthetic peptides.

  2. Malignant Hemispheric Cerebral Infarction Associated with Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kei; Mikami, Takeshi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Aisaka, Wakiko; Irifune, Hideto; Narimatsu, Eichi

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS) is a rare condition that is characterized by unexplained episodic capillary hyperpermeability due to a shift of fluid and protein from the intravascular to the interstitial space. This results in diffuse general swelling, fetal hypovolemic shock, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. Although ISCLS rarely induces cerebral infarction, we experienced a patient who deteriorated and was comatose as a result of massive cerebral infarction associated with ISCLS. In this case, severe hypotensive shock, general edema, hemiparesis, and aphasia appeared after serious antecedent gastrointestinal symptoms. Progressive life-threatening ischemic cerebral edema required decompressive hemicraniectomy. The patient experienced another episode of severe hypotension and limb edema that resulted in multiple extremity compartment syndrome. Treatment entailed forearm and calf fasciotomies. Cerebral edema in the ischemic brain progresses rapidly in patients suffering from ISCLS. Strict control of fluid volume resuscitation and aggressive diuretic therapy may be needed during the post-leak phase of fluid remobilization. PMID:24163674

  3. RASA1 analysis guides management in a family with capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Flore, Leigh Anne; Leon, Eyby; Maher, Tom A.; Milunsky, Jeff M.

    2012-01-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM; MIM 60354) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multifocal cutaneous capillary malformations, often in association with fast-flow vascular lesions, which may be cutaneous, subcutaneous, intramuscular, intraosseus, or cerebral arteriovenous malformations or arteriovenous fistulas. CM-AVM results from heterozygous mutations in the RASA1 gene. Capillary malformations of the skin are common, and clinical examination alone may not be able to definitively diagnose-or exclude- CM-AVM. We report a family in which the proband was initially referred for a genetic evaluation in the neonatal period because of the presence of a cardiac murmur and minor dysmorphic features. Both he and his mother were noted to have multiple capillary malformations on the face, head, and extremities. Echocardiography revealed dilated head and neck vessels and magnetic resonance imaging and angiography of the brain revealed a large infratentorial arteriovenous fistula, for which he has had two embolization procedures. RASA1 sequence analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation, confirming his diagnosis of CM-AVM. We established targeted mutation analysis for the proband's mother and sister, the latter of whom is a healthy 3-year-old whose only cutaneous finding is a facial capillary malformation. This revealed that the proband's mother is also heterozygous for the RASA1 mutation, but his sister is negative. Consequently, his mother will undergo magnetic resonance imaging and angiography screening for intracranial and spinal fast-flow lesions, while his sister will require no imaging or serial evaluations. Targeted mutation analysis has been offered to additional maternal family members. This case illustrates the benefit of molecular testing in diagnosis and making screening recommendations for families with CM-AVM.

  4. RASA1 analysis guides management in a family with capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Flore, Leigh Anne; Leon, Eyby; Maher, Tom A; Milunsky, Jeff M

    2012-06-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM; MIM 60354) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multifocal cutaneous capillary malformations, often in association with fast-flow vascular lesions, which may be cutaneous, subcutaneous, intramuscular, intraosseus, or cerebral arteriovenous malformations or arteriovenous fistulas. CM-AVM results from heterozygous mutations in the RASA1 gene. Capillary malformations of the skin are common, and clinical examination alone may not be able to definitively diagnose-or exclude- CM-AVM. We report a family in which the proband was initially referred for a genetic evaluation in the neonatal period because of the presence of a cardiac murmur and minor dysmorphic features. Both he and his mother were noted to have multiple capillary malformations on the face, head, and extremities. Echocardiography revealed dilated head and neck vessels and magnetic resonance imaging and angiography of the brain revealed a large infratentorial arteriovenous fistula, for which he has had two embolization procedures. RASA1 sequence analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation, confirming his diagnosis of CM-AVM. We established targeted mutation analysis for the proband's mother and sister, the latter of whom is a healthy 3-year-old whose only cutaneous finding is a facial capillary malformation. This revealed that the proband's mother is also heterozygous for the RASA1 mutation, but his sister is negative. Consequently, his mother will undergo magnetic resonance imaging and angiography screening for intracranial and spinal fast-flow lesions, while his sister will require no imaging or serial evaluations. Targeted mutation analysis has been offered to additional maternal family members. This case illustrates the benefit of molecular testing in diagnosis and making screening recommendations for families with CM-AVM. PMID:27625812

  5. A 44-Year-Old Man with Eye, Kidney, and Brain Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Vodopivec, Ivana; Oakley, Derek H.; Perugino, Cory A.; Venna, Nagagopal; Hedley-Whyte, E. Tessa; Stone, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy (RVCL) is a rare, autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations of the three-prime repair exonuclease-1 (TREX1). The phenotypic expressions range from isolated retinal involvement to varying degrees of retinopathy, cerebral infarction with calcium depositions, nephropathy, and hepatopathy. We report a case of RVCL caused by a novel TREX1 mutation. This patient’s multisystem presentation, retinal involvement interpreted as “retinal vasculitis”, and improvement of neuroimaging abnormalities with dexamethasone led to the accepted diagnosis of a rheumatologic disorder resembling Behçet’s disease. Clinicians should consider RVCL in any patient with retinal capillary obliterations associated with tumefactive brain lesions or nephropathy. PMID:26691497

  6. CCK increases the transport of insulin into the brain.

    PubMed

    May, Aaron A; Liu, Min; Woods, Stephen C; Begg, Denovan P

    2016-10-15

    Food intake occurs in bouts or meals, and numerous meal-generated signals have been identified that act to limit the size of ongoing meals. Hormones such as cholecystokinin (CCK) are secreted from the intestine as ingested food is being processed, and in addition to aiding the digestive process, they provide a signal to the brain that contributes to satiation, limiting the size of the meal. The potency of CCK to elicit satiation is enhanced by elevated levels of adiposity signals such as insulin. In the present experiments we asked whether CCK and insulin interact at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We first isolated rat brain capillary endothelial cells that comprise the BBB and found that they express the mRNA for both the CCK1R and the insulin receptor, providing a basis for a possible interaction. We then administered insulin intraperitoneally to another group of rats and 15min later administered CCK-8 intraperitoneally to half of those rats. After another 15min, CSF and blood samples were obtained and assayed for immunoreactive insulin. Plasma insulin was comparably elevated above baseline in both the CCK-8 and control groups, indicating that the CCK had no effect on circulating insulin levels given these parameters. In contrast, rats administered CCK had CSF-insulin levels that were more than twice as high as those of control rats. We conclude that circulating CCK greatly facilitates the transport of insulin into the brain, likely by acting directly at the BBB. These findings imply that in circumstances in which the plasma levels of both CCK and insulin are elevated, such as during and soon after meals, satiation is likely to be due, in part, to this newly-discovered synergy between CCK and insulin. PMID:27570192

  7. Method of making tapered capillary tips with constant inner diameters

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-02-17

    Methods of forming electrospray ionization emitter tips are disclosed herein. In one embodiment, an end portion of a capillary tube can be immersed into an etchant, wherein the etchant forms a concave meniscus on the outer surface of the capillary. Variable etching rates in the meniscus can cause an external taper to form. While etching the outer surface of the capillary wall, a fluid can be flowed through the interior of the capillary tube. Etching continues until the immersed portion of the capillary tube is completely etched away.

  8. The influence of artificial sealing on the capillary barrier's function.

    PubMed

    Trpkosová, Dagmar; Mls, Jirí

    2010-01-01

    Regulations for the sealing of landfill sites require two independent sealing components. To satisfy this requirement, the combined capillary barrier was developed using impermeable sheeting placed between the capillary layer and the capillary block of the traditional capillary barrier. In this study, a numerical model is introduced based on hydraulic characteristics obtained by means of measurements of samples of capillary barrier materials. To make a comparison possible, samples of a laboratory investigated barrier were measured. Two laboratory experiments with a simple and a combined capillary barrier were repeated using the developed numerical model and good agreement between computed and measured results was found. Subsequently, the model was used for investigating the effect of failure of the artificial sheeting on the capillary barrier's efficiency. The obtained results are presented and discussed. PMID:19853432

  9. Capillary leakage in travelers with dengue infection: implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Eyal; Heyman, Zahava; Bin, Hanna; Schwartz, Eli

    2012-03-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is characterized by the presence of a capillary leak syndrome. Its pathogenesis is presumed to differ from that of classical dengue fever (DF) and to be associated with secondary dengue infection. Returning travelers given a diagnosis of DF were evaluated for capillary leakage with abdominal sonography. Data were compared between travelers with primary/secondary infection defined by epidemiologic and serologic parameters. A total of 12 (34.3%) of 35 patients had sonographic signs of capillary leakage. Most (85%) patients with capillary leakage had classical DF. Capillary leak was diagnosed in 32% of primary dengue cases and in 40% of secondary dengue cases (P = 0.69). The two patients given a diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever had primary infections. The high prevalence of capillary leakage among travelers, most of them with primary exposure to dengue, calls into question the importance of secondary infection in causing capillary leakage in dengue infection.

  10. Capillary Penetration into Inclined Circular Glass Tubes.

    PubMed

    Trabi, Christophe L; Ouali, F Fouzia; McHale, Glen; Javed, Haadi; Morris, Robert H; Newton, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    The spontaneous penetration of a wetting liquid into a vertical tube against the force of gravity and the imbibition of the same liquid into a horizontal tube (or channel) are both driven by capillary forces and described by the same fundamental equations. However, there have been few experimental studies of the transition from one orientation to the other. We report systematic measurements of capillary penetration of polydimethylsiloxane oils of viscosities 9.6, 19.2, and 48.0 mPa·s into glass capillary tubes. We first report the effect of tube radii R between 140 and 675 μm on the dynamics of spontaneous imbibition. We show that the data can be fitted using the exact numerical solution to the governing equations and that these are similar to fits using the analytical viscogravitational approximation. However, larger diameter tubes show a rate of penetration slower than expected using an equilibrium contact angle and the known value of liquid viscosity. To account for the slowness, an increase in viscosity by a factor (η/ρ)(scaling) is needed. We show full agreement with theory requires the ratio R/κ(-1) ∼ 0.1 or less, where κ(-1) is the capillary length. In addition, we propose an experimental method that enables the determination of the dynamic contact angle during imbibition, which gives values that agree with the literature values. We then report measurements of dynamic penetration into the tubes of R = 190 and 650 μm for a range of inclination angles to the horizontal, φ, from 5 to 90°. We show that capillary penetration can still be fitted using the viscogravitational solution, rather than the Bosanquet solution which describes imbibition without gravity, even for inclination angles as low as 10°. Moreover, at these low angles, the effect of the tube radius is found to diminish and this appears to relate to an effective capillary length, κ(-1)(φ) = (γ(LV)/ρg sin φ)(1/2). PMID:26738739

  11. Blood-tissue barrier of human brain tumors: correlation of scintigraphic and ultrastructural finding: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Kohn, S.; Nir, I.

    1984-04-01

    Through the first 2 hr, uptake of (Tc-99m)pertechnetate and of Co-57 bleomycin were assessed in 29 brain tumors and were correlated with the ultrastructure of the tumor's capillary endothelium. No difference in uptake was found between the two tracers. Permeability of brain tumors to these agents was found to be governed by the same ultrastructural features that determine permeability in experimental brain tumors: the type of junction between contiguous endothelial cells in the capillaries. That uptake of (Tc-99m)pertechnetate and of Co-57 bleomycin depends on tumor capillary ultrastructure (which determines the permeability) suggests the possibility of the use of radiopharmaceuticals as in vivo indicators of tumor permeability. Brain scintigraphy may help to assess brain-tumor availability to non-lipid-soluble chemotherapeutic drugs.

  12. Pericytes: brain-immune interface modulators

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Cabañas-Morales, Adrian M.; Gómez-Gónzalez, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The premise that the central nervous system is immune-privileged arose from the fact that direct contact between immune and nervous cells is hindered by the blood–brain barrier. However, the blood–brain barrier also comprises the interface between the immune and nervous systems by secreting chemo-attractant molecules and by modulating immune cell entry into the brain. The majority of published studies on the blood–brain barrier focus on endothelial cells (ECs), which are a critical component, but not the only one; other cellular components include astroglia, microglia, and pericytes. Pericytes are poorly studied in comparison with astrocytes or ECs; they are mesenchymal cells that can modify their ultrastructure and gene expression in response to changes in the central nervous system microenvironment. Pericytes have a unique synergistic relationship with brain ECs in the regulation of capillary permeability through secretion of cytokines, chemokines, nitric oxide, matrix metalloproteinases, and by means of capillary contraction. Those pericyte manifestations are related to changes in blood–brain barrier permeability by an increase in endocytosis-mediated transport and by tight junction disruption. In addition, recent reports demonstrate that pericytes control the migration of leukocytes in response to inflammatory mediators by up-regulating the expression of adhesion molecules and releasing chemo-attractants; however, under physiological conditions they appear to be immune-suppressors. Better understanding of the immune properties of pericytes and their participation in the effects of brain infections, neurodegenerative diseases, and sleep loss will be achieved by analyzing pericyte ultrastructure, capillary coverage, and protein expression. That knowledge may provide a mechanism by which pericytes participate in the maintenance of the proper function of the brain-immune interface. PMID:24454281

  13. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  14. Qualitative and quantitative metabolomic investigation of single neurons by capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Peter; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Aerts, Jordan T.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell mass spectrometry (MS) empowers metabolomic investigations by decreasing analytical dimensions to the size of individual cells and subcellular structures. We describe a protocol for investigating and quantifying metabolites in individual isolated neurons using single-cell capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to electrospray ionization time-of-flight MS. The protocol requires ~2 h for sample preparation, neuron isolation, and metabolite extraction, and 1 h for metabolic measurement. The approach was used to detect more than 300 distinct compounds in the mass range of typical metabolites in various individual neurons (25–500-µm in diameter) isolated from the sea slug (Aplysia californica) central and rat (Rattus norvegicus) peripheral nervous systems. A subset of identified compounds was sufficient to reveal metabolic differences among freshly isolated neurons of different types and changes in the metabolite profiles of cultured neurons. The protocol can be applied to the characterization of the metabolome in a variety of smaller cells and/or subcellular domains. PMID:23538882

  15. [Functional morphology of endonasal blood capillaries].

    PubMed

    Grevers, G

    1989-01-01

    Harvey (1628) was the first to describe the blood circulatory system. 50 years later, the capillary system was discovered by Marcello Malpighi as a link between arteries and veins. Since then, the microvascular network has been examined abundantly by means of various morphological and physiological techniques. During the last decades the development of the technical equipment enabled us to receive detailed informations on the structural and ultrastructural aspects of the vasculature and--particularly--the capillary endothelium. New electron microscopic investigations on the behaviour of this special cell system. In the present study we combined our own morphological results on the endonasal microcirculatory system--using different morphological techniques--to interpret these anatomical finding under functional aspects.

  16. Separation of Peptides by Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are an important class of analytes in chemistry, biochemistry, food chemistry, as well as medical and pharmaceutical sciences including biomarker analysis in peptidomics and proteomics. As a high-resolution technique, capillary electrophoresis (CE) is well suited for the analysis of polar compounds such as peptides. In addition, CE is orthogonal to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as both techniques are based on different physicochemical separation principles. For the successful development of peptide separations by CE, operational parameters including puffer pH, buffer concentration and buffer type, applied voltage, capillary dimensions, as well as background electrolyte additives such as detergents, ion-pairing reagents, cyclodextrins, (poly)amines, and soluble polymers have to be considered and optimized. PMID:27645745

  17. Immunogold-silver staining by capillary action.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R K; Braye, S G; Crouch, R L

    1989-12-01

    The authors have developed an improved method for immunogold-silver staining of paraffin sections. Using a manual capillary action staining system, they were able to simplify the technical aspects of the procedure, permitting rapid processing of large batches of slides with better reproducibility. Background staining was decreased by use of buffers containing a detergent. The use of a light-stable silver reagent permitted greater control of the enhancement stage. The method yielded a high degree of contrast with negligible nonspecific staining. Sensitivity was comparable to that obtained with conventional enzymatic immunostaining. However, the authors noted that trypsinization of sections was rendered unnecessary for those antigens for which such pretreatment was usually required, and the need for special fixatives could be eliminated. The method was also applicable to immunostaining of frozen sections. Immunogold-silver staining by capillary action deserves consideration as an alternative to existing immunohistochemical methods in diagnostic histopathology.

  18. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium.

    PubMed

    Perrard, S; Deike, L; Duchêne, C; Pham, C-T

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum.

  19. Wetting kinetics in surface capillary grooves

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.R.; Yost, F.G.; Mann, J.A. Jr.

    1996-10-02

    For V-shaped surface grooves in copper, we have obtained the capillary driven flow kinetics for two liquids: unreactive 1-heptanol and eutectic Sn/Pb solder, which is known to react with copper. We show experimentally that the flow of both liquids in these grooves follows the classical Washburn kinetics, i.e., a Poiseuille flow process, modified to include a dynamic contact angle. Because no subsidiary processes are necessary to fit our data, we propose that in this geometry capillary driven solder flow is too rapid for reaction to provide an appreciable effect. Thus, to observe the effects of Sn/Cu reaction kinetics, the flow rate must be decreased, which the present experiments allow through redesign of the groove geometry and size. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Geometry and wetting of capillary folding.

    PubMed

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Lauga, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Capillary forces are involved in a variety of natural phenomena, ranging from droplet breakup to the physics of clouds. The forces from surface tension can also be exploited in industrial applications provided the length scales involved are small enough. Recent experimental investigations showed how to take advantage of capillarity to fold planar structures into three-dimensional configurations by selectively melting polymeric hinges joining otherwise rigid shapes. In this paper we use theoretical calculations to quantify the role of geometry and fluid wetting on the final folded state. Considering folding in two and three dimensions, studying both hydrophilic and hydrophobic situations with possible contact-angle hysteresis, and addressing the shapes to be folded to be successively infinite, finite, curved, kinked, and elastic, we are able to derive an overview of the geometrical parameter space available for capillary folding.

  1. Penetration of surfactant solutions into hydrophobic capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bain, Colin D

    2005-08-21

    The initial rise velocity of surfactant solutions in hydrophobic capillaries is independent of time (F. Tiberg, B. Zhmud, K. Hallstensson and M. von Bahr, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2000, 2, 5189). By analogy with the hydrodynamics of an overflowing cylinder, we present a steady-state solution for capillary penetration in which the velocity is determined by the adsorption kinetics at the air-water interface. Good agreement between the model predictions and experimental data of Tiberg and coworkers is obtained for the non-ionic surfactant C10E6 under the assumption of diffusion-controlled adsorption. The longer chain homologue, C14E6, shows evidence of kinetic barriers to adsorption.

  2. Iohexol in serum determined by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Shihabi, Z K; Constantinescu, M S

    1992-10-01

    Iohexol, a nonionic compound used as a contrast medium for angiography and as a measure of the glomerular filtration rate, was quantified in serum by capillary electrophoresis. Comparable results were obtained for serum samples deproteinized with acetonitrile or analyzed directly after 50-fold dilution with borate buffer. Serum samples were electrophoresed for 2.6 min at 12 kV in a borate buffer with detection at 254 nm and with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine as internal standard. Acetonitrile deproteinization gave a greater sensitivity than did sample dilution. Between-run CVs were between 4.7% and 6.7%, and within-run CVs were between 2.5 and 3.2%. Analytical recoveries were 95-105%. Results of the method compared well with those by high-performance liquid chromatography (slope 0.96, intercept 0.005 g/L). This method demonstrates the potential of capillary electrophoresis for rapid and simple quantification of small molecules.

  3. Capillary Study - Skylab Student Experiment ED-72

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment ED-72, Capillary Study, proposed by Roger G. Johnson of St. Paul, Mirnesota. Johnson theorized that capillary rise might continue to infinity in Skylab's zero-gravity environment. The behavior of fluids, particularly their flow properties in a low-gravity environment, had been important from the time that Robert H. Goddard launched his liquid-fueled rockets in the 1920's to the more sophisticated space systems of the day. It was necessary to design fluid-flow systems that would not only overcome the lack of gravity but also overcome, or take advantage of, the effect of surface tension. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  4. Capillary flow through heat-pipe wicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are obtained for the capillary-pressure limit and permeability of a fibrous wick in terms of the porosity and fiber diameter. Hysteresis in capillary pressure is included through the introduction of an empirical hysteresis constant. A partial-saturation model based on the statistical distribution of local porosity requires an additional empirical constant, the standard deviation. The theory is compared to results of a beta-ray absorption experiment that measured the liquid content of a partially saturated wick and to results of permeability measurements on partially and fully saturated wicks. A simple wick-weighing experiment is described that yields values for the empirical hysteresis constant and the standard deviation. Theoretical results are used to design an optimum wick.

  5. Electrokinetic Flow and Dispersion in Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2006-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care, and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis (which has evolved from its predecessor, slab-gel electrophoresis), the sample migrates through a single microcapillary instead of through the network of pores in a gel. A fundamental design problem is to minimize dispersion in the separation direction. Molecular diffusion is inevitable and sets a theoretical limit on the best separation that can be achieved. But in practice, there are a number of effects arising out of the interplay between fluid flow, chemistry, thermal effects, and electric fields that result in enhanced dispersion. This paper reviews the subject of fluid flow in such capillary microchannels and examines the various causes of enhanced dispersion that limit the efficiency of separation.

  6. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium.

    PubMed

    Perrard, S; Deike, L; Duchêne, C; Pham, C-T

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum. PMID:26274114

  7. High-performance capillary electrophoresis of histones

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, L.R.; London, J.E.; Valdez, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) system has been developed for the fractionation of histones. This system involves electroinjection of the sample and electrophoresis in a 0.1M phosphate buffer at pH 2.5 in a 50 {mu}m {times} 35 cm coated capillary. Electrophoresis was accomplished in 9 minutes separating a whole histone preparation into its components in the following order of decreasing mobility; (MHP) H3, H1 (major variant), H1 (minor variant), (LHP) H3, (MHP) H2A (major variant), (LHP) H2A, H4, H2B, (MHP) H2A (minor variant) where MHP is the more hydrophobic component and LHP is the less hydrophobic component. This order of separation is very different from that found in acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and in reversed-phase HPLC and, thus, brings the histone biochemist a new dimension for the qualitative analysis of histone samples. 27 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrard, S.; Deike, L.; Duchêne, C.; Pham, C.-T.

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum.

  9. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  10. Capillary precipitin typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, H; Facklam, R R; Padula, J F; Cooksey, R

    1978-01-01

    The Neufeld test is presently the method of choice for typing Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although the test is reliable and relatively easy to perform, a simpler test, not requiring microscopic examination, would facilitate large-scale testing. A capillary precipitine test has been designed and tested for its usefulness in typing pneumococci. The type-specific carbohydrate antigens were obtained from broth culture supernatants. The antigens were reacted with type-specific antisera in glass capillary pipettes. Results from 82 reference antigens and 166 antigens from diagnostic pneumococcal strains showed that the reactions ere specific, and the results agreed with Neufeld test results. These results indicate that the precipitin test is as specific as the Neufeld test. The test is easy to perform, requires small amounts of antiserum, and can be completed in a short period of time. PMID:31369

  11. Metal Ions Analysis with Capillary Zone Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ashok Kumar; Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Varinder

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has recently attracted considerable attention as a promising analytical technique for metal ion separations. Significant advances that open new application areas for capillary electrophoresis in the analysis of metal species occurred based on various auxiliary separation principles. These are mainly due to complexation, ion pairing, solvation, and micellization interactions between metal analytes and electrolyte additives, which alter the separation selectivity in a broad range. Likewise, many separation studies for metal ions have been concentrated on the use of preelectrophoresis derivatization methodology. Approaches suitable for manipulation of selectivity for different metal species including metal cations, metal complexes, metal oxoanions, and organometallic compounds, are discussed, with special attention paid to the related electrophoretic system variables using illustrative examples. PMID:27645740

  12. Capillary Electrophoresis in Food and Foodomics.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Clara; Acunha, Tanize; Valdés, Alberto; García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Simó, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Quality and safety assessment as well as the evaluation of other nutritional and functional properties of foods imply the use of robust, efficient, sensitive, and cost-effective analytical methodologies. Among analytical technologies used in the fields of food analysis and foodomics, capillary electrophoresis (CE) has generated great interest for the analyses of a large number of compounds due to its high separation efficiency, extremely small sample and reagent requirements, and rapid analysis. The introductory section of this chapter provides an overview of the recent applications of capillary electrophoresis (CE) in food analysis and foodomics. Relevant reviews and research articles on these topics are tabulated including papers published in the period 2011-2014. In addition, to illustrate the great capabilities of CE in foodomics the chapter describes the main experimental points to be taken into consideration for a metabolomic study of the antiproliferative effect of carnosic acid (a natural diterpene found in rosemary) against HT-29 human colon cancer cells. PMID:27645749

  13. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles.

  14. Capillary Leveling of Freestanding Liquid Nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilton, Mark; Couchman, Miles M. P.; Gerbelot, Cedric; Benzaquen, Michael; Fowler, Paul D.; Stone, Howard A.; Raphaël, Elie; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Salez, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    We report on the capillary-driven leveling of a topographical perturbation at the surface of a freestanding liquid nanofilm. The width of a stepped surface profile is found to evolve as the square root of time. The hydrodynamic model is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to exhibiting an analogy with diffusive processes, this novel system serves as a precise nanoprobe for the rheology of liquids at interfaces in a configuration that avoids substrate effects.

  15. Capillary-Effect Root-Environment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Bruce D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary-effect root-environment system (CERES) is experimental apparatus for growing plants in nutrient solutions. Solution circulated at slight tension in cavity filled with plastic screen and covered by porous plastic membrane. By adsorptive attraction, root draws solution through membrane. Conceived for use in microgravity of space, also finds terrestrial application in germinating seedlings, because it protects them from extremes of temperature, moisture, and soil pH and from overexposure to fertilizers and herbicides.

  16. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D'Silva, Arthur

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conducts is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer.

  17. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  18. [2012 annual review of capillary electrophoresis technology].

    PubMed

    Qu, Feng; Zhao, Xinying; Wang, Yong

    2012-12-01

    This paper reviews the capillary electrophoresis (CE) in 2012. Four international and three national conferences are included and the important reports are introduced briefly. Literatures searched from ISI Web of Science ranged in 2012.1.1 - 2012.12.1 are classified and introduced based on the biology and medicine applications as well as the use of detectors and the important analytical chemical journals.

  19. Severe reactions to Cuprophan capillary dialyzers.

    PubMed

    Popli, S; Ing, T S; Daugirdas, J T; Kheirbek, A O; Viol, G W; Vilbar, R M; Gandhi, V C

    1982-08-01

    Five severe reactions occurred in four maintenance hemodialysis patients 1 to 5 minutes after initiating dialysis with Cuprophan capillary dialyzers. All reactions were life-threatening and one resulted in death. Inadequate rinsing of the dialyzers was probably the cause of the reactions. The severe reactions were managed by immediate discontinuation of dialysis and the institution of supportive treatment. Antianaphylactic measures were also attempted, but their therapeutic effectiveness remains to be determined. PMID:7181733

  20. EUV Emission of a Pulsed Capillary Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, L. S.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    An argon-filled capillary discharge system with an inner diameter of 1 mm and a length of 10 mm is investigated as potential Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) light source. The working pressure is maintained in the range of 10-4 mbar and the discharge voltage is varied in order to obtain the maximum emission of the EUV energy. The current that flows through the capillary plasma is measured by a magnetic probe while EUV radiation from the capillary discharge is detected by two sets of EUV detector, D1 and D2. Total EUV energy of the order of milli joules is obtained in the wavelength range of 11 to 18 nm from measurement using D1. However, the total energy of the 13.5 nm radiation, as deduced from the signal of D2 is only of the order of micro joules. It is also found that the total EUV energy in the wavelength of 11 to 18 nm increases with the discharge voltage, while the total energy of the EUV radiation at 13.5 nm decreases with the discharge voltage for the current setup.

  1. Drinking in Space: The Capillary Beverage Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollman, Andrew; Weislogel, Mark; Jenson, Ryan; Graf, John; Pettit, Donald; Kelly, Scott; Lindgren, Kjell; Yui, Kimiya

    2015-11-01

    A selection from as many as 50 different drinks including coffees, teas, and fruit smoothies are consumed daily by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. For practical reasons, the drinks are generally sipped through straws inserted in sealed bags. We present the performance of a special cup designed to allow the drinking operation in much the same manner as on earth, only with the role of gravity replaced by the combined effects of surface tension, wetting, and special container geometry. One can finally `smell the coffee.' Six so-called Space Cups are currently in orbit as part of the Capillary Beverage Experiment which aims to demonstrate specific passive control of poorly wetting aqueous capillary systems through a fun mealtime activity. The mathematical fluid mechanical design process with full numerical simulations is presented alongside experimental results acquired using a drop tower and low-g aircraft before complete characterization aboard the Space Station. Astronaut commentary is both humorous and informative, but the insightful experimental results of the potable space experiment testify to the prospects of new no-moving-parts capillary solutions for certain water-based life support operations aboard spacecraft.

  2. Highly conductive, printable pastes from capillary suspensions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Monica; Koos, Erin; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-08-10

    We have used the capillary suspension phenomenon to design conductive pastes for printed electronic applications, such as front side metallization of solar cells, without non-volatile, organic additives that often deteriorate electrical properties. Adding a small amount of a second, immiscible fluid to a suspension creates a network of liquid bridges between the particles. This capillary force-controlled microstructure allows for tuning the flow behavior in a wide range. Yield stress and low-shear viscosity can be adjusted such that long-term stability is provided by inhibiting sedimentation, and, even more importantly, narrow line widths and high aspect ratios are accessible. These ternary mixtures, called capillary suspensions, exhibit a strong degree of shear thinning that allows for conventional coating or printing equipment to be used. Finally, the secondary fluid, beneficial for stability and processing of the wet paste, completely evaporates during drying and sintering. Thus, we obtained high purity silver and nickel layers with a conductivity two times greater than could be obtained with state-of-the-art, commercial materials. This revolutionary concept can be easily applied to other systems using inorganic or even organic conductive particles and represents a fundamental paradigm change to the formulation of pastes for printed electronics.

  3. The order of condensation in capillary grooves.

    PubMed

    Rascón, Carlos; Parry, Andrew O; Nürnberg, Robert; Pozzato, Alessandro; Tormen, Massimo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2013-05-15

    We consider capillary condensation in a deep groove of width L. The transition occurs at a pressure p(co)(L) described, for large widths, by the Kelvin equation p(sat) - p(co)(L) = 2σ cosθ/L, where θ is the contact angle at the side walls and σ is the surface tension. The order of the transition is determined by the contact angle of the capped end θcap; it is continuous if the liquid completely wets the cap, and first-order otherwise. When the transition is first-order, corner menisci at the bottom of the capillary lead to a pronounced metastability, determined by a complementary Kelvin equation Δp(L) = 2σ sinθcap/L. On approaching the wetting temperature of the capillary cap, the corner menisci merge and a single meniscus unbinds from the bottom of the groove. Finite-size scaling shifts, crossover behaviour and critical singularities are determined at mean-field level and beyond. Numerical and experimental results showing the continuous nature of condensation for θcap = 0 and the influence of corner menisci on adsorption isotherms are presented.

  4. Nanobubbles and the nanobubble bridging capillary force.

    PubMed

    Hampton, M A; Nguyen, A V

    2010-02-26

    Interactions between hydrophobic surfaces at nanometer separation distances in aqueous solutions are important in a number of biological and industrial processes. Force spectroscopy studies, most notably with the atomic force microscope and surface-force apparatus, have found the existence of a long range hydrophobic attractive force between hydrophobic surfaces in aqueous conditions that cannot be explained by classical colloidal science theories. Numerous mechanisms have been proposed for the hydrophobic force, but in many cases the force is an artifact due to the accumulation of submicroscopic bubbles at the liquid-hydrophobic solid interface, the so called nanobubbles. The coalescence of nanobubbles as hydrophobic surfaces approach forms a gaseous capillary bridge, and thus a capillary force. The existence of nanobubbles has been highly debated over the last 15 years. To date, experimental evidence is sound but a theoretical understanding is still lacking. It is the purpose of this review to bring together the many experimental results on nanobubbles and the resulting capillary force in order to clarify these phenomena. A review of pertinent nanobubble stability and formation theories is also presented.

  5. Highly conductive, printable pastes from capillary suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Monica; Koos, Erin; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    We have used the capillary suspension phenomenon to design conductive pastes for printed electronic applications, such as front side metallization of solar cells, without non-volatile, organic additives that often deteriorate electrical properties. Adding a small amount of a second, immiscible fluid to a suspension creates a network of liquid bridges between the particles. This capillary force-controlled microstructure allows for tuning the flow behavior in a wide range. Yield stress and low-shear viscosity can be adjusted such that long-term stability is provided by inhibiting sedimentation, and, even more importantly, narrow line widths and high aspect ratios are accessible. These ternary mixtures, called capillary suspensions, exhibit a strong degree of shear thinning that allows for conventional coating or printing equipment to be used. Finally, the secondary fluid, beneficial for stability and processing of the wet paste, completely evaporates during drying and sintering. Thus, we obtained high purity silver and nickel layers with a conductivity two times greater than could be obtained with state-of-the-art, commercial materials. This revolutionary concept can be easily applied to other systems using inorganic or even organic conductive particles and represents a fundamental paradigm change to the formulation of pastes for printed electronics.

  6. The order of condensation in capillary grooves.

    PubMed

    Rascón, Carlos; Parry, Andrew O; Nürnberg, Robert; Pozzato, Alessandro; Tormen, Massimo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2013-05-15

    We consider capillary condensation in a deep groove of width L. The transition occurs at a pressure p(co)(L) described, for large widths, by the Kelvin equation p(sat) - p(co)(L) = 2σ cosθ/L, where θ is the contact angle at the side walls and σ is the surface tension. The order of the transition is determined by the contact angle of the capped end θcap; it is continuous if the liquid completely wets the cap, and first-order otherwise. When the transition is first-order, corner menisci at the bottom of the capillary lead to a pronounced metastability, determined by a complementary Kelvin equation Δp(L) = 2σ sinθcap/L. On approaching the wetting temperature of the capillary cap, the corner menisci merge and a single meniscus unbinds from the bottom of the groove. Finite-size scaling shifts, crossover behaviour and critical singularities are determined at mean-field level and beyond. Numerical and experimental results showing the continuous nature of condensation for θcap = 0 and the influence of corner menisci on adsorption isotherms are presented. PMID:23611878

  7. Microfabricated polymer chip for capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hong, J W; Hosokawa, K; Fujii, T; Seki, M; Endo, I

    2001-01-01

    A polymer (PDMS: poly(dimethylsiloxane)) microchip for capillary gel electrophoresis that can separate different sizes of DNA molecules in a small experimental scale is presented. This microchip can be easily produced by a simple PDMS molding method against a microfabricated master without the use of elaborate bonding processes. This PDMS microchip could be used as a single use device unlike conventional microchips made of glass, quartz or silicon. The capillary channel on the chip was partially filled with agarose gel that can enhance separation resolution of different sizes of DNA molecules and can shorten the channel length required for the separation of the sample compared to capillary electrophoresis in free-flow or polymer solution format. We discuss the optimal conditions for the gel preparation that could be used in the microchannel. DNA molecules were successfully driven by an electric field and separated to form bands in the range of 100 bp to 1 kbp in a 2.0% agarose-filled microchannel with 8 mm of effective separation length.

  8. Highly conductive, printable pastes from capillary suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Monica; Koos, Erin; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    We have used the capillary suspension phenomenon to design conductive pastes for printed electronic applications, such as front side metallization of solar cells, without non-volatile, organic additives that often deteriorate electrical properties. Adding a small amount of a second, immiscible fluid to a suspension creates a network of liquid bridges between the particles. This capillary force-controlled microstructure allows for tuning the flow behavior in a wide range. Yield stress and low-shear viscosity can be adjusted such that long-term stability is provided by inhibiting sedimentation, and, even more importantly, narrow line widths and high aspect ratios are accessible. These ternary mixtures, called capillary suspensions, exhibit a strong degree of shear thinning that allows for conventional coating or printing equipment to be used. Finally, the secondary fluid, beneficial for stability and processing of the wet paste, completely evaporates during drying and sintering. Thus, we obtained high purity silver and nickel layers with a conductivity two times greater than could be obtained with state-of-the-art, commercial materials. This revolutionary concept can be easily applied to other systems using inorganic or even organic conductive particles and represents a fundamental paradigm change to the formulation of pastes for printed electronics. PMID:27506726

  9. Highly conductive, printable pastes from capillary suspensions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Monica; Koos, Erin; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    We have used the capillary suspension phenomenon to design conductive pastes for printed electronic applications, such as front side metallization of solar cells, without non-volatile, organic additives that often deteriorate electrical properties. Adding a small amount of a second, immiscible fluid to a suspension creates a network of liquid bridges between the particles. This capillary force-controlled microstructure allows for tuning the flow behavior in a wide range. Yield stress and low-shear viscosity can be adjusted such that long-term stability is provided by inhibiting sedimentation, and, even more importantly, narrow line widths and high aspect ratios are accessible. These ternary mixtures, called capillary suspensions, exhibit a strong degree of shear thinning that allows for conventional coating or printing equipment to be used. Finally, the secondary fluid, beneficial for stability and processing of the wet paste, completely evaporates during drying and sintering. Thus, we obtained high purity silver and nickel layers with a conductivity two times greater than could be obtained with state-of-the-art, commercial materials. This revolutionary concept can be easily applied to other systems using inorganic or even organic conductive particles and represents a fundamental paradigm change to the formulation of pastes for printed electronics. PMID:27506726

  10. Liquid motion in capillary tubes (TEXUS 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, P. J.; Maisch, E.; Siekmann, J.

    1991-02-01

    The Technological Experiments Under Microgravity (TEXUS) 3 Investigation of the free surface and the dynamics of liquids in capillary systems which aimed at predicting their behavior in porous media is summarized. This study is also relevant to certain materials science systems and liquid systems in space. The apparatus consisted of a reservoir equipped with five stand pipes. Once microgravity conditions were established, the reservoir was filled with delaminated water from a supply tank. The stand pipes served to stabilize the free surface of the liquid and to form flat menisci into which capillary glass tubes with cylindrical, sinusoidal, or conical shapes were lowered. The rise of the liquid allowed the visualization of the velocity field both in the bulk and close to the rising menisci. For comparison, the experiment was simulated on Earth using two immiscible liquids of the same density, in a Plateau setup. The menisci observed in space were less stable than those observed on Earth and deviated from the hemispherical shape, due to hydrodynamical effects. As a result of these effects, the capillary force was reduced and the liquid rise time was longer than observed on Earth. In addition, wetting aids mounted in the stand pipes increased unexpectedly the convective forces. The observations agreed well with theoretical predictions, when account is taken of the fluid velocities and the apparent contact angles in the Gauss-Laplace and Navier-Stokes equations.

  11. Increased mitochondrial ATP production capacity in brain of healthy mice and a mouse model of isolated complex I deficiency after isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Manjeri, Ganesh R; Rodenburg, Richard J; Blanchet, Lionel; Roelofs, Suzanne; Nijtmans, Leo G; Smeitink, Jan A; Driessen, Jacques J; Koopman, Werner J H; Willems, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    We reported before that the minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane is decreased in complex I-deficient mice lacking the NDUFS4 subunit of the respiratory chain (RC) (1.55 and 0.81% at postnatal (PN) 22-25 days and 1.68 and 0.65% at PN 31-34 days for wildtype (WT) and CI-deficient KO, respectively). A more severe respiratory depression was caused by 1.0 MAC isoflurane in KO mice (respiratory rate values of 86 and 45 at PN 22-25 days and 69 and 29 at PN 31-34 days for anesthetized WT and KO, respectively). Here, we address the idea that isoflurane anesthesia causes a much larger decrease in brain mitochondrial ATP production in KO mice thus explaining their increased sensitivity to this anesthetic. Brains from WT and KO mice of the above study were removed immediately after MAC determination at PN 31-34 days and a mitochondria-enriched fraction was prepared. Aliquots were used for measurement of maximal ATP production in the presence of pyruvate, malate, ADP and creatine and, after freeze-thawing, the maximal activity of the individual RC complexes in the presence of complex-specific substrates. CI activity was dramatically decreased in KO, whereas ATP production was decreased by only 26% (p < 0.05). The activities of CII, CIII, and CIV were the same for WT and KO. Isoflurane anesthesia decreased the activity of CI by 30% (p < 0.001) in WT. In sharp contrast, it increased the activity of CII by 37% (p < 0.001) and 50% (p < 0.001) and that of CIII by 37% (p < 0.001) and 40% (p < 0.001) in WT and KO, respectively, whereas it tended to increase that of CIV in both WT and KO. Isoflurane anesthesia increased ATP production by 52 and 69% in WT (p < 0.05) and KO (p < 0.01), respectively. Together these findings indicate that isoflurane anesthesia interferes positively rather than negatively with the ability of CI-deficient mice brain mitochondria to convert their main substrate pyruvate into ATP.

  12. Manipulation of isolated brain nerve terminals by an external magnetic field using D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nano-sized particles and assessment of their effects on glutamate transport

    PubMed Central

    Krisanova, Natalia; Borуsov, Arsenii; Sivko, Roman; Ostapchenko, Ludmila; Babic, Michal; Horak, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary The manipulation of brain nerve terminals by an external magnetic field promises breakthroughs in nano-neurotechnology. D-Mannose-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts followed by oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and addition of D-mannose. Effects of D-mannose-coated superparamagnetic maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles on key characteristics of the glutamatergic neurotransmission were analysed. Using radiolabeled L-[14C]glutamate, it was shown that D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles did not affect high-affinity Na+-dependent uptake, tonic release and the extracellular level of L-[14C]glutamate in isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Also, the membrane potential of synaptosomes and acidification of synaptic vesicles was not changed as a result of the application of D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. This was demonstrated with the potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the pH-sensitive dye acridine orange. The study also focused on the analysis of the potential use of these nanoparticles for manipulation of nerve terminals by an external magnetic field. It was shown that more than 84.3 ± 5.0% of L-[14C]glutamate-loaded synaptosomes (1 mg of protein/mL) incubated for 5 min with D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (250 µg/mL) moved to an area, in which the magnet (250 mT, gradient 5.5 Т/m) was applied compared to 33.5 ± 3.0% of the control and 48.6 ± 3.0% of samples that were treated with uncoated nanoparticles. Therefore, isolated brain nerve terminals can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field using D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, while the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission are not affected. In other words, functionally active synaptosomes labeled with D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were obtained. PMID:24991515

  13. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  14. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  15. Analytical mitigation of solute-capillary interactions in double detection Taylor Dispersion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Latunde-Dada, Seyi; Bott, Rachel; Hampton, Karl; Leszczyszyn, Oksana Iryna

    2015-08-21

    Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA) in the presence of interactions between solutes and capillary walls yields inaccurate results for the diffusion coefficients of the solutes because the resulting concentration profiles are broadened and asymmetric. Whilst there are practical ways of mitigating these interactions, it is not always possible to eradicate them completely. In this paper, an analytical method of mitigating the effects of the adsorptions is presented. By observing the dispersion of the solute molecules at two detection points and using the expected relations between measured parameters, such as the standard deviations and peak amplitudes, the dispersive components of the profiles were isolated with a constrained fitting algorithm. The method was successfully applied to lysozyme and cytochrome C which adsorb onto fused silica capillary walls. Furthermore, this illustrates an advantage of using the fitting method for Taylor Dispersion Analysis. PMID:26189206

  16. Brain heart infusion broth may not be a required component for the decontamination process for the isolation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies Paratuberculosis from fecal samples using ESP broth cultures.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Sreekumari; Berghaus, Roy D; Johnson, Jill; Pence, Mel; Byrum, Beverly; Farrell, Troy; Baldwin, Charles

    2007-11-01

    Based on the authors' laboratory experience indicating that increased bacterial contamination in Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) cultures may be because of the addition of brain heart infusion broth (BHI) during the decontamination process, this study was designed to examine whether BHI is a required component for the isolation of MAP from ESP(R) broth cultures. Twenty-six National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) proficiency test samples supplied for the year 2005 were used for the comparison. Two paired sets of samples were processed in the experiment. In one set, the hexadecylpyridinium chloride monohydrate (HPC) and antibiotic brew were prepared in half strength BHI and for the other set, HPC and antibiotic brew were prepared in sterile distilled water. Culture of the 26 samples using the BHI/HPC decontamination method identified 13 (50%) positives, whereas culture using the water/HPC decontamination method identified 14 (54%) positives. The proportions of samples with a positive result did not differ significantly between the 2 decontamination methods. Although in most cases it took longer to identify a positive result by the BHI method, the difference between methods with respect to the number of days to a positive culture result was not statistically significant. Retrospective data collected from the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Ohio also suggest that inclusion of BHI in the decontamination protocol may not have any effect on MAP recovery or contamination rate. Elimination of BHI from broth cultures may increase the sensitivity of MAP isolation, and reduce the cost of testing.

  17. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  18. On-line simultaneous and rapid separation of anions and cations from a single sample using dual-capillary sequential injection-capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Adam J; Guijt, Rosanne M; Macka, Mirek; Hutchinson, Joseph P; Johns, Cameron; Hilder, Emily F; Dicinoski, Greg W; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Haddad, Paul R; Breadmore, Michael C

    2013-06-01

    A novel capillary electrophoresis (CE) approach has been developed for the simultaneous rapid separation and identification of common environmental inorganic anions and cations from a single sample injection. The method utilised a sequential injection-capillary electrophoresis instrument (SI-CE) with capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) constructed in-house from commercial-off-the-shelf components. Oppositely charged analytes from a single sample plug were simultaneously injected electrokinetically onto two separate capillaries for independent separation and detection. Injection was automated and may occur from a syringe or be directly coupled to an external source in a continuous manner. Software control enabled high sample throughput (17 runs per hour for the target analyte set) and the inclusion of an isolation valve allowed the separation capillaries to be flushed, increasing throughput by removing slow migrating species as well as improving repeatability. Various environmental and industrial samples (subjected only to filtering) were analysed in the laboratory with a 3 min analysis time which allowed the separation of 23 inorganic and small organic anions and cations. Finally, the system was applied to an extended automated analysis of Hobart Southern Water tap water for a period of 48 h. The overall repeatability of the migration times of a 14 analyte standard sample was less than 0.74% under laboratory conditions. LODs ranged from 5 to 61 μg L(-1). The combination of automation, high confidence of peak identification, and low limits of detection make this a useful system for the simultaneous identification of a range of common inorganic anions and cations for discrete or continuous monitoring applications.

  19. Capillary remodeling in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufnagel, D. E.; Mehta, D.; Harshbarger, R.; Treviranus, K.; Wang, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is a process in which collagen is laid down and the delicate capillary-alveolar relationship is disturbed. The architectural changes which occur in the capillaries, a main element of the oxygen transferring unit, are difficult to illustrate without a three-dimensional tool, such as scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, a scanning electron microscopic study was undertaken to show the capillary changes of lung fibrosis. Fibrosis was induced in rats by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. After 30 days the rats were sacrificed, and the vascular tree of the lung was cast with methacrylate. The fibrosis was patchy. The intercapillary space became wider; and some capillaries had large, irregular dilatations. Occasionally giant capillaries (up to 19 mu in diameter) were noted. The pleural and alveolar capillary diameters increased (P less than 0.01), and the branching frequency decreased (P = 0.02). The center of the capillary rings, which has been suggested to be the site of contractile interstitial cells, increased in size (P = 0.03). The appearance of irregularly shaped capillaries and an increase in diameter without a change in density of alveolar capillaries, resulting in a loss of surface area and a decrease in branching, are the main scanning electron microscopic findings of the remodeling which occurs in pulmonary capillaries in lung fibrosis. These changes may partially explain the functional derangement of this disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:2430459

  20. Polydopamine as an adhesive coating for open tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Martma, Kert; Habicht, Kaia-Liisa; Ramirez, Xochitl M; Tepp, Kersti; Käämbre, Tuuli; Volobujeva, Olga; Shimmo, Ruth

    2011-04-01

    Polydopamine (PolyD) coating was used as an adhesive layer in the preparation of biological stationary phases for open tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC). The influence of coating solution freshness, coating time, temperature and dopamine hydrochloride concentration on the PolyD layer formation was studied. The performance of the polyD coating was monitored by measuring the electro-osmotic flow in coated capillaries. Following polyD coating of the capillary, secondary layer material (e.g. cell membrane solutions, phospholipid mixtures or mitochondria) was inserted into the capillary for at least 1 h. The performance of these double-coated capillaries (a polyD layer+a biological material layer) was compared with capillaries containing the respective biological material directly attached to the capillary wall. The study reveals that the presence of polyD layer in fused silica capillaries improves the performance of lipid and membrane fragment coatings in capillaries. At the same time, the thickness of the polyD layer does not have marked impact on the secondary coatings. Analysis with test analytes demonstrated that double-coated capillaries can be applied to study membrane-drug interactions. PMID:21449069

  1. Quantitative analysis of nailfold capillary morphology in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dug-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) has been used to examine morphological and functional microcirculation changes in connective tissue diseases. It has been demonstrated that NFC patterns reflect abnormal microvascular dynamics, which may play a role in fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine NFC patterns in FM, and their association with clinical features of FM. Methods A total of 67 patients with FM, and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, were included. Nailfold capillary patterns were quantitatively analyzed using computerized NFC. The parameters of interest were as follows: number of capillaries within the central 3 mm, deletion score, apical limb width, capillary width, and capillary dimension. Capillary dimension was determined by calculating the number of capillaries using the Adobe Photoshop version 7.0. Results FM patients had a lower number of capillaries and higher deletion scores on NFC compared to healthy controls (17.3 ± 1.7 vs. 21.8 ± 2.9, p < 0.05; 2.2 ± 0.9 vs. 0.7 ± 0.6, p < 0.05, respectively). Both apical limb width (µm) and capillary width (µm) were significantly decreased in FM patients (1.1 ± 0.2 vs. 3.7 ± 0.6; 5.4 ± 0.5 vs. 7.5 ± 1.4, respectively), indicating that FM patients have abnormally decreased digital capillary diameter and density. Interestingly, there was no difference in capillary dimension between the two groups, suggesting that the length or tortuosity of capillaries in FM patients is increased to compensate for diminished microcirculation. Conclusions FM patients had altered capillary density and diameter in the digits. Diminished microcirculation on NFC may alter capillary density and increase tortuosity. PMID:26161020

  2. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  3. Choked Flows in Open Capillary Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendhal, U.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study the forced liquid flow through an open capillary channel is investigated experimentally under reduced gravity conditions (microgravity). The channel consists of two parallel plates and has two free liquid surfaces at the sides. Depending on the applied volume flux, the liquid pressure decreases in the flow direction due to flow losses. To achieve a stationary flow the difference between the liquid pressure and the ambient pressure has to be balanced by the capillary pressure of the free surface. Since the free surface can only withstand a certain difference pressure, the flow rate in the channel is limited. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the surfaces collapse at the end of the capillary channel. The aim of this investigation is to understand the mechanism of the flow rate limitation. Our thesis is, that the limitation occurs due to choking, which is known from compressible gas flows and open channel flow under normal gravity. The theory of choked flow predicts a limiting velocity corresponding to a characteristic signal velocity of the flow. Once that this critical velocity is reached the mass flow is maximal and cannot be increased further. For the open capillary channel flow we except a limiting velocity defined by the speed of longitudinal (capillary) waves. The investigations were performed in the Bremen drop tower and on board the sounding rocket TEXUS-37. For the prediction of the critical velocity an one-dimensional theoretical model taking into account the entrance pressure loss and the frictional pressure loss in the channel is developed. The experiment evaluation yields the critical velocity in the channel and the surface contour in good accuracy with the theoretical prediction. We show that the gained differential equation is of the same structure like the equations of similar compressible gas flows. The key parameter is the ratio of the liquid velocity and the characteristic wave speed which can be taken as a Weber number

  4. Nonlinear gravity-capillary water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei

    1997-11-01

    Two-dimensional gravity-capillary water waves are analyzed using a fully-nonlinear Cauchy-integral method with spectral accuracy. Standing waves are generated in experiments by vertical oscillation and measured by a non-intrusive optical system along with a wave probe. Nonlinear resonance of standing waves with non-wetting contact line effects are discussed in detail. Amplitude- dependent wave frequency and damping in a glass rectangular tank suggest a new contact-line model. A new type of sideband resonance due to modulated forcing is discovered and explained by weakly-nonlinear analysis. This analytical solution is verified by our numerical simulations and physical experiments. New standing waveforms with dimpled or sharp crests are observed in experiments and computations. These new waveforms have strong symmetry breaking in time as a result of nonlinear harmonic interaction. With increasing wave steepness, steep standing waves experience period- tripling with three distinct forms: sharp crest, dimpled or flat crest, and round crest. Significant breaking occurs in the sharp-crest mode and the dimpled-crest mode. Using a complex-demodulation technique, I find that these breaking waves are related to the same 1:2 internal resonance (harmonic interaction) that causes the new steep waveforms. Novel approaches are used to estimate the (breaking and non-breaking) wave dissipation in steep and breaking standing waves. The breaking events (spray, air entrainment, and plunging) approximately double the wave dissipation. Weak capillarity significantly affects the limiting wave height and the form of standing waves, as demonstrated by both computations and small-scale Faraday-wave experiments. Capillary ripple generation on traveling waves is shown to be significant even at moderate wave steepness. The ubiquitous horizontal asymmetry of traveling waves is shown to be critical to capillary ripple generation. Two new asymmetric modes are identified and are shown to have an

  5. Trajectory of isoelectric focusing from gels to capillaries to immobilized gradients in capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Koshel, Brooke M.; Wirth, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    This review presents the need for replacing gels in 2D separations for proteomics, where speed, high-throughput, and the ability to characterize trace level proteins or small samples are the current desires. The theme of the review is isoelectric focusing, which is a valuable tool because it pre-concentrates proteins in addition to separating with high peak capacity. The review traces the technological progress from gel IEF to cIEF to packed capillaries with immobilized gradients for cIEF. Multiple capillary techniques are progressing toward meeting the current desires, providing extremely high sensitivity with regard to concentration and to small samples, integrated automation, and high peak capacity from multiple dimensions of separation. Capillaries with immobilized pH gradients for cIEF are emerging, which will alleviate interference from ampholytes and improve reproducibility in separation times when this valuable technique can be used as one of the dimensions. PMID:22930445

  6. Capillary climb dynamics in the limits of prevailing capillary and gravity force.

    PubMed

    Bijeljic, B; Markicevic, B; Navaz, H K

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of capillary climb of a wetting liquid into a porous medium that is opposed by gravity force is studied numerically. We use the capillary network model, in which an actual porous medium is represented as a network of pores and throats, each following a predefined size distribution function. The liquid potential in the pores along the liquid interface within the network is calculated as a result of capillary and gravity forces. The solution is general, and accounts for changes in the climbing height and climbing velocity. The numerical results for the capillary climb reveal that there are at least two distinct flow mechanisms. Initially, the flow is characterized by high climbing velocity, in which the capillary force is higher than the gravity force, and the flow is the viscous force dominated. For this single-phase flow, the Washburn equation can be used to predict the changes of climbing height over time. Later, for longer times and larger climbing height, the capillary and gravity forces become comparable, and one observes a slower increase in the climbing height as a function of time. Due to the two forces being comparable, the gas-liquid sharp interface transforms into flow front, where the multiphase flow develops. The numerical results from this study, expressed as the climbing height as a power law function of time, indicate that the two powers, which correspond to the two distinct mechanisms, differ significantly. The comparison of the powers with experimental data indicates good agreement. Furthermore, the power value from the Washburn solution is also analyzed, where it should be equal to 1/2 for purely viscous force driven flow. This is in contrast to the power value of ∼0.43 that is found experimentally. We show from the numerical solution that this discrepancy is due to the momentum dissipation on the liquid interface.

  7. Multiple microvascular and astroglial 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtypes in human brain: molecular and pharmacologic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Z; Bouchelet, I; Olivier, A; Villemure, J G; Ball, R; Stanimirovic, D B; Hamel, E

    1999-08-01

    Physiologic and anatomic evidence suggest that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neurons regulate local cerebral blood flow and blood-brain barrier permeability. To evaluate the possibility that some of these effects occur directly on the blood vessels, molecular and/or pharmacologic approaches were used to assess the presence of 5-HT receptors in human brain microvascular fractions, endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures, as well as in astroglial cells which intimately associate with intraparenchymal blood vessels. Isolated microvessels and capillaries consistently expressed messages for the h5-HT1B, h5-HT1D, 5-HT1F, 5-HT2A but not 5-HT7 receptors. When their distribution within the vessel wall was studied in more detail, it was found that capillary endothelial cells exhibited mRNA for the h5-HT1D and for the 5-HT7 receptors whereas microvascular smooth muscle cells, in addition to h5-HT1D and 5-HT7, also showed polymerase chain reaction products for h5-HT1B receptors. Expression of 5-HT1F and 5-HT2A receptor mRNAs was never detected in any of the microvascular cell cultures. In contrast, messages for all 5-HT receptors tested were detected in human brain astrocytes with a predominance of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT7 subtypes. In all cultures, sumatriptan inhibited (35-58%, P < .05) the forskolin-stimulated production of cyclic AMP, an effect blocked by the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonists GR127935 and GR55562. In contrast, 5-carboxamidotryptamine induced strong increases (> or = 400%, P < .005) in basal cyclic AMP levels that were abolished by mesulergine, a nonselective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist. Only astroglial cells showed a ketanserin-sensitive increase (177%, P < .05) in IP3 formation when exposed to 5-HT. These results show that specific populations of functional 5-HT receptors are differentially distributed within the various cellular compartments of the human cortical microvascular bed, and that human brain astroglial cells are endowed with multiple 5-HT receptors

  8. Flight Testing of a Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Kobel, Mark; Bugby, David; Kroliczek, Edward; Baumann, Jane; Cullimore, Brent

    1999-01-01

    Future space-based cryogenic systems will require enhanced integration flexibility, lower weight reduced parasitic penalties, better vibration isolation, and a variety of other improvements to meet performance goals. Additionally, there is an increasing need to locate cooling sources remotely from cooled components. In the past flexible conductive links were used and worked well in most cases. However, as the transport lengths increase, conductive couplings become heavier and less effective, and must be replaced by higher performance systems. One available option, which can meet many of these future requirements, is the cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL). The development of the CCPL technology started in 1992, following the success of the room temperature CPLS. The extrapolation of CCPL technology to cryogenic temperatures offers many performance benefits, which are not currently within the reach of traditional heat pipes or conductive links. Specific advantages of the CCPL technology pertaining to cryocooler integration include: (1) greater capillary pumping pressure for improved ground testability; (2) improved mechanical isolation; (3) faster diode shutdown and lower reverse heat leaks; (4) tighter control of detector temperature; (5) variable or fixed conductance operation; and (6) ease of integration due to their flexibility. The applications of CCPL technology are numerous. Military and commercial applications include surveillance satellites, earth observing satellites, deep space observation systems, medical devices, and many other cryogenic systems. Over the past few years, several breadboard and prototype CCPLs have been built and ground tested. A prototype CCPL has demonstrated successful operation between 80K and 110K with heat loads between O.5W and 12W using nitrogen as the working fluid, and 35K and 40K with head loads of 0.25W to 3.5W using neon. In order to verify CCPL performance in a microgravity environment, a flight unit, CCPL-5, was tested

  9. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of pulmonary alveolar capillary vessels

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, I. G. S.; Ritchie, B. C.; Maloney, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The pattern of subepithelial vessels in pulmonary alveoli of rabbits has been studied using scanning electron microscopy. Alveolar capillaries form a network of interconnecting vascular rings, most of which surround the periphery of type II cells of the alveolar epithelium. Individual capillaries contributing to the formation of adjacent rings follow a corrugated course with angulations located on the sites of junction with other capillaries completing the rings; the capillaries are covered by type I epithelial cells which also extend into and form the alveolar lining at the peripheral area of the interstices of the capillary network. Single type II cells form the alveolar lining at the centre of vascular rings. The pattern of pulmonary alveolar capillaries revealed by scanning electron microscopy is thus similar to that postulated by Weibel (1963) on the basis of transmission microscopic studies. Images PMID:4731118

  11. Forced Aspiration of bubbles into a capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durth, Melanie; Clanet, Christophe; Fernandez, Juan

    2009-11-01

    One way to remove lodged bubbles in small vena is to force the bubble to be completely aspirated into a fine needle. We study the aspiration of a bubble into a vertical capillary tube, for different bubble size relative to the capillary diameter (i.e. bubble confinement) and low Bond numbers (pipette diameter << capillary length). In this case, there is a critical condition of flow rate depending on the bubble confinement and the capillary number Ca beyond which the bubble is aspirated completely into the capillary. Below this value, the bubble breaks-up forming a liquid slug at the entrance of the tube. A simple model which takes into account the draining time of the annular liquid thin film and the characteristic time of the capillary instability, explains the observed experimental results and establish the characteristic time to aspirate completely the bubble.

  12. Reshaping of intense laser pulse with a capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Lihua; Yu Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Wang Xin; Gu Yuqiu; He, X. T.

    2009-09-15

    The reshaping of intense laser pulse by vacuum capillary is studied by particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that as an intense laser pulse propagates from free space into a capillary, its profile is reshaped due to laser-plasma interaction near the entrance of capillary. As a result, the free-space mode is self-consistently converted into a capillary mode. Only the relatively low-intensity periphery of the reshaped pulse interacts with the capillary-wall plasma, so that the high-intensity center of the pulse can propagate in the narrow vacuum channel over a distance much larger than the Rayleigh length. The mechanism is then applied to reshape a radially imperfect laser pulse having two wings around the center spot. Most of the output light energy is concentrated in the center spot, and the wings are almost completely removed. That is, the quality of the laser pulse can be greatly improved by a capillary.

  13. A new electrode chamber for stable performance in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, C; Fanali, S; Bocek, P

    1999-03-01

    Prerequisite to running automated sequences of analyses in capillary electrophoresis is a stable performance of the system. The products of the electrode reaction with the running background electrolyte (BGE) may play an important role, since even the neutral products may be driven into the capillary by electroosmosis and may severely deteriorate the stability of the baseline. Here, a simple, inexpensive, and fast procedure is described for improving the stability of the performance of capillary electrophoresis using a modified vial serving as the electrode chamber for the running BGE. The modification is based on creating two separate rooms in the vial, one for the electrode and a second one for the capillary. These two rooms are connected by a cotton plug. When both rooms are filled with the running BGE, the electrolytic connection between the electrode and the capillary is ensured; however, the convective transport of the electrode reaction products into the capillary is practically eliminated.

  14. An axial approach to detection in capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    Our approach involves on-axis illumination of the compounds inside the capillary detection region and is applied to absorbance and fluorescence detection. Absorbance measurements were made by focussing an incident laser beam into one capillary end; by using signals collected over the entire length of analyte band, this enhances the analytical path length of conventional absorbance detection 60x. This instrument offers a 15x improvement in detection limits. Three fluorescence detection experiments are discussed, all of which involve insertion of an optical fiber into capillary. The first uses a high refractive index liquid phase to obtain total internal reflectance along capillary axis, this reducing light scatter. The second uses a charge-coupled device camera for simultaneous imaging of a capillary array (this may be useful in genome sequencing, etc.). The third is a study of fluid motion inside the capillary under pressure-driven and electroosmotic flow. The thesis is divided into four parts. Figs, tabs.

  15. Simian immunodeficiency virus disrupts extended lengths of the blood--brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Maclean, A G; Belenchia, G E; Bieniemy, D N; Moroney-Rasmussen, T A; Lackner, A A

    2005-10-01

    It is known that there is disruption of the blood-brain barrier during terminal AIDS encephalitis in both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected humans and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques. Much, although by no means all, of the neuropathological findings of HIV and SIV infection involves accumulation of monocytes/macrophages that have likely crossed the blood-brain barrier (BBB). There is no convincing, rigorous, demonstration of HIV (or SIV) infecting endothelial cells in vivo. However, this is not to say that HIV infection would not have any effects on the physiology of microvascular brain endothelial cells. Because of the elaborate nature of cerebral microvessels, previous studies of cerebral endothelial cells have been constrained by sectioning artifacts. Examination of freshly isolated cerebral microvessels allows investigation of extended lengths of vessels (>150 mum) without sectioning artifacts. These studies determine the changes in the expression of the tight junction protein zo-1 protein on the endothelial cells of cerebral capillaries at terminal acquired immune deficiency syndrome, demonstrating that there is a decreased expression of zo-1 protein over extended lengths of microvessels.

  16. Capillary optics for micro x-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bjeoumikhov, A.; Langhoff, N.; Bjeoumikhova, S.; Wedell, R.

    2005-06-15

    Practically achieved parameters of capillary optics are presented. A micro x-ray fluorescence (XRF) arrangement was realized by using a microfocus x-ray tube and a capillary optic. Several examples for application of micro XRF are given. It was shown that polycapillary lenses free of the 'halo effect' well suited for micro XRF of heavy elements can be manufactured. Limits of opportunities for micro XRF applications and further development for micro XRF by using capillary optics are analyzed.

  17. Cerebral oxygenation and optimal vascular brain organization

    PubMed Central

    Hadjistassou, Constantinos; Bejan, Adrian; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral vascular network has evolved in such a way so as to minimize transport time and energy expenditure. This is accomplished by a subtle combination of the optimal arrangement of arteries, arterioles and capillaries and the transport mechanisms of convection and diffusion. Elucidating the interaction between cerebral vascular architectonics and the latter physical mechanisms can catalyse progress in treating cerebral pathologies such as stroke, brain tumours, dementia and targeted drug delivery. Here, we show that brain microvascular organization is predicated on commensurate intracapillary oxygen convection and parenchymal diffusion times. Cross-species grey matter results for the rat, cat, rabbit and human reveal very good correlation between the cerebral capillary and tissue mean axial oxygen convective and diffusion time intervals. These findings agree with the constructal principle. PMID:25972435

  18. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edwards; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1991-04-09

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  19. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1996-02-20

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  20. Fluorinated ethylenepropylene copolymer as a potential capillary material in CE.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Christopher J; Yang, Wen-Chu; Johns, Cameron; Macka, Miroslav; Haddad, Paul R

    2007-10-01

    In this work, a new generation UV-transparent polymer, fluorinated ethylenepropylene copolymer (FEP) exhibiting a low degree of crystallinity, extruded in dimensions similar to the most commonly used CE capillaries of approximately 80 mum id and about 360 mum od was investigated for its use as a CE capillary. FEP is transparent down to the low-UV region, and as fluorinated polymers in general are good electrical insulators and exhibit reasonable heat conductivity, it has considerable potential as a material for electrodriven analysis in capillary or microchip formats. The FEP capillary has been characterised with regard to some important aspects for its use as a CE capillary, including its profile of EOF versus pH, as well as procedures for manipulating EOF by coating the inner capillary wall with various semipermanent and dynamic layers. The FEP capillaries were tested and compared with fused-silica capillary for the separation of inorganic and small organic ions using conditions involving direct and indirect detection in the low-UV region. Finally, advantages of the use of the FEP capillary for simultaneous detection of a mixture containing nine inorganic cations and anions using indirect photometric detection with a movable light-emitting diode (LED) detector and a novel electrolyte are demonstrated. PMID:17847133

  1. A Prediction Model of the Capillary Pressure J-Function

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W. S.; Luo, P. Y.; Sun, L.; Lin, N.

    2016-01-01

    The capillary pressure J-function is a dimensionless measure of the capillary pressure of a fluid in a porous medium. The function was derived based on a capillary bundle model. However, the dependence of the J-function on the saturation Sw is not well understood. A prediction model for it is presented based on capillary pressure model, and the J-function prediction model is a power function instead of an exponential or polynomial function. Relative permeability is calculated with the J-function prediction model, resulting in an easier calculation and results that are more representative. PMID:27603701

  2. Capillary-Condenser-Pumped Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1989-01-01

    Heat being transferred supplies operating power. Capillary-condenser-pumped heat-transfer loop similar to heat pipe and to capillary-evaporator-pumped heat-transfer loop in that heat-transfer fluid pumped by evaporation and condensation of fluid at heat source and sink, respectively. Capillary condenser pump combined with capillary evaporator pump to form heat exchanger circulating heat-transfer fluids in both loops. Transport of heat more nearly isothermal. Thermal stress in loop reduced, and less external surface area needed in condenser section for rejection of heat to heat sink.

  3. Multiple beam interference model for measuring parameters of a capillary.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiwei; Tian, Wenjing; You, Zhihong; Xiao, Jinghua

    2015-08-01

    A multiple beam interference model based on the ray tracing method and interference theory is built to analyze the interference patterns of a capillary tube filled with a liquid. The relations between the angular widths of the interference fringes and the parameters of both the capillary and liquid are derived. Based on these relations, an approach is proposed to simultaneously determine four parameters of the capillary, i.e., the inner and outer radii of the capillary, the refractive indices of the liquid, and the wall material. PMID:26368114

  4. Characterization of UV-transparent capillaries for CEC and CE.

    PubMed

    Bandilla, Dirk; Cabral, Jean-Louis; Skinner, Cameron D

    2006-08-01

    This short communication describes features of UV-transparent capillaries employed for CEC and CE. A waveguide effect was observed when using UV-transparent capillaries. Through imaging with SEM, the UV-transparent coating was found to be highly porous unlike polyimide coating, which did not exhibit any porosity at all. Prolonged exposure to several commonly employed solvents with elevated pH caused abrasion of the coating at the capillary tip but no swelling of the UV-transparent coating was observed. Lastly, four different cutting techniques were compared to obtain smooth capillary tips.

  5. A Prediction Model of the Capillary Pressure J-Function.

    PubMed

    Xu, W S; Luo, P Y; Sun, L; Lin, N

    2016-01-01

    The capillary pressure J-function is a dimensionless measure of the capillary pressure of a fluid in a porous medium. The function was derived based on a capillary bundle model. However, the dependence of the J-function on the saturation Sw is not well understood. A prediction model for it is presented based on capillary pressure model, and the J-function prediction model is a power function instead of an exponential or polynomial function. Relative permeability is calculated with the J-function prediction model, resulting in an easier calculation and results that are more representative. PMID:27603701

  6. Multiple beam interference model for measuring parameters of a capillary.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiwei; Tian, Wenjing; You, Zhihong; Xiao, Jinghua

    2015-08-01

    A multiple beam interference model based on the ray tracing method and interference theory is built to analyze the interference patterns of a capillary tube filled with a liquid. The relations between the angular widths of the interference fringes and the parameters of both the capillary and liquid are derived. Based on these relations, an approach is proposed to simultaneously determine four parameters of the capillary, i.e., the inner and outer radii of the capillary, the refractive indices of the liquid, and the wall material.

  7. Effective viscosity of magnetic nanofluids through capillaries.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    The simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature on the capillary viscosity of magnetic nanofluid is an important parameter for a new class of applications such as nanoduct flow, nanomotors, micro- and nanofluidic devices, for transformer cooling, magnetic targeted drug delivery, etc. The effective viscosity of a nanofluid is explained based on the rotation of the particles and the effect of torque on it due to an externally applied magnetic field. Two types of fluids are used here, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids. In both types of fluids, decrease in effective viscosity with temperature is observed, but in both cases the mechanism for the decrement is quite different. One is due to temperature dependence of the magnetic moment and the other is due to removal of the secondary surfactant. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids, a Curie temperature of ~80 °C is extracted from this study. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids ~65% of the secondary surfactant is removed for a change in temperature, ΔT = 40 °C. This is analogous with removal of a drug from magnetic particles for targeted drug delivery. Further, a linear dependence of effective viscosity with different capillary size and ξ (angle between magnetic field and flow direction, ξε[0,π/2]) is also observed. This linear dependence can also be a good approximation for the study of magnetic drug targeting, as in the human body the capillaries are of different sizes, and the externally applied magnetic field is not always parallel or perpendicular to the drug flow direction.

  8. Loss of alveolar membrane diffusing capacity and pulmonary capillary blood volume in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reduced gas transfer in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is traditionally attributed to remodeling and progressive loss of pulmonary arterial vasculature that results in decreased capillary blood volume available for gas exchange. Methods We tested this hypothesis by determination of lung diffusing capacity (DL) and its components, the alveolar capillary membrane diffusing capacity (Dm) and lung capillary blood volume (Vc) in 28 individuals with PAH in comparison to 41 healthy individuals, and in 19 PAH patients over time. Using single breath simultaneous measure of diffusion of carbon monoxide (DLCO) and nitric oxide (DLNO), DL and Dm were respectively determined, and Vc calculated. Dm and Vc were evaluated over time in relation to standard clinical indicators of disease severity, including brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) by echocardiography. Results Both DLCO and DLNO were reduced in PAH as compared to controls and the lower DL in PAH was due to loss of both Dm and Vc (all p < 0.01). While DLCO of PAH patients did not change over time, DLNO decreased by 24 ml/min/mmHg/year (p = 0.01). Consequently, Dm decreased and Vc tended to increase over time, which led to deterioration of the Dm/Vc ratio, a measure of alveolar-capillary membrane functional efficiency without changes in clinical markers. Conclusions The findings indicate that lower than normal gas transfer in PAH is due to loss of both Dm and Vc, but that deterioration of Dm/Vc over time is related to worsening membrane diffusion. PMID:23339456

  9. A dynamic model of oxygen transport from capillaries to tissue with moving red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Adrien; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Most oxygen required to support the energy needs of vertebrate tissues is delivered by diffusion from microvessels. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) makes blood flow in the microcirculation highly heterogeneous. Additionally, flow regulation mechanisms dynamically respond to changes in tissue energy demand. These spatiotemporal variations directly affect the supply of oxygen to parenchymal cells. Due to various limiting assumptions, current models of oxygen transport cannot fully capture the consequences of complex hemodynamic effects on tissue oxygenation and are often not suitable for studying unsteady phenomena. With our new approach based on moving RBCs, the impact of blood flow heterogeneity on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) in the tissue can be quantified. Oxygen transport was simulated using parachute-shaped solid RBCs flowing through a capillary. With the use of a conical tissue domain with radii 19 and 13 μm, respectively, our computations indicate that Po2 at the RBC membrane exceeds Po2 between RBCs by 30 mmHg on average and that the mean plasma Po2 decreases by 9 mmHg over 50 μm. These results reproduce well recent intravascular Po2 measurements in the rodent brain. We also demonstrate that instantaneous variations of capillary hematocrit cause associated fluctuations of tissue Po2. Furthermore, our results suggest that homogeneous tissue oxygenation requires capillary networks to be denser on venular side than on arteriolar side. Our new model for oxygen transport will make it possible to quantify in detail the effects of blood flow heterogeneity on tissue oxygenation in realistic capillary networks.

  10. Development of gold nanoparticle-sheathed glass capillary nanoelectrodes for sensitive detection of cerebral dopamine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingzi; Yao, Qianqian; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Li, Meina; Zhu, Anwei; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-01-15

    To develop in vivo monitoring strategies of neurotransmitters involved in brain chemistry is a challenging work for progress in understanding the roles that biomolecules play in pathology and physiology. Here we report a new type of gold nanoparticle-sheathed glass capillary nanoelectrode (Au/GCNE) for sensing cerebral dopamine. First, a size-controlled needle-type quartz capillary was pulled with a laser puller. Then, the capillary tip exterior was chemically functionalized with colloidal gold nanoparticles by the seed-mediated growth protocol. Through insulating the above tip with cathodic electrophoretic paint followed by heating to tune the exposed area of gold-nanoparticle-film, the Au/GCNE with tip apex radius ranging from ~8.9 to ~500 nm can be prepared. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and steady-state voltammetry were utilized to characterize the effective radius of nanoelectrodes. The results showed that the tip apex radius of Au/GCNE was mainly affected by the pre-pulled capillary tip, the modified AuNPs and the cathodic electrophoretic paint. By taking advantage of the modified AuNPs and the enhanced electrochemical performance of the nanoelectrode, a wide dynamic linear range from 2.0×10(-8) M to 5.6×10(-6) M with a low detection limit of 1.0×10(-8) M (S/N=3), as well as good selectivity for dopamine, were first achieved with the Nafion-modified Au/GCNE. In addition, the designed glass substrates of Au/GCNE were mechanically stronger and their sharp tips aided in membrane penetration during implantation in the in vivo experiment. As a result, the Nafion-modified Au/GCNE was successfully applied for amperometrically monitoring dopamine in the striatum of anesthetic rats.

  11. A dynamic model of oxygen transport from capillaries to tissue with moving red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Adrien; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Most oxygen required to support the energy needs of vertebrate tissues is delivered by diffusion from microvessels. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) makes blood flow in the microcirculation highly heterogeneous. Additionally, flow regulation mechanisms dynamically respond to changes in tissue energy demand. These spatiotemporal variations directly affect the supply of oxygen to parenchymal cells. Due to various limiting assumptions, current models of oxygen transport cannot fully capture the consequences of complex hemodynamic effects on tissue oxygenation and are often not suitable for studying unsteady phenomena. With our new approach based on moving RBCs, the impact of blood flow heterogeneity on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) in the tissue can be quantified. Oxygen transport was simulated using parachute-shaped solid RBCs flowing through a capillary. With the use of a conical tissue domain with radii 19 and 13 μm, respectively, our computations indicate that Po2 at the RBC membrane exceeds Po2 between RBCs by 30 mmHg on average and that the mean plasma Po2 decreases by 9 mmHg over 50 μm. These results reproduce well recent intravascular Po2 measurements in the rodent brain. We also demonstrate that instantaneous variations of capillary hematocrit cause associated fluctuations of tissue Po2. Furthermore, our results suggest that homogeneous tissue oxygenation requires capillary networks to be denser on venular side than on arteriolar side. Our new model for oxygen transport will make it possible to quantify in detail the effects of blood flow heterogeneity on tissue oxygenation in realistic capillary networks. PMID:25398979

  12. Capillary zone electrophoresis in pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Fanali, S; Cristalli, M; Nardi, A; Ossicini, L; Shukla, S K

    1990-06-01

    The paper presents a brief characterization of capillary zone electrophoresis, a modern analytical separation method with high expediency for practical applications, especially in pharmaceutical analysis. Basic theoretical considerations are presented and discussed to explain the effects of the operational parameters upon the separation efficiency and resolution of species. Descriptions of simple instrumentation and of the analytical procedure itself are given. Experimental examples are given of the separation of mixtures of pharmaceutically important compounds and of the effects of operational parameters, especially pH of BGE and voltage applied. Lastly, the practical application of CZE for analysis of isoxsuprine in commercial preparations is shown.

  13. Capillary-Pumped Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    New type of capillary-pumped heat-transfer loop primes itself at startup. Removes substantial quantities of heat like that generated by people and equipment in rooms and vehicles. Creates continuous path for its working fluid; both vapor and liquid move in same direction. Key element in operation of loop is formation of slugs of liquid, condensed from vapor and moved along loop by vapor bubbles before and after it. Both evaporator and condenser contain axial arteries carrying water. Heat entering evaporator from heat source provides energy for transport of fluid and heat. Dimensions in inches.

  14. Experimental study on capillary filling in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Cao, Bing-Yang; Wang, Wei; Yun, He-Ming; Chen, Bao-Ming

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the capillary filling kinetics of deionized water in nanochannels with heights of 50-120 nm. The measured position of the moving meniscus was proportional to the square root of time, as predicted by the LW equation. However, the extracted slopes were significantly smaller than the predictions based on the bulk properties. This unusual behavior was found to be mainly caused by the electro-viscous effect and dynamic contact angle, which was significantly larger than the static angle. In addition, when the filling distance reached about 600 μm, bubbles tended to be formed, leading to the main meniscus was almost immobile.

  15. Using capillary electrophoresis for failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.G.; Scully, H.S.; Stoner, G.E. . Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE), an advanced solution analysis technique, can be used for failure analysis of corroded components. It has high sensitivity (concentrations as low as parts-per-trillion) and can detect quantitatively a large number of ionic species. CE determined the vapor-phase attack by organic acids, mainly acetic acid, on an electrical equipment enclosure. These acids most likely originated from the seasoning of the oak pallets used to transport the manufactured items, accumulating inside the shrink-wrap film used to bind packages to the pallet.

  16. Paramecium swimming in a capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan

    2010-03-01

    Micro-organisms exhibit different strategies for swimming in complex environments. Many micro-swimmers such as paramecium congregate and tend to live near wall. We investigate how paramecium moves in a confined space as compared to its motion in an unbounded fluid. A new theoretical model based on Taylor's sheet is developed, to study such boundary effects. In experiments, paramecia are put inside capillary tubes and their swimming behavior is observed. The data obtained from experiments is used to test the validity of our theoretical model and understand how the cilia influence the locomotion of paramecia in confined geometries.

  17. Metallized Capillaries as Probes for Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A class of miniature probes has been proposed to supplant the fiber-optic probes used heretofore in some Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic systems. A probe according to the proposal would include a capillary tube coated with metal on its inside to make it reflective. A microlens would be hermetically sealed onto one end of the tube. A spectroscopic probe head would contain a single such probe, which would both deliver laser light to a sample and collect Raman or fluorescent light emitted by the sample.

  18. Microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device and method

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Peter C.; Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2000-01-01

    A capillary array electrophoresis (CAE) micro-plate with an array of separation channels connected to an array of sample reservoirs on the plate. The sample reservoirs are organized into one or more sample injectors. One or more waste reservoirs are provided to collect wastes from reservoirs in each of the sample injectors. Additionally, a cathode reservoir is also multiplexed with one or more separation channels. To complete the electrical path, an anode reservoir which is common to some or all separation channels is also provided on the micro-plate. Moreover, the channel layout keeps the distance from the anode to each of the cathodes approximately constant.

  19. Microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device and method

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Peter C.; Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2004-06-15

    A capillary array electrophoresis (CAE) micro-plate with an array of separation channels connected to an array of sample reservoirs on the plate. The sample reservoirs are organized into one or more sample injectors. One or more waste reservoirs are provided to collect wastes from reservoirs in each of the sample injectors. Additionally, a cathode reservoir is also multiplexed with one or more separation channels. To complete the electrical path, an anode reservoir which is common to some or all separation channels is also provided on the micro-plate. Moreover, the channel layout keeps the distance from the anode to each of the cathodes approximately constant.

  20. Open tubular capillary column for the separation of cytochrome C tryptic digest in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Ali, Faiz; Cheong, Won Jo

    2015-10-01

    A silica capillary of 50 μm internal diameter and 500 mm length (416 mm effective length) was chemically modified with 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenyl isocyanate in the presence of dibutyl tin dichloride as catalyst. Sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate was reacted with the terminal halogen of the bound ligand to incorporate the initiator moiety, and in situ polymerization was performed using a monomer mixture of styrene, N-phenylacrylamide, and methacrylic acid. The resultant open tubular capillary column immobilized with the copolymer layer was used for the separation of tryptic digest of cytochrome C in capillary electrochromatography. The sample was well eluted and separated into many components. The elution patterns of tryptic digest of cytochrome C were studied with respect to pH and water content in the mobile phase. This preliminary study demonstrates that open tubular capillary electrochromatography columns with a modified copolymer layer composed of proper nonpolar and polar units fabricated by reversible addition-fragmentation transfer polymerization can be useful as separation media for proteomic analysis. PMID:26289407

  1. Bacterial surface layer proteins as a novel capillary coating material for capillary electrophoretic separations.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Gordaliza, Estefanía; Stigter, Edwin C A; Lindenburg, Petrus W; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    A novel concept for stable coating in capillary electrophoresis, based on recrystallization of surface layer proteins on hydrophobized fused silica capillaries, was demonstrated. Surface layer protein A (SlpA) from Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria was extracted, purified and used for coating pre-silanized glass substrates presenting different surface wettabilities (either hydrophobic or hydrophilic). Contact angle determination on SlpA-coated hydrophobic silica slides showed that the surfaces turned to hydrophilic after coating (53 ± 5°), due to a protein monolayer formation by protein-surface hydrophobic interactions. Visualization by atomic force microscopy demonstrated the presence of a SlpA layer on methylated silica slides displaying a surface roughness of 0.44 ± 0.02 nm. Additionally, a protein layer was visualized by fluorescence microscopy in methylated silica capillaries coated with SlpA and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled. The SlpA-coating showed an outstanding stability, even after treatment with 20 mM NaOH (pH 12.3). The electroosmotic flow in coated capillaries showed a partial suppression at pH 7.50 (3.8 ± 0.5 10(-9) m(2) V(-1) s(-1)) when compared with unmodified fused silica (5.9 ± 0.1 10(-8) m(2) V(-1) s(-1)). To demonstrate the potential of this novel coating, the SlpA-coated capillaries were applied for the first time for electrophoretic separation, and proved to be very suitable for the isotachophoretic separation of lipoproteins in human serum. The separations showed a high degree of repeatability (absolute migration times with 1.1-1.8% coefficient-of-variation (CV) within a day) and 2-3% CV inter-capillary reproducibility. The capillaries were stable for more than 100 runs at pH 9.40, and showed to be an exceptional alternative for challenging electrophoretic separations at long-term use. PMID:27155306

  2. Production of high quality brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) RNA from isolated populations of rat spinal cord motor neurons obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Prachi; Premkumar, Brian; Morris, Renée

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is composed of multiple cellular elements, making it challenging to segregate one particular cell type to study their gene expression profile. For instance, as motor neurons represent only 5-10% of the total cell population of the spinal cord, meaningful transcriptional analysis on these neurons is almost impossible to achieve from homogenized spinal cord tissue. A major challenge faced by scientists is to obtain good quality RNA from small amounts of starting material. In this paper, we used Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) techniques to identify and isolate spinal cord motor neurons. The present analysis revealed that perfusion with paraformaldehyde (PFA) does not alter RNA quality. RNA integrity numbers (RINs) of tissue samples from rubrospinal tract (RST)-transected, intact spinal cord or from whole spinal cord homogenate were all above 8, which indicates intact, high-quality RNA. Levels of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or for its tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) were not affected by rubrospinal tract (RST) transection, a surgical procedure that deprive motor neurons from one of their main supraspinal input. The isolation of pure populations of neurons with LCM techniques allows for robust transcriptional characterization that cannot be achieved with spinal cord homogenates. Such preparations of pure population of motor neurons will provide valuable tools to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying spinal cord injury and neuromuscular diseases. In the near future, LCM techniques might be instrumental to the success of gene therapy for these debilitating conditions.

  3. Microbial Analysis of Escherichia coli ATCC, Lactobacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using Capillary Electrophoresis Approach.

    PubMed

    Pomastowski, Paweł; Railean-Plugaru, Viorica; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and identification of microorganisms is a challenging and important aspect in many areas of our life, beginning with medicine, ending with industry. Unfortunately, classical methods of microorganisms identification are based on time-consuming and labor-intensive approaches. Screening techniques require rapid and cheap grouping of bacterial isolates; however, modern bioanalytics demands comprehensive bacterial studies on molecular level. The new approach to the rapid identification of bacteria is to use the electromigration techniques, especially capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). CZE is an important technique used in the analysis of microorganisms. However, the analysis of microbial complexes using this technology still encounters several problems-uncontrolled aggregation and/or adhesion to the capillary surface. One way to resolve this issue is the CZE analysis of microbial cell with surface charge modification by bivalent metal ions (e.g., Ca(2+) aq, Zn aq). Under the above conditions, bacterial cells create compact aggregates, and fewer high-intensity signals are observed in electropherograms. The chapter presents the capillary electrophoresis of microbial aggregates approach with UV and one-dimensional intact cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ICM MS) detection. PMID:27645746

  4. Study on Dicarboxylic Acids in Aerosol Samples with Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Heidi; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    The research was performed to study the simultaneous detection of a homologous series of α, ω-dicarboxylic acids (C2–C10), oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and sebacic acids, with capillary electrophoresis using indirect UV detection. Good separation efficiency in 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as background electrolyte modified with myristyl trimethyl ammonium bromide was obtained. The dicarboxylic acids were ionised and separated within five minutes. For the study, authentic samples were collected onto dry cellulose membrane filters of a cascade impactor (12 stages) from outdoor spring aerosols in an urban area. Hot water and ultrasonication extraction methods were used to isolate the acids from membrane filters. Due to the low concentrations of acids in the aerosols, the extracts were concentrated with solid-phase extraction (SPE) before determination. The enrichment of the carboxylic acids was between 86 and 134% with sample pretreatment followed by 100-time increase by preparation of the sample to 50 μL. Inaccuracy was optimised for all the sample processing steps. The aerosols contained dicarboxylic acids C2–C10. Then, mostly they contained C2, C5, and C10. Only one sample contained succinic acid. In the study, the concentrations of the acids in aerosols were lower than 10 ng/m3. PMID:24729915

  5. Modulatory action of acetylcholine on the Na+-dependent action potentials in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket brain.

    PubMed

    Terazima, E; Yoshino, M

    2010-12-01

    Kenyon cells, intrinsic neurons of the insect mushroom body, have been assumed to be a site of conditioning stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) association in olfactory learning and memory. Acetylcholine (ACh) has been implicated to be a neurotransmitter mediating CS reception in Kenyon cells, causing rapid membrane depolarization via nicotinic ACh receptors. However, the long-term effects of ACh on the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the effects of ACh on Na(+) dependent action potentials (Na(+) spikes) elicited by depolarizing current injection and on net membrane currents under the voltage clamp condition in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Current-clamp studies using amphotericin B perforated-patch recordings showed that freshly dispersed cricket Kenyon cells could produce repetitive Na(+) spikes in response to prolonged depolarizing current injection. Bath application of ACh increased both the instantaneous frequency and the amplitudes of Na(+) spikes. This excitatory action of ACh on Kenyon cells is attenuated by the pre-treatment of the cells with the muscarinic receptor antagonists, atropine and scopolamine, but not by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine. Voltage-clamp studies further showed that bath application of ACh caused an increase in net inward currents that are sensitive to TTX, whereas outward currents were decreased by this treatment. These results indicate that in order to mediate CS, ACh may modulate the firing properties of Na(+) spikes of Kenyon cells through muscarinic receptor activation, thus increasing Na conductance and decreasing K conductance.

  6. Using capillary electrophoresis to characterize polymeric particles.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kathryn R; Liu, Sophia; Yu, Guo; Libby, Kara; Cubicciotti, Roger; Colyer, Christa L

    2016-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used for the characterization of a variety of polymeric micron and sub-micron particles based on size, surface functionality, and binding properties. First, a robust capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was developed for the baseline separation and quantitation of commercially available polystyrene particles with various surface modifications (including amino, carboxylate, and sulfate functional groups) and various sizes (0.2, 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0μm). The separation of DNA-templated polyacrylamide particles from untemplated particles (as used for the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine) was demonstrated. Finally, using the 29-base thrombin aptamer and thrombin protein as a model system, a study was undertaken to determine dissociation constants for the aptamer and protein in free solution and when the aptamer was conjugated to a particle, with the goal of better understanding how the use of solid substrates, like particles, affects selection and binding processes. Dissociation constants were determined and were found to be approximately 5-fold higher for the aptamer conjugated to a particle relative to that in free solution. PMID:27543386

  7. Peptide separation in hydrophilic interaction capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongjing; Jin, Wenhai; Xiao, Hua; Huang, Haiwei; Zou, Hanfa

    2003-06-01

    Separation of small peptides by hydrophilic interaction capillary electrochromatography (HI-CEC) has been investigated. The negative surface charge of a hydrophilic, strong-cation-exchange stationary phase (PolySULFOETHYL A) provided a substantial cathodic electroosmotic flow (EOF). The influence of acetonitrile content, ionic strength, mobile phase pH as well as applied voltage on the migration of the peptides was studied. Possible retention mechanisms of the peptides in HI-CEC were discussed. It was found that hydrophilic interaction between the solutes and the stationary phase played a major role in this system, especially when mobile phases with high acetonitrile content were used. However, an ion-exchange mechanism and electrophoretic mobility also affect the migration of the peptides in HI-CEC. Elution order and selectivity was proved to be different in HI-CEC and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), thus revealing the potential of HI-CEC as a complementary technique to CZE for the separation of peptides. Efficiency and selectivity of HI-CEC for the separation of peptides were demonstrated by baseline separating nine peptides in 6 min. PMID:12858379

  8. Critical Velocity in Open Capillary Channel Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosendahl, Uwe; Dreyer, Michael E.; Rath, Hans J.; Motil, Brian; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate forced liquid flows through open capillary channels with free surfaces experimentally. The experiments were performed under low gravity conditions in the Bremen Drop Tower and on board the sounding rocket TEXUS-37. Open capillary channels (vanes) are used in surface tension tanks to transport the propellant and to provide a flow path for the bubble-free liquid supply to the thrusters. Since the free surfaces can only withstand a certain pressure differential between the liquid and ambient, the flow rate in the channel is limited. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the surfaces collapse and gas is ingested into the outlet. Since experimental and theoretical data of this flow rate limitation is lacking, the safety factors for the application of vanes in surface tension tanks must be unnecessary high. The aim of the investigation is to determine the maximum liquid flow rate and the corresponding critical flow velocity. The characteristic nondimensional parameters, OHNESORGE number, and gap ratio, cover a wide range of usual vanes. For the theoretical approach a one-dimensional momentum balance was set up. The numerical solution yields the maximum volume flux and the position of the free surface in good agreement with the experiments.

  9. Capillary surface discontinuities above reentrant corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korevaar, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    A particular configuration of a vertical capillary tube for which S is the equilibrium interface between two fluids in the presence of a downward pointing gravitational field was investigated. S is the graph a function u whose domain is the (horizontal) cross section gamma of the tube. The mean curvature of S is proportional to its height above a fixed reference plane and lambda is a prescribed constant and may be taken between zero and pi/2. Domains gamma for which us is a bounded function but does not extend continuously to d gamma are sought. Simple domains are found and the behavior of u in those domains is studied. An important comparison principle that has been used in the literature to derive many of the results in capillarity is reviewed. It allows one to deduce the approximate shape of a capillary surface by constructing comparison surfaces with mean curvature and contact angle close to those of the (unknown) solution surface. In the context of nonparametric problems the comparison principle leads to height estimates above and below for the function u. An example from the literature where these height estimates have been used successfully is described. The promised domains for which the bounded u does not extend continuously to the boundary are constructed. The point on the boundary at which u has a jump discontinuity will be the vertext of a re-entrant corner having any interior angle theta pi. Using the comparison principle the behavior of u near this point is studied.

  10. Computational modelling of microfluidic capillary breakup phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Sprittles, James; Oliver, Jim

    2013-11-01

    Capillary breakup phenomena occur in microfluidic flows when liquid volumes divide. The fundamental process of breakup is a key factor in the functioning of a number of microfluidic devices such as 3D-Printers or Lab-on-Chip biomedical technologies. It is well known that the conventional model of breakup is singular as pinch-off is approached, but, despite this, theoretical predictions of the global flow on the millimetre-scale appear to agree well with experimental data, at least until the topological change. However, as one approaches smaller scales, where interfacial effects become more dominant, it is likely that such unphysical singularities will influence the global dynamics of the drop formation process. In this talk we develop a computational framework based on the finite element method capable of resolving diverse spatio-temporal scales for the axisymmetric breakup of a liquid jet, so that the pinch-off dynamics can be accurately captured. As well as the conventional model, we discuss the application of the interface formation model to this problem, which allows the pinch-off to be resolved singularity-free, and has already been shown to produce improved flow predictions for related ``singular'' capillary flows.

  11. Capillary wrinkling of thin bilayer polymeric sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jooyoung; Menon, Narayanan; Russell, Thomas

    We have investigated capillary force induced wrinkling on a floated polymeric bilayer thin sheet. The origin of the wrinkle pattern is compressional hoop stress caused by the capillary force of a water droplet placed on the floated polymeric thin sheet afore investigated. Herein, we study the effect of the differences of surface energy arising from the hydrophobicity of Polystyrene (PS Mw: 97 K, Contact Angle: 88 º) and the hydrophilicity of Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA Mw: 99K, Contact Angle: 68 º) on two sides of a bilayer film. We measure the number and the length of the wrinkles by broadly varying the range of thicknesses of top (9 nm to 550 nm) and bottom layer (25 nm to 330 nm). At the same, there is only a small contrast in mechanical properties of the two layers (PS E = 3.4 GPa, and PMMA E = 3 GPa). The number of the wrinkles is not strongly affected by the composition (PS(Top)/PMMA(Bottom) or PMMA(Top)/PS(Bottom)) and the thickness of each and overall bilayer system. However, the length of the wrinkle is governed by the contact angle of the drop on the top layer of bilayer system. We also compare this to the wrinkle pattern obtained in monolayer systems over a wide range of thickness from PS and PMMA (7 nm to 1 μm). W.M. Keck Foundation.

  12. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape.

  13. Differentiation of enantiomers by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2013-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has matured to one of the major liquid phase enantiodifferentiation techniques since the first report in 1985. This can be primarily attributed to the flexibility as well as the various modes available including electrokinetic chromatography (EKC), micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), and microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC). In contrast to chromatographic techniques, the chiral selector is mobile in the background electrolyte. Furthermore, a large variety of chiral selectors are available that can be easily combined in the same separation system. In addition, the migration order of the enantiomers can be adjusted by a number of approaches. In CE enantiodifferentiations the separation principle is comparable to chromatography while the principle of the movement of the analytes in the capillary is based on electrophoretic phenomena. The present chapter will focus on mechanistic aspects of CE enantioseparations including enantiomer migration order and the current understanding of selector-selectand structures. Selected examples of the basic enantioseparation modes EKC, MEKC, and MEEKC will be discussed. PMID:23666080

  14. Capillary Liquid Acquisition Device Heat Entrapment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hastings, L. J.; Statham, G.; Turpin, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid acquisition devices (LADs) for space-based propulsion interface directly with the feed system, which can be a significant heat leak source. Further, the accumulation of thermal energy within LAD channels can lead to the loss of subcooled propellant conditions and result in feed system cavitation during propellant outflow. Therefore, the fundamental question addressed by this program was: To what degree is natural convection in a cryogenic liquid constrained by the capillary screen meshes envisioned for LADs? Testing was first conducted with water as the test fluid, followed by LN2 tests. In either case, the basic experimental approach was to heat the bottom of a cylindrical column of test fluid to establish stratification patterns measured by temperature sensors located above and below a horizontal screen barrier position. Experimentation was performed without barriers, with screens, and with a solid barrier. The two screen meshes tested were those typically used by LAD designers, 200x1400 and 325x2300, both with Twill Dutch Weave. Upon consideration of both the water and LN2 data, it was concluded that heat transfer across the screen meshes was dependent upon barrier thermal conductivity and that the capillary screen meshes were impervious to natural convection currents.

  15. Uniaxial creep as a control on mercury intrusion capillary pressure in consolidating rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Leigh, Christi D.

    2015-09-01

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two - phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in oth er realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Mo dels for waste release scenarios in salt back - fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and vali date. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potent ial usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mech anics, using sieved run - of - mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (%7E900 psi) and temperatures to 90 o C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone "FY:15 Transport Properties of Run - of - Mine Salt Backfill - Unconsolidated to Consolidated". Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time - dependent consolidation, or creep, to various deg rees. Creep volume strain - time relations obey simple log - time behavior through the range of porosities (%7E50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as

  16. Capillary electrophoresis investigations of pET3aPAI-1 DNA involving optimized restriction digestion, laser-induced fluorescence detection, and micropreparative separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepaniak, Michael J.; Stebbins, Michael; Todd, April; Gibson, Timothy; Peterson, Cynthia; Diack, Moustopha

    1998-05-01

    This work centers around developing methodologies to isolate the PAI-1 coding sequence of the DNA plasmid pET3a-PAI-1. Size Selective Capillary Electrophoresis (SSCE), using entangled polymer filled small i.d. capillaries, is used to develop digestion conditions (time and enzyme concentration) that provide single cuts (at variable positions) of the plasmid using BstYI restriction enzyme. After obtaining optimum partial digest conditions for this enzyme, digestion with Ndel will produce a mixture of fragments that includes the fragment (1354 bp) which contains the intact region of interest. Sensitive detection is achieved via laser induced fluorescence using running buffers containing intercalating dye. Using small i.d. capillary conditions as a starting point, the SSCE system is increased to the micro-preparative scale using various larger i.d. capillaries. The effects of capillary diameter, applied voltage, injection amount, and sample buffer concentration on separation performance are studied. Subsequently, single or limited numbers of injections of the single cut sample using a relatively large i.d. capillary should prove adequate material for digestion with Ndel prior to PCR amplification of the 1354 bp fragment.

  17. Rapid Screening of Complex Chemical Samples via Capillary Array Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Anex; D. W. Neyer

    1998-11-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a two-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that developed instrumentation and methods for capillary array analysis. During the course of this project, a new capillary array electrochromatography instrument was developed to perform eight simultaneous separations and provide complementary chromatographic information from each column on a single sample.

  18. Capillary-venous malformation in the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Uihlein, Lily Changchien; Liang, Marilyn G; Fishman, Steven J; Alomari, Ahmad I; Mulliken, John B

    2015-01-01

    We present a group of patients with regional capillary malformations of the upper limbs and few additional findings other than prominent veins. We believe that this entity is the upper extremity equivalent of capillary-venous malformation of the lower limb and, likewise, belongs at the minor end of the spectrum of vascular disorders with overgrowth. PMID:25557931

  19. CD105 expression in oral capillary hemangiomas and cavernous hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Tsuchiya, Motomi; Nomoto, Shouta; Matsue, Yasuyoshi; Nishikawa, Yohichi; Takamura, Tsuyoshi; Oki, Hidero; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    Capillary hemangioma (capillary lobular hemangioma) and cavernous hemangioma (venous malformation) are relatively common oral tumors/malformations and are characterized by increased numbers of normal and abnormal blood vessels. However, the causes of these lesions are not well understood. CD105 (endoglin) is predominantly expressed in proliferating blood endothelial cells (ECs). We analyzed expressions of CD105, CD34, von Willebrand factor, Ki-67, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A in 31 capillary hemangiomas and 34 cavernous hemangiomas. Staining scores were calculated as the product of the proportion score and intensity score. Morphologically normal oral mucosa specimens (n = 10) were simultaneously evaluated as normal controls. As compared with cavernous hemangiomas and normal controls, capillary hemangiomas had higher staining scores for CD105, VEGF-A, and COX-2. The Ki-67 labeling index was significantly higher in capillary hemangiomas than in cavernous hemangiomas and normal controls (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that the biological characteristics of capillary and cavernous hemangiomas are quite different. The ECs of capillary hemangiomas actively proliferated and were generally regulated by VEGF-A. In contrast, the ECs of cavernous hemangiomas lacked proliferative activity. These results suggest that angiogenesis and vasodilatation of pre-existing blood vessels are important in the development of capillary hemangioma and cavernous hemangioma, respectively.

  20. Capillary-Pumped Passive Reactor Concept for Space Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Thomas F. Lin; Dr. Thomas G. Hughes; Christopher G. Miller

    2008-05-30

    To develop the passively-cooled space reactor concept using the capillary-induced lithium flow, since molten lithium possesses a very favorable surface tension characteristic. In space where the gravitational field is minimal, the gravity-assisted natural convection cooling is not effective nor an option for reactor heat removal, the capillary induced cooling becomes an attractive means of providing reactor cooling.