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Sample records for isolated optic neuritis

  1. Optic neuritis

    MedlinePlus

    Retro-bulbar neuritis; Multiple sclerosis - optic neuritis; Optic nerve - optic neuritis ... The exact cause of optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The nerve can swell when ...

  2. Optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Pau, D; Al Zubidi, N; Yalamanchili, S; Plant, G T; Lee, A G

    2011-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study is to provide a clinical update on optic neuritis (ON), its association with multiple sclerosis (MS), and neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Methods This study included a PubMed review of the literature written in the English language. Results ON in adults is typically idiopathic or demyelinating, and is characterised by unilateral, subacute, painful loss of vision that is not associated with any systemic or other neurological symptoms. Demyelinating ON is associated with MS, and we review the key studies of ON including the ON treatment trial and several other MS treatment trials and NMO. Conclusion Acute demyelinating ON can occur in isolation or be associated with MS. Typical ON does not require additional evaluation other than cranial magnetic resonance imaging. NMO is likely a separate disorder from MS and the ON in NMO has a different treatment and prognosis. Methodology The authors conducted an English language search using Pubmed from the years 1964 to 2010 using the search terms ‘ON', ‘MS' and ‘NMO'. The authors included original articles, review articles, and case reports, which revealed new aspects as far as epidemiology, histopathology, clinical manifestations, imaging, genetics, and treatment of ON. Titles were reviewed for topicality and full references were obtained. Letters to the editor, unpublished work, and abstracts were not included in this review. PMID:21527960

  3. Masquerading optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Katherine; Vakros, Georgios; Girgis, Rafik

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the ophthalmology emergency department with a 10-day history of blurred vision. The best-corrected visual acuities and Ishihara colour vision were bilaterally reduced with a left relative afferent pupillary defect. Slit-lamp examination was otherwise normal. Retrobulbar optic neuritis (ON) was presumed as she had suffered with this previously and was known to have multiple sclerosis (MS). She was recalled the following week for visual field (VF) testing, which was not available at the time of presentation. VFs demonstrated an incongruous left homonymous hemianopia. She was immediately referred to the medical team to investigate for a stroke, which was subsequently excluded. Thereafter, a trial of pulsed methylprednisolone was commenced, resulting in near complete resolution of the hemianopia. This case demonstrates not only the importance of VF testing, but also how ON may present with any field defect, including mimicking a stroke, a point valuable to ophthalmologists and medics alike. PMID:26240099

  4. Pediatric optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E Ann; Graves, Jennifer S; Benson, Leslie A; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waldman, Amy

    2016-08-30

    Optic neuritis (ON) is a common presenting symptom in pediatric CNS demyelinating disorders and may be associated with dramatic visual loss. Knowledge regarding clinical presentation, associated diseases, therapy, and outcomes in ON in children has grown over the past decade. These studies have shown that younger children (<10 years of age) are more likely to present with bilateral ON and older children with unilateral ON. Furthermore, studies focusing on visual recovery have shown excellent recovery of high-contrast visual acuity in the majority of children, but functional and structural studies have shown evidence of irreversible injury and functional decline after ON in children. Although randomized controlled treatment trials have not been performed in children and adolescents with ON, standard of care suggests that the use of high-dose pulse steroids is safe and likely effective. This article reviews current knowledge about the clinical presentation and management of pediatric ON, with attention to associated syndromes and evaluative tools that may inform diagnosis and interventions. PMID:27572862

  5. Optic neuritis in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Levin, Marc H; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Verkman, A S

    2013-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease associated with recurrent episodes of optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, often resulting in permanent blindness and/or paralysis. The discovery of autoantibodies (AQP4-IgG) that target aquaporin-4 (AQP4) has accelerated our understanding of the cellular mechanisms driving NMO pathogenesis. AQP4 is a bidirectional water channel expressed on the plasma membranes of astrocytes, retinal Müller cells, skeletal muscle, and some epithelial cells in kidney, lung and the gastrointestinal tract. AQP4 tetramers form regular supramolecular assemblies at the cell plasma membrane called orthogonal arrays of particles. The pathological features of NMO include perivascular deposition of immunoglobulin and activated complement, loss of astrocytic AQP4, inflammatory infiltration with granulocyte and macrophage accumulation, and demyelination with axon loss. Current evidence supports a causative role of AQP4-IgG in NMO, in which binding of AQP4-IgG to AQP4 orthogonal arrays on astrocytes initiates complement-dependent and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and inflammation. Immunosuppression and plasma exchange are the mainstays of therapy for NMO optic neuritis. Novel therapeutics targeting specific steps in NMO pathogenesis are entering the development pipeline, including blockers of AQP4-IgG binding to AQP4 and inhibitors of granulocyte function. However, much work remains in understanding the unique susceptibility of the optic nerves in NMO, in developing animal models of NMO optic neuritis, and in improving therapies to preserve vision.

  6. OPTIC NEURITIS IN NEUROMYELITIS OPTICA

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Marc H.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Verkman, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease associated with recurrent episodes of optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, often resulting in permanent blindness and/or paralysis. The discovery of autoantibodies (AQP4-IgG) that target aquaporin-4 (AQP4) has accelerated our understanding of the cellular mechanisms driving NMO pathogenesis. AQP4 is a bidirectional water channel expressed on the plasma membranes of astrocytes, retinal Müller cells, skeletal muscle, and some epithelial cells in kidney, lung and the gastrointestinal tract. AQP4 tetramers form regular supramolecular assemblies at the cell plasma membrane called orthogonal arrays of particles. The pathological features of NMO include perivascular deposition of immunoglobulin and activated complement, loss of astrocytic AQP4, inflammatory infiltration with granulocyte and macrophage accumulation, and demyelination with axon loss. Current evidence supports a causative role of AQP4-IgG in NMO, in which binding of AQP4-IgG to AQP4 orthogonal arrays on astrocytes initiates complement-dependent and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and inflammation. Immunosuppression and plasma exchange are the mainstays of therapy for NMO optic neuritis. Novel therapeutics targeting specific steps in NMO pathogenesis are entering the development pipeline, including blockers of AQP4-IgG binding to AQP4 and inhibitors of granulocyte function. However, much work remains in understanding the unique susceptibility of the optic nerves in NMO, in developing animal models of NMO optic neuritis, and in improving therapies to preserve vision. PMID:23545439

  7. Optic neuritis in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Levin, Marc H; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Verkman, A S

    2013-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease associated with recurrent episodes of optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, often resulting in permanent blindness and/or paralysis. The discovery of autoantibodies (AQP4-IgG) that target aquaporin-4 (AQP4) has accelerated our understanding of the cellular mechanisms driving NMO pathogenesis. AQP4 is a bidirectional water channel expressed on the plasma membranes of astrocytes, retinal Müller cells, skeletal muscle, and some epithelial cells in kidney, lung and the gastrointestinal tract. AQP4 tetramers form regular supramolecular assemblies at the cell plasma membrane called orthogonal arrays of particles. The pathological features of NMO include perivascular deposition of immunoglobulin and activated complement, loss of astrocytic AQP4, inflammatory infiltration with granulocyte and macrophage accumulation, and demyelination with axon loss. Current evidence supports a causative role of AQP4-IgG in NMO, in which binding of AQP4-IgG to AQP4 orthogonal arrays on astrocytes initiates complement-dependent and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and inflammation. Immunosuppression and plasma exchange are the mainstays of therapy for NMO optic neuritis. Novel therapeutics targeting specific steps in NMO pathogenesis are entering the development pipeline, including blockers of AQP4-IgG binding to AQP4 and inhibitors of granulocyte function. However, much work remains in understanding the unique susceptibility of the optic nerves in NMO, in developing animal models of NMO optic neuritis, and in improving therapies to preserve vision. PMID:23545439

  8. Diagnostic pitfalls: posterior ischemic optic neuropathy mimicking optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Lysandropoulos, Andreas P; Carota, Antonio

    2011-02-01

    In young people, the most frequent cause of isolated monocular visual loss due to an optic neuropathy is optic neuritis. We present the case of a 27 year old woman who presented monocular visual loss, excruciating orbital pain and unusual temporal headache. The initial diagnosis of optic neuritis revealed later to be a posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). In this case, PION was the first unique presentation of a non-traumatic carotid dissection, and it was followed 24h later by an ischemic stroke. Sudden monocular visual loss associated with a new-onset headache are clinical symptoms that should immediately prompt to a carotid dissection. PMID:21056537

  9. Corticosteroids for treating optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Folse, Suzanne Brodney; Gal, Robin L; Beck, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Background Optic neuritis is an inflammatory disease of the optic nerve. It occurs more commonly in women than in men. Usually presenting with an abrupt loss of vision, recovery of vision is almost never complete. Closely linked in pathogenesis to multiple sclerosis, it may be the initial manifestation for this condition. In certain patients, no underlying cause can be found. Objectives To assess the effects of corticosteroids on visual recovery of patients with acute optic neuritis. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (issue 4, 2005), MEDLINE (1966 to December 2005), EMBASE (1980 to January 2006), NNR (issue 4, 2006), LILACS and reference lists of identified trial reports. Selection criteria We included randomized trials that evaluated corticosteroids, in any form, dose or route of administration, in people with acute optic neuritis. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted the data on methodological quality and outcomes for analysis. Main results We included five randomized trials which included a total of 729 participants. Two trials evaluated low dose oral corticosteroids and two trials evaluated a higher dose of intravenous corticosteroids. One three-arm trial evaluated low-dose oral corticosteroids and high-dose intravenous corticosteroids against placebo. Trials evaluating oral corticosteroids compared varying doses of corticosteroids with placebo. Hence, we did not conduct a meta-analysis of such trials. In a meta-analysis of trials evaluating corticosteroids with total dose greater than 3000 mg administered intravenously, the relative risk of normal visual acuity with intravenous corticosteroids compared with placebo was 1.06 (95% CI 0.89 to 1.27) at six months and 1.06 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.22) at one year. The risk ratio of normal contrast sensitivity for the same comparison was 1.10 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.32) at six months follow

  10. [Optic neuritis after a bee sting].

    PubMed

    Zambrano-Infantino, Rosanna de Carmen; Piñieríia-Gonsálvez, Jean Félix; Montaño, César; Rodríguez, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Optic neuritis is an acute inflammation of the optic nerve and, in its atypical form, is caused by inflammation of the optic nerve as part of infectious, immune, granulomatous, or contiguity processes. Hymenoptera stings (bees, wasps and ants) have been associated with different clinical presentations, ranging from local events to systemic manifestations, such as anaphylaxis, glomerulonephritis and central nervous system involvement (ischemic vascular lesions, optic neuritis and demyelinating lesions). This is a report of the case of a 62-year-old woman that after three days of being stung by a bee in the left lower eyelid, showed decreased visual acuity of both eyes and central scotoma, concomitant bilateral headache and eye pain, exacerbated by eye movements. The ophthalmological examination showed that visual acuity was decreased and the bilateral fundus examination revealed blurred optic disks edges. Hyperintense thickening of the left optic nerve was observed with an ocular MRI. Due to the clinical manifestations and epidemiological history, the diagnosis of bilateral optic neuritis was established. Treatment with pulses of 1 g/daily of methylprednisolone was initiated, for three days, with clinical improvement within 24 hours after receiving the first dose. Since 1960, cases of optic neuritis associated with hymenoptera stings have been documented, which take the form of anterior optic neuritis. A case of a patient who presented clinical features of bilateral optic neuritis after been stung by a bee, with a good clinical outcome after treatment with methylprednisolone is reported. PMID:23947007

  11. Bilateral optic neuritis due to malaria.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Joseph G; Onteddu, Sanjeeva; Rosenbaum, Eric R

    2013-09-01

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by protists of the genus Plasmodium. Malaria is widespread in tropical regions around the equator, including much of sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas, and uncommonly seen in the developed world. Although a variety of ocular manifestations have been linked to malaria, optic neuritis is rare. We report a patient who developed bilateral optic neuritis after he was treated successfully for acute falciparum malaria.

  12. Corticosteroids for treating optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Robin L; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Beck, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Background Optic neuritis is an inflammatory disease of the optic nerve. It occurs more commonly in women than in men. Usually presenting with an abrupt loss of vision, recovery of vision is almost never complete. Closely linked in pathogenesis to multiple sclerosis, it may be the initial manifestation for this condition. In certain patients, no underlying cause can be found. Objectives To assess the effects of corticosteroids on visual recovery of patients with acute optic neuritis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), MEDLINE (January 1950 to February 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to February 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 21 February 2012. We also searched reference lists of identified trial reports to find additional trials. Selection criteria We included randomized trials that evaluated corticosteroids, in any form, dose or route of administration, in people with acute optic neuritis. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted the data on methodological quality and outcomes for analysis. Main results We included six randomized trials which included a total of 750 participants. Two trials evaluated low dose oral corticosteroids while one trial evaluated low dose intravenous corticosteroids across two treatment arms and two trials evaluated a higher dose of intravenous corticosteroids. One three-arm trial evaluated low-dose oral corticosteroids and high-dose intravenous corticosteroids against placebo. Trials evaluating oral

  13. [Subclinical alcoholic optic neuritis without vitamin deficiency].

    PubMed

    Dally, S; Deplus, S; Delvert, S; Buisine, A; Hispard, E; Girre, C

    1985-01-01

    Vitamin B1, Folic acid Vitamin B12, whole blood Lead level, and plasma Zinc level were determined in 82 patients admitted to an alcoholism rehabilitation program. Each patient was examined for an optic neuritis. Thirty-two of the patients had sub-clinical abnormalities suggestive of optic neuritis like dyschromatopsias and/or field visual defects. No differences were found in the blood levels of Vitamin B1, Folic acid, and Vitamin B12 between the 32% affected and the 68% unaffected subjects. Moreover vitamins blood levels were found to be within the limits of normal values in both groups. A negative correlation between whole blood Lead levels and plasma Zinc levels was found. When an optic neuritis occurs the lead level tends to be higher and the Zinc lower. Abnormalities of the more usual alcoholism tests: gamma glutamyl Transpeptidase (gamma GT), mean red cell volume (V.G.M.) and glutamic Oxaloacetic transferase (T.G.O.), were more pronounced in alcoholics with optic neuritis.

  14. Multiple Sclerosis Risk after Optic Neuritis: Final Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective Assess the risk of developing MS after optic neuritis and factors predictive of high and low risk Design Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial (ONTT) subjects enrolled between 1988 and 1991 were followed prospectively for 15 years with final examination in 2006. Setting Neurologic and ophthalmologic exams at 13 clinical sites Participants Three hundred eighty-nine subjects with acute optic neuritis Main Outcome Measure(s) Development of MS and neurologic disability assessment Results The cumulative probability of developing MS by 15 years was 50% (95% confidence interval 44% to 56%) and strongly related to presence of lesions on a non-contrast enhanced baseline brain MRI. Twenty-five percent of patients with no baseline brain MRI lesions developed MS during follow-up compared with 72% of patients with one or more lesions. After 10 years, the risk of developing MS was very low for patients without baseline lesions but remained substantial for those with lesions. Among patients without MRI lesions, baseline factors associated with a substantially lower risk of MS included male gender, optic disc swelling, and certain atypical features for optic neuritis. Conclusions The presence of brain MRI abnormalities at the time of an optic neuritis attack is a strong predictor of the 15-year risk of MS. In the absence of MRI lesions, male gender, optic disc swelling and atypical clinical features of optic neuritis are associated with a low likelihood of developing MS. This natural history information is important when considering prophylactic treatment for MS at the time of a first acute optic neuritis attack. PMID:18541792

  15. Multimodality evoked potentials and electrically elicited blink reflex in optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Tackmann, W; Ettlin, T; Strenge, H

    1982-01-01

    Pattern shift visual evoked potentials, brain stem auditory evoked potentials, spinal and scalp recorded somatosensory evoked potentials, and electrically elicited blink reflexes were investigated in 32 patients with isolated optic neuritis. Eleven patients were shown to have one additional lesion in the central nervous system outside the optic nerve. Therefore, cases with optic neuritis of unknown origin should be considered as possible cases of multiple sclerosis. PMID:6181223

  16. Optic neuritis progressing to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Corona-Vazquez, T; Ruiz-Sandoval, J; Arriada-Mendicoa, N

    1997-02-01

    We report a partially retrospective and longitudinal study of patients with optic neuritis (ON) that developed multiple sclerosis (MS). We assessed clinical features or factors that might differentiate these patients from those with ON that did not develop MS. Of the cases followed, 110 (67%) were found to have an idiopathic origin of the disease; whereas 55 (33%) were found to develop it secondary to another disease. Of the 110 idiopathic cases, 13 (12%), developed MS over an average of 2 years. The results of these patients in the laboratory analyses of blood and CSF as well as the results of the MRI and evoked potential studies, were significantly different from the ON patients without MS. We conclude that the percentage of patients with ON in our sample that developed MS is similar to that found in Japan and is relatively low in comparison to other reports.

  17. Relationship of optic neuritis to disease of the paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, J; Maisel, R H; Berlinger, N T; Wirtschafter, J D

    1984-11-01

    The relationship of paranasal sinusitis to optic neuritis remains an intriguing curiosity to both the otolaryngologist and the ophthalmologist. The literature is replete with anecdotal case reports of patients whose sinusitis appears to have caused optic neuritis. There is much speculation about the pathophysiological mechanisms which relate these two distinct disease entities. Five new cases are described which highlight distinct pathophysiologic routes through which paranasal sinus disease has caused optic neuritis. These include compressive optic neuropathy secondary to mucoceles and/or pyoceles; direct extension of sinus infection to the optic nerve from suppurative paranasal sinusitis; and, in one case, from osteomyelitis of the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses. The usefulness of computerized axial tomography of the orbits and paranasal sinuses to evaluate optic neuritis and to elucidate in detail the pathophysiology of its relationship to disease of the paranasal sinuses is emphasized. Currently, optic neuritis is felt to be a rare complication of paranasal sinusitis. Paranasal sinus surgery is advocated in those cases where sinus suppuration is suspected, or when a compressive optic neuropathy is caused by a sinus mucocele or pyocele. Since in most cases, however, optic neuritis is self-limited, it is difficult to evaluate the results of surgery in circumstances other than those mentioned already. Continued careful evaluation, management, and documentation of this group of patients is necessary to help better define the relationship between these two disease entities.

  18. [Optic neuritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient].

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Daniela M R; Buscatti, Izabel M; Lourenço, Benito; Monti, Fernanda C; Paz, José Albino; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) was rarely reported in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, particularly in those under anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha blockage. However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of ON in JIA population has not been studied. Therefore, 5,793 patients were followed up at our University Hospital and 630 (11%) had JIA. One patient (0.15%) had ON and was reported herein. A 6-year-old male was diagnosed with extended oligoarticular JIA, and received naproxen and methotrexate subsequently replaced by leflunomide. At 11 years old, he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis, followed by a partial motor seizure with secondary generalization. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram showed diffuse disorganization of the brain electric activity and leflunomide was suspended. Seven days later, the patient presented acute ocular pain, loss of acuity for color, blurred vision, photophobia, redness and short progressive visual loss in the right eye. A fundoscopic exam detected unilateral papilledema without retinal exudates. Orbital MRI suggested right ON. The anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody was negative. Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone was administered for five days, and subsequently with prednisone, he had clinical and laboratory improvement. In conclusion, a low prevalence of ON was observed in our JIA population. The absence of anti-AQP4 antibody and the normal brain MRI do not exclude the possibility of demyelinating disease associated with chronic arthritis. Therefore, rigorous follow up is required.

  19. Pachymeningitis and optic neuritis in rheumatoid arthritis: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Ağildere, A M; Tutar, N U; Yücel, E; Coşkun, M; Benli, S; Aydin, P

    1999-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease in which cerebral and eye involvement is neither common nor fully understood. Although it is rarely the cause of pachymeningitis and optic neuritis, rheumatoid arthritis should always be kept in mind in these two conditions. We present a 52-year-old male with an 8 month history of rheumatoid arthritis who was referred to the neurology department with headache and decreasing vision and was diagnosed as having rheumatoid pachymeningitis and optic neuritis on the basis of MRI findings.

  20. Unilateral optic neuritis as a presentation of neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Rita; Martins, Cristina; Machado, Inês; Monteiro, José Paulo; Campos, Nuno; Calhau, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    Neurobrucellosis manifesting as optic neuritis is a rare disease in childhood. We report a case of neurobrucellosis in a 11 year old girl leading to visual impairment and headache. Physical examination revealed mild oedema of right tibiotarsic joint and optic neuritis. Investigations showed CSF pleocytosis and a Brucella serum agglutination titer of 1/640. Complete reversal of the symptoms was observed after appropriate antibiotic treatment. To our knowledge only four cases of neurobrucellosis manifesting with visual impairment in childhood are previously reported in literature. PMID:21772948

  1. Antibodies to Aquaporin 4, Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein, and the Glycine Receptor α1 Subunit in Patients With Isolated Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Sepulveda, Maria; Rostásy, Kevin; Höftberger, Romana; Graus, Francesc; Harvey, Robert J.; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE In patients with isolated optic neuritis (ON), the presence of antibodies to aquaporin 4 (AQP4) has diagnostic and prognostic value. In the same clinical setting, the significance of antibodies to myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) or the glycine receptor α1 subunit (GlyR) is unclear. OBJECTIVES To investigate the frequency of antibodies to AQP4, MOG, and GlyR in patients with unilateral or bilateral, severe, or recurrent isolated ON and to determine their clinical and prognostic correlates. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective case-control study from November 1, 2005, through May 30, 2014 with the detection of autoantibodies in a neuroimmunology referral center. We included 51 patients with ON but without clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings outside the optic nerves and 142 controls (30 healthy individuals, 48 patients with neuromyelitis optica, and 64 patients with multiple sclerosis). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinicoimmunologic analysis. We determined the presence of antibodies to AQP4, MOG, and GlyR using cell-based assays. RESULTS The median age of the patients at the onset of ON symptoms was 28 (range, 5–65) years; 36 patients (71%) were female. Antibodies were identified in 23 patients (45%), including MOG in 10 patients, AQP4 in 6 patients, and GlyR in 7 patients (concurrent with MOG in 3 and concurrent with AQP4 in 1). Patients with AQP4 antibodies (median visual score, 3.5 [range, 1–9]) had a worse visual outcome than patients with MOG antibodies alone (median visual score, 0 [range, 0–5]; P = .007), patients with seronegative findings (n = 28) (median visual score, 1.0 [range, 0–14]; P = .08), and patients with GlyR antibodies alone (n = 3) (median visual score, 0 [range, 0–2]; P = .10). The median age of the 7 patients with GlyR antibodies was 27 (range, 11–38) years; 5 (71%) of these were female. Among the 3 patients with GlyR antibodies alone, 1 patient had monophasic ON, 1 had recurrent isolated

  2. Bilateral optic neuritis in a boy - More than the eyes.

    PubMed

    Loh, M A; Alex Khoo, P C; Chong, M F

    2016-04-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare disorder in children with variable presentation. We report a 7-year-old boy who presented with bilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis and responded very well to treatment. He was also positive for aquaporin 4 (AQP4) antibodies, which is part of an emerging endophenotype within autoimmune neurological disorders in childhood. PMID:27326949

  3. Serial Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Acute Optic Neuritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, S. J.; Toosy, A. T.; Jones, S. J.; Altmann, D. R.; Miszkiel, K. A.; MacManus, D. G.; Barker, G. J.; Plant, G. T.; Thompson, A. J.; Miller, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    In serial studies of multiple sclerosis lesions, reductions in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) are thought to be due to demyelination and axonal loss, with later rises due to remyelination. This study followed serial changes in MTR in acute optic neuritis in combination with clinical and electrophysiological measurements to determine if the MTR…

  4. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Tabbarah, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation. PMID:26483675

  5. [A case of Charles Bonnet syndrome following syphilitic optic neuritis].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hidenori; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Torii, Takako; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2011-08-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome refers to visual hallucinations in patients with visual acuity loss or visual field loss without dementia. We report a case of Charles Bonnet syndrome following syphilitic optic neuritis. A 62-year-old man was admitted to our hospital suffering acute bilateral visual loss in a few months. On admission, he was almost blind and his optic discs were found to be atrophic on fundoscopy. In addition to increased cell counts and protein concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), serum and CSF rapid plasma reagin tests were positive. A diagnosis of syphilitic optic neuritis was made and he was treated with intravenous penicillin G (24 million units per day for 14 days) without any recovery. After treatment finished, he began to experience complex, vivid, elaborate and colored visual hallucinations. He recognized these visions as unreal and felt distressed by them. No cognitive impairment was observed on several neuropsychological tests. We diagnosed the patient as suffering from Charles Bonnet syndrome. Brain MRI revealed diffuse mild atrophy of the cerebral cortex and multiple T2 high signal intensity lesions in the deep cerebral white matter. Single photon emission computed tomography revealed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in bilateral medial occipital lobes. Administration of olanzapine resulted in a partial remission of visual hallucinations. Charles Bonnet syndrome following syphilitic optic neuritis is rare. In the present case, visual loss and dysfunction of bilateral medial occipital lobes may have triggered the visual hallucinations, which were alleviated by olanzapine.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging of the optic radiations after optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Scott; Bajraszewski, Clare; Chapman, Caron; Nguyen, Tan; Mitchell, Peter; Paine, Mark; Butzkueven, Helmut; Johnston, Leigh; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Egan, Gary

    2012-09-01

    Trans-synaptic degeneration could exacerbate neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to assess whether anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration could be identified in the primary visual pathway in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to assess the optic radiations in 15 patients with previous optic nerve inflammation and 9 healthy volunteers. A probabilistic atlas of the optic radiations was created from healthy diffusion tractography data. Lengthwise profiles for DTI parameters (axial [λ(||) ], radial [λ(⟂) ] and mean diffusivity [MD], fractional anisotropy [FA] and the angle of deviation of the principal eigenvector [α]) were analyzed for patients and controls. Patients also underwent multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) assessments to characterize the latency and amplitude of cortical potentials. Correlations were performed between mfVEP latency and amplitude in the left and right visual hemi-fields and DTI parameters in the contra-lateral optic radiations. Patients displayed a significant decrease in λ(||) within the body of both optic radiations, which significantly correlated with loss of mfVEP amplitude. Abnormal λ(⟂) and FA were detected bilaterally throughout the optic radiations in patients but the abnormality was not associated with amplitude reduction or latency prolongation of the mfVEP. An abnormal α value was observed in the left optic radiations of patients, and the α value in the body of the optic radiations also correlated with mfVEP amplitude loss. The assocation between bilateral DTI abnormalities within the optic radiations and loss of afferent electrical activity could indicate anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration occurs following optic neuritis.

  7. Disease Activity and Conversion into Multiple Sclerosis after Optic Neuritis Is Treated with Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Hein, Katharina; Pul, Refik; Scholz, Kerstin; Heesen, Christoph; Diem, Ricarda

    2016-01-01

    Changes in cerebral lesion load by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients from a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II study on erythropoietin in clinically isolated optic neuritis (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00355095) were analyzed. Therefore, patients with acute optic neuritis were assigned to receive either 33,000 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin (IV) daily for three days, or a placebo, as an add-on to methylprednisolone. Of 35 patients, we investigated changes in cerebral lesion load in MRIs obtained at baseline and at weeks 4, 8, and 16. In 5 of the 35 patients, we found conversion into multiple sclerosis (MS) based on MRI progression only. These five patients had received the placebo. Another five patients showed MRI progression together with relapses. Three of these patients had received erythropoietin, and two the placebo. Yet, analyzing the change in absolute numbers of periventricular, juxtacortical, and infratentorial lesions including gadolinium-enhancing lesions, there were no significant differences between the groups. Although effective in terms of retinal nerve fiber layer protection, erythropoietin treatment of acute isolated optic neuritis did not influence further evolution of MRI lesions in the brain when comparing absolute numbers. However, early conversion from clinically isolated syndrome to MS assessed by MRI activity seemed to occur more frequently in the placebo-treated group. PMID:27706045

  8. An unusual presentation of optic neuritis and the Pulfrich phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, Maeve; Flitcroft, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The Pulfrich effect (named after Carl Pulfrich) is a well described visual stereoillusion observed when a swinging pendulum bob is viewed through a neutral density filter in front of one eye. The Pulfrich effect can be demonstrated spontaneously (ie, without a neutral density filter) in patients with multiple sclerosis because of the delayed optic nerve conduction seen after unilateral optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis. Here, a Pulfrich effect is described in a man with subclinical multiple sclerosis who only became symptomatic when playing squash. PMID:21686703

  9. An unusual presentation of optic neuritis and the Pulfrich phenomenon.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Maeve; Flitcroft, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The Pulfrich effect (named after Carl Pulfrich) is a well described visual stereoillusion observed when a swinging pendulum bob is viewed through a neutral density filter in front of one eye. The Pulfrich effect can be demonstrated spontaneously (ie, without a neutral density filter) in patients with multiple sclerosis because of the delayed optic nerve conduction seen after unilateral optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis. Here, a Pulfrich effect is described in a man with subclinical multiple sclerosis who only became symptomatic when playing squash.

  10. A reassessment of the risk of multiple sclerosis developing in patients with optic neuritis after extended follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, D A; Compston, D A; Batchelor, J R; McDonald, W I

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and one of 146 patients presenting with isolated idiopathic optic neuritis, previously reviewed in 1978, were reassessed clinically, and retyped for HLA antigens and Factor B alleles, after a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. Fifty eight patients (57%) had developed multiple sclerosis at the time of reassessment in the present study, of whom 51 (88%) had clinically definite disease. This compared with 40% of the original group, in 1978, of whom 62% then had clinically definite multiple sclerosis. When the life-table method of analysis was used, the probability of developing multiple sclerosis was 75%, 15 years after the initial episode of optic neuritis. The frequencies of HLA-DR2 and the recently defined D-region antigen, DQw1, were significantly increased in patients with isolated optic neuritis and those who subsequently developed multiple sclerosis compared with normal controls, but neither allele appears to influence progression from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis. Patients with optic neuritis who were HLA-DR3 positive had an increased risk for the development of multiple sclerosis (RR = 2.8) and this risk was further enhanced when DR3 occurred in combination with DR2 (RR = 6.7). The overall increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis for patients with this combination was 26 times that for the normal population. When the patients' original tissue-typing was considered BT 101 no longer influenced conversion of optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis. This may partly be explained by improved methods of tissue-typing, since not all BT 101 patients were subsequently found to be positive for HLA-DR2 or HLA-DQw1 and vice versa and by extended follow-up as multiple sclerosis conversion in HLA-DR2 negative individuals increased with time. All 101 patients were typed for Factor B alleles. No significant differences in frequencies were found between individuals with isolated optic neuritis or those who progressed to multiple sclerosis compared with the

  11. The afferent pupillary defect in acute optic neuritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with acute optic neuritis were studied by the techniques of infrared pupillometry and visual evoked responses (VER) to pattern reversal. A relative afferent pupillary defect was found in all cases and the magnitude of this defect was found to be related to the amplitude, but not to the latency, of the VER. During follow-up the afferent defect was found to remain persistently abnormal while other methods of clinical evaluation could not demonstrate abnormality reliably. The amplitude of the VER also remained low. PMID:501365

  12. The investigation of acute optic neuritis: a review and proposed protocol.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Wattjes, Mike P; Costello, Fiona; Flores-Rivera, Jose; Fraser, Clare L; Fujihara, Kazuo; Leavitt, Jacqueline; Marignier, Romain; Paul, Friedemann; Schippling, Sven; Sindic, Christian; Villoslada, Pablo; Weinshenker, Brian; Plant, Gordon T

    2014-08-01

    Optic neuritis is an inflammatory optic neuropathy that affects many patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) at some point during their disease course. Differentiation of acute episodes of MS-associated optic neuritis from other autoimmune and inflammatory optic neuropathies is vital for treatment choice and further patient management, but is not always straightforward. Over the past decade, a number of new imaging, laboratory and electrophysiological techniques have entered the clinical arena. To date, however, no consensus guidelines have been devised to specify how and when these techniques can be most rationally applied for the diagnostic work-up of patients with acute optic neuritis. In this article, we review the literature and attempt to formulate a consensus for the investigation of patients with acute optic neuritis, both in standard care and in research with relevance to clinical treatment trials.

  13. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy masquerading as optic neuritis with spontaneous visual recovery.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Wang, An-Guor; Yen, May-Yung; Liu, Jorn-Hon

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) masquerading as optic neuritis with late visual recovery. A 28-year-old man had gradual visual loss in both eyes for two weeks. Visual acuity was 0.4 in the right eye and 0.7 in the left. Fundus examination revealed hyperaemic discs in each eye. Fluorescein angiography revealed dye leakage at both optic discs in the late phase. Static perimetry (Humphrey 30-2) revealed bilateral relative central scotomata. Magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerves was normal and his lumbar puncture showed normal opening pressure. He received steroid pulse therapy for three days. Nevertheless, vision in his right eye deteriorated to 0.1 one month later and left vision worsened to 0.05 six months later. Fifteen months after onset, his vision began to improve. At 21 months, his vision recovered to 0.9 R and 1.0 L. Peripheral blood DNA sequencing revealed 14484 mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Visual recovery can occur in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with mtDNA 14484 mutation. LHON could be misdiagnosed as optic neuritis in some cases. Molecular examination of mtDNA mutation can confirm the diagnosis of LHON in clinically controversial patients. We should keep in mind the diagnosis of LHON when optic neuritis shows poor response to pulse therapy.

  14. Optic neuritis in pediatric population: a review in current tendencies of diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael José; Gómez-Hurtado Cubillana, Aránzazu; Merino-Suárez, María L; Piñero-Llorens, David P; Laria-Ochaita, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis is an inflammation of the optic nerve and may be related to different systemic conditions. The clinical presentation of this pathology usually includes sudden loss of visual acuity (VA) which may be unilateral or bilateral, visual field restriction, pain with eye movements, dyschromatopsia, a relative afferent pupillary defect and optic disk swelling. Optic neuritis in children has specific clinical features and a better prognosis than in adulthood. Although usually appears an underlying viral disease, the main concern for practitioners is the relationship of optic neuritis with multiple sclerosis. In addition to the classical techniques as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), current tendencies of diagnosis for eye practitioners include new imaging devices as optical coherence tomography (OCT), useful to show a thinning of the retinal fibers layer (RFL) after the inflammatory episode. Regarding the management of these patients, short-term intravenous steroid dosages seem to be the best option to treat acute attacks characterized by a very poor bilateral VA. PMID:25000867

  15. Optic neuritis in pediatric population: a review in current tendencies of diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael José; Gómez-Hurtado Cubillana, Aránzazu; Merino-Suárez, María L; Piñero-Llorens, David P; Laria-Ochaita, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis is an inflammation of the optic nerve and may be related to different systemic conditions. The clinical presentation of this pathology usually includes sudden loss of visual acuity (VA) which may be unilateral or bilateral, visual field restriction, pain with eye movements, dyschromatopsia, a relative afferent pupillary defect and optic disk swelling. Optic neuritis in children has specific clinical features and a better prognosis than in adulthood. Although usually appears an underlying viral disease, the main concern for practitioners is the relationship of optic neuritis with multiple sclerosis. In addition to the classical techniques as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), current tendencies of diagnosis for eye practitioners include new imaging devices as optical coherence tomography (OCT), useful to show a thinning of the retinal fibers layer (RFL) after the inflammatory episode. Regarding the management of these patients, short-term intravenous steroid dosages seem to be the best option to treat acute attacks characterized by a very poor bilateral VA.

  16. Elevated Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio in Recurrent Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Guclu, Hande; Ozal, Sadık Altan; Pelitli Gurlu, Vuslat; Birgul, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To demonstrate the relation between optic neuritis (ON) and systemic inflammation markers as neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio), platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), and red cell distribution width (RDW) and furthermore to evaluate the utilization of these markers to predict the frequency of the ON episodes. Methods. Forty-two patients with acute ON and forty healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. The medical records were reviewed for age, sex, hemoglobin (Hb), Haematocrit (Htc), RDW, platelet count, MPV, white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil and lymphocyte count, and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio). Results. The mean N/L ratio, platelet counts, and RDW were significantly higher in ON group (p = 0.000, p = 0.048, and p = 0.002). There was a significant relation between N/L ratio and number of episodes (r = 0.492, p = 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference for MPV between one episode group and recurrent ON group (p = 0.035). Conclusions. Simple and inexpensive laboratory methods could help us show systemic inflammation and monitor ON patients. Higher N/L ratio can be a useful marker for predicting recurrent attacks. PMID:26060578

  17. Re-evaluating the treatment of acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jeffrey L; Nickerson, Molly; Costello, Fiona; Sergott, Robert C; Calkwood, Jonathan C; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Markowitz, Clyde E; Vartanian, Timothy; Morrow, Mark; Moster, Mark L; Taylor, Andrew W; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical case reports and prospective trials have demonstrated a reproducible benefit of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation on the rate of recovery from acute inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. As a result, corticosteroid preparations and adrenocorticotrophic hormones are the current mainstays of therapy for the treatment of acute optic neuritis (AON) and acute demyelination in multiple sclerosis. Despite facilitating the pace of recovery, HPA axis modulation and corticosteroids have failed to demonstrate long-term benefit on functional recovery. After AON, patients frequently report visual problems, motion perception difficulties and abnormal depth perception despite ‘normal’ (20/20) vision. In light of this disparity, the efficacy of these and other therapies for acute demyelination require re-evaluation using modern, high-precision paraclinical tools capable of monitoring tissue injury. In no arena is this more amenable than AON, where a new array of tools in retinal imaging and electrophysiology has advanced our ability to measure the anatomic and functional consequences of optic nerve injury. As a result, AON provides a unique clinical model for evaluating the treatment response of the derivative elements of acute inflammatory CNS injury: demyelination, axonal injury and neuronal degeneration. In this article, we examine current thinking on the mechanisms of immune injury in AON, discuss novel technologies for the assessment of optic nerve structure and function, and assess current and future treatment modalities. The primary aim is to develop a framework for rigorously evaluating interventions in AON and to assess their ability to preserve tissue architecture, re-establish normal physiology and restore optimal neurological function. PMID:25355373

  18. Retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following progressive outer retinal necrosis due to CMV in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Bang, J H; Park, W B; Kim, H B; Kim, N J; Ahn, J K; Chang, K H; Oh, M D; Choe, K W

    2008-10-01

    We report on a 34-year-old male patient with AIDS who developed retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following bilateral progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV). This case documents the presumed association of PORN with retrobulbar optic neuritis, and CMV meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient. PMID:18574556

  19. Retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following progressive outer retinal necrosis due to CMV in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Bang, J H; Park, W B; Kim, H B; Kim, N J; Ahn, J K; Chang, K H; Oh, M D; Choe, K W

    2008-10-01

    We report on a 34-year-old male patient with AIDS who developed retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following bilateral progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV). This case documents the presumed association of PORN with retrobulbar optic neuritis, and CMV meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient.

  20. Epidemiology of monosymptomatic optic neuritis in Rijeka County, Croatia: meteorological aspects.

    PubMed

    Loncarek, Karmen; Brajac, Ines; Petricek, Igor; Stalekar, Hrvoje; Cerovski, Branimir; Pokupe, Rajko

    2005-06-01

    In order to analyze the meteorological factors possibly influencing the monosymptomatic optic neuritis in Rijeka County, northwestern part of Croatia, retrospective analysis of all cases diagnosed in Rijeka County in period from 1977 to 2001, was done. Meteorological data on monthly and yearly temperature, humidity, insolation in Rijeka County were collected from Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service. In the observed period there were 173 cases of monosymptomatic optic neuritis, female/male ratio was 1.66, and overall incidence was 2.18/100,000 inhabitants. There was no correlation of incidence with average yearly and monthly temperature, humidity, insolation, or month of birth. This is the first study on meteorological factors and optic neuritis in Croatia. PMID:16117341

  1. Unilateral Optic Neuritis: A Rare Complication after Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccination in a 30-Year-Old Woman.

    PubMed

    De Giacinto, Chiara; Guaglione, Elvira; Leon, Pia E; D'Aloisio, Rossella; Vattovani, Odilla; Ravalico, Giuseppe; Tognetto, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a case of unilateral optic neuritis following Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccination. Methods. A 30-year-old female developed unilateral optic neuritis five days after a Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) booster vaccination. The patient displayed unilateral involvement, with severe visual loss. However, visual acuity improved significantly after four days of intravenous steroid therapy with 500 mg/day of methylprednisolone. Conclusions. Optic neuritis is one of the rare complications associated with the mumps, measles, and rubella vaccine. It may be a toxic reaction to the nonviral component of the vaccine, but the exact etiology is unknown. Postvaccination neuritis is generally bilateral and usually affects children. In adults, unilateral optic neuritis is usually correlated with multiple sclerosis (MS). PMID:27195163

  2. Longitudinal evidence for anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration after optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Tur, Carmen; Goodkin, Olivia; Altmann, Daniel R; Jenkins, Thomas M; Miszkiel, Katherine; Mirigliani, Alessia; Fini, Camilla; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga; Toosy, Ahmed T

    2016-03-01

    In multiple sclerosis, microstructural damage of normal-appearing brain tissue is an important feature of its pathology. Understanding these mechanisms is vital to help develop neuroprotective strategies. The visual pathway is a key model to study mechanisms of damage and recovery in demyelination. Anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration across the lateral geniculate nuclei has been suggested as a mechanism of tissue damage to explain optic radiation abnormalities seen in association with demyelinating disease and optic neuritis, although evidence for this has relied solely on cross-sectional studies. We therefore aimed to assess: (i) longitudinal changes in the diffusion properties of optic radiations after optic neuritis suggesting trans-synaptic degeneration; (ii) the predictive value of early optic nerve magnetic resonance imaging measures for late optic radiations changes; and (iii) the impact on visual outcome of both optic nerve and brain post-optic neuritis changes. Twenty-eight consecutive patients with acute optic neuritis and eight healthy controls were assessed visually (logMAR, colour vision, and Sloan 1.25%, 5%, 25%) and by magnetic resonance imaging, at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences performed (and metrics obtained) were: (i) optic nerve fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (optic nerve cross-sectional area); (ii) optic nerve proton density fast spin-echo (optic nerve proton density-lesion length); (iii) optic nerve post-gadolinium T1-weighted (Gd-enhanced lesion length); and (iv) brain diffusion-weighted imaging (to derive optic radiation fractional anisotropy, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity). Mixed-effects and multivariate regression models were performed, adjusting for age, gender, and optic radiation lesion load. These identified changes over time and associations between early optic nerve measures and 1-year global optic radiation/clinical measures. The fractional anisotropy in patients' optic

  3. Bilateral Retrobulbar Optic Neuritis Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus in a Patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Jose F.; Castro, Jose G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report on a case of bilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV); and to review the literature focusing on: cases reported, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. Presentation of Case A 38-year-old woman with AIDS presented with a 10-day history of progressive bilateral visual loss and ocular pain. She had bilateral dilated pupils with no light perception; the fundoscopic examination was normal. Facial herpes zoster lesions appeared on the second day of hospitalization Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compatible with a bilateral optic neuritis; the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis, increased proteins and a positive VZV-DNA PCR. She was treated with intravenous acyclovir and corticosteroids and was able, when discharged 2 weeks after admission, to carry out activities of daily living. Discussion VZV retrobulbar optic neuritis has previously been reported in 12 patients with AIDS, more than half of the cases had concomitant herpes zoster and an associated retinopathy. A positive VZV-DNA in the CSF is indicative of VZV infection, initial use of intravenous acyclovir is recommended, and the concomitant use of corticosteroids would be a prudent choice; the duration of antiviral therapy remains undefined. Conclusion VZV retrobulbar optic neuritis in AIDS patients can occur with or without herpes zoster. It is a sight-threatening infectious and inflammatory process requiring the advice of specialists in infectious diseases, ophthalmology, neurology and viral microbiology. PMID:26740936

  4. Optic neuritis caused by canine distemper virus in a Jack Russell terrier.

    PubMed

    Richards, Tara R; Whelan, Nick C; Pinard, Chantale L; Alcala, Fernanda Castillo; Wolfe, Katheryn C

    2011-04-01

    An atypical case of canine distemper (CD) was diagnosed in a vaccinated healthy adult dog. The patient was presented circling, seizuring, and blind. Postmortem examination resulted in a diagnosis of CD. Optic neuritis was diagnosed, a finding not previously described in the context of CD virus infection presenting solely with neurological signs.

  5. Optic neuritis caused by canine distemper virus in a Jack Russell terrier

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Tara R.; Whelan, Nick C.; Pinard, Chantale L.; Alcala, Fernanda Castillo; Wolfe, Katheryn C.

    2011-01-01

    An atypical case of canine distemper (CD) was diagnosed in a vaccinated healthy adult dog. The patient was presented circling, seizuring, and blind. Postmortem examination resulted in a diagnosis of CD. Optic neuritis was diagnosed, a finding not previously described in the context of CD virus infection presenting solely with neurological signs. PMID:21731093

  6. Retinitis and optic neuritis in a child with chickenpox: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Tappeiner, Christoph; Aebi, Christoph; Garweg, Justus G

    2010-12-01

    In immunocompetent individuals, necrotizing retinopathy is a rare complication of chickenpox. Herein, we report on a 3-year-old immunocompetent boy who developed retinitis and optic neuritis 3 days after the onset of chickenpox and compare the findings to published cases. Since macula and optic nerve were affected, visual acuity remained poor. An early diagnosis and treatment of ocular manifestations in chickenpox is imperative for the preservation of a residual visual function and prevention of blinding secondary complications.

  7. Anti-myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein Antibodies in a Patient with Recurrent Optic Neuritis Involving the Cerebral White Matter and Brainstem.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tadashi; Yasui, Kenichi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Fujihara, Kazuo; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of recurrent optic neuritis involving the cerebral white matter and brainstem in a patient positive for anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies. The patient had an initial attack at 24 years of age. Optic neuritis recurred over 14 years, and she was admitted to our neurology unit at 38 years of age. She showed bilateral optic neuritis, high-intensity lesions in the cerebral white matter and brainstem on T2 MRI with contrast enhancement, and elevated serum anti-MOG antibodies. Immunotherapy improved the MRI lesions. Recurrent optic neuritis in patients with anti-MOG antibodies may thus involve the cerebral white matter and brainstem. PMID:27181546

  8. Serial Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Optic Radiations after Acute Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    van der Walt, Anneke; Butzkueven, Helmut; Klistorner, Alexander; Egan, Gary F.; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) changes within the optic radiations of patients after optic neuritis (ON). We aimed to study optic radiation DTI changes over 12 months following acute ON and to study correlations between DTI parameters and damage to the optic nerve and primary visual cortex (V1). We measured DTI parameters [fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD)] from the optic radiations of 38 acute ON patients at presentation and 6 and 12 months after acute ON. In addition, we measured retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, visual evoked potential amplitude, optic radiation lesion load, and V1 thickness. At baseline, FA was reduced and RD and MD were increased compared to control. Over 12 months, FA reduced in patients at an average rate of −2.6% per annum (control = −0.51%; p = 0.006). Change in FA, RD, and MD correlated with V1 thinning over 12 months (FA: R = 0.450, p = 0.006; RD: R = −0.428, p = 0.009; MD: R = −0.365, p = 0.029). In patients with no optic radiation lesions, AD significantly correlated with RNFL thinning at 12 months (R = 0.489, p = 0.039). In conclusion, DTI can detect optic radiation changes over 12 months following acute ON that correlate with optic nerve and V1 damage. PMID:27555964

  9. Serial Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Optic Radiations after Acute Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Scott C; van der Walt, Anneke; Butzkueven, Helmut; Klistorner, Alexander; Egan, Gary F; Kilpatrick, Trevor J

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) changes within the optic radiations of patients after optic neuritis (ON). We aimed to study optic radiation DTI changes over 12 months following acute ON and to study correlations between DTI parameters and damage to the optic nerve and primary visual cortex (V1). We measured DTI parameters [fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD)] from the optic radiations of 38 acute ON patients at presentation and 6 and 12 months after acute ON. In addition, we measured retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, visual evoked potential amplitude, optic radiation lesion load, and V1 thickness. At baseline, FA was reduced and RD and MD were increased compared to control. Over 12 months, FA reduced in patients at an average rate of -2.6% per annum (control = -0.51%; p = 0.006). Change in FA, RD, and MD correlated with V1 thinning over 12 months (FA: R = 0.450, p = 0.006; RD: R = -0.428, p = 0.009; MD: R = -0.365, p = 0.029). In patients with no optic radiation lesions, AD significantly correlated with RNFL thinning at 12 months (R = 0.489, p = 0.039). In conclusion, DTI can detect optic radiation changes over 12 months following acute ON that correlate with optic nerve and V1 damage.

  10. Serial Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Optic Radiations after Acute Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Scott C; van der Walt, Anneke; Butzkueven, Helmut; Klistorner, Alexander; Egan, Gary F; Kilpatrick, Trevor J

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) changes within the optic radiations of patients after optic neuritis (ON). We aimed to study optic radiation DTI changes over 12 months following acute ON and to study correlations between DTI parameters and damage to the optic nerve and primary visual cortex (V1). We measured DTI parameters [fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD)] from the optic radiations of 38 acute ON patients at presentation and 6 and 12 months after acute ON. In addition, we measured retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, visual evoked potential amplitude, optic radiation lesion load, and V1 thickness. At baseline, FA was reduced and RD and MD were increased compared to control. Over 12 months, FA reduced in patients at an average rate of -2.6% per annum (control = -0.51%; p = 0.006). Change in FA, RD, and MD correlated with V1 thinning over 12 months (FA: R = 0.450, p = 0.006; RD: R = -0.428, p = 0.009; MD: R = -0.365, p = 0.029). In patients with no optic radiation lesions, AD significantly correlated with RNFL thinning at 12 months (R = 0.489, p = 0.039). In conclusion, DTI can detect optic radiation changes over 12 months following acute ON that correlate with optic nerve and V1 damage. PMID:27555964

  11. Pulfrich pendulum phenomenon in patients with a history of acute optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Slagsvold, J E

    1978-10-01

    The Pulfrich phenomenon is a stereoillusion in which a pendulum swinging at right angles to the line of gaze appears to be describing an elliptical path when absorbing filters are placed in front of one eye. We used two sets of polaroid glasses as adjustable filters. A spot on a modified oscilloscope served at a pendulum bob. Twenty-nine former patients with a history of optic neuritis and visual acuities of greater than or equal to 6/6 in both eyes and twenty-two normal subjects underwent examinations. The patients showed pathological recordings which separated them from the control subjects. The test seems to expose minor residual dysfunction of affected optic nerves where the visual acuity is normalized. This abnormal response when viewing the moving Pulfrich pendulum is probably caused by disturbed neural conduction. The degree of acute visual loss and the time elapsed since the attack did not seem to influence the Pulfrich response. The results may explain why some patients who have recovered from optic neuritis complain of difficulties when viewing moving objects. In addition to the use of Pulfrich illusion test for diagnostic work; i.e. clinical or subclinical attacks of optic neuritis, it can serve as a valuable supplement to the more sophisticated method of visual evoked response.

  12. Tick-borne encephalitis virus as a possible cause of optic neuritis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Stadtbäumer, K; Leschnik, M W; Nell, B

    2004-01-01

    A 3-year-old spayed female Siberian Husky was presented due to acute vision loss. Examination revealed bilateral optic neuritis and lymphocytic meningoencephalitis. The serum (1:800) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF; 1:200) immunoglobulin (Ig)G titers for tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) were elevated as were the serum IgG titer for Anaplasma phagocytophilum (1:640) and serum IgM titer for Toxoplasma gondii (1:20). Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies such as ehrlichial or anaplasmal morulae were not observed in the CSF or blood smear. The dog was treated with methylprednisone and doxycycline. The left eye regained vision; the right eye remained blind. Anti-inflammatory therapy was stopped on day 18 after diagnosis. Four days later the dog showed evidence of hyperesthesia in the cervical region. Analysis of CSF showed no abnormalities and CSF IgG titers for TBEV and A. phagocytophilum were negative. Funduscopic evidence of active papillitis was absent on day 22 in the left eye and on day 86 in the right eye. On day 243, the dog was presented again with lethargy, ataxia, disorientation and temporary head tilt. The IgG titer for TBEV was again elevated in the CSF (1:800) and in serum (1:400). After interpretation of all findings, we assume that meningoencephalitis and optic neuritis in this patient was caused by TBEV and associated immune-mediated inflammation. In endemic areas, TBEV should be considered as cause of optic neuritis in dogs.

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging of occult injury of optic radiation following optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiafeng; Zhu, Lijun; Li, He; Lu, Ziwen; Chen, Xin; Fang, Shaokuan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is easily detected by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is not possible to detect early or occult lesions in MS by routine MRI, and this may explain the inconsistency between the severity of the lesions found by MRI and the degree of clinical disability of patients with MS. The present study included 10 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 10 healthy volunteers. Each patient underwent routine 3.0 T MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Optic nerve and optic radiation were analyzed by DTI and DTT. The fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), λ//, and λ┴ values were measured. In the 10 patients with MS, 7 optic nerves were affected, and 13 optic nerves were not affected. Cranial MRI showed that optic nerve thickening and hyperintensity occurred in 2 patients with MS. In the directionally encoded color maps, a hypointensive green signal in the optic nerve was observed in 3 patients with MS. The FA values were significantly lower and the MD, λ//, and λ┴ values were significantly higher in the affected and unaffected optic nerves and optic radiations in patients with MS in comparison with controls (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in these values between the affected and unaffected optic nerves and optic radiation in patients with MS (P>0.05). Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive in the detection of occult injury of the optic nerve and optic radiation following optic neuritis. Diffusion tensor imaging may be a useful tool for the early diagnosis, treatment and management of MS. PMID:27703508

  14. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Stig P; Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle J; Frederiksen, Jette L; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2015-09-01

    Optic neuritis is an acute inflammatory condition that is highly associated with multiple sclerosis. Currently, the best predictor of future development of multiple sclerosis is the number of T2 lesions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Previous research has found abnormalities in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood-brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison with cerebrospinal fluid markers of inflammation, cellular trafficking and blood-brain barrier breakdown. To this end, we applied dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T to measure blood-brain barrier permeability in 39 patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis, all referred for imaging as part of the diagnostic work-up at time of diagnosis. Eighteen healthy controls were included for comparison. Patients had magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture performed within 4 weeks of onset of optic neuritis. Information on multiple sclerosis conversion was acquired from hospital records 2 years after optic neuritis onset. Logistic regression analysis showed that baseline permeability in normal-appearing white matter significantly improved prediction of multiple sclerosis conversion (according to the 2010 revised McDonald diagnostic criteria) within 2 years compared to T2 lesion count alone. There was no correlation between permeability and T2 lesion count. An increase in permeability in normal-appearing white matter of 0.1 ml/100 g/min increased the risk of multiple sclerosis 8.5 times whereas having more than nine T2 lesions increased the risk 52.6 times. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of permeability in normal-appearing white matter gave a cut-off of 0.13 ml/100 g/min, which predicted conversion to multiple sclerosis with a sensitivity of

  15. A case of isolated nodulus infarction presenting as a vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung; Cho, Yong-Won

    2004-06-15

    We reported a patient with cerebellar infarction who presented with purely isolated vertigo, ipsilesional spontaneous nystagmus, and contralesional axial lateropulsion without usual symptoms or signs of cerebellar dysfunction. An MRI of the brain showed a small left cerebellar infarct selectively involving the nodulus. A pure vestibular syndrome in our patient may be explained by ipsilateral involvement of nodulo-vestibular inhibitory projection to vestibular nucleus. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of a nodulus infarction in patient with acute vestibular syndrome, even if the pattern of nystagmus and lateropulsion is typical of a vestibular neuritis.

  16. Current and future potential of retinal optical coherence tomography in multiple sclerosis with and without optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Balk, Lisanne J; Petzold, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disorder characterized by inflammation and neuroaxonal degeneration. The latter is held responsible for the irreversible disability in patients with MS. The eye is a unique window into the brain. With the advent of optical coherence tomography, accurate quantification of retinal layer thickness has become feasible. Neuroaxonal degeneration affecting the retinal layers is structurally and functionally related to pathology in the visual pathways, which is most severe following MS optic neuritis. This is relevant to recognize because MS optic neuritis may mask the subtle thinning of retinal layers associated with global CNS atrophy, which is also related to more global loss of neurological function. Taken together, optical coherence tomography stands at the brink of becoming a validated imaging biomarker for monitoring neurodegeneration in MS and to provide end points for clinical trials.

  17. Microfluorimetry defines early axonal damage in a rat model of optic neuritis: a novel method targeting early CNS autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Stokely, Martha E; Bhat, Manzoor A; Koulen, Peter

    2007-11-30

    Autoimmune optic neuritis is a common early manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS), yet early therapeutic interventions for MS often have high ocular toxicity associated with increased risks for glaucoma, cataract, or retinopathy. This need to discover better early treatment options prompted our development of a sensitive and reliable means to quantify the broad range of pathologies that potentially develop very early in autoimmune optic neuritis. Tissue microfluorimetry was used to measure seven established markers for human MS pathology in normal and autoimmune optic nerves 13 days after antigen exposure, in a Brown Norway rat model of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (35-55)-induced autoimmune optic neuritis. Optic neuritis rats demonstrated early and significant pathologic changes in five established indices for neuroinflammation, immune infiltration, and demyelination that accurately modeled pathologies characteristic of MS. Two indices of MS-like axon damage advanced significantly within 13 days of antigen exposure. Fluorimetrically measured immunoreactivity (-ir) was significantly decreased for paranodin (PN, the requisite axonal paranodal junction protein) and significantly increased for amyloid precursor protein (APP), indicating loss of paranodal junctions and impaired fast axonal transport, respectively. Measurements showing decreased PN-ir with increased APP-ir quantitatively defined a pattern of early axonal damage in autoimmune optic neuritis. PMID:17719649

  18. Analysis of Fundus Photography and Fluorescein Angiography in Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy and Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated fundus and fluorescein angiography (FAG) findings and characteristics that can help distinguish nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) from optic neuritis (ON). Methods Twenty-three NAION patients and 17 ON with disc swelling patients were enrolled in this study. We performed fundus photography and FAG. The disc-swelling pattern, hyperemia grade, presence of splinter hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, artery/vein ratio and degree of focal telangiectasia were investigated. The FAG findings for each patient were compared with respect to the following features: the pattern of disc leakage in the early phase, arteriovenous (artery/vein) transit time (second), and the presence and pattern of the filling delay. Results Cotton-wool spots, focal telangiectasia, and venous congestion were more common in the affected eyes of NAION patients. Upon FAG, 76.5% of the patients in the ON group exhibited normal choroidal circulation. However, 56.5% of patients in the NAION group demonstrated abnormal filling defects, such as peripapillary, generalized, or watershed zone filling delays. Conclusions Fundus findings, including cotton-wool spots, focal telangiectasia, and venous congestion in the affected eye, may be clues that can be used to diagnose NAION. In addition, choroidal insufficiencies on FAG could be also helpful in differentiating NAION from ON. PMID:27478356

  19. Optic neuritis, the most common initial presenting manifestation of multiple sclerosis in northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hojjati, Seyed Mohammad Masoud; Zarghami, Amin; Hojjati, Seyed Ali; Baes, Mobina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disease of central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the present study was to determine the type and the frequency of initial presenting symptoms in patients with MS and their relation with demographic characteristics in Babol, northern Iran. Methods: All patients of this study were recruited over a ten year period from 2002 to 2012 from single neurologic clinic. Diagnosis of MS was confirmed according to the McDonald criteria, demographic and clinical features Then, all the clinical findings and demographic variables including: age, sex, marital status, age at onset, education, place of residence, disease duration, initiation pattern of disease have been collected. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was used for the evaluation of disability at the onset of disease. Data analysis was performed by chi-square test. Results: A total of 263 consecutive MS patients with the age range of 17 to 61 yr were examined. Optic neuritis was the most prevalent initial presenting symptom in 123 (46.8%) patients followed by sensory disturbances as the second common presenting symptom of MS. Significant difference was found between patients with or without optic neuritis and the onset age of the disease and EDSS (p<0.001). The mean EDSS score at the time of initial presentation was 1.67±0.77. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that optic neuritis is the most prevalent initial presentation of MS in the geographic region of northern Iran. In patients less than 30 years, development of visual disturbances justifies neurologic examination. PMID:26644882

  20. Visual field characteristics in neuromyelitis optica in absence of and after one episode of optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Harold; Olindo, Stéphane; Jeannin, Séverine; Hage, Rabih; Donnio, Angélique; Richer, Raymond; Cabre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Optic neuritis (ON) observed during neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is in most cases very severe and with poor prognosis. This study’s objective was to analyze visual field (VF) abnormalities observed in the absence of ON and post-ON episode. Methods Twenty-seven cases of both NMO and multiple sclerosis (MS) were selected. Thorough ophthalmologic exam was performed at least 6 months post-ON attack. The VF was collected using the Humphrey 750 perimeter. We used the central threshold tests 24-2 with FASTPAC strategy. The abnormalities were categorized based on the Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial classification. Results After one ON, 40% of the NMO group’s eyes showed total VF loss (P = 0.01), 21% showed abnormalities of neurologic aspect, and 27% showed fascicular abnormalities of which 12% were altitudinal. Given the total VF loss, the positive predictive value in favor of an NMO was 92.8% and the negative predictive value was 47.3%. Conclusion Alterations of the VF during the NMO differ from those observed in the course of the MS. One ON, blinding from the first attack, must call to mind an NMO. The altitudinal deficits point to a vascular mechanism. PMID:23807832

  1. Treatment of optic neuritis with erythropoietin (TONE): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial—study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Diem, Ricarda; Molnar, Fanni; Beisse, Flemming; Gross, Nikolai; Drüschler, Katharina; Heinrich, Sven P; Joachimsen, Lutz; Rauer, Sebastian; Pielen, Amelie; Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Linker, Ralf Andreas; Huchzermeyer, Cord; Albrecht, Philipp; Hassenstein, Andrea; Aktas, Orhan; Guthoff, Tanja; Tonagel, Felix; Kernstock, Christoph; Hartmann, Kathrin; Kümpfel, Tania; Hein, Katharina; van Oterendorp, Christian; Grotejohann, Birgit; Ihorst, Gabriele; Maurer, Julia; Müller, Matthias; Volkmann, Martin; Wildemann, Brigitte; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang; Heesen, Christoph; Schiefer, Ulrich; Wolf, Sebastian; Lagrèze, Wolf A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Optic neuritis leads to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells whose axons form the optic nerve. The standard treatment is a methylprednisolone pulse therapy. This treatment slightly shortens the time of recovery but does not prevent neurodegeneration and persistent visual impairment. In a phase II trial performed in preparation of this study, we have shown that erythropoietin protects global retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT-G) in acute optic neuritis; however, the preparatory trial was not powered to show effects on visual function. Methods and analysis Treatment of Optic Neuritis with Erythropoietin (TONE) is a national, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial with two parallel arms. The primary objective is to determine the efficacy of erythropoietin compared to placebo given add-on to methylprednisolone as assessed by measurements of RNFLT-G and low-contrast visual acuity in the affected eye 6 months after randomisation. Inclusion criteria are a first episode of optic neuritis with decreased visual acuity to ≤0.5 (decimal system) and an onset of symptoms within 10 days prior to inclusion. The most important exclusion criteria are history of optic neuritis or multiple sclerosis or any ocular disease (affected or non-affected eye), significant hyperopia, myopia or astigmatism, elevated blood pressure, thrombotic events or malignancy. After randomisation, patients either receive 33 000 international units human recombinant erythropoietin intravenously for 3 consecutive days or placebo (0.9% saline) administered intravenously. With an estimated power of 80%, the calculated sample size is 100 patients. The trial started in September 2014 with a planned recruitment period of 30 months. Ethics and dissemination TONE has been approved by the Central Ethics Commission in Freiburg (194/14) and the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (61-3910-4039831). It complies with the Declaration of Helsinki

  2. Optic Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging after Acute Optic Neuritis Predicts Axonal and Visual Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    van der Walt, Anneke; Kolbe, Scott C.; Wang, Yejun E.; Klistorner, Alexander; Shuey, Neil; Ahmadi, Gelareh; Paine, Mark; Marriott, Mark; Mitchell, Peter; Egan, Gary F.; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Early markers of axonal and clinical outcomes are required for early phase testing of putative neuroprotective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives To assess whether early measurement of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters (axial and radial diffusivity) within the optic nerve during and after acute demyelinating optic neuritis (ON) could predict axonal (retinal nerve fibre layer thinning and multi-focal visual evoked potential amplitude reduction) or clinical (visual acuity and visual field loss) outcomes at 6 or 12 months. Methods Thirty-seven patients presenting with acute, unilateral ON were studied at baseline, one, three, six and 12 months using optic nerve DTI, clinical and paraclinical markers of axonal injury and clinical visual dysfunction. Results Affected nerve axial diffusivity (AD) was reduced at baseline, 1 and 3 months. Reduced 1-month AD correlated with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thinning at 6 (R=0.38, p=0.04) and 12 months (R=0.437, p=0.008) and VEP amplitude loss at 6 (R=0.414, p=0.019) and 12 months (R=0.484, p=0.003). AD reduction at three months correlated with high contrast visual acuity at 6 (ρ = -0.519, p = 0.001) and 12 months (ρ = -0.414, p=0.011). The time-course for AD reduction for each patient was modelled using a quadratic regression. AD normalised after a median of 18 weeks and longer normalisation times were associated with more pronounced RNFL thinning and mfVEP amplitude loss at 12 months. Affected nerve radial diffusivity (RD) was unchanged until three months, after which time it remained elevated. Conclusions These results demonstrate that AD reduces during acute ON. One month AD reduction correlates with the extent of axonal loss and persistent AD reduction at 3 months predicts poorer visual outcomes. This suggests that acute ON therapies that normalise optic nerve AD by 3 months could also promote axon survival and improve visual outcomes. PMID:24386285

  3. Myeloradiculitis with meningoencephalopathy and optic neuritis in a case of previous Chlamydia psittaci infection

    PubMed Central

    Punter, M N M; Varma, A R

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of optic neuritis and myelo-radiculopathy as a late association following Chlamydia psittaci infection. A 45-year-old female patient with a prior history of C psittaci pneumonia and subsequent reactive arthritis presented to the neurology unit with severe headache, constitutional symptoms and monocular disturbance in vision. Clinical examination revealed focal signs with brisk upper limb reflexes compared to lower limbs and mild left-sided pyramidal signs. Systemic inflammatory markers were raised and serological studies showed no evidence of re-infection. MRI showed multiple high signal foci within the brain parenchyma and pachymeningeal thickening and enhancement. There was marked clinical and haematological improvement with high dose corticosteroids. PMID:22802266

  4. Recurrent optic neuritis and neuromyelitis optica-IgG following first and second human papillomavirus vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyeyeon; Lee, Hye Lim; Yeo, Minju; Kim, Ji Seon; Shin, Dong-Ick; Lee, Sang-Soo; Lee, Sung-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is widely used to prevent cervical cancer caused by certain types of HPV in girls and young women. Demyelinating disorders within months following HPV innoculation have been reported, but the causal link between HPV vaccination and the onset of demyelinating disorders have not been certain. We report a case of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) that was noteworthy because optic neuritis (ON) occurred in a very close temporal association with both the first and second HPV vaccinations, which might suggest an association between HPV vaccination and the development of NMO-IgG and recurrent ON. This emphasizes the necessity for continuing surveillance for adverse events after HPV vaccination. PMID:27046292

  5. [A Patient with Acute Limbic Encephalitis Associated with Anti-Glutamate Receptor Antibodies and Subsequent Optic Neuritis].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Aya; Nakamura, Masataka; Kaneko, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    A 19-year-old woman presented with headache and fever. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed increased pressure (>200 mmH2O) and pleocytosis. Brain MRI showed high intensity in the medial part of the right temporal lobe, insular regions, and basal ganglia of the right hemisphere on fluid attenuated inversion recovery images. Based on a tentative diagnosis of limbic encephalitis caused by viral infection, acyclovir therapy was started. However, 10 days after admission, a right superior temporal quadrantanopia developed in the left eye. MRI detected abnormal intensity in the left optic nerve on short tau inversion recovery images. After three courses of steroid pulse therapy, the optic neuritis quickly improved and the patient was maintained on subsequent oral administration of prednisolone, without relapse for one year. The CSF was positive for anti-glutamate receptor (GluR) antibodies (GluN2B, GluN1, and GluD2); however, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody was not detected in both serum and CSF with cell-based asseys. Compared to previously reported anti-GluR positive cases combined with optic neuritis, the clinical outcome of our patient was short, with good prognosis. Our results indicate that an autoimmune mechanism involving anti-GluR antibodies contributes to the pathogenesis of optic neuritis as well as limbic encephalitis. PMID:27001777

  6. Amiloride Clinical Trial In Optic Neuritis (ACTION) protocol: a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Justin B; Elston, John; Evangelou, Nikos; Gerry, Stephen; Fugger, Lars; Kennard, Christopher; Kong, Yazhuo; Palace, Jacqueline; Craner, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neurodegeneration is a widely accepted contributor to the development of long-term disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). While current therapies in MS predominantly target inflammation and reduce relapse rate they have been less effective at preventing long-term disability. The identification and evaluation of effective neuroprotective therapies within a trial paradigm are key unmet needs. Emerging evidence supports amiloride, a licenced diuretic, as a neuroprotective agent in MS through acid sensing ion channel blockade. Optic neuritis (ON) is a common manifestation of MS with correlates of inflammation and neurodegeneration measurable within the visual pathways. Amiloride Clinical Trial In Optic Neuritis (ACTION) will utilise a multimodal approach to assess the neuroprotective efficacy of amiloride in acute ON. Methods and analysis 46 patients will be recruited within 28 days from onset of ON visual symptoms and randomised on a 1:1 basis to placebo or amiloride 10 mg daily. Double-blinded treatment groups will be balanced for age, sex and visual loss severity by a random-deterministic minimisation algorithm. The primary objective is to demonstrate that amiloride is neuroprotective in ON as assessed by scanning laser polarimetry of the peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness at 6 months in the affected eye compared to the unaffected eye at baseline. RNFL in combination with further retinal measures will also be assessed by optical coherence tomography. Secondary outcome measures on brain MRI will include cortical volume, diffusion-weighted imaging, resting state functional MRI, MR spectroscopy and magnetisation transfer ratio. In addition, high and low contrast visual acuity, visual fields, colour vision and electrophysiology will be assessed alongside quality of life measures. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was given by the south central Oxford B research ethics committee (REC reference: 13/SC/0022). The findings

  7. Neuromyelitis optica-IgG+ optic neuritis associated with celiac disease and dysgammaglobulinemia: a role for tacrolimus?

    PubMed

    Meyts, Isabelle; Jansen, Katrien; Renard, Marleen; Bossuyt, Xavier; Roelens, Filip; Régal, Luc; Lagae, Lieven; Buyse, Gunnar

    2011-05-01

    We present a pediatric case of recurrent optic neuritis, celiac disease, partial IgA and IgG3 deficiency in the context of anti-aquaporin-4 auto-immunity and familial IgA deficiency with celiac disease. Treatment with tacrolimus was successful in preventing disease relapses. This case stresses the relevance of central nervous system anti-aquaporin-4 auto-immunity in a broader context of immune dysregulation and neuro-immunology.

  8. Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Cervical Cord Schwannoma with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4B1 Disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Patrick; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Kharusi, Khalsa; Meftah, Douja; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya

    2016-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 4B1 (CMT4B1) disease is a rare subtype of CMT4 with reported association of facial weakness, vocal cord paresis, chest deformities, and claw hands. We report the unusual occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in a male individual with confirmed CMT4B1 disease. Sequencing of the MTMR2 gene revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.1768C>T (p.Gln590*). The mutation was identified in affected relatives of the proband and a second, apparently unrelated, family. The rare association of optic neuritis or schwannoma with genetically confirmed CMT1A has been individually observed, but never with recessive CMT. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in the same patient has never been reported with any form of CMT including CMT4B1. In similar cases, we recommend immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of schwannomas in patients with all demyelinating CMT subtypes in case of the development of focal neurological signs or acute worsening of clinical status.

  9. Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Cervical Cord Schwannoma with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4B1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Patrick; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Kharusi, Khalsa; Meftah, Douja; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 4B1 (CMT4B1) disease is a rare subtype of CMT4 with reported association of facial weakness, vocal cord paresis, chest deformities, and claw hands. We report the unusual occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in a male individual with confirmed CMT4B1 disease. Sequencing of the MTMR2 gene revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.1768C>T (p.Gln590*). The mutation was identified in affected relatives of the proband and a second, apparently unrelated, family. The rare association of optic neuritis or schwannoma with genetically confirmed CMT1A has been individually observed, but never with recessive CMT. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in the same patient has never been reported with any form of CMT including CMT4B1. In similar cases, we recommend immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of schwannomas in patients with all demyelinating CMT subtypes in case of the development of focal neurological signs or acute worsening of clinical status. PMID:27162595

  10. ATON: results from a Phase II randomized trial of the B-cell-targeting agent atacicept in patients with optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Sergott, Robert C; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Rieckmann, Peter; Montalban, Xavier; Mikol, Daniel; Freudensprung, Ulrich; Plitz, Thomas; van Beek, Johan

    2015-04-15

    The 36-week ATON study compared the efficacy and safety of atacicept with matching placebo in 34 patients with unilateral optic neuritis as a clinically isolated syndrome. Atacicept (150mg) was administered twice weekly for 4weeks (loading period), then once weekly for 32weeks. The ATON study was terminated prematurely by the sponsor when an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board review observed increased multiple sclerosis (MS)-related disease activity in the atacicept arms of the concurrent ATAcicept in MS (ATAMS) study. Analysis of the prematurely terminated ATON study showed that the mean (standard deviation) change from baseline in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness at last observed value in the affected eye was -8.6 (10.1) μm in patients treated with atacicept (n=15) compared with -17.3 (15.2) μm in patients treated with placebo (n=16). In the atacicept treatment group, a higher proportion of patients converted to clinically definite MS during the double-blind period compared with placebo (35.3% [6/17] vs 17.6% [3/17]). Treatment-emergent adverse events were similar across both treatment groups in the double-blind period. A dichotomy emerged with more atacicept-treated patients converting to relapsing-remitting MS compared with placebo-treated patients, despite the same patients experiencing less axonal loss after an optic neuritis event.

  11. Carotid artery thrombosis, encephalitis, myelitis and optic neuritis associated with rubella virus infections.

    PubMed

    Connolly, J H; Hutchinson, W M; Allen, I V; Lyttle, J A; Swallow, M W; Dermott, E; Thomsom, D

    1975-12-01

    The clinical, virological and pathological findings in 5 patients with neurological complications associated with rubella virus infection are described. The neurological illnesses began four to ten days after the rubella illnesses. The patients were all males aged between 6 and 17 years and were diagnosed during one non-epidemic year in a population of 1-5 million people. All the patients had rubella specific IgM in their sera. Two patients had no rash. In one of the patients who died, left internal carotid artery thrombosis and cerebral infarction were found at post-mortem. Rubella virus antigen and particles resembling rubella virus were found in the brain together with IgG and IgM in the same areas. This patient also had extensive liver necrosis. The other patient had a severe meningomyelitis and radiculitis and he recovered completely after two years. His serum rubella antibody rose significantly and was shown to leak into CSF during the acute stage of his illness. Three patients had a rash. Two of these patients had encephalitis: one recovered completely and the other had residual disability. The third patient had bilateral optic neuritis from which he recovered completely. Rubella specific IgM was, however, present in his serum for the abnormally long time of twenty-eight weeks indicating possible persistence of rubella virus. PMID:1218369

  12. Devic's disease before Devic: Bilateral optic neuritis and simultaneous myelitis in a young woman (1874).

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-11-15

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO, Devic's disease) is an often severely disabling disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) which mainly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord. NMO was long considered a clinical subform of multiple sclerosis (MS). In 2004, however, Lennon and colleagues described a novel autoantibody in NMO which targets aquaporin-4, the most abundant water channel in the CNS, and which was later shown to be directly pathogenic. This has led to the recognition of NMO as a distinct disease entity in its own right. While the history of 'classical' MS has been extensively studied, only little is known about the early history of NMO. The term neuromyelitis optica was coined in 1894 by Eugène Devic (1858-1930) and Fernand Gault (1873-1936), who were the first to provide a systematic description of that disorder. Here we re-present a very early description of a case of NMO by a Polish physician, Adolf Wurst, which appeared in 1876 in Przegląd Lekarski, one of the oldest Polish medical journals. This report predates Devic and Gault's seminal work on NMO by more than two decades. The patient, a 30-year-old woman, subacutely developed simultaneous bilateral optic neuritis with papilloedema and bilateral blindness and transverse myelitis with severe paraparesis, anaesthesia, and bladder and bowel dysfunction. At last follow-up, one year after onset, she had recovered except for a residual spastic gait and some visual deficit on the right side. Of note, this is the first known case of NMO in a Caucasian patient ever reported outside Western Europe. PMID:26303625

  13. Anti-aquaporin-4 IgG in Patients Presenting with Unilateral Optic Neuritis: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Etemadifar, Masoud; Abtahi, Mohammad-Ali; Razmjoo, Hassan; Abtahi, Seyed-Hossein; Dehghani, Ali-Reza; Abtahi, Zahra-Alsadat; Akbari, Mojtaba; Mazaheri, Shahir; Maghzi, Amir-Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Optic neuritis (ON) can be the first presentation of multiple sclerosis (MS) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Anti-aquaporin-4 IgG (AQP4 IgG) is a highly specific and moderately sensitive biomarker for NMO. This study was designed to assess the rate of seropositivity for AQP4 IgG, and the short-term outcome of patients presenting with single isolated ON (SION). Methods: A cohort of 41 consecutive patients experiencing severe (< 20 / 200) SION (not fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for MS or NMO), was prospectively recruited. Blood sampling was carried out immediately after the diagnosis of ON, and AQP4 IgG was tested qualitatively, using an indirect immunofluorescence kit. After clinical and paraclinical investigations, all the patients were followed up for a short-term period of at least 18 months. Results: The seroprevalence among the initial ON patients was 9.7% (4 / 41). The short-term conversion rate to MS and NMO was estimated to be about 7.3 and 4.9%, respectively. The conversion rate to NMO in initially seropositive patients was greater than that for the whole cohort [2 / 4 (50%) vs. 2 / 41 (4.9%); P = 0.035; Odds ratio: 19.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.73 to 219.50]. Conclusion: AQP4 IgG seropositive SION patients were more likely to develop NMO in comparison to the total SION population. Further studies, with a longer follow-up period and larger sample sizes are warranted to assess the clinical and prognostic value of assessing AQP4 IgG in SION. PMID:23024849

  14. Dichoptic Metacontrast Masking Functions to Infer Transmission Delay in Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Bruchmann, Maximilian; Korsukewitz, Catharina; Krämer, Julia; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) has detrimental effects on the transmission of neuronal signals generated at the earliest stages of visual information processing. The amount, as well as the speed of transmitted visual signals is impaired. Measurements of visual evoked potentials (VEP) are often implemented in clinical routine. However, the specificity of VEPs is limited because multiple cortical areas are involved in the generation of P1 potentials, including feedback signals from higher cortical areas. Here, we show that dichoptic metacontrast masking can be used to estimate the temporal delay caused by ON. A group of 15 patients with unilateral ON, nine of which had sufficient visual acuity and volunteered to participate, and a group of healthy control subjects (N = 8) were presented with flashes of gray disks to one eye and flashes of gray annuli to the corresponding retinal location of the other eye. By asking subjects to report the subjective visibility of the target (i.e. the disk) while varying the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between disk and annulus, we obtained typical U-shaped masking functions. From these functions we inferred the critical SOAmax at which the mask (i.e. the annulus) optimally suppressed the visibility of the target. ON-associated transmission delay was estimated by comparing the SOAmax between conditions in which the disk had been presented to the affected and the mask to the other eye, and vice versa. SOAmax differed on average by 28 ms, suggesting a reduction in transmission speed in the affected eye. Compared to previously reported methods assessing perceptual consequences of altered neuronal transmission speed the presented method is more accurate as it is not limited by the observers’ ability to judge subtle variations in perceived synchrony. PMID:27711139

  15. [Optic neuritis in childhood. A pediatric series, literature review and treatment approach].

    PubMed

    Lopez-Martin, D; Martinez-Anton, J

    2016-08-01

    Introduccion. En la edad pediatrica, la forma mas frecuente de neuritis optica se presenta generalmente despues de un cuadro infeccioso, con edema de papila, que suele ser bilateral y tiene buen pronostico. La conversion a esclerosis multiple es infrecuente. Objetivo. Presentar las caracteristicas clinicas y de laboratorio de una serie pediatrica de neuritis optica. Pacientes y metodos. Se analiza una serie de 17 casos de neuritis optica en niños y jovenes de 4 a 14 años, referidos entre los años 2000 y 2015. Resultados. La edad mediana de la serie fue de 11 años. Predominaron los pacientes de sexo femenino y el antecedente infeccioso fue poco frecuente; en cinco pacientes, la afectacion fue bilateral, y cuatro casos se presentaron como neuritis optica retrobulbar. La resonancia magnetica mostro hiperintensidad en T2 en los nervios opticos afectados en cinco pacientes. El estudio del liquido cefalorraquideo y bandas oligoclonales fue normal en todos los casos. Los pacientes, tratados con metilprednisolona intravenosa, tuvieron buena recuperacion. Solo en tres casos se comprobo una evolucion posterior a esclerosis multiple. Conclusiones. En esta serie, los casos que evolucionaron a esclerosis multiple no mostraron diferencias clinicas, aunque si presentaron mayor cantidad de lesiones hiperintensas en la resonancia magnetica. Este hecho, descrito en trabajos previos, apoya nuestro esquema diagnostico y terapeutico en un intento por acercarnos al manejo optimo de esta patologia.

  16. Clinical Features and Visual Outcomes of Optic Neuritis in Chinese Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huanfen; Xu, Quangang; Tan, Shaoying; Zhao, Shuo; Yang, Mo; Peng, Chunxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Although optic neuritis (ON) in children is relatively common, visual outcomes and factors associated with the condition have not been well documented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and visual outcomes of ON in Chinese children. Methods. Patients with a first episode of ON at a tertiary neuroophthalmic centre in China were assessed and followed up for at least three months. Visual outcomes and clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. In patients with bilateral ON, only the eyes with worse visual acuity (VA) at presentation were used for statistical analysis. Results. Seventy-six children (76 eyes) with a first episode of ON were included. The mean age was 11.8 years, 60.5% were females, and 48.7% had bilateral involvement. The children were followed up for an average of 18.5 months (age range, 3–48 months). Vision loss at presentation was severe, with VA < 20/200 in 37 eyes (48.7%). At the final visit, 3 (3.9%) eyes had VA of at least 20/20, and 41 (53.9%) eyes had VA of at least 20/40. The final VA in 35 eyes (46.1%) was worse than 20/40. Children aged ≤ 10 years had better predicted visual outcomes when compared to children over 10 years (odds ratio = 2.73, 95% confidential interval: 1.05–7.07, and P = 0.039). The other features of this cohort, such as sex, experienced bilateral attack, VA at presentation, presence of optic disc edema, systemic diseases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) antibody status, were not significantly correlated with the final visual outcome. Conclusion. The data revealed the clinical characteristics and visual outcomes of ON in Chinese children. ON in children was associated with severe vision loss and relatively good visual recovery. The age at onset could predict the final visual function. PMID:27725883

  17. Antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in bilateral and recurrent optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Reddel, Stephen W.; Henderson, Andrew; Parratt, John D.E.; Barnett, Michael; Gatt, Prudence N.; Merheb, Vera; Kumaran, Raani-Yogeeta Anusuiya; Pathmanandavel, Karrnan; Sinmaz, Nese; Ghadiri, Mahtab; Yiannikas, Con; Vucic, Steve; Stewart, Graeme; Bleasel, Andrew F.; Booth, David; Fung, Victor S.C.; Dale, Russell C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We examined a cohort of adults with aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody–negative neuromyelitis optica/neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMO/NMOSD) for antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Methods: We performed a flow cytometry cell-based assay using live human lentivirus–transduced cells expressing full-length surface MOG. Serum was tested in 23 AQP4 antibody–negative NMO/NMOSD patients with bilateral and/or recurrent optic neuritis (BON, n = 11), longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, n = 10), and sequential BON and LETM (n = 2), as well as in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, n = 76) and controls (n = 52). Results: MOG antibodies were detected in 9/23 AQP4 antibody–negative patients with NMO/NMOSD, compared to 1/76 patients with MS and 0/52 controls (p < 0.001). MOG antibodies were detected in 8/11 patients with BON, 0/10 patients with LETM, and 1/2 patients with sequential BON and LETM. Six of 9 MOG antibody–positive patients had a relapsing course. MOG antibody–positive patients had prominent optic disc swelling and were more likely to have a rapid response to steroid therapy and relapse on steroid cessation than MOG antibody–negative patients (p = 0.034 and p = 0.029, respectively). While 8/9 MOG antibody–positive patients had good follow-up visual acuity, one experienced sustained visual impairment, 3 had retinal nerve fiber layer thinning, and one had residual spinal disability. Conclusions: MOG antibodies have a strong association with BON and may be a useful clinical biomarker. MOG antibody–associated BON is a relapsing disorder that is frequently steroid responsive and often steroid dependent. Failure to recognize the disorder early and institute immunotherapy promptly may be associated with sustained impairment. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that MOG antibodies are associated with AQP4 antibody–negative BON (sensitivity 69%, 95% confidence interval [CI

  18. [Fourier analysis of pattern visual evoked potentials and changes of the harmonic component in longstanding optic neuritis].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Abe, H

    1992-11-01

    To determine the clinical usefulness of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) for the detection of abnormal pattern visual evoked potentials (P-VEPs), the P-VEPs were recorded using a checkerboard pattern (check size: 14.4') which was reversed ranging from 4 to 16 per second. Fourteen eyes of 7 patients with longstanding optic neuritis and 15 eyes of age-matched normal controls were examined. Means and the standard deviation of the square root of the FFT power as a function of spectral frequency (1.953 x fHz, f = 1-17) were calculated and statistically significant levels between the two groups were studied for each reversal rate. When the reversal rate was more than 8/sec, The 1st or 2nd harmonic components decreased significantly in optic neuritis and the significant levels (p) of the 1st harmonic component were lower than that (p) of 2nd or 3rd harmonic component. When the reversal rate was 6/sec, the 1st and 2nd harmonic components decreased significantly and 1st harmonic component had the same level of significance as the 2nd harmonic component. When the reversal rate was 4/sec, the 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th harmonic components decreased significantly but 1st harmonic component did not. The level of significance of the 3rd harmonic component was the lowest followed by that of 2nd harmonic component.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Recognition of motion-defined shapes in patients with multiple sclerosis and optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Regan, D; Kothe, A C; Sharpe, J A

    1991-06-01

    We have developed a simple procedure for assessing the ability of the visual pathway to extract a two-dimensional shape from motion. The test requires a patient to read motion-defined (MD) letters. These letters differ physically from the familiar contrast-defined (CD) letters that are dimmer or brighter than their surroundings in that the boundaries of MD letters are rendered visible exclusively by a step in velocity while the boundaries of CD letters are rendered visible by a step in luminance. Subjects viewed a random pattern of bright dots containing a perfectly camouflaged letter. Then the letter was revealed by moving dots within and outside the letter at equal speeds in opposite directions. Letter reading scores for 50 eyes of 25 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) or optic neuritis were compared with norms based on 50 control subjects. When tested with large (50 arc min, i.e., 6/60) MD letters, 34/50 eyes of patients required abnormally high dot speeds to read letters, visual loss being sufficiently selective in 10 eyes that contrast sensitivity, Snellen acuity, 11%-contrast and 4%-contrast acuity were all spared. Four eyes were effectively motion blind in the sense that they could not read large letters even at our highest relative speed of 0.9 deg/s and the failure could not be attributed to reduced Snellen acuity. Our normal limit was 2.5 SD from the control mean and there were 1/50 false positives. Of the 34/50 eyes with elevated speed thresholds, 23 had normal Snellen acuities. The number of eyes abnormal for intermediate (11%) contrast CD letters, was 19/50 of which 8 had normal Snellen acuity, confirming our previous finding that MS can degrade the ability to see low-contrast objects while sparing Snellen acuity. We conclude that MD test letters can detect lesions that are not picked up by testing with CD test letters of high or low contrast. We suggest that the MD letter test can detect dysfunction in the human equivalent of a pathway in monkey

  20. Dynamic visual tests to identify and quantify visual damage and repair following demyelination in optic neuritis patients.

    PubMed

    Raz, Noa; Hallak, Michal; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Levin, Netta

    2014-04-14

    In order to follow optic neuritis patients and evaluate the effectiveness of their treatment, a handy, accurate and quantifiable tool is required to assess changes in myelination at the central nervous system (CNS). However, standard measurements, including routine visual tests and MRI scans, are not sensitive enough for this purpose. We present two visual tests addressing dynamic monocular and binocular functions which may closely associate with the extent of myelination along visual pathways. These include Object From Motion (OFM) extraction and Time-constrained stereo protocols. In the OFM test, an array of dots compose an object, by moving the dots within the image rightward while moving the dots outside the image leftward or vice versa. The dot pattern generates a camouflaged object that cannot be detected when the dots are stationary or moving as a whole. Importantly, object recognition is critically dependent on motion perception. In the Time-constrained Stereo protocol, spatially disparate images are presented for a limited length of time, challenging binocular 3-dimensional integration in time. Both tests are appropriate for clinical usage and provide a simple, yet powerful, way to identify and quantify processes of demyelination and remyelination along visual pathways. These protocols may be efficient to diagnose and follow optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis patients. In the diagnostic process, these protocols may reveal visual deficits that cannot be identified via current standard visual measurements. Moreover, these protocols sensitively identify the basis of the currently unexplained continued visual complaints of patients following recovery of visual acuity. In the longitudinal follow up course, the protocols can be used as a sensitive marker of demyelinating and remyelinating processes along time. These protocols may therefore be used to evaluate the efficacy of current and evolving therapeutic strategies, targeting myelination of the CNS.

  1. Myelin-specific Th17 cells induce severe relapsing optic neuritis with irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Larabee, Chelsea M.; Hu, Yang; Desai, Shruti; Georgescu, Constantin; Wren, Jonathan D.; Axtell, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Optic neuritis affects most patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and current treatments are unreliable. The purpose of this study was to characterize the contribution of Th1 and Th17 cells to the development of optic neuritis. Methods Mice were passively transferred myelin-specific Th1 or Th17 cells to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of neuroautoimmunity. Visual acuity was assessed daily with optokinetic tracking, and 1, 2, and 3 weeks post-induction, optic nerves and retinas were harvested for immunohistochemical analyses. Results Passive transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis elicits acute episodes of asymmetric visual deficits and is exacerbated in Th17-EAE relative to Th1-EAE. The Th17-EAE optic nerves contained more inflammatory infiltrates and an increased neutrophil to macrophage ratio. Significant geographic degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells accompanied Th17-EAE but not Th1. Conclusions Th17-induced transfer EAE recapitulates pathologies observed in MS-associated optic neuritis, namely, monocular episodes of vision loss, optic nerve inflammation, and geographic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. PMID:27122964

  2. Roles of Treg/Th17 Cell Imbalance and Neuronal Damage in the Visual Dysfunction Observed in Experimental Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Chronologically.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; You, Caiyun; Zhang, Zhuhong; Zhang, Jingkai; Yan, Hua

    2015-12-01

    Optic neuritis associated with multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune optic neuritis (EAON), is characterized by inflammation, T cell activation, demyelination, and neuronal damage, which might induce permanent vision loss. Elucidating the chronological relationship among the features is critical for treatment of demyelinating optic neuritis. EAON was induced in C57BL/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein subcutaneously, and visual function was assessed by flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) at days 7, 11, 14, 19, 23, 28 post-immunization. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis was measured by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling. Demyelination and axonal damage were verified with myelin basic protein (MBP) and β-amyloid precursor protein staining, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction quantified IL-17, IL-1β, TGF-β, FoxP3, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA expression in the optic nerve, as well as FoxP3 and IL-17 staining. Systemic changes of Th17 and Treg cells were tested by flow cytometry in spleen. F-VEP latency was prolonged at 11 days and peaked at 23 days commensurate with demyelination. However, F-VEP amplitude was reduced at 11 days, preceding axon damage, and was exacerbated at 23 days when a peak in RGC apoptosis was detected. Th17 cells up-regulated as early as 7 days and peaked at 11 days, while Treg cells down-regulated inversely compared to Th17 cells change as verified by IL-17 and FoxP3 expression; spleen cell samples were slightly different, demonstrating marked changed at 14 days. Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in the optic nerve precedes and may initiate neuronal damage of axons and RGCs. These changes are commensurate with the appearances of visual dysfunction reflected in F-VEP and hence may offer a novel therapeutic avenue for vision preservation. PMID:26318182

  3. Roles of Treg/Th17 Cell Imbalance and Neuronal Damage in the Visual Dysfunction Observed in Experimental Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Chronologically.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; You, Caiyun; Zhang, Zhuhong; Zhang, Jingkai; Yan, Hua

    2015-12-01

    Optic neuritis associated with multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune optic neuritis (EAON), is characterized by inflammation, T cell activation, demyelination, and neuronal damage, which might induce permanent vision loss. Elucidating the chronological relationship among the features is critical for treatment of demyelinating optic neuritis. EAON was induced in C57BL/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein subcutaneously, and visual function was assessed by flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) at days 7, 11, 14, 19, 23, 28 post-immunization. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis was measured by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling. Demyelination and axonal damage were verified with myelin basic protein (MBP) and β-amyloid precursor protein staining, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction quantified IL-17, IL-1β, TGF-β, FoxP3, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA expression in the optic nerve, as well as FoxP3 and IL-17 staining. Systemic changes of Th17 and Treg cells were tested by flow cytometry in spleen. F-VEP latency was prolonged at 11 days and peaked at 23 days commensurate with demyelination. However, F-VEP amplitude was reduced at 11 days, preceding axon damage, and was exacerbated at 23 days when a peak in RGC apoptosis was detected. Th17 cells up-regulated as early as 7 days and peaked at 11 days, while Treg cells down-regulated inversely compared to Th17 cells change as verified by IL-17 and FoxP3 expression; spleen cell samples were slightly different, demonstrating marked changed at 14 days. Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in the optic nerve precedes and may initiate neuronal damage of axons and RGCs. These changes are commensurate with the appearances of visual dysfunction reflected in F-VEP and hence may offer a novel therapeutic avenue for vision preservation.

  4. Retrobulbar optic neuropathy secondary to isolated sphenoid sinus disease

    PubMed Central

    Chafale, Vishal Annaji; Lahoti, Satish Arunkumar; Pandit, Alak; Gangopadhyay, Goutam; Biswas, Atanu

    2015-01-01

    Paranasal sinus disease can cause a condition that mimics optic neuritis. Simultaneous appearance of both diseases would create etiological dilemma. We report two cases of retrobulbar optic neuropathy secondary to isolated sphenoid sinus disease. In the case of a 65-year-old female who had presented with acute loss of vision in the left eye associated with left-sided frontal headache which subsequently turned out to be caused by optic nerve compression at the orbital apex due to collection in abnormally pneumatized left lesser wing of the sphenoid. In another case, a 65-year-old lady had presented with symptoms of bilateral retrobulbar optic neuropathy which was found to be due to direct compression of optic nerves at the orbital apex secondary to metastases from breast carcinoma. PMID:25883489

  5. Repository corticotropin injection in a patient presenting with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and optic neuritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Background Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) causes scarring or sclerosis of glomeruli that act as tiny filters in the kidneys, damage to which results in diminished ability to properly filter blood, resulting in the urinary loss of plasma proteins and subsequent proteinuria. Case presentation A 60-year-old, white female with a history of intermittent proteinuria was referred by her primary care physician for renal dysfunction. Biopsy confirmed FSGS and she was treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. She also had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but no active synovitis and was maintained on prednisone 5 mg/d. She also complained of worsening vision in her right eye and was diagnosed with optic neuritis (ON). She remained stable for about 8 months when examination indicated FSGS relapse, and she reported painful RA flares. She was treated with Acthar® Gel (40 mg biweekly) for 6 months, after which proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio decreased to about half. Her ON improved, and she reported that she had fewer RA flares and pain improved by 50%. This case of confirmed FSGS showed an improved response to treatment with Acthar Gel for FSGS with concomitant RA and ON. Conclusion This referral case is relevant to primary care practitioners who treat disorders that may be responsive to corticosteroid therapy. The antiproteinuric effects and ancillary improvement in RA and ON symptoms during treatment with Acthar Gel are not entirely explained by its steroidogenic actions. ACTH is a bioactive peptide that, together with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, exhibits biologic efficacy by modulating proinflammatory cytokines and subsequent leukocyte extravasation and may have autocrine/paracrine effects in joints. While Acthar Gel was primarily administered in this case to treat proteinuria, it also showed ancillary benefits in patients with concomitant inflammatory disease states. PMID:25848316

  6. Adeno-Associated Viral-Mediated Catalase Expression Suppresses Optic Neuritis in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, John; Qi, Xiaoping; Hauswirth, William W.

    1998-11-01

    Suppression of oxidative injury by viral-mediated transfer of the human catalase gene was tested in the optic nerves of animals with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of primary central nervous system demyelination that has been frequently used as an animal model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS). The optic nerve is a frequent site of involvement common to both EAE and MS. Recombinant adeno-associated virus containing the human gene for catalase was injected over the right optic nerve heads of SJL/J mice that were simultaneously sensitized for EAE. After 1 month, cell-specific catalase activity, evaluated by quantitation of catalase immunogold, was increased approximately 2-fold each in endothelia, oligodendroglia, astrocytes, and axons of the optic nerve. Effects of catalase on the histologic lesions of EAE were measured by computerized analysis of the myelin sheath area (for demyelination), optic disc area (for optic nerve head swelling), extent of the cellular infiltrate, extravasated serum albumin labeled by immunogold (for blood-brain barrier disruption), and in vivo H2O2 reaction product. Relative to control, contralateral optic nerves injected with the recombinant virus without a therapeutic gene, catalase gene inoculation reduced demyelination by 38%, optic nerve head swelling by 29%, cellular infiltration by 34%, disruption of the blood-brain barrier by 64%, and in vivo levels of H2O2 by 61%. Because the efficacy of potential treatments for MS are usually initially tested in the EAE animal model, this study suggests that catalase gene delivery by using viral vectors may be a therapeutic strategy for suppression of MS.

  7. Structural Alterations of Segmented Macular Inner Layers in Aquaporin4-Antibody-Positive Optic Neuritis Patients in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chunxia; Wang, Wei; Xu, Quangang; Zhao, Shuo; Li, Hongyang; Yang, Mo; Cao, Shanshan; Zhou, Huanfen; Wei, Shihui

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to analyse the structural injury of the peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL) and segmented macular layers in optic neuritis (ON) in aquaporin4-antibody (AQP4-Ab) seropositivity(AQP4-Ab-positiveON) patients and in AQP4-Ab seronegativity (AQP4-Ab-negative ON) patients in order to evaluate their correlations with the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and the value of the early diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Design This is a retrospective, cross-sectional and control observational study. Methods In total, 213 ON patients (291 eyes) and 50 healthy controls (HC) (100 eyes) were recruited in this study. According to a serum AQP4-Ab assay, 98 ON patients (132 eyes) were grouped as AQP4-Ab-positive ON and 115 ON patients (159 eyes) were grouped as AQP4-Ab-negative ON cohorts. All subjects underwent scanning with spectralis optical coherence tomography (OCT) and BCVA tests. pRNFL and segmented macular layer measurements were analysed. Results The pRNFL thickness in AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes showed a more serious loss during 0–2 months (-27.61μm versus -14.47 μm) and ≥6 months (-57.91μm versus -47.19μm) when compared with AQP4-Ab-negative ON eyes. AQP4-Ab-positive ON preferentially damaged the nasal lateral pRNFL. The alterations in the macular ganglion cell layer plus the inner plexiform layer (GCIP) in AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes were similar to those in AQP4-Ab-negative ON eyes. AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes had entirely different injury patterns in the inner nuclear layer (INL) compared with AQP4-Ab-negative ON eyes during the first 6 months after the initial ON attack. These differences were as follows: the INL volume of AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes had a gradual growing trend compared with AQP4-Ab-negative ON eyes, and it increased rapidly during 0–2 months, reached its peak during 2–4 months, and then decreased gradually. The pRNFL and GCIP in AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes had positive correlations with BCVA. When the p

  8. Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Is Associated with Altered APP Cleavage in Neurons and Up-Regulation of p53.

    PubMed

    Herold, Sabine; Kumar, Prateek; Wichert, Sven P; Kretzschmar, Benedikt; Bähr, Mathias; Rossner, Moritz J; Hein, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Histopathological and radiological analysis revealed that neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course. However, the pathological mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration are poorly understood. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Brown Norway rats (BN-rats) is a well-established animal model, especially of the neurodegenerative aspects of MS. Previous studies in this animal model indicated that loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the neurons that form the axons of the optic nerve, occurs in the preclinical phase of the disease and is in part independent of overt histopathological changes of the optic nerve. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes which are involved in neuronal cell loss at different disease stages of EAE. Furthermore, genes that are highly specific for autoimmune-driven neurodegeneration were compared to those regulated in RGCs after optic nerve axotomy at corresponding time points. Using laser capture micro dissection we isolated RNA from unfixed RGCs and performed global transcriptome analysis of retinal neurons. In total, we detected 582 genes sequentially expressed in the preclinical phase and 1150 genes in the clinical manifest EAE (P < 0.05, fold-induction >1.5). Furthermore, using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), we identified amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a potential upstream regulator of changes in gene expression in the preclinical EAE but neither in clinical EAE, nor at any time point after optic nerve transection. Therefore, the gene pathway analysis lead to the hypothesis that altered cleavage of APP in neurons in the preclinical phase of EAE leads to the enhanced production of APP intracellular domain (AICD), which in turn acts as a transcriptional regulator and thereby initiates an apoptotic signaling cascade via up-regulation of the

  9. Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Is Associated with Altered APP Cleavage in Neurons and Up-Regulation of p53

    PubMed Central

    Wichert, Sven P.; Kretzschmar, Benedikt; Bähr, Mathias; Rossner, Moritz J.; Hein, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Histopathological and radiological analysis revealed that neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course. However, the pathological mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration are poorly understood. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Brown Norway rats (BN-rats) is a well-established animal model, especially of the neurodegenerative aspects of MS. Previous studies in this animal model indicated that loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the neurons that form the axons of the optic nerve, occurs in the preclinical phase of the disease and is in part independent of overt histopathological changes of the optic nerve. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes which are involved in neuronal cell loss at different disease stages of EAE. Furthermore, genes that are highly specific for autoimmune-driven neurodegeneration were compared to those regulated in RGCs after optic nerve axotomy at corresponding time points. Using laser capture micro dissection we isolated RNA from unfixed RGCs and performed global transcriptome analysis of retinal neurons. In total, we detected 582 genes sequentially expressed in the preclinical phase and 1150 genes in the clinical manifest EAE (P < 0.05, fold-induction >1.5). Furthermore, using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), we identified amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a potential upstream regulator of changes in gene expression in the preclinical EAE but neither in clinical EAE, nor at any time point after optic nerve transection. Therefore, the gene pathway analysis lead to the hypothesis that altered cleavage of APP in neurons in the preclinical phase of EAE leads to the enhanced production of APP intracellular domain (AICD), which in turn acts as a transcriptional regulator and thereby initiates an apoptotic signaling cascade via up-regulation of the

  10. A case of recurrent optic neuritis associated with cerebral and spinal cord lesions and autoantibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein relapsed after fingolimod therapy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Teiichiro; Nakajima, Hideki; Motomura, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Keiko; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Tsujino, Akira

    2016-04-28

    A previously healthy 16-year-old girl developed sudden eye pain and visual loss in her right eye. On day 7 from onset her right visual acuity had decreased to light perception, and she underwent 5 courses of intravenous methylprednisolone therapy (IVMP, 1 g/day for 3 consecutive days per week). Her eye pain and her visual acuity had improved immediately. Eleven months later, follow-up MRI revealed three T2-hyperintense plaques involving subcortical white matter in the left occipital lobe, right frontal lobe, right thalamus, and thoracic spinal cord. We suspected the diagnosis as multiple sclerosis and treated with fingolimod. She developed recurrent optic neuritis (ON) on day 19 from fingolimod therapy, and we stopped fingolimod. For two years from onset she was admitted five times due to recurrences of ON and appearance of white matter lesion and myelitis. At 22 months, anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies revealed to be positive in her sera from the onset to the present. Our case report suggests that fingolimod might not be effective in anti-MOG antibody-related disorders together with anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody-positive group. PMID:27010093

  11. White and Gray Matter Volume Changes and Correlation with Visual Evoked Potential in Patients with Optic Neuritis: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Zhang, Qiang; Hu, Pei-Hong; Zhong, Yu-Lin; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Rong; Xu, Ting-Ting; Shao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate potential morphological alterations of gray and white matter in patients with optic neuritis (ON) and their relationship with behavioral performance, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Material/Methods Twelve (4 males, 8 females) patients with ON and 12 (4 males, 8 females) age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging data were analyzed using two-sample t tests to identify group differences in gray and white matter volume (GMV, WMV). Correlation analysis was used to explore relationships between observed GMV and WMV of different areas and visual evoked potential (VEP) in ON. Results Compared with HCs, ON patients had: significantly decreased GMV in the left postcentral gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left anterior cingulate, left and right middle frontal gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobule; decreased WMV in the left middle frontal gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule; and increased WMV in the left fusiform gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule. VEP latency of the right eye in ON correlated positively with WMV signal value of the left fusiform gyrus (r=0.726, p=0.008), and negatively with GMV signal value of the right inferior parietal lobule (r=−0.611, p=0.035). Duration of ON correlated negatively with WMV signal value of the right superior frontal gyrus (r=−0.662, p=0.019), while best-corrected visual acuity (VA) of the right eye correlated negatively with WMV signal value of the left middle frontal gyrus (r=−0.704, p=0.011). Conclusions These results suggest significant brain involvement in ON, which may reflect the underlying pathologic mechanism. Correlational results demonstrate that VEP in ON is closely associated with WMV and GMV atrophy in many brain regions. PMID:27045330

  12. Disturbed spontaneous brain-activity pattern in patients with optic neuritis using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Cai, Feng-Qin; Hu, Pei-Hong; Zhong, Yu-Lin; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Rong; Pei, Chong-Gang; Zhou, Fu-Qing; Shao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To use the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) technique to investigate the local features of spontaneous brain activity in optic neuritis (ON) and their relationship with behavioral performance. Materials and methods Twelve patients with ON (four male, eight female) and twelve age-, sex-, and education status-matched healthy controls (HCs) (four male, eight female) underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) scans. The ALFF technique was used to assess local features of spontaneous brain activity. Correlation analysis was used to explore the relationship between the observed mean ALFF values of the different areas and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in patients with ON. Results Compared with HCs, patients with ON had significantly decreased ALFF values in the posterior and anterior lobes of the right cerebellum, right putamen, right inferior frontal gyrus, right insula, right supramarginal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left medial frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate/medial frontal gyrus, and bilateral precuneus, and significantly increased ALFF values in the posterior lobes of the left and right cerebellum, right inferior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal/fusiform gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus, left fusiform gyrus, left calcarine fissure, left inferior parietal lobule, and left cuneus. We found negative correlations between the mean ALFF signal value of the left parahippocampal gyrus and the VEP amplitude of the right eye in ON (r=−0.584, P=0.046), and a positive correlation between the mean ALFF signal value of the bilateral precuneus and the best-corrected visual acuity of the left eye (r=0.579, P=0.048) in patients with ON. Conclusion ON mainly seems to involve dysfunction in the default-mode network, cerebellum, and limbic system, which may reflect the underlying pathologic mechanism of ON. PMID:26719692

  13. Power inverter with optical isolation

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Paul G.; Schroeder, John Alan

    2005-12-06

    An optically isolated power electronic power conversion circuit that includes an input electrical power source, a heat pipe, a power electronic switch or plurality of interconnected power electronic switches, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the input power source, a mechanism for connecting comprising an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or input bus bars, an optically isolated drive circuit connected to the switch, a heat sink assembly upon which the power electronic switch or switches is mounted, an output load, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the output load, the mechanism for connecting including an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or output bus bars, at least one a fiber optic temperature sensor mounted on the heat sink assembly, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar, and at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar.

  14. Low-loss, high-isolation, fiber-optic isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, George F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A low-loss, high-isolation, fiber-optic isolator for use in single-mode fiber systems utilizes a Faraday rotator and two polarizers, one at each end angularly oriented from each other at the angle of rotation for isolation, and two aspheric lens connectors to couple optical fibers to the Faraday isolator to reduce forward loss to about 2.5 dB and improve isolation to greater than 70 dB.

  15. Visible optical isolator using ZnSe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunderlich, J. A.; Deshazer, L. G.

    1977-01-01

    A compact Faraday effect optical isolator was constructed for visible wavelengths and tested at 5145 A. The nonreciprocal element of the isolator was polycrystalline zinc selenide placed in the magnetic field of a permanent magnet. For 5145 A the isolator had a 2.06-dB insertion loss and a 25.5-dB isolation. Indices of refraction and Verdet constants were measured for zinc selenide in the wavelength region from 4700 to 6300 A.

  16. Semileaky thin-film optical isolator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, S.T.; Biolsi, W.A.; Blank, S.L.; Tien, P.K.; Martin, R.J.; Bridenbaugh, P.M.; Grabbe, P.

    1981-05-01

    Two interesting effects have been experimentally demonstrated for the first time: (1) simultaneous reciprocal and nonreciprocal mode conversion to achieve an isolation effect and (2) magneto-optic switching between guided and radiation modes. These effects were observed in connection with the construction of a previously proposed thin-film optical isolator. The isolator consists of a piece of LiNbO/sub 3/ placed on top of a thin film of yttrium ion garnet (YIG) with a selenium layer to avoid optical contact problems. The isolator, which is 1 cm long, exhibited 10 dB of isolation at lambda = 1.15 ..mu..m. The observed isolation was better than theoretical predictions and a mysterious isolation direction dependence on mode order was observed. Although the device had 10 dB of insertion loss and required a magnetic field of 40 Oe, with a slight change in wavelength and film composition, it should be possible to reduce the insertion loss and field required to under 1 dB and 0.1 Oe, respectively. These characteristics combined with broad tolerances on film thickness and the length of the isolation region, broadband operation (from lambda = 1.1 to 4.5 ..mu..m), and easy construction and adjustment make the isolator very attractive for use in integrated optics.

  17. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Plant, Gordon T

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of autoimmune optic neuropathies (ON) is extending. The phenotypic spectrum includes single isolated optic neuritis (SION), relapsing isolated optic neuritis (RION), chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy (CRION), the neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, multiple sclerosis associated optic neuritis (MSON) and unclassified optic neuritis (UCON) forms. Epidemiological data suggests a slight female predominance. The ethnic heritage is relevant as Caucasian patients are more likely to suffer from MSON, whilst SION, RION, CRION and NMO are more frequent in non-Caucasian patients. Importantly, prognosis for recovery of visual function is good in MSON, but poorer in NMO and CRION which also have a high chance for recurrent episodes. Testing for serum anti-AQP4 autoantibodies is advised in all patients with severe, atypical or recurrent ON because of the high diagnostic specificity. The diagnostic specificity may be aided by testing for glial biomarkers in the CSF and prognostic accuracy by testing for biomarkers for neuroaxonal degeneration. Optical coherence tomography is a highly accurate tool to document the final outcome. The current clinical classification criteria rely on the phenotype, response to treatment and presence of anti-AQP4 autoantibodies.

  18. Optical isolation via unidirectional resonant photon tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Moccia, Massimo; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Galdi, Vincenzo; Alù, Andrea; Engheta, Nader

    2014-01-28

    We show that tri-layer structures combining epsilon-negative and magneto-optical material layers can exhibit unidirectional resonant photon tunneling phenomena that can discriminate between circularly polarized (CP) waves of given handedness impinging from opposite directions, or between CP waves with different handedness impinging from the same direction. This physical principle, which can also be interpreted in terms of a Fabry-Perot-type resonance, may be utilized to design compact optical isolators for CP waves. Within this framework, we derive simple analytical conditions and design formulae, and quantitatively assess the isolation performance, also taking into account the unavoidable imperfections and nonidealities.

  19. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. 4.123 Section 4.123 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss...

  20. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  1. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  2. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  3. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  4. Optically isolated signal coupler with linear response

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    An optocoupler for isolating electrical signals that translates an electrical input signal linearly to an electrical output signal. The optocoupler comprises a light emitter, a light receiver, and a light transmitting medium. The light emitter, preferably a blue, silicon carbide LED, is of the type that provides linear, electro-optical conversion of electrical signals within a narrow wavelength range. Correspondingly, the light receiver, which converts light signals to electrical signals and is preferably a cadmium sulfide photoconductor, is linearly responsive to light signals within substantially the same wavelength range as the blue LED.

  5. Acute Sciatic Neuritis following Lumbar Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Patrick; Reddy, Chandan G.

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that the common cause of acute/chronic pain in the distribution of the lumbosacral nerve roots is the herniation of a lumbar intervertebral disc, unless proven otherwise. The surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation is successful in radicular pain and prevents or limits neurological damage in the majority of patients. Recurrence of sciatica after a successful disc surgery can be due to many possible etiologies. In the clinical setting we believe that the term sciatica might be associated with inflammation. We report a case of acute sciatic neuritis presented with significant persistent pain shortly after a successful disc surgery. The patient is a 59-year-old female with complaint of newly onset sciatica after complete pain resolution following a successful lumbar laminectomy for acute disc extrusion. In order to manage the patient's newly onset pain, the patient had multiple pain management visits which provided minimum relief. Persistent sciatica and consistent physical examination findings urged us to perform a pelvic MRI to visualize suspected pathology, which revealed right side sciatic neuritis. She responded to the electrical neuromodulation. Review of the literature on sciatic neuritis shows this is the first case report of sciatic neuritis subsequent to lumbar laminectomy. PMID:25024708

  6. Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Melvin A.

    1992-01-01

    A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system s described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber.

  7. Isolation of a single rice chromosome by optical micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haowei; Liu, Xiaohui; Li, Yinmei; Han, Bin; Lou, Liren; Wang, Kangjun

    2004-01-01

    A new method based on optical tweezers technology is reported for the isolation of a single chromosome. A rice cell suspended in liquid was first fragmented by laser pulses (optical scalpel). Then a single released chromosome from the cell was manipulated and pulled away from other cells and oddments by optical tweezers without any direct mechanical contact. Finally the isolated single chromosome was extracted individually into a glass capillary nearby. After molecular cloning of the isolated chromosome, we obtained some specific DNA segments from the single chromosome. All these segments can be used for rice genomic sequencing. Different methods of extracting a single chromosome are compared. The advantages of optical micromanipulation method are summarized.

  8. Optical scattering from isolated metal nanoparticles and arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtz, G. A.; Im, J. S.; Gray, S. K.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Chemistry

    2003-12-25

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is used to explore the optical scattering from isolated metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and arrays of MNPs. The optical excitation source is an evanescent wave created through total internal reflection of a continuous wave laser beam at the sample-air interface. For optical excitation of isolated Ag and Au MNPs, experimental results show that the scattered light propagates into the far field at an angle of 19{sup o} from the substrate. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations are used to study simpler but related metallic nanowire systems under evanescent wave excitation. The FDTD results are found to be similar to the experimental results, indicating the generality of the scattering phenomenon. NSOM characterization of plasmonic arrays that consist of closely spaced Ag MNPs are subsequently reported. Confined optical signals within the array are observed along with a reduction in the far-field scattered signal. Simultaneous collection of the atomic force microscopy signal and near-field signals also shows that the spatial distribution of the near-field is strongly modified in the arrays compared to isolated MNPs. FDTD studies on arrays of nanowires also show large differences from the isolated metal nanoparticle calculations, including a decrease in the forward scattered angle (with chain length) and diminished overall forward scattering.

  9. Dual stage passive vibration isolation for optical interferometer missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronowicki, Allen J.; MacDonald, Rhonda; Gürsel, Yekta; Goullioud, Renaud; Neville, Timothy; Platus, David L.

    2003-02-01

    Future space-based optical instruments such as the Space Interferometer Mission have vibration-induced error allocations at the levels of a few nano-meters and milli-arc-seconds. A dual stage passive isolation approach has been proposed using isolation first at the vibration-inducing reaction wheels, and a second isolation layer between the bus portion of the space vehicle (the backpack) and the optical payload. The development of the backpack isolator is described, with unit transmissibility results for individual isolator struts. The dual stage isolation approach is demonstrated on a dynamically feature-rich, 7-meter structural testbed (STB3). A new passive suspension that mitigates ground vibrations above 0.4 Hz has been integrated into the testbed. A series of OPD performance predictions have been made using measured transfer functions. These indicate that the 5-nm dynamic OPD allocation is within reach using the dual isolator approach. Demonstrating these low response levels in a noisy air environment has proven to be difficult. We are sequentially executing a plan to mitigate acoustic transmission between backpack and flight structure, as well as developing techniques to mitigate effects of background acoustic noise.

  10. [Devic disease associated with isolated spinal cord atrophy].

    PubMed

    Landragin, N; Jeanjean, L; Bouly, S; Honnorat, J; de Sèze, J; Castelnovo, G; Labauge, P

    2007-12-01

    Devic disease is a rare entity characterized by bilateral optic neuritis and transverse myelitis. Recently, recognition of antibody activity (Anti NMO) led to broaden the clinical and MR phenotype spectrum of this disease. This report is about a patient with spinal cord atrophy and bilateral optic neuritis, occurring more than 8 years after symptom onset. PMID:18355472

  11. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  12. Optical mapping system for visualizing arrhythmias in isolated mouse atria.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robyn; Nygren, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Optical mapping has become an important technique in the study of cardiac electrophysiology, especially in terms of investigating the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias. The increasing availability of transgenic mice as models for cardiovascular disease is driving the need for instrumentation suitable for the study of electrical activity in the mouse heart. In this paper we evaluate our optical mapping system's ability to clearly record induced arrhythmic activity in an isolated mouse atrial preparation. Preliminary results indicate that the signal quality is high enough that individual optically recorded action potentials can be discerned in many pixels, even without post-processing for noise removal. The optical mapping video is clear enough for general observations regarding the patterns of electrical propagation during arrhythmic behaviour. The induced arrhythmias appear to have a regular pattern of activity, and are likely best classified as atrial tachycardias.

  13. Enhancing optical isolator performance in nonreciprocal waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Levy, Miguel; Carroll, Turhan K; El-Ganainy, Ramy

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the operation of optical isolators based on magneto-optics waveguide arrays beyond the coupled mode analysis. Semi-vectorial beam propagation simulations demonstrate that evanescent tail coupling and the effects of radiation are responsible for degrading the device's performance. Our analysis suggests that these effects can be mitigated when the array size is scaled up. In addition, we propose the use of radiation blockers in order to offset some of these effects, and we show that they provide a dramatic improvement in performance. Finally, we also study the robustness of the system with respect to fabrication tolerances using the coupled mode theory. We show that small, random variations in the system's parameters tend to average out as the number of optical guiding channels increases.

  14. Long-term follow-up of vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Marco; Nuti, Daniele

    2009-05-01

    The long-term outcome of vestibular neuritis was evaluated in 35 patients using 4 bedside tests (head impulse, head heave, head shake, vibration), the caloric test and two surveys that explored the degree of disability (Dizziness Handicap Inventory [DHI]) and the anxiety and depression levels (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]). Sixty-six percent of patients showed a positive bedside clinical test or calorics abnormalities. DHI scores were significantly higher in the patients group, while HADS scores were comparable between patients and controls. Disability from vestibular neuritis is primarily due to the vestibular disturbance itself, rather than purely psychological factors.

  15. Cauda Equina Neuritis: A Chronic Idiopathic Polyneuritis in Two Horses

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, C. G.; Futcher, K. G.; Clark, E. G.; Naylor, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Two cases of cauda equina neuritis are compared and contrasted. Neurological deficits of the tail and perineum were noted and functional deficits were seen in gait, urination, defecation and cranial nerve function. Lesions consisted of nonsuppurative inflammation of the nerve trunks and proliferation of the perineurium of the cauda equina. Cranial nerve involvement in one case supported a diagnosis of polyneuritis equi rather than cauda equina neuritis. The possible etiologies and pathogenesis of this disease are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:17422405

  16. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A.; Macri, G. F.; Gallo, A.; Fusconi, M.; De Virgilio, A.; Pagliuca, G.; Marinelli, C.; de Vincentiis, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes. PMID:24741601

  17. Optical payload isolation using the Miniature Vibration Isolation System (MVIS-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMickell, M. B.; Kreider, Thom; Hansen, Eric; Davis, Torey; Gonzalez, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Precision satellite payloads commonly require isolation from bus disturbance sources, such as reaction wheels, thrusters, stepper motors, cryo-coolers, solar array drives, thermal popping, and other moving devices. Since nearly every satellite essentially has a unique construction, custom isolation systems are usually designed to attenuate a wide bandwidth of disturbance frequencies. The disadvantage of these custom solutions is that they are not easily reusable or transferable and are generally not robust to changes in payload geometry and mass properties during the development. The MVIS-II isolation system is designed to provide vibration disturbance attenuation over a wide bandwidth, as well as being able to adapt to changes in payload mass properties and geometry, through active control of a smart material. MVIS-II is a collaborative effort between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Space Vehicle Directorate and Honeywell Defense and Space to validate miniature hybrid (passive/active) vibration isolation of sensitive optical payloads. The original flight experiment was intended to isolate a non-critical representative payload mass for demonstration purposes; however, the MVIS-II has been adapted to support the primary optical payload onboard the Tactical Satellite 2 (TacSat-2). Throughout the program MVIS-II has been able to adapt to changes in the payload geometry and mass properties with modification limited to support structures only. The MVIS-II system consists of a hexapod of hybrid struts, where each strut includes a patented passive 3-parameter DStrut n series with a novel hydraulically amplified piezoelectric actuator with integral load cell. Additionally, Honeywell's Flexible I/O controller electronics and software are used for command and control of the hardware. The passive D-Strut element provides a 40 dB/decade passive roll-off to attenuate mid-to-high frequency disturbances, while the active piezoelectric actuator is used for enhanced low

  18. Optical power of the isolated human crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Borja, David; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur; Ziebarth, Noel; Rosen, Alexandre M.; Jain, Rakhi; Amelinckx, Adriana; Arrieta, Esdras; Augusteyn, Robert C.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the age-dependence of isolated human crystalline lens power and quantify the contributions of the lens surfaces and refractive index gradient. Methods Experiments were performed on a total of 100 eyes from 73 donors (average post-mortem: 2.8±1.6 days) with an age range of 6 to 94 years. Lens power was measured with a modified commercial lensmeter or with an optical system based on the Scheiner principle. The radius of curvature and asphericity of the isolated lens surfaces were measured by shadowphotography. For each lens the contributions of the surfaces and the refractive index gradient to the measured lens power were calculated using an optical ray tracing software. The age dependency of these refractive powers was assessed. Results The total refractive power and surface refractive power both showed a biphasic age dependency. The total power decreased at a rate of −0.41D/year between age 6 and 58.1, and increased at a rate of 0.33D/year between age 58.1 and 82. The surface contribution decreased at a rate of −0.13D/year between age 6 and 55.2, and increased at a rate of 0.04D/year between age 55.2 and 94. The relative contribution of the surfaces increased by 0.17%/year. The equivalent refractive index also showed a biphasic age dependency with a decrease at a rate of −3.9×10−4/year from age 6 to 60.4 followed by a plateau. Conclusions The lens power decreases with age due mainly to a decrease in the contribution of the gradient. The use of a constant equivalent refractive index value to calculate lens power using the lens maker formula will underestimate the power of young lenses and overestimate the power of older lenses. PMID:18316704

  19. Edge Detection to Isolate Motion in Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C W

    2003-07-11

    Adaptive optics uses signal processing techniques and deformable mirrors to minimize image degradation caused by phase aberrations. In the case of telescope imaging, the atmosphere causes phase aberrations. In the case of satellite imaging, errors due to the ultra-light-weight characteristics of the primary mirror cause phase aberrations. Scene-based Shack-Hartmann Wave Front Sensing takes the correlation between successive wavelets to determine these phase aberrations. A large problem with the scene-based approach is that motion, such as a moving car, can cause the correlation of two lenslets to peak, not where the scenes align, but where the moving object in each frame aligns. As such, the continued use of scene-based Wave Front Sensing necessitates successful isolation of moving objects from a stationary background scene. With the knowledge of which pixels are immobile, one should avoid the problem of locking onto a moving object when taking the correlation of two successive frames in time. Two main requirements of isolation are consistency and efficiency. In this document I will discuss the different edge detection algorithms explored for moving object isolation and how I came to the conclusion that, for our purposes of scene-based Shack-Hartmann WFS, edge detection is too inconsistent to be of any use. Because the Shack-Hartmann lenslets limits us to low resolutions, edge detection that works on higher resolution images will not work on our images. The results of each algorithm will show that with so few pixels per subaperature, edge detection is a poor method of identifying moving objects.

  20. The First Case of Vestibulocochlear Neuritis in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Joo; Cho, Chin Saeng; Kim, Nak Min; Yun, Su A

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to increase throughout the world. Although neurologic complications are frequent in individuals with HIV infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), vestibulocochlear neuritis is still a relatively rare manifestation. We report the first case of vestibulocochlear neuritis occurring in an AIDS patient in Korea. PMID:27433384

  1. The First Case of Vestibulocochlear Neuritis in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Joo; Cho, Chin Saeng; Kim, Nak Min; Yun, Su A; Yoon, Hee Jung

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to increase throughout the world. Although neurologic complications are frequent in individuals with HIV infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), vestibulocochlear neuritis is still a relatively rare manifestation. We report the first case of vestibulocochlear neuritis occurring in an AIDS patient in Korea.

  2. On-chip optical isolation via unidirectional Bloch oscillations in a waveguide array.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Levy, Miguel

    2012-09-15

    We propose to use the unidirectionality of the optical Bloch oscillation phenomenon achievable in a magneto-optic asymmetric waveguide array to achieve optical isolation. At the 1.55 μm telecommunication wavelength, our isolator design exhibits an isolation ratio of 36 dB between forward- and backward-propagating waves. The proposed design consists of a waveguide array made in a silicon-on-insulator substrate with a magnetic garnet cover layer. A key role is played by the transverse-magnetic mode nonreciprocal phase shift effect.

  3. Optical isolation of circularly polarized light with a spontaneous magnetoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudêncio, Filipa R.; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2016-04-01

    The optical isolation functionality is of key importance in many photonic systems. However, a robust optical isolation is rather challenging to obtain due to the weak nonreciprocal response of conventional materials. Here, we theoretically explore novel solutions to obtain one-way propagation of circularly polarized light using materials with a spontaneous nonreciprocal response combined with chiral metamaterials. Furthermore, we investigate the opportunity of using standard anisotropic nonreciprocal materials (e.g., ferrites or bismuth iron garnet) to obtain the optical isolation of circularly polarized light.

  4. Cascaded transformerless DC-DC voltage amplifier with optically isolated switching devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A very high voltage amplifier is provided in which plural cascaded banks of capacitors are switched by optically isolated control switches so as to be charged in parallel from the preceding stage or capacitor bank and to discharge in series to the succeeding stage or capacitor bank in alternating control cycles. The optically isolated control switches are controlled by a logic controller whose power supply is virtually immune to interference from the very high voltage output of the amplifier by the optical isolation provided by the switches, so that a very high voltage amplification ratio may be attained using many capacitor banks in cascade.

  5. Isolated optic nerve oedema as unusual presentation of electric injury.

    PubMed

    Izzy, Saef; Deeb, Wissam; Peters, George B; Mitchell, Ann

    2014-10-15

    A 45-year-old man with no significant medical history presented following an electric current injury (380 V). He developed multiple systemic injuries including third degree burns and after 1 week of hospitalisation he reported unilateral visual changes. Examination suggested the presence of optic nerve oedema without evidence of haemorrhage, exudate or vessel abnormality. This was considered to be related to the electric shock. A trial of corticosteroids was considered. He was followed up to 5 months in clinic and was noted to have developed unilateral optic atrophy and no other systemic manifestations. Initial and 5 months follow-up optic nerve colour photograph and optical coherence topography were documented. The present case highlights the fact that electric current injury can present with only a unilateral ischaemic optic neuropathy, the need for early diagnosis for timely treatment and the controversial role of corticosteroids.

  6. Isolated optic nerve infiltration in systemic lymphoma--a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Usha R; Shah, Akash D; Arora, Vipul; Solanki, Urvashi

    2010-01-01

    Ocular involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma occurs either as primary ocular, central nervous system lymphoma or isolated intraocular lymphoma. Recurrence of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the form of CNS lymphoma has been reported. However, recurrence as an isolated optic nerve lesion without involving CNS has never been reported in the pediatric age group. We report a case of systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a 2-year-old female, which primarily occurred as suprapubic mass and later recurred in the form of isolated optic nerve infiltration, after remission of the primary disease. Early detection and prompt treatment resulted in complete reversal of the disease. PMID:20523257

  7. All-fiber optical isolator based on Faraday rotation in highly terbium-doped fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Jiang, S.; Zuegel, J. D.; Marciante, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    An all-fiber isolator with 17 dB optical isolation is demonstrated. The fiber Faraday rotator uses 56 wt. % terbium (Tb)-doped silicate fiber, and the fiber polarizers are Corning SP1060 single-polarization fiber. Finally, the effective Verdet constant of the Tb-doped fiber is measured to be -24.5±1.0 rad/(Tm) at 1053 nm, which is 20 times larger than silica fiber and 22% larger than previously reported results.

  8. Single-mode waveguide optical isolator based on direction-dependent cutoff frequency.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lingling; Drezdzon, Samuel M; Yoshie, Tomoyuki

    2008-09-29

    A single-mode-waveguide optical isolator based on propagation direction dependent cut-off frequency is proposed. The isolation bandwidth is the difference between the cut-off frequencies of the lowest forward and backward propagating modes. Perturbation theory is used for analyzing the correlation between the material distribution and the bandwidth. The mode profile determines an appropriate distribution of non-reciprocal materials.

  9. Isolated-attosecond-pulse generation with infrared double optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Pengfei; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2011-06-01

    We propose and theoretically demonstrate an infrared two-color polarization gating scheme for generating an intense isolated attosecond pulse (IAP) in the multicycle regime. Our simulations show that an IAP can be produced using a multicycle two-color driving pulse with a duration up to 60 fs. Moreover, the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of the driving laser is not required to be stabilized, although the IAP intensity changes with the CEP slip. Such a gating scheme significantly relaxes the requirements for driving lasers and opens the door to easily create intense IAPs with a high-power conventional multicycle laser pulse.

  10. Isolated-attosecond-pulse generation with infrared double optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Lan Pengfei; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2011-06-15

    We propose and theoretically demonstrate an infrared two-color polarization gating scheme for generating an intense isolated attosecond pulse (IAP) in the multicycle regime. Our simulations show that an IAP can be produced using a multicycle two-color driving pulse with a duration up to 60 fs. Moreover, the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of the driving laser is not required to be stabilized, although the IAP intensity changes with the CEP slip. Such a gating scheme significantly relaxes the requirements for driving lasers and opens the door to easily create intense IAPs with a high-power conventional multicycle laser pulse.

  11. Optical isolation in the LIGO gravitational wave laser detector in transient states

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, A A; Khazanov, Efim A

    2012-04-30

    This paper presents a numerical analysis of the degree of optical isolation of the laser source by the Faraday isolator in transient states of the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) detector. This system may be in transient states where the power of the light reflected from the detector to the laser source can exceed many times the power of the source. The present results can be used to analyse the need for installing an additional active mechanical isolation of the source and to evaluate its response time.

  12. Optical investigation of functional structures in isolated perfused pig heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, Robert; Boehnert, Markus; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2000-11-01

    Light scattering in tissue of mammals and humans is affected by subcellular structures. Since these structures correlate well with the status of cells and tissue, light scattering seems to be ideal for monitoring of functional tissue state. By use of EMPHO SSK Oxyscan we investigated functional parameters in a novel kind of isolated perfused pig heart model. In this perfusion model we use organs obtained by the local slaughterhouse that are reanimated at our institute by application of a heart-lung machine. By creating 3D-images of tissue scattering we found an interesting relation between anatomical structures of myocardium and the 3D-images. Additionally, we detected coherence between backscattered light intensity and functional tissue status. Furthermore, we got a sight into the redox state of cytochrome aa3, b and c by creating difference spectra. We believe that this new kind of tissue imaging method will give us the opportunity to get new insights into myocardial function.

  13. Efficient Generation of Isolated Attosecond Pulse with CEP-Unstabilized Multicycle Infrared Double Optical Gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Pengfei; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Midorikawa, Kastumi

    We proposed and theoretically demonstrated an optimized gating scheme, which we called infrared double optical gating (IRDOG), to create isolated attosecond pulses (IAPs) with a multicycle laser pulse. Our simulation shows that IAP can be generated by using a pulse up to 60 fs and carrier-envelop phase stabilization is not required.

  14. Controllable optical phase shift over one radian from a single isolated atom.

    PubMed

    Jechow, A; Norton, B G; Händel, S; Blūms, V; Streed, E W; Kielpinski, D

    2013-03-15

    Fundamental optics such as lenses and prisms work by applying phase shifts of several radians to incoming light, and rapid control of such phase shifts is crucial to telecommunications. However, large, controllable optical phase shifts have remained elusive for isolated quantum systems. We have used a single trapped atomic ion to induce and measure a large optical phase shift of 1.3±0.1 radians in light scattered by the atom. Spatial interferometry between the scattered light and unscattered illumination light enables us to isolate the phase shift in the scattered component. The phase shift achieves the maximum value allowed by atomic theory over the accessible range of laser frequencies, pointing out new opportunities in microscopy and nanophotonics. Single-atom phase shifts of this magnitude open up new quantum information protocols, in particular long-range quantum phase-shift-keying cryptography. PMID:25166534

  15. Isolation of intact astrocytes from the optic nerve head of adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2015-01-01

    The astrocytes of the optic nerve head are a specialized subtype of white matter astrocytes that form the direct cellular environment of the unmyelinated ganglion cell axons. Due to their potential involvement in glaucoma, these astrocytes have become a target of research. Due to the heterogeneity of the optic nerve tissue, which also contains other cell types, in some cases it may be desirable to conduct gene expression studies on small numbers of well-characterized astrocytes or even individual cells. Here, we describe a simple method to isolate individual astrocytes. This method permits obtaining astrocytes with intact morphology from the adult mouse optic nerve and reduces contamination of the isolated astrocytes by other cell types. Individual astrocytes can be recognized by their morphology and collected under microscopic control. The whole procedure can be completed in 2-3 hours. We also discuss downstream applications like multiplex single-cell PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR). PMID:26093274

  16. Versatile optical manipulation system for inspection, laser processing, and isolation of individual living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhrmann, B.; Jahnke, H.-G.; Schmidt, M.; Jähn, K.; Betz, T.; Müller, K.; Rothermel, A.; Käs, J.; Robitzki, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    Isolation of individual cells from a heterogeneous cell population is an invaluable step in the analysis of single cell properties. The demands in molecular and cellular biology as well as molecular medicine are the selection, isolation, and monitoring of single cells and cell clusters of biopsy material. Of particular interest are methods which complement a passive optical or spectroscopic selection with a variety of active single cell processing techniques such as mechanical, biochemical, or genetic manipulation prior to isolation. Sophisticated laser-based cell processing systems are available which can perform single cell processing in a contact-free and sterile manner. Until now, however, these multipurpose turnkey systems offer only basic micromanipulation and are not easily modified or upgraded, whereas laboratory situations often demand simple but versatile and adaptable solutions. We built a flexible laser micromanipulation platform combining contact-free microdissection and catapulting capabilities using a pulsed ultraviolet (337nm) laser with simultaneous generation of optical tweezing forces using a continuous wave infrared (1064nm) laser. The potential of our platform is exemplified with techniques such as local laser-induced injection of biomolecules into individual living cells, laser surgery, isolation of single cells by laser catapulting, and control of neuronal growth using optical gradient forces. Arbitrary dynamic optical force patterns can be created by fast laser scanning with acousto-optical deflectors and galvanometer mirrors, allowing multibeam contact-free micromanipulation, a prerequisite for reliable handling of material in laboratory-on-a-chip applications. All common microscopy techniques can be used simultaneously with the offered palette of micromanipulation methods. Taken together, we show that advanced optical micromanipulation systems can be designed which combine quality, cost efficiency, and adaptability.

  17. Idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis after laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis: a complication that may mimic position-related brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Minas, Vasileios; Aust, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old woman who developed idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis, also referred to as Parsonage-Turner syndrome, after laparoscopic excision of endometriosis. The differential diagnosis between this non-position-related neuritis and brachial plexus injury is discussed. The aim of this report was to raise awareness on this distressing postoperative complication. PMID:24183278

  18. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Leo-Kottler, B; Wissinger, B

    2011-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare disease primarily affecting the retinal ganglion cells. In most cases patients with LHON develop permanent visual loss with a large central scotoma in the visual field of both eyes. The optic disc becomes partially or completely pale. At the onset of the disease many patients are considered to suffer from an optic neuritis and are treated under the diagnostic and therapeutic regimen of optic neuritis. LHON is mostly only considered when high dose cortisone therapy fails to be effective or the second eye is affected. Thereafter, molecular genetic analysis will prove LHON in these cases. Detailed anamnesis including pedigree analysis in combination with observance of the peripapillary microangiopathic alterations at the fundus will help to speed up the diagnosis of LHON, but even after exact clinical and molecular genetic diagnosis of LHON some aspects of the disease still remain a mystery today.

  19. Ultraviolet-visible optical isolators based on CeF{sub 3} Faraday rotator

    SciTech Connect

    Víllora, Encarnación G. Shimamura, Kiyoshi; Plaza, Gustavo R.

    2015-06-21

    The first ultraviolet (UV) and visible optical isolators based on CeF{sub 3} are demonstrated. CeF{sub 3} possesses unique properties as Faraday rotator for the UV-visible wavelength region: a wide transparency range (wavelength of >300 nm) and an outstanding Verdet constant. In contrast, currently used terbium-gallium garnets and magneto-optical glasses possess a low transparency in the visible and a small Verdet constant in the UV, respectively. The optical isolator prototypes consist of a CeF{sub 3} rod, a single ring magnet, and a couple of beam splitters. The ring magnets have been designed to guarantee a homogeneous magnetic field; for it, numerical simulations have been carried out. The two prototypes are very compact and operate in the UV at 355 and in the visible at 405 nm, respectively. The performance of these devices indicates the high potential of CeF{sub 3} as a new UV-visible Faraday rotator, specially for shorter wavelengths where at present there are no optical isolators available.

  20. Cell manipulation tool with combined microwell array and optical tweezers for cell isolation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Gou, Xue; Chen, Shuxun; Yan, Xiao; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    Isolation from rare cells and deposition of sorted cells with high accuracy for further study are critical to a wide range of biomedical applications. In the current paper, we report an automated cell manipulation tool with combined optical tweezers and a uniquely designed microwell array, which functions for recognition, isolation, assembly, transportation and deposition of the interesting cells. The microwell array allows the passive hydrodynamic docking of cells, while offering the opportunity to inspect the interesting cell phenotypes with high spatio-temporal resolution based on the flexible image processing technique. In addition, dynamic and parallel cell manipulation in three dimensions can realize the target cell levitation from microwell and pattern assembly with multiple optical traps. Integrated with the programmed motorized stage, the optically levitated and assembled cells can be transported and deposited to the predefined microenvironment, so the tool can facilitate the integration of other on-chip functionalities for further study without removing these isolated cells from the chip. Experiments on human embryonic stem cells and yeast cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell manipulation tool. Besides the application to cell isolation and deposition, three other biological applications with this tool are also presented.

  1. Update on clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thouvenot, Éric

    2015-04-01

    Optic neuritis, myelitis and brainstem syndrome accompanied by a symptomatic MRI T2 or FLAIR hyperintensity and T1 hypointensity are highly suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) in young adults. They are called "clinically isolated syndrome" (CIS) and correspond to the typical first multiple sclerosis (MS) episode, especially when associated with other asymptomatic demyelinating lesions, without clinical, radiological and immunological sign of differential diagnosis. After a CIS, the delay of apparition of a relapse, which corresponds to the conversion to clinically definite MS (CDMS), varies from several months to more than 10 years (10-15% of cases, generally called benign RRMS). This delay is generally associated with the number and location of demyelinating lesions of the brain and spinal cord and the results of CSF analysis. Several studies comparing different MRI criteria for dissemination in space and dissemination in time of demyelinating lesions, two hallmarks of MS, provided enough substantial data to update diagnostic criteria for MS after a CIS. In the last revision of the McDonald's criteria in 2010, diagnostic criteria were simplified and now the diagnosis can be made by a single initial scan that proves the presence of active asymptomatic lesions (with gadolinium enhancement) and of unenhanced lesions. However, time to conversion remains highly unpredictable for a given patient and CIS can remain isolated, especially for idiopathic unilateral optic neuritis or myelitis. Univariate analyses of clinical, radiological, biological or electrophysiological characteristics of CIS patients in small series identified numerous risk factors of rapid conversion to MS. However, large series of CIS patients analyzing several characteristics of CIS patients and the influence of disease modifying therapies brought important information about the risk of CDMS or RRMS over up to 20 years of follow-up. They confirmed the importance of the initial MRI pattern of

  2. Electrochemically Organized Isolated Fullerene-Rich Thin Films with Optical Limiting Properties.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shusen; Zhang, Jian; Sang, Liwen; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Zhang, Zhe; Lu, Ping; Li, Feng; Li, Mao; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-09-21

    Electrochemical assembly was applied directly to determine the aggregation of nanoclusters in isolated fullerene-rich (54-63 wt %) thin films. The electroactive reactions were achieved using electroactive carbazole and pyrene, which led to distinguishable nanoparticle-like and irregular cluster formations. These films, with amorphous and transparent states, showed good photoactivity and significant optical limiting response with an excellent threshold of 63 mJ cm(-2). This work thus paves a way to assemble highly isolated (or monodispersed) building blocks into thin films at the molecular level with control of the nanostructural formations through important molecular design. PMID:27580965

  3. Early and Phasic Cortical Metabolic Changes in Vestibular Neuritis Onset

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Marco; Pagani, Marco; Napolitano, Bianca; Micarelli, Alessandro; Candidi, Matteo; Bruno, Ernesto; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Schillaci, Orazio

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF) are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN), that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients’ cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34) and Temporal (BA 38) cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34) and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38) respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients’ subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding knowledge about

  4. Induction of peripheral tolerance with peptide-specific anergy in experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, S K; Clark, L; Heber-Katz, E; Amento, E P; Rostami, A

    1993-09-01

    Neuritogenic T cells specific for SP-26, a synthetic peptide (residue 53-78) of myelin P2 protein that causes experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), use the same T cell receptor (TCR) V gene family (V beta 8) that can induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Lewis rats. Tolerance to autoregulatory T cells may be induced in rats by intravenous (iv) administration of antigen-coupled splenocytes; however, the mechanisms that lead to altered immune reactivity are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that SP-26, when coupled to syngeneic spleen cells and administered iv, either before or after disease induction, markedly inhibited development and expression of clinical signs and histological changes of EAN. The induction of tolerance by this method was peptide-specific and MHC-restricted. We showed previously that T cells involved in EAN utilize the T cell antigen receptor V beta 8, whereas less than 5% of normal rat peripheral T cells express V beta 8. We have examined T lymphocytes from tolerized rats to determine the presence or absence of V beta 8(+)-bearing cells in order to determine the mechanism of tolerance. V beta 8 cells were undetectable by Northern blot analysis in the lymph nodes of unimmunized animals but easily detected in SP-26-primed and tolerized rats. In addition, spleen cells isolated from tolerized animals were anergic and failed to proliferate in response to SP-26, but retained responsiveness to IL-2 and Con A stimulation. Thus, the peptide-specific unresponsiveness that can be induced in rats with EAN, a T-cell-mediated process that is MHC-restricted and utilizes the T cell receptor V beta 8, occurs while V beta 8 transcripts remain readily detectable in spleen and lymph node cells. The detection of V beta 8-bearing T cells requires the development of antibodies specific for this rat surface protein. PMID:7690307

  5. Induction of peripheral tolerance with peptide-specific anergy in experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, S K; Clark, L; Heber-Katz, E; Amento, E P; Rostami, A

    1993-09-01

    Neuritogenic T cells specific for SP-26, a synthetic peptide (residue 53-78) of myelin P2 protein that causes experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), use the same T cell receptor (TCR) V gene family (V beta 8) that can induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Lewis rats. Tolerance to autoregulatory T cells may be induced in rats by intravenous (iv) administration of antigen-coupled splenocytes; however, the mechanisms that lead to altered immune reactivity are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that SP-26, when coupled to syngeneic spleen cells and administered iv, either before or after disease induction, markedly inhibited development and expression of clinical signs and histological changes of EAN. The induction of tolerance by this method was peptide-specific and MHC-restricted. We showed previously that T cells involved in EAN utilize the T cell antigen receptor V beta 8, whereas less than 5% of normal rat peripheral T cells express V beta 8. We have examined T lymphocytes from tolerized rats to determine the presence or absence of V beta 8(+)-bearing cells in order to determine the mechanism of tolerance. V beta 8 cells were undetectable by Northern blot analysis in the lymph nodes of unimmunized animals but easily detected in SP-26-primed and tolerized rats. In addition, spleen cells isolated from tolerized animals were anergic and failed to proliferate in response to SP-26, but retained responsiveness to IL-2 and Con A stimulation. Thus, the peptide-specific unresponsiveness that can be induced in rats with EAN, a T-cell-mediated process that is MHC-restricted and utilizes the T cell receptor V beta 8, occurs while V beta 8 transcripts remain readily detectable in spleen and lymph node cells. The detection of V beta 8-bearing T cells requires the development of antibodies specific for this rat surface protein.

  6. The Optical Counterpart of the Isolated Neutron Star RX J1605.3+3249

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D. L.; Kulkarni, S. R.; van Kerkwijk, M. H.

    2003-05-01

    We have detected the optical counterpart to the nearby isolated neutron star RX J1605.3+3249 using observations from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrometer aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The counterpart, with m50CCD=26.84+/-0.07 mag and very blue colors, lies close to the ROSAT HRI error circle and within the Chandra error circle. The spectrum is consistent with a Rayleigh-Jeans tail whose emission is a factor of ~14 above the extrapolation of the X-ray blackbody, and the source has an unabsorbed X-ray-to-optical flux ratio of log(fX/fopt)=4.4, similar to that of other isolated neutron stars. This confirms the classification of RX J1605.3+3249 as a neutron star.

  7. An earth-isolated optically coupled wideband high voltage probe powered by ambient light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul M.

    2012-10-01

    An earth-isolated optically-coupled wideband high voltage probe has been developed for pulsed power applications. The probe uses a capacitive voltage divider coupled to a fast light-emitting diode that converts high voltage into an amplitude-modulated optical signal, which is then conveyed to a receiver via an optical fiber. A solar cell array, powered by ambient laboratory lighting, charges a capacitor that, when triggered, acts as a short-duration power supply for an on-board amplifier in the probe. The entire system has a noise level ⩽0.03 kV, a DC-5 MHz bandwidth, and a measurement range from -6 to 2 kV; this range can be conveniently adjusted.

  8. An earth-isolated optically coupled wideband high voltage probe powered by ambient light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul

    2012-10-01

    An earth-isolated optically coupled wideband high voltage probe has been developed for pulsed power applications. The probe uses a capacitive voltage divider coupled to a fast LED that converts high voltage into an amplitude-modulated optical signal, which is then conveyed to a receiver via an optical fiber. A solar cell array powered by ambient laboratory lighting charges a capacitor that, when triggered, acts as a short-duration power supply for an on-board amplifier in the probe. The entire system has a noise level <=0.03 kV, a DC-5 MHz bandwidth and a measurement range from -6 to 2 kV; this range can be conveniently adjusted.

  9. The AMIGA sample of isolated galaxies. XI. Optical characterisation of nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Leon, S.; Best, P.; Sulentic, J.

    2012-09-01

    Context. This paper is part of a series involving the AMIGA project (Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies), which identifies and studies a statistically significant sample of the most isolated galaxies in the northern sky. Aims: We present a catalogue of nuclear activity, traced by optical emission lines, in a well-defined sample of the most isolated galaxies in the local Universe, which will be used as a basis for studying the effect of the environment on nuclear activity. Methods: We obtained spectral data from the 6th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which were inspected in a semi-automatic way. We subtracted the underlying stellar populations from the spectra (using the software Starlight) and modelled the nuclear emission features. Standard emission-line diagnostics diagrams were applied, using a new classification scheme that takes into account censored data, to classify the type of nuclear emission. Results: We provide a final catalogue of spectroscopic data, stellar populations, emission lines and classification of optical nuclear activity for AMIGA galaxies. The prevalence of optical active galactic nuclei (AGN) in AMIGA galaxies is 20.4%, or 36.7% including transition objects. The fraction of AGN increases steeply towards earlier morphological types and higher luminosities. We compare these results with a matched analysis of galaxies in isolated denser environments (Hickson Compact Groups). After correcting for the effects of the morphology and luminosity, we find that there is no evidence for a difference in the prevalence of AGN between isolated and compact group galaxies, and we discuss the implications of this result. Conclusions: We find that a major interaction is not a necessary condition for the triggering of optical AGN. Full Tables 1-7 and A.1-A.3 are only available in electronic form at http://amiga.iaa.es/ and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  10. Isolated primary central nervous system lymphoma arising from the optic chiasm.

    PubMed

    Vassal, F; Pommier, B; Boutet, C; Forest, F; Campolmi, N; Nuti, C

    2014-12-01

    A 58-year-old previously healthy woman rapidly developed progressive bilateral visual loss. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a bulging appearance of the optic chiasm, with homogeneous enhancement after gadolinium administration, which suggested an optic glioma or inflammatory disease. In the absence of (para)clinical clues for a specific diagnosis despite extensive investigation, a biopsy of one optic nerve was performed, resulting in a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma. There was no evidence of any other ocular or systemic involvement, therefore the conclusion was that this immunocompetent patient had a primary central nervous system lymphoma isolated in the anterior visual pathway. Treatment included two cycles of polychemotherapy (rituximab, methotrexate, carmustine, etoposide, methylprednisolone), followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and rituximab plus cytarabine consolidation therapy. Subsequently, the patient exhibited significant improvement in vision, and was still disease-free at the 1-year follow-up examination. The aim of the present paper was to provide well-documented clinical, radiological, and intraoperative features of isolated primary malignant lymphoma arising from the anterior visual pathway. A better recognition of this rare pathological entity is necessary for clinicians who may encounter similar presentations, as prompt management is crucial for both a visual and vital prognosis. PMID:25245922

  11. Optic nerve involvement in childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus: Three cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Suri, D; Abujam, B; Gupta, A; Rawat, A; Saikia, B; Walker Minz, R; Gupta, V; Bansal, R; Kaushik, S; Singh, S

    2016-01-01

    The ocular system can be affected in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in one third of patients. However, optic nerve involvement is relatively uncommon, but is more so in pediatric SLE patients, where it can occur in 1% of cases. We report three children with SLE who presented with optic nerve involvement. Two children had optic neuritis, with optic neuritis being the first manifestation in one child. The third child had ischaemic optic neuropathy secondary to antiphospholipid syndrome. A careful work up for SLE should be performed in every child with optic nerve disease. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment results in a better prognosis.

  12. Optical mapping analysis of the spatiotemporal pattern of experimental tachyarrhythmia in improved isolated rat atrium preparation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tetsuro

    2008-04-01

    We have studied the experimental tachyarrhythmia in an improved isolated rat atrial preparation for the optical mapping of excitation spread. The atrial preparation, including the right or left auricle, was dissected from the adult rat heart, and an artificial hole was made in the center of the preparation. The preparation was then stained with a fast merocyanine-rhodanine voltage-sensitive dye (NK2761). Using a multi-element (16 x 16) photodiode array, the spread of excitation was assessed optically by timing the initiation of the action potential-related extrinsic absorption changes. In comparison with the intact isolated right atrial preparation, which we used previously, the mapping of the excitation spread was much easier and more precise because of the simple structure of the preparation. The electrical stimulation applied by a bipolar electrode evoked the sustained excitation with a fast rhythm, which we termed "experimental tachyarrhythmia" (ET). We optically mapped the spatiotemporal patterns of the spread of excitation during the initiation and the maintenance phases of ET. In most cases, a rotation of the excitatory wave around the artificial hole, i.e., a circus movement of the excitatory wave, was observed. These maps suggest that this circus movement resembles the basic mechanism of the tachycardia-like excitation observed in the intact isolated right atrial preparation. On the other hand, the appearance of an ectopic pacemaker with a fast rhythm was also observed. In some examples, two ectopic pacemakers appeared simultaneously. We consider that the experiment using the improved preparation is a superb in vitro model of atrial arrhythmia.

  13. A circadian rhythm in optic nerve impulses from an isolated eye in darkness.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklet, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the circadian rhythm of optic nerve potentials recorded from the isolated eye of the sea hare Aplysia. The optic nerve activity in constant conditions is found to be clearly circadian and to obey the circadian rule for diurnal animals. In addition, the period length depends on the in vitro culturing solution. In seawater it is about 22 hr, but in culture medium it is 27 hr. The rhythm can be completely phase-shifted in one trial if the phase of the LD 12:12 Zeitgeber is advanced or delayed 4 hr. The rhythm in one eye can be phase-shifted in vivo independently of the other eye and in vitro independently of the rest of the animal. Thus, in the animal, the eye oscillators are, at most, only slightly influenced by each other or by other oscillators in the animal.

  14. Single-dot optical emission from ultralow density well-isolated InP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Ugur, A.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Vamivakas, A. N.; Lombez, L.; Atatuere, M.

    2008-10-06

    We demonstrate a straightforward way to obtain single well-isolated quantum dots emitting in the visible part of the spectrum and characterize the optical emission from single quantum dots using this method. Self-assembled InP quantum dots are grown using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy over a wide range of InP deposition rates, using an ultralow growth rate of about 0.01 atomic monolayers/s, a quantum-dot density of 1 dot/{mu}m{sup 2} is realized. The resulting isolated InP quantum dots embedded in an InGaP matrix are individually characterized without the need for lithographical patterning and masks on the substrate. Such low-density quantum dots show excitonic emission at around 670 nm with a linewidth limited by instrument resolution. This system is applicable as a single-photon source for applications such as quantum cryptography.

  15. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongping; Zhang, Jun

    Noninvasive techniques for imaging in vivo blood flow are of great value to biomedical research and clinical diagnostics where many diseases have a vascular etiology or component. In ophthalmology, many diseases involve disturbances in ocular blood flow, including diabetic retinopathy, low tension glaucoma, anterior ischemic optic neuritis, and macular degeneration. Simultaneous imaging of tissue structure and blood flow could provide critical information for early diagnosis of ocular diseases.

  16. Design of a compact waveguide optical isolator based on multimode interferometers using magneto-optical oxide thin films grown on silicon-on-insulator substrates.

    PubMed

    Shui, Keyi; Nie, Lixia; Zhang, Yan; Peng, Bo; Xie, Jianliang; Deng, Longjiang; Bi, Lei

    2016-06-13

    We report the design of a waveguide optical isolator based on multimode interferometer (MMI) structure using silicon on insulator (SOI) and deposited magneto-optical (MO) thin films. The optical isolator is based on a vertical 1 × 2 SOI MMI utilizing the nonreciprocal phase shift (NRPS) difference of different TM modes of the MO garnet thin film/SOI waveguide. By constructing a silicon/MO thin film/silicon structure, we demonstrate that the NRPS of the fundamental and first order TM modes can show opposite signs for certain device dimensions, therefore significantly reduce the device length. For a 310.42 μm long device, 20 dB isolation bandwidth larger than 1.6 nm with total insertion loss of 0.817 dB is achieved at 1550 nm wavelength. The fabrication tolerances and materials losses are also discussed to satisfy the state-of-the-art fabrication technology and material properties. PMID:27410305

  17. Quantitative assessment of canalicular bile formation in isolated hepatocyte couplets using microscopic optical planimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, A; Ng, O C; Strazzabosco, M; Boyer, J L

    1989-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocyte couplets (IRHC) are primary units of bile secretion that accumulate fluid in an enclosed canalicular space with time in culture. We have quantitated the rate of canalicular secretion in IRHC cultured for 4-8 h by measuring the change in canalicular space volume by video-microscopic optical planimetry using high resolution Nomarski optics. Electron microscopic morphometric studies revealed significant increases in canalicular membrane area after 4-6 h in culture. Canalicular secretion in basal L-15 medium (3.8 +/- 1.3 fl/min) increased significantly with the choleretic bile salts (10 microM), taurocholate, and ursodeoxycholate (14 +/- 7 fl/min each). Secretion rates after exposure to bile acids correlated directly with the canalicular surface area before stimulation. In contrast, expansion times after stimulation varied inversely with initial canalicular volumes. Ursodeoxycholic acid failed to produce a hypercholeresis at 10-, 100-, or 200-microM concentrations compared with taurocholate, either in normal or taurine-depleted IRHC. The present findings establish that rates of canalicular bile secretion can be quantitated in IRHC by serial optical planimetry, both in the basal state and after stimulation with bile acids. Furthermore, ursodeoxycholate does not acutely induce hypercholeresis at the canalicular level in this model. Rather, both taurocholic and ursodeoxycholic acids induced secretion in proportion to the surface area of the canalicular membrane. The IRHC are a useful model to identify canalicular choleretics and for studies of canalicular bile formation. Images PMID:2913052

  18. [A further discussion on acupuncture treatment plan of facial neuritis in Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice in Acupuncture and Moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Yu; Jiang, Yue-Bo

    2014-06-01

    The treatment plan of facial neuritis in Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice in Acupuncture and Moxibustion (2011 edition) is discussed, and case information of facial neuritis during the recent five years in department of acupuncture and moxibustion, PLA General Hospital, is retrospectively analyzed. In accordance with anatomy of the facial nerve to form the acupuncture prescription, the detailed diagnosis and treatment method for facial neuritis are introduced. The advantages of the diagnosis and treatment method for facial neuritis are summarized, hoping to establish a more comprehensive, standardized and unified treatment plan.

  19. Dimethyl Fumarate Ameliorates Lewis Rat Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis and Mediates Axonal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Pitarokoili, Kalliopi; Ambrosius, Björn; Meyer, Daniela; Schrewe, Lisa; Gold, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Dimethyl fumarate is an immunomodulatory and neuroprotective drug, approved recently for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. In view of the limited therapeutic options for human acute and chronic polyneuritis, we used the animal model of experimental autoimmune neuritis in the Lewis rat to study the effects of dimethyl fumarate on autoimmune inflammation and neuroprotection in the peripheral nervous system. Methods and Findings Experimental autoimmune neuritis was induced by immunization with the neuritogenic peptide (amino acids 53–78) of P2 myelin protein. Preventive treatment with dimethyl fumarate given at 45 mg/kg twice daily by oral gavage significantly ameliorated clinical neuritis by reducing demyelination and axonal degeneration in the nerve conduction studies. Histology revealed a significantly lower degree of inflammatory infiltrates in the sciatic nerves. In addition, we detected a reduction of early signs of axonal degeneration through a reduction of amyloid precursor protein expressed in axons of the peripheral nerves. This reduction correlated with an increase of nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2)-related factor 2 positive axons, supporting the neuroprotective potential of dimethyl fumarate. Furthermore, nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2)-related factor 2 expression in Schwann cells was only rarely detected and there was no increase of Schwann cells death during EAN. Conclusions We conclude that immunmodulatory and neuroprotective dimethyl fumarate may represent an innovative therapeutic option in human autoimmune neuropathies. PMID:26618510

  20. Motion compensation of optical mapping signals from isolated beating rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stender, B.; Ernst, F.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Z. X.; Schlaefer, A.

    2013-09-01

    Optical mapping is a well established technique for recording monophasic action potential traces on the epicardial surface of isolated hearts. This measuring technique offers a high spatial resolution but it is sensitive towards myocardial motion. Motion artifacts occur because the mapping between a certain tissue portion sending out fluorescent light and a pixel of the photo detector changes over time. So far this problem has been addressed by suppressing the motion or ratiometric imaging. We developed a different approach to compensate the motion artifacts based on image registration. We could demonstrate how an image deformation field temporally changing with the heart motion could be determined. Using these deformation field time series for image transformation motion signals could be generated for each image pixel which were then successfully applied to remove baseline shift and compensate motion artifacts potentially leading to errors within maps of the first arrival time. The investigation was based on five different rat hearts stained with Di-4-ANEPPS.

  1. Optic neuropathy in children with Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, H; Hedges, T R; Steere, A C

    2001-08-01

    Involvement of the optic nerve, either because of inflammation or increased intracranial pressure, is a rare manifestation of Lyme disease. Of the 4 children reported here with optic nerve abnormalities, 2 had decreased vision months after disease onset attributable to optic neuritis, and 1 had headache and diplopia early in the infection because of increased intracranial pressure associated with Lyme meningitis. In these 3 children, optic nerve involvement responded well to intravenous ceftriaxone therapy. The fourth child had headache and visual loss attributable to increased intracranial pressure and perhaps also to optic neuritis. Despite treatment with ceftriaxone and steroids, he had persistent increased intracranial pressure leading to permanent bilateral blindness. Clinicians should be aware that neuro-ophthalmologic involvement of Lyme disease may have significant consequences. If increased intracranial pressure persists despite antibiotic therapy, measures must be taken quickly to reduce the pressure.

  2. Simultaneous optical mapping of transmembrane potential and wall motion in isolated, perfused whole hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Elliot B.; Bachtel, Andrew D.; Huang, Jian; Walcott, Gregory P.; Rogers, Jack M.

    2011-09-01

    Optical mapping of cardiac propagation has traditionally been hampered by motion artifact, chiefly due to changes in photodetector-to-tissue registration as the heart moves. We have developed an optical mapping technique to simultaneously record electrical waves and mechanical contraction in isolated hearts. This allows removal of motion artifact from transmembrane potential (Vm) recordings without the use of electromechanical uncoupling agents and allows the interplay of electrical and mechanical events to be studied at the whole organ level. Hearts are stained with the voltage-sensitive dye di-4-ANEPPS and ring-shaped markers are attached to the epicardium. Fluorescence, elicited on alternate frames by 450 and 505 nm light-emitting diodes, is recorded at 700 frames/ per second by a camera fitted with a 605+/-25 nm emission filter. Marker positions are tracked in software. A signal, consisting of the temporally interlaced 450 and 505 nm fluorescence, is collected from the pixels enclosed by each moving ring. After deinterlacing, the 505 nm signal consists of Vm with motion artifact, while the 450 nm signal is minimally voltage-sensitive and contains primarily artifacts. The ratio of the two signals estimates Vm. Deformation of the tissue enclosed by each set of 3 rings is quantified using homogeneous finite strain.

  3. Plasmonic Enhancement of Optical Properties by Isolated and Coupled Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Greg; Khurgin, Jacob B.

    2012-12-01

    In this chapter we present a simple and comprehensive explanation of the mechanisms that can so dramatically modify the optical properties of atoms, molecules, or other quantum-size objects placed in the vicinity of metal nanoparticles. We develop a simple model that describes surface plasmon modes supported by the metal nanoparticles and describes them using just three key parameters -- effective volume, Q-factor, and radiative decay rate. We subsequently apply this model to the tasks of estimating the enhancement of optical radiation, electroluminescence, and photoluminescence absorbed or emitted by the optically active objects in the presence of an isolated single nanoparticle. Using the example of gold nanospheres embedded in GaN dielectric, we show that enhancement for each case depends strongly on the nanoparticle size enabling optimization for each combination of absorption cross section, original radiative efficiency, and separation between the object and metal sphere. We then expand the model for single metal nanoparticles to coupled metal nanostructures. We show that complex structures can be treated as coupled multipole modes with highest enhancements obtained due to the superposition of these modes mainly in small particles. This model allows for optimization of the structures for the largest possible field enhancements, which depends on the quality factor Q of the metal and can be as high as Q2 for two spherical particles. The "hot spot" can occur either in the nano-gaps between the particles or near the smaller particles. We trace the optimal field enhancement mechanism to the fact that the extended dipole modes of larger particles act as the efficient antennas while the modes in the gaps or near the smaller particles act as the compact sub-wavelength cavities. The physically-transparent, comprehensive analytical approach developed in this chapter not only offers a quick route for optimization but also can be conveniently extended to incorporate large

  4. Individual sarcomere length determination from isolated cardiac cells using high-resolution optical microscopy and digital image processing.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, K P; Brady, A J

    1982-01-01

    Discrete sarcomere lengths have been determined from dynamically contracting isolated cardiac cells with a high-speed, high-resolution direct optical imaging system. Calcium-tolerant cardiac cells from the rat are isolated by perfusion with collagenase and hyaluronidase. Individual sarcomere lengths can be determined by directly imaging the cell's striation pattern onto a solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) detector interfaced with a digital computer. The precision of detection in a real light microscopic optical system is discussed in relation to the type of image detector, optical contract enhancement techniques, and digital image processing. The optical performance of the direct striation pattern image apparatus has been determined empirically with test grids under standard bright-field and Nomarski-differential interference contrast (DIC) conditions for application to real muscle imaging. Discrete striation positions of isolated cells have been detected and followed with high precision during phasic contraction-relaxation cycles down to average sarcomere lengths as short as 1.43 +/- 0.053 microns. The maximum rates of contraction and relaxation are rapid and synchronous in time course along the length of the cell. These results indicate that direct optical imaging can provide an accurate means to monitor discrete striations and sarcomere lengths along the length of Ca2+-tolerant heart cells. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:7183337

  5. Delayed rupture of flexor tendons in zone V complicated by neuritis 18 years following Galeazzi fracture-dislocation.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Shah, Bhavik; Sankar, Thangasamy

    2014-04-16

    We report a rare case of an 84-year-old woman who presented with delayed, complete rupture of superficial (flexor digitorum superficialis) and deep flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus) of the third, fourth and fifth digits of the right hand in zone V of the flexor tendons. The patient, who was otherwise healthy, active and independent, incurred a closed fracture of her right wrist 18 years ago, which was treated conservatively. Current X-rays and operative findings confirmed a malunited Galeazzi fracture-dislocation with volar dislocation of the ulna from the distal radioulnar joint. She underwent surgical treatment to improve her hand function and agonising neuritis symptoms, as she was unable to use her middle, ring and little fingers and had developed severe neuritis of the ulnar nerve. Exploration and repair of the flexor tendons, nerve decompressions and Darrach procedure were performed. On follow-up, the patient showed improvement in hand function with the neuritis completely resolved.

  6. Vertical eye movements during horizontal head impulse test: a new clinical sign of superior vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, F

    2013-12-01

    In some patients suffering from acute unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit, the head impulse test performed towards the affected side reveals the typical catch-up saccade in the horizontal plane, and an oblique, mostly vertical, upward catch-up saccade after the rotation of the head towards the healthy side. Three cases are reported herein, which have been studied using slow motion video analysis of the eye movements captured by a high-speed webcam (90 fps). The clinical evidence is discussed and a pathophysiological explanation is proposed, consisting in a selective hypofunction of the superior semicircular canal during superior vestibular neuritis. PMID:24376299

  7. Synthetic dimensions in integrated photonics: From optical isolation to four-dimensional quantum Hall physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Goldman, Nathan; Zilberberg, Oded; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-04-01

    Recent technological advances in integrated photonics have spurred on the study of topological phenomena in engineered bosonic systems. Indeed, the controllability of silicon ring-resonator arrays has opened up new perspectives for building lattices for photons with topologically nontrivial bands and integrating them into photonic devices for practical applications. Here, we push these developments even further by exploiting the different modes of a silicon ring resonator as an extra dimension for photons. Tunneling along this synthetic dimension is implemented via an external time-dependent modulation that allows for the generation of engineered gauge fields. We show how this approach can be used to generate a variety of exciting topological phenomena in integrated photonics, ranging from a topologically-robust optical isolator in a spatially one-dimensional (1D) ring-resonator chain to a driven-dissipative analog of the 4D quantum Hall effect in a spatially 3D resonator lattice. Our proposal paves the way towards the use of topological effects in the design of novel photonic lattices supporting many frequency channels and displaying higher connectivities.

  8. Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance of Alkali Atoms Isolated on Helium Nano-Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2009-06-01

    Sharp, hyperfine-resolved, ESR spectra of alkali atoms isolated on helium nanodroplets are measured by optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR). A net spin polarization is created inside a magnetic field (B=0.2 to 4.2 T) by a pump laser beam. Microwave radiation in a resonant cavity at 9.4 GHz causes a spin transition which is detected by a probe laser beam. For ultimate precision the spectrum of free atoms is concurrently measured and serves as a reference. The shift of the ESR lines on the droplet with respect to free atoms directly reflects the distortion of the valence-electron wavefunction due to the He nanodroplet. While the electron g-factor remains unchanged within experimental uncertainties (<5 ppm), the increase of the hyperfine constant (typically +400 ppm) is consistent with an increase of the Fermi contact interaction. We are able to follow this change as a function of droplet size attesting the sensitivity of the method for the measurement of chemical shifts. The observation of Rabi oscillations indicates a long decoherence time and proves our ability to perform coherent manipulation of the spin.

  9. Refractive Index Measurement of the Isolated Crystalline Lens Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Uhlhorn, Stephen R.; Borja, David; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    An optical coherence tomography system has been developed that was designed specifically for imaging the isolated crystalline lens. Cross-sectional OCT images were recorded on 40 lenses from 32 human donors with an age range of 6 – 82 years. A method has been developed to measure the axial thickness and average refractive index of the lens from a single recorded image. The measured average group refractive index at the measurement wavelength of 825 nm was converted to the average phase refractive index at 589 nm using lens dispersion data from the literature. The average refractive index for all lenses measured was 1.408 ± 0.005 which agrees well with recent MRI measurements of the lens index gradient. A linear regression of the data resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the average refractive index with age, but a simple linear model was insufficient to explain the age dependence. The results presented here suggest that the peak refractive index in the nucleus is closer to 1.420, rather than the previously accepted value of 1.406. PMID:18824191

  10. Isolation of Optically Targeted Single Bacteria by Application of Fluidic Force Microscopy to Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophs from the Phyllosphere

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Philipp; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2013-01-01

    In their natural environment, bacteria often behave differently than they do under laboratory conditions. To gain insight into the physiology of bacteria in situ, dedicated approaches are required to monitor their adaptations and specific behaviors under environmental conditions. Optical microscopy is crucial for the observation of fundamental characteristics of bacteria, such as cell shape, size, and marker gene expression. Here, fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM) was exploited to isolate optically selected bacteria for subsequent identification and characterization. In this study, bacteriochlorophyll-producing bacteria, which can be visualized due to their characteristic fluorescence in the infrared range, were isolated from leaf washes. Bacterial communities from the phyllosphere were investigated because they harbor genes indicative of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Our data show that different species of Methylobacterium express their photosystem in planta, and they show a distinct pattern of bacteriochlorophyll production under laboratory conditions that is dependent on supplied carbon sources. PMID:23770907

  11. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies. PMID:25832224

  12. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  13. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C. J. Giltrap, S.; Stuart, N. H.; Parker, S.; Patankar, S.; Lowe, H. F.; Smith, R. A.; Donnelly, T. D.; Drew, D.; Gumbrell, E. T.

    2015-03-15

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10{sup 17} W cm{sup −2}) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  14. Optical coherent tomography measurements of the diffusion rate of water and drugs in an isolated and whole cornea

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, Kirill V; Ghosn, M G

    2006-12-31

    The passive diffusion of drugs through the epithelial surfaces of an eye (the most widespread method for medical treatment of various diseases) is considered. The permeability of water and drugs through rabbit cornea was measured in the isolated cornea (separate from an eye) and in the whole cornea. The permeability coefficients of water and dexamethasone were estimated by the method of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Because multiple photon scattering introduces noise and distortions to the OCT signal, measurements were performed at depths up to 500 {mu}m where most likely single scattering of light occurs in cornea. It is shown that the permeability coefficients in the isolated and whole cornea strongly differ from each other. For example, the water permeability in the isolated and whole cornea is (7.09{+-}0.12)x10{sup -5} and (1.71{+-}0.51)x10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, respectively. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  15. Brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome: A problem of liability. A presentation of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hornillo, M; de la Riva, M C; Ojeda, R

    2016-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy, brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare neuromuscular involvement of unknown aetiology. When it onsets in connection with a health care act, such as childbirth or surgery, a malpractice argument is often used as a cause of adverse outcome, usually due to an incorrect position of the patient on the operating table, a circumstance which directly involves the anesthesia area. Three cases are presented of Parsonage-Turner syndrome following very different surgery, with different results as regards prognosis. A review and discussion of bibliography is presented on the possibility that such circumstances are the subject of malpractice claims. Special emphasis is placed on the most currently accepted aetiopathogenic theories, and the relationship of this syndrome with the surgical act as a determining medico-legal aspect. Valuation parameters are proposed. PMID:26948383

  16. Brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome: A problem of liability. A presentation of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hornillo, M; de la Riva, M C; Ojeda, R

    2016-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy, brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare neuromuscular involvement of unknown aetiology. When it onsets in connection with a health care act, such as childbirth or surgery, a malpractice argument is often used as a cause of adverse outcome, usually due to an incorrect position of the patient on the operating table, a circumstance which directly involves the anesthesia area. Three cases are presented of Parsonage-Turner syndrome following very different surgery, with different results as regards prognosis. A review and discussion of bibliography is presented on the possibility that such circumstances are the subject of malpractice claims. Special emphasis is placed on the most currently accepted aetiopathogenic theories, and the relationship of this syndrome with the surgical act as a determining medico-legal aspect. Valuation parameters are proposed.

  17. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. “Sniff” test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  18. Crystal growth and analysis of ohmic contact and magneto-optical isolator properties of cadmium manganese telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakasam, Mythili; Viraphong, Oudomsack; Teulé-Gay, Lionel; Decourt, Rodolphe; Veber, Philippe; Víllora, Encarnación G.; Shimamura, Kiyoshi

    2011-03-01

    Cd1-xMnxTe (x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9) (CMT) single crystals were grown by the vertical Bridgman method. The optical studies reveal that with the increase in Mn concentration, the band gap values increase, which is attributed to s, p-d exchange interaction between the band carriers and Mn ions. Faraday rotation angle of the grown CMT (x=0.5) crystals were measured at the following wavelengths: 825, 1060 and 1575 nm. It was inferred that CMT exhibit larger Faraday effect (3-6 times larger than terbium-gallium garnet (TGG) currently used for optical isolators) making it as an efficient material for optical isolator at longer wavelengths. Field-cooled and zero field-cooled magnetizations of CMT were measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field. The spin-glass like behavior of CMT and their tendency to decrease in magnitude with increasing Mn concentration have been analyzed. The metal contacts on the Cd1-xMnxTe (x=0.1, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9) crystals have been made with various metals and metal alloys to establish the ohmic contact. The detector characteristics of CMT have been tested using γ-rays with 511 keV (22 Na) and 59.5 keV (241 Am).

  19. Axonal loss and neuroprotection in optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Levin, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Most optic neuropathies do not have effective treatments. Examples are ischemic optic neuropathy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, optic neuritis, and traumatic optic neuropathy. In some cases, the pathophysiology of the optic nerve injury is not fully understood. For example, while the demyelinative aspects of optic neuritis have been studied, the mechanism by which the axonal loss occurs is less apparent. In other cases, although the pathophysiology of the optic neuropathy may be understood, there is difficulty treating the disease, for example, with traumatic optic neuropathy. In response to this therapeutic dearth, the concept of neuroprotection has arisen. Neuroprotection is a therapeutic paradigm for preventing death of neurons from injury and maintaining function. In optic neuropathies, the corresponding neuron is the retinal ganglion cell. These cells are unable to divide, and optic neuropathies irrevocably result in their death; therefore, the primary target of neuroprotection are retinal ganglion cells and their axons. This review emphasizes that most optic neuropathies are axonal and thus good targets for neuroprotection. PMID:17508035

  20. Biometric, optical and physical changes in the isolated human crystalline lens with age in relation to presbyopia.

    PubMed

    Glasser, A; Campbell, M C

    1999-06-01

    The biometric, optical and physical properties of 19 pairs of isolated human eye-bank lenses ranging in age from 5 to 96 years were compared. Lens focal length and spherical aberration were measured using a scanning laser apparatus, lens thickness and the lens surface curvatures were measured by digitizing the lens profiles and equivalent refractive indices were calculated for each lens using this data. The second lens from each donor was used to measure resistance to physical deformation by providing a compressive force to the lens. The lens capsule was then removed from each lens and each measurement was repeated to ascertain what role the capsule plays in determining these optical and physical characteristics. Age dependent changes in lens focal length, lens surface curvatures and lens resistance to physical deformation are described. Isolated lens focal length was found to be significantly linearly correlated with both the anterior and posterior surface curvatures. No age dependent change in equivalent refractive index of the isolated lens was found. Although decapsulating human lenses causes similar changes in focal length to that which we have shown to occur when human lenses are mechanically stretched into an unaccommodated state, the effects are due to nonsystematic changes in lens curvatures. These studies reinforce the conclusion that lens hardening must be considered as an important factor in the development of presbyopia, that age changes in the human lens are not limited to the loss of accommodation that characterizes presbyopia but that the lens optical and physical properties change substantially with age in a complex manner.

  1. Role of amplified spontaneous emission in optical free-space communication links with optical amplification: impact on isolation and data transmission and utilization for pointing, acquisition, and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winzer, Peter J.; Kalmar, Andras; Leeb, Walter R.

    1999-04-01

    We investigate the role of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) produced by an optical booster amplifier at the transmitter of free-space optical communication links. In a communication terminal with a single telescope for both transmission and reception, this ASE power has to be taken into account in connection with transmit-to-receive channel isolation, especially since it partly occupies the same state of polarization and the same frequency band as the receive signal. We show that the booster ASE intercepted by the receiver can represent a non-negligible source of background radiation: In a typical optical intersatellite link scenario, the ASE power spectral density generated by the booster amplifier at the transmitter and coupled to the receiver will be on the order of 10-20 W/Hz, which equals the background radiation of the sun. Exploiting these findings for pointing, acquisition, and tracking (PAT) purposes, we describe a patent-pending PAT system doing without beacon lasers and without the need for diverting a part of the data signal for PAT. Utilizing the transmit booster ASE over a bandwidth of e.g. 20 nm at the receiver, a total power of about -46 dBm is available for PAT purposes without extra power consumption at the transmitter and without the need for beacon lAser alignment.

  2. Macular spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in Tanzanian endemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kisimbi, John; Shalchi, Zaid; Mahroo, Omar A; Mhina, Celina; Sanyiwa, Anna J; Mabey, Denise; Mohamed, Moin; Plant, Gordon T

    2013-11-01

    , which were associated with severe retinal nerve fibre layer loss. Similar changes have recently been reported from optical coherence tomography images of patients with multiple sclerosis, relapsing isolated optic neuritis, dominant optic atrophy, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and a patient with a chronic compressive optic neuropathy, supporting the hypothesis that this may be a non-specific phenomenon secondary to ganglion cell death. The correspondence of the changes to an annulus discernible on infra-red en face imaging, but not using other conventional retinal imaging techniques highlights the potential usefulness of this modality. PMID:24018312

  3. Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: A modular vacuum ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan Roberts, F.; Anderson, Scott L.

    2013-12-15

    The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a “soft” photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

  4. Cutoff-mesa isolated rib optical waveguide for III-V heterostructure photonic integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, Gregory A.; Smith, Robert E.

    1998-01-01

    A cutoff mesa rib waveguide provides single-mode performance regardless of any deep etches that might be used for electrical isolation between integrated electrooptic devices. Utilizing a principle of a cutoff slab waveguide with an asymmetrical refractive index profile, single mode operation is achievable with a wide range of rib widths and does not require demanding etch depth tolerances. This new waveguide design eliminates reflection effects, or self-interference, commonly seen when conventional rib waveguides are combined with deep isolation etches and thereby reduces high order mode propagation and crosstalk compared to the conventional rib waveguides.

  5. Cutoff-mesa isolated rib optical waveguide for III-V heterostructure photonic integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G.A.; Smith, R.E.

    1998-04-28

    A cutoff mesa rib waveguide provides single-mode performance regardless of any deep etches that might be used for electrical isolation between integrated electrooptic devices. Utilizing a principle of a cutoff slab waveguide with an asymmetrical refractive index profile, single mode operation is achievable with a wide range of rib widths and does not require demanding etch depth tolerances. This new waveguide design eliminates reflection effects, or self-interference, commonly seen when conventional rib waveguides are combined with deep isolation etches and thereby reduces high order mode propagation and crosstalk compared to the conventional rib waveguides. 7 figs.

  6. Recessive Mutations in RTN4IP1 Cause Isolated and Syndromic Optic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Angebault, Claire; Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Talmat-Amar, Yasmina; Charif, Majida; Gerber, Sylvie; Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gueguen, Naig; Halloy, François; Moore, David; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Manes, Gael; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Quiles, Mélanie; Piro-Mégy, Camille; Teigell, Marisa; Delettre, Cécile; Rossel, Mireille; Meunier, Isabelle; Preising, Markus; Lorenz, Birgit; Carelli, Valerio; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Kaplan, Josseline; Roubertie, Agathe; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Bomont, Pascale; Hamel, Christian P.; Lenaers, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive optic neuropathies are rare blinding conditions related to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and optic-nerve degeneration, for which only mutations in TMEM126A and ACO2 are known. In four families with early-onset recessive optic neuropathy, we identified mutations in RTN4IP1, which encodes a mitochondrial ubiquinol oxydo-reductase. RTN4IP1 is a partner of RTN4 (also known as NOGO), and its ortholog Rad8 in C. elegans is involved in UV light response. Analysis of fibroblasts from affected individuals with a RTN4IP1 mutation showed loss of the altered protein, a deficit of mitochondrial respiratory complex I and IV activities, and increased susceptibility to UV light. Silencing of RTN4IP1 altered the number and morphogenesis of mouse RGC dendrites in vitro and the eye size, neuro-retinal development, and swimming behavior in zebrafish in vivo. Altogether, these data point to a pathophysiological mechanism responsible for RGC early degeneration and optic neuropathy and linking RTN4IP1 functions to mitochondrial physiology, response to UV light, and dendrite growth during eye maturation. PMID:26593267

  7. GUIDA: A Graphical User Interface for Optical Data Analysis of Isolated Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.

    2015-09-01

    Studying pulsars from ground-based telescopes needs data analysis to be performed according to specific requirements. Because of the periodic behavior of these objects such requirements are expressed in terms of timing. In fact, several factors must be taken into account to correctly extract the period (frequency) and then light curves of pulsars. Until now, analysis software packages have been mainly developed for satellite data and are not completely suitable for optical observations from the ground. A software package called GUIDA has been developed to analyze optical photometric data recorded by the SiFAP instrument, completely conceived and realized at the Physics Department of La Sapienza-Università di Roma. This software package is capable of analyzing data relative to ground observations, including timing corrections, and of deriving corrected pulsar light curves.

  8. Thermo-optically tuned photonic resonators with concurrent electrical connection and thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Zortman, William A.; Savignon, Daniel J.

    2016-06-14

    A photonic resonator system is designed to use thermal tuning to adjust the resonant wavelength of each resonator in the system, with a separate tuning circuit associated with each resonator so that individual adjustments may be made. The common electrical ground connection between the tuning circuits is particularly formed to provide thermal isolation between adjacent resonators by including a capacitor along each return path to ground, where the presence of the capacitor's dielectric material provides the thermal isolation. The use of capacitively coupling necessarily requires the use of an AC current as an input to the heater element (conductor/resistor) of each resonator, where the RMS value of the AC signal is indicative of the amount of heat that is generated along the element and the degree of wavelength tuning that is obtained.

  9. Local phenol injection in the treatment of interdigital neuritis of the foot (Morton's neuroma).

    PubMed

    Magnan, B; Marangon, A; Frigo, A; Bartolozzi, P

    2005-01-01

    The symptomatic treatment of Civinini-Morton syndrome (interdigital neuritis: IDN) may be performed directly on the nervous trunk involved using orthotic, local pharmacological or surgical methods. Alcoholization with phenol in the percutaneous treatment of IDN has the purpose of provoking a permanent chemical neurolysis, obtaining remission of the neuritic pain symptoms. A total of 71 cases were treated by a dorsal approach to the intermetatarsal space using a needle-electrode connected to the electro-stimulator. Once the nervous trunk with a reproduction of the paresthesia to the fingers was localized, 2.5 ml of phenol at 5% water solution was injected, immediately followed by local anesthetic with a postsurgical analgesic purpose. Mean follow-up was 36 +/- 8 months. The patients were evaluated by visual analogue scale for pain (VAS). Alcoholization of the common interdigital nerve proved to be effective in treating pain in 80.3% of cases (57/71). Treatment must be considered a percutaneous mini-invasive surgical procedure. The results are better than those reported in the literature with conservative and infiltrative treatment and they appear to be comparable today with those obtained when surgical treatment was used, with no complications occurring.

  10. Traditional Chinese medicine Yisui Tongjing relieved neural severity in experimental autoimmune neuritis rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Erli; Li, Mingquan; Zhao, Jianjun; Dong, Yuxiang; Yang, Xueqin; Huang, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of Yisui Tongjing (YSTJ) prescription on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and microstructure of the sciatic nerve in experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) rats, the Guillain–Barré syndrome classic animal models. Materials and methods In this study, we established an EAN model in Lewis rats by immunization. We evaluated the potential clinical application of a traditional Chinese medicine YSTJ by intragastric administration and compared its effect with immunoglobulin. The sciatic MNCV was measured by electrophysiology experiment. Hematoxylin–eosin staining and transmission electron microscope analysis were used to determine the pathologically morphological changes before and after YSTJ application. Results We found that application of YSTJ could significantly alleviate the clinical signs in EAN rats. The treatment also increased MNCV in the sciatic nerve compared to that in the untreated nerve. Demyelination in the sciatic nerve in EAN rats was significantly ameliorated, and newly generated myelinated nerve fibers were observed with treatment of high dose of YSTJ. Conclusion This study showed that the traditional Chinese medicine YSTJ was likely to serve as a therapeutic medicine in autoimmune neuropathies, providing an effective and economic means to the treatment of Guillain–Barré syndrome. PMID:27729792

  11. Regulation of experimental autoimmune neuritis by transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, S K; Lee, W P; Beck, L S; Rostami, A; Amento, E P

    1994-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by demyelination and mononuclear cell infiltration of the peripheral nervous system. It is induced in Lewis rats by administration of myelin P2 protein or a synthetic peptide (SP-26) corresponding to amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein. The effects of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) on the clinical signs, histological changes, cell-mediated immune responses, and secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by lymphoid cells of rats with EAN were examined. Systemic administration of TGF-beta 1 markedly inhibited the clinical signs and histological changes of EAN when given intraperitoneally every other day for Days 0 through 18. In addition, it decreased proliferative responses and reduced the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to SP-26 compared to control rats. The reduction in clinical severity correlated with skin test unresponsiveness (DTH) to the disease-inducing agent (SP-26) as well to decreased cellular responsiveness to the antigen in vitro. The decrease in cellular responsiveness extended to a decrease in at least one T cell lymphokine, IFN-gamma. The profound effect of TGF-beta on disease progression in EAN, a T-cell-mediated process, is consistent with a direct effect of this growth factor on T lymphocytes. PMID:7515330

  12. Delayed-type hypersensitivity response in experimental autoimmune neuritis treated with peptide-coupled spleen cells.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, S K; Rostami, A

    1994-04-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system that is characterized by demyelination and mononuclear cell infiltration. It is induced in Lewis rats by administration of myelin P2 protein or a synthetic peptide (SP-26) corresponding to amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein. Recently, we showed that SP-26, when coupled to syngeneic spleen cells and administered intravenously, provided an effective means of inducing tolerance by inhibiting the clinical signs, decreased proliferative response of lymphoid cells to SP-26 and histological changes of EAN. However, our current data indicate that, despite tolerance induction in these Lewis rats, the antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to SP-26 remained intact. Furthermore, interferon (IFN)-gamma production by spleen cells of tolerized rats were unchanged as compared to EAN rats. The in vitro proliferation of T lymphocytes from tolerized rats stimulated by SP-26 was reduced as compared to EAN controls but was enhanced upon addition of exogenous interleukin-2. Thus, reduction in EAN clinical signs does not necessarily indicate a decrease in DTH response and IFN-gamma production in EAN Lewis rats. The implication of this finding in regard to immunoregulatory mechanism of DTH response is discussed. PMID:7512578

  13. Human Rabies with Initial Manifestations that Mimic Acute Brachial Neuritis and Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Edward C.; Maury, Joaquin S.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Craver, Randall D.; El-Abassi, Rima; Segura-Palacios, Enrique; Sumner, Austin J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Human rabies can be overlooked in places where this disease is now rare. Its diagnosis is further confused by a negative history of exposure (cryptogenic rabies), by a Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) type of presentation, or by symptoms indicating another diagnosis, eg, acute brachial neuritis (ABN). Case presentation A 19-year-old Mexican, with no past health problems, presented with a two-day history of left shoulder, arm, and chest pain. He arrived in Louisiana from Mexico five days prior to admission. Of particular importance is the absence of a history of rabies exposure and immunization. On admission, the patient had quadriparesis, areflexia, and elevated protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, prompting a diagnosis of GBS. However, emerging neurological deficits pointed towards acute encephalitis. Rabies was suspected on hospital day 11 after common causes of encephalitis (eg, arboviruses) have been excluded. The patient tested positive for rabies IgM and IgG. He died 17 days after admission. Negri bodies were detected in the patient’s brain and rabies virus antigen typing identified the vampire bat as the source of infection. Conclusion Rabies should be suspected in every patient with a rapidly evolving GBS-like illness—even if there is no history of exposure and no evidence of encephalitis on presentation. The patient’s ABN-like symptoms may be equivalent to the pain experienced by rabies victims near the inoculation site. PMID:22577299

  14. Delayed-type hypersensitivity response in experimental autoimmune neuritis treated with peptide-coupled spleen cells.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, S K; Rostami, A

    1994-04-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system that is characterized by demyelination and mononuclear cell infiltration. It is induced in Lewis rats by administration of myelin P2 protein or a synthetic peptide (SP-26) corresponding to amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein. Recently, we showed that SP-26, when coupled to syngeneic spleen cells and administered intravenously, provided an effective means of inducing tolerance by inhibiting the clinical signs, decreased proliferative response of lymphoid cells to SP-26 and histological changes of EAN. However, our current data indicate that, despite tolerance induction in these Lewis rats, the antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to SP-26 remained intact. Furthermore, interferon (IFN)-gamma production by spleen cells of tolerized rats were unchanged as compared to EAN rats. The in vitro proliferation of T lymphocytes from tolerized rats stimulated by SP-26 was reduced as compared to EAN controls but was enhanced upon addition of exogenous interleukin-2. Thus, reduction in EAN clinical signs does not necessarily indicate a decrease in DTH response and IFN-gamma production in EAN Lewis rats. The implication of this finding in regard to immunoregulatory mechanism of DTH response is discussed.

  15. Regulation of experimental autoimmune neuritis by transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, S K; Lee, W P; Beck, L S; Rostami, A; Amento, E P

    1994-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by demyelination and mononuclear cell infiltration of the peripheral nervous system. It is induced in Lewis rats by administration of myelin P2 protein or a synthetic peptide (SP-26) corresponding to amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein. The effects of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) on the clinical signs, histological changes, cell-mediated immune responses, and secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by lymphoid cells of rats with EAN were examined. Systemic administration of TGF-beta 1 markedly inhibited the clinical signs and histological changes of EAN when given intraperitoneally every other day for Days 0 through 18. In addition, it decreased proliferative responses and reduced the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to SP-26 compared to control rats. The reduction in clinical severity correlated with skin test unresponsiveness (DTH) to the disease-inducing agent (SP-26) as well to decreased cellular responsiveness to the antigen in vitro. The decrease in cellular responsiveness extended to a decrease in at least one T cell lymphokine, IFN-gamma. The profound effect of TGF-beta on disease progression in EAN, a T-cell-mediated process, is consistent with a direct effect of this growth factor on T lymphocytes.

  16. Erythropoietin is a hypoxia inducible factor-induced protective molecule in experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bangwei; Jiang, Man; Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Xiong, Jian; Schluesener, Hermann J; Zhang, Zhiren; Wu, Yuzhang

    2013-08-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), an autoantigen-specific T-cell-mediated disease model for human demyelinating inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system, is characterized by self-limitation. Here we investigated the regulation and contribution of erythropoietin (EPO) in EAN self-limitation. In EAN sciatic nerves, hypoxia, and protein and mRNA levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), HIF-2α, EPO and EPO receptor (EPOR) were induced in parallel at disease peak phase but reduced at recovery periods. Further, the deactivation of HIF reduced EAN-induced EPO/EPOR upregulation in EAN, suggesting the central contribution of HIF to EPO/EPOR induction. The deactivation of EPOR signalling exacerbated EAN progression, implying that endogenous EPO contributed to EAN recovery. Exogenous EPO treatment greatly improved EAN recovery. In addition, EPO was shown to promote Schwann cell survival and myelin production. In EAN, EPO treatment inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and altered helper T cell differentiation by inducing increase of Foxp3(+)/CD4(+) regulatory T cells and decrease of IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) Th1 cells. Furthermore, EPO inhibited inflammatory macrophage activation and promoted its phagocytic activity. In summary, our data demonstrated that EPO was induced in EAN by HIF and contributed to EAN recovery, and endogenous and exogenous EPO could effectively suppress EAN by attenuating inflammation and exerting direct cell protection, indicating that EPO contributes to the self-recovery of EAN and could be a potent candidate for treatment of autoimmune neuropathies. PMID:23603807

  17. Bilateral simultaneous optic neuropathy in adults: clinical, imaging, serological, and genetic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, S P; Borruat, F X; Miller, D H; Moseley, I F; Sweeney, M G; Govan, G G; Kelly, M A; Francis, D A; Harding, A E; McDonald, W I

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the cause(s) of acute or subacute bilateral simultaneous optic neuropathy (BSON) in adult life, a follow up study of 23 patients was performed with clinical assessment, brain MRI, HLA typing, and mitochondrial DNA analysis. The results of CSF electrophoresis were available from previous investigations in 11 patients. At follow up, five (22%) had developed clinically definite multiple sclerosis, four (17%) had mitochondrial DNA point mutations indicating a diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The remaining 14 patients (61%) still had clinically isolated BSON a mean of 50 months after the onset of visual symptoms: three of 14 (21%) had multiple MRI white matter lesions compatible with multiple sclerosis, three of 14 (21%) had the multiple sclerosis associated HLA-DR15/DQw6 haplotype, and one of seven tested had CSF oligoclonal IgG bands; in total only five (36%) had one or more of these risk factors. The low frequency of risk factors for the development of multiple sclerosis in these 14 patients suggests that few will develop multiple sclerosis with more prolonged follow up. It is concluded that: (a) about 20% of cases of BSON without affected relatives are due to LHON; (b) multiple sclerosis develops after BSON in at least 20% of cases, but the long term conversion rate is likely to be considerably less than the rate of over 70% seen after an episode of acute unilateral optic neuritis in adult life. PMID:7823072

  18. Further enhancement of the second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) coefficient and the stability of NLO polymers that contain isolation chromophore moieties by using the "suitable isolation group" concept and the Ar/Ar(F) self-assembly effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbo; Ye, Cheng; Qin, Jingui; Li, Zhen

    2013-08-01

    For the first time, a series of second-order NLO poly(arylene-ethynylene)s, in which an isolation chromophore was introduced to enhance the NLO coefficients, were successfully designed and synthesized. Thanks to the isolation chromophore, these polymers demonstrated good NLO activities and optical transparency. To further improve the comprehensive performance of the polymers, different isolation groups of various sizes were introduced to subtly modify the structure of the polymers according to the "suitable isolation group" concept. The naphthalene (Np) group was found to be a "suitable isolation group" in this series of polymers and polymer P3 demonstrated the highest d33 value (122.1 pm V(-1)) of these five polymers. Interestingly, polymer P5, which contained a pentafluorophenyl ring as an isolation group, exhibited a much higher NLO effect and stability than polymer P2, which just contained normal phenyl rings as isolation groups (97.2 versus 62.5 pm V(-1)), thus indicating the advantages of the Ar-Ar(F) self-assembly effect in the field of non-linear optics.

  19. Isolated cotton-wool spots of unknown etiology: management and sequential spectral domain optical coherence tomography documentation.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Antonis; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos D; Elaroud, Ibrahim; Andreou, Petros

    2011-01-01

    Cotton-wool spots (CWSs) are common retinal manifestations of many diseases including diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Clinically they appear as whitish, fluffy patches on the retina and eventually fade with time. In this study, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with mapping was used to demonstrate in vivo the characteristics of an isolated CWS in a 59-year-old patient as well as its appearance immediately after ophthalmoscopic resolution. Presented here is the work-up and management of this clinical problem for the ophthalmologist. The authors propose that SD-OCT could be a valuable research tool in characterizing and following the dynamic CWS changes at individual retinal layer level, with potential clinical applications as a screening or diagnostic tool in CWS-related diseases. PMID:22034565

  20. Isolated cotton-wool spots of unknown etiology: management and sequential spectral domain optical coherence tomography documentation

    PubMed Central

    Ioannides, Antonis; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos D; Elaroud, Ibrahim; Andreou, Petros

    2011-01-01

    Cotton-wool spots (CWSs) are common retinal manifestations of many diseases including diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Clinically they appear as whitish, fluffy patches on the retina and eventually fade with time. In this study, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with mapping was used to demonstrate in vivo the characteristics of an isolated CWS in a 59-year-old patient as well as its appearance immediately after ophthalmoscopic resolution. Presented here is the work-up and management of this clinical problem for the ophthalmologist. The authors propose that SD-OCT could be a valuable research tool in characterizing and following the dynamic CWS changes at individual retinal layer level, with potential clinical applications as a screening or diagnostic tool in CWS-related diseases. PMID:22034565

  1. Simultaneous three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and intravital microscopy for imaging subpleural pulmonary alveoli in isolated rabbit lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Sven; Knels, Lilla; Krueger, Alexander; Koch, Thea; Koch, Edmund

    2009-09-01

    There is a growing interest in analyzing lung mechanics at the level of the alveoli in order to understand stress-related pathogenesis and possibly avoid ventilator associated lung injury. Emerging quantitative models to simulate fluid mechanics and the associated stresses and strains on delicate alveolar walls require realistic quantitative input on alveolar geometry and its dynamics during ventilation. Here, three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and conventional intravital microscopy are joined in one setup to investigate the geometric changes of subpleural alveoli during stepwise pressure increase and release in an isolated and perfused rabbit lung model. We describe good qualitative agreement and quantitative correlation between the OCT data and video micrographs. Our main finding is the inflation and deflation of individual alveoli with noticeable hysteresis. Importantly, this three-dimensional geometry data can be extracted and converted into input data for numerical simulations.

  2. Common-path Fourier domain optical coherence tomography of irradiated human skin and ventilated isolated rabbit lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, A.; Wendel, M.; Knels, L.; Knuschke, P.; Mehner, M.; Koch, T.; Boller, D.; Koch, P.; Koch, E.

    2005-08-01

    A compact common path Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) system based on a broadband superluminescence diode is used for biomedical imaging. The epidermal thickening of human skin after exposure to ultraviolet radiation is measured to proof the feasibility of FD-OCT for future substitution of invasive biopsies in a long term study on natural UV skin protection. The FD-OCT system is also used for imaging lung parenchyma. FD-OCT images of a formalin fixated lung show the same alveolar structure as scanning electron microscopy images. In the ventilated and blood-free perfused isolated rabbit lung FD-OCT is used for real-time cross-sectional image capture of alveolar mechanics throughout tidal ventilation. The alveolar mechanics changing from alternating recruitment-derecruitment at zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to persistent recruitment after applying a PEEP of 5 cm H2O is observed in the OCT images.

  3. Ventricular filling slows epicardial conduction and increases action potential duration in an optical mapping study of the isolated rabbit heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, Derrick; Mills, Robert W.; Schettler, Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanical stimulation can induce electrophysiologic changes in cardiac myocytes, but how mechanoelectric feedback in the intact heart affects action potential propagation remains unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: Changes in action potential propagation and repolarization with increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 0 to 30 mmHg were investigated using optical mapping in isolated perfused rabbit hearts. With respect to 0 mmHg, epicardial strain at 30 mmHg in the anterior left ventricle averaged 0.040 +/- 0.004 in the muscle fiber direction and 0.032 +/- 0.006 in the cross-fiber direction. An increase in ventricular loading increased average epicardial activation time by 25%+/- 3% (P < 0.0001) and correspondingly decreased average apparent surface conduction velocity by 16%+/- 7% (P = 0.007). Ventricular loading did not significantly alter action potential duration at 20% repolarization (APD20) but did at 80% repolarization (APD80), from 179 +/- 7 msec to 207 +/- 5 msec (P < 0.0001). The dispersion of APD20 was decreased with loading from 19 +/- 2 msec to 13 +/- 2 msec (P = 0.024), whereas the dispersion of APD80 was not significantly changed. These electrophysiologic changes with ventricular loading were not affected by the nonspecific stretch-activated channel blocker streptomycin (200 microM) and were not attributable to changes in myocardial perfusion or the presence of an electromechanical decoupling agent (butanedione monoxime) during optical mapping. CONCLUSION: Acute loading of the left ventricle of the isolated rabbit heart decreased apparent epicardial conduction velocity and increased action potential duration by a load-dependent mechanism that may not involve stretch-activated channels.

  4. An optical spectrum of a large isolated gas-phase PAH cation: C78H26+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Junfeng; Mulas, Giacomo; Bonnamy, Anthony; Joblin, Christine

    2016-03-01

    A gas-phase optical spectrum of a large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cation - C78H26+ - in the 410 -610 nm range is presented. This large all-benzenoid PAH should be large enough to be stable with respect to photodissociation in the harsh conditions prevailing in the interstellar medium (ISM). The spectrum is obtained via multi-photon dissociation (MPD) spectroscopy of cationic C78H26 stored in the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) cell of the PIRENEA setup using the radiation from a mid-band optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser. The experimental spectrum shows two main absorption peaks at 431 nm and 516 nm, in good agreement with a theoretical spectrum computed via time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). DFT calculations indicate that the equilibrium geometry, with the absolute minimum energy, is of lowered, nonplanar C2 symmetry instead of the more symmetric planar D2h symmetry that is usually the minimum for similar PAHs of smaller size. This kind of slightly broken symmetry could produce some of the fine structure observed in some diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). It can also favor the folding of C78H26+ fragments and ultimately the formation of fullerenes. This study opens up the possibility to identify the most promising candidates for DIBs amongst large cationic PAHs.

  5. Molecular hydrogen beyond the optical edge of an isolated spiral galaxy.

    PubMed

    Braine, Jonathan; Herpin, Fabrice

    2004-11-18

    Knowledge about the outermost portions of galaxies is limited owing to the small amount of light coming from them. It is known that in many cases atomic hydrogen (H I) extends well beyond the optical radius. In the centres of galaxies, however, molecular hydrogen (H2) usually dominates by a large factor, raising the question of whether H2 is also abundant in the outer regions. Here we report the detection of emission from carbon monoxide (CO), the most abundant tracer of H2, beyond the optical radius of the nearby galaxy NGC 4414. The host molecular clouds probably formed in the regions of relatively high H i column density and in the absence of spiral density waves. The relative strength of the lines from the two lowest rotational levels indicates that both the temperature and density of the H2 are quite low compared to conditions closer to the centre. The inferred surface density of the molecular material continues the monotonic decrease from the inner regions. We conclude that although molecular clouds can form in the outer region of this galaxy, there is little mass associated with them.

  6. An optical spectrum of a large isolated gas-phase PAH cation: C78H26+

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Junfeng; Mulas, Giacomo; Bonnamy, Anthony; Joblin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    A gas-phase optical spectrum of a large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cation - C78H26+- in the 410-610 nm range is presented. This large all-benzenoid PAH should be large enough to be stable with respect to photodissociation in the harsh conditions prevailing in the interstellar medium (ISM). The spectrum is obtained via multi-photon dissociation (MPD) spectroscopy of cationic C78H26 stored in the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) cell using the radiation from a mid-band optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser. The experimental spectrum shows two main absorption peaks at 431 nm and 516 nm, in good agreement with a theoretical spectrum computed via time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). DFT calculations indicate that the equilibrium geometry, with the absolute minimum energy, is of lowered, nonplanar C2 symmetry instead of the more symmetric planar D2h symmetry that is usually the minimum for similar PAHs of smaller size. This kind of slightly broken symmetry could produce some of the fine structure observed in some diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). It can also favor the folding of C78H26+ fragments and ultimately the formation of fullerenes. This study opens up the possibility to identify the most promising candidates for DIBs amongst large cationic PAHs. PMID:26942230

  7. Optical studies of tissue mitochondrial redox in isolated perfused rat lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Jacobs, E. R.; Audi, S.; Ranji, M.

    2012-02-01

    Through the monitoring of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavoprotein Adenine Dinucleotide), the redox state of metabolism can be probed in real time in many intact organs, but its use has not been fully developed in lungs. The ratio of these fluorophores, (NADH/FAD), referred to as the mitochondrial redox ratio (RR), can be used as a quantitative metabolic marker of tissue. We have designed a fluorometer that can be used to monitor lung surface NADH and FAD fluorescence in isolated perfused lungs. Surface fluorescence NADH and FAD signals were acquired in the absence (control) and presence of pentachlorophenol (PCP), rotenone, and potassium cyanide (KCN). Rotenone, an inhibitor of complex I, increased RR by 18%, predominantly due to an increase in NADH signal. KCN, an inhibitor of complex IV reduced the chain and resulted in an increase of 33% in RR, as a result of 23% increase in NADH and 8% in FAD . PCP, an uncoupler which oxidizes the respiratory chain, decreased RR by 18% as a result of 14% decrease in NADH signal and 4% increase in FAD signal. These results demonstrate the ability of surface fluorometry to detect changes in lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs.

  8. Neurosarcoidosis mimicking a malignant optic glioma.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Jeffrey M; Greiner, Francis G; Crowder, Jason B; Crowder, Jessica W; Quindlen, Eugene

    2008-09-01

    A 55-year-old African-American man developed progressive unilateral optic neuropathy and periocular pain. MRI showed thickening and enhancement of the mid-orbital segment of the ipsilateral optic nerve. Optic neuritis was diagnosed, and he was treated with corticosteroids without improvement. After being lost to follow-up, he returned with worsening vision in the affected eye, aggravated pain, and proptosis. MRI now showed thickening and enhancement of the entire orbital and intracranial segments of the optic nerve. Because the patient had no light perception vision in that eye and a malignant glioma was suspected, he underwent optic nerve biopsy that revealed non-caseating granulomas throughout the optic nerve tissue. CT body imaging failed to disclose other evidence of sarcoidosis. Neurosarcoidosis limited to the optic nerve is rare but should always be suspected in such circumstances. An exhaustive effort to find extracranial evidence for this diagnosis should be undertaken before resorting to optic nerve biopsy.

  9. Autonomous Pattern Formation of Micro-organic Cell Density with Optical Interlink between Two Isolated Culture Dishes.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Lee, Jeesoo; Song, Simon; Hara, Masahiko; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-01-01

    Artificial linking of two isolated culture dishes is a fascinating means of investigating interactions among multiple groups of microbes or fungi. We examined artificial interaction between two isolated dishes containing Euglena cells, which are photophobic to strong blue light. The spatial distribution of swimming Euglena cells in two micro-aquariums in the dishes was evaluated as a set of new measures: the trace momentums (TMs). The blue light patterns next irradiated onto each dish were deduced from the set of TMs using digital or analogue feedback algorithms. In the digital feedback experiment, one of two different pattern-formation rules was imposed on each feedback system. The resultant cell distribution patterns satisfied the two rules with an and operation, showing that cooperative interaction was realized in the interlink feedback. In the analogue experiment, two dishes A and B were interlinked by a feedback algorithm that illuminated dish A (B) with blue light of intensity proportional to the cell distribution in dish B (A). In this case, a distribution pattern and its reverse were autonomously formed in the two dishes. The autonomous formation of a pair of reversal patterns reflects a type of habitat separation realized by competitive interaction through the interlink feedback. According to this study, interlink feedback between two or more separate culture dishes enables artificial interactions between isolated microbial groups, and autonomous cellular distribution patterns will be achieved by correlating various microbial species, despite environmental and spatial scale incompatibilities. The optical interlink feedback is also useful for enhancing the performance of Euglena-based soft biocomputing. PMID:25622016

  10. Perineural Mast Cells Are Specifically Enriched in Pancreatic Neuritis and Neuropathic Pain in Pancreatic Cancer and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Kehl, Timo; Giese, Nathalia A.; Algül, Hana; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatic neuritis is a histopathological hallmark of pancreatic neuropathy and correlates to abdominal neuropathic pain sensation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, inflammatory cell subtypes that compose pancreatic neuritis and their correlation to the neuropathic pain syndrome in PCa and CP are yet unknown. Methods Inflammatory cells within pancreatic neuritis lesions of patients with PCa (n = 20) and CP (n = 20) were immunolabeled and colorimetrically quantified with the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, with CD68 (macrophages), CD8 (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes), CD4 (T-helper cells), CD20 (B-lymphocytes), NCL-PC (plasma cells), neutrophil elastase, PRG2 (eosinophils), anti-mast cell (MC) tryptase and correlated to pain sensation. Perineural mast cell subtypes were analyzed by double immunolabeling with MC chymase. Expression and neural immunoreactivity of protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR-1) and type 2 (PAR-2) were analyzed in PCa and CP and correlated to pain status of the patients. Results In PCa and CP, nerves were predominantly infiltrated by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (PCa: 35% of all perineural inflammatory cells, CP: 33%), macrophages (PCa: 39%, CP: 33%) and MC (PCa: 21%, CP: 27%). In both entities, neuropathic pain sensation was associated with a specific increase of perineural MC (PCa without pain: 14% vs. PCa with pain: 31%; CP without pain: 19% vs. CP with pain: 34%), not affecting the frequency of other inflammatory cell subtypes. The vast majority of these MC contained MC chymase. PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression did not correlate to the pain sensation of PCa and CP patients. Conclusion Pancreatic neuritis in PC and CP is composed of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, macrophages and MC. The specific enrichment of MC around intrapancreatic nerves in neuropathic pain due to PCa and CP suggests the presence of MC-induced visceral hypersensitivity in the pancreas. Therefore, pancreatic and enteric neuropathies seem

  11. Chronic symptoms after vestibular neuritis and the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Arshad, Qadeer; Roberts, R Edward; Ahmad, Hena; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis As the anterior and posterior semicircular canals are vital to the regulation of gaze stability, particularly during locomotion or vehicular travel, we tested whether the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of the three ipsilesional semicircular canals elicited by the modified Head Impulse Test would correlate with subjective dizziness or vertigo scores after vestibular neuritis (VN). Background Recovery following acute VN varies with around half reporting persistent symptoms long after the acute episode. However, an unanswered question is whether chronic symptoms are associated with impairment of the high velocity VOR of the anterior or posterior canals. Methods Twenty patients who had experienced an acute episode of VN at least three months earlier were included in this study. Participants were assessed with the video head impulse test (vHIT) of all six canals, bithermal caloric irrigation, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptoms Scale short-form (VSS). Results Of these 20 patients, 12 felt that they had recovered from the initial episode whereas 8 did not and reported elevated DHI and VSS scores. However, we found no correlation between DHI or VSS scores and the ipsilesional single or combined vHIT gain, vHIT gain asymmetry or caloric paresis. The high velocity VOR was not different between patients who felt they had recovered and patients who felt they had not. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic symptoms of dizziness following VN are not associated with the high velocity VOR of the single or combined ipsilesional horizontal, anterior or posterior semicircular canals. PMID:26719963

  12. Forced Exercise Preconditioning Attenuates Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis by Altering Th1 Lymphocyte Composition and Egress

    PubMed Central

    Calik, Michael W.; Shankarappa, Sahadev A.; Langert, Kelly A.; Stubbs, Evan B.

    2015-01-01

    A short-term exposure to moderately intense physical exercise affords a novel measure of protection against autoimmune-mediated peripheral nerve injury. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which forced exercise attenuates the development and progression of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), an established animal model of Guillain–Barré syndrome. Adult male Lewis rats remained sedentary (control) or were preconditioned with forced exercise (1.2 km/day × 3 weeks) prior to P2-antigen induction of EAN. Sedentary rats developed a monophasic course of EAN beginning on postimmunization day 12.3 ± 0.2 and reaching peak severity on day 17.0 ± 0.3 (N = 12). By comparison, forced-exercise preconditioned rats exhibited a similar monophasic course but with significant (p < .05) reduction of disease severity. Analysis of popliteal lymph nodes revealed a protective effect of exercise preconditioning on leukocyte composition and egress. Compared with sedentary controls, forced exercise preconditioning promoted a sustained twofold retention of P2-antigen responsive leukocytes. The percentage distribution of pro-inflammatory (Th1) lymphocytes retained in the nodes from sedentary EAN rats (5.1 ± 0.9%) was significantly greater than that present in nodes from forced-exercise preconditioned EAN rats (2.9 ± 0.6%) or from adjuvant controls (2.0 ± 0.3%). In contrast, the percentage of anti-inflammatory (Th2) lymphocytes (7–10%) and that of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (∼20%) remained unaltered by forced exercise preconditioning. These data do not support an exercise-inducible shift in Th1:Th2 cell bias. Rather, preconditioning with forced exercise elicits a sustained attenuation of EAN severity, in part, by altering the composition and egress of autoreactive proinflammatory (Th1) lymphocytes from draining lymph nodes. PMID:26186926

  13. QUIESCENT ISOLATION: THE EXTREMELY EXTENDED H I HALO OF THE OPTICALLY COMPACT DWARF GALAXY ADBS 113845+2008

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Rosenberg, Jessica L. E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu

    2009-05-10

    We present new optical imaging and spectroscopy and H I spectral line imaging of the dwarf galaxy ADBS 113845 + 2008 (hereafter ADBS 1138). This metal-poor (Z {approx} 30% Z {sub sun}), 'post-starburst' system has one of the most compact stellar distributions known in any galaxy to date (B-band exponential scale length = 0.57 kpc). In stark contrast to the compact stellar component, the neutral gas is extremely extended; H I is detected to a radial distance of {approx}25 kpc at the 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} level ({approx}> 44 B-band scale lengths). Comparing to measurements of similar 'giant disk' dwarf galaxies in the literature, ADBS 1138 has the largest known H I-to-optical size ratio. The stellar component is located near the center of a broken ring of H I that is {approx}15 kpc in diameter; column densities peak in this structure at the {approx}3.5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} level. At the center of this ring, in a region of comparatively low H I column density, we find ongoing star formation traced by H{alpha} emission. We sample the rotation curve to the point of turn over; this constrains the size of the dark matter halo of the galaxy, which outweighs the luminous component (stars + gas) by at least a factor of 15. To explain these enigmatic properties, we examine 'inside-out' and 'outside-in' evolutionary scenarios. Calculations of star formation energetics indicate that 'feedback' from concentrated star formation is not capable of producing the ring structure; we posit that this is a system where the large H I disk is evolving in quiescent isolation. In a global sense, this system is exceedingly inefficient at converting neutral gas into stars.

  14. Development of ferromagnetic spinels for optical isolation at 10. 6. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Teegarden, K.J.

    1980-05-01

    Vacuum hot pressing was used to fabricate CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/, CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/ and (1-x) CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/.x CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/ discs with diameters of 1.25 cm from fine powders and small single crystals to relative densities as high as 99.6%. Optical attenuation coefficients of approx. 1.0 cm/sup -1/ at 10.6 m were obtained for CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/, and values of 12.1 cm/sup -1/ and 14.9 cm/sup -1/ for the selenide and sulfur-selenide mixture. Two-and-three-phonon absorption bands were found to limit the transmission of CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/ at lambda > 10 ..mu..m. Extrinsic absorption mechanisms caused the higher attenuation coefficients in CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/ and the mixture. The main extrinsic mechanisms at long wavelengths were free carrier absorption (in CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/) and an impurity absorption band at 16.3 ..mu..m due to Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. At short wavelengths the attenuation coefficient was dominated by scattering from pores and second phases. Free carrier absorption was found to be induced by free selenium present in the starting powders. Suppression of this absorption was achieved by optimizing the hot-pressing procedure in order to remove free selenium. The presence of pores was attributed to incomplete densification arising from the presence of second phases (CdSe and Cr/sub 2/Se/sub 3/) and the absence of plastic deformation as a densification mechanism. Laser damage thresholds of 250 MWcm/sup -2/ and 100 MWcm/sup -2/ were measured at 10.6 ..mu..m for CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/ and CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/, respectively.

  15. Facial paralysis and lymphocytic facial neuritis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) positive for simian retrovirus type D2.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Anna L; Colby, Lesley A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2011-12-01

    Simian retrovirus type D (SRVD) is a naturally occurring betaretrovirus in nonhuman primates of the genus Macaca. Infection can lead to a variety of clinical, hematologic, and histopathologic abnormalities. We report an unusual clinical presentation of facial paralysis and histologic lymphocytic neuritis in an SRVD type 2 (SRVD2)-infected rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a catheter-associated vena caval thrombus, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and multisystemic lymphoid hyperplasia. At initial presentation, a right atrial mass was detected by echocardiography. The macaque was clinically asymptomatic but had persistent anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperglobulinemia, and later neutropenia. It was seropositive for SRV and PCR-positive for SRVD 2. Approximately 1 mo after initial presentation, the macaque developed right facial paralysis and was euthanized. Histologic lesions included lymphoplasmacytic aggregates affecting multiple organs, consistent with SRV-related lymphoid hyperplasia. The right facial nerve showed lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. The nerve itself was negative immunohistochemically for SRV antigen, but antigen was present infrequently in pericapillary lymphoid cells within the facial nerve and abundantly within lymphoid aggregates in the adjacent parotid salivary gland, bone marrow, and soft tissue. Known neurotropic viruses could not be identified. Given the widespread inflammation in this macaque, particularly in the area surrounding the facial nerve, lymphocytic neuritis and facial paralysis likely were an indirect effect of SRV infection due to local extension of SRV-related inflammation in the surrounding tissue.

  16. Use of a fiber glass optical system to measure the contractile characteristics of a single isolated muscle cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chulung; Yin, Shizhuo; Li, Jiang; Yu, Francis T. S.; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Zhang, Xueqian; Lei, Xiaoxiao; Wu, Zhongkong

    1998-05-01

    Cell is the basic structural and fundamental unit of all organisms; the smallest structure capable of performing all the activities vital to life. One goal of current research interest is to learn how the muscle varies the strength of its contraction in response to electric stimuli. A wide variety of techniques have been developed to monitor the mechanical response of isolated cardiac myocytes. Some success has been reported either with the use of intact rat myocytes supported by suction micropipettes or in guinea pig myocytes adhering to glass beams. However, the usual measuring techniques exhibit destructive contact performance on live cells. They could not solve the problem, since the cell may die during or after the time-consuming attachment process at the beginning of each experiment. In contrast, a novel optical system, which consists of a microglass tube with an inner diameter the same size of a real cardiac cell, is proposed to simulate real cell's twitch process. the physical parameters of synthetic cell are well known. By comparing the dynamics of the real cell with that of the simulated cell, the twitch characteristics of the real cell can be measured.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography to Assess Neurodegeneration in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Retinal spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a clinical and research tool in multiple sclerosis (MS) and optic neuritis (ON). This chapter summarizes a short OCT protocol as included in international consensus guidelines. The protocol was written for hands-on style such that both clinicians and OCT technicians can make use of it. The protocol is suitable for imaging of the optic nerve head and macular regions as a baseline for follow-up investigations, individual layer segmentation, and diagnostic assessment.

  18. Neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis: Seeing differences through optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, JL; de Seze, J; Lana-Peixoto, M; Palace, J; Waldman, A; Schippling, S; Tenembaum, S; Banwell, B; Greenberg, B; Levy, M; Fujihara, K; Chan, KH; Kim, HJ; Asgari, N; Sato, DK; Saiz, A; Wuerfel, J; Zimmermann, H; Green, A; Villoslada, P

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that preferentially targets the optic nerves and spinal cord. The clinical presentation may suggest multiple sclerosis (MS), but a highly specific serum autoantibody against the astrocytic water channel aquaporin-4 present in up to 80% of NMO patients enables distinction from MS. Optic neuritis may occur in either condition resulting in neuro-anatomical retinal changes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become a useful tool for analyzing retinal damage both in MS and NMO. Numerous studies showed that optic neuritis in NMO typically results in more severe retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell layer thinning and more frequent development of microcystic macular edema than in MS. Furthermore, while patients’ RNFL thinning also occurs in the absence of optic neuritis in MS, subclinical damage seems to be rare in NMO. Thus, OCT might be useful in differentiating NMO from MS and serve as an outcome parameter in clinical studies. PMID:25662342

  19. Isolated exon 8 deletion in type 1 spinal muscular atrophy with bilateral optic atrophy: unusual genetic mutation leading to unusual manifestation?

    PubMed

    Maiti, D; Bhattacharya, M; Yadav, S

    2012-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) or type 1 SMA is a fatal autosomal recessive disorder usually caused by homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 in the survivor motor neuron (SMN) gene. Additional deletion of the neuronal apotosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene exacerbates the clinical severity. Isolated exon 8 deletion has been reported in a single case series of SMA types 2 and 3 and never with SMA type 1. While extraocular muscles are typically spared, there are a few case reports documenting associated external ophthalmoplegia. Optic atrophy is a hitherto unreported association of SMA. We report a 10-month-old male infant with SMA type 1 with optic atrophy due to isolated deletion of exon 8 of the SMN gene with intact exon 7 and NAIP gene. PMID:23298926

  20. Candidate isolated neutron stars and other optically blank x-ray fields identified from the rosat all-sky and sloan digital sky surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Agueros, Marcel A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Margon, Bruce; Haberl, Frank; Voges, Wolfgang; Annis, James; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-11-01

    Only seven radio-quiet isolated neutron stars (INSs) emitting thermal X rays are known, a sample that has yet to definitively address such fundamental issues as the equation of state of degenerate neutron matter. We describe a selection algorithm based on a cross-correlation of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that identifies X-ray error circles devoid of plausible optical counterparts to the SDSS g {approx} 22 magnitudes limit. We quantitatively characterize these error circles as optically blank; they may host INSs or other similarly exotic X-ray sources such as radio-quiet BL Lacs, obscured AGN, etc. Our search is an order of magnitude more selective than previous searches for optically blank RASS error circles, and excludes the 99.9% of error circles that contain more common X-ray-emitting subclasses. We find 11 candidates, nine of which are new. While our search is designed to find the best INS candidates and not to produce a complete list of INSs in the RASS, it is reassuring that our number of candidates is consistent with predictions from INS population models. Further X-ray observations will obtain pinpoint positions and determine whether these sources are entirely optically blank at g {approx} 22, supporting the presence of likely isolated neutron stars and perhaps enabling detailed follow-up studies of neutron star physics.

  1. CP-10, a chemotactic peptide, is expressed in lesions of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, neuritis, uveitis and in C6 gliomas.

    PubMed

    Deininger, M H; Zhao, Y; Schluesener, H J

    1999-01-01

    CP-10 (chemotactic protein of m.w. 10,000) is a member of the S100 superfamily of Ca2+ binding peptides, which has potent chemotactic activity for murine and human myeloid cells. Here we report on the generation of monoclonal antibodies against CP-10 and accumulation of CP-10+ cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), neuritis (EAN), uveitis (EAU) and in experimentally transplanted C6 gliomas. During acute inflammation, CP-10 is mainly expressed by large ED1+ monocytic perivascular cells that accumulate at days 11-14. CP-10+ cells are predominantly located in areas of cellular infiltration but are as well found in the meninges and infiltrating the brain parenchyma. In transplanted gliomas, CP-10+ cells are located exclusively within the tumor parenchyma. Using double labeling experiments, other cells participating in the inflammatory reaction were found to express CP-10, like few lymphoblastic W3/13+ cells in the vicinity of the inflammatory infiltrate.

  2. rhesus cytomegalovirus (macacine herpesvirus 3)-associated facial neuritis in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Assaf, B T; Knight, H L; Miller, A D

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are common sequelae to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans and are due to a variety of mechanisms, including direct antiretroviral toxicity, HIV-mediated damage, immune-mediated disorders, and opportunistic viral infections. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) remain the most consistent animal model for unraveling the pathogenesis of lentiviral-associated disease and its associated opportunistic infections. Rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) is the most common opportunistic viral infection in rhesus macaques infected with SIV and causes multiorgan pathology; however, its role in peripheral nerve pathology has not been explored. We have identified 115 coinfected cases with SIV and RhCMV, of which 10 cases of RhCMV-associated facial neuritis were found (8.7% prevalence). Histologic lesions were consistent in all cases and ranged from partial to complete obliteration of the nerves of the tongue, lacrimal gland, and other facial tissues with a mixed inflammatory population of neutrophils and macrophages, of which the latter commonly contained intranuclear inclusion bodies. Luxol fast blue staining and myelin basic protein immunohistochemistry confirmed the progressive myelin loss in the peripheral nerves. Bielschowsky silver stain revealed progressive loss of axons directly related to the severity of inflammation. Double immunohistochemistry with spectral imaging analysis revealed RhCMV-infected macrophages directly associated with the neuritis, and there was no evidence to support RhCMV infection of Schwann cells. These results suggest that peripheral nerve damage is a bystander effect secondary to inflammation rather than a direct infection of Schwann cells and warrants further investigations into the pathogenesis of RhCMV-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  3. Analog signal isolation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  4. Analog signal isolation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  5. [Retrobulbar optic nevritis and chicken pox: a case report in a child].

    PubMed

    Roelandt, V; Fayol, L; Hugonenq, C; Mancini, J; Chabrol, B

    2005-03-01

    We report here the case of a three-year-old boy presenting with an optic neuritis during the invasive phase of a chicken pox. This clinical, infrequent picture, can be directly due to the virus or be secondary to an auto-immune mechanism. The examination of the ocular fundus, the profile of the spinal fluid, the MRI and the measure of visual evoked potential allow to reach diagnosis and to identify the type of lesion. There is no consensus on the treatment of this optic neuritis and the current attitude is therapeutic abstention because of a rapid spontaneous improvement. Cerebellitis, meningitis can also be seen during chicken pox. Their evolution is quickly favorable, not requiring additional exam. Encephalitis can result from an auto-immune lesion of the white matter and require then the use of corticoids with antiviral drugs.

  6. [Retrobulbar optic nevritis and chicken pox: a case report in a child].

    PubMed

    Roelandt, V; Fayol, L; Hugonenq, C; Mancini, J; Chabrol, B

    2005-03-01

    We report here the case of a three-year-old boy presenting with an optic neuritis during the invasive phase of a chicken pox. This clinical, infrequent picture, can be directly due to the virus or be secondary to an auto-immune mechanism. The examination of the ocular fundus, the profile of the spinal fluid, the MRI and the measure of visual evoked potential allow to reach diagnosis and to identify the type of lesion. There is no consensus on the treatment of this optic neuritis and the current attitude is therapeutic abstention because of a rapid spontaneous improvement. Cerebellitis, meningitis can also be seen during chicken pox. Their evolution is quickly favorable, not requiring additional exam. Encephalitis can result from an auto-immune lesion of the white matter and require then the use of corticoids with antiviral drugs. PMID:15734123

  7. Features of anti-aquaporin 4 antibody-seropositive Chinese patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyang; Wang, Yanling; Xu, Quangang; Zhang, Aidi; Zhou, Huanfen; Zhao, Shuo; Kang, Hao; Peng, Chunxia; Cao, Shanshan; Wei, Shihui

    2015-10-01

    The detection of anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody (AQP-4 Ab) is crucial to detect patients who will develop neuromyelitis optica (NMO); however, there are few studies on the AQP-4 Ab serostatus of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum ON. We analyzed the clinical and paraclinical features of neuromyelitis optica spectrum ON patients in China according to the patients' AQP4-Ab serostatus. 125 patients with recurrent and bilateral ON with simultaneous attacks were divided into AQP-4 Ab-seropositive and -seronegative groups. Demographic, clinical, serum autoantibody data, connective tissue disorders (CTDs), visual performance were compared. A Visual Acuity (VA) of less than 0.1 during acute ON attacks occurred more frequently in the seropositive group (p = 0.023); however, there was not a significant difference between groups on VA recovery after the first attack. The seropositive group experienced the worst outcome during the last attack (p = 0.017). Other co-existing autoimmunity antibodies (p < 0.001) and CTDs (p < 0.001) were more prevalent in seropositive patients. There were no significant differences on VA recovery and RNFLT combined with other autoantibodies or CTDs. The two groups did not differ significantly with regard to time to relapse, annualized relapse rates, time of diagnosis NMO, or RNFL. There were no significant differences on VA recovery and RNFLT combined with other autoantibodies or CTDs. RNFLT was thinner in NMO seropositive patients. Although AQP-4 Ab expression predicted poor visual outcome, positive patients were usually associated with mild symptoms at first onset. Anti-SSA/SSB antibody or Sjögren syndrome may be associated with AQP-4 Ab in neuromyelitis optica spectrum ON.

  8. The Correlation between Aquaporin-4 Antibody and the Visual Function of Patients with Demyelinating Optic Neuritis at Onset

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wei; Zhao, Xiujuan; Xiao, Wei; Lin, Shaofen; Luo, Yan; Lu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    ON patients with AQP4-Ab seropositivity tend to be predominantly female and young and have worse visual acuity and more severe damage to their visual fields compared with AQP4-Ab seronegativity. PMID:26078876

  9. Charging a Battery-Powered Device with a Fiber-Optically Connected Photonic Power System for Achieving High-Voltage Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Lizon, David C; Gioria, Jack G; Dale, Gregory E; Snyder, Hans R

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a system to provide isolated power to the cathode-subsystem electronics of an x-ray tube. These components are located at the cathode potential of several hundred kilovolts, requiring a supply of power isolated from this high voltage. In this design a fiber-optically connected photonic power system (PPS) is used to recharge a lithium-ion battery pack, which will subsequently supply power to the cathode-subsystem electronics. The suitability of the commercially available JDSU PPS for this application is evaluated. The output of the ppe converter is characterized. The technical aspects of its use for charging a variety of Li-Ion batteries are discussed. Battery charge protection requirements and safety concerns are also addressed.

  10. Distortions of the posterior surface in optical coherence tomography images of the isolated crystalline lens: effect of the lens index gradient

    PubMed Central

    Borja, David; Siedlecki, Damian; de Castro, Alberto; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Ortiz, Sergio; Arrieta, Esdras; Parel, Jean-Marie; Marcos, Susana; Manns, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    We quantify the posterior surface distortions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of isolated crystalline lenses. The posterior radius of curvature and asphericity obtained from OCT images acquired with the beam incident first on the anterior, and then the posterior, surface were compared. The results were compared with predictions of a ray-tracing model which includes the index gradient. The results show that the error in the radius of curvature is within the measurement reproducibility and that it can be corrected by assuming a uniform refractive index. However, accurate asphericity values require a correction algorithm that takes into account the gradient. PMID:21258553

  11. Assessing Optic Nerve Pathology with Diffusion MRI: from Mouse to Human

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junqian; Sun, Shu-Wei; Naismith, Robert T.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cross, Anne H.; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2008-01-01

    Optic nerve is often affected in patients with glaucoma and multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional MRI can detect nerve damage but it does not accurately assess the underlying pathologies. Mean diffusivity and diffusion anisotropy indices derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been shown to be sensitive to a variety of central nervous system (CNS) white matter pathologies. Despite being sensitive, the lack of specificity limits the ability of these measures to differentiate the underlying pathology in CNS white matter tissues. Directional (axial and radial) diffusivities, measuring water diffusion parallel and perpendicular to the axonal tracts, have been shown to be specific to axonal and myelin damages in mouse models of optic nerve injury, including retinal ischemia and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The progression of Wallerian degeneration has also been detected using directional diffusivities after retinal ischemia. However, translating these findings to human optic nerve is technically challenging. The current status of human optic nerve diffusion MRI, including the imaging sequences and protocols, are summarized herein. Despite lacking a consensus of the optimal sequence or protocol among different groups, increased mean diffusivity and decreased diffusion anisotropy has been observed in injured optic nerve from chronic optic neuritis patients. Decreased λ∥, correlating with visual function and recovery, was observed recently in acute optic neuritis patients in a pilot study, suggesting the specificity of λ∥ to axonal injury. From different mouse models of optic nerve injuries to the emerging studies on optic neuritis patients, directional diffusivities demonstrate great potential to be specific biomarkers for axonal and myelin injury. PMID:18756587

  12. Aspects of cerebral plasticity related to clinical features in acute vestibular neuritis: a "starting point" review from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Micarelli, A; Chiaravalloti, A; Schillaci, O; Ottaviani, F; Alessandrini, M

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is one of the most common causes of vertigo and is characterised by a sudden unilateral vestibular failure (UVF). Many neuroimaging studies in the last 10 years have focused on brain changes related to sudden vestibular deafferentation as in VN. However, most of these studies, also due to different possibilities across diverse centres, were based on different times of first acquisition from the onset of VN symptoms, neuroimaging techniques, statistical analysis and correlation with otoneurological and psychological findings. In the present review, the authors aim to merge together the similarities and discrepancies across various investigations that have employed neuroimaging techniques and group analysis with the purpose of better understanding about how the brain changes and what characteristic clinical features may relate to each other in the acute phase of VN. Six studies that strictly met inclusion criteria were analysed to assess cortical-subcortical correlates of acute clinical features related to VN. The present review clearly reveals that sudden UVF may induce a wide variety of cortical and subcortical responses - with changes in different sensory modules - as a result of acute plasticity in the central nervous system. PMID:27196070

  13. [Optic neuromyelitis. Main differences with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Lopategui Cabezas, I; Cervantes Llano, M; Pentón Rol, G

    2008-06-01

    The optic neuromyelitis or syndrome of Devic is an inflammatory and autoimmune illness of the central nervous system. It is characterized by attacks of optic neuritis and myelitis, being able to produce blindness, great neurological disability and even the short term death. Until the moment an effective treatment doesn't exist, the therapy is centred in the treatment of the acute attacks, the medical prevention of the complications and the rehabilitation. This article is a revision of this not very common illness, considering that its prevalence in our country has gone in increase. We compare between the optic neuromyelitis and the multiple sclerosis, being based on the main ones characteristic clinical-epidemic that distinguishes these two pathologies, considered by many clinical variants of oneself illness. PMID:19295979

  14. SS316 structure fabricated by selective laser melting and integrated with strain isolated optical fiber high temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jinesh; Havermann, Dirk; Polyzos, Dimitrios; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2015-09-01

    Smart metal having integrated high temperature sensing capability is reported. The SS316 structure is made by additive layer manufacturing via selective laser melting (SLM). Sensor component is embedded in to the structure during the SLM build process. The strain isolated in-fiber Fabry-Perot cavity sensor measures temperature up to 1100 °C inside the metal.

  15. Retinal and optic nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2003-11-01

    A variety of disease processes can affect the retina and/or the optic nerve, including vascular or ischemic disease, inflammatory or infectious disease, and degenerative disease. These disease processes may selectively damage certain parts of the retina or optic nerve, and the specific areas that are damaged may have implications for the design of potential therapeutic visual prosthetic devices. Outer retinal diseases include age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Although the retinal photoreceptors may be lost, the inner retina is relatively well-preserved in these diseases and may be a target for retinal prosthetic devices. Inner retinal diseases include retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal venous occlusive disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Other retinal diseases such as ocular infections (retinitis, endophthalmitis) may affect all retinal layers. Because the inner retinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cells, may be destroyed in these diseases (inner retinal or whole retinal), prosthetic devices that stimulate the inner retina may not be effective. Common optic nerve diseases include glaucoma, optic neuritis, and ischemic optic neuropathy. Because the ganglion cell nerve fibers themselves are damaged, visual prosthetics for these diseases will need to target more distal portions of the visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. Clearly, a sound understanding of retinal and optic nerve disease pathophysiology is critical for designing and choosing the optimal visual prosthetic device.

  16. Congenital optic tract hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Fujio, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Taylor, David

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of isolated unilateral optic tract hypoplasia, described only twice previously. Bilateral optic disk hypoplasia was seen ophthalmoscopically and visual field studies showed an incongruous right homonymous hemianopia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral hypoplasia of both optic nerves and the left optic tract. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography mapping correlated well with the visual field studies. PMID:26228965

  17. Optic neuropathy associated with systemic sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Ben J.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Plant, Gordon T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify and follow a series of 52 patients with optic neuropathy related to sarcoidosis. Methods: Prospective observational cohort study. Results: The disorder was more common in women and affected a wide age range. It was proportionately more common in African and Caribbean ethnic groups. Two clinical subtypes were identified: the more common was a subacute optic neuropathy resembling optic neuritis; a more slowly progressive optic neuropathy arose in the remaining 17%. Sixteen (31%) were bilateral. Concurrent intraocular inflammation was seen in 36%. Pain arose in only 27% of cases. An optic perineuritis was seen in 2 cases, and predominate involvement of the chiasm in one. MRI findings showed optic nerve involvement in 75% of cases, with adjacent and more widespread inflammation in 31%. Treatment with corticosteroids was helpful in those with an inflammatory optic neuropathy, but not those with mass lesions. Relapse of visual signs arose in 25% of cases, necessitating an increase or escalation of treatment, but relapse was not a poor prognostic factor. Conclusions: This is a large prospective study of the clinical characteristics and outcome of treatment in optic neuropathy associated with sarcoidosis. Patients who experience an inflammatory optic neuropathy respond to treatment but may relapse. Those with infiltrative or progressive optic neuropathies improve less well even though the inflammatory disorder responds to therapy. PMID:27536707

  18. High-generation second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) Dendrimers that contain isolation chromophores: convenient synthesis by using click chemistry and their increased NLO effects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbo; Li, Conggang; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi; Ye, Cheng; Qin, Jingui; Li, Zhen

    2012-08-27

    Herein, high-generation dendrimers G4-NS and G5-NS, which contained 30 and 62 azo-benzene chromophore moieties, respectively, were conveniently prepared in high purity and satisfied yields by a combination of divergent and convergent approaches, coupled with the utilization of the powerful Sharpless click reaction. These dendrimers possessed a regular structure of alternating layers of nitro-based and sulfonyl-based azo chromophores in which the sulfonyl-based azo-chromophore moieties were utilized as co-isolation groups for the nitro-based moieties to achieve larger macroscopic second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) effects. These high-generation dendrimers (G4-NS and G5-NS) displayed very large NLO efficiencies (up to 253.0 pm V(-1)), which is, to the best of our knowledge, the record highest efficiency for simple azo-chromophore moieties.

  19. Myelin ultrastructure of sciatic nerve in rat experimental autoimmune neuritis model and its correlation with associated protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiao-Jing; Wei, Yu-Jun; Ao, Qiang; Gong, Kai; Wang, Jian-Yong; Sun, Qiang-San; Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Zun-Cheng; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    To explore the relationship of peripheral nerve ultrastructure and its associated protein expression in experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN). EAN was established in Lewis rats using an emulsified mixture of P0 peptide 180-199, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant. Rats immunized with saline solution were used as a control group. Sciatic nerve ultrastructure and immunofluorescence histopathology were measured at the neuromuscular severity peak on day 18 post-induction. Cell-specific protein markers were used for immunofluorescence histopathology staining to characterize sciatic nerve cells: CD3 (T cell), Iba-1 (microglia), S100 (myelin), and neurofilament 200 (axon). The results showed that swelling of the myelin lamellae, vesicular disorganization, separation of the myelin lamellae, and an attenuation or disappearance of the axon were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the EAN group. CD3 and Iba-1 increased significantly in the structures characterized by separation or swelling of the myelin lamellae, and increased slightly in the structures characterized by vesicular of the myelin lamellae, S100 decreased in the structures characterized by vesicular disorganization or separation of the myelin lamellae. And neurofilament 200 decreased in the structures characterized by separation of the myelin lamellae. Furthermore, we found that Iba1 were positive in the myelin sheath, and overlapped with S100, which significantly indicated that Schwann cells played as macrophage-like cells during the disease progression of ENA. Our findings may be a significant supplement for the knowledge of EAN model, and may offer a novel sight on the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome. PMID:26339349

  20. Prevention and therapy of experimental autoimmune neuritis by an antibody against T cell receptors-alpha/beta.

    PubMed

    Jung, S; Krämer, S; Schluesener, H J; Hünig, T; Toyka, K; Hartung, H P

    1992-06-15

    The mAb R73 directed to the TCR-alpha/beta of rat lymphocytes was tested for its therapeutic potential during the effector phase of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) in Lewis rats. EAN can be actively induced by immunization with bovine peripheral nerve myelin, bovine P2 protein, or a peptide containing its neuritogenic epitope and serves as a model of the human Guilain-Barré syndrome. Adoptive transfer of activated P2-specific T lymphocytes also produces the monophasic disease (AT-EAN) characterized by inflammation and demyelination of peripheral nerves and highlights the central role of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of EAN. A single administration of the mAb R73 immediately after injection of activated P2-specific T line cells completely prevented the development of clinical and electrophysiologic signs of EAN in most animals and greatly alleviated the disease in the others. In further experiments mAb R73 was applied after the appearance of first clinical signs of EAN actively induced by immunization with a neuritogenic peptide or bovine peripheral nerve myelin. In both cases the anti-TCR-alpha/beta mAb reversed clinical signs of EAN and prevented the development of peripheral nerve dysfunction. In vivo and in vitro data suggest that impairment of Ag recognition and T cell function by occupancy of the TCR and R73-induced TCR-modulation rather than depletion of TCR-alpha/beta-bearing lymphocytes is the decisive mechanism underlying suppression of EAN that is apparent already within 48 h of the first R73 injection. PMID:1376340

  1. Kinetic spectroscopy of heme hydration and ligand binding in myoglobin and isolated hemoglobin chains: an optical window into heme pocket water dynamics.

    PubMed

    Esquerra, Raymond M; López-Peña, Ignacio; Tipgunlakant, Pooncharas; Birukou, Ivan; Nguyen, Rosa L; Soman, Jayashree; Olson, John S; Kliger, David S; Goldbeck, Robert A

    2010-09-21

    The entry of a water molecule into the distal heme pocket of pentacoordinate heme proteins such as myoglobin and the alpha,beta chains of hemoglobin can be detected by time-resolved spectroscopy in the heme visible bands after photolysis of the CO complex. Reviewing the evidence from spectrokinetic studies of Mb variants, we find that this optical method measures the occupancy of non(heme)coordinated water in the distal pocket, n(w), with high fidelity. This evidence further suggests that perturbation of the kinetic barrier presented by distal pocket water is often the dominant mechanism by which active site mutations affect the bimolecular rate constant for CO binding. Water entry into the heme pockets of isolated hemoglobin subunits was detected by optical methods. Internal hydration is higher in the native alpha chains than in the beta chains, in agreement with previous crystallographic results for the subunits within Hb tetramers. The kinetic parameters obtained from modeling of the water entry and ligand rebinding in Mb mutants and native Hb chains are consistent with an inverse dependence of the bimolecular association rate constant on the water occupancy factor. This correlation suggests that water and ligand mutually exclude one another from the distal pockets of both types of hemoglobin chains and myoglobin.

  2. Performance of D-criteria in isolating meteor showers from the sporadic background in an optical data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.

    2016-02-01

    Separating meteor showers from the sporadic meteor background is critical for the study of both showers and the sporadic complex. The linkage of meteors to meteor showers, to parent bodies, and to other meteors is done using measures of orbital similarity. These measures often take the form of so-called D-parameters and are generally paired with some cutoff value within which two orbits are considered related. The appropriate cut-off value can depend on the size of the data set (Southworth & Hawkins 1963), the sporadic contribution within the observed size range (Jopek 1995), or the inclination of the shower (Galligan 2001). If the goal is to minimize sporadic contamination of the extracted shower, the cut-off value should also reflect the strength of the shower compared to the local sporadic background. In this paper, we present a method for determining, on a per-shower basis, the orbital similarity cut-off value that corresponds to a chosen acceptable false-positive rate. This method also assists us in distinguishing which showers are significant within a set of data. We apply these methods to optical meteor observations from the NASA All-Sky and Southern Ontario Meteor Networks.

  3. Isolated acute dysphagia due to varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Vittorio; Rigamonti, Andrea; Valentini, Sergio; Fiumani, Anna; Piamarta, Francesca; Bonfanti, Paolo; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of zoster sine herpete causing isolated acute dysphagia in an immunocompetent patient. The interest of this paper is the atypical presentation of varicella-zoster virus reactivation. A 77-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of fever and worsening dysphagia for both liquid and solid foods. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis and PCR amplified varicella-zoster virus DNA with high antibody titers in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The panel was suggestive of a cranial neuritis due to varicella-zoster virus, involved cranial nerves, even in the absence of a cutaneous and mucosal rash. Varicella-zoster virus reactivation should be included in the differential diagnosis of isolated or multiple cranial nerve palsies, with or without zosteriform skin lesions. A prompt etiologic diagnosis can lead to early administration of antiviral therapy.

  4. Optical voltage reference

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  5. Detecting Optic Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Using New Colorimetric Analysis Software: From Idea to Application.

    PubMed

    Bambo, Maria Pilar; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Perez-Olivan, Susana; Larrosa-Povés, José Manuel; Polo-Llorens, Vicente; Gonzalez-De la Rosa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Neuro-ophthalmologists typically observe a temporal pallor of the optic disc in patients with multiple sclerosis. Here, we describe the emergence of an idea to quantify these optic disc color changes in multiple sclerosis patients. We recruited 12 multiple sclerosis patients with previous optic neuritis attack and obtained photographs of their optic discs. The Laguna ONhE, a new colorimetric software using hemoglobin as the reference pigment in the papilla, was used for the analysis. The papilla of these multiple sclerosis patients showed greater pallor, especially in the temporal sector. The software detected the pallor and assigned hemoglobin percentages below normal reference values. Measurements of optic disc hemoglobin levels obtained with the Laguna ONhE software program had good ability to detect optic atrophy and, consequently, axonal loss in multiple sclerosis patients. This new technology is easy to implement in routine clinical practice.

  6. Autonomous oscillation/separation of cell density artificially induced by optical interlink feedback as designed interaction between two isolated microalgae chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Won, June; Song, Simon; Maeda, Mizuo

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a designed interaction between two isolated cell populations of Euglena gracilis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, separately confined in two 25-square micro-aquariums of lab-on-chip size. The interaction was realized by interlinking two identical optical feedback systems, which measured the cell distribution. To analyze the cell populations, we measured the cell distribution in the 25 squares and irradiated the cells with a blue light pattern as an external stimulus. The cell distribution dataset was exchanged between the two systems. Governed by a designed interaction algorithm, the feedback systems produced a dynamic blue light illumination pattern that evoked the photophobic responses of both species. We also induced autonomous cell density oscillation and cell distribution separation and clustering, and analyzed how the types and diversities of the photophobic responses affected the oscillation period and separation and clustering. We conclude that artificial interlink feedback is a promising method for investigating diverse cell–cell interactions in ecological communities, and for developing soft-computing applications with living cells.

  7. Theoretical investigations of the optical spectra and EPR parameters for the isolated and pairs of trivalent ytterbium ions in Li6Y(BO3)3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Wen-Chen

    2015-11-01

    The optical spectra and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters (g factors and hyperfine structure constants A) for an isolated Yb3+ ion in Li6Y(BO3)3 (LYB) crystal are investigated first by the complete diagonalization method based on the superposition model. The obtained results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental ones. For a pair of coupled Yb3+ ions in crystals, the extensively used formulas to calculate EPR splitting lines for such pair cannot be directly adopted in the present study and thus we extend them to the case of arbitrarily directed vector R connecting the two Yb3+ ions in crystal. By these amended formulas, we find that in addition to the interacting Yb3+ pair with nearest distance R (=0.385 nm), the Yb3+ pair with next-nearest distance R (=0.662 nm) would also make contribution to experimental EPR spectra. This point which was not noticed in previous works would help us further understand the energy transfer scheme between two Yb3+ ions in crystals.

  8. Autonomous oscillation/separation of cell density artificially induced by optical interlink feedback as designed interaction between two isolated microalgae chips

    PubMed Central

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Won, June; Song, Simon; Maeda, Mizuo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a designed interaction between two isolated cell populations of Euglena gracilis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, separately confined in two 25-square micro-aquariums of lab-on-chip size. The interaction was realized by interlinking two identical optical feedback systems, which measured the cell distribution. To analyze the cell populations, we measured the cell distribution in the 25 squares and irradiated the cells with a blue light pattern as an external stimulus. The cell distribution dataset was exchanged between the two systems. Governed by a designed interaction algorithm, the feedback systems produced a dynamic blue light illumination pattern that evoked the photophobic responses of both species. We also induced autonomous cell density oscillation and cell distribution separation and clustering, and analyzed how the types and diversities of the photophobic responses affected the oscillation period and separation and clustering. We conclude that artificial interlink feedback is a promising method for investigating diverse cell–cell interactions in ecological communities, and for developing soft-computing applications with living cells. PMID:27098710

  9. Autonomous oscillation/separation of cell density artificially induced by optical interlink feedback as designed interaction between two isolated microalgae chips.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Won, June; Song, Simon; Maeda, Mizuo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a designed interaction between two isolated cell populations of Euglena gracilis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, separately confined in two 25-square micro-aquariums of lab-on-chip size. The interaction was realized by interlinking two identical optical feedback systems, which measured the cell distribution. To analyze the cell populations, we measured the cell distribution in the 25 squares and irradiated the cells with a blue light pattern as an external stimulus. The cell distribution dataset was exchanged between the two systems. Governed by a designed interaction algorithm, the feedback systems produced a dynamic blue light illumination pattern that evoked the photophobic responses of both species. We also induced autonomous cell density oscillation and cell distribution separation and clustering, and analyzed how the types and diversities of the photophobic responses affected the oscillation period and separation and clustering. We conclude that artificial interlink feedback is a promising method for investigating diverse cell-cell interactions in ecological communities, and for developing soft-computing applications with living cells. PMID:27098710

  10. Induction of severe experimental autoimmune neuritis with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 53-78 amino acid sequence of the myelin P2 protein.

    PubMed

    Rostami, A; Gregorian, S K; Brown, M J; Pleasure, D E

    1990-12-01

    We generated a synthetic peptide (SP-26), corresponding to the amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein, which induced severe clinical and pathological characteristics of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) in Lewis rats. Lymph node cell populations from SP-26-immunized rats elicited a proliferative response to the peptide and to the P2 protein. After 16 cycles of antigen stimulation with the peptide, the SP-26 T cell line shows a decreased response to P2, but not to SP-26. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of a SP-26 T cell line indicated the majority of cells to be of CD4+ CD8-. This report demonstrates that the synthetic peptide SP-26 can induce severe EAN in Lewis rats in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, specific T cell lines reactive to SP-26 can be generated from the lymph nodes of SP-26-immunized rats. PMID:1699975

  11. Activation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates experimental autoimmune neuritis in Lewis rats in association with enhanced humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Li, Xiao-Li; Li, Heng; Wang, Shan; Wang, Cong-Cong; Yue, Long-Tao; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Hui; Yang, Bing; Duan, Rui-Sheng

    2016-04-15

    Accumulated evidence demonstrated that Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is involved in the inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we showed that a selective A2AR agonist, CGS21680, exacerbated experimental autoimmune neuritis in Lewis rats induced with bovine peripheral myelin. The exacerbation was accompanied with reduced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, increased CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and antigen-specific autoantibodies, which is possibly due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced by CGS21680. Combined with previous studies, our data indicate that the effects of A2AR stimulation in vivo are variable in different diseases. Caution should be taken in the use of A2AR agonists. PMID:27049573

  12. Induction of severe experimental autoimmune neuritis with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 53-78 amino acid sequence of the myelin P2 protein.

    PubMed

    Rostami, A; Gregorian, S K; Brown, M J; Pleasure, D E

    1990-12-01

    We generated a synthetic peptide (SP-26), corresponding to the amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein, which induced severe clinical and pathological characteristics of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) in Lewis rats. Lymph node cell populations from SP-26-immunized rats elicited a proliferative response to the peptide and to the P2 protein. After 16 cycles of antigen stimulation with the peptide, the SP-26 T cell line shows a decreased response to P2, but not to SP-26. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of a SP-26 T cell line indicated the majority of cells to be of CD4+ CD8-. This report demonstrates that the synthetic peptide SP-26 can induce severe EAN in Lewis rats in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, specific T cell lines reactive to SP-26 can be generated from the lymph nodes of SP-26-immunized rats.

  13. Labyrinthitis and Vestibular Neuritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... any further problems. A key component of successful adaptation is a dedicated effort to keep moving, despite ... can prolong or even prevent the process of adaptation. Authors: Charlotte L. Shupert, PhD with contributions from ...

  14. Whole-Genome Optical Mapping and Finished Genome Sequence of Sphingobacterium deserti sp. nov., a New Species Isolated from the Western Desert of China

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, István; Li, Xinna; Tang, Ran; Chen, Ming; Wang, Lin; Su, Shiyou; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Min

    2015-01-01

    A novel Gram-negative bacterium, designated ZWT, was isolated from a soil sample of the Western Desert of China, and its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic position were investigated using a polyphasic approach. Growth occurred on TGY medium at 5–42°C with an optimum of 30°C, and at pH 7.0–11.0 with an optimum of pH 9.0. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c/C16:1ω6c or C16:1ω6c/C16:1ω7c) (39.22%), iso-C15:0 (27.91%), iso-C17:0 3OH (15.21%), C16:0 (4.98%), iso-C15:0 3OH (3.03%), C16:0 3OH (5.39%) and C14:0 (1.74%). The major polar lipid of strain ZWT is phosphatidylethanolamine. The only menaquinone observed was MK-7. The GC content of the DNA of strain ZWT is 44.9 mol%. rDNA phylogeny, genome relatedness and chemotaxonomic characteristics all indicate that strain ZWT represents a novel species of the genus Sphingobacterium. We propose the name S. deserti sp. nov., with ZWT (= KCTC 32092T = ACCC 05744T) as the type strain. Whole genome optical mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to derive a finished genome sequence for strain ZWT, consisting of a circular chromosome of 4,615,818 bp in size. The genome of strain ZWT features 3,391 protein-encoding and 48 tRNA-encoding genes. Comparison of the predicted proteome of ZWT with those of other sphingobacteria identified 925 species-unique proteins that may contribute to the adaptation of ZWT to its native, extremely arid and inhospitable environment. As the first finished genome sequence for any Sphingobacterium, our work will serve as a useful reference for subsequent sequencing and mapping efforts for additional strains and species within this genus. PMID:25830331

  15. Whole-genome optical mapping and finished genome sequence of Sphingobacterium deserti sp. nov., a new species isolated from the Western Desert of China.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chao; Zhou, Zhengfu; Molnár, István; Li, Xinna; Tang, Ran; Chen, Ming; Wang, Lin; Su, Shiyou; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Min

    2015-01-01

    A novel Gram-negative bacterium, designated ZWT, was isolated from a soil sample of the Western Desert of China, and its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic position were investigated using a polyphasic approach. Growth occurred on TGY medium at 5-42°C with an optimum of 30°C, and at pH 7.0-11.0 with an optimum of pH 9.0. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c/C16:1ω6c or C16:1ω6c/C16:1ω7c) (39.22%), iso-C15:0 (27.91%), iso-C17:0 3OH (15.21%), C16:0 (4.98%), iso-C15:0 3OH (3.03%), C16:0 3OH (5.39%) and C14:0 (1.74%). The major polar lipid of strain ZWT is phosphatidylethanolamine. The only menaquinone observed was MK-7. The GC content of the DNA of strain ZWT is 44.9 mol%. rDNA phylogeny, genome relatedness and chemotaxonomic characteristics all indicate that strain ZWT represents a novel species of the genus Sphingobacterium. We propose the name S. deserti sp. nov., with ZWT (= KCTC 32092T = ACCC 05744T) as the type strain. Whole genome optical mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to derive a finished genome sequence for strain ZWT, consisting of a circular chromosome of 4,615,818 bp in size. The genome of strain ZWT features 3,391 protein-encoding and 48 tRNA-encoding genes. Comparison of the predicted proteome of ZWT with those of other sphingobacteria identified 925 species-unique proteins that may contribute to the adaptation of ZWT to its native, extremely arid and inhospitable environment. As the first finished genome sequence for any Sphingobacterium, our work will serve as a useful reference for subsequent sequencing and mapping efforts for additional strains and species within this genus.

  16. [Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy animal model and its treatment applications].

    PubMed

    Chuman, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most common acute unilaterally onset optic nerve diseases. One management problem in terms of NAION is the difficulty of differential diagnosis between NAION and anterior optic neuritis (ON). A second problem is that there is no established treatment for the acute stage of NAION. A third problem is that there is no preventive treatment for a subsequent attack on the fellow eye, estimated to occur in 15 to 25% of patients with NAION. For differentiation of acute NAION from anterior optic neuritis, we investigated the usefulness of laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG). In the normal control group, the tissue blood flow did not significantly differ between the right and left eyes. In the NAION group, all 6 patients had 29.5% decreased mean blur rate (MBR), which correlates to optic disc blood flow, of the NAION eye compared with the unaffected eye. In the anterior ON group, all 6 cases had 15.9% increased MBR of the anterior ON eye compared with the unaffected eye. Thus, LSFG showed a difference of the underlying pathophysiology between NAION and anterior ON despite showing disc swelling in both groups and could be useful for differentiating both groups. For the treatment of acute stage of NAION, we tried to reproduce the rodent model of NAION (rNAION) developed by Bernstein and colleagues. To induce rNAION, after the administration of rose bengal(RB) (2.5 mM) into the tail vein of SD rats, the small vessels of the left optic nerve were photoactivated using a 514 nm argon green laser (RB-laser-induction). In the RB-laser-induction eyes, the capillaries within the optic disc were reduced markedly, the optic disc became swollen, and fluorescein angiography showed filling defect in the choroid and the optic disc at an early stage, followed by hyperfluorescence at a late stage. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed that visual evoked potential (VEP) amplitude was significantly decreased but an electroretinogram

  17. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  18. Effect of protein and glycerol concentration on the mechanical, optical, and water vapor barrier properties of canola protein isolate-based edible films.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang; Nickerson, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable edible films prepared using proteins are both economically and environmentally important to the food packaging industry relative to traditional petroleum-derived synthetic materials. In the present study, the mechanical and water vapor barrier properties of casted canola protein isolate edible films were investigated as a function of protein (5.0% and 7.5%) and glycerol (30%, 35%, 40%, 45%, and 50%) content. Specifically, tensile strength and elongation, elastic modulus, puncture strength and deformation, opacity, and water vapor permeability were measured. Results indicated that tensile strength, puncture strength, and elastic modulus decreased, while tensile elongation and puncture deformation values increased as glycerol concentration increased for both 5.0% and 7.5% canola protein isolate films. Furthermore, tensile strength, puncture strength, and elastic modulus values were found to increase at higher protein concentrations within the canola protein isolate films, whereas puncture deformation values decreased. Tensile elongation was found to be similar for both canola protein isolate protein levels. Canola protein isolate films became more transparent with increasing of glycerol concentration and decreasing of canola protein isolate concentration. Water vapor permeability value was also found to increase with increasing glycerol and protein contents. Overall, results indicated that canola protein isolate films were less brittle, more malleable and transparent, and had greater water vapor permeability at higher glycerol levels. However, as protein level increased, canola protein isolate films were more brittle, less malleable and more opaque, and also had increased water vapor permeability.

  19. Effect of protein and glycerol concentration on the mechanical, optical, and water vapor barrier properties of canola protein isolate-based edible films.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang; Nickerson, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable edible films prepared using proteins are both economically and environmentally important to the food packaging industry relative to traditional petroleum-derived synthetic materials. In the present study, the mechanical and water vapor barrier properties of casted canola protein isolate edible films were investigated as a function of protein (5.0% and 7.5%) and glycerol (30%, 35%, 40%, 45%, and 50%) content. Specifically, tensile strength and elongation, elastic modulus, puncture strength and deformation, opacity, and water vapor permeability were measured. Results indicated that tensile strength, puncture strength, and elastic modulus decreased, while tensile elongation and puncture deformation values increased as glycerol concentration increased for both 5.0% and 7.5% canola protein isolate films. Furthermore, tensile strength, puncture strength, and elastic modulus values were found to increase at higher protein concentrations within the canola protein isolate films, whereas puncture deformation values decreased. Tensile elongation was found to be similar for both canola protein isolate protein levels. Canola protein isolate films became more transparent with increasing of glycerol concentration and decreasing of canola protein isolate concentration. Water vapor permeability value was also found to increase with increasing glycerol and protein contents. Overall, results indicated that canola protein isolate films were less brittle, more malleable and transparent, and had greater water vapor permeability at higher glycerol levels. However, as protein level increased, canola protein isolate films were more brittle, less malleable and more opaque, and also had increased water vapor permeability. PMID:24072788

  20. Applications of Optical Coherence Tomography in Pediatric Clinical Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Robert A.; Rajjoub, Raneem D.; Trimboli-Heidler, Carmelina; Waldman, Amy T.

    2015-01-01

    For nearly two centuries, the ophthalmoscope has permitted examination of the retina and optic nerve—the only axons directly visualized by the physician. The retinal ganglion cells project their axons, which travel along the innermost retina to form the optic nerve, marking the beginning of the anterior visual pathway. Both the structure and function of the visual pathway are essential components of the neurologic examination as it can be involved in numerous acquired, congenital and genetic central nervous system conditions. The development of optical coherence tomography now permits the pediatric neuroscientist to visualize and quantify the optic nerve and retinal layers with unprecedented resolution. As optical coherence tomography becomes more accessible and integrated into research and clinical care, the pediatric neuroscientist may have the opportunity to utilize and/or interpret results from this device. This review describes the basic technical features of optical coherence tomography and highlights its potential clinical and research applications in pediatric clinical neuroscience including optic nerve swelling, optic neuritis, tumors of the visual pathway, vigabatrin toxicity, nystagmus, and neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25803824

  1. Constructing a statistical atlas of the radii of the optic nerve and cerebrospinal fluid sheath in young healthy adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Optic neuritis is a sudden inflammation of the optic nerve (ON) and is marked by pain on eye movement, and visual symptoms such as a decrease in visual acuity, color vision, contrast and visual field defects. The ON is closely linked with multiple sclerosis (MS) and patients have a 50% chance of developing MS within 15 years. Recent advances in multi-atlas segmentation methods have omitted volumetric assessment. In the past, measuring the size of the ON has been done by hand. We utilize a new method of automatically segmenting the ON to measure the radii of both the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sheath to develop a normative distribution of healthy young adults. We examine this distribution for any trends and find that ON and CSF sheath radii do not vary between 20-35 years of age and between sexes. We evaluate how six patients suffering from optic neuropathy compare to this distribution of controls. We find that of these six patients, five of them qualitatively differ from the normative distribution which suggests this technique could be used in the future to distinguish between optic neuritis patients and healthy controls

  2. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in the early and peak phases of autoimmune neuritis in rat sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changjong; Ahn, Meejung; Kim, Heechul; Lee, Yongduk; Koh, Chang Sung; Matsumoto, Yoh; Shin, Taekyun

    2005-04-01

    To examine the involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in autoimmune disorders of the peripheral nerve system, we analyzed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK protein in the sciatic nerves of Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN). Western blot analysis showed that phosphorylated p38 (p-p38) MAPK protein was significantly increased in the sciatic nerves of rats in the early and peak phases of EAN, and declined gradually thereafter. Immunohistochemistry showed that p-p38 MAPK levels were increased in the infiltrating inflammatory cells, including T cells and macrophages, as well as in blood vessels and some Schwann cells in EAN-affected sciatic nerves, as compared to the sciatic nerves of controls. Some inflammatory cells and a few Schwann cells were also positive for TUNEL reaction at the peak and recovery phases of EAN. In conclusion, we postulate that the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK is involved in the elimination of infiltrating inflammatory cells during the course of EAN and may possibly modulate recovery in autoimmune disorders of the peripheral nervous system.

  3. Peptide 53-78 of myelin P2 protein is a T cell epitope for the induction of experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    PubMed

    Rostami, A; Gregorian, S K

    1991-02-01

    We have recently described the clinical and pathological features of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) in Lewis rats inoculated with varying doses of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein (SP-26). Immunization with this synthetic peptide was able to induce severe clinical and pathological characteristics of EAN. We are now reporting that, SP-26 T cell lines derived from spleen and lymph node cell populations of such immunized rats, upon being triggered by SP-26, can adoptively transfer severe clinical and histological signs of EAN to naive syngeneic recipients. The disease appears 7-8 days postinoculation of the cells and persist 5-10 days. The pathological features were indistinguishable from SP-26-induced active EAN which appears 12-15 days after sensitization. Examination of the surface phenotype of the cells that were used for the passive transfer of EAN by FACS analysis, showed majority of the cells to be CD4+, Ia+ cells. PMID:1703049

  4. Peptide 53-78 of myelin P2 protein is a T cell epitope for the induction of experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    PubMed

    Rostami, A; Gregorian, S K

    1991-02-01

    We have recently described the clinical and pathological features of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) in Lewis rats inoculated with varying doses of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the amino acid residues 53-78 of bovine P2 protein (SP-26). Immunization with this synthetic peptide was able to induce severe clinical and pathological characteristics of EAN. We are now reporting that, SP-26 T cell lines derived from spleen and lymph node cell populations of such immunized rats, upon being triggered by SP-26, can adoptively transfer severe clinical and histological signs of EAN to naive syngeneic recipients. The disease appears 7-8 days postinoculation of the cells and persist 5-10 days. The pathological features were indistinguishable from SP-26-induced active EAN which appears 12-15 days after sensitization. Examination of the surface phenotype of the cells that were used for the passive transfer of EAN by FACS analysis, showed majority of the cells to be CD4+, Ia+ cells.

  5. Optical Coherence Tomography in Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Noval, Susana; Contreras, Inés; Muñoz, Silvia; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Manzano, Beatriz; Rebolleda, Gema

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light interference patterns to produce a cross-sectional image of the retina. It is capable of measuring the unmyelinated axons of the retinal ganglionar cells as they converge on the optic disc. In a disease like multiple sclerosis (MS), in which axonal loss has been identified as an important cause of sustained disability, it may prove an invaluable tool. OCT has demonstrated that axonal loss occurs after each episode of optic neuritis and that the degree of axonal loss is correlated to visual outcomes. Furthermore, axonal loss occurs in MS even in the absence of inflammatory episodes, and the degree of this loss is correlated with the duration of the disease process, with more thinning as the disease advances and in progressive forms. Thus, OCT retinal nerve fiber layer measurements may represent an objective outcome measure with which to evaluate the effect of treatment. PMID:22096638

  6. Investigating Tissue Optical Properties and Texture Descriptors of the Retina in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Boglárka Enikő; Gao, Wei; Laurik, Kornélia Lenke; Tátrai, Erika; Simó, Magdolna; Somfai, Gábor Márk; Cabrera DeBuc, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the differences in texture descriptors and optical properties of retinal tissue layers in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to evaluate their usefulness in the detection of neurodegenerative changes using optical coherence tomography (OCT) image segmentation. Patients and Methods 38 patients with MS were examined using Stratus OCT. The raw macular OCT data were exported and processed using OCTRIMA software. The enrolled eyes were divided into two groups, based on the presence of optic neuritis (ON) in the history (MSON+ group, n = 36 and MSON- group, n = 31). Data of 29 eyes of 24 healthy subjects (H) were used as controls. A total of seven intraretinal layers were segmented and thickness as well as optical parameters such as contrast, fractal dimension, layer index and total reflectance were measured. Mixed-model ANOVA analysis was used for statistical comparisons. Results Significant thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), ganglion cell/inner plexiform layer complex (GCL+IPL) and ganglion cell complex (GCC, RNFL+GCL+IPL) was observed between study groups in all comparisons. Significant difference was found in contrast in the RNFL, GCL+IPL, GCC, inner nuclear layer (INL) and outer plexiform layer when comparing MSON+ to the other groups. Higher fractal dimension values were observed in GCL+IPL and INL layers when comparing H vs. MSON+ groups. A significant difference was found in layer index in the RNFL, GCL+IPL and GCC layers in all comparisons. A significant difference was observed in total reflectance in the RNFL, GCL+IPL and GCC layers between the three examination groups. Conclusion Texture and optical properties of the retinal tissue undergo pronounced changes in MS even without optic neuritis. Our results may help to further improve the diagnostic efficacy of OCT in MS and neurodegeneration. PMID:26619298

  7. Lead silicate microstructured optical fibres for electro-optical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen Qi; Manning, Sean; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Monro, Tanya M

    2013-12-16

    We report progress towards the realization of optical modulators based on electro-optic effects in soft glass fibres. A hybrid fabrication procedure was developed for producing microstructured lead silicate glass fibres with internal electrodes. Electro-optical characterization confirms experimentally that the enhanced nonlinear properties and superior isolation between the optical field and the electrodes make these fibres an ideal candidate platform for efficient electro-optical devices.

  8. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  9. Nontensorial Transformation Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Meca, C.; Barceló, C.

    2016-06-01

    We present an alternative version of transformation optics that allows us to mold the flow of light without rotating or scaling the electromagnetic fields. The resulting media experience unusual force densities, are nonreciprocal, and exhibit loss or gain. Because of these singular features, a variety of effects and devices unreachable by standard transformation optics can be achieved, including reflectionless light compression, optical modes with arbitrary in-plane polarization, and special isolators.

  10. Isolated neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Crişan, Doiniţa; Tompa, I; Szabo, I

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory granulomatous disease affecting multiple organ systems. Neurosarcoidosis (central nervous system involvement) is seen in approximately 25% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis, although it is subclinical in most of these cases. Clinical presentations and imaging findings in nervous system were varied. Cranial nerve abnormalities were the most common clinical presentation and involvement of the optic nerve in particular was associated with a poor prognosis for visual recovery. A patient is described who presented with decreased visual acuity, hypoesthesia of the face and multiple tumors of the eyelids on both eyes. Initial biopsy of one of the tumor of the eyelids revealed a non-caseating granulomatous inflammatory process with nodular infiltrates made up of epithelioid cells, Langhans-type giant multinucleated cells and mononuclear cells; the diagnosis of sarcoidosis was suspected. After two years of clinical and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) follow up, the diagnosis of isolated neurosarcoidosis was confirmed by histology. In this study, we analyzed clinical and radiologic records of this patient with biopsy proven and clinically diagnosed neurosarcoidosis for the following reasons: (1) to assess the concordance between abnormalities noted on MRI with neurologic symptoms at presentation; (2) to correlate changes in imaging findings during follow-up with clinical worsening; and (3) to show up the characteristic feature of this case with no general sign/symptoms of sarcoidosis.

  11. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  12. Effect of Purified Murine NGF on Isolated Photoreceptors of a Rodent Developing Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Petrocchi Passeri, Pamela; Micera, Alessandra; Aloe, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    A number of different studies have shown that neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) support the survival of retinal ganglion neurons during a variety if insults. Recently, we have reported that that eye NGF administration can protect also photoreceptor degeneration in a mice and rat with inherited retinitis pigmentosa. However, the evidence that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors and that other retinal cells mediate the NGF effect could not be excluded. In the present study we have isolated retinal cells from rats with inherited retinitis pigmentosa (RP) during the post-natal stage of photoreceptor degenerative. In presence of NGF, these cells are characterized by enhanced expression of NGF-receptors and rhodopsin, the specific marker of photoreceptor and better cell survival, as well as neuritis outgrowth. Together these observations support the hypothesis that NGF that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors survival and prevents photoreceptor degeneration as previously suggested by in vivo studies. PMID:25897972

  13. Extremely Isolated Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Christopher R.; Marcum, P.; Fanelli, M.; Aars, C.

    2006-06-01

    Isolated galaxies provide a means of assessing the evolution of galactic systems. Extremely isolated galaxies define a zero-interaction baseline for comparative studies of galaxy evolution. We present results of a search for isolated elliptical galaxies (IEGs). We utilize the optical imaging data produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to identify candidate galaxies from Release 1-4 of the SDSS. Candidate IEGs meet strict isolation criteria: Any IEG must be separated by at least 2.5 Mpc from any neighboring non-dwarf galaxy having a MV fainter than -16.5 mag. The candidate isolated systems have no non-dwarf neighbors within a distance such that we can insure that the IEGs have never interacted with another existing galaxy since formation.In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, we have used the SDSS images in the u,g,r filters to create combined sets of images for each IEG. The stacked images permit a more robust determination of the morphology of the candidate galaxies. Verification that these are spheroidal systems is achieved through a bulge/disk decomposition technique using standard surface photometry. Our preliminary sample of 51 isolated systems defines a complete volume-limited population of extremely isolated early-type galaxies within a distance of 72Mpc

  14. The role of autophagy in axonal degeneration of the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jan Christoph; Lingor, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Different pathological conditions including glaucoma, optic neuritis, hereditary optic atrophy and traumatic injury lead to a degeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons in the optic nerve. Besides this clinical relevance, several experimental models employ the optic nerve as a model system to examine general mechanisms of axonal degeneration in the central nervous system. Several experimental studies have demonstrated that an activation of autophagy is a prominent feature of axonal degeneration in the optic nerve independent of the underlying pathological condition. However, the function of autophagy in axonal degeneration remains still unclear. Inhibition of autophagy was found to attenuate axonal degeneration within the first hours after optic nerve lesion. Other studies focusing on survival of retinal ganglion cells at later postlesional time points report contradicting results, where both inhibition and induction of autophagy were beneficial for survival, depending on the model system or examination time. Therefore, a more precise understanding of the role and the kinetics of autophagy in axonal degeneration is mandatory to develop new therapies for diseases of the optic nerve. Here, we review the literature on the pathophysiological role of autophagy in axonal degeneration in the optic nerve and discuss its implications for future therapeutic approaches in diseases of the eye and the central nervous system involving axonal degeneration.

  15. Production of optically pure L-lactic acid from lignocellulosic hydrolysate by using a newly isolated and D-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus paracasei strain.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yang-Cheng; Yuan, Shuo-Fu; Wang, Chun-An; Huang, Yin-Jung; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hwang, Wen-Song

    2015-12-01

    The use of lignocellulosic feedstock for lactic acid production with a difficulty is that the release of inhibitory compounds during the pretreatment process which inhibit the growth of microorganism. Thus we report a novel lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus paracasei 7 BL, that has a high tolerance to inhibitors and produced optically pure l-lactic acid after the interruption of ldhD gene. The strain 7 BL fermented glucose efficiently and showed high titer of l-lactic acid (215 g/l) by fed-batch strategy. In addition, 99 g/l of l-lactic acid with high yield (0.96 g/g) and productivity (2.25-3.23 g/l/h) was obtained by using non-detoxified wood hydrolysate. Rice straw hydrolysate without detoxification was also tested and yielded a productivity rate as high as 5.27 g/l/h. Therefore, L. paracasei 7 BL represents a potential method of l-lactic acid production from lignocellulosic biomass and has attractive application for industries. PMID:26433790

  16. Genetics Home Reference: neuromyelitis optica

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the condition. Neuromyelitis optica is characterized by optic neuritis, which is inflammation of the nerve that carries information from the eye to the brain ( optic nerve ). Optic neuritis causes eye pain and vision ...

  17. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  18. EKG isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, E.; Rasquin, J. R.; Smith, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Light beam transmits heartbeat signal from electrodes on patient to electrocardiograph without exposing patient to possible severe electrical shock. System provides complete isolation between patient and EKG instrumentation.

  19. K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O: A UV Nonlinear Optical Crystal with Isolated [B3O4(OH)4](3-) Anion Groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Yang, Zhihua; Zhang, Fangfang; Liu, Lili; Han, Jian; Li, Zhi; Pan, Shilie

    2016-09-01

    A potential ultraviolet (UV) nonlinear optical (NLO) material, K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O, was successfully synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The compound crystallizes into the Cmc21 space group and exhibits isolated [B3O4(OH)4](3-) anion groups connected by O-H···O hydrogen bonds. The UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum shows that K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O has a wide transparency range with an absorption edge below 190 nm. Powder second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements using 1064 nm radiation revealed a moderate efficiency, 0.8 × KDP. Additional particle size vs SHG efficiency measurements indicate that K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O is type I phase-matchable. Our calculated results show that the borate groups as well as the waters of hydration determine the NLO properties of K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O.

  20. K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O: A UV Nonlinear Optical Crystal with Isolated [B3O4(OH)4](3-) Anion Groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Yang, Zhihua; Zhang, Fangfang; Liu, Lili; Han, Jian; Li, Zhi; Pan, Shilie

    2016-09-01

    A potential ultraviolet (UV) nonlinear optical (NLO) material, K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O, was successfully synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The compound crystallizes into the Cmc21 space group and exhibits isolated [B3O4(OH)4](3-) anion groups connected by O-H···O hydrogen bonds. The UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum shows that K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O has a wide transparency range with an absorption edge below 190 nm. Powder second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements using 1064 nm radiation revealed a moderate efficiency, 0.8 × KDP. Additional particle size vs SHG efficiency measurements indicate that K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O is type I phase-matchable. Our calculated results show that the borate groups as well as the waters of hydration determine the NLO properties of K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O. PMID:27504674

  1. Optical interferometer testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwood, Gary H.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on optical interferometer testbed presented at the MIT Space Research Engineering Center 3rd Annual Symposium are included. Topics covered include: space-based optical interferometer; optical metrology; sensors and actuators; real time control hardware; controlled structures technology (CST) design methodology; identification for MIMO control; FEM/ID correlation for the naked truss; disturbance modeling; disturbance source implementation; structure design: passive damping; low authority control; active isolation of lightweight mirrors on flexible structures; open loop transfer function of mirror; and global/high authority control.

  2. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  3. Social isolation

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, John T.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Norman, Greg J.; Berntson, Gary G.

    2011-01-01

    Social species, by definition, form organizations that extend beyond the individual. These structures evolved hand in hand with behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms to support them because the consequent social behaviors helped these organisms survive, reproduce, and care for offspring sufficiently long that they too reproduced. Social isolation represents a lens through which to investigate these behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms. Evidence from human and nonhuman animal studies indicates that isolation heightens sensitivity to social threats (predator evasion) and motivates the renewal of social connections. The effects of perceived isolation in humans share much in common with the effects of experimental manipulations of isolation in nonhuman social species: increased tonic sympathetic tonus and HPA activation, and decreased inflammatory control, immunity, sleep salubrity, and expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid responses. Together, these effects contribute to higher rates of morbidity and mortality in older adults. PMID:21651565

  4. Analyses on the misdiagnoses of 25 patients with unilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun-Feng; Xia, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Xiang-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Yong; Wen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate clinical features of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) that was misdiagnosed, and to find methods to reduce the misdiagnoses. METHODS Retrospective series study. Twenty-five misdisgnosed patients with unilateral ONSM were collected from Jan. 2008 to Jan. 2015 and the clinical records reviewed. RESULTS Patients were misdiagnosed with acute papillitis most frequently (n=17), immediately followed by optic atrophy (n=8), ischemic optic neuropathy (n=5), acute retrobulbar optic neuritis (n=5), optic disc vasculitis (n=3). For each patient, the minimum frequency of misdiagnoses was once and the maximum was 4 times. As for the lasting time of being misdiagnosed, the shortest was 1.5mo and the longest was 45mo. Twenty-one cases (84%) were once treated with glucocorticoids, and its side effects was found in seventeen patients. Twenty patients (80%) complained with varying degree of vision loss. When a definite diagnosis was made, sixteen cases (64%) showed slight exophthalmos and eighteen cases (72%) had the tubular ONSM. CONCLUSION ONSM without loss obvious exophthalmos is easily misdiagnosed in clinic, and for most of these ONSMs are tubular. PMID:27672598

  5. Robust Non-Local Multi-Atlas Segmentation of the Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Asman, Andrew J; Delisi, Michael P; Mawn; Galloway, Robert L; Landman, Bennett A

    2013-03-13

    Labeling or segmentation of structures of interest on medical images plays an essential role in both clinical and scientific understanding of the biological etiology, progression, and recurrence of pathological disorders. Here, we focus on the optic nerve, a structure that plays a critical role in many devastating pathological conditions - including glaucoma, ischemic neuropathy, optic neuritis and multiple-sclerosis. Ideally, existing fully automated procedures would result in accurate and robust segmentation of the optic nerve anatomy. However, current segmentation procedures often require manual intervention due to anatomical and imaging variability. Herein, we propose a framework for robust and fully-automated segmentation of the optic nerve anatomy. First, we provide a robust registration procedure that results in consistent registrations, despite highly varying data in terms of voxel resolution and image field-of-view. Additionally, we demonstrate the efficacy of a recently proposed non-local label fusion algorithm that accounts for small scale errors in registration correspondence. On a dataset consisting of 31 highly varying computed tomography (CT) images of the human brain, we demonstrate that the proposed framework consistently results in accurate segmentations. In particular, we show (1) that the proposed registration procedure results in robust registrations of the optic nerve anatomy, and (2) that the non-local statistical fusion algorithm significantly outperforms several of the state-of-the-art label fusion algorithms. PMID:24478826

  6. Analyses on the misdiagnoses of 25 patients with unilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun-Feng; Xia, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Xiang-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Yong; Wen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate clinical features of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) that was misdiagnosed, and to find methods to reduce the misdiagnoses. METHODS Retrospective series study. Twenty-five misdisgnosed patients with unilateral ONSM were collected from Jan. 2008 to Jan. 2015 and the clinical records reviewed. RESULTS Patients were misdiagnosed with acute papillitis most frequently (n=17), immediately followed by optic atrophy (n=8), ischemic optic neuropathy (n=5), acute retrobulbar optic neuritis (n=5), optic disc vasculitis (n=3). For each patient, the minimum frequency of misdiagnoses was once and the maximum was 4 times. As for the lasting time of being misdiagnosed, the shortest was 1.5mo and the longest was 45mo. Twenty-one cases (84%) were once treated with glucocorticoids, and its side effects was found in seventeen patients. Twenty patients (80%) complained with varying degree of vision loss. When a definite diagnosis was made, sixteen cases (64%) showed slight exophthalmos and eighteen cases (72%) had the tubular ONSM. CONCLUSION ONSM without loss obvious exophthalmos is easily misdiagnosed in clinic, and for most of these ONSMs are tubular.

  7. Power supply with optical-isolator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, R. H.; Wheeler, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    Power supply consists of several stages, interconnected and programmed for required output. In capacitor charging mode, transistor switches are closed. Last stage is in series with rectifier that prevents current from flowing backward into circuit. In capacitor discharge mode, transistor switches are closed, and voltage delivered to load is sum of voltages across capacitors.

  8. Optical source and apparatus for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald Barry (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An optical amplifier is configured to amplify an injected seed optical pulse. The optical amplifier may include two or more gain sections coupled to form a continuous solid waveguide along a primary optical path. Each gain section may include: (i) an optical isolator forming an input to that gain section; (ii) a doped optical fiber having a first end coupled to the optical isolator and having a second end; (iii) a plurality of pump laser diodes; (iv) a controller providing drive signals to each of the plurality, the controller being configured to provide at least pulsed drive signals; and (v) an optical coupler having a first input port coupled to the second end, and a second input port coupled to the plurality and an output port.

  9. Glioblastoma multiforme of the optic chiasm: A rare case of common pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lyapichev, Kirill A.; Bregy, Amade; Cassel, Adrienne; Handfield, Chelsea; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Kay, Matthew D.; Basil, Gregory; Komotar, Ricardo J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malignant optic and chiasmatic gliomas are extremely rare, and are classified pathologically as anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Approximately 40 cases of optic GBM in adults have been reported in the literature, and only five of them were described to originate from the optic chiasm. Case Description: An 82-year-old male patient with a past medical history of diabetes mellitus type 2, melanoma, and bladder cancer presented with gradual vision loss of the left eye in a period of 1 month. After neuro-ophthalmological examination, the decision of thither magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies was made. It showed a contrast enhancing mass in the region of the optic chiasm. In this case, imaging study was not enough to establish an accurate diagnosis and a left pterional craniotomy for biopsy and resection of the optic chiasmal mass was performed. After histological evaluation of the mass tissue, the diagnosis of GBM was made. Taking into account the patient's poor condition and unfavorable prognosis he was moved to inpatient hospice. The patient deceased within 2 months after surgery. Conclusion: Chiasmal GBM is an extremely rare condition where a biopsy is necessary for accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment. Differential diagnosis for such lesions can be very difficult and include demyelinating optic neuritis and non-demyelinating inflammatory optic neuropathy (e.g., sarcoid), vascular lesions (e.g., cavernoma), compressive lesions of the optic apparatus, metastatic malignancy, and primary tumors of the anterior optic pathway. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy including novel stereotaxic radiosurgery methods is still unclear and will need to be evaluated. PMID:27512611

  10. Optical microspectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2004-05-25

    An optical microspectrometer comprises a grism to disperse the spectra in a line object. A single optical microspectrometer can be used to sequentially scan a planar object, such as a dye-tagged microchip. Because the optical microspectrometer is very compact, multiple optical microspectrometers can be arrayed to provide simultaneous readout across the width of the planar object The optical microspectrometer can be fabricated with lithographic process, such as deep X-ray lithography (DXRL), with as few as two perpendicular exposures.

  11. Permanent-magnet Faraday isolator with the field intensity of 25 kOe

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, E A; Snetkov, I L; Voitovich, A V; Palashov, O V

    2013-08-31

    A Faraday isolator with a single magneto-optical element is constructed and experimentally tested. It provides the isolation ratio of 30 dB at an average laser radiation power of 650 W. These parameters are obtained by increasing the field intensity in the magnetic system of the isolator and employing a low-absorption magneto-optical element. (elements of laser devices)

  12. GOES-R Dual Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freesland, Doug; Carter, Delano; Chapel, Jim; Clapp, Brian; Howat, John; Krimchansky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) is the first of the next generation geostationary weather satellites, scheduled for delivery in late 2015. GOES-R represents a quantum increase in Earth and solar weather observation capabilities, with 4 times the resolution, 5 times the observation rate, and 3 times the number of spectral bands for Earth observations. With the improved resolution, comes the instrument suite's increased sensitive to disturbances over a broad spectrum 0-512 Hz. Sources of disturbance include reaction wheels, thruster firings for station keeping and momentum management, gimbal motion, and internal instrument disturbances. To minimize the impact of these disturbances, the baseline design includes an Earth Pointed Platform (EPP), a stiff optical bench to which the two nadir pointed instruments are collocated together with the Guidance Navigation & Control (GN&C) star trackers and Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). The EPP is passively isolated from the spacecraft bus with Honeywell D-Strut isolators providing attenuation for frequencies above approximately 5 Hz in all six degrees-of-freedom. A change in Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA) vendors occurred very late in the program. To reduce the risk of RWA disturbances impacting performance, a secondary passive isolation system manufactured by Moog CSA Engineering was incorporated under each of the six 160 Nms RWAs, tuned to provide attenuation at frequencies above approximately 50 Hz. Integrated wheel and isolator testing was performed on a Kistler table at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. High fidelity simulations were conducted to evaluate jitter performance for four topologies: 1) hard mounted no isolation, 2) EPP isolation only, 2) RWA isolation only, and 4) dual isolation. Simulation results demonstrate excellent performance relative to the pointing stability requirements, with dual isolated Line of Sight (LOS) jitter less than 1 micron rad.

  13. Optical and infrared masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Ongoing research progress in the following areas is described: (1) tunable infrared light sources and applications; (2) precision frequency and wavelength measurements in the infrared with applications to atomic clocks; (3) zero-degree pulse propagation in resonant medium; (4) observation of Dicke superradiance in optically pumped HF gas; (5) unidirectional laser amplifier with built-in isolator; and (6) progress in infrared metal-to-metal point contact tunneling diodes.

  14. Eight electrode optical readout gap

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.; Crain, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    A protective device for a plurality of electrical circuits includes a pluity of isolated electrodes forming a gap with a common electrode. An output signal, electrically isolated from the circuits being monitored, is obtained by a photosensor viewing the discharge gap through an optical window. Radioactive stabilization of discharge characteristics is provided for slowly changing voltages and carbon tipped dynamic starters provide desirable discharge characteristics for rapidly varying voltages. A hydrogen permeation barrier is provided on external surfaces of the device.

  15. High speed optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Michael Y.; Livas, Jeff

    2005-02-01

    unregenerated reach. More sophisticated optical amplifiers provide lower noise for increased reach and increased spectral bandwidth for higher wavelength count lower wavelength blocking probability. Optical analog networks also require methods for mitigating optical power transients, for controlling optical spectral flatness, and for dynamically managing changes (e.g. in chromatic dispersion and polarization mode dispersion.) Since signals stay in the optical domain, optical performance monitoring techniques are required for fault isolation and correction. Efficient routing of optical signals also requires sophisticated switching nodes with an ability to selectively steer optical signals into several directions with single-channel spectral granularity. Most of these technologies are not modular and require interruption of service if not deployed at the initial system installation, thereby increasing first install costs substantially, even if initial capacity loading is small. Further, validation of systems and software targeting a specific network design is complex. Only a small fraction of the total network may be reasonably reproduced in the lab, and many field configurations are not predictable or even dynamic. Thus, extra system margin has to be allocated to handle the behavior uncertainty. To constrain the complexity of both hardware technology and software algorithms, regions of network transparency can be established with OEO forced at perimeters. Thus, "analog" regions are surrounded by "digital" interfaces. Following are some example tradeoffs that will be discussed. What is a good modulation format choice, and does increased reach and impairment resiliency justify hardware and controls that are more complicated? What are reasonable amplifier choices to make under specific network assumptions? Can high transport system capacity be leveraged to simplify optical switch node design by reducing spectral efficiency?

  16. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M; Shelton, Ryan L; Pilutti, Lara A; Motl, Robert W; Moss, Heather E; Pula, John H; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT. Blood vessel diameter (BVD), blood vessel number (BVN), and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) were extracted from OCT images collected from around the optic nerves of 129 eyes (24 control, 24 MS + ON, 81 MS-ON) of 71 subjects. Associations between blood vessel metrics, MS diagnosis, MS disability, ON, and RNFLT were evaluated using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. MS eyes had a lower total BVD and BVN than control eyes. The effect was more pronounced with increased MS disability, and persisted in multivariate models adjusting for RNFLT and ON history. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of MS subjects had fewer retinal blood vessels than all control subjects. MS diagnosis, disability, and ON history were not associated with average blood vessel size. The relationship between MS and lower total BVD/BVN is not accounted for by RNFLT or ON. Further study is needed to determine the relationship between OCT blood vessel metrics and qualitative retinal blood vessel abnormalities in MS. PMID:27375947

  17. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M; Shelton, Ryan L; Pilutti, Lara A; Motl, Robert W; Moss, Heather E; Pula, John H; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT. Blood vessel diameter (BVD), blood vessel number (BVN), and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) were extracted from OCT images collected from around the optic nerves of 129 eyes (24 control, 24 MS + ON, 81 MS-ON) of 71 subjects. Associations between blood vessel metrics, MS diagnosis, MS disability, ON, and RNFLT were evaluated using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. MS eyes had a lower total BVD and BVN than control eyes. The effect was more pronounced with increased MS disability, and persisted in multivariate models adjusting for RNFLT and ON history. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of MS subjects had fewer retinal blood vessels than all control subjects. MS diagnosis, disability, and ON history were not associated with average blood vessel size. The relationship between MS and lower total BVD/BVN is not accounted for by RNFLT or ON. Further study is needed to determine the relationship between OCT blood vessel metrics and qualitative retinal blood vessel abnormalities in MS.

  18. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Motl, Robert W.; Moss, Heather E.; Pula, John H.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT. Blood vessel diameter (BVD), blood vessel number (BVN), and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) were extracted from OCT images collected from around the optic nerves of 129 eyes (24 control, 24 MS + ON, 81 MS-ON) of 71 subjects. Associations between blood vessel metrics, MS diagnosis, MS disability, ON, and RNFLT were evaluated using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. MS eyes had a lower total BVD and BVN than control eyes. The effect was more pronounced with increased MS disability, and persisted in multivariate models adjusting for RNFLT and ON history. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of MS subjects had fewer retinal blood vessels than all control subjects. MS diagnosis, disability, and ON history were not associated with average blood vessel size. The relationship between MS and lower total BVD/BVN is not accounted for by RNFLT or ON. Further study is needed to determine the relationship between OCT blood vessel metrics and qualitative retinal blood vessel abnormalities in MS. PMID:27375947

  19. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  20. Optical Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Matt

    1973-01-01

    Describes the characteristics and operational problems of optical waveguides, and concludes that the wide use of optical communications can be expected if difficulties in commercial production of components can be eliminated. (CC)

  1. Optical keyboard

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; Feichtner, John D.; Phillips, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

  2. Microprecision interferometer: evaluation of new disturbance isolation solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, John F.; Goullioud, Renaud; Neat, Gregory W.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes a benchmark to assess performance of six- axis vibration isolation systems. The targeted application, spaceborne interferometers, require isolation of the reaction wheel disturbances in order to stabilize the precision optical elements to the required levels. The problem is to isolate this vibrating payload from the quiet structure (spacecraft). The unique feature of this procedure is that isolator performance is measured in terms of the stability of the interferometer optical elements. Central to the procedure is the Micro-Precision Interferometer (MPI) testbed which is a hardware model of a future spaceborne optical interferometer. The isolation system under evaluation is mounted on the testbed and disturbance transfer functions are then measured from the isolator payload to the optical sensor output that must be stabilized. Off-line, the procedure combines these measured testbed transfer functions with an empirical model of the reaction wheel disturbance, in order predict isolator performance over the entire range of wheel speeds. The paper applies the procedure to four different disturbance interface conditions: hard mounted, passive hexapod isolator, active hexapod isolator and a passive elastomeric isolator. The paper contains all the necessary information to allow industry, academia or other organizations to evaluate custom designs in this testbed facility.

  3. Optical Micromachining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) with Marshall Space Flight Center, Potomac Photonics, Inc., constructed and demonstrated a unique tool that fills a need in the area of diffractive and refractive micro-optics. It is an integrated computer-aided design and computer-aided micro-machining workstation that will extend the benefits of diffractive and micro-optic technology to optical designers. Applications of diffractive optics include sensors and monitoring equipment, analytical instruments, and fiber optic distribution and communication. The company has been making diffractive elements with the system as a commercial service for the last year.

  4. Optical key system

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla G.; Clough, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  5. Novel Anti-idiotype Antibody Therapy for Lipooligosaccharide-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis: Use Relevant to Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Usuki, S.; Taguchi, K.; Thompson, S.A.; Chapman, P.B.; Yu, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is a frequent antecedent event in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), inducing high-titer serum antibodies for ganglioside antigens in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Molecular mimicry between the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) component of Campylobacter jejuni and human peripheral nerve gangliosides is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GBS. Conventional treatment strategies for patients with GBS include plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and immunosuppression, which are invasive or relatively ineffective. In this study, we used our animal model of GBS, in which Lewis rats were immunized with GD3-like LOS isolated from C. jejuni. The animals developed anti-GD3 ganglioside antibodies and manifested neuromuscular dysfunction. To develop novel therapeutic strategies, we treated the animals by intraperitoneal administration of an anti-GD3 antiidiotype monoclonal antibody (BEC2) that specifically interacts with the pathogenic antibody. The treated animals had a remarkable reduction of anti-GD3 antibody titers and improvement of motor nerve functions. The results suggest that ganglioside mimics, such as antiidiotype antibodies, may be powerful reagents for therapeutic intervention in GBS by neutralizing specific pathogenic antiganglioside antibodies. PMID:20077429

  6. Optic Nerve Lymphoma. Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jennifer L.; Mendoza, Pia; Rashid, Alia; Hayek, Brent; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoma may involve the optic nerve as isolated optic nerve lymphoma or in association with CNS or systemic lymphoma. We present two biopsy-proven non-Hodgkin lymphomas of the optic nerve and compare our findings with previously reported cases. We discuss the mechanism of metastasis, classification of optic nerve involvement, clinical features, radiologic findings, optic nerve biopsy indications and techniques, histologic features, and treatments. We propose a classification system of optic nerve lymphoma: isolated optic nerve involvement, optic nerve involvement with CNS disease, optic nerve involvement with systemic disease, and optic nerve involvement with primary intraocular lymphoma. Although it is an uncommon cause of infiltrative optic neuropathy, optic nerve metastasis should be considered in patients with a history of lymphoma. The recommended approach to a patient with presumed optic nerve lymphoma includes neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid evaluation as part of the initial work-up, then judicious use of optic nerve biopsy, depending on the clinical situation. PMID:25595061

  7. Electro-Optical High-Voltage Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottsche, Allan; Johnston, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Electro-optical sensors for measuring high voltages developed for use in automatically controlled power-distribution systems. Sensors connected to optoelectronic interrogating equipment by optical fibers. Because sensitive material and optical fibers are all dielectric, no problem in electrically isolating interrogating circuitry from high voltage, and no need for voltage dividers. Sensor signals transmitted along fibers immune to electromagnetic noise at radio and lower frequencies.

  8. Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orvil Scully, Marlan; Zubairy, Muhammad Suhail

    1997-09-01

    Quantum optics has witnessed significant theoretical and experimental developments in recent years. This book provides an in-depth and wide-ranging introduction to the subject, emphasizing throughout the basic principles and their applications. The book begins by developing the basic tools of quantum optics, and goes on to show the application of these tools in a variety of quantum optical systems, including lasing without inversion, squeezed states, and atom optics. The final four chapters discuss quantum optical tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics, and particular aspects of measurement theory. Assuming only a background of standard quantum mechanics and electromagnetic theory, and containing many problems and references, this book will be invaluable to graduate students of quantum optics, as well as to researchers in this field.

  9. Geometrical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindlein, Norbert; Leuchs, Gerd

    This chapter shall discuss the basics and the applications of geometrical optical methods in modern optics. Geometrical optics has a long tradition and some ideas are many centuries old. Nevertheless, the invention of modern personal computers which can perform several million floating-point operations in a second also revolutionized the methods of geometrical optics and so several analytical methods lost importance whereas numerical methods such as ray tracing became very important. Therefore, the emphasis in this chapter is also on modern numerical methods such as ray tracing and some other systematic methods such as the paraxial matrix theory.

  10. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  11. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes. During these episodes the person is unable to move ...

  12. Optical latches using optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenbo; Hu, Hongyu; Dutta, Niloy K.

    2013-05-01

    Optical latches are important for a wide range of applications including communication systems, optical logic systems, optical random access memory (RAM) and encryption. All optical logic operations using quantum dot (QD) based semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) have been studied. The building block of an optical latch such as NAND gate has been fabricated and their operation experimentally demonstrated at ~ 80 GHz. A rate equation model has been developed for the QD-SOA-MZI and it has been used to analyze the Boolean logic operation. The model has been used to analyze the Set-Reset (S-R) latch and the D-Flip-Flop (DFF) devices. The DFF is the basic device for building larger logic circuits. The results show that the latches would work to speeds of ~ 250 Gb/s.

  13. QUANTUM OPTICS. Universal linear optics.

    PubMed

    Carolan, Jacques; Harrold, Christopher; Sparrow, Chris; Martín-López, Enrique; Russell, Nicholas J; Silverstone, Joshua W; Shadbolt, Peter J; Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Oguma, Manabu; Itoh, Mikitaka; Marshall, Graham D; Thompson, Mark G; Matthews, Jonathan C F; Hashimoto, Toshikazu; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Laing, Anthony

    2015-08-14

    Linear optics underpins fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and quantum technologies. We demonstrate a single reprogrammable optical circuit that is sufficient to implement all possible linear optical protocols up to the size of that circuit. Our six-mode universal system consists of a cascade of 15 Mach-Zehnder interferometers with 30 thermo-optic phase shifters integrated into a single photonic chip that is electrically and optically interfaced for arbitrary setting of all phase shifters, input of up to six photons, and their measurement with a 12-single-photon detector system. We programmed this system to implement heralded quantum logic and entangling gates, boson sampling with verification tests, and six-dimensional complex Hadamards. We implemented 100 Haar random unitaries with an average fidelity of 0.999 ± 0.001. Our system can be rapidly reprogrammed to implement these and any other linear optical protocol, pointing the way to applications across fundamental science and quantum technologies. PMID:26160375

  14. Camera Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    The camera presents an excellent way to illustrate principles of geometrical optics. Basic camera optics of the single-lens reflex camera are discussed, including interchangeable lenses and accessories available to most owners. Several experiments are described and results compared with theoretical predictions or manufacturer specifications.…

  15. Optical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyant, James; Hochberg, Eric; Breault, Robert; Greivenkamp, John; Hunt, Gary; Mason, Pete; Mcguire, James; Meinel, Aden; Morris, Mike; Scherr, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Optical testing is one of the most vital elements in the process of preparing an optical instrument for launch. Without well understood, well controlled, and well documented test procedures, current and future mission goals will be jeopardized. We should keep in mind that the reason we test is to provide an opportunity to catch errors, oversights, and problems on the ground, where solutions are possible and difficulties can be rectified. Consequently, it is necessary to create tractable test procedures that truly provide a measure of the performance of all optical elements and systems under conditions which are close to those expected in space. Where testing is not feasible, accurate experiments are required in order to perfect models that can exactly predict the optical performance. As we stretch the boundaries of technology to perform more complex space and planetary investigations, we must expand the technology required to test the optical components and systems which we send into space. As we expand the observational wavelength ranges, so must we expand our range of optical sources and detectors. As we increase resolution and sensitivity, our understanding of optical surfaces to accommodate more stringent figure and scatter requirements must expand. Only with research and development in these areas can we hope to achieve success in the ever increasing demands made on optical testing by the highly sophisticated missions anticipated over the next two decades. Technology assessment and development plan for surface figure, surface roughness, alignment, image quality, radiometric quantities, and stray light measurement are presented.

  16. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goushcha, Alexander; Tabbert, Bernd

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities - from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  17. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  18. Optical Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, John C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This four-article section focuses on information storage capacity of the optical disk covering the information workstation (uses microcomputer, optical disk, compact disc to provide reference information, information content, work product support); use of laser videodisc technology for dissemination of agricultural information; encoding databases…

  19. Optical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. PMID:27365039

  20. GREAT optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Gentner, Armin; Graf, Urs U.; Philipp, Martin; Rabanus, David; Stutzki, Jürgen

    2004-10-01

    The German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies (GREAT) is a first generation PI instrument for the SOFIA telescope, developed by a collaboration between the MPIfR, KOSMA, DLR, and the MPAe. The first three institutes each contribute one heterodyne receiver channel to operate at 1.9, 2.7 and 4.7 THz, respectively. A later addition of a e.g. 1.4 THz channel is planned. The GREAT instrument is developed to carry two cryostats at once. That means that any two of the three frequencies can be observed simultaneously. Therefore, we need to be able to quickly exchange the optics benches, the local oscillator (LO) subsystems, and the cryostats containing the mixer devices. This demands a high modularity and flexibility of our receiver concept. Our aim is to avoid the need for realignment when swapping receiver channels. After an overview of the common GREAT optics, a detailed description of several parts (optics benches, calibration units, diplexer, focal plane imager) is given. Special emphasis is given to the LO optics of the KOSMA 1.9 THz channel, because its backward wave oscillator has an astigmatic output beam profile, which has to be corrected for. We developed astigmatic off-axis mirrors to compensate this astigmatism. The mirrors are manufactured in-house on a 5 axis CNC milling machine. We use this milling machine to obtain optical components with highest surface accuracy (about 5 microns) appropriate for these wavelengths. Based on the CNC machining capabilities we present our concept of integrated optics, which means to manufacture optical subsystems monolithically. The optics benches are located on three point mounts, which in conjunction with the integrated optics concept ensure the required adjustment free optics setup.

  1. Optical diode based on plasmonic nanosphere chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroua, W.; AbdelMalek, F.; Kamli, Ali A.

    2014-12-01

    The merging of electronics and photonics at the nanoscales overcomes the limitation in integrating photonic components into electronic chips, in which surface plasmon may play a central role in future hybrid nanocircuit integration. We report in this paper a surface plasmon optical diode based on the nonreciprocal light propagation. We show that by using a chain of plasmonic nanospheres embedded in a spatial-temporal modulated medium in silicon on insulator (SOI) waveguide the light propagates only in forward direction for metallic nanoparticles (MNPs). In this paper, the isolation of light is performed by calculating the optical intensity and propagation distance in both directions obtained by a finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Our optical diode exhibits a large bandwidth and a competitive optical isolation region. Our design presents a fundamental feature in optical signal processing, and leverages the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility necessary for microelectronic industry.

  2. Georges Sagnac: A life for optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrigol, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Georges Sagnac is mostly known for the optical effect in rotating frames that he demonstrated in 1913. His scientific interests were quite diverse: they included photography, optical illusions, X-ray physics, radioactivity, the blue of the sky, anomalous wave propagation, interferometry, strioscopy, and acoustics. An optical theme nonetheless pervaded his entire œuvre. Within optics, an original theory of the propagation of light motivated most of his investigations, from an ingenious explanation of the Fresnel drag, through the discovery of the Sagnac effect, to his quixotic defense of an alternative to relativity theory. Optical analogies efficiently guided his work in other domains. Optics indeed was his true passion. He saw himself as carrying the torch of the two great masters of French optics, Augustin Fresnel and Hippolyte Fizeau. In this mission he overcame his poor health and labored against the modernist tide, with much success originally and bitter isolation in the end. xml:lang="fr"

  3. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  4. Cryogenic Faraday isolator

    SciTech Connect

    Zheleznov, D S; Zelenogorskii, V V; Katin, E V; Mukhin, I B; Palashov, O V; Khazanov, Efim A

    2010-05-26

    A Faraday isolator is described in which thermal effects are suppressed by cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The principal scheme, main characteristics and modifications of the isolator are presented. The isolation degree is studied experimentally for the subkilowatt average laser radiation power. It is shown that the isolator can be used at radiation powers up to tens of kilowatts. (quantum electronic devices)

  5. Conceptual Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paesler, Michael

    1997-11-01

    Conceptual Physics courses are a staple of the curriculum in many colleges and universities. Such courses stress the development of conceptual understanding without appeal to calculational demonstration of that understanding. We have developed a Conceptual Optics course with a similar thrust but a more focused subject matter: the study of light. The course differs from similar courses typically titled Light or Color in that it attempts to cover most topics taught in more conventional optics courses rather than sampling from the variety of topics among those falling under the optics rubric. The course features an extramural laboratory in which student teams are given equipment, a lab manual, and a notebook and are expected to perform various optics experiments in everyday surroundings. This and other features of the course will be discussed.

  6. Ocean optics

    SciTech Connect

    Spinard, R.W.; Carder, K.L.; Perry, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    This volume is the twenty fifth in the series of Oxford Monographs in Geology and Geophysics. The propagation off light in the hydra-atmosphere systems is governed by the integral-differential Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). Closure and inversion are the most common techniques in optical oceanography to understand the most basic principles of natural variability. Three types of closure are dealt with: scale closure, experimental closure, and instrument closure. The subject is well introduced by Spinard et al. in the Preface while Howard Gordon in Chapter 1 provides an in-depth introduction to the RTE and its inherent problems. Inherent and apparent optical properties are dealt with in Chapter 2 by John Kirk and the realities of optical closure are presented in the following chapter by Ronald Zaneveld. The balance of the papers in this volume is quite varied. The early papers deal in a very mathematical manner with the basics of radiative transfer and the relationship between inherent and optical properties. Polarization of sea water is discussed in a chapter that contains a chronological listing of discoveries in polarization, starting at about 1000 AD with the discovery of dichroic properties of crystals by the Vikings and ending with the demonstration of polarotaxis in certain marine organisms by Waterman in 1972. Chapter 12 on Raman scattering in pure water and the pattern recognition techniques presented in Chapter 13 on the optical effects of large particles may be of relevance to fields outside ocean optics.

  7. Ground Isolation Circuit for Isolating a Transmission Line from Ground Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Craig A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a system for isolating ground interference from a transmission line, e.g., a ground isolation circuit for isolating a wideband transmission signal (such as a video signal) from ground by modulating the base signal on a carrier signal to permit the transmission signal to be isolated. In one embodiment, the circuit includes a pair of matched mixer circuits, each of which receives a carrier signal from the same oscillator circuit. The first mixer circuit also receives the baseband signal input, after appropriate conditioning, and modulates the baseband signal onto the carrier signal. In a preferred embodiment the carrier signal has a predetermined frequency which is at least two times the frequency of the baseband signal. The modulated signal (which can comprise an rf signal) is transmitted via an rf transmission line to the second mixer, which demodulates the rf signal to recover the baseband signal. Each port of the mixer connects to an isolation transformer to ensure isolation from ground interference. The circuit is considered to be of commercial value in that it can provide isolation between transmitting and receiving circuits, e.g., ground isolation for television circuits or high frequency transmitters, without the need for video transformers or optical isolators, thereby reducing the complexity, power consumption, and weight of the system.

  8. Isolation of rotational isomers and developments derived therefrom

    PubMed Central

    ŌKI, Michinori

    2010-01-01

    Isolation of rotational isomer models of ethane-type molecules is described. We could experimentally prove that, if rotational isomers whose molecular shape was chiral, the molecule could be optically active, even though it did not carry an asymmetric carbon atom. As an extension, other types of stereochemically fundamental and optically active molecules were isolated and their absolute stereochemistry was determined. One example is the model of meso-tartaric acid, for which optical inactivity had been attributed to internal compensation but is now explained as follows. On dissolution of meso-tartaric acid in a solvent, the molecule gives two kinds of conformers, one of which is a Ci molecule and the other is a C1 molecule. Although the latter is intrinsically optically active, the optical activity is cancelled by its enantiomer. The theory of internal compensation is recommended to be abandoned. As an extension to another area, some reactions of conformers are also discussed. PMID:21084771

  9. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  10. Psychopathology of social isolation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sang-Bin

    2014-06-01

    The most important defining factor of being human is the use of symbolic language. Language or communication problem occurs during the growth, the child will have a higher risk of social isolation and then the survival will be threatened constantly. Today, adolescents and youths are familiar with computer and smart-phone devices, and communication with others by these devices is easy than face-to-face communication. As adolescents and youths live in the comfortable and familiar cyber-world rather than actively participating real society, so they make social isolation. Extreme form of this isolation in adolescents and youths is so-called Socially Withdrawn Youth. In this study, the psychopathological factors inducing social isolation were discussed. Development stages of social isolation in relation with types of social isolation, Ego-syntonic isolation and Ego-dystonic isolation, were also considered.

  11. Optical memory

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  12. Optical coupler

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2004-06-15

    In a camera or similar radiation sensitive device comprising a pixilated scintillation layer, a light guide and an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, wherein there exists so-called dead space between adjacent photomultiplier tubes the improvement comprising a two part light guide comprising a first planar light spreading layer or portion having a first surface that addresses the scintillation layer and optically coupled thereto at a second surface that addresses the photomultiplier tubes, a second layer or portion comprising an array of trapezoidal light collectors defining gaps that span said dead space and are individually optically coupled to individual position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. According to a preferred embodiment, coupling of the trapezoidal light collectors to the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is accomplished using an optical grease having about the same refractive index as the material of construction of the two part light guide.

  13. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  14. CODEX optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delabre, Bernard; Manescau, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    CODEX is a high resolution spectrograph for the ESO E-ELT. A classical spectrograph can only achieve a resolution of about 120.000 on a 42 m telescope with extremely large echelle gratings and cameras. This paper describes in detail the optical concept of CODEX, which uses only optical elements size similar to those in current high resolution spectrographs. This design is based on slicers, anamorphic beams and slanted VPHG as cross dispersers. In this new version of the CODEX design, no special expensive materials as calcium fluoride or abnormal dispersion glasses are needed. The optical quality is excellent and compatible with 10K x 10K detectors with 10 μm pixels.

  15. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  16. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  17. Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Ajoy; Thyagarajan, K.

    With the development of extremely low-loss optical fibers and their application to communication systems, a revolution has taken fiber glass place during the last 40 years. In 2001, using glass fibers as the transmission medium and lightwaves as carrier wave waves, information was transmitted at a rate more than 1 Tbit/s (which is roughly equivalent to transmission of about 15 million simultaneous telephone conversations) through one hair thin optical fiber. Experimental demonstration of transmission at the rate of 14 Tbit/s over a 160 km long single fiber was demonstrated in 2006, which is equivalent to sending 140 digital high definition movies in 1 s. Very recently record transmission of more than 100 Tbit/s over 165 km single mode fiber has been reported. These can be considered as extremely important technological achievements. In this chapter we will discuss the propagation characteristics of optical fibers with special applications to optical communication systems and also present some of the noncommunication applications such as sensing.

  18. Optical electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The development of an optical diode consisting of a metal-dielectric-metal junction in which the high-speed electric conduction process occurs due to quantum mechanical electron tunneling across the dielectric barrier is briefly reviewed. Potential applications of the diode are discussed.

  19. Optical Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the production and structure of a sequence of optical crystals which can serve as one-, two-, and three-dimensional diffraction plates to illustrate diffraction patterns by using light rather than x-rays or particles. Applications to qualitative presentations of Laue theory at the secondary and college levels are recommended. (CC)

  20. Optical Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderstar, John

    1987-01-01

    Classifies and briefly describes several types of optical storage media available today--read-only and write-once analog disks, read-only and write-once digital disks and erasable disks. The appropriateness of CD-ROM (compact disk read-only memory) for use in libraries of developing nations is discussed in terms of users' information needs and…

  1. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking.

  2. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking.

  3. Diophantine Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, D.

    2016-09-01

    What I call Diophantine optics is the exploitation in optics of some remarkable algebraic relations between powers of integers. The name comes from Diophantus of Alexandria, a greek mathematician, known as the father of algebra. He studied polynomial equations with integer coefficients and integer solutions, called diophantine equations. Since constructive or destructive interferences are playing with optical path differences which are multiple integer (odd or even) of λ/2 and that the complex amplitude is a highly non-linear function of the optical path difference (or equivalently of the phase), one can understand that any Taylor development of this amplitude implies powers of integers. This is the link with Diophantine equations. We show how, especially in the field of interferometry, remarkable relations between powers of integers can help to solve several problems, such as achromatization of a phase shifter or deep nulling efficiency. It appears that all the research that was conducted in this frame of thinking, relates to the field of detection of exoplanets, a very active domain of astrophysics today.

  4. Optical Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2013-03-01

    Part I. Principles and Techniques: 1. General principles and characteristics of optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, E. B. Alexandrov and D. Budker; 2. Quantum noise in atomic magnetometers M. V. Romalis; 3. Quantum noise, squeezing, and entanglement in radio-frequency optical magnetometers K. Jensen and E. S. Polzik; 4. Mx and Mz magnetometers E. B. Alexandrov and A. K. Vershovskiy; 5. Spin-exchange-relaxation-free (serf) magnetometers I. Savukov and S. J. Seltzer; 6. Optical magnetometry with modulated light D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. Pustelny, V. V. Yashchuk and D. Budker; 7. Microfabricated atomic magnetometers S. Knappe and J. Kitching; 8. Optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond V. M. Acosta, D. Budker, P. R. Hemmer, J. R. Maze and R. L. Walsworth; 9. Magnetometry with cold atoms W. Gawlik and J. M. Higbie; 10. Helium magnetometers R. E. Slocum, D. D. McGregor and A. W. Brown; 11. Surface coatings for atomic magnetometry S. J. Seltzer, M.-A. Bouchiat and M. V. Balabas; 12. Magnetic shielding V. V. Yashchuk, S.-K. Lee and E. Paperno; Part II. Applications: 13. Remote detection magnetometry S. M. Rochester, J. M. Higbie, B. Patton, D. Budker, R. Holzlöhner and D. Bonaccini Calia; 14. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with atomic magnetometers M. P. Ledbetter, I. Savukov, S. J. Seltzer and D. Budker; 15. Space magnetometry B. Patton, A. W. Brown, R. E. Slocum and E. J. Smith; 16. Detection of biomagnetic fields A. Ben-Amar Baranga, T. G. Walker and R. T. Wakai; 17. Geophysical applications M. D. Prouty, R. Johnson, I. Hrvoic and A. K. Vershovskiy; Part III. Broader Impact: 18. Tests of fundamental physics with optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. K. Lamoreaux and T. E. Chupp; 19. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscopes E. A. Donley and J. Kitching; 20. Commercial magnetometers and their application D. C. Hovde, M. D. Prouty, I. Hrvoic and R. E. Slocum; Index.

  5. Forty Years of Research on Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J.

    2010-10-01

    Isolated galaxies have not been a hot topic over the past four decades. This is partly due to uncertainties about their existence. Are there galaxies isolated enough to be interesting? Do they exist in sufficient numbers to be statistically useful? Most attempts to compile isolated galaxy lists were marginally successful-too small number and not very isolated galaxies. If really isolated galaxies do exist then their value becomes obvious in a Universe where effects of interactions and environment (i.e. nurture) are important. They provide a means for better quantifying effects of nurture. The Catalog of Isolated Galaxies (CIG) compiled by Valentina Karachentseva appeared near the beginning of the review period. It becomes the focus of this review because of its obvious strengths and because the AMIGA project has increased its utility through a refinement (a vetted CIG). It contains almost 1000 galaxies with nearest neighbor crossing times of 1--3 Gyr. It is large enough to serve as a zero-point or control sample. The galaxies in the CIG (and the distribution of galaxy types) may be significantly different than those in even slightly richer environments. The AMIGA-CIG, and future iterations, may be able to tell us something about galaxy formation. It may also allow us to better define intrinsic (natural) correlations like e.g. Fisher-Tully and FIR-OPTICAL. Correlations can be better defined when the dispersion added by external stimuli (nurture) is minimized or removed.

  6. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking. Scope of Submission The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following: Ethernet PHY development 10-Gbit Ethernet on multimode fiber Native Ethernet transport and Ethernet on legacy networks EPON Ethernet OAM Resilient packet ring (RPR) and Ethernet QoS definition and management on Ethernet Ethernet protection switching Circuit emulation services on Ethernet Transparent LAN service development Carrier VLAN and Ethernet Ethernet MAC frame expansion Ethernet switching High-speed Ethernet applications Economic models of high-speed Ethernet services Ethernet field deployment and standard activities To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "Optical Ethernet feature" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions

  7. TSAG-based cryogenic Faraday isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starobor, Aleksey; Yasyhara, Ryo; Snetkov, Ilya; Mironov, Evgeniy; Palashov, Oleg

    2015-09-01

    Thermooptical and magnetooptical properties of novel magnetoactive crystal terbium-scandium aluminum garnet were investigated at temperature range 80-300 K. It is shown that Verdet constant increases inversely proportional to temperature, and thermally induced depolarization, and the optical power of the thermal lens is reduced significantly with cooling from 290 K to 80 K. According to estimates, TSAG crystals in [1 1 1] orientation allow to create a cryogenic Faraday isolator provides a degree of isolation of 30 dB with the laser power exceeds ∼6 kW, it is estimated that the transition to the [0 0 1] orientation allows to provide degree of isolation of 30 dB at a laser power higher than 400 kW.

  8. Soft optics in intelligent optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shue, Chikong; Cao, Yang

    2001-10-01

    In addition to the recent advances in Hard-optics that pushes the optical transmission speed, distance, wave density and optical switching capacity, Soft-optics provides the necessary intelligence and control software that reduces operational costs, increase efficiency, and enhances revenue generating services by automating optimal optical circuit placement and restoration, and enabling value-added new services like Optical VPN. This paper describes the advances in 1) Overall Hard-optics and Soft-optics 2) Layered hierarchy of Soft-optics 3) Component of Soft-optics, including hard-optics drivers, Management Soft-optics, Routing Soft-optics and System Soft-optics 4) Key component of Routing and System Soft-optics, namely optical routing and signaling (including UNI/NNI and GMPLS signaling). In summary, the soft-optics on a new generation of OXC's enables Intelligent Optical Networks to provide just-in-time service delivery and fast restoration, and real-time capacity management that eliminates stranded bandwidth. It reduces operational costs and provides new revenue opportunities.

  9. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  10. Multimode fiber optic wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single optical fiber, can have increased bandwidth and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. Two WDM system designs that might be used with multimode fibers are considered and a general description of the components which could be used to implement the system are given. The components described are sources, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer technique which is the major developmental component in the WDM system.

  11. Review on Recent Advances in the Analysis of Isolated Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Satori, Chad P.; Kostal, Vratislav; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of isolated organelles is one of the pillars of modern bioanalytical chemistry. This review describes recent developments on the isolation and characterization of isolated organelles both from living organisms and cell cultures. Salient reports on methods to release organelles focused on reproducibility and yield, membrane isolation, and integrated devices for organelle release. New developments on organelle fractionation after their isolation were on the topics of centrifugation, immunocapture, free flow electrophoresis, flow field-flow fractionation, fluorescence activated organelle sorting, laser capture microdissection, and dielectrophoresis. New concepts on characterization of isolated organelles included atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers combined with Raman spectroscopy, organelle sensors, flow cytometry, capillary electrophoresis, and microfluidic devices. PMID:23107131

  12. Optical aeronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, S.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Optical measurements of thermospheric and ionospheric processes and their interpretation are reviewed and the chemical reactions and their effects on emissions are discussed. Also included are the phenomena which excite the airglow and aurora, i.e., the solar UV/EUV flux and auroral particle precipitation. Consideration is given to solar flux, atomic emissions, molecular emissions, hydrogen geocorona, and molecular oxygen and the green line nightglow.

  13. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking. The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following: Ethernet PHY development 10-Gbit Ethernet on multimode fiber Native Ethernet transport and Ethernet on legacy networks EPON Ethernet OAM Resilient packet ring (RPR) and Ethernet QoS definition and management on Ethernet Ethernet protection switching Circuit emulation services on Ethernet Transparent LAN service development Carrier VLAN and Ethernet Ethernet MAC frame expansion Ethernet switching High-speed Ethernet applications Economic models of high-speed Ethernet services Ethernet field deployment and standard activities

  14. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-08-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking. The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following: Ethernet PHY development 10-Gbit Ethernet on multimode fiber Native Ethernet transport and Ethernet on legacy networks EPON Ethernet OAM Resilient packet ring (RPR) and Ethernet QoS definition and management on Ethernet Ethernet protection switching Circuit emulation services on Ethernet Transparent LAN service development Carrier VLAN and Ethernet Ethernet MAC frame expansion Ethernet switching High-speed Ethernet applications Economic models of high-speed Ethernet services Ethernet field deployment and standard activities

  15. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking. The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following: Ethernet PHY development 10-Gbit Ethernet on multimode fiber Native Ethernet transport and Ethernet on legacy networks EPON Ethernet OAM Resilient packet ring (RPR) and Ethernet QoS definition and management on Ethernet Ethernet protection switching Circuit emulation services on Ethernet Transparent LAN service development Carrier VLAN and Ethernet Ethernet MAC frame expansion Ethernet switching High-speed Ethernet applications Economic models of high-speed Ethernet services Ethernet field deployment and standard activities

  16. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-07-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking. The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following: Ethernet PHY development 10-Gbit Ethernet on multimode fiber Native Ethernet transport and Ethernet on legacy networks EPON Ethernet OAM Resilient packet ring (RPR) and Ethernet QoS definition and management on Ethernet Ethernet protection switching Circuit emulation services on Ethernet Transparent LAN service development Carrier VLAN and Ethernet Ethernet MAC frame expansion Ethernet switching High-speed Ethernet applications Economic models of high-speed Ethernet services Ethernet field deployment and standard activities

  17. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking. The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following: Ethernet PHY development 10-Gbit Ethernet on multimode fiber Native Ethernet transport and Ethernet on legacy networks EPON Ethernet OAM Resilient packet ring (RPR) and Ethernet QoS definition and management on Ethernet Ethernet protection switching Circuit emulation services on Ethernet Transparent LAN service development Carrier VLAN and Ethernet Ethernet MAC frame expansion Ethernet switching High-speed Ethernet applications Economic models of high-speed Ethernet services Ethernet field deployment and standard activities

  18. Optical gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Goss, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Instrument uses phase difference between two beams of light to measure rotation. It is considerably simpler and more reliable than conventional spinning-mass gyroscopes used for inertial guidance and is more compact, lighter, and potentially less expensive. Moreover, optical gyroscope requires no warmup period. Although conceived for spacecraft and satellite stabilization, gyroscope should also find applications in flight instruments for private, commercial, and military aircraft.

  19. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  20. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-02-07

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  1. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-01-01

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  2. Foveated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Kyle R.

    2016-05-01

    Foveated imaging can deliver two different resolutions on a single focal plane, which might inexpensively allow more capability for military systems. The following design study results provide starting examples, lessons learned, and helpful setup equations and pointers to aid the lens designer in any foveated lens design effort. Our goal is to put robust sensor in a small package with no moving parts, but still be able to perform some of the functions of a sensor in a moving gimbal. All of the elegant solutions are out (for various reasons). This study is an attempt to see if lens designs can solve this problem and realize some gains in performance versus cost for airborne sensors. We determined a series of design concepts to simultaneously deliver wide field of view and high foveal resolution without scanning or gimbals. Separate sensors for each field of view are easy and relatively inexpensive, but lead to bulky detectors and electronics. Folding and beam-combining of separate optical channels reduces sensor footprint, but induces image inversions and reduced transmission. Entirely common optics provide good resolution, but cannot provide a significant magnification increase in the foveal region. Offsetting the foveal region from the wide field center may not be physically realizable, but may be required for some applications. The design study revealed good general guidance for foveated optics designs with a cold stop. Key lessons learned involve managing distortion, telecentric imagers, matching image inversions and numerical apertures between channels, reimaging lenses, and creating clean resolution zone splits near internal focal planes.

  3. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  4. Module isolation devices

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Cooke, John Albert; Buzinski, Michael David

    2010-04-27

    A gas flow isolation device includes a gas flow isolation valve movable from an opened condition to a closed condition. The module isolation valve in one embodiment includes a rupture disk in flow communication with a flow of gas when the module isolation valve is in an opened condition. The rupture disk ruptures when a predetermined pressure differential occurs across it causing the isolation valve to close. In one embodiment the valve is mechanically linked to the rupture disk to maintain the valve in an opened condition when the rupture disk is intact, and which permits the valve to move into a closed condition when the rupture disk ruptures. In another embodiment a crushable member maintains the valve in an open condition, and the flow of gas passed the valve upon rupturing of the rupture disk compresses the crushable member to close the isolation valve.

  5. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  6. Power optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.

    2014-02-01

    By using the theory we developed in the early 1970s, a broad range of phenomena is considered for an optical surface of a solid body that is exposed to radiation arbitrarily varying in time and producing temperature fields, thermoelastic stresses and thermal deformations on the surface layer. The examination is based on the relations (which are similar to Duhamel's integral formula from the theory of heat conduction) between the quantities characterising the thermal stress state in any nonstationary regimes of energy input into a solid. A peculiar feature of the analysis of the thermal stress state in this case consists in the fact that this relation comprises time as a parameter, which in turn is a consequence of incoherence of the quasi-stationary problem of thermoelasticity. This phenomenon is particularly important for the optics of high-power, high-pulse repetition rate lasers, which are being actively developed. In the review, we have recently published in Laser Physics, the thermal stress state of a solid is analysed. In this state, time is treated as an independent variable used in differentiation. Such an approach greatly reduces the applicability of the method. The review published contains data on the use of capillary porous structures made of various materials with different degrees of the surface development. Moreover, such structures can be efficiently employed to increase the heat exchange at a temperature below the boiling point of the coolant. In the present review we discuss the dependences of the limiting laser intensities on the duration of a pulse or a pulse train, corresponding to the three stages of the state of the reflecting surface and leading to unacceptable elastic deformations of the surface, to the plastic yield of the material accompanied by the formation of residual stresses and to the melting of the surface layer. We also analyse the problem of heat exchange in the surface layer with a liquid metal coolant pumped through it. The

  7. Power optics

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonov, V V

    2014-02-28

    By using the theory we developed in the early 1970s, a broad range of phenomena is considered for an optical surface of a solid body that is exposed to radiation arbitrarily varying in time and producing temperature fields, thermoelastic stresses and thermal deformations on the surface layer. The examination is based on the relations (which are similar to Duhamel's integral formula from the theory of heat conduction) between the quantities characterising the thermal stress state in any nonstationary regimes of energy input into a solid. A peculiar feature of the analysis of the thermal stress state in this case consists in the fact that this relation comprises time as a parameter, which in turn is a consequence of incoherence of the quasi-stationary problem of thermoelasticity. This phenomenon is particularly important for the optics of high-power, high-pulse repetition rate lasers, which are being actively developed. In the review, we have recently published in Laser Physics, the thermal stress state of a solid is analysed. In this state, time is treated as an independent variable used in differentiation. Such an approach greatly reduces the applicability of the method. The review published contains data on the use of capillary porous structures made of various materials with different degrees of the surface development. Moreover, such structures can be efficiently employed to increase the heat exchange at a temperature below the boiling point of the coolant. In the present review we discuss the dependences of the limiting laser intensities on the duration of a pulse or a pulse train, corresponding to the three stages of the state of the reflecting surface and leading to unacceptable elastic deformations of the surface, to the plastic yield of the material accompanied by the formation of residual stresses and to the melting of the surface layer. We also analyse the problem of heat exchange in the surface layer with a liquid metal coolant pumped through it. The

  8. Isolated Attosecond Pulses using a Detuned Second-harmonic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Merdji, Hamed; Auguste, Thierry; Boutu, Willem; Caumes, J.-Pascal; Carre, Bertrand; Pfeifer, Thomas; Jullien, Aurelie; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-11-07

    Calculations are presented for the generation of an isolated attosecond pulse in a multicycle two-color strong-field regime. We show that the recollision of the electron wave packet can be confined to half an optical cycle using pulses of up to 40 fs in duration. The scheme is proven to be efficient using two intense beams, one producing a strong field at {omega} and the other a strong field detuned from 2{omega}. The slight detuning {delta}{omega} of the second harmonic is used to break the symmetry of the electric field over many optical cycles and provides a coherent control for the formation of an isolated attosecond pulse.

  9. Parallel optical sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Skogen, Erik J; Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-20

    An optical sampler includes a first and second 1.times.n optical beam splitters splitting an input optical sampling signal and an optical analog input signal into n parallel channels, respectively, a plurality of optical delay elements providing n parallel delayed input optical sampling signals, n photodiodes converting the n parallel optical analog input signals into n respective electrical output signals, and n optical modulators modulating the input optical sampling signal or the optical analog input signal by the respective electrical output signals, and providing n successive optical samples of the optical analog input signal. A plurality of output photodiodes and eADCs convert the n successive optical samples to n successive digital samples. The optical modulator may be a photodiode interconnected Mach-Zehnder Modulator. A method of sampling the optical analog input signal is disclosed.

  10. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D. M.; Carter, K. M.; Yao, X.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  11. Hamilton optics: transformational theory of optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, Roland; Ge, Wenjun

    2013-09-01

    In 1824 William Rowan Hamilton presented a memoir to the Royal Irish Academy on Optics(Trans. R. Irish. Acacamy, XV, 1828), which was the foundation for transformational optics, classical mechanics, nonimaging optics and thermodynamical foundation of nonimaging optics,etc. It is useful for us even in 2013 to revisit the Hamilton resolution.

  12. Optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-07-13

    An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

  13. Optical microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-01-11

    An optical microphone includes a laser and beam splitter cooperating therewith for splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and a signal beam. A reflecting sensor receives the signal beam and reflects it in a plurality of reflections through sound pressure waves. A photodetector receives both the reference beam and reflected signal beam for heterodyning thereof to produce an acoustic signal for the sound waves. The sound waves vary the local refractive index in the path of the signal beam which experiences a Doppler frequency shift directly analogous with the sound waves.

  14. The temperature dependence of the thermo-optical properties of TAG optical ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starobor, A. V.; Zheleznov, D. S.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    The thermal effects of thermally-induced depolarization and a thermal lens in terbium aluminum garnet (TAG) ceramics were investigated in the temperature range 79-293 K. Thermal effects decrease considerably upon cooling to 79 K, and it is demonstrated that the thermo-optical properties of TAG ceramics are not inferior to the properties of TGG ceramics. TAG is a promising medium for Faraday isolators and cryogenic Faraday isolators.

  15. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  16. Optical interconnect assembly

    DOEpatents

    Laughlin, Daric; Abel, Philip

    2015-06-09

    An optical assembly includes a substrate with a first row of apertures and a second row of apertures. A first optical die includes a first plurality of optical transducer elements and is mounted on the substrate such that an optical signal interface of each transducer element is aligned with an aperture of the first row of optical apertures. A second optical die includes a second plurality of optical transducer elements and is mounted on the substrate such that an optical signal interface of each of the second plurality of optical transducer elements is aligned with an aperture of the second row of optical apertures. A connector configured to mate with the optical assembly supports a plurality of optical fibers. A terminal end of each optical fiber protrudes from the connector and extends into one of the apertures when the connector is coupled with the optical assembly.

  17. Positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosener, A. A.; Jonkoniec, T. G.

    1975-01-01

    A positive isolation disconnect was developed for component replacement in serviced liquid and gaseous spacecraft systems. Initially a survey of feasible concepts was made to determine the optimum method for fluid isolation, sealing techniques, coupling concepts, and foolproofing techniques. The top concepts were then further evaluated, including the fabrication of a semifunctional model. After all tradeoff analyses were made, a final configuration was designed and fabricated for development testing. This resulted in a 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) line and 12.7 mm (1/2 inch) line positive isolation disconnect, each unit consisting of two coupled disconnect halves, each capable of fluid isolation with essentially zero clearance between them for zero leakage upon disconnect half disengagement. An interlocking foolproofing technique was incorporated that prevents uncoupling of disconnect halves prior to fluid isolation.

  18. Extremely Isolated Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Christopher; Marcum, Pamela; Fanelli, Michael

    2006-10-01

    Isolated galaxies provide a unique means of assessing the evolution of galactic systems. Extremely isolated galaxies define the zero-interaction baseline for comparative studies of galaxy evolution. Here we present results for a sample of isolated early-type galaxies (IEGs) in the local universe. Candidate IEGs were identified using the optical imaging data from Release 1-5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Objects are selected according to strict isolation criteria: IEGs must be separated by at least 2.5 Mpc from any neighboring non-dwarf companion galaxy (MV> -16.5 mag). These criteria insure that the IEGs have never interacted with another existing galaxy since formation. We have combined SDSS images in the u,g,r filters to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The stacked images permit a more robust determination of the morphology and photometric structure of the candidate galaxies. The images are interpreted using annular surface photometry and a bulge/disk decomposition technique. Our sample defines a complete volume-limited population of extremely isolated early-type galaxies within a distance of 72Mpc.

  19. The input optics of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D. B.; Arain, M. A.; Ciani, G.; Feldbaum, D.; Fulda, P.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, R.; Heintze, M.; Martin, R. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Williams, L. F.; Mueller, G.; Quetschke, V.; Korth, W. Z.; Reitze, D. H.; Derosa, R. T.; Effler, A.; Kokeyama, K.; Frolov, V. V.; Mullavey, A.; Poeld, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Input Optics (IO) of advanced LIGO will be described. The IO consists of all the optics between the laser and the power recycling mirror. The scope of the IO includes the following hardware: phase modulators, power control, input mode cleaner, an in-vacuum Faraday isolator, and mode matching telescopes. The IO group has developed and characterized RTP-based phase modulators capable of operation at 180 W cw input power. In addition, the Faraday isolator is compensated for depolarization and thermal lensing effects up to the same power and is capable of achieving greater than 40 dB isolation. This research has been supported by the NSF through Grants PHY-1205512 and PHY-1505598. LIGO-G1600067.

  20. Neuromyelitis Optica-AQP4: an update.

    PubMed

    Benavente, Emilio; Paira, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    Devic disease (neuromyelitis optica [NMO]) is an idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating and necrotizing disease characterized by optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, either simultaneously or in isolation. NMO is often idiopathic but may also be associated with systemic autoimmune disease. The prognosis of NMO is severe, especially in those with early and recurrent relapses. MRI studies have revealed that most frequently, there is a long spinal cord lesion that extends through three or more vertebral segments in length. NMO-IgG is the first antibody marker for any inflammatory central nervous system disorder and is both sensitive and specific for NMO. The identification of NMO-IgG in patients with recurrent optic neuritis or longitudinally extensive myelitis and its ability to predict subsequent relapse support the concept of a spectrum of NMO disorders. Treatment in the acute phase includes intravenous steroids and plasma exchange therapy. Immunosuppressive agents are recommended for the prophylaxis of relapses. PMID:21922173

  1. Optical spectroscopy of novel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijnders, Anjan A.

    Optical Spectroscopy is a well-established experimental technique for the study of solids, gasses, and liquids. This thesis focuses on two broad topics related to optical spectroscopy; experimental instrumentation, and its application to novel materials. The first half of the thesis discusses the design and construction of a novel, multifunctional magneto-optical spectroscopy apparatus with exceptional repeatability. Included are the operating principles of FTIR reflectance and transmittance spectroscopy, and the optical ray-tracing design, physical design, and characterization of a custom built magneto-optical spectroscopy apparatus. The second half of the thesis discusses the experimental results of a comprehensive spectroscopic study of Topological Insulators and thermoelectric Pb0.77Sn0.23Se. Topological Insulators (TIs) are a recently discovered phase of matter in which highly conductive free carriers are found on the surface of small band-gap insulators. A challenge in TI research is the experimental isolation of conductive surface states from the bulk states, which are frequently plagued by residual conductivity due to impurities. In this work, optical spectroscopy is used to simultaneously probe the bulk and surface states to study their individual optical properties, in addition to their coupling. Using variable temperature, crystal orientation, and a broad frequency range, we identify compounds with the most resistive bulk states, and provide new insights into carrier dynamics, surface state conductance suppression as a function of temperature, and practical material optimization guidelines for application purposes. A comprehensive optical investigation of Pb0.77Sn0.23Se is also discussed. This is a promising thermoelectric, which exhibits a temperature dependent band inversion, associated with a topological phase transition. We find clear evidence for this band inversion, and find a bulk carrier lifetime dominated by electron-acoustic phonon scattering

  2. Optical Backplane Interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1991-01-01

    Optical backplane interconnection (OBIT), method of optically interconnecting many parallel outputs from data processor to many parallel inputs of other data processors by optically changing wavelength of output optical beam. Requires only one command: exact wavelength necessary to make connection between two desired processors. Many features, including smallness advantageous to incorporate OBIT into integrated optical device. Simplifies or eliminates wiring and speeds transfer of data over existing electrical or optical interconnections. Computer hookups and fiber-optical communication networks benefit from concept.

  3. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  4. Optical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Precision Lapping and Optical Co. has developed a wide variety of hollow retroreflector systems for applications involving the entire optical spectrum; they are, according to company literature, cheaper, more accurate, lighter and capable of greater size than solid prisms. Precision Lapping's major customers are aerospace and defense companies, government organizations, R&D and commercial instrument companies. For example, Precision Lapping supplies hollow retroreflectors for the laser fire control system of the Army's Abrams tank, and retroreflectors have been and are being used in a number of space tests relative to the Air Force's Strategic Defense Initiative research program. An example of a customer/user is Chesapeake Laser Systems, producer of the Laser Tracker System CMS-2000, which has applications in SDI research and industrial robotics. Another customer is MDA Scientific, Inc., manufacturer of a line of toxic gas detection systems used to monitor hazardous gases present in oil fields, refineries, offshore platforms, chemical plants, waste storage sites and other locations where gases are released into the environment.

  5. Optical Nanodozers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshid, Ahmed; Reisner, Walter; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    Experiment, simulation and scaling analytics are converging on a comprehensive picture regarding the equilibrium behaviour of nanochannel confined semiflexible, self-avoiding chains. Yet, strongly non-equilibrium behaviour of confined polymers is largely unexplored from either an experimental or theoretical point of view. Combining optical trapping and nanofluidics, we have developed a ``nanodozer'' assay for quantifying confined polymer dynamics. An optical trap is used to slide a nanosphere at a fixed velocity along a nanochannel. The trapped bead acts as a permeable gasket, letting fluid escape but preventing the polymer from passing. As the sliding bead comes in contact with a nanochannel extended DNA, the molecule is dynamically compressed, undergoing transient dynamics characterized by a traveling concentration ``shockwave'' before reaching a final steady state with a ramp-like concentration profile. Remarkably, these strongly non-equilibrium measurements can be quantified via a simple nonlinear convective-diffusion formalism and yield insights into the local blob statistics, allowing us to conclude that the compressed nanochannel confined chain exhibits mean-field behaviour.

  6. Optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkel, Mitchell W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner for imaging lines in an object plane onto a linear array in a focal plane either continuously or discretely is described. The scanner consists of a set of four mutually perpendicularly oriented plane corner mirrors which provide a reflecting path that describes a parallelogram. In addition, there is a plane parallel scanning mirror with a front and back reflecting surface located midway between the first and fourth corner mirrors. It is oriented so that in the mid-scan position it is parallel to the first corner mirror, and therefore perpendicular to the fourth corner mirror. As the scan mirror rotates, rays incident from a plurality of lines in the object plane are selectively directed through the optical system arriving at a common intersection on the back surface of the scanning mirror where the rays are colinearly directed toward a lens and then imaged onto the linear array in the focal plane. A set of compensating mirrors may be introduced just before the imaging lens to compensate for a small and generally negligible path difference delta sub l between the axial and marginal rays.

  7. Ultraviolet-visible bulk optical properties of randomly distributed soot.

    PubMed

    Renard, J B; Hadamcik, E; Brogniez, C; Berthet, G; Worms, J C; Chartier, M; Pirre, M; Ovarlez, J; Ovarlez, H

    2001-12-20

    The presence of soot in the lower stratosphere was recently established by in situ measurements. To isolate their contribution to optical measurements from that of background aerosol, the soot's bulk optical properties must be determined. Laboratory measurements of extinction and polarization of randomly distributed soot were conducted. For all soot, measurements show a slight reddening extinction between 400 and 700 nm and exhibit a maximum of 100% polarization at a scattering angle of 75 +/- 5 degrees. Such results cannot be reproduced by use of Mie theory assumptions. The different optical properties of soot and background stratospheric aerosol could allow isolation of soot in future analyses of stratospheric measurements.

  8. Laser window with annular grooves for thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Horton, J.A.; Alger, T.W.

    1983-07-13

    A laser window or other optical element which is thermally loaded, heats up and causes optical distortions because of temperature gradients between the center and the edge. A number of annular grooves, one to three or more, are formed in the element between a central portion and edge portion, producing a web portion which concentrates the thermal gradient and thermally isolates the central portion from the edge portion, producing a uniform temperature profile across the central portion and therefore reduce the optical distortions. The grooves are narrow and closely spaced with respect to the thickness of the element, and successive grooves are formed from alternate sides of the element.

  9. Optical manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Falicoff, Waqidi; Chaves, Julio C.; Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-02-23

    Optical systems are described that have at least one source of a beam of blue light with divergence under 15.degree.. A phosphor emits yellow light when excited by the blue light. A collimator is disposed with the phosphor and forms a yellow beam with divergence under 15.degree.. A dichroic filter is positioned to transmit the beam of blue light to the phosphor and to reflect the beam of yellow light to an exit aperture. In different embodiments, the beams of blue and yellow light are incident upon said filter with central angles of 15.degree., 22.degree., and 45.degree.. The filter may reflect all of one polarization and part of the other polarization, and a polarization rotating retroreflector may then be provided to return the unreflected light to the filter.

  10. Single-cycle nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik; Goulielmakis, E.; Schultze, M.; Hofstetter, M.; Yakovlev, V. S.; Gagnon, J.; Uiberacker, M.; Aquila, A. L.; gullikson, E. M.; attwood, D. T.; Kienberger, R.; Krausz, F.; Kleineberg, U.

    2008-11-05

    Nonlinear optics plays a central role in the advancement of optical science and laser-based technologies. We report on the confinement of the nonlinear interaction of light with matter to a single wave cycle and demonstrate its utility for time-resolved and strong-field science. The electric field of 3.3-femtosecond, 0.72-micron laser pulses with a controlled and measured waveform ionizes atoms near the crests of the central wave cycle, with ionization being virtually switched off outside this interval. Isolated sub-100-attosecond pulses of extreme ultraviolet light (photon energy {approx} 80 electron volts), containing {approx} 0.5 nanojoule of energy, emerge from the interaction with a conversion efficiency of {approx} 10{sup -6}. These tools enable the study of the precision control of electron motion with light fields and electron-electron interactions with a resolution approaching the atomic unit of time ({approx} 24 attoseconds).

  11. Isolated perianal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Akgun, E; Tekin, F; Ersin, S; Osmanoglu, H

    2005-03-01

    Perianal tuberculosis, without the presence of any previous or active pulmonary infection, is extremely rare. A case of isolated perianal tuberculosis without gastrointestinal or pulmonary spread will be discussed here with an evaluation of the clinical features. PMID:15813425

  12. Base isolation: Fresh insight

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, V.

    1993-07-15

    The objective of the research is a further development of the engineering concept of seismic isolation. Neglecting the transient stage of seismic loading results in a widespread misjudgement: The force of resistance associated with velocity is mostly conceived as a source of damping vibrations, though it is an active force at the same time, during an earthquake type excitation. For very pliant systems such as base isolated structures with relatively low bearing stiffness and with artificially added heavy damping mechanism, the so called `damping`` force may occur even the main pushing force at an earthquake. Thus, one of the two basic pillars of the common seismic isolation philosophy, namely, the doctrine of usefulness and necessity of a strong damping mechanism, is turning out to be a self-deception, sometimes even jeopardizing the safety of structures and discrediting the very idea of seismic isolation. There is a way out: breaking with damping dependancy.

  13. Short term reproducibility of a high contrast 3-D isotropic optic nerve imaging sequence in healthy controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The optic nerve (ON) plays a crucial role in human vision transporting all visual information from the retina to the brain for higher order processing. There are many diseases that affect the ON structure such as optic neuritis, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Because the ON is the sole pathway for visual information from the retina to areas of higher level processing, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. Increased intracranial pressure has been shown to correlate with the size of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the ON. These measures are generally taken at an arbitrary point along the nerve and do not account for changes along the length of the ON. We propose a high contrast and high-resolution 3-D acquired isotropic imaging sequence optimized for ON imaging. We have acquired scan-rescan data using the optimized sequence and a current standard of care protocol for 10 subjects. We show that this sequence has superior contrast-to-noise ratio to the current standard of care while achieving a factor of 11 higher resolution. We apply a previously published automatic pipeline to segment the ON and CSF sheath and measure the size of each individually. We show that these measures of ON size have lower short- term reproducibility than the population variance and the variability along the length of the nerve. We find that the proposed imaging protocol is (1) useful in detecting population differences and local changes and (2) a promising tool for investigating biomarkers related to structural changes of the ON.

  14. Short Term Reproducibility of a High Contrast 3-D Isotropic Optic Nerve Imaging Sequence in Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The optic nerve (ON) plays a crucial role in human vision transporting all visual information from the retina to the brain for higher order processing. There are many diseases that affect the ON structure such as optic neuritis, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Because the ON is the sole pathway for visual information from the retina to areas of higher level processing, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. Increased intracranial pressure has been shown to correlate with the size of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the ON. These measures are generally taken at an arbitrary point along the nerve and do not account for changes along the length of the ON. We propose a high contrast and high-resolution 3-D acquired isotropic imaging sequence optimized for ON imaging. We have acquired scan-rescan data using the optimized sequence and a current standard of care protocol for 10 subjects. We show that this sequence has superior contrast-to-noise ratio to the current standard of care while achieving a factor of 11 higher resolution. We apply a previously published automatic pipeline to segment the ON and CSF sheath and measure the size of each individually. We show that these measures of ON size have lower short-term reproducibility than the population variance and the variability along the length of the nerve. We find that the proposed imaging protocol is (1) useful in detecting population differences and local changes and (2) a promising tool for investigating biomarkers related to structural changes of the ON. PMID:27175048

  15. Reflective Optics for Microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, Gene E

    2007-01-01

    Nondispersive optics are essential for emerging microdiffraction and nanobeam research. Here we describe extensions to traditional Kirkpatrick Baez optics required to develop nondispersive microdiffraction and nanoprobe optics with 1-10 nm spatial resolution.

  16. Optical data latch

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2010-08-31

    An optical data latch is formed on a substrate from a pair of optical logic gates in a cross-coupled arrangement in which optical waveguides are used to couple an output of each gate to an photodetector input of the other gate. This provides an optical bi-stability which can be used to store a bit of optical information in the latch. Each optical logic gate, which can be an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter) or an optical NOR gate, includes a waveguide photodetector electrically connected in series with a waveguide electroabsorption modulator. The optical data latch can be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or GaAs substrate) from III-V compound semiconductor layers. A number of optical data latches can be cascaded to form a clocked optical data shift register.

  17. Fiber optic multiplex optical transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A multiplex optical transmission system which minimizes external interference while simultaneously receiving and transmitting video, digital data, and audio signals is described. Signals are received into subgroup mixers for blocking into respective frequency ranges. The outputs of these mixers are in turn fed to a master mixer which produces a composite electrical signal. An optical transmitter connected to the master mixer converts the composite signal into an optical signal and transmits it over a fiber optic cable to an optical receiver which receives the signal and converts it back to a composite electrical signal. A de-multiplexer is coupled to the output of the receiver for separating the composite signal back into composite video, digital data, and audio signals. A programmable optic patch board is interposed in the fiber optic cables for selectively connecting the optical signals to various receivers and transmitters.

  18. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  19. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  20. Optoelectronic performance issues in fiber-optic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channin, D. J.

    1985-06-01

    The use of optoelectronic devices and components in fiber-optic communications systems is discussed. Optical power budget and signal fidelity, which govern fiber-optic system performance, are explained. The characteristics of isolated optoelectronic devices, which include bandwidths and noise, are described. Interaction of the characteristics of an optoelectronic source with the fiber-optic medium can limit the performance of the fiber-optic communications systems; these factors are examined. Modulation of light for signal transmission and the design constraints for fiber-optic transmitters and receivers because of modulation are discussed. The performance of the fiber-optic communications systems and the effect various optoelectronic devices and specifications have on the system's performance are considered. Analytical descriptions and quantitative examples of the phenomena reviewed are provided.

  1. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.; Findakly, T.; Innarella, R.

    1982-01-01

    The status and near term potential of materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electro-optical components are discussed. Issues discussed are host material and orientation, waveguide formation, optical loss mechanisms, wavelength selection, polarization effects and control, laser to integrated optics coupling fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, sources, and detectors. Recommendations of the best materials, technology, and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are given.

  2. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  3. Optical-to-optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A. D.; Bleha, W. P.; Miller, L.; Grinberg, J.; Fraas, L.; Margerum, D.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop an optical-to-optical interface device capable of performing real-time incoherent-to-incoherent optical image conversion. The photoactivated liquid crystal light valve developed earlier represented a prototype liquid crystal light valve device capable of performing these functions. A device was developed which had high performance and extended lifetime.

  4. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  5. Optical extensometer

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Ray A.; Reich, Fred R.; Russell, James T.

    1978-01-01

    An optical extensometer is described using sequentially pulsed light beams for measuring the dimensions of objects by detecting two opposite edges of the object without contacting the object. The light beams may be of different distinguishable light characteristics, such as polarization or wave length, and are time modulated in an alternating manner at a reference frequency. The light characteristics are of substantially the same total light energy and are distributed symmetrically. In the preferred embodiment two light beam segments of one characteristic are on opposite sides of a middle segment of another characteristic. As a result, when the beam segments are scanned sequentially across two opposite edges of the object, they produce a readout signal at the output of a photoelectric detector that is compared with the reference signal by a phase comparator to produce a measurement signal with a binary level transition when the light beams cross an edge. The light beams may be of different cross sectional geometries, including two superimposed and concentric circular beam cross sections of different diameter, or two rectangular cross sections which intersect with each other substantially perpendicular so only their central portions are superimposed. Alternately, a row of three light beams can be used including two outer beams on opposite sides and separate from a middle beam. The three beams may all be of the same light characteristic. However it is preferable that the middle beam be of a different characteristic but of the same total energy as the two outer beams.

  6. Astrometric Telescope Facility isolation and pointing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibble, William; Allen, Terry; Jackson, Louis; Medbery, James; Self, Richard

    1988-01-01

    The Astrometric Telescope Facility (ATF), an optical telescope designed to detect extrasolar planetary systems, is scheduled to be a major user of the Space Station's Payload Pointing System (PPS). However, because the ATF has such a stringent pointing stability specification and requires + or - 180 deg roll about its line of sight, mechanisms to enhance the basic PPS capability are required. The ATF pointing performance achievable by the addition of a magnetic isolation and pointing system (MIPS) between the PPS upper gimbal and the ATF, and separately, by the addition of a passive isolation system between the Space Station and the PPS base was investigated. The candidate MIPS can meet the ATF requirements in the presence of a 0.01 g disturbance. It fits within the available annular region between the PPS and the ATF while meeting power and weight limitations and providing the required roll motion, payload data and power services. By contrast, the passive base isolator system must have an unrealistically low isolation bandwidth on all axes to meet ATF pointing requirements and does not provide roll about the line of sight.

  7. Fiber-Optic Distribution Of Pulsed Power To Multiple Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Optoelectronic systems designed according to time-sharing scheme distribute optical power to multiple integrated-circuit-based sensors in fiber-optic networks. Networks combine flexibility of electronic sensing circuits with advantage of electrical isolation afforded by use of optical fibers instead of electrical conductors to transmit both signals and power. Fiber optics resist corrosion and immune to electromagnetic interference. Sensor networks of this type useful in variety of applications; for example, in monitoring strains in aircraft, buildings, and bridges, and in monitoring and controlling shapes of flexible structures.

  8. Optical NAND gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2011-08-09

    An optical NAND gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator and a photodetector. One pair of the optical waveguide devices is electrically connected in parallel to operate as an optical AND gate; and the other pair of the optical waveguide devices is connected in series to operate as an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter). The optical NAND gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NAND function output. The optical NAND gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  9. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Jackson, S. P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-01-01

    This document is a progress report of work done in 1985 on the Communications and Control for Electric Power Systems Project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  10. Lithography optics: its present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Mori, Takashi

    1998-09-01

    Firstly, various technical aspects of ArF optics are surveyed. At present, the ArF excimer laser is regarded as one of the most promising candidates as a next-generation light source for optical lithography. Discussions are ranging over some critical issues of ArF optics. The lifetime of ArF optics supposedly limited by the radiation compaction of silica glass is estimated in comparison with KrF optics. Availability of calcium fluoride (CaF2) is also discussed. As a designing issue, a comparative study is made about the optical configuration, dioptric or catadioptric. In the end, our resist-based performance is shown. Secondly, estimated are the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters, such as numerical aperture and wavelength. For the estimation, simulations based on aerial images are performed, where in the resolution limit is defined as a minimum feature size which retains practical depth of focus. Pattern geometry is classified into two categories, which are dense lines and isolated lines. Available wavelengths are assumed to be KrF excimer laser ((λ =248 nm), ArF excimer laser (λ =193 nm) and F2 excimer laser (λ =157 nm). Based upon the simulation results, the resolution limit is estimated for each geometry and each wavelength.

  11. Nucleic acid isolation process

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lewis, Annette K.; Hildebrand, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduce the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without affect on the protocol.

  12. Nucleic acid isolation

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, J.L.; Lewis, A.K.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1988-01-21

    A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduces the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without effect on the protocol.

  13. Clinical Islet Isolation.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Wayne J; Williams, Lindy; Chew, Yi Vee

    2016-01-01

    The overarching success of islet transplantation relies on the success in the laboratory to isolate the islets. This chapter focuses on the processes of human islet cell isolation and the ways to optimally provide islet cells for transplantation. The major improvements in regards to the choice of enzyme type, way the digested pancreas tissue is handled to best separate islets from the acinar and surrounding tissues, the various methods of purification of the islets, their subsequent culture and quality assurance to improve outcomes to culminate in safe and effective islet transplantation will be discussed. After decades of improvements, islet cell isolation and transplantation now clearly offer a safe, effective and feasible therapeutic treatment option for an increasing number of patients suffering from type 1 diabetes specifically for those with severe hypoglycaemic unawareness. PMID:27586424

  14. OPTICAL MICROVARIABILITY IN QUASARS: SPECTRAL VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    RamIrez, A.; Dultzin, D.; De Diego, J. A. E-mail: deborah@astroscu.unam.m

    2010-05-01

    We present a method that we developed to discern where the optical microvariability (OM) in quasars originates: in the accretion disk (related to thermal processes) or in the jet (related to non-thermal processes). Analyzing nearly simultaneous observations in three different optical bands of continuum emission, we are able to determine the origin of several isolated OM events. In particular, our method indicates that from nine events reported by RamIrez et al., three of them are consistent with a thermal origin, three with non-thermal, and three cannot be discerned. The implications for the emission models of OM are briefly discussed.

  15. Fast serial link using optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    In virtue of offering complete immunity from EMI, fiber-optics links for digital data are useful in the isolation of sensitive detecting apparatus from noisy digital computers. Attention is presently given to one such serial data link employing commercially available transmitter, receiver, cable and connector components together with an encoder/decoder circuit employing standard TTL digital logic components. Although designed for high speed fiber-optic operation, the circuit is equally well suited to medium- or low-speed operation over wires and does not have to transmit a separate clock. A data error rate is measured through operation of the link for a lengthy period of time.

  16. Optical image encryption topology.

    PubMed

    Yong-Liang, Xiao; Xin, Zhou; Qiong-Hua, Wang; Sheng, Yuan; Yao-Yao, Chen

    2009-10-15

    Optical image encryption topology is proposed based on the principle of random-phase encoding. Various encryption topological units, involving peer-to-peer, ring, star, and tree topologies, can be realized by an optical 6f system. These topological units can be interconnected to constitute an optical image encryption network. The encryption and decryption can be performed in both digital and optical methods.

  17. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  18. Optical XOR gate

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  19. Optical NOR gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2011-09-06

    An optical NOR gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical NOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NOR function digital optical output. The optical NOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  20. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  1. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  2. On-chip waveguide isolator based on bismuth iron garnet operating via nonreciprocal single-mode cutoff.

    PubMed

    Drezdzon, Samuel M; Yoshie, Tomoyuki

    2009-05-25

    We analyze an on-chip optical isolator based on direction dependent single-mode cutoff, which is described in 1D and 2D momentum space. Isolation is shown using 3D finite difference time domain (FDTD) where the magnetization is represented by imaginary off-diagonal permittivity tensor elements. The isolator designs are optimized using perturbation theory, which successfully predicts increased isolation for rib waveguides and structures with non-magnetic dielectric layers. Our isolators are based on bismuth iron garnet and its compatible substrates; an isolation ratio of 10.7 dB/mm is achieved for TM modes.

  3. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.

    1982-01-01

    The materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electrooptical components are described. Issues included in the study are: (1) host material and orientation, (2) waveguide formation, (3) optical loss mechanisms, (4) wavelength selection, (5) polarization effects and control, (6) laser to integrated optics coupling,(7) fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, (8) souces, (9) detectors. The best materials, technology and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are recommended.

  4. Lightning vulnerability of fiber-optic cables.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

    2008-06-01

    One reason to use optical fibers to transmit data is for isolation from unintended electrical energy. Using fiber optics in an application where the fiber cable/system penetrates the aperture of a grounded enclosure serves two purposes: first, it allows for control signals to be transmitted where they are required, and second, the insulating properties of the fiber system help to electrically isolate the fiber terminations on the inside of the grounded enclosure. A fundamental question is whether fiber optic cables can allow electrical energy to pass through a grounded enclosure, with a lightning strike representing an extreme but very important case. A DC test bed capable of producing voltages up to 200 kV was used to characterize electrical properties of a variety of fiber optic cable samples. Leakage current in the samples were measured with a micro-Ammeter. In addition to the leakage current measurements, samples were also tested to DC voltage breakdown. After the fiber optic cables samples were tested with DC methods, they were tested under representative lightning conditions at the Sandia Lightning Simulator (SLS). Simulated lightning currents of 30 kA and 200 kA were selected for this test series. This paper documents measurement methods and test results for DC high voltage and simulated lightning tests performed at the Sandia Lightning Simulator on fiber optic cables. The tests performed at the SLS evaluated whether electrical energy can be conducted inside or along the surface of a fiber optic cable into a grounded enclosure under representative lightning conditions.

  5. Positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.

    1980-01-01

    Positive-isolation-disconnect (PID) device with two mating halves prevents leakage or spillover when two fluid lines are disconnected. Each half has shutoff poppet to stop fluid flow. When flow is shut, poppets are flush against each other, leaving no space for fluid to remain it.

  6. Biological Isolation Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A spinoff of astronaut's biological garment will allow hospital patients who are highly vulnerable to infection to leave their sterile habitats for several hours, carrying their germ free environment with them. Garments can be used in any of some 200 hospitals where isolation rooms are installed to treat leukemia.

  7. Biological isolation garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spross, F. R.

    1968-01-01

    Biological Isolation Garment /BIG/ is a one-piece loose fitting garment fabricated from a tightly woven, permeable, 100 percent-cotton fabric. Its headpiece, incorporates an integral oronsal respirator with 0.3-micron-particle filters, and a full width visor. All fabrication seams are sealed on the inside of the garment.

  8. Acousto-optic, electro-optic, and magneto-optic devices and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, J.

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings contain 30 papers grouped under the headings of: Acousto-optic devices; Signal processing architectures; Acousto-optic and electro-optic applications; Magneto-optic and guided wave optic devices.

  9. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  10. A catalog of isolated galaxy pairs with accurate radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamaraux, P.; Nottale, L.

    2016-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to the construction of a catalog of isolated galaxy pairs from the Uppsala Galaxy Catalog (UGC), using accurate radial velocities. The UGC lists 12 921 galaxies to δ > -2°30' and is complete to an apparent diameter of 1'. The criteria used to define the isolated galaxy pairs are based on velocity, interdistance, reciprocity and isolation information. A peculiar investigation has allowed to gather very accurate radial velocities for pair members, from high quality HI and optical measurements (median uncertainty on velocity differences 10 kms-1). Our final catalog contains 1005 galaxy pairs with ρ > 2.5, of which 509 have ρ > 5 (50% of the pairs, i.e. 8%of the UGC galaxies) and 273 are highly isolated with ρ > 10 (27% of the pairs, i.e. 4% of the UGC galaxies). Some global properties of the pair catalog are given.

  11. Near optimal graphene terahertz non-reciprocal isolator.

    PubMed

    Tamagnone, Michele; Moldovan, Clara; Poumirol, Jean-Marie; Kuzmenko, Alexey B; Ionescu, Adrian M; Mosig, Juan R; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2016-04-06

    Isolators, or optical diodes, are devices enabling unidirectional light propagation by using non-reciprocal optical materials, namely materials able to break Lorentz reciprocity. The realization of isolators at terahertz frequencies is a very important open challenge made difficult by the intrinsically lossy propagation of terahertz radiation in current non-reciprocal materials. Here we report the design, fabrication and measurement of a terahertz non-reciprocal isolator for circularly polarized waves based on magnetostatically biased monolayer graphene, operating in reflection. The device exploits the non-reciprocal optical conductivity of graphene and, in spite of its simple design, it exhibits almost 20 dB of isolation and only 7.5 dB of insertion loss at 2.9 THz. Operation with linearly polarized light can be achieved using quarter-wave plates as polarization converters. These results demonstrate the superiority of graphene with respect to currently used terahertz non-reciprocal materials and pave the way to a novel class of optimal non-reciprocal devices.

  12. Near optimal graphene terahertz non-reciprocal isolator

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnone, Michele; Moldovan, Clara; Poumirol, Jean-Marie; Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Ionescu, Adrian M.; Mosig, Juan R.; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Isolators, or optical diodes, are devices enabling unidirectional light propagation by using non-reciprocal optical materials, namely materials able to break Lorentz reciprocity. The realization of isolators at terahertz frequencies is a very important open challenge made difficult by the intrinsically lossy propagation of terahertz radiation in current non-reciprocal materials. Here we report the design, fabrication and measurement of a terahertz non-reciprocal isolator for circularly polarized waves based on magnetostatically biased monolayer graphene, operating in reflection. The device exploits the non-reciprocal optical conductivity of graphene and, in spite of its simple design, it exhibits almost 20 dB of isolation and only 7.5 dB of insertion loss at 2.9 THz. Operation with linearly polarized light can be achieved using quarter-wave plates as polarization converters. These results demonstrate the superiority of graphene with respect to currently used terahertz non-reciprocal materials and pave the way to a novel class of optimal non-reciprocal devices. PMID:27048760

  13. Near optimal graphene terahertz non-reciprocal isolator.

    PubMed

    Tamagnone, Michele; Moldovan, Clara; Poumirol, Jean-Marie; Kuzmenko, Alexey B; Ionescu, Adrian M; Mosig, Juan R; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Isolators, or optical diodes, are devices enabling unidirectional light propagation by using non-reciprocal optical materials, namely materials able to break Lorentz reciprocity. The realization of isolators at terahertz frequencies is a very important open challenge made difficult by the intrinsically lossy propagation of terahertz radiation in current non-reciprocal materials. Here we report the design, fabrication and measurement of a terahertz non-reciprocal isolator for circularly polarized waves based on magnetostatically biased monolayer graphene, operating in reflection. The device exploits the non-reciprocal optical conductivity of graphene and, in spite of its simple design, it exhibits almost 20 dB of isolation and only 7.5 dB of insertion loss at 2.9 THz. Operation with linearly polarized light can be achieved using quarter-wave plates as polarization converters. These results demonstrate the superiority of graphene with respect to currently used terahertz non-reciprocal materials and pave the way to a novel class of optimal non-reciprocal devices. PMID:27048760

  14. Integrated-optical directional coupler biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luff, B. J.; Harris, R. D.; Wilkinson, J. S.; Wilson, R.; Schiffrin, D. J.

    1996-04-01

    We present measurements of biomolecular binding reactions, using a new type of integrated-optical biosensor based on a planar directional coupler structure. The device is fabricated by Ag+ - Na+ ion exchange in glass, and definition of the sensing region is achieved by use of transparent fluoropolymer isolation layers formed by thermal evaporation. The suitability of the sensor for application to the detection of environmental pollutants is considered.

  15. Fabrication of freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blalock, Todd; Medicus, Kate; DeGroote Nelson, Jessica

    2015-08-01

    Freeform surfaces on optical components have become an important design tool for optical designers. Non-rotationally symmetric optical surfaces have made solving complex optical problems easier. The manufacturing and testing of these surfaces has been the technical hurdle in freeform optic's wide-spread use. Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) optics manufacturing technology has made the fabrication of optical components more deterministic and streamlined for traditional optics and aspheres. Optimax has developed a robust freeform optical fabrication CNC process that includes generation, high speed VIBE polishing, sub-aperture figure correction, surface smoothing and testing of freeform surfaces. Metrology of freeform surface is currently achieved with coordinate measurement machines (CMM) for lower resolution and interferometry with computer generated holograms (CGH) for high resolution irregularity measurements.

  16. Nonlinear Optics and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin A. (Editor); Frazier, Donald O. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear optics is the result of laser beam interaction with materials and started with the advent of lasers in the early 1960s. The field is growing daily and plays a major role in emerging photonic technology. Nonlinear optics play a major role in many of the optical applications such as optical signal processing, optical computers, ultrafast switches, ultra-short pulsed lasers, sensors, laser amplifiers, and many others. This special review volume on Nonlinear Optics and Applications is intended for those who want to be aware of the most recent technology. This book presents a survey of the recent advances of nonlinear optical applications. Emphasis will be on novel devices and materials, switching technology, optical computing, and important experimental results. Recent developments in topics which are of historical interest to researchers, and in the same time of potential use in the fields of all-optical communication and computing technologies, are also included. Additionally, a few new related topics which might provoke discussion are presented. The book includes chapters on nonlinear optics and applications; the nonlinear Schrodinger and associated equations that model spatio-temporal propagation; the supercontinuum light source; wideband ultrashort pulse fiber laser sources; lattice fabrication as well as their linear and nonlinear light guiding properties; the second-order EO effect (Pockels), the third-order (Kerr) and thermo-optical effects in optical waveguides and their applications in optical communication; and, the effect of magnetic field and its role in nonlinear optics, among other chapters.

  17. Optical waveguides in magneto-optical glasses fabricated by proton implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Li, Yu-Wen; Zheng, Rui-Lin; Fu, Li-Li; Zhang, Liao-Lin; Guo, Hai-Tao; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Li, Wei-Nan; Lin, She-Bao; Wei, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Planar waveguides in magneto-optical glasses (Tb3+-doped aluminum borosilicate glasses) have been produced by a 550-keV proton implantation at a dose of 4.0×1016 ions/cm2 for the first time to our knowledge. After annealing at 260 °C for 1.0 h, the dark-mode spectra and near-field intensity distributions are measured by the prism-coupling and end-face coupling methods. The damage profile, refractive index distribution and light propagation mode of the planar waveguide are numerically calculated by SRIM 2010, RCM and FD-BPM, respectively. The effects of implantation on the structural and optical properties are investigated by Raman and absorption spectra. It suggests that the proton-implanted Tb3+-doped aluminum borosilicate glass waveguide is a good candidate for a waveguide isolator in optical fiber communication and all-optical communication.

  18. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  19. Organic nonlinear optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umegaki, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it became clear that organic compounds with delocalized pi electrons show a great nonlinear optical response. Especially, secondary nonlinear optical constants of more than 2 digits were often seen in the molecular level compared to the existing inorganic crystals such as LiNbO3. The crystallization was continuously tried. Organic nonlinear optical crystals have a new future as materials for use in the applied physics such as photomodulation, optical frequency transformation, opto-bistabilization, and phase conjugation optics. Organic nonlinear optical materials, e.g., urea, O2NC6H4NH2, I, II, are reviewed with 50 references.

  20. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  1. Fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J.; Sohler, W.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of fiber optics sensor technology is presented along with a discussion of the advantages of optical measuring instruments as compared with electronic sensors. The two primary types of fiber optics sensors, specifically those with multiwave fibers and those with monowave fibers, are described. Examples of each major sensor type are presented and discussed. Multiwave detectors include external and internal fiber optics sensors. Among the monowave detectors are Mach-Zender interferometers, Michelson interferometers, Sagnac interferometers (optical gyroscopes), waveguide resonators, and polarimeter sensors. Integrated optical sensors and their application in spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  2. Pump isolation valve

    DOEpatents

    Kinney, Calvin L.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-08-02

    The pump isolation valve provides a means by which the pump may be selectively isolated from the remainder of the coolant system while being compatible with the internal hydraulic arrangement of the pump during normal operation of the pump. The valve comprises a valve cylinder disposed around the pump and adjacent to the last pump diffuser with a turning vane attached to the lower end of the valve cylinder in a manner so as to hydraulically match with the discharge diffuser. The valve cylinder is connected to a drive means for sliding the valve cylinder relative to the diffuser support cylinder so as to block flow in either direction through the discharge diffuser when the valve is in the closed position and to aid in the flow of the coolant from the discharge diffuser by means of the turning vane when the valve is in the open position.

  3. Ultrasonic thermometer isolation standoffs

    DOEpatents

    Arave, Alvin E.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for minimizing sticking of the transmission line to the protective sheath and preventing noise echoes from interfering with signal echoes in an improved high temperature ultrasonic thermometer which includes an ultrasonic transmission line surrounded by a protective sheath. Small isolation standoffs are mounted on the transmission line to minimize points of contact between the transmission line and the protective sheath, the isolation standoffs serving as discontinuities mounted on the transmission line at locations where a signal echo is desired or where an echo can be tolerated. Consequently any noise echo generated by the sticking of the standoff to the protective sheath only adds to the amplitude of the echo generated at the standoff and does not interfere with the other signal echoes.

  4. Bacillus odysseyi isolate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri (Inventor); La Duc, Myron Thomas (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to discovery and isolation of a biologically pure culture of a Bacillus odysseyi isolate with high adherence and sterilization resistant properties. B. odysseyi is a round spore forming Bacillus species that produces an exosporium. This novel species has been characterized on the basis of phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. According to the results of these analyses, this strain belongs to the genus Bacillus and the type strain is 34hs-1.sup.T (=ATCC PTA-4993.sup.T=NRRL B-30641.sup.T=NBRC 100172.sup.T). The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of strain 34hs-1.sup.T is AF526913.

  5. Isolated lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Isolated lung perfusion (ILP) has been historically used as a method to study basic lung physiologic concepts using animal models. More recently, ILP has been applied in lung transplantation and thoracic oncology. In lung transplantation, ILP has been used to assess physiological integrity of donor lungs after the organ is removed from the donor. This procedure is called Ex vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP), and it has also been proposed as a method for active treatment and repair of injured unsuitable donor organs ex vivo. In oncology, ILP is an attractive method to deliver high dose chemotherapy to treat pulmonary metastatic disease. Since the lung vasculature is isolated in vivo, this technique is called in vivo lung perfusion (IVLP). This review will focus on the rationale, technical aspects, experimental and clinical experience of EVLP and IVLP. A perspective on the future use of these techniques is described. PMID:22202033

  6. Isolated glucocorticoid insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Werder, E A; Haller, R; Vetter, W; Zachmann, M; Siebenmann, R

    1975-07-01

    Two cases of isolated glucocorticoid insufficiency or congenital adrenocortical unresponsiveness to ACTH-a variant of adrenocortical failure without mineralocorticoid insufficiency-are presented. Familial incidence was present only in case 1 since two of the siblings died after convulsions, possible related to hypoglycemia. The pathology specimens of one sibling were available for review showing complete lack of the fascicular zone and degenerative changes in the adrenals and evidence of increased ACTH secretion in the pituitary. In the patients who were given substitution therapy with hydrocortisone, studies of plasma renin and aldosterone revealed impairment of plasma aldosterone response to salt restriction, orthostatism and furosemide-induced diuresis combined with postural change. We conclude that in some cases of isolated glucocorticoid insufficiency, impairment of mineralocorticoid function may gradually develop, which is in contrast to the assumption of a congenital defect in the action of ACTH.

  7. High voltage isolation transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Ruitberg, A. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage isolation transformer is provided with primary and secondary coils separated by discrete electrostatic shields from the surfaces of insulating spools on which the coils are wound. The electrostatic shields are formed by coatings of a compound with a low electrical conductivity which completely encase the coils and adhere to the surfaces of the insulating spools adjacent to the coils. Coatings of the compound also line axial bores of the spools, thereby forming electrostatic shields separating the spools from legs of a ferromagnetic core extending through the bores. The transformer is able to isolate a high constant potential applied to one of its coils, without the occurrence of sparking or corona, by coupling the coatings, lining the axial bores to the ferromagnetic core and by coupling one terminal of each coil to the respective coating encasing the coil.

  8. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, K; Swiggard, W J; Steinman, R M; Romani, N; Schuler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  9. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kayo; Swiggard, William J; Steinman, Ralph M; Romani, Nikolaus; Schuler, Gerold; Brinster, Carine

    2009-08-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 x 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  10. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C.

    2009-07-15

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  11. Technology Development for High Efficiency Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Deep space optical communications is a significantly more challenging operational domain than near Earth space optical communications, primarily due to effects resulting from the vastly increased range between transmitter and receiver. The NASA Game Changing Development Program Deep Space Optical Communications Project is developing four key technologies for the implementation of a high efficiency telecommunications system that will enable greater than 10X the data rate of a state-of-the-art deep space RF system (Ka-band) for similar transceiver mass and power burden on the spacecraft. These technologies are a low mass spacecraft disturbance isolation assembly, a flight qualified photon counting detector array, a high efficiency flight laser amplifier and a high efficiency photon counting detector array for the ground-based receiver.

  12. The Optical Spectrum of the Geminga Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher; Halpern, Jules P.; Schiminovich, David; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum of the isolated pulsar Geminga at the Keck Observatory. The optical object is at the limit of spectroscopic capability of any telescope, with a continuum flux that is approx. 0.5% of the dark sky on Mauna Kea. With particular attention paid to the dominant systematics of sky subtraction in our observing and analysis methods, we attained approx. 0.1% systematics in heavily binned spectra. The resulting spectrum spanning 3700 - 8000 A has a flat power-law shape f(sub nu) proportional to nu(exp -0.8) and a broad dip over 6300 - 6500 A. Thermal radiation cannot explain the optical spectrum of Geminga. The dominant component can be modeled as either electron synchrotron emission and ion (proton) cyclotron absorption, or ion cyclotron emission, the latter in a 10(exp 11) G magnetic field.

  13. Binary optics at Hughes Danbury Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logue, James; Power, Michael

    1993-01-01

    An overview of binary optics development at Hughes Danbury Optical Systems is presented. Design software used for mask design is presented. A brief discussion of fabrication follows. Two examples of actual projects are used to highlight the discussion: (1) a large aspheric lens; and (2) a set of grating and lenslet arrays.

  14. Trends in optical design and optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Philip J.

    1992-04-01

    Unconventional optical surfaces can now be readily manufactured with high precision. Good design practice requires that these surfaces be used to optimize the concept of an optical system rather than to provide a marginal performance improvement. The paper considers some of the possibilities.

  15. Genetics of population isolates.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Burgos, M; Muenke, M

    2002-04-01

    Genetic isolates, as shown empirically by the Finnish, Old Order Amish, Hutterites, Sardinian and Jewish communities among others, represent a most important and powerful tool in genetically mapping inherited disorders. The main features associated with that genetic power are the existence of multigenerational pedigrees which are mostly descended from a small number of founders a short number of generations ago, environmental and phenotypic homogeneity, restricted geographical distribution, the presence of exhaustive and detailed records correlating individuals in very well ascertained pedigrees, and inbreeding as a norm. On the other hand, the presence of a multifounder effect or admixture among divergent populations in the founder time (e.g. the Finnish and the Paisa community from Colombia) will theoretically result in increased linkage disequilibrium among adjacent loci. The present review evaluates the historical context and features of some genetic isolates with emphasis on the basic population genetic concepts of inbreeding and genetic drift, and also the state-of-the-art in mapping traits, both Mendelian and complex, on genetic isolates. PMID:12030885

  16. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  17. Isolation of neuromelanin granules.

    PubMed

    Tribl, Florian

    2008-12-01

    Neuromelanin granules are pigmented organelles in the human midbrain that give name to a brain area, substantia nigra pars compacta, which macroscopically appears as a dark brown region in the midbrain due to the insoluble pigment neuromelanin. The substantia nigra pars compacta massively degenerates in Parkinson's disease and gives rise to severely disabling movement symptoms. It has been suggested that neuromelanin granules play an important role in the neurodegenerative events in Parkinson's disease: redox-active iron is bound to neuromelanin and thereby retained within this compartment, but in Parkinson's disease it is thought to be increasingly released into the cytosol, promoting oxidative stress. This unit includes a methodological workflow for the isolation of neuromelanin granules from the human midbrain. This top-down approach (describes an approach that reduces the complexity of the sample stepwise from the level of tissue to cell, and from cell to organelle) encompasses the organelle isolation by sequential density gradient centrifugation and the assessment of the isolation efficacy by western blotting. PMID:19085988

  18. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  19. ''Atomic Optics'': Nonimaging Optics on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Roland Winston Joseph O'Gallagher

    2005-01-15

    This is the final report for a one year close out extension of our basic research program that was established at the University of Chicago more than sixteen years ago to explore and develop the optical sub-discipline that has come to be known as ''nonimaging optics''. This program has been extremely fruitful, having both broadened the range of formalism available for workers in this field and led to the discovery of many new families of optical devices. These devices and techniques have applications wherever the efficient transport and transformation of light distributions are important, in particular in illumination, fiber optics, collection and concentration of sunlight, and the detection of faint light signals in physics and astrophysics. Over the past thirty years, Nonimaging Optics (Welford and Winston, 1989) has brought a fresh approach to the analysis of many problems in classical macro-scale optics. Through the application of phase-space concepts, statistical methods, thermodynamic arguments, etc., many previously established performance limits were able to be broken and many technical surprises with exciting practical applications were discovered. The most recent three-year phase of our long-term continuing program ended in late 2002 and emphasized extending our work in geometrical optics and expanding it to include some interesting questions in physical optics as well as in the new field of statistical optics. This report presents a survey of the basic history and concepts of nonimaging optics and reviews highlights and significant accomplishments over the past fifteen years. This is followed by a more detailed summary of recent research directions and accomplishments during the last three years. This most recent phase was marked by the broadening in scope to include a separate project involving a collaboration with an industrial partner, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This effort was proposed and approved in 1998 and was

  20. A Prenylated Xanthone, Cudratricusxanthone A, Isolated from Cudrania tricuspidata Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuroinflammation through Inhibition of NF-κB and p38 MAPK Pathways in BV2 Microglia.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Chi-Su; Kim, Dong-Cheol; Quang, Tran Hong; Seo, Jungwon; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Cudrania tricuspidata Bureau (Moraceae) is an important source of traditional Korean and Chinese medicines used to treat neuritis and inflammation. Cudratricusxanthone A (1), a prenylated xanthone, isolated from C. tricuspidata, has a variety of biological and therapeutic activities. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of compound 1 on neuroinflammation and characterize its mechanism of action in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. Cudratricusxanthone A (1) suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 enzymes and decreased the production of iNOS-derived nitric oxide and COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 in LPS-stimulated mouse BV2 microglia. The compound also decreased tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12 production; inhibited the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α; and blocked the nuclear translocation of p50 and p65 in mouse BV2 microglia induced by LPS. Cudratricusxanthone A (1) had inhibitory effects on nuclear factor kappa B DNA-binding activity. Additionally, it inhibited the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Our data suggests that cudratricusxanthone A (1) may be a useful therapeutic agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases caused by neuroinflammation. PMID:27649130

  1. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.

    1994-11-08

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage. 5 figs.

  2. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  3. Optical devices: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Technological developments in the field of optics devices which have potential utility outside the aerospace community are described. Optical instrumentation, light generation and transmission, and laser techniques are among the topics covered. Patent information is given.

  4. [INVITED] Optical microfibre devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, G.

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade optical fibre tapers with micrometre diameter (often called microfibers) have been investigated for numerous applications ranging from sensing to wavelength convertors, telecom and optical manipulation. This paper reviews the various applications of microfibres.

  5. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  6. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage.

  7. Fiber Optics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  8. Optical signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses several optical configurations used for signal processing. Electronic-to-optical transducers are outlined, noting fixed window transducers and moving window acousto-optic transducers. Folded spectrum techniques are considered, with reference to wideband RF signal analysis, fetal electroencephalogram analysis, engine vibration analysis, signal buried in noise, and spatial filtering. Various methods for radar signal processing are described, such as phased-array antennas, the optical processing of phased-array data, pulsed Doppler and FM radar systems, a multichannel one-dimensional optical correlator, correlations with long coded waveforms, and Doppler signal processing. Means for noncoherent optical signal processing are noted, including an optical correlator for speech recognition and a noncoherent optical correlator.

  9. Optics for natural lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, H. B.

    1978-01-01

    Energy-saving optics utilize sky and sun for lighting. Innovative optical arrangements for transmitting outdoor light into building interiors are decribed using flat white and mirrored surfaces for converging and diverging light pipes.

  10. Optic Disc and Optic Cup Segmentation Methodologies for Glaucoma Image Detection: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Almazroa, Ahmed; Burman, Ritambhar; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of loss of vision in the world. Examining the head of optic nerve (cup-to-disc ratio) is very important for diagnosing glaucoma and for patient monitoring after diagnosis. Images of optic disc and optic cup are acquired by fundus camera as well as Optical Coherence Tomography. The optic disc and optic cup segmentation techniques are used to isolate the relevant parts of the retinal image and to calculate the cup-to-disc ratio. The main objective of this paper is to review segmentation methodologies and techniques for the disc and cup boundaries which are utilized to calculate the disc and cup geometrical parameters automatically and accurately to help the professionals in the glaucoma to have a wide view and more details about the optic nerve head structure using retinal fundus images. We provide a brief description of each technique, highlighting its classification and performance metrics. The current and future research directions are summarized and discussed. PMID:26688751

  11. Optic Disc and Optic Cup Segmentation Methodologies for Glaucoma Image Detection: A Survey.

    PubMed

    Almazroa, Ahmed; Burman, Ritambhar; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of loss of vision in the world. Examining the head of optic nerve (cup-to-disc ratio) is very important for diagnosing glaucoma and for patient monitoring after diagnosis. Images of optic disc and optic cup are acquired by fundus camera as well as Optical Coherence Tomography. The optic disc and optic cup segmentation techniques are used to isolate the relevant parts of the retinal image and to calculate the cup-to-disc ratio. The main objective of this paper is to review segmentation methodologies and techniques for the disc and cup boundaries which are utilized to calculate the disc and cup geometrical parameters automatically and accurately to help the professionals in the glaucoma to have a wide view and more details about the optic nerve head structure using retinal fundus images. We provide a brief description of each technique, highlighting its classification and performance metrics. The current and future research directions are summarized and discussed. PMID:26688751

  12. Photonic crystal optical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, A. Wirth; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2011-06-01

    After several decades pushing the technology and the development of the world, the electronics is giving space for technologies that use light. We propose and analyze an optical memory embedded in a nonlinear photonic crystal (PhC), whose system of writing and reading data is controlled by an external command signal. This optical memory is based on optical directional couplers connected to a shared optical ring. Such a device can work over the C-Band of ITU (International Telecommunication Union).

  13. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  14. Tunable nonreciprocal terahertz transmission and enhancement based on metal/magneto-optic plasmonic lens.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fei; Chen, Sai; Wang, Xiang-Hui; Chang, Sheng-Jiang

    2013-04-01

    A tunable metal/magneto-optic plasmonic lens for terahertz isolator is demonstrated. Based on the magneto-optical effect of the semiconductor material and non-symmetrical structure, this plasmonic lens has not only the focusing feature but also nonreciprocal transmission property. Moreover, a transmission enhancement through this device greatly larger than that of the ordinary metallic slit arrays is contributed by the extraordinary optical transmission effect of the magneto surface plasmon polaritons. The results show that the proposed isolator has an isolation bandwidth of larger than 0.4THz and the maximum isolation of higher than 110dB, and its operating frequency also can be broadly tuned by changing the external magnetic field or temperature. This low-loss, high isolation, broadband tunable nonreciprocal terahertz transmission mechanism has a great potential for terahertz application systems. PMID:23571951

  15. Neurologic Complications Associated with Sjögren's Disease: Case Reports and Modern Pathogenic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Colaci, Michele; Cassone, Giulia; Manfredi, Andreina; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Sjögren's syndrome (SS) may be complicated by some neurological manifestations, generally sensory polyneuropathy. Furthermore, involvement of cranial nerves was described as rare complications of SS. Methods. We reported 2 cases: the first one was a 40-year-old woman who developed neuritis of the left optic nerve as presenting symptom few years before the diagnosis of SS; the second was a 54-year-old woman who presented a paralysis of the right phrenic nerve 7 years after the SS onset. An exhaustive review of the literature on patients with cranial or phrenic nerve involvements was also carried out. Results. To the best of our knowledge, our second case represents the first observation of SS-associated phrenic nerve mononeuritis, while optic neuritis represents the most frequent cranial nerve involvement detectable in this connective tissue disease. Trigeminal neuropathy is also frequently reported, whereas neuritis involving the other cranial nerves is quite rare. Conclusions. Cranial nerve injury is a harmful complication of SS, even if less commonly recorded compared to peripheral neuropathy. Neurological manifestations may precede the clinical onset of SS; therefore, in patients with apparently isolated cranial nerve involvement, a correct diagnosis of the underlying SS is often delayed or overlooked entirely; in these instances, standard clinicoserological assessment is recommendable. PMID:25161786

  16. Trapped particle optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmqvist, Lars; Hertz, Hans M.

    1992-11-01

    A scanned probe optical microscope allowing nondestructive studies of a wide range of objects and surface is described. The microscope utilizes a noninvasive optical trap to position a microscopic probe light source in immediate proximity to the studied object. We demonstrate the method experimentally and show theoretically its potential for optical imaging with subdiffraction limited resolution of, e.g., biological objects.

  17. Optical Circuitry Cooperative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, H. M.; Gibson, U.; Peyghambarian, N.; Sarid, D.; Stegeman, G.

    1985-01-01

    An Optical Circuitry Cooperative (OCC) has been formed as an NSF cooperative research center in which six or more companies contribute financial support; NSF provides support which declines to zero in five years. Companies benefit from a center by early access to research results, leverage for their research dollars, participation in research selection, and improved relations with faculty and students. The university receives support for a major research program that increases its research capability, provides reasonably stable funding, and opens more opportunities for graduate students. The potential of optical circuitry has been discussed for many years, but the excitement is growing rapidly on the strength of the success of optical fibers for optical transmission, the generation of subpicosecond opitcal pulses, and the development of promising optical logic elements, such as optical bistable devices. And yet, much research remains to be done to discover the best nonlinear optical materials and fabrication techniques. OCC will perform research to provide a data base to allow the development of optical circuitry devices. The areas encompassed by OCC include all-optical logic, picosecond decision-making, guided-wave preprocessors, opti-cal interconnects within computers (both fiber and whole-array imaging), optical storage, and optical computer architecture and devices.

  18. What Is Optical Imaging?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hespos, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a promising new methodology called optical imaging. Optical imaging is used for measuring changes in cortical blood flow due to functional activation. The article outlines the pros and cons of using optical imaging for studying the brain correlates of perceptual, cognitive, and language development in infants and young…

  19. Adaptive optical zoom sensor.

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2005-11-01

    In order to optically vary the magnification of an imaging system, continuous mechanical zoom lenses require multiple optical elements and use fine mechanical motion to precisely adjust the separations between individual or groups of lenses. By incorporating active elements into the optical design, we have designed and demonstrated imaging systems that are capable of variable optical magnification with no macroscopic moving parts. Changing the effective focal length and magnification of an imaging system can be accomplished by adeptly positioning two or more active optics in the optical design and appropriately adjusting the optical power of those elements. In this application, the active optics (e.g. liquid crystal spatial light modulators or deformable mirrors) serve as variable focal-length lenses. Unfortunately, the range over which currently available devices can operate (i.e. their dynamic range) is relatively small. Therefore, the key to this concept is to create large changes in the effective focal length of the system with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual elements by leveraging the optical power of conventional optical elements surrounding the active optics. By appropriately designing the optical system, these variable focal-length lenses can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length, and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses.

  20. All-optical repeater.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  1. Covert optically-scanning enhanced zoom pinhole lens technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, H. S.

    2007-10-01

    Lens technology has been developed that enables a scene to be scanned optically whilst the lens remains stationary. The covert optically-scanning enhanced (COSE) pinhole lens technology also has the option of incorporating a zoom capability. This allows any target in the scene to be isolated and zoomed onto for further scrutiny. The COSE lens has an external stationary entrance pupil. The operation of the lens may be visualized as optically pivoting about this pupil plane whilst scanning the scene but physically remaining stationary. A technology demonstrator has been built and its performance is discussed. Further developments of the COSE technology are also discussed.

  2. Mechanical one-to-many fiber-optic switch.

    PubMed

    Spillman, W B

    1979-06-15

    A mechanical multimode fiber-optic switch has been developed which uses a spherical mirror mounted on a galvanometer scanner to switch multimode light from one to many other fibers located in a linear array in the one-to-one imaging plane of the mirror. Characteristics of the switch include (1) measured optical insertion loss less than 1.5 dB; (2) optical isolation greater than 37 dB; (3) switching rate of 300 Hz; (4) potential for greater than one-to-ten fiber switching; and (5) little degradation of device characteristics after 10(6) switchings between two output fibers spaced four fiber diameters apart. PMID:20212604

  3. How isolated is Antarctica?

    PubMed

    Clarke, Andrew; Barnes, David K A; Hodgson, Dominic A

    2005-01-01

    The traditional view of Antarctica and the surrounding Southern Ocean as an isolated system is now being challenged by the recent discovery at the Antarctic Peninsula of adult spider crabs Hyas areneus from the North Atlantic and of larvae of subpolar marine invertebrates. These observations question whether the well described biogeographical similarities between the benthic fauna of the Antarctic Peninsula and the Magellan region of South America result from history (the two regions were once contiguous), or from a previously unrecognized low level of faunal exchange. Such exchange might be influenced by regional climate change, and also exacerbated by changes in human impact. PMID:16701330

  4. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy.

  5. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  6. Paraxial ray optics cloaking.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joseph S; Howell, John C

    2014-12-01

    Despite much interest and progress in optical spatial cloaking, a three-dimensional (3D), transmitting, continuously multidirectional cloak in the visible regime has not yet been demonstrated. Here we experimentally demonstrate such a cloak using ray optics, albeit with some edge effects. Our device requires no new materials, uses isotropic off-the-shelf optics, scales easily to cloak arbitrarily large objects, and is as broadband as the choice of optical material, all of which have been challenges for current cloaking schemes. In addition, we provide a concise formalism that quantifies and produces perfect optical cloaks in the small-angle ('paraxial') limit.

  7. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  8. Near perfect optics

    SciTech Connect

    Goeke, R.; Farnsworth, A.V.; Neumann, C.C.; Sweatt, W.C.; Warren, M.E.; Weed, J.W.

    1996-06-01

    This report discusses a novel fabrication process to produce nearly perfect optics. The process utilizes vacuum deposition techniques to optimally modify polished optical substrate surfaces. The surface figure, i.e. contour of a polished optical element, is improved by differentially filling in the low spots on the surface using flux from a physical vapor deposition source through an appropriate mask. The process is expected to enable the manufacture of diffraction-limited optical systems for the UV, extreme UV, and soft X-ray spectral regions, which would have great impact on photolithography and astronomy. This same technique may also reduce the fabrication cost of visible region optics with aspheric surfaces.

  9. Paraxial ray optics cloaking.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joseph S; Howell, John C

    2014-12-01

    Despite much interest and progress in optical spatial cloaking, a three-dimensional (3D), transmitting, continuously multidirectional cloak in the visible regime has not yet been demonstrated. Here we experimentally demonstrate such a cloak using ray optics, albeit with some edge effects. Our device requires no new materials, uses isotropic off-the-shelf optics, scales easily to cloak arbitrarily large objects, and is as broadband as the choice of optical material, all of which have been challenges for current cloaking schemes. In addition, we provide a concise formalism that quantifies and produces perfect optical cloaks in the small-angle ('paraxial') limit. PMID:25606881

  10. Paraxial ray optics cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joseph S.; Howell, John C.

    2015-02-01

    Despite much interest and progress in optical spatial cloaking, a three-dimensional (3D), transmitting, continuously multidirectional cloak in the visible regime has not yet been demonstrated. Here we experimentally demonstrate such a cloak using ray optics, albeit with some edge effects. Our device requires no new materials, uses isotropic off-the-shelf optics, scales easily to cloak arbitrarily large objects, and is as broadband as the choice of optical material, all of which have been challenges for current cloaking schemes. In addition, we provide a concise formalism that quantifies and produces perfect optical cloaks in the small-angle (`paraxial') limit.

  11. Investigation of mercury thruster isolators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Mercury ion thruster isolator lifetime tests were performed using different isolator materials and geometries. Tests were performed with and without the flow of mercury through the isolators in an oil diffusion pumped vacuum facility and cryogenically pumped bell jar. The onset of leakage current in isolators occurred in time intervals ranging from a few hours to many hundreds of hours. In all cases, surface contamination was responsible for the onset of leakage current and subsequent isolator failure. Rate of increase of leakage current and the leakage current level increased approximately exponentially with isolator temperature. Careful attention to shielding techniques and the elimination of sources of metal oxides appear to have eliminated isolator failures as a thruster life limiting mechanism.

  12. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  13. Optical logic: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2005-05-01

    Progress of optical logic has been anything but uniform or even monotonic. The hope for "all optical computers" was largely abandoned after devastating critiques by Keyes. Over time, optical logic transformed into a very viable niche activity by the needs of optical communication for "all optical" logic and the advent of a critical component: the SOA or Semiconductor Optical Amplifier. I argue that a new phase in this uneven history can be defined - linear (single photon, not multiple entangled photon) quantum optical logic. These can perform conservative, reversible logic operations without energy or time penalties, but cascading requires the irreversible act of measurement, so only single devices or single layers can deliver those advantages.

  14. Optically-selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Gordon

    2016-08-01

    will discuss the selection and properties of optically-selected AGN as contrasted with other multi-wavelength investigations. While optical surveys are able to identify *more* AGNs than other wavelengths, this size comes with a bias towards brighter, unobscured sources. Although optical surveys are not ideal for probing obscured AGNs, I will discuss how they can guide our search for them. The bias towards unobscured sources in the optical is partially mitigated, however, by an increase in information content for the sources that *are* identified---in the form of physics probed by the combination of optical continuum, absorption, and emission. An example is the ability to estimate the mass of AGNs based on the optical/UV emission lines. I will discuss the range of mass (and accretion rate) probed by the optical in addition to serious biases in the black hole mass scaling relations that corrupt these estimates at high redshift.

  15. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  16. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  17. Mechanisms for optical binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.; Davila Romero, Luciana C.

    2009-08-01

    The phenomenon of optical binding is now experimentally very well established. With a recognition of the facility to collect and organize particles held in an optical trap, the related term 'optical matter' has also been gaining currency, highlighting possibilities for a significant interplay between optically induced inter-particle forces and other interactions such as chemical bonding and dispersion forces. Optical binding itself has a variety of interpretations. With some of these explanations being more prominent than others, and their applicability to some extent depending on the nature of the particles involved, a listing of these has to include the following: collective scattering, laser-dressed Casimir forces, virtual photon coupling, optically induced dipole resonance, and plasmon resonance coupling. It is the purpose of this paper to review and to establish the extent of fundamental linkages between these theoretical descriptions, recognizing the value that each has in relating the phenomenon of optical binding to the broader context of other, closely related physical measurements.

  18. Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter

    DOEpatents

    Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

    1983-06-30

    A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

  19. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  20. Recombinant baculovirus isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac or BaculoDirect, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Additionally, many systems require a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay. Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.