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Sample records for isolated pea nuclei

  1. Characterization of nucleoside triphosphatase activity in isolated pea nuclei and its photoreversible regulation by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. R.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    A nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) present in highly purified preparations of pea nuclei was partially characterized. The activity of this enzyme was stimulated by divalent cations (Mg2+ = Mn2+ > Ca2+), but was not affected by the monovalent cations, Na+ and K+. The Mg(2+)-dependent activity was further stimulated by concentrations of Ca2+ in the low micromolar range. It could catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP, all with a pH optimum of 7.5. The nuclear NTPase activity was not inhibited by vanadate, oligomycin, or nitrate, but was inhibited by relatively low concentrations of quercetin and the calmodulin inhibitor, compound 48/80. The NTPase was stimulated more than 50% by red light, and this effect was reversed by subsequent irradiation with far-red light. The photoreversibility of the stimulation indicated that the photoreceptor for this response was phytochrome, an important regulator of photomorphogenesis and gene expression in plants.

  2. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  3. Phytochrome regulates GTP-binding protein activity in the envelope of pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Memon, A. R.; Thompson, G. A. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Three GTP-binding proteins with apparent molecular masses of 27, 28 and 30 kDa have been detected in isolated nuclei of etiolated pea plumules. After LDS-PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose these proteins bind [32P]GTP in the presence of excess ATP, suggesting that they are monomeric G proteins. When nuclei are disrupted, three proteins co-purify with the nuclear envelope fraction and are highly enriched in this fraction. The level of [32P]GTP-binding for all three protein bands is significantly increased when harvested pea plumules are irradiated by red light, and this effect is reversed by far-red light. The results indicate that GTP-binding activity associated with the nuclear envelope of plant cells is photoreversibly regulated by the pigment phytochrome.

  4. Isolation of nuclei from yeast.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, M M; Halvorson, H O

    1971-05-01

    A method for isolation of nuclei from Saccharomyces cervisiae in high yield is described. The DNA/protein ratio of the isolated nuclei is 10 times higher than that of whole cells. Examination of these nuclei in phase and electron microscopes has shown them to be round bodies having a double membrane, microtubules, and a dark crescent at one end. The optimum conditions for extraction and resolution of histones of these nuclei on acrylamide gels have been investigated. The nuclei have an active RNA polymerase (E.C. 2.7.7.6) and are able to synthesize RNA in vitro. They are also readily stainable with Giemsa's, Feulgen's, and acridine orange methods. PMID:19866769

  5. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Almost all the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase activity in nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum, L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.3 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified 80,000-fold by salt fractionation and high performance liquid chromatography, after which it has a high specific activity of about 100 picomoles per minute per microgram in the presence of Ca2+ and reaches half-maximal activation at about 3 x 10(-7) molar free Ca2+, without calmodulin. It is a monomer with a molecular weight near 90,000. It can efficiently use histone III-S, ribosomal S6 protein, and casein as artificial substrates, but it phosphorylates phosvitin only weakly. Its Ca(2+)-dependent kinase activity is half-maximally inhibited by 0.1 millimolar chlorpromazine, by 35 nanomolar K-252a and by 7 nanomolar staurosporine. It is insensitive to sphingosine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, and to basic polypeptides that block other Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. It is not stimulated by exogenous phospholipids or fatty acids. In intact isolated pea nuclei it preferentially phosphorylates several chromatin-associated proteins, with the most phosphorylated protein band being near the same molecular weight (43,000) as a nuclear protein substrate whose phosphorylation has been reported to be stimulated by phytochrome in a calcium-dependent fashion.

  6. Glycerolipid biosynthesis in isolated pea root plastids

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Lingru; Sparace, S.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Plastids have been isolated from germinating pea (Pisum sativum L.) roots by differential centrifugation and purified on Percoll gradients. Marker enzymes (NADPH: cytochrome c reductase, fumarase and fatty acid synthesis) indicate that greater than 50% of the plastids are recovered essentially free from mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum contamination. Fatty acids synthesized from ({sup 14}C)acetate by Percoll-purified plastids are primarily 16:0, 16:1 and 18:1. ({sup 14}C)Acetate-labelled fatty acids and ({sup 14}C)glycerol-3-phosphate are both readily incorporated into glycerolipid. Approximately 12% of the total activity for glycerolipid biosynthesis from glycerol-3-phosphate is recovered in the purified plastid fraction. Glycerolipids synthesized from these precursors are primarily TAG, DAG, PE, PG, PC, PI and PA. Acyl-CoA's also accumulate when acetate is the precursor.

  7. Protein import into isolated pea root leucoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chiung-Chih; Li, Hsou-min

    2015-01-01

    Leucoplasts are important organelles for the synthesis and storage of starch, lipids and proteins. However, molecular mechanism of protein import into leucoplasts and how it differs from that of import into chloroplasts remain unknown. We used pea seedlings for both chloroplast and leucoplast isolations to compare within the same species. We further optimized the isolation and import conditions to improve import efficiency and to permit a quantitative comparison between the two plastid types. The authenticity of the import was verified using a mitochondrial precursor protein. Our results show that, when normalized to Toc75, most translocon proteins are less abundant in leucoplasts than in chloroplasts. A precursor shown to prefer the receptor Toc132 indeed had relatively more similar import efficiencies between chloroplasts and leucoplasts compared to precursors that prefer Toc159. Furthermore we found two precursors that exhibited very high import efficiency into leucoplasts. Their transit peptides may be candidates for delivering transgenic proteins into leucoplasts and for analyzing motifs important for leucoplast import. PMID:26388889

  8. The major nucleoside triphosphatase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei and in rat liver nuclei share common epitopes also present in nuclear lamins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. G.; Dauwalder, M.; Clawson, G. A.; Hatem, C. L.; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The major nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activities in mammalian and pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei are associated with enzymes that are very similar both biochemically and immunochemically. The major NTPase from rat liver nuclei appears to be a 46-kD enzyme that represents the N-terminal portion of lamins A and C, two lamina proteins that apparently arise from the same gene by alternate splicing. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) G2, raised to human lamin C, both immunoprecipitates the major (47 kD) NTPase in pea nuclei and recognizes it in western blot analyses. A polyclonal antibody preparation raised to the 47-kD pea NTPase (pc480) reacts with the same lamin bands that are recognized by MAb G2 in mammalian nuclei. The pc480 antibodies also bind to the same lamin-like bands in pea nuclear envelope-matrix preparations that are recognized by G2 and three other MAbs known to bind to mammalian lamins. In immunofluorescence assays, pc480 and anti-lamin antibodies stain both cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in plant cells, with slightly enhanced staining along the periphery of the nuclei. These results indicate that the pea and rat liver NTPases are structurally similar and that, in pea nuclei as in rat liver nuclei, the major NTPase is probably derived from a lamin precursor by proteolysis.

  9. Desiccation tolerance of protoplasts isolated from pea embryos.

    PubMed

    Xiao, L; Koster, K L

    2001-11-01

    To facilitate studies of desiccation tolerance at the cellular level, a technique to isolate protoplasts from desiccation-tolerant pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) embryos has been developed. Using FDA (fluorescein diacetate) as a probe, viability of the protoplasts was investigated before and after drying to determine whether the protoplasts could survive desiccation in a manner similar to the tissue from which they were isolated. Protoplasts were isolated from 12 h imbibed pea axes, suspended in several different sugar solutions, then dried to water contents less than 0.2 g H(2)O g(-1) DW. Protoplasts only survived drying if the rate was rapid (<2 h), while slow drying (24 h) was lethal. Maximal survival (75%) was obtained after drying protoplasts with a mixture of sucrose and raffinose, while pure sucrose and trehalose were somewhat less effective protectants. Low survival was obtained after drying protoplasts with monosaccharides and pure raffinose. Protoplasts isolated from germinated seedlings did not survive dehydration below 0.2 g H(2)O g(-1) DW. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that dried desiccation-tolerant protoplasts appeared shrunken, with folded membranes, while dried protoplasts from sensitive tissue had disrupted membranes. While isolated protoplasts maintained some of the desiccation tolerance of orthodox seeds, their inability to survive complete drying and their sensitivity to drying rate is similar to the behaviour of recalcitrant embryos.

  10. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  11. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thaver, S.S.; Bhava, D.; Castelfranco, P.A.

    1986-04-01

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid (/sup 14/C)-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed.

  12. Isolation and characterization of nuclei from rice embryos.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, J; Lim, P Y; Aratani, K; Akazawa, T

    1992-04-01

    A method has been developed to isolate pure preparations of nuclei in high yield from commercially available viable rice embryos (germ), employing extraction with buffer solution containing glycerol (without detergent) and polyamine, followed by centrifugation on a 30% Percoll cushion. The intactness of the isolated nuclei was confirmed by light microscopy as well as electron microscopy. The protein profiles of both whole nuclei and nuclear extracts obtained by SDS-PAGE, organellar marker enzyme activities, DNA and RNA analyses, and in vitro RNA synthesis, all indicate that the highly purified nuclei are isolated from rice embryos.

  13. Isolation and characterization of phytoferritin from pea (Pisum sativum) and Lentil (Lens esculenta).

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, R R; Ponce-Ortiz, Y; Koch, M H; Parfait, R; Stuhrmann, H B

    1978-01-01

    Ferritin was isolated from the seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and lentil (Lens esculenta). The homogeneity of the phytoferritins was established by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The subunit molecular weights were respectively 20 300 and 21 400 for hte pea and lentil proteins. A neutron low-angle scattering study established the molecular weight of the oligomer as 480 000 for pea apoferritin and 510 000 for lentil apoferritin. Although the quaternary structure of 24 polypeptide chains is preserved, the phytoferritins have a larger cavity in the interior than mammalian ferritins and can thus potentially store 1.2-1.4 times as much iron. The amino acid composition of the phytoferritins show some similarities to those of mammalian apoferritins; tryptic 'fingerprinting' reveals that there are many differences in the amino acid sequence of plant and mammalian apoferritins. Images Fig. 1. PMID:656049

  14. Gibberellin metabolism in isolated pea fruit tissue and intact fruits

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, S.; Brenner, M.L. )

    1989-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) have been shown by others to be required for normal development of pea fruit. Whether the pericarp of the developing pea fruit produces GAs in situ is not known. To determine if the pericarp has the capacity to produce GAs during fruit growth, the metabolism of the first two committed GAs in the biosynthetic pathway, ({sup 14}C)GA{sub 12}-aldehyde and ({sup 14}C)GA{sub 12} was examined in tissue obtained from pollinated, parthenocarpic, and control fruit over 4 days from treatment. ({sup 14}C)GA{sub 12}-aldehyde was converted primarily to conjugates, including ({sup 14}C)GA{sub 12}-aldehyde conjugate. ({sup 14}C)GA{sub 12} was converted to ({sup 14}C)GA{sub 53} in all tissue, but by day 4 only tissue from pollinated or parthenocarpic fruits showed sustained formation of ({sup 14}C)GA{sub 53}. When ({sup 14}C)GA{sub 12} is applied to 4-day-old fruits attached to the plants, the major product obtained after 24 hours is ({sup 14}C)GA{sub 20} (as identified by GC-MS). No transport to the developing seed was observed. These results indicate that the elongating fruit tissue has the capacity to produce GAs.

  15. Polarographic Study of Oxaloacetate Reduction by Isolated Pea Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John W.; House, Colin M.

    1979-01-01

    Suspensions of pea chloroplasts, prepared by differential centrifugation, catalyzed oxaloacetate-dependent O2 evolution (mean rate of 29 determinations 10.9 micromoles per milligram of chlorophyll per hour, sd 3.2) with the concomitant production of malate. At optimum concentrations of oxaloacetate, both reactions were light-dependent, inhibited by 3-(3,4- dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea and oxalate, and enhanced 2.5- to 4-fold by 10 millimolar NH4Cl. At concentrations of oxaloacetate (<50 micromolar), 10 millimolar NH4Cl was inhibitory. The ratio of O2 evolved to malate produced was 0.39 to 0.58. The ratio of O2 evolved to oxaloacetate supplied was commensurate with the theoretical value of 0.5. Chloroplast suspensions contained both NAD- and NADP-malate dehydrogenase activities. It was concluded from oxalate inhibition studies and the promotion of oxaloacetate-dependent O2 evolution by shocked chloroplasts by NADPH (but not NADH) that the reaction was mediated via the NADP enzyme. PMID:16661092

  16. Characterization of superoxide production by isolated pea thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, S.; Osmond, B. )

    1991-05-01

    During photosynthesis chloroplasts univalently reduce molecular oxygen to superoxide through autoxidations in the electron transport chain. Cytochrome c reduction was used to assay superoxide production in illuminate pea thylakoids under a variety of conditions. Superoxide dismutase was found to inhibit the reaction by 80%, indicating that cytochrome c reduction is primarily mediated by superoxide. This was further supported by the observation that the highest rates of cytochrome c reduction occurred in the presence of methyl viologen, an autoxidizable redox carrier that accepts electrons from photosystem I. The reaction was fully suppressed by DCMU, demonstrating a requirement for electron transport. In the presence of the plastoquinone antagonist DBMIB the rate of cytochrome c reduction increased substantially. This indicates that under conditions where electron transport to photosystem I is blocked, autoxidation reactions can occur on the reducing side of photosystem II to maintain Q{sub A} in the oxidized state. Superoxide production at sites other than the reducing side of photosystem I may thus represent an important pathway for dissipating excess excitation energy.

  17. Partial purification and characterization of an enzyme from pea nuclei with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y L; Roux, S J

    1995-01-01

    A pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclear enzyme with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity has been partially purified and characterized. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 90 kD as judged by molecular sieve column chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Like animal protein tyrosine phosphatases it can be inhibited by low concentrations of molybdate and vanadate. It is also inhibited by heparin and spermine but not by either the acid phosphatase inhibitors citrate and tartrate or the protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. The enzyme does not require Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ for its activity but is stimulated by ethylenediaminetetraacetate and by ethyleneglycolbis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. It dephosphorylates phosphotyrosine residues on the four different 32P-tyrosine-labeled peptides tested but not the phosphoserine/threonine residues on casein and histone. Like some animal protein tyrosine phosphatases, it has a variable pH optimum depending on the substrate used: the optimum is 5.5 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled lysozyme, but it is 7.0 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled poly(glutamic acid, tyrosine). It has a Km of 4 microM when the lysozyme protein is used as a substrate.

  18. Changes in respiration of mitochondria isolated from cotyledons of ethylene-treated pea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Duncan, I; Spencer, M

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of intact, germinating pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Homesteader) seedlings with ethylene enhanced the cyanide-resistant respiration of mitochondria isolated from the cotyledons. The level of enhancement depended on the concentration of ethylene. Thus, exposure to 0.9 μl·l(-1) of ethylene in air for days 4-6 of germination had little effect on cyanide-resistant respiration, while exposure to 130 μl·l(-1) increased it from 10 to 50 nmol O2·min(-1)·(mg protein)(-1). The length of exposure to ethylene also affected the degree of enhancement. According to some literature data, lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.12) activity can be mistaken for cyanide-resistant respiration, but in our preparations of purified pea mitochondria ethylene had no effect on lipoxygenase activity, nor did the gas disrupt the outer mitochondrial membrane. Bahr and Bonner plots of respiration in the presence of salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) indicated that ethylene did not affect respiration proceeding via the cytochrome pathway. Thus, increases in total respiration in mitochondria from cotyledons of ethylene-treated pea seedlings reflect increases in cyanide-resistant respiration.

  19. Molecular characterization and identification of plant growth promoting endophytic bacteria isolated from the root nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohsin; Hameed, Sohail; Yasmeen, Tahira; Zahid, Mehwish; Zafar, Marriam

    2014-02-01

    Root nodule accommodates various non-nodulating bacteria at varying densities. Present study was planned to identify and characterize the non-nodulating bacteria from the pea plant. Ten fast growing bacteria were isolated from the root nodules of cultivated pea plants. These bacterial isolates were unable to nodulate pea plants in nodulation assay, which indicate the non-rhizobial nature of these bacteria. Bacterial isolates were tested in vitro for plant growth promoting properties including indole acetic acid (IAA) production, nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, root colonization and biofilm formation. Six isolates were able to produce IAA at varying level from 0.86 to 16.16 μg ml(-1), with the isolate MSP9 being most efficient. Only two isolates, MSP2 and MSP10, were able to fix nitrogen. All isolates were able to solubilize inorganic phosphorus ranging from 5.57 to 11.73 μg ml(-1), except MSP4. Bacterial isolates showed considerably better potential for colonization on pea roots. Isolates MSP9 and MSP10 were most efficient in biofilm formation on polyvinyl chloride, which indicated their potential to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses, whereas the remaining isolates showed a very poor biofilm formation ability. The most efficient plant growth promoting agents, MSP9 and MSP10, were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as Ochrobactrum and Enterobacter, respectively, with 99% similarity. It is suggested the potential endophytic bacterial strains, Ochrobactrum sp. MSP9 and Enterobacter sp. MSP10, can be used as biofertilizers for various legume and non-legume crops after studying their interaction with the host crop and field evaluation.

  20. Molecular characterization and identification of plant growth promoting endophytic bacteria isolated from the root nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohsin; Hameed, Sohail; Yasmeen, Tahira; Zahid, Mehwish; Zafar, Marriam

    2014-02-01

    Root nodule accommodates various non-nodulating bacteria at varying densities. Present study was planned to identify and characterize the non-nodulating bacteria from the pea plant. Ten fast growing bacteria were isolated from the root nodules of cultivated pea plants. These bacterial isolates were unable to nodulate pea plants in nodulation assay, which indicate the non-rhizobial nature of these bacteria. Bacterial isolates were tested in vitro for plant growth promoting properties including indole acetic acid (IAA) production, nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, root colonization and biofilm formation. Six isolates were able to produce IAA at varying level from 0.86 to 16.16 μg ml(-1), with the isolate MSP9 being most efficient. Only two isolates, MSP2 and MSP10, were able to fix nitrogen. All isolates were able to solubilize inorganic phosphorus ranging from 5.57 to 11.73 μg ml(-1), except MSP4. Bacterial isolates showed considerably better potential for colonization on pea roots. Isolates MSP9 and MSP10 were most efficient in biofilm formation on polyvinyl chloride, which indicated their potential to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses, whereas the remaining isolates showed a very poor biofilm formation ability. The most efficient plant growth promoting agents, MSP9 and MSP10, were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as Ochrobactrum and Enterobacter, respectively, with 99% similarity. It is suggested the potential endophytic bacterial strains, Ochrobactrum sp. MSP9 and Enterobacter sp. MSP10, can be used as biofertilizers for various legume and non-legume crops after studying their interaction with the host crop and field evaluation. PMID:24072498

  1. Rapid Isolation of Nuclei from Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Nabbi, Arash; Riabowol, Karl

    2015-08-01

    This protocol presents a rapid, efficient, and practical (REAP) method to separate nuclei from cultured cells in vitro with as little damage and contamination as possible. The REAP procedure is performed at low temperature and takes <2 min, which minimizes protein degradation, protein modification, and diffusion of soluble proteins out of the nuclear compartment while maintaining the integrity of protein complexes. A mild detergent, NP-40, is used together with mild mechanical shearing to disrupt the plasma membrane, leaving the nuclear membrane intact. The REAP method can be used with various cell lines grown in vitro and requires minimal optimization. The isolated nuclei are suitable for numerous downstream applications (e.g., western blotting, 2D gel electrophoresis, and immunoprecipitation). If desired, aliquots of whole-cell lysate and the cytoplasmic fraction can be saved for comparison. PMID:26240403

  2. Uptake of auxins into membrane vesicles isolated from pea stems: an in vitro auxin transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test the applicability of the chemiosmotic theory of auxin transport to a subcellular system. Membrane vesicles were isolated from the basal portion of the third internode of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska) by differential centrifugation. Uptake of auxin was determined by adding /sup 14/C-labeled indoleacetic acid (IAA) to vesicles. Nigericin, a monovalent cation ionophore, and the electrogenic protonophore, carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), at micromolar concentrations abolished saturable uptake. Bursting vesicles by sonication, osmotic shock and freeze/thawing also eliminated saturable uptake. As the temperature increased from 0 to 30/sup 0/C, saturable uptake decreased markedly. Nonsaturable auxin uptake was less affected by these treatments. The pH gradient-dependent uptake of auxin appeared to be a transmembrane uptake of auxin into the vesicles rather than surface binding. Unlabeled IAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at low concentrations reduced the saturable accumulation of (/sup 14/C)IAA in vesicles, while phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, and 1-NAA were effective only at high concentrations. Kinetic analysis revealed two types of sites: a high affinity site with an uptake capacity of 25 to 40 pmoles/g tissue, and a low affinity site with an uptake capacity of 260 to 600 pmole/g tissue, fresh wt. In conclusion, several principal elements of an auxin transport system, as specific by the chemiosmotic theory of polar auxin transport, were present in membrane vesicles isolated from relatively mature pea stem tissue. However, one important aspect of the theory was not demonstrated in this in vitro system - a TIBA/NPA-sensitive auxin efflux. The kinetics and specificity of auxin uptake strongly suggested that this system was physiologically significant.

  3. Effects of GA sub 4 on gene expression in isolated nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sechley, K.A.; Srivastava, L.M. )

    1989-04-01

    GA{sub 4} is active in promoting elongation in cucumber (Cucuminus sativus) hypocotyls. Nuclei, isolated from the apical 1cm portion of the hypocotyl and purified on Percoll step gradients increased transcription (({sup 3}H)UTP incorporation into TCA precipitable products) in the presence of GA{sub 4} compared to untreated nuclei. This response was not observed in nuclei isolated from basal (nontarget) regions of the hypocotyl. Enhanced transcription in the presence of GA{sub 4} appears to be affected by proteinaceous factors which can be washed out of the nuclei. The GA{sub 4} induced response of cucumber hypocotyls is temperature sensitive; nuclei isolated from plants grown at 34C do not show the above GA{sub 4}-induced transcriptional enhancement. Comparison of 2-D flurograms of in vitro translation products synthesized from transcripts obtained from intact plants and isolated nuclei in the presence or absence of GA{sub 4} is currently in progress.

  4. The pH dependence of violaxanthin deepoxidation in isolated pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuendel, E.E.; Dilley, R.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The absorbance change at 505 nm was used to monitor the kinetics of violaxanthin deepoxidation in isolated pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts under dark conditions at various pH values. In long-term measurements (65 min) a fast and a slow exponential component of the 505-nm absorbance change could be resolved. The fast rate constant was up to 10 times higher than the slow rate constant. The asymptote value of the fast kinetic component was twice that of the slow component. The pH dependency of the parameters of the fast kinetic component was analyzed from pH 5.2 to pH 7.0. It was found that the asymptote value dropped slightly with increasing pH. The rate constant was zero at pH values greater than 6.3 and showed maximum values at pH values less than 5.8. Hill plot analysis revealed a strong positive cooperativity for the pH dependency of the fast rate constant (Hill coefficient n[sub H] = 5.3). The results are discussed with respect to published activity curves of violaxanthin deepoxidation. 23 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. [Isolation and in vitro translation of polysomes and the RNA matrix from gibberellic acid-treated etiolated dwarf pea shoots].

    PubMed

    Kilev, S N; Evtushenko, E V; Chekurov, V M; Mertvetsov, N P

    1983-08-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid (GA) on the size of polysomes (PS) and on the specific translation activity of epicotyl PS of two dwarf pea varieties was studied. It was shown that GA does not significantly alter the specific translation activity of PS and of mRNA isolated from dwarf pea epicotyl PS. Electrophoretic separation of the polypeptides synthesized in a cell-free protein-synthesizing system in PS of control and GA-treated shoots revealed no differences between them. Some minor qualitative and quantitative differences in the protein composition of the cytoplasm of control and hormone-treated shoots were found. Possible influence of GA on the composition of a definite class of mRNA and on posttranslational processing of plant proteins is discussed. PMID:6194827

  6. Transcription of the cauliflower mosaic virus genome in isolated nuclei from turnip leaves.

    PubMed

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1980-11-01

    Nuclei isolated from turnip (Brassica rapa L. c.v. Just Right) leaves infected with cauliflower mosaic virus synthesize RNA in vitro which hybridizes to purified cauliflower mosaic virus DNA. Nuclei isolated from uninfected leaves do not produce these viral transcripts in vitro. Viral-specific transcription in isolated nuclei is catalyzed by endogenous DNA-dependent RNA polymerase 11 based on sensitivity to alpha-amanitin and ionic strength optima. Only one strand of the viral genome is transcribed in vitro in isolated nuclei. The RNA synthesized in vitro hybridizes to the same strand and EcoRI restriction fragments of cauliflower mosaic virus DNA as the viral-specific RNA that accumulates in vivo in infected turnip leaves.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase cDNA clones isolated from pea cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Burgess, D; Penton, A; Dunsmuir, P; Dooner, H

    1997-02-01

    Three ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPG-PPase) cDNA clones have been isolated and characterized from a pea cotyledon cDNA library. Two of these clones (Psagps1 and Psagps2) encode the small subunit of ADPG-PPase. The deduced amino acid sequences for these two clones are 95% identical. Expression of these two genes differs in that the Psagps2 gene shows comparatively higher expression in seeds relative to its expression in other tissues. Psagps2 expression also peaks midway through seed development at a time in which Psagps1 transcripts are still accumulating. The third cDNA isolated (Psagp11) encodes the large subunit of ADPG-PPase. It shows greater selectivity in expression than either of the small subunit clones. It is highly expressed in sink organs (seed, pod, and seed coat) and undetectable in leaves.

  8. Characteristics of DNA replication in isolated nuclei initiated by an aprotinin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Hameed, M; Cohen, S

    1993-02-01

    Isolated cell nuclei were used as the source of template DNA to investigate the role of a cytosolic aprotinin-binding protein (ADR) in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. Computerized image cytometry demonstrated that the DNA content of individual nuclei increased significantly following incubation with ADR-containing preparations, and the extent of DNA synthesis is consistent with that allowed by the limiting concentration of dTTP. Thus, dTTP incorporation into isolated nuclei represents DNA synthesis and not parent strand repair. We found that dTTP incorporation into the isolated nuclei is dependent on DNA polymerase alpha (a principal polymerase in DNA replication) but that DNA polymerase beta (a principal polymerase in DNA repair processes) does not play a significant role in this system. Finally, neither aprotinin nor a previously described cytosolic ADR inhibitor can block the replication of nuclease-treated calf thymus DNA, while both strongly inhibit replication of DNA in isolated nuclei. This result, coupled with the relative ineffectiveness of nuclease-treated DNA compared with nuclear DNA to serve as a replicative template in this assay, argues against a significant contribution from repair or synthesis which initiates at a site of DNA damage. These data indicate that ADR-mediated incorporation of 3H-dTTP into isolated nuclei results from DNA replicative processes that are directly relevant to in vivo S phase events. PMID:7680045

  9. Isolation and transcript analysis of gibberellin 20-oxidase genes in pea and bean in relation to fruit development.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, J L; López-Diaz, I; Sánchez-Beltrán, M J; Phillips, A L; Ward, D A; Gaskin, P; Hedden, P

    1997-04-01

    PCR was used with degenerate primers based on conserved amino acid sequences in gibberellin (GA) 20-oxidases to isolate cDNA clones for these enzymes from young seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and developing embryos of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). One GA 20-oxidase cDNA (Ps27-12) was obtained from pea and three (Pv 15-11, Pv73-1 and Pv85-26) from bean. Their identities were confirmed by demonstrating that fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited GA 20-oxidase activity, converting [14C]GA12 to [14C]GA9. The intermediates in this three-step reaction, GA15 and GA24, were also identified as products. The expression proteins from three of the clones (Ps27-12, Pv15-11 and Pv73-1) were also shown to convert GA53 to GA20, as effectively as they did GA12. On the basis of transcript levels measured by northern blot analysis, the pea GA 20-oxidase gene is most highly expressed in young leaves, fully expanded internodes, very young seeds (until 4 days after anthesis) and expanding pods (from 3 days after anthesis at least until day 6). Expression in pods from 3-day-old unpollinated ovaries is higher than in those from pollinated ovaries. Treatment of unpollinated ovaries with GA3 to induce parthenocarpic fruit-set severely reduced the amount of GA 20-oxidase mRNA, whereas treatment with 2,4-D, although inducing fruit-set, did not reduce the levels of these transcripts. Plant decapitation above an unpollinated ovary resulted in very high levels of GA 20-oxidase mRNA in the pod. The three GA 20-oxidase genes from French bean showed very different patterns of expression: Pv 15-1 was expressed in the roots, young leaves, and developing seeds, but most highly in immature cotyledons, while Pv73-1 has a similar expression pattern to Ps27-12, with transcripts found only in young seeds and young leaves, where it was particularly abundant. Transcripts corresponding to Pv85-26 were detected in developing seeds, and just traces in the young leaves. Southern blot analysis

  10. Decreased ribonucleic acid synthesis in isolated rat liver nuclei during starvation

    PubMed Central

    Rickwood, D.; Klemperer, H. G.

    1970-01-01

    1. Isolated nuclei from starved rats showed a lowered incorporation of [14C]UMP into RNA. 2. The Mg2+-dependent incorporation was decreased by 30% after 1 day of starvation, but incorporation in the presence of Mn2+ and ammonium sulphate decreased only after longer periods of starvation. 3. RNA synthesis by nuclei in the presence of excess of added RNA polymerase was unchanged after 1 day of starvation and was inhibited by 20% after 4 days. 4. The capacity of nuclei to bind actinomycin D was unchanged after 1 day and was decreased by 20% after 4 days of starvation. PMID:5493859

  11. Lysis gradient centrifugation: a flexible method for the isolation of nuclei from primary cells.

    PubMed

    Katholnig, Karl; Poglitsch, Marko; Hengstschläger, Markus; Weichhart, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The isolation of nuclei from eukaryotic cells is essential for studying the composition and the dynamic changes of the nuclear proteome to gain insight into the mechanisms of gene expression and cell signalling. Primary cells are particularly challenging for standard nuclear isolation protocols due to low protein content, sample degradation, or nuclear clumping. Here, we describe a rapid and flexible protocol for the isolation of clean and intact nuclei, which results in the recovery of 90-95 % highly pure nuclei. The method, called lysis gradient centrifugation (LGC), is based on an iso-osmolar discontinuous iodixanol-based density gradient including a detergent-containing lysis layer. A single low g-force centrifugation step enables mild cell lysis and prevents extensive contact of the nuclei with the cytoplasmic environment. This fast method shows high reproducibility due to the relatively little cell manipulation required by the investigator. Further advantages are the low amount of starting material required, easy parallel processing of multiple samples, and isolation of nuclei and cytoplasm at the same time from the same sample.

  12. A scaffold-associated DNA region is located downstream of the pea plastocyanin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Slatter, R E; Dupree, P; Gray, J C

    1991-01-01

    Chromosomal scaffold-associated DNA has been isolated from pea leaf nuclei treated with lithium diiodosalicylate to remove histones and then digested with restriction enzymes to remove the DNA in chromosomal loops. A scaffold-associated region (SAR) of DNA has been identified 8 to 9 kb downstream of the single-copy pea plastocyanin gene in proximity to a repetitive sequence present in 300 copies in the pea haploid genome. Isolated restriction fragments from within the SAR can bind to scaffold preparations in a binding assay in vitro. The nucleotide sequence of the SAR indicates a 540-bp 77% A+T-rich region containing many sequence elements in common with SARs from other organisms. Sequences with homology to topoisomerase II binding sites, A-box and T-box sequences, and replication origins are present within this AT-rich region. PMID:1821767

  13. Transcriptional activities of the chloroplast-nuclei and proplastid-nuclei isolated from tobacco exhibit different sensitivities to tagetitoxin: implication of the presence of distinct RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sakai, A; Saito, C; Inada, N; Kuroiwa, T

    1998-09-01

    We examined the effects of tagetitoxin, a potent inhibitor of RNA polymerases from chloroplasts and Escherichia coli, on the transcriptional activities of chloroplast- and proplastid-nuclei (nucleoids) isolated from mature tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaves and cultured tobacco cells (line BY-2), respectively. Transcription by the isolated chloroplast-nuclei was effectively inhibited by tagetitoxin (95-99% reduction at 10 microM tagetitoxin), but transcription by the isolated proplastid-nuclei was only partially inhibited (40-50% reduction) by this compound. Southern hybridization experiments revealed that the transcription of various plastid genes (psbA, atpA, rpoB, psaA/B, atpB, rbcL, petB, rpl16, and rrn23) was sensitive to tagetitoxin in the isolated chloroplast-nuclei, whereas the transcription of the same genes was relatively resistant to this compound in the isolated proplastid-nuclei. These results suggest that; (i) distinct RNA polymerase activities with different sensitivities to tagetitoxin are present in plastids, (ii) a tagetitoxin-sensitive RNA polymerase is the major RNA polymerase in chloroplasts whereas a tagetitoxin-insensitive enzyme is major in proplastids, and (iii) both RNA polymerases can transcribe various plastid genes.

  14. Identification of a new pea gene, PsNlec1, encoding a lectin-like glycoprotein isolated from the symbiosomes of root nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Kardailsky, I V; Sherrier, D J; Brewin, N J

    1996-01-01

    A 27-kD glycoprotein antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody MAC266 was purified from isolated symbiosomes derived from pea (Pisum sativum) root nodules containing Rhizobium. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained, and the corresponding cDNA clone was isolated by a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy. The clone contained a single open reading frame, and the gene was termed PsNlec1. Phylogenetic analysis of 31 legume sequences showed that the PsNlec1 protein is related to the legume lectin family but belongs to a subgroup that is very different from pea seed lectin. Expression of the PsNlec1 transcript was much stronger in nodules than in other parts of the plant. It was found in both infected and uninfected cells in the central tissue of the nodule and in the stele of the root near the attachment point of the nodule. When uninfected pea seedlings were grown on medium containing nitrate, weak transcription of PsNlec1 was observed in the root system. The identification of PsNlec1 inside the symbiosome is consistent with the observation that legume lectins are generally vacuolar proteins that may serve as transient storage components. PMID:8685275

  15. Isolation of cell nuclei using inert macromolecules to mimic the crowded cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Ronald; Hadj-Sahraoui, Yasmina

    2009-10-23

    Cell nuclei are commonly isolated and studied in media which include millimolar concentrations of cations, which conserve the nuclear volume by screening the negative charges on chromatin and maintaining its compaction. However, two factors question if these ionic conditions correctly reproduce the environment of nuclei in vivo: the small-scale motion and conformation of chromatin in vivo are not reproduced in isolated nuclei, and experiments and theory suggest that small ions in the cytoplasm are not free in the soluble phase but are predominantly bound to macromolecules. We studied the possible role in maintaining the structure and functions of nuclei in vivo of a further but frequently overlooked property of the cytoplasm, the crowding or osmotic effects caused by diffusible macromolecules whose concentration, measured in several studies, is in the range of 130 mg/ml. Nuclei which conserved their volume in the cell and their ultrastructure seen by electron microscopy were released from K562 cells in media containing the inert polymer 70 kDa Ficoll (50% w/v) or 70 kDa dextran (35% w/v) to replace the diffusible cytoplasmic molecules which were dispersed on cell lysis with digitonin, with 100 microM K-Hepes buffer as the only source of ions. Immunofluorescence labelling and experiments using cells expressing GFP-fusion proteins showed that internal compartments (nucleoli, PML and coiled bodies, foci of RNA polymerase II) were conserved in these nuclei, and nascent RNA transcripts could be elongated. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that crowding by diffusible cytoplasmic macromolecules is a crucial but overlooked factor which supports the nucleus in vivo by equilibrating the opposing osmotic pressure cause by the high concentration of macromolecules in the nucleus, and suggest that crowded media provide more physiological conditions to study nuclear structure and functions. They may also help to resolve the long-standing paradox that the small

  16. Isolation of cell nuclei using inert macromolecules to mimic the crowded cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Ronald; Hadj-Sahraoui, Yasmina

    2009-01-01

    Cell nuclei are commonly isolated and studied in media which include millimolar concentrations of cations, which conserve the nuclear volume by screening the negative charges on chromatin and maintaining its compaction. However, two factors question if these ionic conditions correctly reproduce the environment of nuclei in vivo: the small-scale motion and conformation of chromatin in vivo are not reproduced in isolated nuclei, and experiments and theory suggest that small ions in the cytoplasm are not free in the soluble phase but are predominantly bound to macromolecules. We studied the possible role in maintaining the structure and functions of nuclei in vivo of a further but frequently overlooked property of the cytoplasm, the crowding or osmotic effects caused by diffusible macromolecules whose concentration, measured in several studies, is in the range of 130 mg/ml. Nuclei which conserved their volume in the cell and their ultrastructure seen by electron microscopy were released from K562 cells in media containing the inert polymer 70 kDa Ficoll (50% w/v) or 70 kDa dextran (35% w/v) to replace the diffusible cytoplasmic molecules which were dispersed on cell lysis with digitonin, with 100 microM K-Hepes buffer as the only source of ions. Immunofluorescence labelling and experiments using cells expressing GFP-fusion proteins showed that internal compartments (nucleoli, PML and coiled bodies, foci of RNA polymerase II) were conserved in these nuclei, and nascent RNA transcripts could be elongated. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that crowding by diffusible cytoplasmic macromolecules is a crucial but overlooked factor which supports the nucleus in vivo by equilibrating the opposing osmotic pressure cause by the high concentration of macromolecules in the nucleus, and suggest that crowded media provide more physiological conditions to study nuclear structure and functions. They may also help to resolve the long-standing paradox that the small

  17. An assessment of some methodological criticisms of studies of RNA efflux from isolated nuclei.

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S

    1983-09-15

    RNA efflux from isolated nuclei can be studied either as a means of elucidating the general mechanism of nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport, or as part of an investigation of the processing and utilization of particular gene transcripts. The present paper describes an assessment of three methodological criticisms of RNA-efflux measurements that are made for the former reason: for such measurements, it is sufficient to show that the post-incubation supernatant RNA is similar overall to homologous cytoplasmic mRNA, rather than to nuclear RNA, that is nevertheless of intranuclear origin, and that alterations to the medium during experiments do not markedly perturb this general nuclear restriction. The results seem to justify the following conclusions. (1) Although degradation of the nuclear RNA occurs during incubation in vitro, this process does not account for the appearance of RNA in the postnuclear supernatant. The degradation can be largely prevented by the addition of serine-proteinase inhibitors without altering the RNA efflux rate. (2) Some adsorption of labelled cytoplasmic RNA to the nuclear surface occurs during both isolation and incubation of the nuclei, and some desorption occurs during incubation. However, these effects introduce errors of less than 10% into the measurements of efflux rates. (3) Exogenous acidic polymers, including polyribonucleotides, disrupt nuclei and increase the apparent RNA efflux rate by causing leakage of nuclear contents. However, this effect can largely be overcome by including the nuclear stabilizers spermidine, Ca2+ and Mn2+ in the medium. In terms of this assessment, it appears that RNA efflux from isolated nuclei in media containing nuclear stabilizers serves as a reasonable model for transport in vivo.

  18. An assessment of some methodological criticisms of studies of RNA efflux from isolated nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Agutter, P S

    1983-01-01

    RNA efflux from isolated nuclei can be studied either as a means of elucidating the general mechanism of nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport, or as part of an investigation of the processing and utilization of particular gene transcripts. The present paper describes an assessment of three methodological criticisms of RNA-efflux measurements that are made for the former reason: for such measurements, it is sufficient to show that the post-incubation supernatant RNA is similar overall to homologous cytoplasmic mRNA, rather than to nuclear RNA, that is nevertheless of intranuclear origin, and that alterations to the medium during experiments do not markedly perturb this general nuclear restriction. The results seem to justify the following conclusions. (1) Although degradation of the nuclear RNA occurs during incubation in vitro, this process does not account for the appearance of RNA in the postnuclear supernatant. The degradation can be largely prevented by the addition of serine-proteinase inhibitors without altering the RNA efflux rate. (2) Some adsorption of labelled cytoplasmic RNA to the nuclear surface occurs during both isolation and incubation of the nuclei, and some desorption occurs during incubation. However, these effects introduce errors of less than 10% into the measurements of efflux rates. (3) Exogenous acidic polymers, including polyribonucleotides, disrupt nuclei and increase the apparent RNA efflux rate by causing leakage of nuclear contents. However, this effect can largely be overcome by including the nuclear stabilizers spermidine, Ca2+ and Mn2+ in the medium. In terms of this assessment, it appears that RNA efflux from isolated nuclei in media containing nuclear stabilizers serves as a reasonable model for transport in vivo. PMID:6194787

  19. ImmunoFISH on isolated nuclei from paraffin-embedded biopsy material.

    PubMed

    Tan, Soo-Yong; Mattsson, Goran

    2010-01-01

    The detection of genetic abnormalities in paraffin sections by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is widely used in clinical practice to detect amplification of the ERB2 gene in breast carcinoma and various chromosomal translocations in lymphomas and soft tissue tumors. However, interpretation of FISH signals in tissue sections may be difficult due to overlapping nuclei and nuclear truncation artifacts. Some of these shortcomings may be avoided by the use of isolated nuclear preparations. However, identification of cell populations may be difficult in detached cells removed from their histological context. We have described an optimized immunoFISH technique on isolated nuclear suspension, which combines the benefits of studying isolated cells derived from paraffin embedded tissues by FISH analysis with the ability to detect cell lineage and other markers by immunofluorescence.

  20. Isolation of PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 from etiolated pea epicotyls and their expression on a three-dimensional clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Hitotsubashi, Reiko; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Tanimoto, Eiichi; Ueda, Junichi

    We isolated novel cDNAs containing the complete open reading frames of a putative auxin influx carrier, PsAUX1, and a putative auxin efflux carrier, PsPIN2, from etiolated pea epicotyls. High levels of homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (Accession No. AY222857) and AtPINs. Phylogenetic analyses based on deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 and AtPIN7, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1. The results were similar for PsAUX1 and AtAUX1, where PsAUX1 belongs to the same subclade as AtAUX1 and CS-AUX1. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in pea epicotyl segments was promoted upon incubation of the segments with auxin (indole-3-acetic acid). In 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings, relatively high expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 was observed in the hook region, growing epicotyls and root tips as compared with those in mature regions of epicotyls and roots. Expression of PsPIN2 in roots was less than that in shoots. Simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat remarkably increased gene expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the hook and the internodes of pea epicotyls, but the increase in PsPIN2 was less. In contrast, polar auxin transport of pea epicotyls was substantially suppressed under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3D clinostat, similar to data from a space experiment on STS-95. These results suggest that PsPINs and PsAUX1 are auxin-inducible genes, and that the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 genes is sensitive to gravistimulation.

  1. Effects of zinc and cadmium on apoptotic DNA fragmentation in isolated bovine liver nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, R D; Beyersmann, D

    1994-01-01

    Isolated nuclei from mammalian cells contain a calcium-dependent endonuclease. The produced DNA fragmentation is a necessary step in the sequence of events resulting in apoptosis (programmed cell death). We report here that zinc and cadmium inhibit the calcium-dependent endonuclease. The essential metal ion zinc may counterbalance the calcium-mediated apoptosis. In contrast to zinc, cadmium alone stimulates the endonuclease by replacing calcium. Thus cadmium exerts a dual effect: micromolar concentrations inhibit the apoptotic endonuclease in the presence but activate the enzyme in the absence of calcium. Images Figure 2. PMID:7843111

  2. Non-nucleolar transcription complexes of rat liver as revealed by spreading isolated nuclei.

    PubMed

    Harper, F; Puvion-Dutilleul, F

    1979-12-01

    Miller's technique was applied to isolated nuclei of rat liver. Both the usual nucleolar and non-nucleolar transcription complexes were visualized. In addition, an unusual type of putative non-ribosomal transcription unit was revealed. It was charcaterized by a high density of the lateral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) fibrils. Although these particular units exhibited a regular increase of fibril lengths, the length of the transcript-covered deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) fibres and the morphological aspect of the RNP fibrils distinguished them from the nucleolar 'Christmas-tree'-like figures. The linear and granular configuration of the transcripts and the absence of terminal knobs made them similar to non-nucleolar nascent RNP fibrils.

  3. DNA and RNA polymerase activities of nuclei and hypotonic extracts of nuclei isolated from tomato golden mosaic virus infected tobacco leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Coutts, R H; Buck, K W

    1985-01-01

    Nuclei and hypotonically leached extracts of nuclei prepared from tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV)-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves have been used in in vitro DNA and RNA polymerisation reactions. The synthesis of virus-specific DNA was resistant to aphidicolin, sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide and dideoxy TTP, and stimulated by KC1 and ATP. Variably virion (+) and complementary (-) strand DNA of both the A and B genomic components were synthesised. Virus-specific RNA was synthesised in reactions which were initiated prior to nuclei isolation and leaching. From inhibitor studies and salt requirements RNA synthesis appeared to be catalysed by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase type II enzyme. Both components of the TGMV genome were transcribed in a bidirectional fashion with a prevalence in some experiments of transcripts derived from DNA component A. Images PMID:4069999

  4. Induction of DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei by cytoplasmic factors: inhibition by protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.L.; Gutowski, J.K.; Katz, M.; Goldfarb, R.H.; Cohen, S.

    1987-01-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts from spontaneously proliferating and mitogen-activated lymphoid cells contain a protein factor called ADR (activator of DNA replication) that induces DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. ADR-containing preparations have proteolytic activity, as indicated by their ability to degrade fibrin in a plasminogen-independent and plasminogen-dependent manner. In addition, aprotinin, a nonspecific protease inhibitor, abrogates ADR-induced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion. Preincubation studies demonstrated that the effect of aprotinin is not due to its suppressive effects on the nuclei themselves. Other protease inhibitors such as leupeptin, p-aminobenzamidine, and N-..cap alpha..-tosyllysine chloromethyl ketone are also inhibitory, but soybean trypsin inhibitor is without effect. ADR activity can be removed from active extracts by adsorption with aprotinin-conjugated agarose beads and can be recovered by elution with an acetate buffer (pH 5). These finding are consistent with the interpretation that the initiation of DNA synthesis in resting nuclei may be protease dependent and, further, that the cytoplasmic stimulatory factor the authors have called ADR may be a protease itself.

  5. Metabolism and possible compartmentalization of inositol lipids in isolated rat-liver nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Vann, L R; Wooding, F B; Irvine, R F; Divecha, N

    1997-01-01

    (1) The removal of the nuclear envelope from isolated rat-liver nuclei by washing with Triton X-100 (TX-100) was assessed by electron microscopy. All the envelope was removed by 0.04% (w/v) TX-100. (2) After this removal, phosphorylation of inositol lipids and diacylglycerol (DAG) from [gamma-32P]ATP still occurs, despite the near complete absence of detectable (by mass assay) DAG and PtdIns. This suggests that the majority of these two lipids in nuclei are present in the nuclear membrane, but the small amounts remaining after extraction, defined as intranuclear, are available for phosphorylation by lipid kinases (36% for DAG and 24% for PtdIns respectively, when expressed as a percentage of incorporation of intact nuclei). (3) PtdIns(4,5)P2 did not follow the same pattern as PtdIns and DAG; after removal of the nuclear membrane, 40% of the mass of this lipid was left in the nucleus. Moreover, a similar amount of PtdIns(4,5)P2 was also resistant to extraction with even higher concentrations of detergent, suggesting that PtdIns(4,5)P2 has a discrete intranuclear location, probably bound to nuclear proteins. (4) Addition of exogenous substrates, PtdIns, PtdIns(4)P and DAG, to membrane-depleted nuclei resulted in reconstitution of the majority of lipid phosphorylations from [gamma-32P]ATP (70%, 90% and 94% of intact nuclei respectively), suggesting a predominantly intranuclear location for the respective kinases. (5) Nuclei also showed phosphomonoesterase and phosphatidic acid hydrolase activity; dephosphorylation of pre-radiolabelled PtdIns(4)P, PtdIns(4,5)P2 and phosphatidic acid was observed when [gamma-32P]ATP was removed. However, some of the radioactivity was apparently resistant to these enzymes, suggesting the existence of multiple pools of these lipids. (6) Addition of excess non-radiolabelled ATP to nuclei pre-labelled with [gamma-32P]ATP resulted in an initial increase in the label in PtdIns(4,5)P2, implying a precursor-product relationship between the

  6. Rapid isolation of nuclei from living immune cells by a single centrifugation through a multifunctional lysis gradient.

    PubMed

    Poglitsch, Marko; Katholnig, Karl; Säemann, Marcus D; Weichhart, Thomas

    2011-10-28

    Due to their low protein content and limited nuclear detergent stability, primary human immune cells such as monocytes or T lymphocytes represent a great challenge for standard nuclear isolation protocols. Nuclei clumping during the multiple centrifugation steps or contamination of isolated nuclei with cytoplasmic proteins due to membrane lysis is a frequently observed problem. Here we describe a versatile and novel method for the isolation of clean and intact nuclei from primary human monocytes, which can be applied for virtually any cell type. Living cells were applied on an iso-osmolar discontinuous iodixanol-based density gradient including a detergent-containing lysis layer. Mild cell lysis as well as efficient washing of the nuclei was performed during the course of one single low g-force centrifugation step. The isolation procedure, which we call lysis gradient centrifugation (LGC), results in the recovery of 90-95% of highly pure nuclei. This easy and highly reproducible procedure allows an effective preparation of nuclei and the cytoplasm in only 15 min with the ability to handle as little as one million cells per sample and easy parallel processing of multiple samples.

  7. Characterization of adenovirus type 2 transcriptional complexes isolated from infected HeLa cell nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, J; Brison, O; Kedinger, C; Chambon, P

    1976-01-01

    HeLa cell nuclei, isolated 17 h after infection with human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2), were treated with 200 mM ammonium sulfate. The extract (S200 fraction) contained 50 to 70% of the nonintegrated Ad2 DNA, which was in the form of nucleoprotein complexes. These complexes contained native, intact Ad2 DNA (with the exception of replicative intermediates) and could be partially purified and resolved by velocity gradient centrifugation. Using high-salt (200 mM ammonium sulfate) incubation conditions, more than 95% of the nuclear RNA polymerase activity belonged to class B. About 45% of the class B enzyme molecules bound to DNA in the nuclei (those "engaged" in RNA synthesis) were released from the nuclei in the form of Ad2 transcriptional complexes by treatment with 200 mM ammonium sulfate. At least 90% of the RNA synthesized in high salt in the nuclei or in the S200 fraction was Ad2 specific, and essentially all of this RNA was complementary to the l strand of Ad2 DNA. These findings are compatible with what is known about Ad2-specific RNA synthesis in vivo. The analysis of the RNA synthesized from partially purified transcriptional complexes supports the contention that its transcription is almost entirely asymmetric, and that the asymmetry observed in vivo is not a consequence of the rapid degradation of h-strand transcripts. The RNA synthesized in vitro in the absence of detectable RNase activity sedimented with a maximum size of 35 to 40S. Less than 5% of the nuclear or the S200 fraction RNA polymerase activity was class C when assayed under non-reinitiating conditions. Although much of the RNA synthesized by the class C enzyme was Ad2 specific, 5.5S virus-associated RNA was not the predominant product. The isolation of Ad2 DNA transcriptional complexes provides an attractive system for further characterizing the Ad2 DNA template used for transcription and for studying the regulation of the expression of the Ad2 genome during the productive infection cycle. PMID

  8. Enzymatic protein hydrolysates from high pressure-pretreated isolated pea proteins have better antioxidant properties than similar hydrolysates produced from heat pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; Chao, Dongfang; Lin, Lin; He, Rong; Jung, Stephanie; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2015-12-01

    Isolated pea protein (IPP) dispersions (1%, w/v) were pretreated with high pressure (HP) of 200, 400, or 600 MPa for 5 min at 24 °C or high temperature (HT) for 30 min at 100 °C prior to hydrolysis with 1% (w/w) Alcalase. HP pretreatment of IPP at 400 and 600 MPa levels led to significantly (P<0.05) improved (>40%) oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) of hydrolysates. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide radical and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities of pea protein hydrolysates were also significantly (P<0.05) improved (25%, 20%, and 40%, respectively) by HP pretreatment of IPP. Protein hydrolysates from HT IPP showed no ORAC, superoxide or hydroxyl scavenging activity but had significantly (P<0.05) improved (80%) ferric reducing antioxidant power. The protein hydrolysates had weaker antioxidant properties than glutathione but overall, the HP pretreatment was superior to HT pretreatment in facilitating enzymatic release of antioxidant peptides from IPP.

  9. Isolated nuclei adapt to force and reveal a mechanotransduction pathway in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Guilluy, Christophe; Osborne, Lukas D; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Sharek, Lisa; Superfine, Richard; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Burridge, Keith

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical forces influence many aspects of cell behaviour. Forces are detected and transduced into biochemical signals by force-bearing molecular elements located at the cell surface, in adhesion complexes or in cytoskeletal structures. The nucleus is physically connected to the cell surface through the cytoskeleton and the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, allowing rapid mechanical stress transmission from adhesions to the nucleus. Although it has been demonstrated that nuclei experience force, the direct effect of force on the nucleus is not known. Here we show that isolated nuclei are able to respond to force by adjusting their stiffness to resist the applied tension. Using magnetic tweezers, we found that applying force on nesprin-1 triggers nuclear stiffening that does not involve chromatin or nuclear actin, but requires an intact nuclear lamina and emerin, a protein of the inner nuclear membrane. Emerin becomes tyrosine phosphorylated in response to force and mediates the nuclear mechanical response to tension. Our results demonstrate that mechanotransduction is not restricted to cell surface receptors and adhesions but can occur in the nucleus.

  10. Reproductive isolation between divergent races of pea aphids on two hosts. II. Selection against migrants and hybrids in the parental environments.

    PubMed

    Via, S; Bouck, A C; Skillman, S

    2000-10-01

    Sympatric races of pea aphids on alfalfa and red clover are highly ecologically specialized and significantly reproductively isolated. Much of the restriction of gene flow between the specialized populations is due to habitat choice behavior of the winged colonizers (Via 1999). Here, we document additional pre- and postmating reproductive isolation through selection against migrants and hybrids in the parental environments. First, a group of randomly chosen genotypes from each race that were experimentally migrated between hosts had very low survival and reproduction on the alternate host relative to genotypes originating from that host (natives). Such selection against cross-host migrants forms a premating barrier to gene flow because it is likely to reduce migrant frequencies before the sexual forms are induced in the fall. Our reciprocal transplant experiment also shows that natural selection acts directly on individual migrants between the crops to favor host choice behavior: genotypes from each host suffered large losses of fitness when forced to migrate to the alternate host plant relative to the fitness they would have enjoyed had they been able to choose their native host. In a companion field study, sequential sampling throughout the summer in newly colonized fields of both alfalfa and clover revealed a decrease in the frequency of host-specific marker alleles characteristic of the alternate crop. These field data further support the hypothesis that selection disfavors migrants that cross between crops. Second, when two sets of F1 hybrids between the races were reciprocally tested on alfalfa and clover, both sets had significantly lower average fitness than the specialized parent in each of the two environments. This demographic selection against hybrids in the parental environments is a source of postmating reproductive isolation between the specialized races. Finally, significant genetic variation in fitness traits was seen among F1 hybrid genotypes from

  11. Isolation of Arabidopsis nuclei and measurement of gene transcription rates using nuclear run-on assays.

    PubMed

    Folta, Kevin M; Kaufman, Lon S

    2006-01-01

    Isolation of transcriptionally active nuclei from plant tissues is a fundamental first step in many plant molecular biology protocols. Enriched nuclear fractions may be used in "run-on" assays to measure the rate of transcription for any given gene, adding additional resolution to assays of steady-state transcript accumulation such as RNA-gel blots, RT-PCR or microarrays. The protocols presented here streamline, adapt and optimize existing methods for use in Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant materials are ground in hexylene glycol-based buffers and highly enriched nuclear fractions are obtained using Percoll density gradients. Standard and small-scale protocols are presented, along with a tested method for nuclear run-on assays. The entire process may be completed within 3 days. This capability complements the immense body of steady-state transcript measurements and indirectly identifies instances where message turnover may have a critical and/or primary role in regulating gene expression levels.

  12. Organization of transcribed and nontranscribed chromatin in isolated nuclei of Zea mays root cells.

    PubMed

    Greimers, R; Deltour, R

    1981-02-01

    A slightly modified technique of Miller was applied to nuclei isolated from roots of germinating corn embryos. Under the conditions used, the extranucleolar chromatin was easily spread but the nucleolar chromatin often remained aggregated. The nontranscribed chromatin regions consisted of long deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) fibrils with the typical "beads-on-a-string" appearance of nucleosomal arrangement. When the EDTA concentration of the spreading medium was increased, linear arrangement of nucleosomes, 20 nm and 40-50 nm DNP granules were observed on the same DNP fibril. The supranucleosomal granules were also closely packed without any apparent order. Independently of the EDTA concentration, numerous non-nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (RNP) fibrils with a knobby structure were seen laterally bound to DNP fibrils. These knobby RNP fibrils (transcripts) were highly folded and appeared in "bunch-of-grapes" configurations. Each RNP knob measured 23 nm in diameter and the longest of these RNP fibrils were estimated to reach 1.5 micron. The RNP fibrils were often solitary and never exceeded 8 per 10 micron of the DNP axis. Distribution, morphology, and size of these transcripts distinguished them from the nucleolar "Christmas-tree"-like figures, which were rarely observed with our material. These non-nucleolar transcriptional units may correspond to genes coding for the heterodisperse nuclear RNA (hnRNA) and the knobs of 23 nm could be related to informofers or hnRNA particles. Up to now, the visualization of transcriptional units for higher plant tissues have never been reported.

  13. Comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of isolated nuclei and routine histological sections from paraffin-embedded prostatic adenocarcinoma specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, J.; Bostwick, D. G.; Takahashi, S.; Borell, T. J.; Brown, J. A.; Lieber, M. M.; Jenkins, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful tool for quantitative analysis of chromosomes and genes and can be applied in a variety of specimens, including cell cultures, isolated nuclei from fresh and fixed tissues, and histological tissue sections. However, the results of FISH analysis of isolated nuclei in prostate cancer have not been previously compared with those from histological sections from the paraffin-embedded tissue blocks. To compare these methods, we studied isolated nuclei derived from 50-microns sections and adjacent 5-microns tissue sections from 10 cases of benign nodular hyperplasia of the prostate and 16 cases of prostatic carcinoma. FISH analysis employed centromere-specific probes for chromosomes 7, 8, 11, and 12. In benign tissue, the percentage of nuclei with three or more signals for chromosomes 7, 8, 11, and 12 was less than 3% for both isolated nuclei and tissue sections. However, the percentage of nuclei with no and one signals was less than 8% for isolated nuclei and more than 24% for tissue sections. In prostatic carcinoma, numeric chromosomal anomalies were found in 75% of cases by both FISH methods. However, isolated nuclei had more chromosomal tetrasomy than tissue sections (mean, 9.2 to 11.0% versus 5.1 to 5.6%, respectively). Conversely, intratumor heterogeneity of chromosomal anomalies was identified in 5 cases by FISH analysis of tissue sections but not in isolated nuclei. Cancer ploidy analysis by FISH correlated well with ploidy analysis by flow cytometry, although FISH was more sensitive for aneuploidy. We conclude that FISH analysis of isolated nuclei and histological tissue sections from paraffin blocks are reliable methods for detection of chromosomal anomalies in archival tissue of prostate cancer, although each method has advantages and disadvantages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8863668

  14. Isolation of cell nuclei in microchannels by short-term chemical treatment via two-step carrier medium exchange.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Kaori; Yamada, Masumi; Seki, Minoru

    2012-08-01

    Separation/purification of nuclei from cells is a critical process required for medical and biochemical research applications. Here, we report a flow-through microfluidic device for isolating cell nuclei by selectively digesting the cell membrane by using the concept of hydrodynamic filtration (HDF). When a cell suspension is continuously introduced into a microchannel (main channel) possessing multiple side channels, cells flow through the main channel, whereas the carrier medium of the cells is drained through the side channels. Introductions of a cell treatment solution containing a surfactant and a washing buffer enable the two-step exchange of the carrier-medium and the cell treatment by the surfactant for a short span of time. The precise control of the treatment time by changing the flow rate and/or the size of the microchannel enables the selective digestion of cell membranes, resulting in the isolation of cell nuclei after separation from membrane debris and cytoplasmic components according to size. We examined several surfactant molecules and demonstrated that Triton X-100 exhibited high efficiency regarding nucleus isolation for both adherent (HeLa) and nonadherent (JM) cells, with a recovery ratio of ~80 %. In addition, the isolation efficiency was evaluated by western blotting. The presented flow-through microfluidic cell-nucleus separator may be a useful tool for general biological applications, because of its simplicity in operation, high reproducibility, and accuracy.

  15. [Transport of RNA from rat liver cell nuclei in vitro. Effect of superoxide dismutase on the release of rapidly labeled RNA from isolated nuclei].

    PubMed

    Koen, Ia M; Peskin, A V; Baru, V A; Fedorchenko, V V; Zbarskiĭ, I B; Konstantinov, A A

    1978-12-01

    Purified superoxide dismutase from beaf and rat liver cytosol was found to inhibit in vitro a release of the newly synthesized poly(A)-containing RNA from isolated hepatocyte nuclei in a cell-free system. The inhibition was concentration-dependent. Similar effect was observed with Cu2+ and coppertyrosine complex, which possess SOD-like type catalytic activity. The effectiveness of the complex and of Cu2+ however was an order smaller than that of SOD. The inhibitory effects of SOD and the two other copper-containing compounds could be abolished by potassium cyanide and reduced glutathione as far as by gomologous cytosol. Catalase failed to effect the RNA release. Although serum albumin itself did not affect release of RNA it was capable to abolish the inhibitory effects of Cu2+ and of copper-tyrosine, but not that of SOD. Possible mechanisms for the inhibitory effect of SOD on RNA transfer across the nuclear envelope are discussed. PMID:743506

  16. Influence of nucleotides, cations and nucleoside triphosphatase inhibitors on the release of ribonucleic acid from isolated rat liver nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Agutter, P S

    1980-01-01

    The reasons underlying reported discrepancies in the effects of ATP, ADP, adenosine 5'-[beta gamma-methylene]triphosphate, AMP + PPi, P-chloromercuribenzoate and F- on RNA efflux from isolated rat liver nuclei and on nuclear envelope nucleoside triphosphatase activity were investigated. The stimulatory effect of ADP was attributed to myokinase activity associated with the nuclei; this activity was eluted on repeated washing with nuclear incubation medium. In the absence of Ca2+ and Mn2+, ATP, adenosine 5'[beta gamma-methylene]triphosphate and AMP +PPi were found to promote release of both DNA and RNA. In the presence of 0.5 mM-Ca2+ and 9.3 mM-Mn2+, only ATP promoted RNA efflux to a significant extent. In the absence of spermidine, Ca2+ and Mn2+, nuclei released large quantities of DNA and RNA into the medium; this effect was promoted by p-chloromereuribenzoate. In the presence of the three cations, however, p-chloromercuribenzoate inhibited RNA efflux. F- caused a slight leakage of DNA from nuclei. The results are discussed in terms of models for the effects of ATP and analogues on RNA efflux and nuclear stability. PMID:6157391

  17. Influence of nucleotides, cations and nucleoside triphosphatase inhibitors on the release of ribonucleic acid from isolated rat liver nuclei.

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S

    1980-04-15

    The reasons underlying reported discrepancies in the effects of ATP, ADP, adenosine 5'-[beta gamma-methylene]triphosphate, AMP + PPi, P-chloromercuribenzoate and F- on RNA efflux from isolated rat liver nuclei and on nuclear envelope nucleoside triphosphatase activity were investigated. The stimulatory effect of ADP was attributed to myokinase activity associated with the nuclei; this activity was eluted on repeated washing with nuclear incubation medium. In the absence of Ca2+ and Mn2+, ATP, adenosine 5'[beta gamma-methylene]triphosphate and AMP +PPi were found to promote release of both DNA and RNA. In the presence of 0.5 mM-Ca2+ and 9.3 mM-Mn2+, only ATP promoted RNA efflux to a significant extent. In the absence of spermidine, Ca2+ and Mn2+, nuclei released large quantities of DNA and RNA into the medium; this effect was promoted by p-chloromereuribenzoate. In the presence of the three cations, however, p-chloromercuribenzoate inhibited RNA efflux. F- caused a slight leakage of DNA from nuclei. The results are discussed in terms of models for the effects of ATP and analogues on RNA efflux and nuclear stability.

  18. Effects of cholesterol on the properties of the membranes of isolated sheep liver nuclei and nuclear envelopes.

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S; Suckling, K E

    1981-04-22

    The exchangeability of cholesterol between sheep liver nuclear membranes and liposomes, and the effect of cholesterol on the fluidity of the membrane lipid were studied. In intact nuclei, the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio increased from 0.102 to 0.145 mol/mol on incubation with cholesterol-rich liposomes, with a time for half-maximal uptake of 4.2 h. In isolated envelopes under the same conditions, the ratio increased from 0.110 to 0.266 mol/mol with a time for half-maximal uptake of about 1.9 h. Moreover, the approximate order parameter of the spin label 5-(N-oxyl-4',4'-dimethyloxazolidino)-stearic acid was 0.677 in intact nuclei and 0.723 in isolated envelopes prior to exchange; after exchange, these values increased to 0.717 and 0.756, respectively. These differences between the preparations could not be attributed to differences in the capacity for cholesterol uptake between the two nuclear membranes, or to a slow rate of exchange between them; the presence of an intact nuclear matrix appeared both to disorder the lipid partially and to inhibit cholesterol uptake. The differences indicate that conclusions based on physical studies of the membrane lipid in isolated envelopes are not necessarily applicable to the intact nucleus.

  19. In vitro secondary activation (memory effect) of avian vitellogenin II gene in isolated liver nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Jost, J P; Moncharmont, B; Jiricny, J; Saluz, H; Hertner, T

    1986-01-01

    The vitellogenin II gene is specifically reactivated in vitro (secondary stimulation, memory effect) in purified liver nuclei that had ceased to express the gene in vivo a month after the roosters had received a single injection of estradiol (primary stimulation). The in vitro reactivation depends on the addition to the nuclei of nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts from estradiol-stimulated livers, polyamines (0.1-1.0 mM), and calmodulin (0.1 mM). Under identical incubation conditions the vitellogenin gene could not be reactivated in oviduct, embryonic, and immature chicken liver nuclei. Two other genes, those for ovalbumin and lysozyme, which are regulated by estradiol in the oviduct, could not be activated in the liver nuclei. The correct initiation of vitellogenin gene transcription in the liver nuclei was tested by primer extension studies. Addition of the antiestrogen tamoxifen (0.1 microM) to the system decreased vitellogenin mRNA synthesis by about 45% without affecting total RNA synthesis. Addition of quercetin (0.1 mM) and trans-flupenthixol (0.2 mM), inhibitors of nuclear protein kinase II and calmodulin-dependent kinase, respectively, inhibited the synthesis of vitellogenin mRNA by about 55% without affecting total RNA synthesis. The inhibitory effects of the antiestrogen and the kinase inhibitors were not additive, suggesting that both classes of inhibitor act on the same target or related targets. Depleting the estradiol receptors from the cell and nuclear extracts by means of estradiol-receptor antibodies covalently bound to Matrex beads reduced the stimulation of the vitellogenin gene by 40%. We conclude that in addition to the estradiol receptor and phosphorylation of nuclear protein(s) there are additional factors responsible for the in vitro secondary activation of the avian vitellogenin II gene. Images PMID:3455757

  20. Resistance to moist conditions of whey protein isolate and pea starch biodegradable films and low density polyethylene nondegradable films: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehyar, G. F.; Bawab, A. Al

    2015-10-01

    Biodegradable packaging materials are degraded under the natural environmental conditions. Therefore using them could alleviate the problem of plastics accumulation in nature. For effective replacement of plastics, with biodegradable materials, biodegradable packages should keep their properties under the high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Therefore the objectives of the study were to develop biodegradable packaging material based on whey protein isolate (WPI) and pea starch (PS). To study their mechanical, oxygen barrier and solubility properties under different RHs compared with those of low density polyethylene (LDPE), the most used plastic in packaging. Films of WPI and PS were prepared separately and conditioned at different RH (30-90%) then their properties were studied. At low RHs (<50%), WPI films had 2-3 times lower elongation at break (E or stretchability) than PS and LDPE. Increasing RH to 90% significantly (P<0.01) increased the elongation of PS but not WPI and LDPE films. LDPE and WPI films kept significantly (P<0.01) higher tensile strength (TS) than PS films at high RH (90%). Oxygen permeability (OP) of all films was very low (<0.5 cm3 μm m-2 d-1 kPa-1) below 40% RH but increased for PS films and became significantly (P<0.01) different than that of LDPE and WPI at > 40% RH. Oxygen permeability of WPI and LDPE did not adversely affected by increasing RH to 65%. Furthermore, WPI and LDPE films had lower degree of hydration at 50% and 90% RH and total soluble matter than PS films. These results suggest that WPI could be successfully replacing LDPE in packaging of moist products.

  1. Improved technique for fluorescence in situ hybridisation analysis of isolated nuclei from archival, B5 or formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Schurter, M J; LeBrun, D P; Harrison, K J

    2002-04-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is an effective method to detect chromosomal alterations in a variety of tissue types, including archived paraffin wax embedded specimens fixed in B5 or formalin. However, precipitating fixatives such as B5 have been known to produce unsatisfactory results in comparison with formalin when used for FISH. This study describes an effective nuclear isolation and FISH procedure for B5 and formalin fixed tissue, optimising the nuclear isolation step and nuclei pretreatments using tonsil and mantle cell lymphoma specimens. The protocol presented can be used to isolate nuclei and perform FISH on B5 or formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded samples from a variety of tissue types.

  2. Inhibition of ribonucleic acid efflux from isolated SV40-3T3 cell nuclei by 3'-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin).

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S; McCaldin, B

    1979-05-15

    The effect of 3'-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin) on mRNA efflux from isolated SV40-3T3 cell nuclei has been studied and compared with its effect on the nucleoside triphosphatase activity in the isolated nuclear envelope. Inhibition of mRNA efflux occurs rapidly, but is dependent on the presence of ATP. Half-maximal inhibition occurs with 40 microM-cordycepin. The effect is not simulated by 2'-deoxyadenosine or by actinomycin D, and adenosine provides a substantial degree of protection against it. Cordycepin does not directly inhibit the nucleoside triphosphatase. The stimulation of this enzyme by poly(A) is not affected unless the poly(A) and cordycepin are incubated together with nuclear lysate in the presence of ATP; in this case the stimulation is significantly reduced. Possible interpretations of these results and their relevance for understanding the system in vivo for nucleo-cytoplasmic messenger transport are discussed.

  3. Inhibition of ribonucleic acid efflux from isolated SV40-3T3 cell nuclei by 3'-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin).

    PubMed Central

    Agutter, P S; McCaldin, B

    1979-01-01

    The effect of 3'-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin) on mRNA efflux from isolated SV40-3T3 cell nuclei has been studied and compared with its effect on the nucleoside triphosphatase activity in the isolated nuclear envelope. Inhibition of mRNA efflux occurs rapidly, but is dependent on the presence of ATP. Half-maximal inhibition occurs with 40 microM-cordycepin. The effect is not simulated by 2'-deoxyadenosine or by actinomycin D, and adenosine provides a substantial degree of protection against it. Cordycepin does not directly inhibit the nucleoside triphosphatase. The stimulation of this enzyme by poly(A) is not affected unless the poly(A) and cordycepin are incubated together with nuclear lysate in the presence of ATP; in this case the stimulation is significantly reduced. Possible interpretations of these results and their relevance for understanding the system in vivo for nucleo-cytoplasmic messenger transport are discussed. PMID:226073

  4. Accurate transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II in a soluble extract from isolated mammalian nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Dignam, J D; Lebovitz, R M; Roeder, R G

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for preparing extracts from nuclei of human tissue culture cells that directs accurate transcription initiation in vitro from class II promoters. Conditions of extraction and assay have been optimized for maximum activity using the major late promoter of adenovirus 2. The extract also directs accurate transcription initiation from other adenovirus promoters and cellular promoters. The extract also directs accurate transcription initiation from class III promoters (tRNA and Ad 2 VA). Images PMID:6828386

  5. Pea weevil damage and chemical characteristics of pea cultivars determining their resistance to Bruchus pisorum L.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, I

    2016-04-01

    Bruchus pisorum (L.) is one of the most intractable pest problems of cultivated pea in Europe. Development of resistant cultivars is very important to environmental protection and would solve this problem to a great extent. Therefore, the resistance of five spring pea cultivars was studied to B. pisorum: Glyans, Modus; Kamerton and Svit and Pleven 4 based on the weevil damage and chemical composition of seeds. The seeds were classified as three types: healthy seeds (type one), damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence holes (type two) and damaged seeds with bruchid emergence holes (type three). From visibly damaged pea seeds by pea weevil B. pisorum was isolated the parasitoid Triaspis thoracica Curtis (Hymenoptera, Braconidae). Modus, followed by Glyans was outlined as resistant cultivars against the pea weevil. They had the lowest total damaged seed degree, loss in weight of damaged seeds (type two and type three) and values of susceptibility coefficients. A strong negative relationship (r = -0.838) between the weight of type one seeds and the proportion of type three seeds was found. Cultivars with lower protein and phosphorus (P) content had a lower level of damage. The crude protein, crude fiber and P content in damaged seeds significantly or no significantly were increased as compared with the healthy seeds due to weevil damage. The P content had the highest significant influence on pea weevil infestation. Use of chemical markers for resistance to the creation of new pea cultivars can be effective method for defense and control against B. pisorum. PMID:26837535

  6. RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei of lactating mammary cells in presence of unmodified and mercury-labeled CTP.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R; Banerjee, M R

    1978-01-01

    Isolated nuclei of lactating mouse mammary gland were capable of supporting DNA-dependent RNA synthesis in vitro in presence of unmodified and mercurated CTP (Hg-CTP) at high ionic condition at 25 degrees C. In presence of unmodified CTP, [3H]UMP incorporation into RNA increased linearly upto 180 min. The kinetic pattern of the reaction and the rate of RNA synthesis were essentially similar when CTP was replaced by Hg-CTP. Both in unmodified and Hg-CTP containing reactions, 70-80% of RNA synthesis was inhibited by alpha-amanitin. Presence of poly(A) in a small portion of the in vitro synthesized messenger-like RNA was detectable by oligo(dT) cellulose chromatography. Both poly(A)+ and poly(A)- RNAs sedimented with a clear peak around 15S region in a formamide-sucrose denaturing gradient. The Hg-RNA after separation from endogenous nuclear RNA by SH-agarose affinity column chromatography also sedimented around 15S region in a formamide-sucrose gradient. The Hg-RNA synthesized in the isolated mammary cell nuclei in vitro should now permit monitoring hormonal regulation of specific gene (casein) transcription in the mammary cells by molecular hybridization of the Hg-RNA with cDNA to casein mRNA. PMID:724523

  7. Generation of hydroxyl radical in isolated pea root cell wall, and the role of cell wall-bound peroxidase, Mn-SOD and phenolics in their production.

    PubMed

    Kukavica, Biljana; Mojovic, Milos; Vuccinic, Zeljko; Maksimovic, Vuk; Takahama, Umeo; Jovanovic, Sonja Veljovic

    2009-02-01

    The hydroxyl radical produced in the apoplast has been demonstrated to facilitate cell wall loosening during cell elongation. Cell wall-bound peroxidases (PODs) have been implicated in hydroxyl radical formation. For this mechanism, the apoplast or cell walls should contain the electron donors for (i) H(2)O(2) formation from dioxygen; and (ii) the POD-catalyzed reduction of H(2)O(2) to the hydroxyl radical. The aim of the work was to identify the electron donors in these reactions. In this report, hydroxyl radical (.OH) generation in the cell wall isolated from pea roots was detected in the absence of any exogenous reductants, suggesting that the plant cell wall possesses the capacity to generate .OH in situ. Distinct POD and Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) isoforms different from other cellular isoforms were shown by native gel electropho-resis to be preferably bound to the cell walls. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of cell wall isolates containing the spin-trapping reagent, 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO), was used for detection of and differentiation between .OH and the superoxide radical (O(2)(-).). The data obtained using POD inhibitors confirmed that tightly bound cell wall PODs are involved in DEPMPO/OH adduct formation. A decrease in DEPMPO/OH adduct formation in the presence of H(2)O(2) scavengers demonstrated that this hydroxyl radical was derived from H(2)O(2). During the generation of .OH, the concentration of quinhydrone structures (as detected by EPR spectroscopy) increased, suggesting that the H(2)O(2) required for the formation of .OH in isolated cell walls is produced during the reduction of O(2) by hydroxycinnamic acids. Cell wall isolates in which the proteins have been denaturated (including the endogenous POD and SOD) did not produce .OH. Addition of exogenous H(2)O(2) again induced the production of .OH, and these were shown to originate from the Fenton reaction with tightly bound metal ions

  8. Enzymatic properties of viral replication complexes isolated from adenovirus type 2-infected HeLa cell nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Brison, O; Kedinger, C; Wilhelm, J

    1977-01-01

    When HeLa cell nuclei, isolated 17 h after infection with adenovirus type 2 (Ad2), were extracted with 200 mM ammonium sulfate, Ad2 nucleoprotein complexes were selectively released. These complexes contained a DNA polymerase activity that corresponded to DNA polymerase molecules actively engaged in Ad2 DNA replication. Under our high-salt (200 mM ammonium sulfate) incubation conditions, where no reinitiation occurred, full-length Ad2 DNA chains were synthesized by elongation of chains that had been initiated in vivo. This conclusion was further supported by density labeling experiments indicating that the in vitro DNA synthesis was semiconservative. Evidence is presented suggesting that at least part of the DNA polymerase molecules engaged in Ad2 DNA replication belong to the gamma class. PMID:916022

  9. Concentrations of long-chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins during fatty acid synthesis by chloroplasts isolated from pea (Pisum sativum), safflower (Carthamus tinctoris), and amaranthus (Amaranthus lividus) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Roughan, G.; Nishida, I. )

    1990-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis from (1-14C)acetate by chloroplasts isolated from peas and amaranthus was linear for at least 15 min, whereas incorporation of the tracer into long-chain acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) did not increase after 2-3 min. When reactions were transferred to the dark after 3-5 min, long-chain acyl-ACPs lost about 90% of their radioactivity and total fatty acids retained all of theirs. Half-lives of the long-chain acyl-ACPs were estimated to be 10-15 s. Concentrations of palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-ACP as indicated by equilibrium labeling during steady-state fatty acid synthesis, ranged from 0.6-1.1, 0.2-0.7, and 0.4-1.6 microM, respectively, for peas and from 1.6-1.9, 1.3-2.6, and 0.6-1.4 microM, respectively, for amaranthus. These values are based on a chloroplast volume of 47 microliters/mg chlorophyll and varied according to the mode of the incubation. A slow increase in activity of the fatty acid synthetase in safflower chloroplasts resulted in long-chain acyl-ACPs continuing to incorporate labeled acetate for 10 min. Upon re-illumination following a dark break, however, both fatty acid synthetase activity and acyl-ACP concentrations increased very rapidly. Palmitoyl-ACP was present at concentrations up to 2.5 microM in safflower chloroplasts, whereas those of stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACPs were in the lower ranges measured for peas. Acyl-ACPs were routinely separated from extracts of chloroplasts that had been synthesising long-chain fatty acids from labeled acetate by a minor modification of the method of Mancha et al. The results compared favorably with those obtained using alternative analytical methods such as adsorption to filter paper and partition chromatography on silicic acid columns.

  10. Monitoring UVR induced damage in single cells and isolated nuclei using SR-FTIR microspectroscopy and 3D confocal Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Lipiec, Ewelina; Bambery, Keith R; Heraud, Philip; Kwiatek, Wojciech M; McNaughton, Don; Tobin, Mark J; Vogel, Christian; Wood, Bayden R

    2014-09-01

    SR-FTIR in combination with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to investigate macromolecular changes in a population of melanocytes and their extracted nuclei induced by environmentally relevant fluxes of UVR (Ultraviolet Radiation). Living cells and isolated cellular nuclei were investigated post-irradiation for three different irradiation dosages (130, 1505, 15,052 Jm(-2) UVR, weighted) after either 24 or 48 hours of incubation. DNA conformational changes were observed in cells exposed to an artificial UVR solar-simulator source as evidenced by a shift in the DNA asymmetric phosphodiester vibration from 1236 cm(-1) to 1242 cm(-1) in the case of the exposed cells and from 1225 cm(-1) to 1242 cm(-1) for irradiated nuclei. PCA Scores plots revealed distinct clustering of spectra from irradiated cells and nuclei from non-irradiated controls in response to the range of applied UVR radiation doses. 3D Raman confocal imaging in combination with k-means cluster analysis was applied to study the effect of the UVR radiation exposure on cellular nuclei. Chemical changes associated with apoptosis were detected and included intra-nuclear lipid deposition along with chromatin condensation. The results reported here demonstrate the utility of SR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy to probe in situ DNA damage in cell nuclei resulting from UVR exposure. These results are in agreement with the increasing body of evidence that lipid accumulation is a characteristic of aggressive cancer cells, and are involved in the production of membranes for rapid cell proliferation.

  11. Multi-wavelength properties and smbh's masses of the isolated galaxies with active nuclei in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, Iryna; Vasylenko, Anatolij; Babyk, Iuri; Pulatova, Nadya

    2016-07-01

    We apply the specially-oriented Astro-Space databases obtained with ground-based telescopes and space observatories to study the multi-wavelength spectral and physical properties of galaxies with active nuclei (AGNs), namely of isolated AGNs that are poorly investigated especially in X-rays. Such a study allowed us 1) to separate the internal evolution mechanisms from the environment influence and consider them as two separate processes related to fueling nuclear activity, 2) to explore absorption features and the X-ray continuum radiation from accretion disks around SMBHs (e.g. to select accretion models). In the case of detecting the Fe K emission line, it was possible to analyze the physical conditions in the AGNs innermost parts in more details. Using the SDSS spectral Hβ-line data we were able to estimate the SMBH masses of several isolated AGNs in the Local Universe, which are systematically lower than the SMBH masses of AGNs located in a dense environment. We present also the results of analysis of the spectral data obtained by XMM-Newton, Swift, Chandra, and INTEGRAL space observatories for several isolated AGNs from 2MIG catalogue, for which the available X-ray data were accessed. Among these objects are CGCG 179-005, NGC 6300, NGC 1050, NGC 2989, WKK 3050, ESO 438-009, ESO 317-038 and others. We determined corresponding spectral models and values of their parameters (spectral index, intrinsic absorption etc.). X-ray spectra for bright galaxies, NGC 6300 and Circinus, were analyzed up to 250 keV and their characteristics of emission features were determined in 6-7 keV range.

  12. A single, plastic population of Mycosphaerella pinodes causes ascochyta blight on winter and spring peas (Pisum sativum) in France.

    PubMed

    Le May, Christophe; Guibert, Michèle; Leclerc, Aurélie; Andrivon, Didier; Tivoli, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Plant diseases are caused by pathogen populations continuously subjected to evolutionary forces (genetic flow, selection, and recombination). Ascochyta blight, caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes, is one of the most damaging necrotrophic pathogens of field peas worldwide. In France, both winter and spring peas are cultivated. Although these crops overlap by about 4 months (March to June), primary Ascochyta blight infections are not synchronous on the two crops. This suggests that the disease could be due to two different M. pinodes populations, specialized on either winter or spring pea. To test this hypothesis, 144 pathogen isolates were collected in the field during the winter and spring growing seasons in Rennes (western France), and all the isolates were genotyped using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Furthermore, the pathogenicities of 33 isolates randomly chosen within the collection were tested on four pea genotypes (2 winter and 2 spring types) grown under three climatic regimes, simulating winter, late winter, and spring conditions. M. pinodes isolates from winter and spring peas were genetically polymorphic but not differentiated according to the type of cultivars. Isolates from winter pea were more pathogenic than isolates from spring pea on hosts raised under winter conditions, while isolates from spring pea were more pathogenic than those from winter pea on plants raised under spring conditions. These results show that disease developed on winter and spring peas was initiated by a single population of M. pinodes whose pathogenicity is a plastic trait modulated by the physiological status of the host plant.

  13. Inhibition of DNA fragmentation in thymocytes and isolated thymocyte nuclei by agents that stimulate protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    McConkey, D J; Hartzell, P; Jondal, M; Orrenius, S

    1989-08-15

    Glucocorticoid hormones and Ca2+ ionophores stimulate a suicide process in immature thymocytes, known as apoptosis or programmed cell death, that involves extensive DNA fragmentation. We have recently shown that a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration stimulates DNA fragmentation and cell killing in glucocorticoid- or ionophore-treated thymocytes. However, a sustained increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ level also mediates lymphocyte proliferation, suggesting that apoptosis is blocked in proliferating thymocytes. In this study we report that phorbol esters, which selectively stimulate protein kinase C (PKC), blocked DNA fragmentation and cell death in thymocytes exposed to Ca2+ ionophore or glucocorticoid hormone. The T cell mitogen, concanavalin A, which stimulates thymocytes by a mechanism that involves PKC activation, caused concentration-dependent increases in the cytosolic Ca2+ level that did not result in DNA fragmentation, but incubation with concanavalin A and the PKC inhibitor H-7 (1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine) resulted in both DNA fragmentation and cell death. Phorbol ester directly inhibited Ca2+-dependent DNA fragmentation in isolated thymocyte nuclei. Our results strongly suggest that PKC activation blocks thymocyte apoptosis by preventing Ca2+-stimulated endonuclease activation. PMID:2503500

  14. Spermine stimulation of a nuclear NII kinase from pea plumules and its role in the phosphorylation of a nuclear polypeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, N.; Schell, M. B.; Roux, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that spermine stimulates the phosphorylation of a 47 kilodalton nuclear polypeptide from pea plumules (N Datta, LK Hardison, SJ Roux 1986 Plant Physiol 82: 681-684). In this paper we report that spermine stimulates the activity of a cyclic AMP independent casein kinase, partially purified from a chromatin fraction of pea plumule nuclei. This effect of spermine was substrate specific; i.e. with casein as substrate, spermine stimulated the kinase activity, and with phosvitin as substrate, spermine completely inhibited the activity. The stimulation by spermine of the casein kinase was, in part, due to the lowering of the Mg2+ requirement of the kinase. Heparin could partially inhibit this casein kinase activity and spermine completely overcame this inhibition. By further purification of the casein kinase extract on high performance liquid chromatography, we fractionated it into an NI and an NII kinase. Spermine stimulated the NII kinase by 5- to 6-fold but had no effect on the NI kinase. Using [gamma-32P]GTP, we have shown that spermine promotes the phosphorylation of the 47 kilodalton polypeptide(s) in isolated nuclei, at least in part by stimulating an NII kinase.

  15. Pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea belongs to the Leguminosae plant family, the third largest flowering plant family with 800 genera and over 18,000 species. Tribe Fabeae is considered one of the youngest groups in the legumes and Bayesian molecular clock and ancestral range analysis suggest a crown age of 23 – 16 Mya, in the mi...

  16. Immunological and biochemical evidence for nuclear localization of annexin in peas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    Immunofluorescent localization of annexins using an anti-pea annexin polyclonal antibody (anti-p35) in pea (Pisum sativum) leaf and stem epidermal peels showed staining of the nuclei and the cell periphery. Nuclear staining was also seen in cell teases prepared from pea plumules. The amount of nuclear stain was reduced both by fixation time and by dehydration and organic solvent treatment. Observation with confocal microscopy demonstrated that the anti-p35 stain was diffusely distributed throughout the nuclear structure. Immunoblots of purified nuclei, nuclear envelope matrix, nucleolar, and chromatin fractions showed a cross-reactive protein band of 35 kDa. These data are the first to show annexins localized in plant cell nuclei where they may play a role in nuclear function.

  17. Attraction of pea moth Cydia nigricana to pea flower volatiles.

    PubMed

    Thöming, Gunda; Knudsen, Geir K

    2014-04-01

    The pea moth Cydia nigricana causes major crop losses in pea (Pisum sativum) production. We investigated attraction of C. nigricana females to synthetic pea flower volatiles in a wind tunnel and in the field. We performed electroantennogram analysis on 27 previously identified pea plant volatiles, which confirmed antennal responses to nine of the compounds identified in pea flowers. A dose-dependent response was found to eight of the compounds. Various blends of the nine pea flower volatiles eliciting antennal responses were subsequently studied in a wind tunnel. A four-compound blend comprising hexan-1-ol, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-β-ocimene and (E)-β-ocimene was equally attractive to mated C. nigricana females as the full pea flower mimic blend. We conducted wind-tunnel tests on different blends of these four pea flower compounds mixed with a headspace sample of non-flowering pea plants. By considering the effects of such green leaf background odour, we were able to identify (Z)- and (E)-β-ocimene as fundamental for host location by the pea moths, and hexan-1-ol and (E)-2-hexen-1-ol as being of secondary importance in that context. In the field, the two isomers of β-ocimene resulted in trap catches similar to those obtained with the full pea flower mimic and the four-compound blend, which clearly demonstrated the prime significance of the β-ocimenes as attractants of C. nigricana. The high level of the trap catches of female C. nigricana noted in this first field experiment gives a first indication of the potential use of such artificial kairomones in pea moth control.

  18. THE ORIGIN AND OPTICAL DEPTH OF IONIZING RADIATION IN THE 'GREEN PEA' GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    Although Lyman-continuum (LyC) radiation from star-forming galaxies likely drove the reionization of the universe, observations of star-forming galaxies at low redshift generally indicate low LyC escape fractions. However, the extreme [O III]/[O II] ratios of the z = 0.1-0.3 Green Pea galaxies may be due to high escape fractions of ionizing radiation. To analyze the LyC optical depths and ionizing sources of these rare, compact starbursts, we compare nebular photoionization and stellar population models with observed emission lines in the Peas' Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. We focus on the six most extreme Green Peas, the galaxies with the highest [O III]/[O II] ratios and the best candidates for escaping ionizing radiation. The Balmer line equivalent widths and He I {lambda}3819 emission in the extreme Peas support young ages of 3-5 Myr, and He II {lambda}4686 emission in five extreme Peas signals the presence of hard ionizing sources. Ionization by active galactic nuclei or high-mass X-ray binaries is inconsistent with the Peas' line ratios and ages. Although stacked spectra reveal no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features, we tentatively detect WR features in the SDSS spectra of three extreme Peas. Based on the Peas' ages and line ratios, we find that WR stars, chemically homogeneous O stars, or shocks could produce the observed He II emission. If hot stars are responsible, then the Peas' optical depths are ambiguous. However, accounting for emission from shocks lowers the inferred optical depth and suggests that the Peas may be optically thin. The Peas' ages likely optimize the escape of LyC radiation; they are old enough for supernovae and stellar winds to reshape the interstellar medium, but young enough to possess large numbers of UV-luminous O or WR stars.

  19. Cyanide-insensitive Respiration in Pea Cotyledons.

    PubMed

    James, T W; Spencer, M S

    1979-09-01

    Mitochondria isolated by a zonal procedure from the cotyledons of germinating peas possessed a cyanide-resistant respiration. This respiration was virtually absent in mitochondria isolated during the first 24 hours of germination but thereafter increased gradually until the 6th or 7th day of seedling development. At this time between 15 and 20% of the succinate oxidation was not inhibited by cyanide. The activity of the cyanide-resistant respiration was also determined in the absence of cyanide. Relationships among mitochondrial structure, cyanide-resistant respiration, and seedling development are discussed.

  20. ORC-dependent and origin-specific initiation of DNA replication at defined foci in isolated yeast nuclei.

    PubMed

    Pasero, P; Braguglia, D; Gasser, S M

    1997-06-15

    We describe an in vitro replication assay from yeast in which the addition of intact nuclei to an S-phase nuclear extract results in the incorporation of deoxynucleotides into genomic DNA at spatially discrete foci. When BrdUTP is substituted for dTTP, part of the newly synthesized DNA shifts to a density on CsCl gradients, indicative of semiconservative replication. Initiation occurs in an origin-specific manner and can be detected in G1- or S-phase nuclei, but not in G2-phase or mitotic nuclei. The S-phase extract contains a heat- and 6-DMAP-sensitive component necessary to promote replication in G1-phase nuclei. Replication of nuclear DNA is blocked at the restrictive temperature in an orc2-1 mutant, and the inactive Orc2p cannot be complemented in trans by an extract containing wild-type ORC. The initiation of DNA replication in cln-deficient nuclei blocked in G1 indicates that the ORC-dependent prereplication complex is formed before Start. This represents the first nonviral and nonembryonic replication system in which DNA replication initiates in an ORC-dependent and origin-specific manner in vitro. PMID:9203578

  1. Characterization of two brassinosteroid C-6 oxidase genes in pea.

    PubMed

    Jager, Corinne E; Symons, Gregory M; Nomura, Takahito; Yamada, Yumiko; Smith, Jennifer J; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Weller, James L; Yokota, Takao; Reid, James B

    2007-04-01

    C-6 oxidation genes play a key role in the regulation of biologically active brassinosteroid (BR) levels in the plant. They control BR activation, which involves the C-6 oxidation of 6-deoxocastasterone (6-DeoxoCS) to castasterone (CS) and in some cases the further conversion of CS to brassinolide (BL). C-6 oxidation is controlled by the CYP85A family of cytochrome P450s, and to date, two CYP85As have been isolated in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), two in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), one in rice (Oryza sativa), and one in grape (Vitis vinifera). We have now isolated two CYP85As (CYP85A1 and CYP85A6) from pea (Pisum sativum). However, unlike Arabidopsis and tomato, which both contain one BR C-6 oxidase that converts 6-DeoxoCS to CS and one BR C-6 Baeyer-Villiger oxidase that converts 6-DeoxoCS right through to BL, the two BR C-6 oxidases in pea both act principally to convert 6-DeoxoCS to CS. The isolation of these two BR C-6 oxidation genes in pea highlights the species-specific differences associated with C-6 oxidation. In addition, we have isolated a novel BR-deficient mutant, lke, which blocks the function of one of these two BR C-6 oxidases (CYP85A6). The lke mutant exhibits a phenotype intermediate between wild-type plants and previously characterized pea BR mutants (lk, lka, and lkb) and contains reduced levels of CS and increased levels of 6-DeoxoCS. To date, lke is the only mutant identified in pea that blocks the latter steps of BR biosynthesis and it will therefore provide an excellent tool to further examine the regulation of BR biosynthesis and the relative biological activities of CS and BL in pea. PMID:17322341

  2. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If...

  3. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If...

  4. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If...

  5. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If...

  6. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If...

  7. Isolation of Plant Nuclei at Defined Cell Cycle Stages Using EdU Labeling and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wear, Emily E; Concia, Lorenzo; Brooks, Ashley M; Markham, Emily A; Lee, Tae-Jin; Allen, George C; Thompson, William F; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a nucleoside analog of thymidine that can be rapidly incorporated into replicating DNA in vivo and, subsequently, detected by using "click" chemistry to couple its terminal alkyne group to fluorescent azides such as Alexa Fluor 488. Recently, EdU incorporation followed by coupling with a fluorophore has been used to visualize newly synthesized DNA in a wide range of plant species. One particularly useful application is in flow cytometry, where two-parameter sorting can be employed to analyze different phases of the cell cycle, as defined both by total DNA content and the amount of EdU pulse-labeled DNA. This approach allows analysis of the cell cycle without the need for synchronous cell populations, which can be difficult to obtain in many plant systems. The approach presented here, which was developed for fixed, EdU-labeled nuclei, can be used to prepare analytical profiles as well as to make highly purified preparations of G1, S, or G2/M phase nuclei for molecular or biochemical analysis. We present protocols for EdU pulse labeling, tissue fixation and harvesting, nuclei preparation, and flow sorting. Although developed for Arabidopsis suspension cells and maize root tips, these protocols should be modifiable to many other plant systems. PMID:26659955

  8. Isolation of Plant Nuclei at Defined Cell Cycle Stages Using EdU Labeling and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wear, Emily E; Concia, Lorenzo; Brooks, Ashley M; Markham, Emily A; Lee, Tae-Jin; Allen, George C; Thompson, William F; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a nucleoside analog of thymidine that can be rapidly incorporated into replicating DNA in vivo and, subsequently, detected by using "click" chemistry to couple its terminal alkyne group to fluorescent azides such as Alexa Fluor 488. Recently, EdU incorporation followed by coupling with a fluorophore has been used to visualize newly synthesized DNA in a wide range of plant species. One particularly useful application is in flow cytometry, where two-parameter sorting can be employed to analyze different phases of the cell cycle, as defined both by total DNA content and the amount of EdU pulse-labeled DNA. This approach allows analysis of the cell cycle without the need for synchronous cell populations, which can be difficult to obtain in many plant systems. The approach presented here, which was developed for fixed, EdU-labeled nuclei, can be used to prepare analytical profiles as well as to make highly purified preparations of G1, S, or G2/M phase nuclei for molecular or biochemical analysis. We present protocols for EdU pulse labeling, tissue fixation and harvesting, nuclei preparation, and flow sorting. Although developed for Arabidopsis suspension cells and maize root tips, these protocols should be modifiable to many other plant systems.

  9. The connection between chromatin motion on the 100 nm length scale and core histone dynamics in live XTC-2 cells and isolated nuclei.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sara K; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2004-01-01

    The diffusive motion of DNA-containing chromatin in live cells and isolated nuclei is investigated using a two-photon standing wave fluorescence photobleaching experiment with 100 nm spatial resolution. The chromatin is labeled using the minor groove binding dye Hoechst 33342. In live cells, the mean diffusion rate is 5 x 10(-4) micro m2/s, with considerable cell-to-cell variation. This diffusion is highly constrained and cannot be observed in a standard, single beam fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiment. To determine the chemical origin of the diffusion, we study motion in isolated nuclei and vary the strength of the histone-DNA interactions by changing the ionic strength and using chemical and photocross-linking experiments. At higher NaCl concentrations, we see increased chromatin diffusion as the histone-DNA interaction is weakened due to ionic screening, whereas photocross-linking the core histones to the DNA results in a complete absence of diffusive motion. These trends are consistent with the 100 nm scale motion being correlated with the interactions of histone proteins with the DNA. If chromatin diffusion is connected to the nucleosomal dynamics on much smaller length scales, this may provide a way to assay biochemical activity in vivo based on larger scale macromolecular dynamics observed via fluorescence microscopy.

  10. Diversity of Rhizobium leguminosarum from pea fields in Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizobia-mediated biological nitrogen (N) fixation in legumes contributes to yield potential in these crops and also provides residual fertilizer to subsequent cereals. Our objectives were to collect isolates of Rhizobium leguminosarum from several pea fields in Washington, examine genetic diversity...

  11. A diagnostic guide for Fusarium Root Rot of pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium root rot, caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi, is a major root rot pathogen in pea production areas worldwide. Here we provide a diagnostic guide that describes: the taxonomy of the pathogen, signs and symptoms of the pathogen, host range, geographic distribution, methods used to isolate ...

  12. The plastid ndh genes code for an NADH-specific dehydrogenase: isolation of a complex I analogue from pea thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, L A; Burrows, P A; Nixon, P J

    1998-02-01

    The plastid genomes of several plants contain ndh genes-homologues of genes encoding subunits of the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, or complex I, involved in respiration in mitochondria and eubacteria. From sequence similarities with these genes, the ndh gene products have been suggested to form a large protein complex (Ndh complex); however, the structure and function of this complex remains to be established. Herein we report the isolation of the Ndh complex from the chloroplasts of the higher plant Pisum sativum. The purification procedure involved selective solubilization of the thylakoid membrane with dodecyl maltoside, followed by two anion-exchange chromatography steps and one size-exclusion chromatography step. The isolated Ndh complex has an apparent total molecular mass of approximately 550 kDa and according to SDS/PAGE consists of at least 16 subunits including NdhA, NdhI, NdhJ, NdhK, and NdhH, which were identified by N-terminal sequencing and immunoblotting. The Ndh complex showed an NADH- and deamino-NADH-specific dehydrogenase activity, characteristic of complex I, when either ferricyanide or the quinones menadione and duroquinone were used as electron acceptors. This study describes the isolation of the chloroplast analogue of the respiratory complex I and provides direct evidence for the function of the plastid Ndh complex as an NADH:plastoquinone oxidoreductase. Our results are compatible with a dual role for the Ndh complex in the chlororespiratory and cyclic photophosphorylation pathways.

  13. Rapid activation of protein kinase C in isolated rat liver nuclei by prolactin, a known hepatic mitogen.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, A R; Crowe, P D; Russell, D H

    1988-01-01

    Rat liver nuclei pure by enzymatic and electron microscope criteria contain protein kinase C (PKC) that can be activated several hundredfold within 3 min of addition of prolactin or phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate. Rat prolactin stimulated PKC maximally at 10(-12) M, whereas ovine prolactin was maximally stimulatory at 10(-10) M. Activation was time and dose dependent, exhibited a biphasic pattern, and was blocked by anti-prolactin antiserum, by PKC inhibitors such as 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7) and sphingosine, and by cyclosporine. Moreover, the ability of prolactin to activate nuclear PKC was inhibited totally by a monoclonal antibody to the rat liver prolactin receptor, implicating a prolactin receptor-mediated activation process. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a liver mitogen, caused a lesser but significant activation of nuclear PKC. However, EGF and suboptimal prolactin were synergistic. Human growth hormone, which has lactogenic properties, stimulated PKC activity, whereas nonlactogenic substances such as ovine growth hormone, insulin, dexamethasone, and 8-bromo-cAMP were inactive. That this may be a general mechanism for prolactin is suggested by the ability of prolactin to stimulate PKC 140-fold in rat splenocyte nuclei. Prolactin has comitogenic properties in lymphocytes. Images PMID:3186750

  14. Early embryo invasion as a determinant in pea of the seed transmission of pea seed-borne mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Maule, A J

    1992-07-01

    Seed transmission of an isolate of pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) in several pea genotypes has been studied. Cross-pollination experiments showed that pollen transmission of PSbMV did not occur and accordingly, virus was not detected in pollen grains by ELISA or electron microscopy. Comparative studies between two pea cultivars, one with a high incidence of seed transmission and one with none, showed that PSbMV infected the floral tissues (sepals, petals, anther and carpel) of both cultivars, but was not detected in ovules prior to fertilization. Virus was detected equally well in seed coats of the progeny in both cultivars. Analysis of virus incidence and concentration in pea seeds of different developmental stages demonstrated that in the cultivar with a high incidence of seed transmission, PSbMV directly invaded immature embryos, multiplied in the embryonic tissues and persisted during seed maturation. In contrast, the cultivar without seed transmission did not show invasion of immature embryos by the virus; there was no evidence for virus multiplication or persistence during embryo development and seed maturation. Hence seed transmission of PSbMV resulted from direct invasion of immature pea embryos by the virus and the block to seed transmission in the non-permissive cultivar probably occurred at this step.

  15. Two parametric cell cycle analyses of plant cell suspension cultures with fragile, isolated nuclei to investigate heterogeneity in growth of batch cultivations.

    PubMed

    Haas, Christiane; Hegner, Richard; Helbig, Karsten; Bartels, Kristin; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2016-06-01

    Plant cell suspensions are frequently considered to be heterogeneous with respect to growth in terms of progression of the cells through the cell cycle and biomass accumulation. Thus, segregated data of fractions in different cycle phases during cultivation is needed to develop robust production processes. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and BrdU-antibodies or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) click-it chemistry are frequently used to acquire such information. However, their use requires centrifugation steps that cannot be readily applied to sensitive cells, particularly if nuclei have to be extracted from the protective cellular milieu and envelopes for DNA analysis. Therefore, we have established a BrdU-Hoechst stain quenching protocol for analyzing nuclei directly isolated from delicate plant cell suspension cultures. After adding BrdU to test Harpagophytum procumbens cell suspension cultures the cell cycle distribution could be adequately resolved using its incorporation for the following 72 h (after which BrdU slowed biomass accumulation). Despite this limitation, the protocol allows resolution of the cell cycle distribution of cultures that cannot be analyzed using commonly applied methods due to the cells' fragility. The presented protocol enabled analysis of cycling heterogeneities in H. procumbens batch cultivations, and thus should facilitate process control of secondary metabolite production from fragile plant in vitro cultures. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1244-1250. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26614913

  16. Two parametric cell cycle analyses of plant cell suspension cultures with fragile, isolated nuclei to investigate heterogeneity in growth of batch cultivations.

    PubMed

    Haas, Christiane; Hegner, Richard; Helbig, Karsten; Bartels, Kristin; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2016-06-01

    Plant cell suspensions are frequently considered to be heterogeneous with respect to growth in terms of progression of the cells through the cell cycle and biomass accumulation. Thus, segregated data of fractions in different cycle phases during cultivation is needed to develop robust production processes. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and BrdU-antibodies or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) click-it chemistry are frequently used to acquire such information. However, their use requires centrifugation steps that cannot be readily applied to sensitive cells, particularly if nuclei have to be extracted from the protective cellular milieu and envelopes for DNA analysis. Therefore, we have established a BrdU-Hoechst stain quenching protocol for analyzing nuclei directly isolated from delicate plant cell suspension cultures. After adding BrdU to test Harpagophytum procumbens cell suspension cultures the cell cycle distribution could be adequately resolved using its incorporation for the following 72 h (after which BrdU slowed biomass accumulation). Despite this limitation, the protocol allows resolution of the cell cycle distribution of cultures that cannot be analyzed using commonly applied methods due to the cells' fragility. The presented protocol enabled analysis of cycling heterogeneities in H. procumbens batch cultivations, and thus should facilitate process control of secondary metabolite production from fragile plant in vitro cultures. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1244-1250. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Glycolate transporter of the pea chloroplast envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Howitz, K.T.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of a glycolate transporter in the pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast envelope is described. Several novel silicone oil centrifugation methods were developed to resolve the initial rate kinetics of (/sup 14/C)glycolate transport by isolated, intact pea chloroplasts. Chloroplast glycolate transport was found to be carrier mediated. Transport rates saturated with increasing glycolate concentration. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment of chloroplasts inhibited transport, an inhibition prevented by glycolate. Glycolate distributed across the envelope in a way which equalized stromal and medium glycolic acid concentrations, limiting possible transport mechanisms to facilitated glycolic acid diffusion, proton symport or hydroxyl antiport. The effects of stomal and medium pH's on the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ fit the predictions of mobile carrier kinetic models of hydroxyl antiport or proton symport (H/sup +/ binds first). The carrier mediated transport was fast enough to be consistent with in vivo rates of photorespiration. The 2-hydroxymonocarboxylates, glycerate, lactate and glyoxylate are competitive inhibitors of chloroplast glycolate uptake. Glyoxylate, D-lactate and D-glycerate cause glycolate counterflow, indicating that they are also substrates of the glycolate carrier. This finding was confirmed for D-glycerate by studies on glycolate effects on (1-/sup 14/C)D-glycerate transport.

  18. Multilocus sequence typing confirms wild birds as the source of a Campylobacter outbreak associated with the consumption of raw peas.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Patrick S L; Xavier, Catherine; Santovenia, Monica; Pruckler, Janet; Stroika, Steven; Joyce, Kevin; Gardner, Tracie; Fields, Patricia I; McLaughlin, Joe; Tauxe, Robert V; Fitzgerald, Collette

    2014-08-01

    From August to September 2008, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) assisted the Alaska Division of Public Health with an outbreak investigation of campylobacteriosis occurring among the residents of Southcentral Alaska. During the investigation, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from human, raw pea, and wild bird fecal samples confirmed the epidemiologic link between illness and the consumption of raw peas contaminated by sandhill cranes for 15 of 43 epidemiologically linked human isolates. However, an association between the remaining epidemiologically linked human infections and the pea and wild bird isolates was not established. To better understand the molecular epidemiology of the outbreak, C. jejuni isolates (n=130; 59 from humans, 40 from peas, and 31 from wild birds) were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Here we present the molecular evidence to demonstrate the association of many more human C.jejuni infections associated with the outbreak with raw peas and wild bird feces. Among all sequence types (STs) identified, 26 of 39 (67%) were novel and exclusive to the outbreak. Five clusters of overlapping STs (n=32 isolates; 17 from humans, 2 from peas, and 13 from wild birds) were identified. In particular, cluster E (n=7 isolates; ST-5049) consisted of isolates from humans,peas, and wild birds. Novel STs clustered closely with isolates typically associated with wild birds and the environment but distinct from lineages commonly seen in human infections. Novel STs and alleles recovered from human outbreak isolates allowed additional infections caused by these rare genotypes to be attributed to the contaminated raw peas.

  19. Multilocus sequence typing confirms wild birds as the source of a Campylobacter outbreak associated with the consumption of raw peas.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Patrick S L; Xavier, Catherine; Santovenia, Monica; Pruckler, Janet; Stroika, Steven; Joyce, Kevin; Gardner, Tracie; Fields, Patricia I; McLaughlin, Joe; Tauxe, Robert V; Fitzgerald, Collette

    2014-08-01

    From August to September 2008, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) assisted the Alaska Division of Public Health with an outbreak investigation of campylobacteriosis occurring among the residents of Southcentral Alaska. During the investigation, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from human, raw pea, and wild bird fecal samples confirmed the epidemiologic link between illness and the consumption of raw peas contaminated by sandhill cranes for 15 of 43 epidemiologically linked human isolates. However, an association between the remaining epidemiologically linked human infections and the pea and wild bird isolates was not established. To better understand the molecular epidemiology of the outbreak, C. jejuni isolates (n=130; 59 from humans, 40 from peas, and 31 from wild birds) were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Here we present the molecular evidence to demonstrate the association of many more human C.jejuni infections associated with the outbreak with raw peas and wild bird feces. Among all sequence types (STs) identified, 26 of 39 (67%) were novel and exclusive to the outbreak. Five clusters of overlapping STs (n=32 isolates; 17 from humans, 2 from peas, and 13 from wild birds) were identified. In particular, cluster E (n=7 isolates; ST-5049) consisted of isolates from humans,peas, and wild birds. Novel STs clustered closely with isolates typically associated with wild birds and the environment but distinct from lineages commonly seen in human infections. Novel STs and alleles recovered from human outbreak isolates allowed additional infections caused by these rare genotypes to be attributed to the contaminated raw peas. PMID:24837383

  20. [Labelling of nif-plasmid pEA9 from Enterobacter agglomerans 339].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-jun; Klingmüller, Walter

    2002-07-01

    The authors describe the in vivo labelling of the plasmid pEA9 in Enterobacter agglomerans 339 with a kanamycin resistance gene. For labelling purposes the donor plasmid pST5 was constructed. This plasmid contains the nif ENX region from pEA9,in which a kanamycin resistance gene is cloned.pST5 was transformed into E.a.339 and subsequently cured from the host. Curing was achieved with AP medium. Fourty strains that had lost pST5,but retained the kanamycin resistance, could be isolated. It showed that none of these clones contained co-integrates of pST5 and pEA9. This is evident that in all clones the kanamycin resistance gene was integrated into pEA9 by homologous recombination.

  1. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...), except that: (1) The optional pea ingredient is the dry seeds of the pea plant of the species Pisum... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is...

  2. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...), except that: (1) The optional pea ingredient is the dry seeds of the pea plant of the species Pisum... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is...

  3. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...), except that: (1) The optional pea ingredient is the dry seeds of the pea plant of the species Pisum... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is...

  4. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...), except that: (1) The optional pea ingredient is the dry seeds of the pea plant of the species Pisum... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is...

  5. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...), except that: (1) The optional pea ingredient is the dry seeds of the pea plant of the species Pisum... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is...

  6. Nodulation, Nitrogen Fixation, and Hydrogen Oxidation by Pigeon Pea Bradyrhizobium spp. in Symbiotic Association with Pigeon Pea, Cowpea, and Soybean †

    PubMed Central

    Nautiyal, C. S.; Hegde, S. V.; van Berkum, P.

    1988-01-01

    The pigeon pea strains of Bradyrhizobium CC-1, CC-8, UASGR(S), and F4 were evaluated for nodulation, effectiveness for N2 fixation, and H2 oxidation with homologous and nonhomologous host plants. Strain CC-1 nodulated Macroptilium atropurpureum, Vigna unguiculata, Glycine max, and G. soja but did not nodulate Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Trifolium repens. Strain F4 nodulated G. max cv. Peking and PI 434937 (Malayan), but the symbioses formed were poor. Similarly, G. max cv. Peking, cv. Bragg, PI 434937, PR 13-28-2-8-7, and HM-1 were nodulated by strain CC-1, and symbioses were also poor. G. max cv. Williams and cv. Clark were not nodulated. H2 uptake activity was expressed with pigeon pea and cowpea, but not with soybean. G. max cv. Bragg grown in Bangalore, India, in local soil not previously exposed to Bradyrhizobium japonicum formed nodules with indigenous Bradyrhizobium spp. Six randomly chosen isolates, each originating from a different nodule, formed effective symbioses with pigeon pea host ICPL-407, nodulated PR 13-28-2-8-7 soybean forming moderately effective symbioses, and did not nodulate Williams soybean. These results indicate the six isolates to be pigeon pea strains although they originated from soybean nodules. Host-determined nodulation of soybean by pigeon pea Bradyrhizobium spp. may depend upon the ancestral backgrounds of the cultivars. The poor symbioses formed by the pigeon pea strains with soybean indicate that this crop should be inoculated with B. japonicum for its cultivation in soils containing only pigeon pea Bradyrhizobium spp. PMID:16347542

  7. Cosmogenic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raisbeck, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclei, nuclides formed by nuclear interactions of galactic and solar cosmic rays with extraterrestrial or terrestrial matter are discussed. Long lived radioactive cosmogenic isotopes are focused upon. Their uses in dating, as tracers of the interactions of cosmic rays with matter, and in obtaining information on the variation of primary cosmic ray flux in the past are discussed.

  8. 7 CFR 457.137 - Green pea crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... timely planted acreage. If you have limited or additional levels of coverage, as specified in 7 CFR part... genetically developed to be eaten without shelling (e.g., snap peas, snow peas, and Chinese peas)....

  9. Developmental differences in posttranslational calmodulin methylation in pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    A calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used to analyze the degree of lysine-115 methylation of pea calmodulin. Calmodulin was isolated from segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of {sup 3}H-methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The methylation of these calmodulin samples occurs specifically at lysine 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position were not methylated and competitively inhibited methylation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in NAD kinase activation by methylated and unmethylated calmodulins, raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation could affect calmodulin action.

  10. Cyanide-insensitive Respiration in Pea Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    James, Terrance W.; Spencer, Mary S.

    1979-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated by a zonal procedure from the cotyledons of germinating peas possessed a cyanide-resistant respiration. This respiration was virtually absent in mitochondria isolated during the first 24 hours of germination but thereafter increased gradually until the 6th or 7th day of seedling development. At this time between 15 and 20% of the succinate oxidation was not inhibited by cyanide. The activity of the cyanide-resistant respiration was also determined in the absence of cyanide. Relationships among mitochondrial structure, cyanide-resistant respiration, and seedling development are discussed. PMID:16660982

  11. Comparative effects of sulfhydryl compounds on target organellae, nuclei and mitochondria, of hydroxylated fullerene-induced cytotoxicity in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshio; Inomata, Akiko; Ogata, Akio; Nakae, Dai

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by a hydroxylated fullerene [C60 (OH)24 ], which is a spherical nanomaterial and/or a water-soluble fullerene derivative, and their protection by sulfhydryl compounds were studied in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. The exposure of hepatocytes to C60 (OH)24 at a concentration of 50 μM caused time (0 to 3 h)-dependent cell death accompanied by the formation of cell surface blebs, the loss of cellular levels of ATP and reduced glutathione, accumulation of glutathione disulfide, and induction of DNA fragmentation assayed using alkali single-cell agarose-gel electrophoresis. C60 (OH)24 -induced cytotoxicity was effectively prevented by pretreatment with sulfhydryl compounds. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), L-cysteine and L-methionine, at a concentration of 2.5 mM, ameliorated cell death, accompanied by a decrease in cellular ATP levels, formation of cell surface blebs, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential caused by C60 (OH)24 . In addition, DNA fragmentation caused by C60 (OH)24 was also inhibited by NAC, whereas an antioxidant ascorbic acid did not affect C60 (OH)24 -induced cell death and DNA damage in rat hepatocytes. Taken collectively, these results indicate that incubation of rat hepatocytes with C60 (OH)24 elicits DNA damage, suggesting that nuclei as well as mitochondria are target sites of the hydroxylated fullerene; and induction of DNA damage and oxidative stress is ameliorated by an increase in cellular GSH levels, suggesting that the onset of toxic effects may be partially attributable to a thiol redox-state imbalance caused by C60 (OH)24 .

  12. Pea3 transcription factor promotes neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Kandemir, Basak; Caglayan, Berrak; Hausott, Barbara; Erdogan, Burcu; Dag, Ugur; Demir, Ozlem; Sogut, Melis S.; Klimaschewski, Lars; Kurnaz, Isil A.

    2014-01-01

    Pea3 subfamily of E–twenty six transcription factors consist of three major -exhibit branching morphogenesis, the function of Pea3 family in nervous system development and regeneration is only beginning to unfold. In this study, we provide evidence that Pea3 can directs neurite extension and axonal outgrowth in different model systems, and that Serine 90 is important for this function. We have also identified neurofilament-L and neurofilament-M as two putative novel targets for Pea3. PMID:25018694

  13. Strigolactones promote nodulation in pea.

    PubMed

    Foo, Eloise; Davies, Noel W

    2011-11-01

    Strigolactones are recently defined plant hormones with roles in mycorrhizal symbiosis and shoot and root architecture. Their potential role in controlling nodulation, the related symbiosis between legumes and Rhizobium bacteria, was explored using the strigolactone-deficient rms1 mutant in pea (Pisum sativum L.). This work indicates that endogenous strigolactones are positive regulators of nodulation in pea, required for optimal nodule number but not for nodule formation per se. rms1 mutant root exudates and root tissue are almost completely deficient in strigolactones, and rms1 mutant plants have approximately 40% fewer nodules than wild-type plants. Treatment with the synthetic strigolactone GR24 elevated nodule number in wild-type pea plants and also elevated nodule number in rms1 mutant plants to a level similar to that seen in untreated wild-type plants. Grafting studies revealed that nodule number and strigolactone levels in root tissue of rms1 roots were unaffected by grafting to wild-type scions indicating that strigolactones in the root, but not shoot-derived factors, regulate nodule number and provide the first direct evidence that the shoot does not make a major contribution to root strigolactone levels.

  14. EDTA a novel inducer of pisatin, a phytoalexin indicator of the non-host resistance in peas.

    PubMed

    Hadwiger, Lee A; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2014-12-23

    Pea pod endocarp suppresses the growth of an inappropriate fungus or non-pathogen by generating a "non-host resistance response" that completely suppresses growth of the challenging fungus within 6 h. Most of the components of this resistance response including pisatin production can be elicited by an extensive number of both biotic and abiotic inducers. Thus this phytoalexin serves as an indicator to be used in evaluating the chemical properties of inducers that can initiate the resistance response. Many of the pisatin inducers are reported to interact with DNA and potentially cause DNA damage. Here we propose that EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) is an elicitor to evoke non-host resistance in plants. EDTA is manufactured as a chelating agent, however at low concentration it is a strong elicitor, inducing the phytoalexin pisatin, cellular DNA damage and defense-responsive genes. It is capable of activating complete resistance in peas against a pea pathogen. Since there is also an accompanying fragmentation of pea DNA and alteration in the size of pea nuclei, the potential biochemical insult as a metal chelator may not be its primary action. The potential effects of EDTA on the structure of DNA within pea chromatin may assist the transcription of plant defense genes.

  15. Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao Tien; Egelhof, Peter; Gales, Sydney; Giai, Nguyen Van; Motobayashi, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    ]C([symbol], n)[symbol]O by the transfer reaction [symbol]C([symbol]Li, t)[symbol]O / F. Hammache et al. -- SPIRAL2 at GANIL: a world of leading ISOL facility for the physics of exotic nuclei / S. Gales -- Magnetic properties of light neutron-rich nuclei and shell evolution / T. Suzuki, T. Otsuka -- Multiple scattering effects in elastic and quasi free proton scattering from halo nuclei / R. Crespo et al. -- The dipole response of neutron halos and skins / T. Aumann -- Giant and pygmy resonances within axially-symmetric-deformed QRPA with the Gogny force / S. Péru, H. Goutte -- Soft K[symbol] = O+ modes unique to deformed neutron-rich unstable nuclei / K. Yoshida et al. -- Synthesis, decay properties, and identification of superheavy nuclei produced in [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / Yu. Ts. Oganessian et al. -- Highlights of the Brazilian RIB facility and its first results and hindrance of fusion cross section induced by [symbol]He / P. R. S. Gomes et al. -- Search for long fission times of super-heavy elements with Z = 114 / M. Morjean et al. -- Microscopic dynamics of shape coexistence phenomena around [symbol]Se and [symbol]Kr / N. Hinohara et al. -- [symbol]-cluster states and 4[symbol]-particle condensation in [symbol]O / Y. Funaki et al. -- Evolution of the N = 28 shell closure far from stability / O. Sorlin et al. -- Continuum QRPA approach and the surface di-neutron modes in nuclei near the neutron drip-line / M. Matsuo et al. -- Deformed relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model for exotic nuclei / S. G. Zhou et al. -- Two- and three-body correlations in three-body resonances and continuum states / K. Katō, K. Ikeda -- Pion- and Rho-Meson effects in relativistic Hartree-Fock and RPA / N. V. Giai et al. -- Study of the structure of neutron rich nuclei by using [symbol]-delayed neutron and gamma emission method / Y. Ye et al. -- Production of secondary radioactive [symbol] Na beam for the study of [symbol]Na([symbol], p)[symbol]Mg stellar reaction / D. N. Binh et al

  16. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  17. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  18. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  19. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  20. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  1. Growth parameters of vegetable pigeon pea cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigeon pea is an important crop in the dry regions of eastern Kenya, due to its drought tolerance and high protein content; however, farmer’s yield is limiting. Ojwang et al. (HortTech Vol 26 (1), 2016) evaluated twelve pigeon pea cultivars for flowering, plant height, branches, pod length and yield...

  2. Yield potential of pigeon pea cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yield potential of twelve vegetable pigeon pea (Cajanus cajun) cultivars was evaluated at two locations in eastern Kenya during 2012 and 2013 cropping years. Pigeon pea pod numbers, seeds per pod, seed mass, grain yield and shelling percentage were quantified in three replicated plots, arranged in a...

  3. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen peas. 158.170 Section 158.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Product definition. Frozen peas is the food in “package” form as that term...

  4. The effect of rotenone on respiration in pea cotyledon mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Flanagan, A M; Spencer, M S

    1981-12-01

    Respiration utilizing NAD-linked substrates in mitochondria isolated from cotyledons of etiolated peas (Pisum sativum L. var. Homesteader) by sucrose density gradient centrifugation exhibited resistance to rotenone. The inhibited rate of alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation was equivalent to the recovered rate of malate oxidation. (The recovered rate is the rate following the transient inhibition by rotenone.) The inhibitory effect of rotenone on malate oxidation increased with increasing respiratory control ratios as the mitochondria developed. The cyanide-resistant and rotenone-resistant pathways followed different courses of development as cotyledons aged. The rotenone-resistant pathway transferred reducing equivalents to the cyanide-sensitive pathway. Malic enzyme was found to be inhibited competitively with respect to NAD by rotenone concentrations as low as 1.67 micromolar. In pea cotyledon mitochondria, rotenone was transformed into elliptone. This reduced its inhibitory effect on intact mitochondria. Malate dehydrogenase was not affected by rotenone or elliptone. However, elliptone inhibited malic enzyme to the same extent that rotenone did when NAD was the cofactor. The products of malate oxidation reflected the interaction between malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase. Rotenone also inhibited the NADH dehydrogenase associated with malate dehydrogenase. Thus, rotenone seemed to exert its inhibitory effect on two enzymes of the electron transport chain of pea cotyledon mitochondria.

  5. Effective stabilization of CLA by microencapsulation in pea protein.

    PubMed

    Costa, A M M; Nunes, J C; Lima, B N B; Pedrosa, C; Calado, V; Torres, A G; Pierucci, A P T R

    2015-02-01

    CLA was microencapsulated by spray drying in ten varied wall systems (WS) consisting of pea protein isolate or pea protein concentrate (PPC) alone at varied core:WS ratios (1:2; 1:3 and 1:4), or blended with maltodextrin (M) and carboxymethylcellulose at a pea protein:carbohydrate ratio of 3:1. The physical-chemical properties of the CLA microparticles were characterised by core retention, microencapsulation efficiency (ME), particle size and moisture. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) showed the most promising results, thus we evaluated the effect of M addition in the WS on other physical-chemical characteristics and oxidative stability (CLA isomer profile, quantification of CLA and volatile compounds by SPME coupled with CG-MS) during two months of storage at room temperature, CLA:PPC (1:4) was selected for comparisons. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) microparticles demonstrated better morphology, solubility, dispersibility and higher glass-transition temperature values. M addition did not influence the oxidative stability of CLA, however its presence improved physical-chemical characteristics necessary for food applications.

  6. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Localization of a Novel Pea Thioredoxin: Identification of Its Mitochondrial Target Proteins1[W

    PubMed Central

    Martí, María C.; Olmos, Enrique; Calvete, Juan J.; Díaz, Isabel; Barranco-Medina, Sergio; Whelan, James; Lázaro, Juan J.; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Plants contain several genes encoding thioredoxins (Trxs), small proteins involved in the regulation of the activity of many enzymes through dithiol-disulfide exchange. In addition to chloroplastic and cytoplasmic Trx systems, plant mitochondria contain a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent Trx reductase and a specific Trx o, and to date, there have been no reports of a gene encoding a plant nuclear Trx. We report here the presence in pea (Pisum sativum) mitochondria and nuclei of a Trx isoform (PsTrxo1) that seems to belong to the Trx o group, although it differs from this Trx type by its absence of introns in the genomic sequence. Western-blot analysis with isolated mitochondria and nuclei, immunogold labeling, and green fluorescent protein fusion constructs all indicated that PsTrxo1 is present in both cell compartments. Moreover, the identification by tandem mass spectrometry of the native mitochondrial Trx after gel filtration using the fast-protein liquid chromatography system of highly purified mitochondria and the in vitro uptake assay into isolated mitochondria also corroborated a mitochondrial location for this protein. The recombinant PsTrxo1 protein has been shown to be reduced more effectively by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial Trx reductase Trr2 than by the wheat (Triticum aestivum) cytoplasmic reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent Trx reductase. PsTrxo1 was able to activate alternative oxidase, and it was shown to interact with a number of mitochondrial proteins, including peroxiredoxin and enzymes mainly involved in the photorespiratory process. PMID:19363090

  7. A novel plasmid pEA68 of Erwinia amylovora and the description of a new family of plasmids.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Emadeldeen; Blom, Jochen; Bultreys, Alain; Ivanović, Milan; Obradović, Aleksa; van Doorn, Joop; Bergsma-Vlami, Maria; Maes, Martine; Willems, Anne; Duffy, Brion; Stockwell, Virginia O; Smits, Theo H M; Puławska, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Recent genome analysis of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease on Rosaceae, has shown that the chromosome is highly conserved among strains and that plasmids are the principal source of genomic diversity. A new circular plasmid, pEA68, was found in E. amylovora strain 692 (LMG 28361), isolated in Poland from Sorbus (mountain ash) with fire blight symptoms. Annotation of the 68,763-bp IncFIIa-type plasmid revealed that it contains 79 predicted CDS, among which two operons (tra, pil) are associated with mobility. The plasmid is maintained stably in E. amylovora and does not possess genes associated with antibiotic resistance or known virulence genes. Curing E. amylovora strain 692 of pEA68 did not influence its virulence in apple shoots nor amylovoran synthesis. Of 488 strains of E. amylovora from seventeen countries, pEA68 was only found in two additional strains from Belgium. Although the spread of pEA68 is currently limited to Europe, pEA68 comprises, together with pEA72 and pEA78 both found in North America, a new plasmid family that spans two continents. PMID:25178659

  8. A novel plasmid pEA68 of Erwinia amylovora and the description of a new family of plasmids.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Emadeldeen; Blom, Jochen; Bultreys, Alain; Ivanović, Milan; Obradović, Aleksa; van Doorn, Joop; Bergsma-Vlami, Maria; Maes, Martine; Willems, Anne; Duffy, Brion; Stockwell, Virginia O; Smits, Theo H M; Puławska, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Recent genome analysis of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease on Rosaceae, has shown that the chromosome is highly conserved among strains and that plasmids are the principal source of genomic diversity. A new circular plasmid, pEA68, was found in E. amylovora strain 692 (LMG 28361), isolated in Poland from Sorbus (mountain ash) with fire blight symptoms. Annotation of the 68,763-bp IncFIIa-type plasmid revealed that it contains 79 predicted CDS, among which two operons (tra, pil) are associated with mobility. The plasmid is maintained stably in E. amylovora and does not possess genes associated with antibiotic resistance or known virulence genes. Curing E. amylovora strain 692 of pEA68 did not influence its virulence in apple shoots nor amylovoran synthesis. Of 488 strains of E. amylovora from seventeen countries, pEA68 was only found in two additional strains from Belgium. Although the spread of pEA68 is currently limited to Europe, pEA68 comprises, together with pEA72 and pEA78 both found in North America, a new plasmid family that spans two continents.

  9. 7 CFR 457.137 - Green pea crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) The producer's commitment to plant and grow green peas, and to deliver the green pea production to the... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Green pea crop insurance provisions. 457.137 Section... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.137 Green pea crop...

  10. 7 CFR 457.137 - Green pea crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) The producer's commitment to plant and grow green peas, and to deliver the green pea production to the... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Green pea crop insurance provisions. 457.137 Section... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.137 Green pea crop...

  11. 78 FR 68410 - United States Standards for Whole Dry Peas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... for Whole Dry Peas. The proposal would establish an additional color grading factor requirement for the Whole Dry Peas class ``Smooth Yellow Dry Peas'' and establish a definition for ``fair color yellow... currently popular smooth yellow dry pea varieties do not have a true yellow color which necessitates...

  12. Pea amyloplast DNA is qualitatively similar to pea chloroplast DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloplast DNA (apDNA), when subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases, yields patterns nearly identical to that of DNA from mature pea chloroplasts (ctDNA). Southern transfers of apDNA and ctDNA, probed with the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), shows hybridization to the expected restriction fragments for both apDNA and ctDNA. However, Northern transfers of total RNA from chloroplasts and amyloplasts, probed again with the LS gene of Rubisco, shows that no detectable LS meggage is found in amyloplasts although LS expression in mature chloroplasts is high. Likewise, two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of etiolated gravisensitive pea tissue shows that both large and small subunits of Rubisco are conspicuously absent; however, in greening tissue these two constitute the major soluble proteins. These findings suggest that although the informational content of these two organelle types is equivalent, gene expression is quite different and is presumably under nuclear control.

  13. Isolation of DNA methyltransferase from plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, K.; Malbroue, C.

    1987-05-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DMT) were isolated from nuclei of cauliflower, soybean, and pea by extraction with 0.35 M NaCl. Assays were performed on hemimethylated Micrococcus luteus DNA or on M. luteus DNA to test for maintenance or de novo methylase activity, respectively. Fully methylated DNA was used as a substrate to determine background levels of methylation. Based on these tests, yields of maintenance DMT activity in the crude extract from pea hypocotyl, soybean hypocotyl, and cauliflower inflorescence were 2.8, 0.9, and 1.6 units per g wet tissue (one unit equals 1 pmol of methyl from (/sup 3/H)AdoMet incorporated into acid precipitable material per h at 30/sup 0/). Two peaks of DMT activity were detected in the soybean nuclear extract following phosphocellulose chromatography. One eluted at 0.4 M and the other at 0.8 M KCl. With both fractions maintenance activity was approximately 2 times that of the de novo activity. Using gel filtration the DMT eluted at 220,000 Daltons. The optimal pH for activity was between 6.5 and 7.0, and the optimal temperature was 30/sup 0/.

  14. Influence of tillage on adult and immature pea leaf weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) densities in pea.

    PubMed

    Hanavan, Ryan P; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A; Schotzko, Dennis J; Eigenbrode, Sanford D

    2010-06-01

    The pea leaf weevil, Sitona lineatus (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), has been a major pest of pea, Pisum sativum L., in eastern Washington and northern Idaho since its introduction to the region in the early 1970s. Eggs are deposited in the spring on the soil surface and first instars hatch and move to pea root nodules, where larvae feed before they pupate and adults emerge in mid- to late summer. No-tillage practices are known to reduce pea leaf weevil colonization in pea, but the effects of tillage on larval densities and subsequent adult emergence have not been examined. During 2005, 2006, and 2007, we compared densities of colonizing adult and immature pea leaf weevils on pea plots grown using conventional tillage and no-tillage. In 2005 and 2006, emergence of adult pea leaf weevil was monitored in the same plots. Densities of colonizing adult and immature pea leaf weevil were significantly higher in conventional tillage plots. Larvae in conventional tillage were further along in development than larvae in no-tillage plots during June and July. Densities of emerging adult pea leaf weevil were significantly greater from conventional tillage than no-tillage plots. Based on densities of colonizing and subsequent emerging adults, survival of weevils from egg through adult was greater in conventional tillage plots. Soils under no-tillage are cooler, resulting in later emergence of the pea crop and delayed root nodule development, possibly affecting the ability of first-instar pea leaf weevil to locate host plant roots. Our results indicate no-tillage fields are less suitable for pea leaf weevil colonization and survival than conventional tillage fields.

  15. [Ultrastructure and metabolic activity of pea mitochondria under clinorotation].

    PubMed

    Brykov, V A; Generozova, I P; Shugaev, A G

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data on the mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration in root apex as well as metabolic activity of the organelles isolated from pea seedling roots after 5-day of clinorotation are presented. It was shown that mitochondrial condensation in the distal elongation zone correlated with an increased rate of oxygen uptake on 7%. We also observed increase in rate of malate oxidation and respiratory control ratio increased simultaneously with a decreased in efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. Such character of mitochondrial rearrangements in simulated microgravity is assumed to be a consequence of adaptation to these conditions.

  16. Fatty acid biosynthesis in pea root plastids

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, R.J.; Sparace, S.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis from (1-{sup 14}C)acetate was optimized in plastids isolated from primary root tips of 7-day-old germinating pea seeds. Fatty acid synthesis was maximum at approximately 80 nmoles/hr/mg protein in the presence of 200 {mu}M acetate, 0.5 mM each of NADH, NADPH and CoA, 6 mM each of ATP and MgCl{sub 2}, 1 mM each of the MnCl{sub 2} and glycerol-3-phosphate, 15 mM KHCO{sub 3}, and 0.1M Bis-tris-propane, pH 8.0 incubated at 35C. At the standard incubation temperature of 25C, fatty acid synthesis was linear from up to 6 hours with 80 to 100 {mu}g/mL plastid protein. ATP and CoA were absolute requirements, whereas KHCO{sub 3}, divalent cations and reduced nucleotides all improved activity by 80 to 85%. Mg{sup 2+} and NADH were the preferred cation and nucleotide, respectively. Dithiothreitol and detergents were generally inhibitory. The radioactive products of fatty acid biosynthesis were approximately 33% 16:0, 10% 18:0 and 56% 18:1 and generally did not vary with increasing concentrations of each cofactor.

  17. High-yield expression of pea thioredoxin m and assessment of its efficiency in chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activation.

    PubMed Central

    López Jaramillo, J; Chueca, A; Jacquot, J P; Hermoso, R; Lázaro, J J; Sahrawy, M; López Gorgé, J

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding pea (Pisum sativum L.) chloroplast thioredoxin (Trx) m and its transit peptide were isolated from a pea cDNA library. Its deduced amino acid sequence showed 70% homology with spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) Trx m and 25% homology with Trx f from pea and spinach. After subcloning in the Ndel-BamHI sites of pET-12a, the recombinant supplied 20 mg Trx m/L. Escherichia coli culture. This protein had 108 amino acids and was 12,000 D, which is identical to the pea leaf native protein. Unlike pea Trx f, pea Trx m showed a hyperbolic saturation of pea chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), with a Trx m/ FBPase molar saturation ratio of about 60, compared with 4 for the Trx f/FBPase quotient. Cross-experiments have shown the ability of pea Trx m to activate the spinach chloroplast FBPase, results that are in contrast with those in spinach found by P. Schürmann, K. Maeda, and A. Tsugita ([1981] Eur J Biochem 116: 37-45), who did not find Trx m efficiency in FBPase activation. This higher efficiency of pea Trx m could be related to the presence of four basic residues (arginine-37, lysine-70, arginine-74, and lysine-97) flanking the regulatory cluster; spinach Trx m lacks the positive charge corresponding to lysine-70 of pea Trx m. This has been confirmed by K70E mutagenesis of pea Trx m, which leads to a 50% decrease in FBPase activation. PMID:9276945

  18. Symbiotic Activity of Pea (Pisum sativum) after Application of Nod Factors under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Siczek, Anna; Lipiec, Jerzy; Wielbo, Jerzy; Kidaj, Dominika; Szarlip, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Growth and symbiotic activity of legumes are mediated by Nod factors (LCO, lipo-chitooligosaccharides). To assess the effects of application of Nod factors on symbiotic activity and yield of pea, a two-year field experiment was conducted on a Haplic Luvisol developed from loess. Nod factors were isolated from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain GR09. Pea seeds were treated with the Nod factors (10−11 M) or water (control) before planting. Symbiotic activity was evaluated by measurements of nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), nodule number and mass, and top growth by shoot mass, leaf area, and seed and protein yield. Nod factors generally improved pea yield and nitrogenase activity in the relatively dry growing season 2012, but not in the wet growing season in 2013 due to different weather conditions. PMID:24786094

  19. Recovery of plants from pea and strawberry meristems cryopreserved for 28 years.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Karen L; Kartha, Kutty K

    2009-01-01

    Meristems isolated from in vitro strawberry shoot cultures (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. cv. Redcoat) and in vitro germinated pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L. cv. Century) were treated with cryoprotectants, slowly frozen to -40 degree C (0.6 degree C per min for pea and 0.84 degree C per min for strawberry), and stored in liquid nitrogen in 1979. In 2007, several ampoules containing cryopreserved meristems of each species were thawed, cultured in vitro, and scored for viability. Meristems which differentiated into plants upon thawing and reculture were considered viable. Fifty-nine percent of the 91 strawberry meristems thawed in 2007 were viable after 28 years of cryopreservation, as compared to 56 percent viability after 8 weeks cryopreservation, as reported in the original study. Fourteen percent of the 78 pea meristems thawed in 2007 were viable after 28 years, as compared to 61 percent after 26 weeks of cryopreservation, as reported in the original study. With both strawberry and pea meristems there was variability in viability between ampoules. Viability between thawed ampoules of strawberry meristems ranged from 35 to 80 percent. Four of eight thawed ampoules of pea meristems contained no viable meristems, while the highest viability from a single ampoule was 77 percent. Shoots obtained from surviving meristems were rooted in vitro, transferred to soil, and produced phenotypically normal plants.

  20. Bean alpha-amylase inhibitors in transgenic peas inhibit development of pea weevil larvae.

    PubMed

    de Sousa-Majer, Maria José; Hardie, Darryl C; Turner, Neil C; Higgins, Thomas J V

    2007-08-01

    This glasshouse study used an improved larval measurement procedure to evaluate the impact of transgenic pea, Pisum sativum L., seeds expressing a-amylase inhibitor (AI)-1 or -2 proteins on pea weevil, Bruchus pisorum L. Seeds of transgenic 'Laura' and 'Greenfeast' peas expressing alpha-(AI)-1 reduced pea weevil survival by 93-98%. Larval mortality occurred at an early instar. Conversely, in nontransgenic cultivars, approximately 98-99% of the pea weevils emerged as adults. By measuring the head capsule size, we determined that larvae died at the first to early third instar in alpha-(AI)-1 transgenic peas, indicating that this inhibitor is highly effective in controlling this insect. By contrast, transgenic Laura and 'Dundale' expressing alpha-(AI)-2 did not affect pea weevil survival, but they did delay larval development. After 77 d of development, the head capsule size indicated that the larvae were still at the third instar stage in transgenic alpha-(AI)-2 peas, whereas adult bruchids had developed in the nontransgenic peas.

  1. ATPase Activity of Pea Cotyledon Submitochondrial Particles

    PubMed Central

    Grubmeyer, Charles; Spencer, Mary

    1980-01-01

    Submitochondrial particles freshly prepared by sonication from pea cotyledon mitochondria showed low ATPase activity. Activity increased 20-fold on exposure to trypsin. The pea cotyledon submitochondrial particle ATPase was also activated by “aging” in vitro. At pH 7.0 addition of 1 millimolar ATP prevented the activation. ATPase of freshly prepared pea cotyledon submitochondrial particles had a substrate specificity similar to that of the soluble ATPase from pea cotyledon mitochondria, with GTPase > ATPase. “Aged” or trypsin-treated particles showed equal activity with the two substrates. NaCl and NaHCO3, which stimulate the ATPase but not the GTPase activity of the soluble pea enzyme, were stimulatory to both the ATPase and GTPase activities of freshly prepared submitochondrial particles. However, they were stimulatory only to the ATPase activity of trypsin-treated or “aged” submitochondrial particles. In contrast, the ATPase activity of rat liver submitochondrial particles was stimulated by HCO3−, but inhibited by Cl−, indicating that Cl− stimulation is a distinguishing property of the pea mitochondrial ATPase complex. PMID:16661174

  2. Stamina pistilloida, the Pea ortholog of Fim and UFO, is required for normal development of flowers, inflorescences, and leaves.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S; Hofer, J; Murfet, I

    2001-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of two severe alleles at the Stamina pistilloida (Stp) locus reveals that Stp is involved in a wide range of developmental processes in the garden pea. The most severe allele, stp-4, results in flowers consisting almost entirely of sepals and carpels. Production of ectopic secondary flowers in stp-4 plants suggests that Stp is involved in specifying floral meristem identity in pea. The stp mutations also reduce the complexity of the compound pea leaf, and primary inflorescences often terminate prematurely in an aberrant sepaloid flower. In addition, stp mutants were shorter than their wild-type siblings due to a reduction in cell number in their internodes. Fewer cells were also found in the epidermis of the leaf rachis of stp mutants. Examination of the effects of stp-4 in double mutant combinations with af, tl, det, and veg2-2-mutations known to influence leaf, inflorescence, and flower development in pea-suggests that Stp function is independent of these genes. A synergistic interaction between weak mutant alleles at Stp and Uni indicated that these two genes act together, possibly to regulate primordial growth. Molecular analysis revealed that Stp is the pea homolog of the Antirrhinum gene Fimbriata (Fim) and of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) from Arabidopsis. Differences between Fim/UFO and Stp mutant phenotypes and expression patterns suggest that expansion of Stp activity into the leaf was an important step during evolution of the compound leaf in the garden pea. PMID:11158527

  3. Stamina pistilloida, the Pea ortholog of Fim and UFO, is required for normal development of flowers, inflorescences, and leaves.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S; Hofer, J; Murfet, I

    2001-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of two severe alleles at the Stamina pistilloida (Stp) locus reveals that Stp is involved in a wide range of developmental processes in the garden pea. The most severe allele, stp-4, results in flowers consisting almost entirely of sepals and carpels. Production of ectopic secondary flowers in stp-4 plants suggests that Stp is involved in specifying floral meristem identity in pea. The stp mutations also reduce the complexity of the compound pea leaf, and primary inflorescences often terminate prematurely in an aberrant sepaloid flower. In addition, stp mutants were shorter than their wild-type siblings due to a reduction in cell number in their internodes. Fewer cells were also found in the epidermis of the leaf rachis of stp mutants. Examination of the effects of stp-4 in double mutant combinations with af, tl, det, and veg2-2-mutations known to influence leaf, inflorescence, and flower development in pea-suggests that Stp function is independent of these genes. A synergistic interaction between weak mutant alleles at Stp and Uni indicated that these two genes act together, possibly to regulate primordial growth. Molecular analysis revealed that Stp is the pea homolog of the Antirrhinum gene Fimbriata (Fim) and of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) from Arabidopsis. Differences between Fim/UFO and Stp mutant phenotypes and expression patterns suggest that expansion of Stp activity into the leaf was an important step during evolution of the compound leaf in the garden pea.

  4. Peas in a Pod: Environment and Ionization in Green Pea Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Heather; Jaskot, Anne; Drew, Patrick; Pare, Dylan; Griffin, Jon; Petersen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Green Peas are extreme, highly ionized, starburst galaxies with strong [OIII] 5007 emission. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we present statistics on the environment of Green Peas and investigate its effects on their ionized gas properties. Although most dwarf starburst galaxies are in low-density environments, we identify a sample of Green Peas in dense environments. Emission line observations with the WIYN 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak reveal that one cluster Green Pea is more highly ionized in the direction of the cluster center. Ram pressure stripping likely generates this ionization gradient. We explore the role of the environment in enhancing star formation rates and ionization, and we compare the nebular properties of Green Peas in high-density environments to those in low-density environments.

  5. PED/PEA-15 Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Ins-1E Pancreatic Beta-Cells via PLD-1

    PubMed Central

    Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Zatterale, Federica; Nigro, Cecilia; Mirra, Paola; Falco, Roberta; Ulianich, Luca; Di Jeso, Bruno; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The small scaffold protein PED/PEA-15 is involved in several different physiologic and pathologic processes, such as cell proliferation and survival, diabetes and cancer. PED/PEA-15 exerts an anti-apoptotic function due to its ability to interfere with both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in different cell types. Recent evidence shows that mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 present larger pancreatic islets and increased beta-cells mass. In the present work we investigated PED/PEA-15 role in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E beta-cells. In pancreatic islets isolated from TgPED/PEA-15 mice hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA fragmentation was lower compared to WT islets. TUNEL analysis showed that PED/PEA-15 overexpression increases the viability of Ins-1E beta-cells and enhances their resistance to apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide exposure. The activity of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP-1 were markedly reduced in Ins-1E cells overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Ins-1EPED/PEA-15). In parallel, we observed a decrease of the mRNA levels of pro-apoptotic genes Bcl-xS and Bad. In contrast, the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xL was enhanced. Accordingly, DNA fragmentation was higher in control cells compared to Ins-1EPED/PEA-15 cells. Interestingly, the preincubation with propranolol, an inhibitor of the pathway of PLD-1, a known interactor of PED/PEA-15, responsible for its deleterious effects on glucose tolerance, abolishes the antiapoptotic effects of PED/PEA-15 overexpression in Ins-1E beta-cells. The same results have been obtained by inhibiting PED/PEA-15 interaction with PLD-1 in Ins-1EPED/PEA-15. These results show that PED/PEA-15 overexpression is sufficient to block hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E cells through a PLD-1 mediated mechanism. PMID:25489735

  6. 1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE. - Fort Delaware, Sea Wall, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  7. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE - Fort Delaware, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  8. Immunofluorescence detection of pea protein in meat products.

    PubMed

    Petrášová, Michaela; Pospiech, Matej; Tremlová, Bohuslava; Javůrková, Zdeňka

    2016-08-01

    In this study we developed an immunofluorescence method to detect pea protein in meat products. Pea protein has a high nutritional value but in sensitive individuals it may be responsible for causing allergic reactions. We produced model meat products with various additions of pea protein and flour; the detection limit (LOD) of the method for pea flour was 0.5% addition, and for pea protein it was 0.001% addition. The repeatabilities and reproducibilities for samples both positive and negative for pea protein were all 100%. In a blind test with model products and commercial samples, there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) between the declared concentrations of pea protein and flour and the immunofluorescence method results. Sensitivity was 1.06 and specificity was 1.00. These results show that the immunofluorescence method is suitable for the detection of pea protein in meat products. PMID:27441410

  9. Pea Plants Show Risk Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dener, Efrat; Kacelnik, Alex; Shemesh, Hagai

    2016-07-11

    Sensitivity to variability in resources has been documented in humans, primates, birds, and social insects, but the fit between empirical results and the predictions of risk sensitivity theory (RST), which aims to explain this sensitivity in adaptive terms, is weak [1]. RST predicts that agents should switch between risk proneness and risk aversion depending on state and circumstances, especially according to the richness of the least variable option [2]. Unrealistic assumptions about agents' information processing mechanisms and poor knowledge of the extent to which variability imposes specific selection in nature are strong candidates to explain the gap between theory and data. RST's rationale also applies to plants, where it has not hitherto been tested. Given the differences between animals' and plants' information processing mechanisms, such tests should help unravel the conflicts between theory and data. Measuring root growth allocation by split-root pea plants, we show that they favor variability when mean nutrient levels are low and the opposite when they are high, supporting the most widespread RST prediction. However, the combination of non-linear effects of nitrogen availability at local and systemic levels may explain some of these effects as a consequence of mechanisms not necessarily evolved to cope with variance [3, 4]. This resembles animal examples in which properties of perception and learning cause risk sensitivity even though they are not risk adaptations [5]. PMID:27374342

  10. Pea Disease Diagnostic Series- Rhizoctonia seed, seedling and root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea disease diagnostic cards that growers can carry with them into the field that are water resistant and durable which can be used to identify the signs and symptoms of major pea pathogens were developed. Color photographs of major fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens on peas and a brief descript...

  11. 7 CFR 457.137 - Green pea crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Dry peas. Green peas that have matured to the dry form for use as food, feed, or seed. Good farming... the Special Provisions. Processor. Any business enterprise regularly engaged in canning or freezing... peas genetically developed to be shelled prior to eating, canning or freezing. 2. Unit Division (a)...

  12. The pea gene NA encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sandra E; Elliott, Robert C; Helliwell, Chris A; Poole, Andrew T; Reid, James B

    2003-01-01

    The gibberellin (GA)-deficient dwarf na mutant in pea (Pisum sativum) has severely reduced internode elongation, reduced root growth, and decreased leaflet size. However, the seeds develop normally. Two genes, PsKAO1 and PsKAO2, encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases of the subfamily CYP88A were isolated. Both PsKAO1 and PsKAO2 had ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO) activity, catalyzing the three steps of the GA biosynthetic pathway from ent-kaurenoic acid to GA(12) when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). In addition to the intermediates ent-7alpha-hydroxykaurenoic acid and GA(12)-aldehyde, some additional products of the pea KAO activity were detected, including ent-6alpha,7alpha-dihydroxykaurenoic acid and 7beta-hydroxykaurenolide. The NA gene encodes PsKAO1, because in two independent mutant alleles, na-1 and na-2, PsKAO1 had altered sequences and the five-base deletion in PsKAO1 associated with the na-1 allele cosegregated with the dwarf na phenotype. PsKAO1 was expressed in the stem, apical bud, leaf, pod, and root, organs in which GA levels have previously been shown to be reduced in na plants. PsKAO2 was expressed only in seeds and this may explain the normal seed development and normal GA biosynthesis in seeds of na plants.

  13. Effect of Ca2+ on programmed death of guard and epidermal cells of pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Kiselevsky, D B; Kuznetsova, Yu E; Vasil'ev, L A; Lobysheva, N V; Zinovkin, R A; Nesov, A V; Shestak, A A; Samuilov, V D

    2010-05-01

    The effect of Ca2+ on programmed death of guard cells (GC) and epidermal cells (EC) determined from destruction of the cell nucleus was investigated in epidermis of pea leaves. Ca2+ at concentrations of 1-100 microM increased and at a concentration of 1 mM prevented the CN(-)-induced destruction of the nucleus in GC, disrupting the permeability barrier of GC plasma membrane for propidium iodide (PI). Ca2+ at concentrations of 0.1-1 mM enhanced drastically the number of EC nuclei stained by PI in epidermis treated with chitosan, an inducer of programmed cell death. The internucleosomal DNA fragmentation caused by CN(-) was suppressed by 2 mM Ca2+ on 6 h incubation, but fragmentation was stimulated on more prolonged treatment (16 h). Presumably, the disruption of the permeability barrier of plasma membrane for PI is not a sign of necrosis in plant cells. Quinacrine and diphenylene iodonium at 50 microM concentration prevented GC death induced by CN(-) or CN(-) + 0.1 mM Ca2+ but had no influence on respiration and photosynthetic O2 evolution in pea leaf slices. The generation of reactive oxygen species determined from 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence was promoted by Ca2+ in epidermal peels from pea leaves.

  14. Clarification on Host Range of Didymella pinodes the Causal Agent of Pea Ascochyta Blight

    PubMed Central

    Barilli, Eleonora; Cobos, Maria José; Rubiales, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Didymella pinodes is the principal causal agent of ascochyta blight, one of the most important fungal diseases of pea (Pisum sativum) worldwide. Understanding its host specificity has crucial implications in epidemiology and management; however, this has not been clearly delineated yet. In this study we attempt to clarify the host range of D. pinodes and to compare it with that of other close Didymella spp. D. pinodes was very virulent on pea accessions, although differences in virulence were identified among isolates. On the contrary, studied isolates of D. fabae, D. rabiei, and D. lentil showed a reduced ability to infect pea not causing macroscopically visible symptoms on any of the pea accessions tested. D. pinodes isolates were also infective to some extend on almost all species tested including species such as Hedysarum coronarium, Lathyrus sativus, Lupinus albus, Medicago spp., Trifolium spp., Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vicia articulata which were not mentioned before as hosts of D. pinodes. On the contrary, D. lentil and D. rabiei were more specific, infecting only lentil and chickpea, respectively. D. fabae was intermediate, infecting mainly faba bean, but also slightly other species such as Glycine max, Phaseolus vulgaris, Trifolium spp., Vicia sativa, and V. articulata. DNA sequence analysis of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) was performed to confirm identity of the isolates studies and to determine phylogenetic relationship among the Didymella species, revealing the presence of two clearly distinct clades. Clade one was represented by two supported subclusters including D. fabae isolates as well as D. rabiei with D. lentil isolates. Clade two was the largest and included all the D. pinodes isolates as well as Phoma medicaginis var. pinodella. Genetic distance between D. pinodes and the other Didymella spp. isolates was not correlated with overall differences in pathogenicity. Based on evidences presented here, D

  15. Clarification on Host Range of Didymella pinodes the Causal Agent of Pea Ascochyta Blight.

    PubMed

    Barilli, Eleonora; Cobos, Maria José; Rubiales, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Didymella pinodes is the principal causal agent of ascochyta blight, one of the most important fungal diseases of pea (Pisum sativum) worldwide. Understanding its host specificity has crucial implications in epidemiology and management; however, this has not been clearly delineated yet. In this study we attempt to clarify the host range of D. pinodes and to compare it with that of other close Didymella spp. D. pinodes was very virulent on pea accessions, although differences in virulence were identified among isolates. On the contrary, studied isolates of D. fabae, D. rabiei, and D. lentil showed a reduced ability to infect pea not causing macroscopically visible symptoms on any of the pea accessions tested. D. pinodes isolates were also infective to some extend on almost all species tested including species such as Hedysarum coronarium, Lathyrus sativus, Lupinus albus, Medicago spp., Trifolium spp., Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vicia articulata which were not mentioned before as hosts of D. pinodes. On the contrary, D. lentil and D. rabiei were more specific, infecting only lentil and chickpea, respectively. D. fabae was intermediate, infecting mainly faba bean, but also slightly other species such as Glycine max, Phaseolus vulgaris, Trifolium spp., Vicia sativa, and V. articulata. DNA sequence analysis of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) was performed to confirm identity of the isolates studies and to determine phylogenetic relationship among the Didymella species, revealing the presence of two clearly distinct clades. Clade one was represented by two supported subclusters including D. fabae isolates as well as D. rabiei with D. lentil isolates. Clade two was the largest and included all the D. pinodes isolates as well as Phoma medicaginis var. pinodella. Genetic distance between D. pinodes and the other Didymella spp. isolates was not correlated with overall differences in pathogenicity. Based on evidences presented here, D

  16. Analysis of the state of posttranslational calmodulin methylation in developing pea plants. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-07-01

    A specific calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used in a radiometric assay to analyze the degree of methylation of lysine-115 in pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Calmodulin was isolated from dissected segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by incubation with the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of ({sup 3}H)methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. By this approach, the presence of unmethylated calmodulins were demonstrated in pea tissues, and the levels of methylation varied depending on the developmental state of the tissue tested. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments of both etiolated and green plants, and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The incorporation of methyl groups into these calmodulin samples appears to be specific for position 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position competitively inhibited methyl group incorporation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in the ability of methylated and unmethylated calmodulins to activate pea NAD kinase raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation of calmodulin could be another mechanism for regulating calmodulin activity.

  17. Sugar-Binding Activity of Pea Lectin Expressed in White Clover Hairy Roots.

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, C. L.; Logman, TJJ.; Stam, H. C.; Kijne, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Introduction of the pea (Pisum sativum L.) lectin (PSL) gene into white clover (Trifolium repens L.) hairy roots facilitates nodulation by the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae, which normally nodulates pea and not white clover (C.L. Diaz, L.S. Melchers, P.J.J. Hooykaas, B.J.J. Lugtenberg, and J.W. Kijne [1989] Nature 338: 579-581). Here, we show that PSL is functionally expressed in transgenic white clover hairy roots transformed with the PSL gene. PSL could be isolated from these roots by affinity chromatography. Immunoanalysis of PSL showed the presence of polypeptides corresponding to the PSL precursor and its [beta] subunits. In addition, we developed a highly sensitive localization technique based on specific binding of a glycan moiety of rat IgE to PSL. Similar to the situation in pea roots, PSL appeared to be localized on the external cell surface of elongated epidermal cells and on the tips of emerging and growing root hairs of transgenic white clover hairy roots. PSL was not observed on normal white clover roots and on hairy roots without the PSL gene. These results show that (a) in transgenic white clover hairy roots, PSL is correctly processed and targeted to root cells susceptible to rhizobial infection, and (b) like in pea roots, PSL is surface bound with at least one of its two sugar-binding sites available for (rhizobial) ligands. PMID:12228660

  18. Review of the health benefits of peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Dahl, Wendy J; Foster, Lauren M; Tyler, Robert T

    2012-08-01

    Pulses, including peas, have long been important components of the human diet due to their content of starch, protein and other nutrients. More recently, the health benefits other than nutrition associated with pulse consumption have attracted much interest. The focus of the present review paper is the demonstrated and potential health benefits associated with the consumption of peas, Pisum sativum L., specifically green and yellow cotyledon dry peas, also known as smooth peas or field peas. These health benefits derive mainly from the concentration and properties of starch, protein, fibre, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals in peas. Fibre from the seed coat and the cell walls of the cotyledon contributes to gastrointestinal function and health, and reduces the digestibility of starch in peas. The intermediate amylose content of pea starch also contributes to its lower glycaemic index and reduced starch digestibility. Pea protein, when hydrolysed, may yield peptides with bioactivities, including angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor activity and antioxidant activity. The vitamin and mineral contents of peas may play important roles in the prevention of deficiency-related diseases, specifically those related to deficiencies of Se or folate. Peas contain a variety of phytochemicals once thought of only as antinutritive factors. These include polyphenolics, in coloured seed coat types in particular, which may have antioxidant and anticarcinogenic activity, saponins which may exhibit hypocholesterolaemic and anticarcinogenic activity, and galactose oligosaccharides which may exert beneficial prebiotic effects in the large intestine.

  19. Colonizing ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens 2112, among collections of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens spp. in pea rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Dal; Fuente, Leonardo De La; Weller, David M; Thomashow, Linda S

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 2112, isolated in Korea as an indigenous antagonistic bacteria, can produce 2,4- diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and the siderophore pyoveridin2112 for the control of phytophthora blight of red-pepper. P. fluorescens 2112 was classified into a new genotype C among the 17 genotypes of 2,4-DAPG producers, by phlD restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The colonizing ability of P. fluorescens 2112 in pea rhizosphere was equal to the well-known pea colonizers, P. fluorescens Q8r1 (genotype D) and MVP1-4 (genotype P), after 6 cycling cultivations for 18 weeks. Four tested 2,4- DAPG-producing Pseudomonas spp. could colonize with about a 96% dominance ratio against total bacteria in pea rhizosphere. The strain P. fluorescens 2112 was as good a colonizer as other Pseudomonas spp. genotypes in pea plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria.

  20. CEI-PEA Alert, Fall 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Innovation - Public Education Association, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The "CEI-PEA Alert" is an advocacy newsletter that deals with topics of interest to all concerned with the New York City public schools. This issue includes: (1) Chancellor Joel I. Klein Announces New Accountability System for NYC Schools; (2) Students Achieve Record-High Scores!; (3) Use Data to Help Your Child Improve Performance; (4) Are…

  1. CEI-PEA Alert, Summer 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Innovation - Public Education Association, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "CEI-PEA Alert" is an advocacy newsletter that deals with topics of interest to all concerned with the New York City public schools. This issue includes: (1) Practical Skills & High Academic Standards: Career Technical Education; (2) Parents: Help Your Children Gain "Soft Skills" for the Workforce; (3) Culinary Arts Motivate High School…

  2. Heat Stress Response in Pea Involves Interaction of Mitochondrial Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase with a Novel 86-Kilodalton Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Escobar Galvis, Martha L.; Marttila, Salla; Håkansson, Gunilla; Forsberg, Jens; Knorpp, Carina

    2001-01-01

    In this work we have further characterized the first mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase (mtNDPK) isolated from plants. The mitochondrial isoform was found to be especially abundant in reproductive and young tissues. Expression of the pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Oregon sugarpod) mtNDPK was not affected by different stress conditions. However, the pea mtNDPK was found to interact with a novel 86-kD protein, which is de novo synthesized in pea leaves upon exposure to heat. Thus, we have evidence for the involvement of mtNDPK in mitochondrial heat response in pea in vivo. Studies on oligomerization revealed that mtNDPK was found in complexes of various sizes, corresponding to the sizes of e.g. hexamers, tetramers, and dimers, indicating flexibility in oligomerization. This flexibility, also found for other NDPK isoforms, has been correlated with the ability of this enzyme to interact with other proteins. We believe that the mtNDPK is involved in heat stress response in pea, possibly as a modulator of the 86-kD protein. PMID:11351071

  3. Dwarf mutations in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.): origin, morphology, inheritance and linkage studies.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Dibyendu

    2009-08-01

    Induction of mutation has been used to create additional genetic variability in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.). During the ongoing investigations on different induced-morphological mutants, the author detected three types of dwarf mutants in grass pea. One mutant, designated as dwf1 type was earlier identified in colchicine-induced C2 generation of grass pea variety BioR-231 while the other two, designated as dwf2 and dwf3 were isolated in 250 Gy and 300 Gy gamma ray irradiated M2 progeny of variety 'BioR-231' and 'Hooghly Local', respectively. As compared to their parental varieties (controls), all the three mutants manifested stunted, erect and determinate stem, early maturity and tolerance to pod shattering habit. The mutants differed from each other, as well as with controls, in number of primary branches, nature of stipules and internodes, length of peduncle, leaflet and seed coat colour, seed yield and seed neurotoxin content. The three dwarf mutants were monogenically recessive and bred true in successive generations. F2 segregation pattern obtained from the crosses involving the three mutants indicated that dwarf mutation in grass pea was controlled by two independent non-allelic genes, assigned as df1 (for dwf1 type), df2 (for dwf2 type) and df3 (for dwf3 type), with the df1 locus being multiple allelic. Primary trisomic analyses revealed the presence of df1/df2 locus on the extra chromosome of trisomic type I, whereas df3 was located on the extra chromosome of type III. Linkage studies involving five other phenotypic markers suggested linked association of df1/df2 locus with lfc (leaflet colour) and wgn (winged internode) and df3 locus with cbl (seed coat colour). Both the loci; however, assorted independently with flower colour and stipule character. The dwarf types can be utilized as valuable tools for further cytogenetic research and breeding of grass pea.

  4. Antibody expressing pea seeds as fodder for prevention of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Jana; Saalbach, Isolde; Jahn, Doreen; Giersberg, Martin; Haehnel, Sigrun; Wedel, Julia; Macek, Jeanette; Zoufal, Karen; Glünder, Gerhard; Falkenburg, Dieter; Kipriyanov, Sergey M

    2009-01-01

    Background Coccidiosis caused by protozoans of genus Eimeria is a chicken parasitic disease of great economical importance. Conventional disease control strategies depend on vaccination and prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs. Alternative solution to prevent and treat coccidiosis could be provided by passive immunization using orally delivered neutralizing antibodies. We investigated the possibility to mitigate the parasitic infection by feeding poultry with antibody expressing transgenic crop seeds. Results Using the phage display antibody library, we generated a panel of anti-Eimeria scFv antibody fragments with high sporozoite-neutralizing activity. These antibodies were expressed either transiently in agrobacteria-infiltrated tobacco leaves or stably in seeds of transgenic pea plants. Comparison of the scFv antibodies purified either from tobacco leaves or from the pea seeds demonstrated no difference in their antigen-binding activity and molecular form compositions. Force-feeding experiments demonstrated that oral delivery of flour prepared from the transgenic pea seeds had higher parasite neutralizing activity in vivo than the purified antibody fragments isolated from tobacco. The pea seed content was found to protect antibodies against degradation by gastrointestinal proteases (>100-fold gain in stability). Ad libitum feeding of chickens demonstrated that the transgenic seeds were well consumed and not shunned. Furthermore, feeding poultry with shred prepared from the antibody expressing pea seeds led to significant mitigation of infection caused both by high and low challenge doses of Eimeria oocysts. Conclusion The results suggest that our strategy offers a general approach to control parasitic infections in production animals using cost-effective antibody expression in crop seeds affordable for the animal health market. PMID:19747368

  5. Automorphosis and auxin polar transport of etiolated pea seedlings under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Ueda, Junichi

    2004-11-01

    On STS-95 space experiment, etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings showed automorphosis and activities of auxin polar transport in epicotyls were substantially suppressed. These results together with the fact that inhibitors of auxin polar transport induced automorphosis-like growth and development strongly suggested that there are close relationships between automorphosis and auxin polar transport in etiolated pea seedlings. In order to know how gravistimuli control auxin polar transport at molecular levels, we isolated novel cDNAs of PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 encoding putative auxin efflux and influx carriers from etiolated pea seedlings. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (accession no. AY222857) and AtPINs, and between PsAUX1 and AtAUX1. Exogenously applied auxin substantially enhanced the expression of PsAUX1 and PsPIN2 as well as PsPIN1. Simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat remarkably increased gene expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the hook and the 1st internode of pea epicotyls, while the increase of expression of PsPIN2 in both organs was not so much. These results suggest that PsPINs and PsAUX1 are auxin-inducible genes, and the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 is under the control of gravistimulation. A possible role of these genes in regulating auxin transport relevant to automorphosis of etiolated pea seedlings is also discussed. PMID:15858337

  6. Scissors Mode in Gd Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, G. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-02-01

    Spectra of γ rays following neutron capture at isolated resonances of 6 stable Gd isotopes were measured with highly segmented BaF2 detector DANCE at the Los Alamos LANSCE spallation neutron source. The main emphasis was put on studying the γ-cascade decay of neutron resonances to get unique information on photon strength. An analysis of the accumulated γ-ray spectra within the extreme statistical model leads to an inescapable conclusion that scissors mode resonances are built not only on the ground-state, but also on excited levels in all product nuclei studied. The results on summed B(M1)↑ strength and energy of the scissors mode are compared with systematics of scissors mode parameters for the ground-state transitions deduced from nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements. A specific feature of our experiments is the investigation of scissors mode of odd nuclei, for which the nuclear resonance fluorescence provides only limited information.

  7. Plant waxy bloom on peas affects infection of pea aphids by Pandora neoaphidis.

    PubMed

    Duetting, Patrick S; Ding, Hongjian; Neufeld, Jeffrey; Eigenbrode, Sanford D

    2003-11-01

    This study examined the effects of the surface wax bloom of pea plants, Pisum sativum, on infection of pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, by the fungal pathogen Pandora neoaphidis. In prior field surveys, a higher proportion of P. neoaphidis-killed pea aphids (cadavers) had been observed on a pea line with reduced wax bloom, as compared with a sister line with normal surface wax bloom. Laboratory bioassays were conducted in order to examine the mechanisms. After plants of each line infested with aphids were exposed to similar densities of conidia, the rate of accumulation of cadavers on the reduced wax line was significantly greater than on the normal wax bloom line; at the end of the experiment (13d), the proportion of aphid cadavers on the reduced wax line was approximately four times that on the normal wax bloom line. When plants were exposed to conidia first and then infested with aphids, the rate of accumulation of cadavers was slightly but significantly greater on the reduced wax line, and infection at the end of the experiment (16d) did not differ between the lines. When aphids were exposed first and then released onto the plants, no differences in the proportion of aphid cadavers were observed between the pea lines. Greater infection of pea aphid on reduced wax peas appears to depend upon plants being exposed to inoculum while aphids are settled in typical feeding positions on the plant. Additional experiments demonstrated increased adhesion and germination by P. neoaphidis conidia to leaf surfaces of the reduced wax line as compared with normal wax line, and this could help explain the higher infection rate by P. neoaphidis on the reduced wax line. In bioassays using surface waxes extracted from the two lines, there was no effect of wax source on germination of P. neoaphidis conidia.

  8. Widespread host-dependent hybrid unfitness in the pea aphid species complex.

    PubMed

    Peccoud, Jean; de la Huerta, Manon; Bonhomme, Joël; Laurence, Cindy; Outreman, Yannick; Smadja, Carole M; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Linking adaptive divergence to hybrid unfitness is necessary to understand the ecological factors contributing to reproductive isolation and speciation. To date, this link has been demonstrated in few model systems, most of which encompass ecotypes that occupy relatively early stages in the speciation process. Here we extend these studies by assessing how host-plant adaptation conditions hybrid fitness in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We made crosses between and within five pea aphid biotypes adapted to different host plants and representing various stages of divergence within the complex. Performance of F1 hybrids and nonhybrids was assessed on a "universal" host that is favorable to all pea aphid biotypes in laboratory conditions. Although hybrids performed equally well as nonhybrids on the universal host, their performance was much lower than nonhybrids on the natural hosts of their parental populations. Hence, hybrids, rather than being intrinsically deficient, are maladapted to their parents' hosts. Interestingly, the impact of this maladaptation was stronger in certain hybrids from crosses involving the most divergent biotype, suggesting that host-dependent postzygotic isolation has continued to evolve late in divergence. Even though host-independent deficiencies are not excluded, hybrid maladaptation to parental hosts supports the hypothesis of ecological speciation in this complex.

  9. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a hepatoprotective and antioxidant extract of pea by-product.

    PubMed

    Seida, Ahmed A; El Tanbouly, Nebal D; Islam, Wafaa T; Eid, Hanaa H; El Maraghy, Shohda A; El Senousy, Amira S

    2015-01-01

    The hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of the hydroalcoholic extract (PE) of pea (Pisum sativum L.) by-product were evaluated, using CCl4-induced oxidative stress and hepatic damage in rats. These activities were assessed via measuring alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein and albumin, malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), protein thiols (PSH), nitrite/nitrate levels, glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities, as well as, histopathological evaluation. PE revealed significant hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities mostly found in n-butanol fraction. Chromatographic fractionation of this active fraction led to the isolation of five flavonoid glycosides namely, quercetin-3-O-sophorotrioside (1), quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (2), quercetin-3-O-(6″″-O-E sinapoyl)-sophorotrioside (3), quercetin-3-O-(6″″-O-E feruloyl)-sophorotrioside (4) and quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5). The isolated compounds were quantified in PE, using a validated HPLC method and the nutritional composition of pea by-product was also investigated. Our results suggest that pea by-product contained biologically active constituents which can be utilised to obtain high value added products for nutraceutical use.

  10. Response of Pea Varieties to Damage Degree of Pea Weevil, Bruchus pisorum L.

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Ivelina Mitkova

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the response of five pea varieties (Pisum sativum L.) to damage degree of Bruchus pisorum: Glyans, Modus, Kamerton, and Svit (Ukrainian cultivars) and Pleven 4 (Bulgarian cultivar). The seeds were classified into three types: healthy seeds (type 1), damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence hole (type 2), and damaged seeds with bruchid emergence hole (type 3) and they were sown. It was found that the weight of 1000 seeds did not affect the field germination of the pea varieties. Healthy and damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence holes (first and second seed types) provide a very good opportunity for growth and development while plants from damaged seeds with bruchid emergence holes had poor germination and vigor and low productivity. These seeds cannot provide the creation of well-garnished seeding and stable crop yields. Among tested varieties, the Ukrainian variety Glyans had considerably higher seed weight, field germination, and index germination and weak egg-laying activity of B. pisorum compared to others. Use of spring pea cultivars that are weakly preferred by the pea weevil in breeding programs would reduce losses due to pea weevil and provide an environmentally safer option to its control. PMID:27042379

  11. Molecular cloning of isoflavone reductase from pea (Pisum sativum L.): evidence for a 3R-isoflavanone intermediate in (+)-pisatin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Paiva, N L; Sun, Y; Dixon, R A; VanEtten, H D; Hrazdina, G

    1994-08-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) reduces achiral isoflavones to chiral isoflavanones during the biosynthesis of chiral pterocarpan phytoalexins. A cDNA clone for IFR from pea (Pisum sativum) was isolated using the polymerase chain reaction and expressed in Escherichia coli. Analysis of circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the reduction product sophorol obtained using the recombinant enzyme indicated that the isoflavanone possessed the 3R stereochemistry, in contrast to previous reports indicating a 3S-isoflavanone as the product of the pea IFR. Analysis of CD spectra of sophorol produced using enzyme extracts of CuCl2-treated pea seedlings confirmed the 3R stereochemistry. Thus, the stereochemistry of the isoflavanone intermediate in (+)-pisatin biosynthesis in pea is the same as that in (-)-medicarpin biosynthesis in alfalfa, although the final pterocarpans have the opposite stereochemistry. At the amino acid level the pea IFR cDNA was 91.8 and 85.2% identical to the IFRs from alfalfa and chickpea, respectively. IFR appears to be encoded by a single gene in pea. Its transcripts are highly induced in CuCl2-treated seedlings, consistent with the appearance of IFR enzyme activity and pisatin accumulation.

  12. Genomic Tools in Pea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tayeh, Nadim; Aubert, Grégoire; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Warkentin, Thomas D.; Burstin, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22–25% protein, complex starch and fiber constituents, and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tons produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel's experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress toward deciphering the pea genome. PMID:26640470

  13. 7 CFR 201.56-6 - Legume or pea family, Fabaceae (Leguminosae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., beans (Phaseolus spp.), Florida beggarweed, black medic, broadbean, burclovers, buttonclover, chickpea.... (b) Adzuki bean, broadbean, chickpea, field pea, lentil, pea, roughpea, runner bean, velvetbean,...

  14. 7 CFR 201.56-6 - Legume or pea family, Fabaceae (Leguminosae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., beans (Phaseolus spp.), Florida beggarweed, black medic, broadbean, burclovers, buttonclover, chickpea.... (b) Adzuki bean, broadbean, chickpea, field pea, lentil, pea, roughpea, runner bean, velvetbean,...

  15. 7 CFR 201.56-6 - Legume or pea family, Fabaceae (Leguminosae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., beans (Phaseolus spp.), Florida beggarweed, black medic, broadbean, burclovers, buttonclover, chickpea.... (b) Adzuki bean, broadbean, chickpea, field pea, lentil, pea, roughpea, runner bean, velvetbean,...

  16. 7 CFR 201.56-6 - Legume or pea family, Fabaceae (Leguminosae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., beans (Phaseolus spp.), Florida beggarweed, black medic, broadbean, burclovers, buttonclover, chickpea.... (b) Adzuki bean, broadbean, chickpea, field pea, lentil, pea, roughpea, runner bean, velvetbean,...

  17. [THE EFFECT OF ACID RAIN ON ULTRASTRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL PARAMETERS OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS OF PEA LEAVES].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, A V; Vodka, M V; Belyavskaya, N A; Khomochkin, A P; Zolotareva, E K

    2016-01-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain (SAR) on the ultrastructure and functional parameters of the photosynthetic apparatus were studied using 14-day-old pea leaves as test system. Pea plants were sprayed with an aqueous solution containing NaNO₃(0.2 mM) and Na₂SO₄(0.2 mM) (pH 5.6, a control variant), or with the same solution, which was acidified to pH 2.5 (acid variant). Functional characteristics were determined by chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. Acid rain application caused reduction in the efficiency of the photosynthetic electron transport by 25%, which was accompanied by an increase by 85% in the quantum yield of thermal dissipation of excess light quanta. Ultrastructural changes in chloroplast were registered by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after two days of the SAR-treatment of pea leaves. In this case, the changes in the structure of grana, heterogeneity of thylakoids packaging in granum, namely, the increase of intra-thylakoid gaps and thickness of granal thylakoids compared to the control were found. The migration of protein complexes in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts isolated from leaves treated with SAR was suppressed. It was shown also that carbonic anhydrase activity was inhibited in chloroplast preparations isolated from SAR-treated pea leaves. We proposed a hypothesis on the possible inactivation of thylakoid carbonic anhydrase under SAR and its involvement in the inhibition of photochemical activity of chloroplasts. The data obtained allows to suggest that acid rains negatively affect the photosynthetic apparatus disrupting the membrane system of chloroplast. PMID:27220252

  18. [THE EFFECT OF ACID RAIN ON ULTRASTRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL PARAMETERS OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS OF PEA LEAVES].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, A V; Vodka, M V; Belyavskaya, N A; Khomochkin, A P; Zolotareva, E K

    2016-01-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain (SAR) on the ultrastructure and functional parameters of the photosynthetic apparatus were studied using 14-day-old pea leaves as test system. Pea plants were sprayed with an aqueous solution containing NaNO₃(0.2 mM) and Na₂SO₄(0.2 mM) (pH 5.6, a control variant), or with the same solution, which was acidified to pH 2.5 (acid variant). Functional characteristics were determined by chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. Acid rain application caused reduction in the efficiency of the photosynthetic electron transport by 25%, which was accompanied by an increase by 85% in the quantum yield of thermal dissipation of excess light quanta. Ultrastructural changes in chloroplast were registered by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after two days of the SAR-treatment of pea leaves. In this case, the changes in the structure of grana, heterogeneity of thylakoids packaging in granum, namely, the increase of intra-thylakoid gaps and thickness of granal thylakoids compared to the control were found. The migration of protein complexes in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts isolated from leaves treated with SAR was suppressed. It was shown also that carbonic anhydrase activity was inhibited in chloroplast preparations isolated from SAR-treated pea leaves. We proposed a hypothesis on the possible inactivation of thylakoid carbonic anhydrase under SAR and its involvement in the inhibition of photochemical activity of chloroplasts. The data obtained allows to suggest that acid rains negatively affect the photosynthetic apparatus disrupting the membrane system of chloroplast.

  19. Gibberellin (GA3) enhances cell wall invertase activity and mRNA levels in elongating dwarf pea (Pisum sativum) shoots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L. L.; Mitchell, J. P.; Cohn, N. S.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    The invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) purified from cell walls of dwarf pea stems to homogeneity has a molecular mass of 64 kilodaltons (kD). Poly(A)+RNA was isolated from shoots of dwarf pea plants, and a cDNA library was constructed using lambda gt11 as an expression vector. The expression cDNA library was screened with polyclonal antibodies against pea cell wall invertase. One invertase cDNA clone was characterized as a full-length cDNA with 1,863 base pairs. Compared with other known invertases, one homologous region in the amino acid sequence was found. The conserved motif, Asn-Asp-Pro-Asn-Gly, is located near the N-terminal end of invertase. Northern blot analysis showed that the amount of invertase mRNA (1.86 kb) was rapidly induced to a maximal level 4 h after GA3 treatment, then gradually decreased to the control level. The mRNA level at 4 h in GA3-treated peas was fivefold higher than that of the control group. The maximal increase in activity of pea cell wall invertase elicited by GA3 occcured at 8 h after GA3 treatment. This invertase isoform was shown immunocytochemically to be localized in the cell walls, where a 10-fold higher accumulation occurred in GA3-treated tissue compared with control tissue. This study indicates that the expression of the pea shoot cell-wall invertase gene could be regulated by GA3 at transcriptional and/or translational levels.

  20. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  1. Studies on the Control of Ascochyta Blight in Field Peas (Pisum sativum L.) Caused by Ascochyta pinodes in Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Xu, Shengchun; Yao, Xiefeng; Zhang, Guwen; Mao, Weihua; Hu, Qizan; Feng, Zhijuan; Gong, Yaming

    2016-01-01

    Ascochyta blight, an infection caused by a complex of Ascochyta pinodes, Ascochyta pinodella, Ascochyta pisi, and/or Phoma koolunga, is a destructive disease in many field peas (Pisum sativum L.)-growing regions, and it causes significant losses in grain yield. To understand the composition of fungi associated with this disease in Zhejiang Province, China, a total of 65 single-pycnidiospore fungal isolates were obtained from diseased pea samples collected from 5 locations in this region. These isolates were identified as Ascochyta pinodes by molecular techniques and their morphological and physiological characteristics. The mycelia of ZJ-1 could penetrate pea leaves across the stomas, and formed specific penetration structures and directly pierced leaves. The resistance level of 23 available pea cultivars was tested against their representative isolate A. pinodes ZJ-1 using the excised leaf-assay technique. The ZJ-1 mycelia could penetrate the leaves of all tested cultivars, and they developed typical symptoms, which suggested that all tested cultivars were susceptible to the fungus. Chemical fungicides and biological control agents were screened for management of this disease, and their efficacies were further determined. Most of the tested fungicides (11 out of 14) showed high activity toward ZJ-1 with EC50 < 5 μg/mL. Moreover, fungicides, including tebuconazole, boscalid, iprodione, carbendazim, and fludioxonil, displayed more than 80% disease control efficacy under the recorded conditions. Three biocontrol strains of Bacillus sp. and one of Pantoea agglomerans were isolated from pea-related niches and significantly reduced the severity of disease under greenhouse and field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first study on ascochyta blight in field peas, and results presented here will be useful for controlling the disease in this area. PMID:27148177

  2. Studies on the Control of Ascochyta Blight in Field Peas (Pisum sativum L.) Caused by Ascochyta pinodes in Zhejiang Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Xu, Shengchun; Yao, Xiefeng; Zhang, Guwen; Mao, Weihua; Hu, Qizan; Feng, Zhijuan; Gong, Yaming

    2016-01-01

    Ascochyta blight, an infection caused by a complex of Ascochyta pinodes, Ascochyta pinodella, Ascochyta pisi, and/or Phoma koolunga, is a destructive disease in many field peas (Pisum sativum L.)-growing regions, and it causes significant losses in grain yield. To understand the composition of fungi associated with this disease in Zhejiang Province, China, a total of 65 single-pycnidiospore fungal isolates were obtained from diseased pea samples collected from 5 locations in this region. These isolates were identified as Ascochyta pinodes by molecular techniques and their morphological and physiological characteristics. The mycelia of ZJ-1 could penetrate pea leaves across the stomas, and formed specific penetration structures and directly pierced leaves. The resistance level of 23 available pea cultivars was tested against their representative isolate A. pinodes ZJ-1 using the excised leaf-assay technique. The ZJ-1 mycelia could penetrate the leaves of all tested cultivars, and they developed typical symptoms, which suggested that all tested cultivars were susceptible to the fungus. Chemical fungicides and biological control agents were screened for management of this disease, and their efficacies were further determined. Most of the tested fungicides (11 out of 14) showed high activity toward ZJ-1 with EC50 < 5 μg/mL. Moreover, fungicides, including tebuconazole, boscalid, iprodione, carbendazim, and fludioxonil, displayed more than 80% disease control efficacy under the recorded conditions. Three biocontrol strains of Bacillus sp. and one of Pantoea agglomerans were isolated from pea-related niches and significantly reduced the severity of disease under greenhouse and field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first study on ascochyta blight in field peas, and results presented here will be useful for controlling the disease in this area. PMID:27148177

  3. Studies on the Control of Ascochyta Blight in Field Peas (Pisum sativum L.) Caused by Ascochyta pinodes in Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Xu, Shengchun; Yao, Xiefeng; Zhang, Guwen; Mao, Weihua; Hu, Qizan; Feng, Zhijuan; Gong, Yaming

    2016-01-01

    Ascochyta blight, an infection caused by a complex of Ascochyta pinodes, Ascochyta pinodella, Ascochyta pisi, and/or Phoma koolunga, is a destructive disease in many field peas (Pisum sativum L.)-growing regions, and it causes significant losses in grain yield. To understand the composition of fungi associated with this disease in Zhejiang Province, China, a total of 65 single-pycnidiospore fungal isolates were obtained from diseased pea samples collected from 5 locations in this region. These isolates were identified as Ascochyta pinodes by molecular techniques and their morphological and physiological characteristics. The mycelia of ZJ-1 could penetrate pea leaves across the stomas, and formed specific penetration structures and directly pierced leaves. The resistance level of 23 available pea cultivars was tested against their representative isolate A. pinodes ZJ-1 using the excised leaf-assay technique. The ZJ-1 mycelia could penetrate the leaves of all tested cultivars, and they developed typical symptoms, which suggested that all tested cultivars were susceptible to the fungus. Chemical fungicides and biological control agents were screened for management of this disease, and their efficacies were further determined. Most of the tested fungicides (11 out of 14) showed high activity toward ZJ-1 with EC50 < 5 μg/mL. Moreover, fungicides, including tebuconazole, boscalid, iprodione, carbendazim, and fludioxonil, displayed more than 80% disease control efficacy under the recorded conditions. Three biocontrol strains of Bacillus sp. and one of Pantoea agglomerans were isolated from pea-related niches and significantly reduced the severity of disease under greenhouse and field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first study on ascochyta blight in field peas, and results presented here will be useful for controlling the disease in this area.

  4. Enzymatic breakdown of raffinose oligosaccharides in pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Blöchl, Andreas; Peterbauer, Thomas; Hofmann, Julia; Richter, Andreas

    2008-06-01

    Both alkaline and acidic alpha-galactosidases (alpha-D: -galactoside galactohydrolases, E.C.3.2.1.22) isolated from various plant species have been described, although little is known about their co-occurrence and functions in germinating seeds. Here, we report on the isolation of two cDNAs, encoding for alpha-galactosidases from maturing and germinating seeds of Pisum sativum. One was identified as a member of the acidic alpha-galactosidase of the family 27 glycosyl hydrolase cluster and the other as a member of the family of alkaline alpha-galactosidases, which are highly homologous to seed imbibition proteins (SIPs). PsGAL1 transcripts, encoding for the ACIDIC alpha-GALACTOSIDASE, were predominately expressed during seed maturation and acidic enzyme activities were already present in dry seeds, showing little changes during seed germination. Compartmentation studies revealed that acidic alpha-galactosidases were located in protein storage vacuoles (PSVs). PsAGA1, encoding for the ALKALINE alpha-GALACTOSIDASE, was only expressed after radicle protrusion, when about 50% of RFOs have already been broken down. RFO breakdown was markedly decreased when the translation of the alkaline enzyme was inhibited, providing evidence that PsAGA1 indeed functioned in RFO degradation. Based on these data, we present an integrated model of RFO breakdown by two sequentially active alpha-galactosidases in pea seeds.

  5. Fibril formation from pea protein and subsequent gel formation.

    PubMed

    Munialo, Claire Darizu; Martin, Anneke H; van der Linden, Erik; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2014-03-19

    The objective of this study was to characterize fibrillar aggregates made using pea proteins, to assemble formed fibrils into protein-based gels, and to study the rheological behavior of these gels. Micrometer-long fibrillar aggregates were observed after pea protein solutions had been heated for 20 h at pH 2.0. Following heating of pea proteins, it was observed that all of the proteins were hydrolyzed into peptides and that 50% of these peptides were assembled into fibrils. Changes on a structural level in pea proteins were studied using circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis. During the fibril assembly process, an increase in aggregate size was observed, which coincided with an increase in thioflavin T binding, indicating the presence of β-sheet aggregates. Fibrils made using pea proteins were more branched and curly. Gel formation of preformed fibrils was induced by slow acidification from pH 7.0 to a final pH of around pH 5.0. The ability of pea protein-based fibrillar gels to fracture during an amplitude sweep was comparable to those of soy protein and whey protein-based fibrillar gels, although gels prepared from fibrils made using pea protein and soy protein were weaker than those of whey protein. The findings show that fibrils can be prepared from pea protein, which can be incorporated into protein-based fibrillar gels.

  6. 7 CFR 457.140 - Dry pea crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.140 Dry pea crop insurance... policies: Department of Agriculture Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Reinsured Policies (Appropriate title for insurance provider) Both FCIC and reinsured policies: Dry Pea Crop Provisions 1....

  7. Plant characteristics and growth parameters of vegetable pigeon pea cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigeon pea is an important crop in dry land and semi-arid regions and is a supplementary source of dietary protein for the resource-constrained farmers. The aim of this research was to evaluate growth parameters of twelve vegetable pigeon pea genotypes at two locations in Eastern Kenya. The number o...

  8. The Effect of Rotenone on Respiration in Pea Cotyledon Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Flanagan, Anne M.; Spencer, Mary S.

    1981-01-01

    Respiration utilizing NAD-linked substrates in mitochondria isolated from cotyledons of etiolated peas (Pisum sativum L. var. Homesteader) by sucrose density gradient centrifugation exhibited resistance to rotenone. The inhibited rate of α-ketoglutarate oxidation was equivalent to the recovered rate of malate oxidation. (The recovered rate is the rate following the transient inhibition by rotenone.) The inhibitory effect of rotenone on malate oxidation increased with increasing respiratory control ratios as the mitochondria developed. The cyanide-resistant and rotenone-resistant pathways followed different courses of development as cotyledons aged. The rotenone-resistant pathway transferred reducing equivalents to the cyanide-sensitive pathway. Malic enzyme was found to be inhibited competitively with respect to NAD by rotenone concentrations as low as 1.67 micromolar. In pea cotyledon mitochondria, rotenone was transformed into elliptone. This reduced its inhibitory effect on intact mitochondria. Malate dehydrogenase was not affected by rotenone or elliptone. However, elliptone inhibited malic enzyme to the same extent that rotenone did when NAD was the cofactor. The products of malate oxidation reflected the interaction between malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase. Rotenone also inhibited the NADH dehydrogenase associated with malate dehydrogenase. Thus, rotenone seemed to exert its inhibitory effect on two enzymes of the electron transport chain of pea cotyledon mitochondria. PMID:16662080

  9. Plant-pathogenic fungi in seeds of different pea cultivars in poland.

    PubMed

    Wilman, Karolina; Stępień, Lukasz; Fabiańska, Izabela; Kachlicki, Piotr

    2014-09-29

    Legume crops are exposed to infection by fungal pathogens, which often results in contamination with mycotoxins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of field resistance/susceptibility of edible and fodder pea cultivars to the colonization of seeds by fungal pathogens in two subsequent seasons, as well as to identify the pathogens present in the seeds of the tested cultivars. Alternaria spp. were the most common fungi isolated from pea seeds in both seasons, followed by Fusarium spp., Stemphylium spp., Ulocladium spp., Botrytis cinerea Pers., Epicoccum nigrum Link., and Phomapinodella L. K. Jones. The highest percentage of infected seeds (55 %) was recorded for cultivar Ezop. The presence of a large number of fungi was found in 2012 for cultivars Santana, Tarchalska, Medal, Cysterski, Mentor, Lasso, and Ezop. Fodder cultivars displayed a lower infection level than edible cultivars. We can conclude that Alternaria spp. were the most frequent fungi present in pea seeds in Poland and Fusarium spp. were likely the most dangerous, having in mind their established mycotoxigenic abilities.

  10. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Green Split Peas (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-11-01

    Lectins have captured the attention of a large number of researchers on account of their various exploitable activities, including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, as well as HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities. A mannose/glucose-specific lectin was isolated from green split peas (a variety of Pisum sativum) and characterized. The purification step involved anion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column, cation-exchange chromatography on an SP-Sepharose column, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on Superdex 200. The purified lectin had a native molecular mass of around 50 kDa as determined by size exclusion chromatography. It appeared as a heterotetramer, composed of two distinct polypeptide bands with a molecular mass of 6 and 19 kDa, respectively, in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The N-terminal sequence of green split pea lectin shows some degree of homology compared to lectins from other legume species. Its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by glucose, mannose, and sucrose, and attenuated at pH values higher than 12 or lower than 3. Hemagglutinating activity was preserved at temperatures lower than 80 °C. The lectin did not show antifungal activity toward fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Green split pea lectin showed a mitogenic effect toward murine splenocytes and could inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  11. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Green Split Peas (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-11-01

    Lectins have captured the attention of a large number of researchers on account of their various exploitable activities, including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, as well as HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities. A mannose/glucose-specific lectin was isolated from green split peas (a variety of Pisum sativum) and characterized. The purification step involved anion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column, cation-exchange chromatography on an SP-Sepharose column, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on Superdex 200. The purified lectin had a native molecular mass of around 50 kDa as determined by size exclusion chromatography. It appeared as a heterotetramer, composed of two distinct polypeptide bands with a molecular mass of 6 and 19 kDa, respectively, in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The N-terminal sequence of green split pea lectin shows some degree of homology compared to lectins from other legume species. Its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by glucose, mannose, and sucrose, and attenuated at pH values higher than 12 or lower than 3. Hemagglutinating activity was preserved at temperatures lower than 80 °C. The lectin did not show antifungal activity toward fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Green split pea lectin showed a mitogenic effect toward murine splenocytes and could inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. PMID:26304129

  12. Differential expression of two related organ-specific genes in pea.

    PubMed

    Williams, M E; Mundy, J; Kay, S A; Chua, N H

    1990-05-01

    We have screened a pea genomic library using a cDNA probe derived from pea shoot RNA. From this screen, we isolated two closely related genes, designated as S2 and P4. An intriguing property of these two genes is the presence in their coding region of a repeated sequence that is conserved between them in sequence but not in the number of the repeating units. The predicted amino acid sequence suggests that these proteins could be exported and glycosylated. 3' S1 analysis reveals that one of the genes, S2, is expressed highly in stem, as expected from previous work. However, mRNA derived from the other gene, P4, is not detectable in stem tissue, but is present in tissue derived from pea pods. The 5' upstream sequence of S2 and P4 are 94% identical up to position -121, suggesting that sequences upstream of -121 are responsible for organ-specific expression of the two genes.

  13. 78 FR 63160 - United States Standards for Feed Peas, Split Peas, and Lentils

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Grain Inspection, Packers... Peas, and Lentils under the Agriculture Marketing Act (AMA) of 1946. To ensure that the standards...

  14. Integrated effect of microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide in controlling seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani) and improving yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Akhter, Wasira; Bhuiyan, Mohamed Khurshed Alam; Sultana, Farjana; Hossain, Mohamed Motaher

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the comparative performance of a few microbial antagonists, organic amendments and fungicides and their integration for the management of seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani Kühn) and yield improvement in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Before setting the experiment in field microplots, a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to select a virulent isolate of R. solani, an effective antagonistic isolate of Trichoderma harzianum, a fungitoxic organic amendment and an appropriate fungicide. A greenhouse pathogenicity test compared differences in seedling mortality in pea inoculated by four isolates of R. solani and identified the isolate RS10 as the most virulent one. Among the 20 isolates screened in dual culture assay on PDA, T. harzianum isolate T-3 was found to show the highest (77.22%) inhibition of the radial growth of R. solani. A complete inhibition (100.00%) of colony growth of R. solani was observed when fungicide Bavistin 50 WP and Provax-200 at the rate of 100 and 250 ppm, respectively, were used, while Provax-200 was found to be highly compatible with T. harzianum. Mustard oilcake gave maximum inhibition (60.28%) of the radial growth of R. solani at all ratios, followed by sesame oilcake and tea waste. Integration of soil treatment with T. harzianum isolate T-3 and mustard oilcake and seed treatment with Provax-200 appeared to be significantly superior in reducing seedling mortality and improving seed yield in pea in comparison to any single or dual application of them in the experimental field. The research results will help growers develop integrated disease management strategies for the control of Rhizoctonia disease in pea. The research results show the need for an integrating selective microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide to achieve appropriate management of seedling mortality (R. solani) and increase of seed yield in pea. PMID:25528673

  15. Integrated effect of microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide in controlling seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani) and improving yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Akhter, Wasira; Bhuiyan, Mohamed Khurshed Alam; Sultana, Farjana; Hossain, Mohamed Motaher

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the comparative performance of a few microbial antagonists, organic amendments and fungicides and their integration for the management of seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani Kühn) and yield improvement in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Before setting the experiment in field microplots, a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to select a virulent isolate of R. solani, an effective antagonistic isolate of Trichoderma harzianum, a fungitoxic organic amendment and an appropriate fungicide. A greenhouse pathogenicity test compared differences in seedling mortality in pea inoculated by four isolates of R. solani and identified the isolate RS10 as the most virulent one. Among the 20 isolates screened in dual culture assay on PDA, T. harzianum isolate T-3 was found to show the highest (77.22%) inhibition of the radial growth of R. solani. A complete inhibition (100.00%) of colony growth of R. solani was observed when fungicide Bavistin 50 WP and Provax-200 at the rate of 100 and 250 ppm, respectively, were used, while Provax-200 was found to be highly compatible with T. harzianum. Mustard oilcake gave maximum inhibition (60.28%) of the radial growth of R. solani at all ratios, followed by sesame oilcake and tea waste. Integration of soil treatment with T. harzianum isolate T-3 and mustard oilcake and seed treatment with Provax-200 appeared to be significantly superior in reducing seedling mortality and improving seed yield in pea in comparison to any single or dual application of them in the experimental field. The research results will help growers develop integrated disease management strategies for the control of Rhizoctonia disease in pea. The research results show the need for an integrating selective microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide to achieve appropriate management of seedling mortality (R. solani) and increase of seed yield in pea.

  16. The Effect of Orobanche crenata Infection Severity in Faba Bean, Field Pea, and Grass Pea Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Flores, Fernando; Rubiales, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Broomrape weeds (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp.) are root holoparasites that feed off a wide range of important crops. Among them, Orobanche crenata attacks legumes complicating their inclusion in cropping systems along the Mediterranean area and West Asia. The detrimental effect of broomrape parasitism in crop yield can reach up to 100% depending on infection severity and the broomrape-crop association. This work provides field data of the consequences of O. crenata infection severity in three legume crops, i.e., faba bean, field pea, and grass pea. Regression functions modeled productivity losses and revealed trends in dry matter allocation in relation to infection severity. The host species differentially limits parasitic sink strength indicating different levels of broomrape tolerance at equivalent infection severities. Reductions in host aboveground biomass were observed starting at low infection severity and half maximal inhibitory performance was predicted as 4.5, 8.2, and 1.5 parasites per faba bean, field pea, and grass pea plant, respectively. Reductions in host biomass occurred in both vegetative and reproductive organs, the latter resulting more affected. The increase of resources allocated within the parasite was concomitant to reduction of host seed yield indicating that parasite growth and host reproduction compete directly for resources within a host plant. However, the parasitic sink activity does not fully explain the total host biomass reduction because combined biomass of host–parasite complex was lower than the biomass of uninfected plants. In grass pea, the seed yield was negligible at severities higher than four parasites per plant. In contrast, faba bean and field pea sustained low but significant seed production at the highest infection severity. Data on seed yield and seed number indicated that the sensitivity of field pea to O. crenata limited the production of grain yield by reducing seed number but maintaining seed size. In contrast

  17. An image processing pipeline to detect and segment nuclei in muscle fiber microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanen; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yaming; Xia, Shunren; Yang, Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Muscle fiber images play an important role in the medical diagnosis and treatment of many muscular diseases. The number of nuclei in skeletal muscle fiber images is a key bio-marker of the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. In nuclei segmentation one primary challenge is to correctly separate the clustered nuclei. In this article, we developed an image processing pipeline to automatically detect, segment, and analyze nuclei in microscopic image of muscle fibers. The pipeline consists of image pre-processing, identification of isolated nuclei, identification and segmentation of clustered nuclei, and quantitative analysis. Nuclei are initially extracted from background by using local Otsu's threshold. Based on analysis of morphological features of the isolated nuclei, including their areas, compactness, and major axis lengths, a Bayesian network is trained and applied to identify isolated nuclei from clustered nuclei and artifacts in all the images. Then a two-step refined watershed algorithm is applied to segment clustered nuclei. After segmentation, the nuclei can be quantified for statistical analysis. Comparing the segmented results with those of manual analysis and an existing technique, we find that our proposed image processing pipeline achieves good performance with high accuracy and precision. The presented image processing pipeline can therefore help biologists increase their throughput and objectivity in analyzing large numbers of nuclei in muscle fiber images.

  18. [Effect of IAA on the photophosphorylation of pea isolated chloroplasts].

    PubMed

    Akulova, E A; Murzaeva, S V; Taukeleva, Sh N; Ruzieva, R Kh

    1975-01-01

    Effect of IAA (10(-10)-10(-3) M) on photophosphorylation, NADP reduction and the oxygen exchange is investigated. It is shown that low concentrations of IAA (10(-10)-10(-7) M) increase the photophosphorylation reaction and the flow of electrones to NADP under the phosphorylation conditions in the chloroplasts, and their effect on the O2 exchange is not the same in different types of photophosphorylation. It is supposed that the effect of IAA on the photophosphorylation is connected with H292 metabolism in chloroplasts and with catalase and peroxidase functions.

  19. Exotic Light Nuclei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerny, Joseph; Poskanzer, Arthur M.

    1978-01-01

    Among the light elements, nuclei with unequal numbers of protons and neutrons are highly unstable. Some survive just long enough to be detected and exhibit unusual regimes of radioactive decay. ( Autor/MA)

  20. Ethylene effects in pea stem tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, D.A.; Chadwick, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    The marked effects of ethylene on pea stem growth have been investigated. Low temperatures and colchicine, both known microtubule depolymerization agents, reverse the effects of ethylene in straight growth tests. Low temperature (6 C) also profoundly reduces the effects of gas in terms of swelling, hook curvature, and horizontal mutation. Deuterium oxide, an agent capable of rigidifying microtubular structure, mimics the effects of ethylene. Electron microscopy shows that microtubule orientation is strikingly altered by ethylene. These findings indicate that some of the ethylene responses may be due to a stabilizing effect on microtubules in plant cells.

  1. Differential gene expression in C4 plants. Research proposal, February 1, 1982-January 31, 1983. [Pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, A. R.

    1981-11-01

    The topic of this research proposal is slightly different from that originally outlined. Specifically, instead of characterizing the genes encoding the small subunit of RuBP carboxylase and the chlorophyll a/b binding polypeptide from corn, these genes from pea are being characterized. The above polypeptides represent the major products of cytoplasmic protein synthesis in green leaves. CDNA clones encoding the above polypeptides were isolated and characterized. Both of these cDNA clones have now been sequenced, providing the amino acid sequences for the carboxylase small subunit and, for the first time, for the chlorophyll a/b binding polypeptide. Pea nuclear DNA was cloned into the lambda phage Charon 4, and cloned nuclear DNA sequences encoding the above polypeptides were isolated. Future work will be concerned with the structural and functional characterization of these nuclear genes.

  2. Characterization and pathogenicity of Rhizoctonia and Rhizoctonia-like spp. from pea crops in the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 179 isolates of Rhizoctonia and Rhizoctonia-like species were obtained from soil and plant samples collected from irrigated pea crops in the semi-arid Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington from 2011 to 2013, and characterized to species, subspecies, and anastomosis groups (AG) based on ...

  3. Molecular cloning and analysis of a pea cDNA that is expressed in darkness and very rapidly induced by gibberellic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, H Y; Guo, Z F; Zhu, Y X

    1998-09-01

    Using cDNA representational difference analysis (cDNA RDA), we isolated a cDNA named GDA-1 from a cDNA library constructed with mRNA from short-day (SD) grown G2 pea apical tissue. The amino acid sequence deduced from GDA-1 shares partial identity with the B2 protein which is expressed during embryogenesis of carrot cells. Northern analysis showed that GDA-1 mRNA is abundant in SD-grown G2 pea apical buds. In long-day (LD) conditions, there was almost no detectable GDA-1 mRNA. When LD-grown G2 peas were kept in continuous darkness for 24 h, the GDA-1 mRNA content reached a level equivalent to about 50% of that in the SD samples. On the other hand, when SD-grown peas were transferred into the light for 24 h, the amount of hybridizable GDA-1 mRNA dropped to the same as that of LD-grown plants. GDA-1 expression was found to be independent of flower initiation time. GA3 application in vitro resulted in rapid accumulation of GDA-1 mRNA in LD-grown G2 pea apical buds, which is compatible with its delaying effect on apical senescence. Time-course experiments revealed that GDA-1 is induced within 15 min of GA3 application. Exogenous GA3 did not influence the expression of GDA-1 in SD-grown G2 peas. Since both photoperiod and GA induce the expression of GDA-1, we speculate that they may activate similar signal transduction pathways in G2 peas. Our work also shows that photoperiod may change the efficiency of gibberellin perception by plants. PMID:9790595

  4. An efficient technique for nuclei segmentation based on ellipse descriptor analysis and improved seed detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongming; Lu, Cheng; Mandal, Mrinal

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient method for segmenting cell nuclei in the skin histopathological images. The proposed technique consists of four modules. First, it separates the nuclei regions from the background with an adaptive threshold technique. Next, an elliptical descriptor is used to detect the isolated nuclei with elliptical shapes. This descriptor classifies the nuclei regions based on two ellipticity parameters. Nuclei clumps and nuclei with irregular shapes are then localized by an improved seed detection technique based on voting in the eroded nuclei regions. Finally, undivided nuclei regions are segmented by a marked watershed algorithm. Experimental results on 114 different image patches indicate that the proposed technique provides a superior performance in nuclei detection and segmentation.

  5. Self-transmissible nif plasmid (pEA9) of Enterobacter agglomerans 339: molecular cloning and evidence for the existence of similar nif clusters on dissimilar plasmids in Enterobacter strains.

    PubMed

    Steibl, H D; Siddavattam, D; Klingmüller, W

    1995-11-01

    A cosmid library was generated to the 200-kb self-transmissible nif plasmid pEA9 isolated from Enterobacter agglomerans 339. The cosmid clone identified to contain the complete nif cluster was used to determine the nif gene organization and the physical map. The restriction pattern and nif gene organization of this nif cluster showed remarkable similarities to the nif cluster identified on the 110-kb plasmid pEA3 of Enterobacter agglomerans 333. Nucleotide sequence of several randomly selected regions of the nif cluster of pEA9 showed 96% similarity when compared to the known sequences of the nif cluster of pEA3. However, the homology ended abruptly at the flanking regions of the nif clusters and no similarity could be detected with the rest of the DNA of these plasmids. This reveals the existence of similar nif clusters on dissimilar plasmids, implying the horizontal transfer of the entire nif gene cluster.

  6. Photoreversible changes in pH of pea phytochrome solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokutomi, S.; Yamamoto, K.T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Furuya, M.

    1982-02-01

    Phytochrome is a chromoprotein that serves as the photoreceptor for a variety of photomorphogenic responses in plants. Phytochrome was isolated from etiolated pea seedlings. Photoinduced pH changes of an unbuffered solution of the phytochrome were monitored with a semimicrocombination pH electrode at pH 6.5. Red-light irradiation increased the pH of the medium. This alkalinization was reversed by a subsequent far-red-light irradiation. The magnitude and direction of the red-light-induced pH changes was dependent on the pH of the photocrome solution, and the maximum alkalinization was observed at pH 6.0, where the number of protons taken up per phytochrome monomer was 0.18. These results suggest that phytochrome is a multifunctional protein composed of a chromophoric domain and a hydrophobic domain. It is probable that the hydrophobic domain is responsible for the photoinduced change of hydrophobicity of phytochrome and that the ionizable groups responsible for the photoinduced pH changes are localized in the chromophoric domain. (JMT)

  7. Radiations from hot nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1993-01-01

    The investigation indicates that nuclei with excitation energy of a few hundred MeV to BeV are more likely to radiate hot nuclear clusters than neutrons. These daughter clusters could, furthermore, de-excite emitting other hot nuclei, and the chain continues until these nuclei cool off sufficiently to evaporate primarily neutrons. A few GeV excited nuclei could radiate elementary particles preferentially over neutrons. Impact of space radiation with materials (for example, spacecraft) produces highly excited nuclei which cool down emitting electromagnetic and particle radiations. At a few MeV excitation energy, neutron emission becomes more dominant than gamma-ray emission and one often attributes the cooling to take place by successive neutron decay. However, a recent experiment studying the cooling process of 396 MeV excited Hg-190 casts some doubt on this thinking, and the purpose of this investigation is to explore the possibility of other types of nuclear emission which might out-compete with neutron evaporation.

  8. The Pea GIGAS Gene Is a FLOWERING LOCUS T Homolog Necessary for Graft-Transmissible Specification of Flowering but Not for Responsiveness to Photoperiod[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Valérie; Laurie, Rebecca E.; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K.; Ridge, Stephen; Knowles, Claire L.; Liew, Lim Chee; Sussmilch, Frances C.; Murfet, Ian C.; Macknight, Richard C.; Weller, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Garden pea (Pisum sativum) was prominent in early studies investigating the genetic control of flowering and the role of mobile flowering signals. In view of recent evidence that genes in the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) family play an important role in generating mobile flowering signals, we isolated the FT gene family in pea and examined the regulation and function of its members. Comparison with Medicago truncatula and soybean (Glycine max) provides evidence of three ancient subclades (FTa, FTb, and FTc) likely to be common to most crop and model legumes. Pea FT genes show distinctly different expression patterns with respect to developmental timing, tissue specificity, and response to photoperiod and differ in their activity in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting they may have different functions. We show that the pea FTa1 gene corresponds to the GIGAS locus, which is essential for flowering under long-day conditions and promotes flowering under short-day conditions but is not required for photoperiod responsiveness. Grafting, expression, and double mutant analyses show that GIGAS/FTa1 regulates a mobile flowering stimulus but also provide clear evidence for a second mobile flowering stimulus that is correlated with expression of FTb2 in leaf tissue. These results suggest that induction of flowering by photoperiod in pea results from interactions among several members of a diversified FT family. PMID:21282524

  9. Multiple plastid signals regulate the expression of the pea plastocyanin gene in pea and transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, James A; Gray, John C

    2002-12-01

    The expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthesis-related proteins is regulated by signals from plastids. To investigate how the pea PetE gene encoding plastocyanin is regulated by plastid signals, the effects of norflurazon, lincomycin and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), specific inhibitors of plastid-located processes generating plastid signals, have been examined. RNA-gel blot analysis of 7-day-old pea and tobacco seedlings containing the pea PetE gene showed that treatment with norflurazon and lincomycin, but not DCMU, decreased the accumulation of transcripts of pea PetE and endogenous Lhcb1 genes. Analysis of chimeric PetE gene constructs in tobacco seedlings showed that an intact PetE mRNA 5' terminus and elements within the PetE coding region were required to confer sensitivity to norflurazon and lincomycin, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation. Analysis of 4-week-old tobacco plants containing chimeric PetE constructs showed that DCMU treatment decreased the accumulation of pea PetE and Lhcb1 transcripts, but had opposite effects on the transcription of the genes in nuclear run-on assays. DCMU upregulated transcription from the pea PetE promoter whereas transcription of tobacco Lhcb1 genes was decreased. These experiments provide evidence for multiple plastid signals operating at different developmental stages and affecting transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes regulating expression of the pea PetE gene.

  10. Reaction theory for exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, Angela

    2014-05-09

    Exotic nuclei are usually defined as those with unusual N/Z ratios. They can be found in the crust of neutron stars enbedded in a sea of electrons or created in laboratory by fragmentation of a primary beam (in-flight method) or of the target (ISOL method). They are extremely important for nuclear astrophysics, see for example Ref.[1]. Furthermore by studying them we can check the limits of validity of nuclear reaction and structure models. This contribution will be devoted to the understanding of how by using reaction theory and comparing to the data we can extract structure information. We shall discuss the differences between the mechanisms of transfer and breakup reactions, an we will try to explain how nowadays it is possible to do accurate spectroscopy in extreme conditions.

  11. Color of illumination during growth affects LHCII chiral macroaggregates in pea plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Gussakovsky, Eugene E; Shahak, Yosepha; Schroeder, Dana F

    2007-02-01

    To determine whether the color of illumination under which plants are grown, affects the structure of photosynthetic antennae, pea plants were grown under either blue-enriched, red-enriched, or white light. Carotenoid content of isolated chloroplasts was found to be insensitive to the color of illumination during growth, while chlorophyll a/b ratio in chloroplasts isolated from young illuminated leaves showed susceptibility to color. Color of illumination affects the LHCII chiral macroaggregates in intact leaves and isolated chloroplasts, providing light-induced alteration of the handedness of the LHCII chiral macroaggregate, as measured with circular dichroism and circularly polarized luminescence. The susceptibility of handedness to current illumination (red light excitation of chlorophyll fluorescence) is dependent on the color under which the plants were grown, and was maximal for the red-enriched illumination. We propose the existence of a long-term (growth period) color memory, which influences the susceptibility of the handedness of LHCII chiral macroaggregates to current light.

  12. Critical-point nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.M.

    2004-10-01

    It has been suggested that a change of nuclear shape may be described in terms of a phase transition and that specific nuclei may lie close to the critical point of the transition. Analytical descriptions of such critical-point nuclei have been introduced recently and they are described briefly. The results of extensive searches for possible examples of critical-point behavior are presented. Alternative pictures, such as describing bands in the candidate nuclei using simple {Delta}K = 0 and {Delta}K = 2 rotational-coupling models, are discussed, and the limitations of the different approaches highlighted. A possible critical-point description of the transition from a vibrational to rotational pairing phase is suggested.

  13. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.

  14. Response of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The dipole giant resonance is reviewed, as it is the only vibration which has been experimentally identified in the decay of hot nuclei. The mechanism of exciting the resonance and the mode of the resonance are described. The methods used to calculate the vibrations from the shell model are discussed, including the Hartree-Fock approximation and random phase approximation. Nuclei formed by compound nuclear reactions, which possess high excitation energy and angular momentum, are considered. It is argued that the stability of the dipole may be used to advantage in the study of other properties of nuclei at high excitation. It is also considered possible that the discussion of the dipole giant resonance may be extended to the gamma decay of the isovector quadrupole vibration. 26 refs., 18 figs. (LEW)

  15. Influence of pea protein aggregates on the structure and stability of pea protein/soybean polysaccharide complex emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Baoru; Zhang, Rujing; Yao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry have been hampered by their precipitation in acidic solution. In this study, pea protein isolate (PPI) with poor dispersibility in acidic solution was used to form complexes with soybean soluble polysaccharide (SSPS), and the effects of PPI aggregates on the structure and stability of PPI/SSPS complex emulsions were investigated. Under acidic conditions, high pressure homogenization disrupts the PPI aggregates and the electrostatic attraction between PPI and SSPS facilitates the formation of dispersible PPI/SSPS complexes. The PPI/SSPS complex emulsions prepared from the PPI containing aggregates prove to possess similar droplet structure and similar stability compared with the PPI/SSPS emulsions produced from the PPI in which the aggregates have been previously removed by centrifugation. The oil droplets are protected by PPI/SSPS complex interfacial films and SSPS surfaces. The emulsions show long-term stability against pH and NaCl concentration changes. This study demonstrates that PPI aggregates can also be used to produce stable complex emulsions, which may promote the applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry.

  16. Development of Mitochondrial Activities in Pea Cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Morohashi, Yukio; Bewley, J. Derek

    1980-01-01

    Mitochondria in 4-hour imbibed and desiccated pea cotyledons develop in a similar manner upon rehydration to those in cotyledons hydrated only once. As a consequence of desiccation during imbibition, mitochondria revert to their original state as in the mature dry cotyledon, although limited damage occurs. This damage is more evident when the initial imbibition time before desiccation is longer. The presence of the axis does not protect cotyledonary mitochondria from damage, nor does it influence mitochondrial development upon rehydration of desiccated cotyledons. During the early hours after the start of imbibition mitochondrial development is dependent both upon hydration levels of the cotyledon and upon other metabolic processes, as shown by sensitivity to conditions that prevent ATP synthesis. PMID:16661494

  17. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  18. Ozone stress proteins in pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, P.; Mozley, D.; Price, A.; Hetherington, A.; Lea, P. )

    1989-04-01

    21 day old pea plants were fumigated with 200, 100, 50 and 0 ppb ozone (8 hrs/day) for 5 days. Soluble proteins were extracted from the first 6 leaves and analyzed by 1D SDS PAGE. Polypeptides were visualized after coomassie blue staining. With respect to controls, fumigation resulted in a dose dependent decrease in staining intensity of several polypeptides (of approximate M.W. 94, 54, 35 kD). However, treatment with 200 ppb ozone resulted in the appearance of a polypeptide with a molecular weight of circa 32 kD. This polypeptide was absent from control (0 ppb ozone) plants. Currently, we are (1) purifying the c32kD polypeptide, (2) studying the temporal aspects of the synthesis of this polypeptide and (3) investigating whether this represents a general response to pollutant gases.

  19. Electromagnetic structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, R.G.

    1986-07-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics in the electromagnetic structure of nucleons and nuclei, including nucleon form factors from both quantum chromodynamics and electron scattering data, measurements of the deuteron and triton form factors, quasi-elastic scattering, and the EMC effect. 47 refs., 13 figs. (LEW)

  20. Quark structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics involved in the relativistic quark structure of nuclei such as the infinite momentum variables, scaling variables, counting rules, forward-backward variables, thermodynamic-like limit, QCD effects, higher quark bags, confinement, and many unanswered questions.

  1. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  2. [Inactivated pea flour (Pisum sativum) in bread making].

    PubMed

    Alasino, María Celia; Andrich, Oscar Daniel; Sabbag, Nora Guadalupe; Costa, Silvia Claudia; de la Torre, María Adela; Sánchez, Hugo Diego

    2008-12-01

    Pea flour (Pisum sativum) is a relatively cheap protein source and it is scarcely utilized in making widely consumed products. It provides a good opportunity to improve the amino acidic profile. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the enzymatic inactivation of pea on bread characteristics, made with levels of 5, 10 and 15% of pea flour. Protein and lysine contents were determined and then chemical score obtained considering lysine as limiting amino acid. Sensory evaluation was carry out by six trained panelists using quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) at p = 0.05. Residual lipoxygenase activity was 48.6% when heat treatment was made during 1 minute, and only 2.1% when the heat treatment was carry out during 1.5 minutes. Highest specific volumes of bread were obtained with pea flour treated during 1 minute. The sensory evaluation by panel determined that pea flour at a level of 5% could be successfully substituted for both heat treatments. But pea flour substitution at levels of 10 and 15% had adverse effects on specific volume and sensory characteristics. PMID:19368302

  3. Effect of cationic plastoquinone SkQ1 on electron transfer reactions in chloroplasts and mitochondria from pea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, V D; Kiselevsky, D B

    2015-04-01

    Plastoquinone bound with decyltriphenylphosphonium cation (SkQ1) penetrating through the membrane in nanomolar concentrations inhibited H2O2 generation in cells of epidermis of pea seedling leaves that was detected by the fluorescence of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein. Photosynthetic electron transfer in chloroplasts isolated from pea leaves is suppressed by SkQ1 at micromolar concentrations: the electron transfer in chloroplasts under the action of photosystem II or I (with silicomolybdate or methyl viologen as electron acceptors, respectively) is more sensitive to SkQ1 than under the action of photosystem II + I (with ferricyanide or p-benzoquinone as electron acceptors). SkQ1 reduced by borohydride is oxidized by ferricyanide, p-benzoquinone, and, to a lesser extent, by silicomolybdate, but not by methyl viologen. SkQ1 is not effective as an electron acceptor supporting O2 evolution from water in illuminated chloroplasts. The data on suppression of photosynthetic O2 evolution or consumption show that SkQ1, similarly to phenazine methosulfate, causes conversion of the chloroplast redox-chain from non-cyclic electron transfer mode to the cyclic mode without O2 evolution. Oxidation of NADH or succinate in mitochondria isolated from pea roots is stimulated by SkQ1.

  4. RNA-sequencing from single nuclei.

    PubMed

    Grindberg, Rashel V; Yee-Greenbaum, Joyclyn L; McConnell, Michael J; Novotny, Mark; O'Shaughnessy, Andy L; Lambert, Georgina M; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Lee, Jun; Fishman, Max; Robbins, Gillian E; Lin, Xiaoying; Venepally, Pratap; Badger, Jonathan H; Galbraith, David W; Gage, Fred H; Lasken, Roger S

    2013-12-01

    It has recently been established that synthesis of double-stranded cDNA can be done from a single cell for use in DNA sequencing. Global gene expression can be quantified from the number of reads mapping to each gene, and mutations and mRNA splicing variants determined from the sequence reads. Here we demonstrate that this method of transcriptomic analysis can be done using the extremely low levels of mRNA in a single nucleus, isolated from a mouse neural progenitor cell line and from dissected hippocampal tissue. This method is characterized by excellent coverage and technical reproducibility. On average, more than 16,000 of the 24,057 mouse protein-coding genes were detected from single nuclei, and the amount of gene-expression variation was similar when measured between single nuclei and single cells. Several major advantages of the method exist: first, nuclei, compared with whole cells, have the advantage of being easily isolated from complex tissues and organs, such as those in the CNS. Second, the method can be widely applied to eukaryotic species, including those of different kingdoms. The method also provides insight into regulatory mechanisms specific to the nucleus. Finally, the method enables dissection of regulatory events at the single-cell level; pooling of 10 nuclei or 10 cells obscures some of the variability measured in transcript levels, implying that single nuclei and cells will be extremely useful in revealing the physiological state and interconnectedness of gene regulation in a manner that avoids the masking inherent to conventional transcriptomics using bulk cells or tissues.

  5. Nucleotide sequence of a complementary DNA encoding pea cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.A.; Zilinskas, B.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors now report the nucleotide sequence of the cytosolic Cu/Zn SOD cloned from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library constructed from mRNA extracted from leaves of 7- to 10-d pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.). The clone was isolated using a 22-base synthetic oligonucleotide complementary to the amino acid sequence CGIIGLQG. This sequence, found at the protein's carboxy terminus, is highly conserved among plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but not chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs. The 738-base pair sequence contains an open reading frame specifying 152 codons and a predicted M{sub r} of 18,024 D. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous (79-82% identity) with the sequences of other known plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but less highly conserved (63-65%) when compared with several chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs including pea (10).

  6. Oligomycin Effects on ATPase and Photophosphorylation of Pea Chloroplast Thylakoid Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Bouthyette, Pierre-Yves; Jagendorf, Andre T.

    1982-01-01

    Oligomycin inhibited the membrane-bound, Ca2+-dependent ATPase of pea (Pisum sativum var. Progress No. 9) chloroplasts up to 50%, but only after treating the membranes with trypsin, whether or not the trypsin step was needed for full activity. The energy-linked Mg2+-dependent (light- and dithiothreitol (DTT)-activated) ATPase of pea thylakoids could be inhibited up to 100% under specified conditions. The data indicate that oligomycin does not interfere with activation processes, and it failed to inhibit the ATPase of solubilized chloroplast coupling factor 1 under any circumstances. Photophosphorylation, previously thought insensitive to oligomycin, was inhibited 30% in the case of pea chloroplasts, and this increased to 50% inhibition after pretreating the chloroplasts with either trypsin or DTT. The nature of inhibition of phosphorylation was complex, with apparent small components of electron transport inhibition and uncoupling, as well as energy transfer inhibition. Sensitivity of isolated pea thylakoid Mg2+-dependent ATPase to oligomycin was found during summer months but not during the winter. This was traced to a seasonal variation in relative humidity with values of 20% or less during the winter, leading to lack of inhibition in the isolated chloroplasts. The effect of low relative humidity during growth could be reversed by placing plants for 17 to 20 hours in a chamber at 50% relative humidity. The optimum humidity range for sensitivity to oligomycin was between 40 and 60%. With chloroplasts potentially sensitive to oligomycin due to “permissive” growth conditions, the inhibition was modulated by a number of parameters during chloroplast activation or ATPase assay. Preincubation in high concentrations of KCl diminished oligomycin sensitivity, and this effect was reversed by valinomycin. The greatest sensitivity, as well as the highest ATPase rates, occurred only if thylakoids were activated by light and DTT at a relatively high temperature (35 to 40

  7. PEA1 and PEA3 enhancer elements are primary components of the polyomavirus late transcription initiator element.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, W; Martin, M E; Folk, W R

    1991-01-01

    The circular polyomavirus genome is transcribed from divergent promoter regions. Early mRNAs are initiated from a transcription complex formed at a TATA motif, the site of binding of transcription factor TFIID. Early transcription is promoted at a distance by the viral enhancer, which includes DNA motifs bound by cellular proteins of the PEA1 and PEA3 families of transcription activators. In contrast, the predominant viral late mRNAs are initiated within the viral enhancer, which lacks a TATA motif, near the PEA1 and PEA3 DNA motifs. Here, we demonstrate that these PEA1 and PEA3 binding sites are primary components of an autonomous transcription initiator element (Inr). They cause transcription of most polyomavirus late mRNAs and can direct the transcription of heterologous reporter genes. Alternative roles of these DNA motifs as activators of early mRNA transcription and as an initiator element for late mRNA transcription help explain how polyomavirus gene expression is regulated during lytic growth and provides a model for cellular transcription during development. Images PMID:1654447

  8. Energetic Nuclei, Superdensity and Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldin, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    High-energy, relativistic nuclei were first observed in cosmic rays. Studing these nuclei has provided an opportunity for analyzing the composition of cosmic rays and for experimentally verifying principles governing the behavior of nuclear matter at high and super-high temperatures. Medical research using accelerated nuclei is suggested.…

  9. τ- capture in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Huan, Ching; Oset, Eulogio

    1991-04-01

    We determine the capture rate of a τ- from inner atomic orbits in medium and heavy nuclei through the reaction τ-p-->nvτ, The capture rates are of the order of 2×109 s-1, a factor 150 larger than the muon capture rates in heavy nuclei, and three orders of magnitude smaller than the ordinary free τ- width. The investigatiion of this and related τ- capture channels would allow the exploration of the nuclear excitation mechanisms in an unsusual regime of momentum transfer and would provide valuable information on the axial form factor of the nucleon at large momentum transfer. Permanent address: Departmento de Física Teórica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia - CSIC, E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) Spain.

  10. Nuclei in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of investigations in nuclear reactions, induced by radioactive nuclear beams, make it possible to analyze the nucleosynthesis scenario in the region of light elements in a new manner.

  11. Antifungal chromans inhibiting the mitochondrial respiratory chain of pea seeds and new xanthones from Calophyllum caledonicum.

    PubMed

    Hay, A-E; Guilet, D; Morel, C; Larcher, G; Macherel, D; Le Ray, A-M; Litaudon, M; Richomme, P

    2003-12-01

    Two new xanthones, caledonixanthone M 1 and caloxanthone L 2, and one new acid, caledonic acid 6 were isolated from the hexane-soluble extract of the stem bark of Calophyllum caledonicum. In the course of this phytochemical study, seven other known compounds - calothwaitesixanthone, calozeyloxanthone, allanxanthone, isoapetalic acid 3, calolongic acid 4, apetalic acid 5 and isocalolongic acid 7 - were isolated. Their antifungal activity against the growth of the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus was then investigated. The results indicated that the crude extract, calolongic acid 4 and isocalolongic acid 7 exhibited strong inhibitory effects with MIC (80) values of 8, 4, 2 microg/mL, respectively. Besides, calolongic acid 4, its lactone derivative 4a and isocalolongic acid 7 markedly reduced the respiration of pea seed mitochondria.

  12. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  13. Olfactory cues from different plant species in host selection by female pea moths.

    PubMed

    Thöming, Gunda; Norli, Hans Ragnar

    2015-03-01

    In herbivorous insects specialized on few plant species, attraction to host odor may be mediated by volatiles common to all host species, by specific compounds, or combinations of both. The pea moth Cydia nigricana is an important pest of the pea. Volatile signatures of four host plant species were studied to identify compounds involved in pea moth host selection and to improve previously reported attractive volatile blends. P. sativum and alternative Fabaceae host species were compared regarding female attraction, oviposition, and larval performance. Pea moth females were strongly attracted to the sweet pea Lathyrus odoratus, but larval performance on that species was moderate. Chemical analyses of sweet pea odor and electrophysiological responses of moth antennae led to identification of seven sweet-pea-specific compounds and ten compounds common to all tested host species. Blends of these specific and common cues were highly attractive to mated pea moth females in wind tunnel and field experiments.

  14. Social aggregation in pea aphids: experiment and random walk modeling.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Christa; Paige, John; Warner, Olivia; Mayhew, Benjamin; Sutley, Ryan; Lam, Matthew; Bernoff, Andrew J; Topaz, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    From bird flocks to fish schools and ungulate herds to insect swarms, social biological aggregations are found across the natural world. An ongoing challenge in the mathematical modeling of aggregations is to strengthen the connection between models and biological data by quantifying the rules that individuals follow. We model aggregation of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Specifically, we conduct experiments to track the motion of aphids walking in a featureless circular arena in order to deduce individual-level rules. We observe that each aphid transitions stochastically between a moving and a stationary state. Moving aphids follow a correlated random walk. The probabilities of motion state transitions, as well as the random walk parameters, depend strongly on distance to an aphid's nearest neighbor. For large nearest neighbor distances, when an aphid is essentially isolated, its motion is ballistic with aphids moving faster, turning less, and being less likely to stop. In contrast, for short nearest neighbor distances, aphids move more slowly, turn more, and are more likely to become stationary; this behavior constitutes an aggregation mechanism. From the experimental data, we estimate the state transition probabilities and correlated random walk parameters as a function of nearest neighbor distance. With the individual-level model established, we assess whether it reproduces the macroscopic patterns of movement at the group level. To do so, we consider three distributions, namely distance to nearest neighbor, angle to nearest neighbor, and percentage of population moving at any given time. For each of these three distributions, we compare our experimental data to the output of numerical simulations of our nearest neighbor model, and of a control model in which aphids do not interact socially. Our stochastic, social nearest neighbor model reproduces salient features of the experimental data that are not captured by the control.

  15. Social aggregation in pea aphids: experiment and random walk modeling.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Christa; Paige, John; Warner, Olivia; Mayhew, Benjamin; Sutley, Ryan; Lam, Matthew; Bernoff, Andrew J; Topaz, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    From bird flocks to fish schools and ungulate herds to insect swarms, social biological aggregations are found across the natural world. An ongoing challenge in the mathematical modeling of aggregations is to strengthen the connection between models and biological data by quantifying the rules that individuals follow. We model aggregation of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Specifically, we conduct experiments to track the motion of aphids walking in a featureless circular arena in order to deduce individual-level rules. We observe that each aphid transitions stochastically between a moving and a stationary state. Moving aphids follow a correlated random walk. The probabilities of motion state transitions, as well as the random walk parameters, depend strongly on distance to an aphid's nearest neighbor. For large nearest neighbor distances, when an aphid is essentially isolated, its motion is ballistic with aphids moving faster, turning less, and being less likely to stop. In contrast, for short nearest neighbor distances, aphids move more slowly, turn more, and are more likely to become stationary; this behavior constitutes an aggregation mechanism. From the experimental data, we estimate the state transition probabilities and correlated random walk parameters as a function of nearest neighbor distance. With the individual-level model established, we assess whether it reproduces the macroscopic patterns of movement at the group level. To do so, we consider three distributions, namely distance to nearest neighbor, angle to nearest neighbor, and percentage of population moving at any given time. For each of these three distributions, we compare our experimental data to the output of numerical simulations of our nearest neighbor model, and of a control model in which aphids do not interact socially. Our stochastic, social nearest neighbor model reproduces salient features of the experimental data that are not captured by the control. PMID:24376691

  16. Social Aggregation in Pea Aphids: Experiment and Random Walk Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Christa; Paige, John; Warner, Olivia; Mayhew, Benjamin; Sutley, Ryan; Lam, Matthew; Bernoff, Andrew J.; Topaz, Chad M.

    2013-01-01

    From bird flocks to fish schools and ungulate herds to insect swarms, social biological aggregations are found across the natural world. An ongoing challenge in the mathematical modeling of aggregations is to strengthen the connection between models and biological data by quantifying the rules that individuals follow. We model aggregation of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Specifically, we conduct experiments to track the motion of aphids walking in a featureless circular arena in order to deduce individual-level rules. We observe that each aphid transitions stochastically between a moving and a stationary state. Moving aphids follow a correlated random walk. The probabilities of motion state transitions, as well as the random walk parameters, depend strongly on distance to an aphid's nearest neighbor. For large nearest neighbor distances, when an aphid is essentially isolated, its motion is ballistic with aphids moving faster, turning less, and being less likely to stop. In contrast, for short nearest neighbor distances, aphids move more slowly, turn more, and are more likely to become stationary; this behavior constitutes an aggregation mechanism. From the experimental data, we estimate the state transition probabilities and correlated random walk parameters as a function of nearest neighbor distance. With the individual-level model established, we assess whether it reproduces the macroscopic patterns of movement at the group level. To do so, we consider three distributions, namely distance to nearest neighbor, angle to nearest neighbor, and percentage of population moving at any given time. For each of these three distributions, we compare our experimental data to the output of numerical simulations of our nearest neighbor model, and of a control model in which aphids do not interact socially. Our stochastic, social nearest neighbor model reproduces salient features of the experimental data that are not captured by the control. PMID:24376691

  17. Protein methylation in pea chloroplasts. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J.; Adler, J.; Selman, B.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methylinkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile ({sup 3}H)methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the ({sup 3}H)methyl group.

  18. Auxin influences strigolactones in pea mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Foo, E

    2013-03-15

    Hormone interactions are essential for the control of many developmental processes, including intracellular symbioses. The interaction between auxin and the new plant hormone strigolactone in the regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was examined in one of the few auxin deficient mutants available in a mycorrhizal species, the auxin-deficient bsh mutant of pea (Pisum sativum). Mycorrhizal colonisation with the fungus Glomus intraradices was significantly reduced in the low auxin bsh mutant. The bsh mutant also exhibited a reduction in strigolactone exudation and the expression of a key strigolactone biosynthesis gene (PsCCD8). Strigolactone exudation was also reduced in wild type plants when the auxin content was reduced by stem girdling. Low strigolactone levels appear to be at least partially responsible for the reduced colonisation of the bsh mutant, as application of the synthetic strigolactone GR24 could partially rescue the mycorrhizal phenotype of bsh mutants. Data presented here indicates root auxin content was correlated with strigolactone exudation in both mutant and wild type plants. Mutant studies suggest that auxin may regulate early events in the formation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by controlling strigolactone levels, both in the rhizosphere and possibly during early root colonisation. PMID:23219475

  19. Redistribution of annexin in gravistimulated pea plumules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Rafati, D. S.; Bolton, R. J.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    We used immunocytochemistry to investigate the effects of gravistimulation on annexin localization in etiolated pea plumule shoots. In longitudinal sections, an asymmetric annexin immunostaining pattern was observed in a defined group of cells located just basipetal to apical meristems at the main shoot apex and at all of the axillary buds, an area classically referred to as the leaf gap. The pattern was observed using both protein-A-purified anti-annexin and affinity-purified anti-annexin antibodies for the immunostaining. A subset of the cells with the annexin staining also showed an unusually high level of periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining in their cell walls. Prior to gravistimulation, the highest concentration of annexin was oriented toward the direction of gravity along the apical end of these immunostained cells. In contrast, both at 15 and 30 min after gravistimulation, the annexin immunostain became more evenly distributed all around the cell and more distinctly cell peripheral. The asymmetry along the lower wall of these cells was no longer evident. In accord with current models of annexin action, we interpret the results to indicate that annexin-mediated secretion in the leaf gap area is preferentially toward the apical meristem prior to gravistimulation, and that gravistimulation results in a redirection of this secretion. These data are to our knowledge the first to show a correlation between the vector of gravity and the distribution of annexins in the cells of flowering plants. c 2000 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS.

  20. [Effect of gibberellic acid on RNA synthesis in dwarf peas].

    PubMed

    Kilev, S N; Kholodar', A V; Chekurov, V M; Mertvetsov, N P

    1982-04-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid (GA) on total RNA and polysomal poly-[A]+-RNA synthesis in epicotylia and embryos of dwarf pea of two varieties differing in their physiological sensitivity to GA was studied. It was found that incubation with GA increases the accumulation of total RNA in pea epicotylia, var. "Pioner" and "Polzunok". The maximal stimulation of RNA accumulation makes up to 40% for the low sensitivity variety "Polzunok" and 150% for the highly sensitive variety "Pioner". GA increases the synthesis of polysomal poly (A)+-mRNA in 5-year-old pea sprouts and that of newly synthesized poly (A)+-mRNA in epicotylian polysomes of both varieties 5, 24, 48 and 72 hrs after incubation with GA. GA at concentrations of 10(-6) and 10(-5) stimulates the incorporation of [3H]uridine into polysomal mRNA during the first 1--3 hours after treatment and enhances the accumulation of newly synthesized mRNA in pea embryonic polyribosomes. The stimulating effect is directly proportional to the dose of the hormone. The mechanisms of GA effect on the transcription and translation in pea plant cells are discussed. PMID:6177351

  1. Potential alternative hosts for the pea powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe trifolii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Powdery mildew of pea (Pisum sativum) is an important disease in the field and in the greenhouse. The most widely documented powdery mildew pathogen on pea is Erysiphe pisi, but E. baeumleri and E. trifolii have also been reported. We recently showed that E. trifolii is frequently found on pea in th...

  2. 7 CFR 319.56-45 - Shelled garden peas from Kenya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR 319.56-45 and have been inspected and found free of pests.” (Approved by the Office of Management... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled garden peas from Kenya. 319.56-45 Section 319... Shelled garden peas from Kenya. Garden peas (Pisum sativum) may be imported into the continental...

  3. 7 CFR 319.56-45 - Shelled garden peas from Kenya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR 319.56-45 and have been inspected and found free of pests.” (Approved by the Office of Management... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled garden peas from Kenya. 319.56-45 Section 319... Shelled garden peas from Kenya. Garden peas (Pisum sativum) may be imported into the continental...

  4. 7 CFR 319.56-45 - Shelled garden peas from Kenya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CFR 319.56-45 and have been inspected and found free of pests.” (Approved by the Office of Management... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled garden peas from Kenya. 319.56-45 Section 319... Shelled garden peas from Kenya. Garden peas (Pisum sativum) may be imported into the continental...

  5. Light-modulated abundance of an mRNA encoding a calmodulin-regulated, chromatin-associated NTPase in pea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, H. L.; Tong, C. G.; Thomas, C.; Roux, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    A CDNA encoding a 47 kDa nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) that is associated with the chromatin of pea nuclei has been cloned and sequenced. The translated sequence of the cDNA includes several domains predicted by known biochemical properties of the enzyme, including five motifs characteristic of the ATP-binding domain of many proteins, several potential casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, a helix-turn-helix region characteristic of DNA-binding proteins, and a potential calmodulin-binding domain. The deduced primary structure also includes an N-terminal sequence that is a predicted signal peptide and an internal sequence that could serve as a bipartite-type nuclear localization signal. Both in situ immunocytochemistry of pea plumules and immunoblots of purified cell fractions indicate that most of the immunodetectable NTPase is within the nucleus, a compartment proteins typically reach through nuclear pores rather than through the endoplasmic reticulum pathway. The translated sequence has some similarity to that of human lamin C, but not high enough to account for the earlier observation that IgG against human lamin C binds to the NTPase in immunoblots. Northern blot analysis shows that the NTPase MRNA is strongly expressed in etiolated plumules, but only poorly or not at all in the leaf and stem tissues of light-grown plants. Accumulation of NTPase mRNA in etiolated seedlings is stimulated by brief treatments with both red and far-red light, as is characteristic of very low-fluence phytochrome responses. Southern blotting with pea genomic DNA indicates the NTPase is likely to be encoded by a single gene.

  6. The Utilization of Glycolytic Intermediates as Precursors for Fatty Acid Biosynthesis by Pea Root Plastids.

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q.; Kleppinger-Sparace, K. F.; Sparace, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Radiolabeled pyruvate, glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, acetate, and malate are all variously utilized for fatty acid and glycerolipid biosynthesis by isolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) root plastids. At the highest concentrations tested (3-5mM), the rates of incorporation of these precursors into fatty acids were 183, 154, 125, 99 and 57 nmol h-1 mg-1 protein, respectively. In all cases, cold pyruvate consistently caused the greatest reduction, whereas cold acetate consistently caused the least reduction, in the amounts of each of the other radioactive precursors utilized for fatty acid biosynthesis. Acetate incorporation into fatty acids was approximately 55% dependent on exogenously supplied reduced nucleotides (NADH and NADPH), whereas the utilization of the remaining precursors was only approximately 10 and 20% dependent on added NAD(P)H. In contrast, the utilization of all precursors was greatly dependent (85-95%) on exogenously supplied ATP. Palmitate, stearate, and oleate were the only fatty acids synthesized from radioactive precursors. Higher concentrations of each precursor caused increased proportions of oleate and decreased proportions of palmitate synthesized. Radioactive fatty acids from all precursors were incorporated into glycerolipids. The data presented indicate that the entire pathway from glucose, including glycolysis, to fatty acids and glycerolipids is operating in pea root plastids. This pathway can supply both carbon and reduced nucleotides required for fatty acid biosynthesis but only a small portion of the ATP required PMID:12228367

  7. Separation and Partial Characterization of Two Ribonucleic Acid Polymerases from Pea Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Glicklich, Daniel; Jendrisak, Jerome J.; Becker, Wayne M.

    1974-01-01

    Two DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (ribonucleoside triphosphate:RNA nucleotidyl transferase, EC 2.7.7.6) have been isolated from pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings. The enzymes were solubilized by sonication in high salt buffer and were separated by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose using a linear salt gradient. Polymerase I eluted at 0.10 m (NH4)2SO4, accounted for about 10% of the recovered activity and was completely insensitive to α-amanitin. Polymerase II eluted at 0.14 m (NH4)2SO4, accounted for the remaining 90% of recovered activity and was strongly inhibited by α-amanitin. Both enzymes preferred denatured to native DNA as template, both showed an absolute requirement of divalent cation, and both were sensitive to the ionic strength of the assay medium. The developing pea seedling seems a promising system for studies of possible changes in relative activities and roles of multiple RNA polymerases during eukaryotic development. PMID:16658887

  8. Differential gene expression according to race and host plant in the pea aphid.

    PubMed

    Eyres, Isobel; Jaquiéry, Julie; Sugio, Akiko; Duvaux, Ludovic; Gharbi, Karim; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Legeai, Fabrice; Nelson, Michaela; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Smadja, Carole M; Butlin, Roger; Ferrari, Julia

    2016-09-01

    Host-race formation in phytophagous insects is thought to provide the opportunity for local adaptation and subsequent ecological speciation. Studying gene expression differences amongst host races may help to identify phenotypes under (or resulting from) divergent selection and their genetic, molecular and physiological bases. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) comprises host races specializing on numerous plants in the Fabaceae and provides a unique system for examining the early stages of diversification along a gradient of genetic and associated adaptive divergence. In this study, we examine transcriptome-wide gene expression both in response to environment and across pea aphid races selected to cover the range of genetic divergence reported in this species complex. We identify changes in expression in response to host plant, indicating the importance of gene expression in aphid-plant interactions. Races can be distinguished on the basis of gene expression, and higher numbers of differentially expressed genes are apparent between more divergent races; these expression differences between host races may result from genetic drift and reproductive isolation and possibly divergent selection. Expression differences related to plant adaptation include a subset of chemosensory and salivary genes. Genes showing expression changes in response to host plant do not make up a large portion of between-race expression differences, providing confirmation of previous studies' findings that genes involved in expression differences between diverging populations or species are not necessarily those showing initial plasticity in the face of environmental change. PMID:27474484

  9. Natural incidence of endophytic bacteria in pea cultivars under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Elvira-Recuenco, M; van Vuurde, J W

    2000-11-01

    Pea plants grown in the field were used to study the natural incidence of endophytic bacteria in the stem. Eleven pea cultivars at the flowering stage were screened for the presence of endophytic bacteria using a printing technique with surface disinfested stem cross-sections on 5% Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA). Five cultivars showed colonization. Cultivar Twiggy showed the highest and most consistent colonization and was further investigated. Stems of cv. Twiggy at the pod stage were analyzed for endophytic bacterial types and populations. Cross-sections of surface disinfested stems were printed on 5% TSA. Endophytic bacterial populations decreased from the lower to the upper part of the stem. One section from the third and the fourth internode was surface disinfested, homogenized, and spiral plated on the media 5% TSA, R2A, and SC (Davis et al. 1980). Over a series of 30 samples, 5% TSA gave significantly better recovery of bacterial endophytes compared with R2A and SC media. For most stems, populations ranged from 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/g except in one of the field blocks in which endophyte populations were uniformly higher. Comparison of colony counts by spiral plating and printing showed a positive correlation. The most frequently recovered bacterial types were Pantoea agglomerans and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Less frequently isolated were Pseudomonas viridiflava and Bacillus megaterium.

  10. Effects of bacterial secondary symbionts on host plant use in pea aphids.

    PubMed

    McLean, A H C; van Asch, M; Ferrari, J; Godfray, H C J

    2011-03-01

    Aphids possess several facultative bacterial symbionts that have important effects on their hosts' biology. These have been most closely studied in the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), a species that feeds on multiple host plants. Whether secondary symbionts influence host plant utilization is unclear. We report the fitness consequences of introducing different strains of the symbiont Hamiltonella defensa into three aphid clones collected on Lathyrus pratensis that naturally lack symbionts, and of removing symbionts from 20 natural aphid-bacterial associations. Infection decreased fitness on Lathyrus but not on Vicia faba, a plant on which most pea aphids readily feed. This may explain the unusually low prevalence of symbionts in aphids collected on Lathyrus. There was no effect of presence of symbiont on performance of the aphids on the host plants of the clones from which the H. defensa strains were isolated. Removing the symbiont from natural aphid-bacterial associations led to an average approximate 20 per cent reduction in fecundity, both on the natural host plant and on V. faba, suggesting general rather than plant-species-specific effects of the symbiont. Throughout, we find significant genetic variation among aphid clones. The results provide no evidence that secondary symbionts have a major direct role in facilitating aphid utilization of particular host plant species.

  11. Expression of ribosomal genes in pea cotyledons at the initial stages of germination

    SciTech Connect

    Gumilevskaya, N.A.; Chumikhina, L.V.; Akhmatova, A.T.; Kretovich, V.L.

    1986-01-20

    The time of appearance of newly synthesized rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) in the ribosomes of pea cotyledons (Pisum sativum L.) during germination was investigated. The ribosomal fraction was isolated and analyzed according to the method of germination of the embryo in the presence of labeled precursors or after pulse labeling of the embryos at different stages of germination. For the identification of newly synthesized rRNAs in the ribosomes we estimated the relative stability of labeled RNAs to the action of RNase, the sedimentation rate, the ability to be methylated in vivo in the presence of (/sup 14/C)CH/sub 3/-methionine, and the localization in the subunits of dissociated ribosomes. The presence of newly synthesized r-proteins in the ribosomes was judged on the basis of the electrophoretic similarity in SDS-disc electrophoresis of labeled polypeptides of purified ribosome preparations and of genuine r-proteins, as well as according to the localization of labeled proteins in the subunits of the dissociated ribosomes. It was shown that the expression of the ribosomal genes in highly specialized cells of pea cotyledons that have completed their growth occurs at very early stages of germination.

  12. PsPMEP, a pollen-specific pectin methylesterase of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Gómez, María Dolores; Renau-Morata, Begoña; Roque, Edelín; Polaina, Julio; Beltrán, José Pío; Cañas, Luis A

    2013-09-01

    Pectin methylesterases (PMEs) are a family of enzymes involved in plant reproductive processes such as pollen development and pollen tube growth. We have isolated and characterized PsPMEP, a pea (Pisum sativum L.) pollen-specific gene that encodes a protein with homology to PMEs. Sequence analysis showed that PsPMEP belongs to group 2 PMEs, which are characterized by the presence of a processable amino-terminal PME inhibitor domain followed by the catalytic PME domain. Moreover, PsPMEP contains several motifs highly conserved among PMEs with the essential amino acid residues involved in enzyme substrate binding and catalysis. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses showed that PsPMEP is expressed in pollen grains from 4 days before anthesis till anther dehiscence and in pollinated carpels. In the PsPMEP promoter region, we have identified several conserved cis-regulatory elements that have been associated with gene pollen-specific expression. Expression analysis of PsPMEP promoter fused to the uidA reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants showed a similar expression pattern when compared with pea, indicating that this promoter is also functional in a non-leguminous plant. GUS expression was detected in mature pollen grains, during pollen germination, during pollen tube elongation along the transmitting tract, and when the pollen tube reaches the embryo sac in the ovule.

  13. Properties of Plasma Membrane from Pea Root Seedlings under Altered Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymchuk, D.; Baranenko, V.; Vorobyova, T. V.; Kurylenko, I.; Chyzhykova, O.; Dubovoy, V.

    In this study, the properties of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plasma membrane were examined to determine how the membrane structure and functions are regulated in response to clinorotation (2 rev/min) conditions. Membrane preparations enriched by plasma membrane vesicles were obtained by aqueous two-phase partitioning from 6-day seedling roots. The specific characteristics of H^+-ATPase, lípid composition and peroxidation intensity as well as fluidity of lipid bilayer were analysed. ATP hydrolytic activity was inhibited by ortovanadate and was insensitive to aside and nitrate in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from both clinorotated and control seedlings. Plasma membrane vesicles from clinorotated seedlings in comparison to controls were characterised by increase in the total lipid/protein ratio, ATP hydrolytic activity and intensifying of lipid peroxidation. Sitosterol and campesterol were the predominant free sterol species. Clinorotated seedlings contained a slightly higher level of unsaturated fatty acid than controls. Plasma membrane vesicles were labelled with pyrene and fluorescence originating from monomeric (I_M) molecules and excimeric (I_E) aggregates were measured. The calculated I_E/I_M values were higher in clinorotated seedlings compared with controls reflecting the reduction in membrane microviscosity. The involvement of the changes in plasma membrane lipid content and composition, fluidity and H^+-ATPase activity in response of pea seedlings to altered gravity is discussed.

  14. Properties of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahe, J.; Vanysek, V.; Weissman, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    Active long- and short-period comets contribute about 20 to 30 % of the major impactors on the Earth. Cometary nuclei are irregular bodies, typically a few to ten kilometers in diameter, with masses in the range 10(sup 15) to 10(sup 18) g. The nuclei are composed of an intimate mixture of volatile ices, mostly water ice and hydrocarbon and silicate grains. The composition is the closest to solar composition of any known bodies in the solar system. The nuclei appear to be weakly bonded agglomerations of smaller icy planetesimals, and material strengths estimated from observed tidal disruption events are fairly low, typically 10(sup 2) to 10(sup 4) N m(sup -2). Density estimates range between 0.2 and 1.2 g cm(sup -3) but are very poorly determined, if at all. As comets age they develop nonvolitile crusts on their surfaces which eventually render them inactive, similar in appearance to carbonaceous asteroids. However, dormant comets may continue to show sporadic activity and outbursts for some time before they become truly extinct. The source of the long-period comets is the Oort cloud, a vast spherical cloud of perhaps 10(sup 12) to 10(sup 13) comets surrounding the solar system and extending to interstellar distances. The likely source for short-period comets is the Kuiper belt. a ring of perhaps 10(sup 8) to 10(sup 10) remnant icy planetesimals beyond the orbit of Neptune, though some short-period comets may also be long-period comets from the Oort cloud which have been perturbed into short-period orbits.

  15. Gibberellin-auxin interaction in pea stem elongation.

    PubMed

    Ockerse, R; Galston, A W

    1967-01-01

    Joint application of gibberellic acid and indole-3-acetic acid to excised stem sections, terminal cuttings, and decapitated plants of a green dwarf pea results in a markedly synergistic growth response to these hormones. Synergism in green tall pea stem sections is comparatively small, although growth is kinetically indistinguishable from similarly treated dwarf sections.Gibberellin-induced growth does not appear to be mediated through its effect on auxin synthesis, since gibberellin pretreatment of dwarf cuttings fails to elicit an enhanced tryptophan-induced growth response of sections, whereas auxin-induced growth is strongly enhanced. Also, tryptophan-gibberellin synergism is not significant in sections and cuttings of green dwarf peas, while auxin-gibberellin synergism is.Administration of gibberellic acid prior to indole-3-acetic acid results in greatly increased growth. In reversed order, the application fails to produce any synergistic interaction. This indicates that gibberellin action must precede auxin action in growth regulation. PMID:16656484

  16. Electroproduction of Strange Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Hungerford

    2002-06-01

    The advent of high-energy, CW-beams of electrons now allows electro-production and precision studies of nuclei containing hyperons. Previously, the injection of strangeness into a nucleus was accomplished using secondary beams of mesons, where beam quality and target thickness limited the missing mass resolution. We review here the theoretical description of the (e, e'K+) reaction mechanism, and discuss the first experiment demonstrating that this reaction can be used to precisely study the spectra of light hypernuclei. Future experiments based on similar techniques, are expected to attain even better resolutions and rates.

  17. Damping in Yb nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Lee, I.Y.; Ward, D.; Fallon, P.; Cromaz, M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Clark, R.M.; Diamond, R.M.; Gorgen, A.

    2002-07-01

    In a mixture of three Yb nuclei, we find the rotational damping widths vary from 180 keV at 1.1 MeV {gamma}-ray energy to 290 keV at 1.5 MeV, and the average compound damping widths (or spreading widths) vary from 40 keV at 1.1 MeV {gamma}-ray energy to 60 keV at 1.3 MeV. The simulations also suggest extensive motional narrowing.

  18. Comparative Transcriptomic Analyses of Vegetable and Grain Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhang, Guwen; Xu, Shengchun; Mao, Weihua; Hu, Qizan; Gong, Yaming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating pea seed developmental process is extremely important for pea breeding. In this study, we used high-throughput RNA-Seq and bioinformatics analyses to examine the changes in gene expression during seed development in vegetable pea and grain pea, and compare the gene expression profiles of these two pea types. RNA-Seq generated 18.7 G of raw data, which were then de novo assembled into 77,273 unigenes with a mean length of 930 bp. Our results illustrate that transcriptional control during pea seed development is a highly coordinated process. There were 459 and 801 genes differentially expressed at early and late seed maturation stages between vegetable pea and grain pea, respectively. Soluble sugar and starch metabolism related genes were significantly activated during the development of pea seeds coinciding with the onset of accumulation of sugar and starch in the seeds. A comparative analysis of genes involved in sugar and starch biosynthesis in vegetable pea (high seed soluble sugar and low starch) and grain pea (high seed starch and low soluble sugar) revealed that differential expression of related genes at late development stages results in a negative correlation between soluble sugar and starch biosynthetic flux in vegetable and grain pea seeds. RNA-Seq data was validated by using real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 30 randomly selected genes. To our knowledge, this work represents the first report of seed development transcriptomics in pea. The obtained results provide a foundation to support future efforts to unravel the underlying mechanisms that control the developmental biology of pea seeds, and serve as a valuable resource for improving pea breeding. PMID:26635856

  19. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvár, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Heil, M.; Jandel, M.; Käppeler, F.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Vieira, D. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-10-01

    Spectra of γ rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei weremeasured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of 153,155-159Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength ΣB(M1)↑, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum ΣB(M1)↑ increases with A and for 157,159Gd it is significantly higher compared to 156,158Gd.

  20. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Spectra of {gamma} rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of {sup 153,155-159}Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow}, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow} increases with A and for {sup 157,159}Gd it is significantly higher compared to {sup 156,158}Gd.

  1. Physiological Studies on Pea Tendrils. IV. Flavonoids and Contact Coiling

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, M. J.; Galston, A. W.

    1967-01-01

    Pea tendrils contain high concentrations of flavonoids, mainly quercetin-triglucosyl-p-coumarate (QGC). QGC is most abundant near the highly responsive apex of the tendril, and least abundant at the base. After mechanical stimulation, and during coiling of the tendril, the QGC titer drops to about 30% of its original value. The kinetics of flavonoid disappearance are significantly correlated with the kinetics of coiling. Aqueous extracts of unstimulated pea tendrils or 10 μm QGC inhibit contact coiling of excised tendrils. Extracts of coiled tendrils do not. The evidence indicates a possible regulatory role for flavonoids in contact coiling. PMID:16656581

  2. Biosynthesis of pentosyl lipids by pea membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, T; Maclachlan, G

    1984-01-01

    Pea membranes were incubated with UDP-[14C]xylose or UDP-[14C]arabinose and sequentially extracted with chloroform/methanol/water (10:10:3, by vol.) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (2%, w/v). An active epimerase in the membranes rapidly interconverted the two pentosyl nucleotides. Chromatographic analysis of the lipid extract revealed that both substrates gave rise to xylose- and arabinose-containing neutral lipids, xylolipid with properties similar to a polyisoprenol monophosphoryl derivative, and highly charged lipid-linked arabinosyl oligosaccharide. When UDP-[14C]pentose or the extracted lipid-linked [14C]arabinosyl oligosaccharide were used as substrates, their 14C was also incorporating into sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and -insoluble fractions as major end products. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble products indicated the formation of mobile components with Mr values between 40 000 and 200 000 (Sepharose CL-6B). The lipid-linked [14C]arabinosyl oligosaccharide possessed properties comparable with those of unsaturated polyisoprenyl pyrophosphoryl derivatives. It was hydrolysed by dilute acid to a charged product (apparent Mr 2300) that could be fractionated in alkali. It was degraded to shorter labelled oligosaccharides by slightly more concentrated acid and eventually to [14C]arabinose as the only labelled component. Susceptibility to acid hydrolysis, and methylation analysis, indicated that the oligosaccharide contained approximately seven sequential alpha-1,5-linked arabinofuranosyl units at the non-reducing end. Several acidic residues appear to be interposed between the terminal arabinosyl units and the charged lipid. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 8. PMID:6712596

  3. Electron Scattering from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wallace Van Orden

    2002-08-01

    The description of nuclei at distances on the order of a fermi or less poses a difficult challenge for theoretical physicists. At larger distances the traditional description of the nucleus as a collection of interacting nucleons has been quite successful and substantial progress has been made in recent years in describing few-nucleon systems using this approach. However, it has been known for several decades that the nucleons themselves are composite objects which are believed to be described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). QCD is a complicated nonlinear strongly interacting field theory which can only be used for calculation in special circumstances. Due to the property of asymptotic freedom exhibited by QCD, perturbative calculations of QCD can be made at large momentum transfers and have achieved substantial success for a variety of processes. Understanding the transition from traditional pictures of nuclei to QCD is a substantial challenge. As an example of this problem, this paper describes recent calculations of elastic electron-deuteron scattering based on a relativistic extension of the traditional nuclear physics approach. The results of this work are compared to new data obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory and to the predictions of perturbative QCD.

  4. Enhancing Neoplasm Expression in Field Pea (Pisum sativum) via Intercropping and Its Significance to Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum) Management

    PubMed Central

    Teshome, Abel; Bryngelsson, Tomas; Mendesil, Esayas; Marttila, Salla; Geleta, Mulatu

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasm formation, a non-meristematic tissue growth on young field pea (Pisum sativum L.) pods is triggered in the absence of UV light and/or in response to oviposition by pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L.). This trait is expressed in some genotypes [neoplastic (Np) genotypes] of P. sativum and has the capacity to obstruct pea weevil larval entry into developing seeds. In the present study, 26% of the tested accessions depicted the trait when grown under greenhouse conditions. However, UV light inhibits full expression of this trait and subsequently it is inconspicuous at the field level. In order to investigate UV light impact on the expression of neoplasm, particular Np genotypes were subjected to UV lamp light exposure in the greenhouse and sunlight at the field level. Under these different growing conditions, the highest mean percentage of Np pods was in the control chamber in the greenhouse (36%) whereas in single and double UV lamp chambers, the percentage dropped to 10 and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, when the same Np genotypes were grown in the field, the percentage of Np pods dropped significantly (7%). In order to enhance Np expression at the field level, intercropping of Np genotypes with sorghum was investigated. As result, the percentage of Np pods was threefold in intercropped Np genotypes as compared to those without intercropping. Therefore, intercropping Np genotypes with other crops such as sorghum and maize can facilitate neoplasm formation, which in turn can minimize the success rate of pea weevil larvae entry into developing seeds. Greenhouse artificial infestation experiments showed that pea weevil damage in Np genotypes is lower in comparison to wild type genotypes. Therefore, promoting Np formation under field conditions via intercropping can serve as part of an integrated pea weevil management strategy especially for small scale farming systems. PMID:27242855

  5. Overlapping nuclei segmentation based on Bayesian networks and stepwise merging strategy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, M-R; Ko, B C; Nam, J-Y

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the segmentation of fluorescence in situ hybridization images. First, to segment the cell nuclei from the background, a threshold is estimated using a Gaussian mixture model and maximizing the likelihood function of the grey values for the cell images. After the nuclei segmentation, the overlapping and isolated nuclei are classified to facilitate a more accurate nuclei analysis. To do this, the morphological features of the nuclei, such their compactness, smoothness and moments, are extracted from training data to generate three probability distribution functions that are then applied to a Bayesian network as evidence. Following the nuclei classification, the overlapping nuclei are segmented into isolated nuclei using an intensity gradient transform and watershed algorithm. A new stepwise merging strategy is also proposed to merge fragments into a major nucleus. Experimental results using fluorescence in situ hybridization images confirm that the proposed system produced better segmentation results when compared to previous methods, because of the nuclei classification before separating the overlapping nuclei.

  6. Exotic nuclei in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2012-07-01

    Recently the academic community has marked several anniversaries connected with discoveries that played a significant role in the development of astrophysical investigations. The year 2009 was proclaimed by the United Nations the International Year of Astronomy. This was associated with the 400th anniversary of Galileo Galilei's discovery of the optical telescope, which marked the beginning of regular research in the field of astronomy. An important contribution to not only the development of physics of the microcosm, but also to the understanding of processes occurring in the Universe, was the discovery of the atomic nucleus made by E. Rutherford 100 years ago. Since then the investigations in the fields of physics of particles and atomic nuclei have helped to understand many processes in the microcosm. Exactly 80 years ago, K. Yanski used a radio-telescope in order to receive the radiation from cosmic objects for the first time, and at the present time this research area of physics is the most efficient method for studying the properties of the Universe. Finally, the April 12, 1961 (50 years ago) launching of the first sputnik into space with a human being onboard, the Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, marked the beginning of exploration of the Universe with the direct participation of man. All these achievements considerably extended our ideas about the Universe. This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclear-physics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of

  7. Inhibition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-stimulated elongation of pea stem segments by a xyloglucan oligosaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    York, W.S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1984-06-01

    Xyloglucan, isolated from the soluble extracellular polysaccharides of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells, was digested with an endo-..beta..-1,4-glucanase purified from the culture fluid of Trichoderma viride. A nonasaccharide-rich Bio-Gel P-2 fraction of this digest inhibited 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic-acid-stimulated elongation of etiolated pea stem segments. The inhibitory activity of this oligosaccharide fraction exhibited a well-define concentraction optimum between 10/sup -2/ and 10/sup -1/ micrograms per milliliter. Another fraction of the same xyloglucan digest, rich in a structurally related heptasaccharide, did not, at similar concentrations, significantly inhibit the elongation. 11 references, 3 figures.

  8. Genotypic and symbiotic diversity of Rhizobium populations associated with cultivated lentil and pea in sub-humid and semi-arid regions of Eastern Algeria.

    PubMed

    Riah, Nassira; Béna, Gilles; Djekoun, Abdelhamid; Heulin, Karine; de Lajudie, Philippe; Laguerre, Gisèle

    2014-07-01

    The genetic structure of rhizobia nodulating pea and lentil in Algeria, Northern Africa was determined. A total of 237 isolates were obtained from root nodules collected on lentil (Lens culinaris), proteaginous and forage pea (Pisum sativum) growing in two eco-climatic zones, sub-humid and semi-arid, in Eastern Algeria. They were characterised by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region (IGS), and the nodD-F symbiotic region. The combination of these haplotypes allowed the isolates to be clustered into 26 distinct genotypes, and all isolates were classified as Rhizobium leguminosarum. Symbiotic marker variation (nodD-F) was low but with the predominance of one nod haplotype (g), which had been recovered previously at a high frequency in Europe. Sequence analysis of the IGS further confirmed its high variability in the studied strains. An AMOVA analysis showed highly significant differentiation in the IGS haplotype distribution between populations from both eco-climatic zones. This differentiation was reflected by differences in dominant genotype frequencies. Conversely, no host plant effect was detected. The nodD gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested that symbiotic gene diversity in pea and lentil nodulating rhizobial populations in Algeria was low compared to that reported elsewhere in the world.

  9. IBA in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Warner, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and characteristic properties and predictions of the IBA in deformed nuclei are reviewed, and compared with experiment, in particular for /sup 168/Er. Overall, excellent agreement, with a minimum of free parameters (in effect, two, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), was obtained. A particularly surprising, and unavoidable, prediction is that of strong ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions, a feature characteristically absent in the geometrical model, but manifest empirically. Some discrepancies were also noted, principally for the K=4 excitation, and the detailed magnitudes of some specific B(E2) values. Considerable attention is paid to analyzing the structure of the IBA states and their relation to geometric models. The bandmixing formalism was studied to interpret both the aforementioned discrepancies and the origin of the ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions. The IBA states, extremely complex in the usual SU(5) basis, are transformed to the SU(3) basis, as is the interaction Hamiltonian. The IBA wave functions appear with much simplified structure in this way as does the structure of the associated B(E2) values. The nature of the symmetry breaking of SU(3) for actual deformed nuclei is seen to be predominantly ..delta..K=0 mixing. A modified, and more consistent, formalism for the IBA-1 is introduced which is simpler, has fewer free parameters (in effect, one, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), is in at least as good agreement with experiment as the earlier formalism, contains a special case of the 0(6) limit which corresponds to that known empirically, and appears to have a close relationship to the IBA-2. The new formalism facilitates the construction of contour plots of various observables (e.g., energy or B(E2) ratios) as functions of N and chi/sub Q/ which allow the parameter-free discussion of qualitative trajectories or systematics.

  10. Thermostability of sperm nuclei assessed by microinjection into hamster oocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclei isolated from spermatozoa of various species (golden hamster, mouse, human, rooster, and the fish tilapia) were heated at 60 degrees-125 degrees C for 20-120 min and then microinjected into hamster oocytes to determine whether they could decondense and develop into pronucl...

  11. Genome sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International aphid genome consortium, IAGC, herein presents the 464 Mb draft genome assembly sequence of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This is the first published whole genome sequence from the diverse assemblage of hemimetabolous insects, providing an outgroup to the multiple published g...

  12. Extracellular proteins in pea root tip and border cell exudates.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fushi; VanEtten, Hans D; Tsaprailis, George; Hawes, Martha C

    2007-02-01

    Newly generated plant tissue is inherently sensitive to infection. Yet, when pea (Pisum sativum) roots are inoculated with the pea pathogen, Nectria haematococca, most newly generated root tips remain uninfected even though most roots develop lesions just behind the tip in the region of elongation. The resistance mechanism is unknown but is correlated spatially with the presence of border cells on the cap periphery. Previously, an array of >100 extracellular proteins was found to be released while border cell separation proceeds. Here we report that protein secretion from pea root caps is induced in correlation with border cell separation. When this root cap secretome was proteolytically degraded during inoculation of pea roots with N. haematococca, the percentage of infected root tips increased from 4% +/- 3% to 100%. In control experiments, protease treatment of conidia or roots had no effect on growth and development of the fungus or the plant. A complex of >100 extracellular proteins was confirmed, by multidimensional protein identification technology, to comprise the root cap secretome. In addition to defense-related and signaling enzymes known to be present in the plant apoplast were ribosomal proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and others typically associated with intracellular localization but recently shown to be extracellular components of microbial biofilms. We conclude that the root cap, long known to release a high molecular weight polysaccharide mucilage and thousands of living cells into the incipient rhizosphere, also secretes a complex mixture of proteins that appear to function in protection of the root tip from infection.

  13. A preliminary report on green peas in Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western Regional Plant Introduction Station at Pullman, Washington and Seneca Foods Corporation in Dayton, WA collaborated with the Sub-arctic Agricultural Research Unit (SARU) to test a set of established cultivars and breeding lines of green peas under sub-arctic growing conditions. This test set ...

  14. Associations of wheat with pea can reduce aphid infestations.

    PubMed

    Lopes, T; Bodson, B; Francis, F

    2015-06-01

    Increasing plant diversity within crops can be beneficial for pest control. In this field study, the effects of two wheat and pea associations (mixed cropping and strip cropping) on aphid populations were compared with pure stands of both crops by observations on tillers and plants. Pea was more susceptible to infestations than wheat. As expected, the density of aphid colonies was significantly higher in pure stands during the main occurrence periods, compared with associations. Additionally, flying beneficials, such as not only aphidophagous adult ladybirds but also parasitoid, hoverfly and lacewing species that feed on aphids at the larval stage, were monitored using yellow pan traps. At specific times of the sampling season, ladybirds and hoverflies were significantly more abundant in the pure stand of pea and wheat, respectively, compared with associations. Few parasitoids and lacewings were trapped. This study showed that increasing plant diversity within crops by associating cultivated species can reduce aphid infestations, since host plants are more difficult to locate. However, additional methods are needed to attract more efficiently adult beneficials into wheat and pea associations. PMID:26013274

  15. Pea (Pisum sp.) genetic resources, its analysis and exploration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea is important temperate region pulse, with feed, fodder and vegetable uses. Originated and domesticated in Middle East and Mediterranean, it formed important dietary components of early civilizations. Although Pisum is a small genus with two or three species, it is very diverse and structured, r...

  16. Quarks in Few Body Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Roy J.

    2016-03-01

    Electron scattering at very high Bjorken x from hadrons provides an excellent test of models, has an important role in high energy physics, and from nuclei, provides a window into short range correlations. Light nuclei have a key role because of the relatively well-known nuclear structure. The development of a novel tritium target for Jefferson Lab has led to renewed interest in the mass three system. For example, deep inelastic scattering experiments in the light nuclei provide a powerful means to determine the neutron structure function. The isospin dependence of electron scattering from mass-3 nuclei provide information on short range correlations in nuclei. The program using the new tritium target will be presented along with a summary of other experiments aimed at revealing the large-x structure of the nucleon.

  17. Gravistimulation changes expression of genes encoding putative carrier proteins of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Miyamoto, K.; Tanimoto, E.; Ueda, J.

    STS-95 space experiment has showed that auxin polar transport in etiolated epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings is controlled by gravistimulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana auxin polar transport has considered to be regulated by efflux and influx carrier proteins in plasma membranes, AtPIN1 and AtAUX1, respectively. In order to know how gravistimuli control auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls at molecular levels, strenuous efforts have been made, resulting in successful isolation of full-length cDNAs of a putative auxin efflux and influx carriers, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (accession no. AY222857, Chawla and DeMason, 2003) and AtPINs, and also among PsAUX1, AtAUX1 and their related genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 relating to lateral transport of auxin, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1 relating to auxin polar transport. In the present study, we examined the effects of gravistimuli on the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 in etiolated pea seedlings by northern blot analysis. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in hook region of 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat increased as compared with that of the seedlings grown under 1 g conditions. On the other hand, that of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the 1st internode region under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat also increased, while that of PsPIN2 was affected little. These results suggest that expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 regulating polar/lateral transport of auxin is substantially under the control of gravity. A possible role of PsPINs and PsAUX1 of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea seedlings will also be discussed.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative involvement of P3N-PIPO in overcoming recessive resistance against Clover yellow vein virus in pea carrying the cyv1 gene.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Hee; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Nakahara, Kenji S; Atsumi, Go; Shimada, Ryoko; Hisa, Yusuke; Naito, Satoshi; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2013-07-01

    In pea carrying cyv1, a recessive gene for resistance to Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV), ClYVV isolate Cl-no30 was restricted to the initially infected cells, whereas isolate 90-1 Br2 overcame this resistance. We mapped the region responsible for breaking of cyv1-mediated resistance by examining infection of cyv1 pea with chimeric viruses constructed from parts of Cl-no30 and 90-1 Br2. The breaking of resistance was attributed to the P3 cistron, which is known to produce two proteins: P3, from the main open reading frame (ORF), and P3N-PIPO, which has the N-terminal part of P3 fused to amino acids encoded by a small open reading frame (ORF) called PIPO in the +2 reading frame. We introduced point mutations that were synonymous with respect to the P3 protein but nonsynonymous with respect to the P3N-PIPO protein, and vice versa, into the chimeric viruses. Infection of plants with these mutant viruses revealed that both P3 and P3N-PIPO were involved in overcoming cyv1-mediated resistance. Moreover, P3N-PIPO quantitatively affected the virulence of Cl-no30 in cyv1 pea. Additional expression in trans of the P3N-PIPO derived from Cl-no30, using White clover mosaic virus as a vector, enabled Cl-no30 to move to systemic leaves in cyv1 pea. Susceptible pea plants infected with chimeric ClYVV possessing the P3 cistron of 90-1 Br2, and which were therefore virulent toward cyv1 pea, accumulated more P3N-PIPO than did those infected with Cl-no30, suggesting that the higher level of P3N-PIPO in infected cells contributed to the breaking of resistance by 90-1 Br2. This is the first report showing that P3N-PIPO is a virulence determinant in plants resistant to a potyvirus.

  19. Generalized parton distributions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2009-12-01

    Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of nuclei describe the distribution of quarks and gluons in nuclei probed in hard exclusive reactions, such as e.g. deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). Nuclear GPDs and nuclear DVCS allow us to study new aspects of many traditional nuclear effects (nuclear shadowing, EMC effect, medium modifications of the bound nucleons) as well as to access novel nuclear effects. In my talk, I review recent theoretical progress in the area of nuclear GPDs.

  20. Electroweak properties of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Saori

    2016-03-01

    In this talk, I will review the present understanding of nuclear electroweak properties of light nuclei, including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions, as well as selected beta decays in A <= 10 nuclei. Emphasis will be on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electroweak currents. Work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  1. The nature of comet nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Walker, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    The icy-conglomerate model of comet nuclei has dominated all others since its introduction. It provided a basis for understanding the non-gravitational motions of comets which had perplexed dynamicists up to that time, and provided a focus for understanding cometary composition and origin. The image of comets as dirty snowballs was quickly adopted. Comet nuclei including their trail mass loss rates and refractory to volatile mass ratios are described.

  2. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PEA)-15: A potential therapeutic target in multiple disease states

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Fiona H.; Nixon, Graeme F.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 (PEA-15) is a cytoplasmic protein that sits at an important junction in intracellular signalling and can regulate diverse cellular processes, such as proliferation and apoptosis, dependent upon stimulation. Regulation of these processes occurs by virtue of the unique interaction of PEA-15 with other signalling proteins. PEA-15 acts as a cytoplasmic tether for the mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) preventing nuclear localisation. In order to release ERK1/2, PEA-15 requires to be phosphorylated via several potential pathways. PEA-15 (and its phosphorylation state) therefore regulates many ERK1/2-dependent processes, including proliferation, via regulating ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. In addition, PEA-15 contains a death effector domain (DED) which allows interaction with other DED-containing proteins. PEA-15 can bind the DED-containing apoptotic adaptor molecule, Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) which is also dependent on the phosphorylation status of PEA-15. PEA-15 binding of FADD can inhibit apoptosis as bound FADD cannot participate in the assembly of apoptotic signalling complexes. Through these protein–protein interactions, PEA-15-regulated cellular effects have now been investigated in a number of disease-related studies. Changes in PEA-15 expression and regulation have been observed in diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurological disorders and the cardiovascular system. These changes have been suggested to contribute to the pathology related to each of these disease states. As such, new therapeutic targets based around PEA-15 and its associated interactions are now being uncovered and could provide novel avenues for treatment strategies in multiple diseases. PMID:24657708

  3. Effect of pectin methylesterase gene expression on pea root development.

    PubMed

    Wen, F; Zhu, Y; Hawes, M C

    1999-06-01

    Expression of an inducible gene with sequences common to genes encoding pectin methylesterase (PME) was found to be tightly correlated, both spatially and temporally, with border cell separation in pea root caps. Partial inhibition of the gene's expression by antisense mRNA in transgenic pea hairy roots prevented the normal separation of root border cells from the root tip into the external environment. This phenotype was correlated with an increase in extracellular pH, reduced root elongation, and altered cellular morphology. The translation product of the gene exhibited PME activity in vitro. These results are consistent with the long-standing hypothesis that the demethylation of pectin by PME plays a key role in cell wall metabolism.

  4. Clinorotation affects mesophyll photosynthetic cells in leaves of pea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Adamchuk, N I

    1998-07-01

    Experiments with autotrophs in altered gravity condition have a grate significant for development of space biology. The main results of investigation in the photosynthetic apparatus state under microgravity condition have based on the experiments with maturity plants and their differentiated cells. The structural and functional organization of photosynthetic cells in seedlings is poor understandable still. Along with chloroplasts preserving a native membrane system in palisade parenchyma cells of the 29-day pea plant leaves in microgravity, chloroplasts with fribly packed or damaged granae, whose thylakoids appeared as vesicles with an electrontransparent content, were also observed. The investigation of preceding process induced these effects have a sense. That is why, the goal of our experiments was to perform the study of a structural organization of the photosynthetic cells of 3-d pair of pea seedlings leaves under the influence of clinorotation.

  5. Pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements of embedded charge distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Pearson, Lee H.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution and evolution of embedded charge in thin dielectric materials has important applications in semiconductor, high-power electronic device, high-voltage DC power cable insulation, high-energy and plasma physics apparatus, and spacecraft industries. Knowing how, where, and how much charge accumulates and how it redistributes and dissipates can predict destructive charging effects. Pulsed Electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements— and two closely related methods, Pressure Wave Propagation (PWP) and Laser Intensity Modulation (LIMM)— nondestructively probe such internal charge distributions. We review the instrumentation, methods, theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments, as well as the related PPW and LIMM methods. We emphasize system improvements required to achieve high spatial resolution for in vacuo measurements of thin dielectrics charged using electron beam injection.

  6. Effect of presowing magnetic treatment on properties of pea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M.; Haq, Z. U.; Jamil, Y.; Ahmad, M. R.

    2012-02-01

    The pea seeds were exposed to full-wave rectified sinusoidal magnetic fields. The effects of electromagnetic treatment on seedling growth and chlorophyll contents and have been investigated. Seed were sown after magnetic field treatment according to ISTA under controlled laboratory conditions. The magnetic filed treatment of seeds increased the growth significantly (P<0.05), while the increment in contents of chlorophyll have been found non significant (P<0.05). The shoot length, root length, root dry mass, shoot dry mass, fresh root mass and fresh shoot mass increased up to 140.5, 218.2, and 104, 263.6, 74.5, 91.3%, respectively. The result suggested that magnetic field could be used to enhance the growth in pea plant.

  7. Effect of pectin methylesterase gene expression on pea root development.

    PubMed Central

    Wen, F; Zhu, Y; Hawes, M C

    1999-01-01

    Expression of an inducible gene with sequences common to genes encoding pectin methylesterase (PME) was found to be tightly correlated, both spatially and temporally, with border cell separation in pea root caps. Partial inhibition of the gene's expression by antisense mRNA in transgenic pea hairy roots prevented the normal separation of root border cells from the root tip into the external environment. This phenotype was correlated with an increase in extracellular pH, reduced root elongation, and altered cellular morphology. The translation product of the gene exhibited PME activity in vitro. These results are consistent with the long-standing hypothesis that the demethylation of pectin by PME plays a key role in cell wall metabolism. PMID:10368183

  8. Protein modification by fermentation: effect of fermentation on the potential allergenicity of pea.

    PubMed

    Barkholt, V; Jørgensen, P B; Sørensen, D; Bahrenscheer, J; Haikara, A; Lemola, E; Laitila, A; Frøkiaer, H

    1998-01-01

    The effect of fermentation on components of potential significance for the allergenicity of pea was analyzed. Pea flour was fermented with three lactic acid bacteria, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactococcus raffinolactis, and Lactobacillus plantarum, and two fungi, Rhizopus microsporus, var. oligosporus and Geotrichum candidum. Residual antigenicity against antipea antibodies was reduced to 10% by the three lactic acid bacteria and R. microsporus. Reactions to anti-pea profilin and anti-Bet v 1 were still detectable after fermentation. The contents of lectin and pea protease inhibitor were not reduced by the microorganisms. PMID:9826013

  9. [Possibility of using flour of pigeon pea in products prepared with rice or wheat flour].

    PubMed

    Mueses, C; de León, L; Bressani, R

    1993-03-01

    The present study reports on the development of foods containing processed pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) flour. The pigeon pea flours described in a previous publication were prepared from dehulled pigeon peas by cooking in autoclave, by extrusion-cooking and by cooking/dehydration by drum-drying. Mixtures of cooked pigeon peas and rice were first evaluated biological through a protein complementation design using NPR. The results of this study showed that the two products had high protein quality and were similar when mixed in ratios of 80:20 to 40:60. For the evaluation of the processed pigeon pea flour, mixtures with rice (80:20) were used. All pigeon pea flours gave similar protein quality values. On the basis of these results three products were developed and tested. One was a gruel ("atole"), a second a fruit-flavored thick drink with and without 15% milk. Cookies were also prepared with a series of blends of pigeon pea flour (extrusion-cooked) and wheat. The gruel and the fruit flavored products had high acceptability based on a sensory evaluation test. Cookies with 100% pigeon pea flour were unacceptable, however, mixtures of 75% wheat flour and 25% pigeon pea flour gave cookies of attractive appearance and good taste. The study showed the possibility of preparing and utilizing tropical grain legume flours for food products of relatively high acceptability and nutritive value.

  10. Validation of SSR markers associated with rust (Uromyces fabae) resistance in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Rai, Rashmi; Singh, Brahma Deo; Chand, Ramesh; Srivastava, Chandra Prakash

    2015-04-01

    Pea rust is a devastating disease of peas especially in the sub-tropical regions of the world and greatly influenced by the environmental conditions during disease development. Molecular markers associated with pea rust resistance would be useful in marker assisted selection (MAS). Utility of molecular markers associated with the pea rust resistance were evaluated in 30 diverse pea genotypes using four SSR markers (AA446 and AA505 flanking the major QTL Qruf; AD146 and AA416 flanking the minor QTL, Qruf1). QTL, Qruf flanking markers were able to identify all the resistant genotypes when used together, except Pant P 31. While, SSR markers AD146 and AA416 flanking the minor QTL, Qruf1 were able to identify all the pea resistant genotypes used for validation, except for HUDP-11 by AD146 and Pant P 31 by AA416. Similarly, SSR markers AA446 and AA505 were able to identify all the susceptible pea genotypes, except IPFD 99-13, HFP 9415 and S- 143. SSR markers AD146 and AA416 were together able to identify all the pea susceptible genotypes used for validation, except KPMR 526, KPMR 632 and IPFD 99-13. On the basis of marker allele analysis it may be concluded that SSR markers (AA446, AA505, AD146 and AA416) can be used in MAS of pea rust resistance.

  11. Pre-fractionation strategies to resolve pea (Pisum sativum) sub-proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Menckhoff, Ljiljana; Kukavica, Biljana M.; Lüthje, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Legumes are important crop plants and pea (Pisum sativum L.) has been investigated as a model with respect to several physiological aspects. The sequencing of the pea genome has not been completed. Therefore, proteomic approaches are currently limited. Nevertheless, the increasing numbers of available EST-databases as well as the high homology of the pea and medicago genome (Medicago truncatula Gaertner) allow the successful identification of proteins. Due to the un-sequenced pea genome, pre-fractionation approaches have been used in pea proteomic surveys in the past. Aside from a number of selective proteome studies on crude extracts and the chloroplast, few studies have targeted other components such as the pea secretome, an important sub-proteome of interest due to its role in abiotic and biotic stress processes. The secretome itself can be further divided into different sub-proteomes (plasma membrane, apoplast, cell wall proteins). Cell fractionation in combination with different gel-electrophoresis, chromatography methods and protein identification by mass spectrometry are important partners to gain insight into pea sub-proteomes, post-translational modifications and protein functions. Overall, pea proteomics needs to link numerous existing physiological and biochemical data to gain further insight into adaptation processes, which play important roles in field applications. Future developments and directions in pea proteomics are discussed. PMID:26539198

  12. The role of recovery of mitochondrial structure and function in desiccation tolerance of pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Møller, Ian M; Song, Song-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial repair is of fundamental importance for seed germination. When mature orthodox seeds are imbibed and germinated, they lose their desiccation tolerance in parallel. To gain a better understanding of this process, we studied the recovery of mitochondrial structure and function in pea (Pisum sativum cv. Jizhuang) seeds with different tolerance to desiccation. Mitochondria were isolated and purified from the embryo axes of control and imbibed-dehydrated pea seeds after (re-)imbibition for various times. Recovery of mitochondrial structure and function occurred both in control and imbibed-dehydrated seed embryo axes, but at different rates and to different maximum levels. The integrity of the outer mitochondrial membrane reached 96% in all treatments. However, only the seeds imbibed for 12 h and then dehydrated recovered the integrity of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) and State 3 (respiratory state in which substrate and ADP are present) respiration (with NADH and succinate as substrate) to the control level after re-imbibition. With increasing imbibition time, the degree to which each parameter recovered decreased in parallel with the decrease in desiccation tolerance. The tolerance of imbibed seeds to desiccation increased and decreased when imbibed in CaCl(2) and methylviologen solution, respectively, and the recovery of the IMM integrity similarly improved and weakened in these two treatments, respectively. Survival of seeds after imbibition-dehydration linearly increased with the increase in ability to recover the integrity of IMM and State 3 respiration, which indicates that recovery of mitochondrial structure and function during germination has an important role in seed desiccation tolerance.

  13. Combining gene expression and genetic analyses to identify candidate genes involved in cold responses in pea.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Sylvain; Marque, Gilles; Blassiau, Christelle; Bluteau, Aurélie; Canoy, Anne-Sophie; Fontaine, Véronique; Jaminon, Odile; Bahrman, Nasser; Mautord, Julie; Morin, Julie; Petit, Aurélie; Baranger, Alain; Rivière, Nathalie; Wilmer, Jeroen; Delbreil, Bruno; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle

    2013-09-01

    Cold stress affects plant growth and development. In order to better understand the responses to cold (chilling or freezing tolerance), we used two contrasted pea lines. Following a chilling period, the Champagne line becomes tolerant to frost whereas the Terese line remains sensitive. Four suppression subtractive hybridisation libraries were obtained using mRNAs isolated from pea genotypes Champagne and Terese. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) performed on 159 genes, 43 and 54 genes were identified as differentially expressed at the initial time point and during the time course study, respectively. Molecular markers were developed from the differentially expressed genes and were genotyped on a population of 164 RILs derived from a cross between Champagne and Terese. We identified 5 candidate genes colocalizing with 3 different frost damage quantitative trait loci (QTL) intervals and a protein quantity locus (PQL) rich region previously reported. This investigation revealed the role of constitutive differences between both genotypes in the cold responses, in particular with genes related to glycine degradation pathway that could confer to Champagne a better frost tolerance. We showed that freezing tolerance involves a decrease of expression of genes related to photosynthesis and the expression of a gene involved in the production of cysteine and methionine that could act as cryoprotectant molecules. Although it remains to be confirmed, this study could also reveal the involvement of the jasmonate pathway in the cold responses, since we observed that two genes related to this pathway were mapped in a frost damage QTL interval and in a PQL rich region interval, respectively.

  14. Two distinct signaling pathways participate in auxin-induced swelling of pea epidermal protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Mutsumi; Haga, Ken; Napier, Richard M; Iino, Moritoshi

    2004-02-01

    Protoplast swelling was used to investigate auxin signaling in the growth-limiting stem epidermis. The protoplasts of epidermal cells were isolated from elongating internodes of pea (Pisum sativum). These protoplasts swelled in response to auxin, providing the clearest evidence that the epidermis can directly perceive auxin. The swelling response to the natural auxin IAA showed a biphasic dose response curve but that to the synthetic auxin 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) showed a simple bell-shaped dose response curve. The responses to IAA and NAA were further analyzed using antibodies raised against ABP1 (auxin-binding protein 1), and their dependency on extracellular ions was investigated. Two signaling pathways were resolved for IAA, an ABP1-dependent pathway and an ABP1-independent pathway that is much more sensitive to IAA than the former. The response by the ABP1 pathway was eliminated by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had a higher sensitivity to NAA, and did not depend on extracellular Ca(2+). In contrast, the response by the non-ABP1 pathway was not affected by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had no sensitivity to NAA, and depended on extracellular Ca(2+). The swelling by either pathway required extracellular K(+) and Cl(-). The auxin-induced growth of pea internode segments showed similar response patterns, including the occurrence of two peaks in the dose response curve for IAA and the difference in Ca(2+) requirements. It is suggested that two signaling pathways participate in auxin-induced internode growth and that the non-ABP1 pathway is more likely to be involved in the control of growth by constitutive concentrations of endogenous auxin. PMID:14764902

  15. Two Distinct Signaling Pathways Participate in Auxin-Induced Swelling of Pea Epidermal Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Mutsumi; Haga, Ken; Napier, Richard M.; Iino, Moritoshi

    2004-01-01

    Protoplast swelling was used to investigate auxin signaling in the growth-limiting stem epidermis. The protoplasts of epidermal cells were isolated from elongating internodes of pea (Pisum sativum). These protoplasts swelled in response to auxin, providing the clearest evidence that the epidermis can directly perceive auxin. The swelling response to the natural auxin IAA showed a biphasic dose response curve but that to the synthetic auxin 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) showed a simple bell-shaped dose response curve. The responses to IAA and NAA were further analyzed using antibodies raised against ABP1 (auxin-binding protein 1), and their dependency on extracellular ions was investigated. Two signaling pathways were resolved for IAA, an ABP1-dependent pathway and an ABP1-independent pathway that is much more sensitive to IAA than the former. The response by the ABP1 pathway was eliminated by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had a higher sensitivity to NAA, and did not depend on extracellular Ca2+. In contrast, the response by the non-ABP1 pathway was not affected by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had no sensitivity to NAA, and depended on extracellular Ca2+. The swelling by either pathway required extracellular K+ and Cl–. The auxin-induced growth of pea internode segments showed similar response patterns, including the occurrence of two peaks in the dose response curve for IAA and the difference in Ca2+ requirements. It is suggested that two signaling pathways participate in auxin-induced internode growth and that the non-ABP1 pathway is more likely to be involved in the control of growth by constitutive concentrations of endogenous auxin. PMID:14764902

  16. Role of H₂O₂ in pea seed germination.

    PubMed

    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Hernández, José Antonio; Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro

    2012-02-01

    The imbibition of pea seeds with hydrogen peroxide H₂O₂ increased the germination as well as the seedling growth, producing an invigoration of the seeds. We propose that H₂O₂ could acts as signaling molecule in the beginning of seed germination involving specific changes at proteomic, transcriptomic and hormonal levels. These findings have practical implication in the context of seed priming technologies to invigorate low vigour seeds.

  17. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei measured, with the DANCE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Bečvář, F.; Krtička, M.; Valenta, S.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Spectra of γ-rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured with the DANCE detector. The objectives were to obtain new information on the photon strength of 153,155-159Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is built not only on the ground state, but also on all excited levels of the nuclei studied. Our approach allows estimating the summed scissors-mode strength \\sum B(M1)\\!\\!\\uparrow even for odd product nuclei for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our data indicate that for 157,159Gd the strength \\sum B(M1)\\!\\!\\uparrow is significantly higher compared to 156,158Gd.

  18. Mechanism of gibberellin-dependent stem elongation in peas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Sovonick-Dunford, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    Stem elongation in peas (Pisum sativum L.) is under partial control by gibberellins, yet the mechanism of such control is uncertain. In this study, we examined the cellular and physical properties that govern stem elongation, to determine how gibberellins influence pea stem growth. Stem elongation of etiolated seedlings was retarded with uniconozol, a gibberellin synthesis inhibitor, and the growth retardation was reversed by exogenous gibberellin. Using the pressure probe and vapor pressure osmometry, we found little effect of uniconozol and gibberellin on cell turgor pressure or osmotic pressure. In contrast, these treatments had major effects on in vivo stress relaxation, measured by turgor relaxation and pressure-block techniques. Uniconozol-treated plants exhibited reduced wall relaxation (both initial rate and total amount). The results show that growth retardation is effected via a reduction in the wall yield coefficient and an increase in the yield threshold. These effects were largely reversed by exogenous gibberellin. When we measured the mechanical characteristics of the wall by stress/strain (Instron) analysis, we found only minor effects of uniconozol and gibberellin on the plastic compliance. This observation indicates that these agents did not alter wall expansion through effects on the mechanical (viscoelastic) properties of the wall. Our results suggest that wall expansion in peas is better viewed as a chemorheological, rather than a viscoelastic, process.

  19. Mechanism of gibberellin-dependent stem elongation in peas.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, D J; Sovonick-Dunford, S A

    1989-01-01

    Stem elongation in peas (Pisum sativum L.) is under partial control by gibberellins, yet the mechanism of such control is uncertain. In this study, we examined the cellular and physical properties that govern stem elongation, to determine how gibberellins influence pea stem growth. Stem elongation of etiolated seedlings was retarded with uniconozol, a gibberellin synthesis inhibitor, and the growth retardation was reversed by exogenous gibberellin. Using the pressure probe and vapor pressure osmometry, we found little effect of uniconozol and gibberellin on cell turgor pressure or osmotic pressure. In contrast, these treatments had major effects on in vivo stress relaxation, measured by turgor relaxation and pressure-block techniques. Uniconozol-treated plants exhibited reduced wall relaxation (both initial rate and total amount). The results show that growth retardation is effected via a reduction in the wall yield coefficient and an increase in the yield threshold. These effects were largely reversed by exogenous gibberellin. When we measured the mechanical characteristics of the wall by stress/strain (Instron) analysis, we found only minor effects of uniconozol and gibberellin on the plastic compliance. This observation indicates that these agents did not alter wall expansion through effects on the mechanical (viscoelastic) properties of the wall. Our results suggest that wall expansion in peas is better viewed as a chemorheological, rather than a viscoelastic, process. PMID:11537446

  20. Green Pea Galaxies Reveal Secrets of Lyα Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Gronke, Max; Rhoads, James E.; Dijkstra, Mark; Jaskot, Anne; Zheng, Zhenya; Wang, Junxian

    2016-04-01

    We analyze archival Lyα spectra of 12 “Green Pea” galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, model their Lyα profiles with radiative transfer models, and explore the dependence of the Lyα escape fraction on various properties. Green Pea galaxies are nearby compact starburst galaxies with [O iii] λ5007 equivalent widths (EWs) of hundreds of Å. All 12 Green Pea galaxies in our sample show Lyα lines in emission, with an Lyα EW distribution similar to high-redshift Lyα emitters. Combining the optical and UV spectra of Green Pea galaxies, we estimate their Lyα escape fractions and find correlations between Lyα escape fraction and kinematic features of Lyα profiles. The escape fraction of Lyα in these galaxies ranges from 1.4% to 67%. We also find that the Lyα escape fraction depends strongly on metallicity and moderately on dust extinction. We compare their high-quality Lyα profiles with single H i shell radiative transfer models and find that the Lyα escape fraction anticorrelates with the derived H i column densities. Single-shell models fit most Lyα profiles well, but not the ones with the highest escape fractions of Lyα. Our results suggest that low H i column density and low metallicity are essential for Lyα escape and make a galaxy an Lyα emitter.

  1. Auxin biosynthesis in pea: characterization of the tryptamine pathway.

    PubMed

    Quittenden, Laura J; Davies, Noel W; Smith, Jason A; Molesworth, Peter P; Tivendale, Nathan D; Ross, John J

    2009-11-01

    One pathway leading to the bioactive auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), is known as the tryptamine pathway, which is suggested to proceed in the sequence: tryptophan (Trp), tryptamine, N-hydroxytryptamine, indole-3-acetaldoxime, indole-3-acetaldehyde (IAAld), IAA. Recently, this pathway has been characterized by the YUCCA genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and their homologs in other species. YUCCA is thought to be responsible for the conversion of tryptamine to N-hydroxytryptamine. Here we complement the genetic findings with a compound-based approach in pea (Pisum sativum), detecting potential precursors by gas chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry. In addition, we have synthesized deuterated forms of many of the intermediates involved, and have used them to quantify the endogenous compounds, and to investigate their metabolic fates. Trp, tryptamine, IAAld, indole-3-ethanol, and IAA were detected as endogenous constituents, whereas indole-3-acetaldoxime and one of its products, indole-3-acetonitrile, were not detected. Metabolism experiments indicated that the tryptamine pathway to IAA in pea roots proceeds in the sequence: Trp, tryptamine, IAAld, IAA, with indole-3-ethanol as a side-branch product of IAAld. N-hydroxytryptamine was not detected, but we cannot exclude that it is an intermediate between tryptamine and IAAld, nor can we rule out the possibility of a Trp-independent pathway operating in pea roots. PMID:19710233

  2. High-level expression of ice nuclei in Erwinia herbicola is induced by phosphate starvation and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Fall, A L; Fall, R

    1998-06-01

    In laboratory cultures of ice nucleation-active (Ice+) Erwinia herbicola isolates, it has been difficult to achieve high-level expression of ice nuclei, especially nuclei active at temperatures warmer than -5 degrees C (i.e., type 1 ice nuclei). Here we demonstrate that starvation for phosphate and exposure to low temperature triggers expression of ice nuclei in E. herbicola cultures. Starvation for nitrogen, sulfur, or iron was less effective. Under optimal conditions with two different strains, essentially all cells produced ice nuclei active at -10 degrees C or warmer, with an average of 22% containing type 1 ice nuclei within 1 h of a low-temperature shift. These conditions did not greatly enhance the shedding of ice nucleation-active membrane vesicles that are known to be produced by Ice+ E. herbicola isolates. These results support the theory that the Ice+ phenotype may allow nutrient-limited epiphytes to trigger freezing damage, releasing nutrients from host plants. PMID:9608750

  3. Novel cross-linked alcohol-insoluble solid (CL-AIS) affinity gel from pea pod for pectinesterase purification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Chang; Lin, Guan-Hui; Wang, Yuh-Tai; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Chang, Hung-Min

    2005-10-01

    Alcohol-insoluble solids (AIS) from pea pod were cross-linked (CL-AIS) and used as an affinity gel matrix to isolate pectin esterases (PEs) from tendril shoots of chayote (TSC) and jelly fig achenes (JFA), and the results were compared with those isolated by ion-exchange chromatography with a commercial resin. CL-AIS gel matrix in a column displayed poor absorption and purification fold of PE; however, highly methoxylated CL-AIS (HM-CL-AIS), by exposing CL-AIS to methanolic sulfuric acid to increase the degree of esterification (DE) to 92%, facilitated the enzyme purification. The purified TSC PE and JFA PE by the HM-CL-AIS column were proofed as a single band on an SDS-PAGE gel, showing that the HM-CL-AIS column was a good matrix for purification of PE, either with alkaline isoelectric point (pI) (TSC PE) or with acidic pI (JFA PE).

  4. Post-reproductive parthenogenetic pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) are visually identifiable and disproportionately positioned distally to clonal colonies

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Julia Daisy; Henneman, Nathaniel Fath; Levitis, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of kin-selection in the evolution of post-reproductive life is controversial. While anthropological and demographic studies strongly suggest that humans and a few other species experience kin selection for significant post-reproductive survival, these results are necessarily correlational. Understanding could therefore be advanced by the development of a globally available, field and laboratory tractable experimental model of kin-selected post-reproductive survival. In only one invertebrate (Quadrartus yoshinomiyai, a gall-forming aphid endemic to Japan) have individuals too old to reproduce been shown to be both numerous in natural habitats and able to help close relatives survive or reproduce. Pea aphids, (Acyrthosiphon pisum), common, tractable organisms, frequently outlive their reproductive ages in laboratories, live in tight interacting groups that are often clonal, and therefore should be evaluated as potential model organisms for the study of adaptive post-reproductive life. The first major step in this process is to identify an optimal method for assessing if a parthenogenetic adult is post-reproductive. We evaluated three methods, relying respectively on isolation in clip cages, visual examination for embryonic eyespots, and dissection. In every case each method identified the same individuals as reproductive versus post-reproductive. While the clip-cage method requires a multi-day wait to produce data, and dissection is inevitably fatal, the eyespot method is quick (under one minute per individual) easy, and non-invasive. This method makes it possible to accurately assess the post-reproductive status of a large number of parthenogenetic pea aphids. We demonstrate the usefulness of the eyespot method in showing that while reproductively valuable adults tend to place themselves near the centers of clonal colonies, less valuable post-reproductive adults are more often at or beyond the edges of colonies. These encouraging early results provide both

  5. Antihypertensive Properties of a Pea Protein Hydrolysate during Short- and Long-Term Oral Administration to Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi D; Onuh, John O; Malomo, Sunday A; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated short-term (24 h) and long-term (5 wk) systolic blood pressure (SBP)-lowering effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) of a 5 kDa membrane pea protein hydrolysate permeate (PPH-5) produced through thermoase hydrolysis of pea protein isolate (PPI). Amino acid analysis showed that the PPH-5 had lower contents of sulfur-containing amino acids than the PPI. Size-exclusion chromatography indicated mainly low molecular weight (<10 kDa) peptides in PPH-5 but not in the PPI. The PPH-5 had renin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition IC50 values of 0.57 and 0.10 mg/mL (P < 0.05), respectively, and consisted mainly of peptides with 2 to 6 amino acids. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed mainly hydrophilic tetrapeptide sequences. After a single oral administration (100 mg/kg body weight) to SHR, the unheated PPI showed weakest (P < 0.05) SBP-lowering effect with a -4 mm Hg maximum when compared to -25 mm Hg for heat-treated PPI and -36 mm Hg for PPH-5. Incorporation of the PPH-5 as 0.5% or 1% (w/w) casein substitute in the SHR diet produced maximum SBP reductions of -22 or -26 mm Hg (P < 0.05), respectively after 3 wk. In comparison, the unhydrolyzed PPI produced a maximum SBP reduction of -17 mm Hg also after 3 wk. Potency of the pea products decreased in the 4th and 5th wk, though SBP values of the treated rats were still lower than the untreated control. We conclude that the antihypertensive potency of PPH-5 may have been due to the presence of easily absorbed hydrophilic peptides. PMID:27037677

  6. Biosynthesis of Indoleacetic Acid from Tryptophan-14C in Cell-free Extracts of Pea Shoot Tips 1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Thomas C.; Shaner, Coralie A.

    1967-01-01

    A 2-step, 1-dimensional thin-layer chromatographic procedure for isolating indoleacetic acid (IAA) was developed and utilized in investigations of the biosynthesis of IAA from tryptophan-14C in cell-free extracts of pea (Pisum sativum L.) shoot tips. Identification of a 14C-product as IAA was by (a) co-chromatography of authentic IAA and 14C-product on thin-layer chromatography, and (b) gas-liquid and thin-layer chromatography of authentic and presumptive IAA methyl esters. Dialysis of enzyme extracts and addition of α-ketoglutaric acid and pyridoxal phosphate to reaction mixtures resulted in approximately 2- to 3-fold increases in net yields of IAA over yields in non-dialyzed reaction mixtures which did not contain additives essential to a transaminase reaction of tryptophan. Addition of thiamine pyrophosphate to reaction mixtures further enhanced net biosynthesis of IAA. It is concluded that the formation of indolepyruvic acid and its subsequent decarboxylation probably are sequential reactions in the major pathway of IAA biosynthesis from tryptophan in cell-free extracts of Pisum shoot tips. Comparison of maximum net IAA biosynthesis in extracts of shoot tips of etiolated and light-grown dwarf and tall pea seedlings revealed an order, on a unit protein N basis, of: light-grown tall > light-grown dwarf > etiolated tall ≅ etiolated dwarf. It is concluded that the different rates of stem elongation among etiolated and light-grown dwarf and tall pea seedlings are correlated, in general, with differences in net IAA biosynthesis and sensitivity of the tissues to IAA. PMID:16656720

  7. Enumeration of islets by nuclei counting and light microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pisania, Anna; Papas, Klearchos K; Powers, Daryl E; Rappel, Michael J; Omer, Abdulkadir; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C; Colton, Clark K

    2010-11-01

    Islet enumeration in impure preparations by conventional dithizone staining and visual counting is inaccurate and operator dependent. We examined nuclei counting for measuring the total number of cells in islet preparations, and we combined it with morphological analysis by light microscopy (LM) for estimating the volume fraction of islets in impure preparations. Cells and islets were disrupted with lysis solution and shear, and accuracy of counting successively diluted nuclei suspensions was verified with (1) visual counting in a hemocytometer after staining with crystal violet, and automatic counting by (2) aperture electrical resistance measurement and (3) flow cytometer measurement after staining with 7-aminoactinomycin-D. DNA content averaged 6.5 and 6.9 pg of DNA per cell for rat and human islets, respectively, in agreement with literature estimates. With pure rat islet preparations, precision improved with increasing counts, and samples with about ≥160 islets provided a coefficient of variation of about 6%. Aliquots of human islet preparations were processed for LM analysis by stereological point counting. Total nuclei counts and islet volume fraction from LM analysis were combined to obtain the number of islet equivalents (IEs). Total number of IE by the standard method of dithizone staining/manual counting was overestimated by about 90% compared with LM/nuclei counting for 12 freshly isolated human islet research preparations. Nuclei counting combined with islet volume fraction measurements from LM is a novel method for achieving accurate islet enumeration. PMID:20697375

  8. A peptide that binds the pea aphid gut impedes entry of Pea enation mosaic virus into the aphid hemocoel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Sijun; Sivakumar, S.; Sparks, Wendy O.; Miller, W. Allen; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-05-25

    Development of ways to block virus transmission by aphids could lead to novel and broad-spectrum means of controlling plant viruses. Viruses in the Luteoviridae enhanced are obligately transmitted by aphids in a persistent manner that requires virion accumulation in the aphid hemocoel. To enter the hemocoel, the virion must bind and traverse the aphid gut epithelium. By screening a phage display library, we identified a 12-residue gut binding peptide (GBP3.1) that binds to the midgut and hindgut of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Binding was confirmed by labeling the aphid gut with a GBP3.1-green fluorescent protein fusion. GBP3.1 reduced uptake of Pea enation mosaic virus (Luteoviridae) from the pea aphid gut into the hemocoel. GBP3.1 also bound to the gut epithelia of the green peach aphid and the soybean aphid. These results suggest a novel strategy for inhibiting plant virus transmission by at least three major aphid pest species.

  9. PEA-15 potentiates H-Ras mediated epithelial cell transformation through Phospholipase D

    PubMed Central

    Sulzmaier, Florian J.; Valmiki, Mohana K. Gudur; Nelson, Deirdre A.; Caliva, Maisel J.; Geerts, Dirk; Matter, Michelle L.; White, Eileen P.; Ramos, Joe W.

    2011-01-01

    The small GTPase H-Ras is a proto-oncogene that activates a variety of different pathways including the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway. H-Ras is mutated in many human malignancies and these mutations cause the protein to be constitutively active. PEA-15 blocks ERK-dependent gene transcription and inhibits proliferation by sequestering ERK in the cytoplasm. We therefore investigated whether PEA-15 influences H-Ras mediated transformation. We found that PEA-15 does not block H-Ras activated proliferation when H-Ras is constitutively active. We show instead that in H-Ras transformed mouse kidney epithelial cells, co-expression of PEA-15 resulted in enhanced soft agar colony growth and increased tumor growth in vivo. Overexpression of both H-Ras and PEA-15 resulted in accelerated G1/S cell cycle transition and increased activation of the ERK signaling pathway. PEA-15 mediated these effects through activation of its binding partner phospholipase D1 (PLD1). Inhibition of PLD1 or interference with PEA-15/PLD1 binding blocked PEA-15’s ability to increase ERK activation. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism by which PEA-15 positively regulates Ras/ERK signaling and increases the proliferation of H-Ras transformed epithelial cells through enhanced PLD1 expression and activation. Thus, our work provides a surprising mechanism by which PEA-15 augments H-Ras driven transformation. These data reveal that PEA-15 not only suppresses ERK signaling and tumorigenesis but can alternatively enhance tumorigenesis in the context of active Ras. PMID:22105357

  10. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Mørch, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure–time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes. PMID:26442138

  11. Nuclear pore ion channel activity in live syncytial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Jose Omar

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are important nanochannels for the control of gene activity and expression. Most of our knowledge of NPC function has been derived from isolated nuclei and permeabilized cells in cell lysates/extracts. Since recent patch-clamp work has challenged the dogma that NPCs are freely permeable to small particles, a preparation of isolated living nuclei in their native liquid environment was sought and found: the syncytial nuclei in the water of the coconut Cocos nucifera. These nuclei have all properties of NPC-mediated macromolecular transport (MMT) and express foreign green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmids. They display chromatin movement, are created by particle aggregation or by division, can grow by throwing filaments to catch material, etc. This study shows, for the first time, that living NPCs engaged in MMT do not transport physiological ions - a phenomenon that explains observations of nucleocytoplasmic ion gradients. Since coconuts are inexpensive (less than US$1/nut per litre), this robust preparation may contribute to our understanding of NPCs and cell nucleus and to the development of biotechnologies for the production of DNA, RNA and proteins.

  12. Polarized EMC Effect in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Cloet; A. W. Thomas; W. Bentz

    2006-06-05

    The discovery of the EMC effect and the proton spin crisis by the European Muon Collaboration are two of the standout experiments of the last 25 years. It is therefore surprising that there has been no experimental and little theoretical investigation of the spin structure functions of atomic nuclei. To address this we present results for the spin-dependent structure functions of nuclei. The quark degrees of freedom in nuclei are accessed via the convolution formalism. Where the nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the relativistic Faddeev equation, and a relativistic shell model is used to model the atomic nucleus. We find the important result that the medium modifications to the polarized structure functions are about twice that of the unpolarized case.

  13. Mycoflora and aflatoxin production in pigeon pea stored in jute sacks and iron bins.

    PubMed

    Bankole, S A; Eseigbe, D A; Enikuomehin, O A

    The mycoflora, moisture content and aflatoxin contamination of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millisp) stored in jute sacks and iron bins were determined at monthly intervals for a year. The predominant fungi on freshly harvested seeds were Alternaria spp., Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium spp. and Phoma spp. These fungi gradually disappeared from stored seeds with time and by 5-6 months, most were not isolated. The fungi that succeeded the initially dominant ones were mainly members of the general Aspergillus, Penicillium and Rhizopus. Population of these fungi increased up to the end of one year storage. Higher incidence of mycoflora and Aspergillus flavus were recorded in jute-sack samples throughout the storage period. The moisture content of stored seeds was found to fluctuate with the prevailing weather conditions, being low during the dry season and slightly high during the wet season. The stored seeds were free of aflatoxins for 3 and 5 months in jute sacks and iron bins respectively. The level of aflatoxins detected in jute-sack storage system was considerably higher than that occurring in the iron bin system. Of 196 isolates of A. flavus screened, 48% were toxigenic in liquid culture (54% from jute sacks and 41% from iron bins).

  14. Characterization of regenerated butterfly pea (Clitoria ternatea L.) accessions for morphological, phenology, reproductive and potential nutraceutical, pharmaceutical trait utilization.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butterfly pea, Clitoria ternatea, has been used in Africa as a companion crop and in the United States as an ornamental. The USDA, ARS, PGRCU curates 28 butterfly pea accessions. Butterfly pea accessions were transplanted from about 30-day-old seedlings to the field in Griffin, GA, around 01 June ...

  15. Octupole shapes in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    1994-08-01

    Theoretical calculations and measurements show the presence of strong octupole correlations in thecyround states and low-lying states of odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei in the RaPa region. Evidence for octupole correlations is provided by the observation of parity doublets and reductions in M1 matrix elements, decoupling parameters, and Coriolis matrix elements Involving high-j states. Enhancement of E1 transition rates has also been observed for some of the octupole deformed nuclei. The most convincing argument for octupole deformation is provided by the similarities of the reduced alpha decay rates to the two members of parity doublets.

  16. On the Quest of Cellular Functions of PEA-15 and the Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes, 15 KDa (PEA-15), a ubiquitously expressed small protein in all mammals, is known for decades for its potent interactions with various protein partners along distinct biological pathways. Most notable interacting partners of PEA-15 include extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) protein involving in the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), and the phospholipase D1 (PLD1) affecting the insulin sensitivity. However, the actual cellular functions of PEA-15 are still mysterious, and the question why this protein is expressed in almost all cell and tissue types remains unanswered. Here we synthesize the most recent structural, biological, and clinical studies on PEA-15 with emphases on its anti-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and anti-inflammative properties, and propose a converged protective role of PEA-15 that maintains the balance of death and survival in different cell types. Under conditions that this delicate balance is unsustainable, PEA-15 may become pathological and lead to various diseases, including cancers and diabetes. Targeting PEA-15 interactions, or the use of PEA-15 protein as therapeutics, may provide a wider window of opportunities to treat these diseases. PMID:26263999

  17. 76 FR 21712 - Notice of Availability for Final PEA and Draft FONSI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Availability for Final PEA and Draft FONSI AGENCY: Department of the Navy... draft Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the development and operation of small-scale wind... appropriate. Dates and Addresses: The waiting period for the Final PEA and FONSI will end 30 days...

  18. Screening of pea genotypes for resistance to root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 8, 2012.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 8 is one of the major pathogens that causes pea root rot and stunting in the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington. The disease is most severe in fields where wheat has been mono-cropped for a number of years or where cereal cover crops are incorporated just before pea seedin...

  19. Transforming but not immortalizing oncogenes activate the transcription factor PEA1.

    PubMed Central

    Wasylyk, C; Imler, J L; Wasylyk, B

    1988-01-01

    The transcription factor PEA1 (a homologue of AP1 and c-jun) is highly active in several fibroblast cell lines, compared to its low activity in a myeloma and an embryo-carcinoma (EC) cell line. Serum components are essential to attain these high levels of PEA1 activity in fibroblasts. This serum requirement is abrogated by transformation with the oncogenes c-Ha-ras, v-src and polyoma middle T (Py-MT) but not by immortalization with polyoma large T (Py-LT), v-myc, c-myc or SV40 large T (SV40T). Expression in myeloma cells of the same transforming oncogenes, as well as v-mos and c-fos, activates PEA1, whereas expression of the same immortalizing oncogenes and EIA does not. These results suggest that a common target for transforming oncogenes is PEA1. Serum components have no effect on PEA1 activity in the myeloma and EC cell lines. In contrast, retinoic acid treatment of F9 EC cells augments PEA1 activity. These results suggest that transforming oncogene expression compensates for the absence of cell type-specific factors which are required to activate PEA1. Activation of PEA1 may lead to altered transcription of a set of transformation-related genes. Images PMID:3142763

  20. Genetic Diversity of Chinese and Global Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Collections.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important food and feed legume grown across many temperate regions of the world, especially from Asia to Europe and North America. The goal of this study was to use 30 informative pea microsatellite markers to compare genetic diversity in a global core from the USDA and ...

  1. Association mapping of agronomic and quality traits in USDA pea single-plant collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping is an efficient approach for the identification of the molecular basis of agronomic traits in crop plants. For this purpose in pea (Pisum sativum L.), we genotyped and phenotyped individual lines of the single-plant derived core collection of the USDA pea single-plant (PSP) colle...

  2. Exotic nuclei and nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    I overview new aspects of the structure of exotic nuclei as compared to stable nuclei, focusing on several characteristic effects of nuclear forces. The shell structure of nuclei has been proposed by Mayer and Jensen, and has been considered to be kept valid basically for all nuclei, with well-known magic numbers, 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, …. Nuclear forces were shown, very recently, to change this paradigm. It will be presented that the evolution of shell structure occurs in various ways as more neutrons and/or protons are added, and I will present basic points of this shell evolution in terms of the monopole interaction of nuclear forces. I will discuss three types of nuclear forces. The first one is the tensor force. The tensor force is one of the most fundamental nuclear forces, but its first-order effect on the shell structure has been clarified only recently in studies on exotic nuclei. The tensor force can change the spin-orbit splitting depending on the occupation of specific orbits. This results in changes of the shell structure in many nuclei, and consequently some of Mayer-Jensen's magic numbers are lost and new ones emerge, in certain nuclei. This mechanism can be understood in an intuitive way, meaning that the effect is general and robust. The second type of nuclear forces is central force. I will show a general but unknown property of the central force in the shell-model Hamiltonian that can describe nuclear properties in a good agreement with experiment. I will then demonstrate how it can be incorporated into a simple model of the central force, and will discuss how this force works in the shell evolution. Actually, by combining this central force with the tensor force, one can understand and foresee how the same proton-neutron interaction drives the shell evolution, for examples such as Sn/Sb isotopes, N = 20 nuclei and Ni/Cu isotopes. The distribution of single-particle strength is discussed also in comparison to (e,e‧p) experiment on 48Ca. The shell

  3. Formation of electric dipoles in pea stem tissue due to an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Farahani, Elham

    2016-07-01

    For examining the effect of an electrical field (DC) on pea seed, we exposed the pea seeds to electric fields with intensities 1, 4 and 7 kV/cm for 30, 230, 430 and 630 seconds. The tests were repeated three times, and each iteration had 5 seeds. Then, the seeds were moved to packaged plates. Finally, microscopic observation of the pea stem tissue showed that the application of a DC electrical field caused a deformation in the pea stem tissue. The results led us to examine the deformation of the tissue theoretically and to address that deformation as an electrostatic problem. In this regard, we modeled the pea stem based on the formation of electric dipoles. Then, theoretically, we calculated the force acting on each xylem section by coding, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  4. Analysis of pea HMG-I/Y expression suggests a role in defence gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Steven J; Choi, Jane J; Hadwiger, Lee A

    2003-07-01

    SUMMARY HMG-I/Y proteins are characterized by the presence of AT-hook motifs, DNA binding domains that recognize AT-rich tracts of DNA. By facilitating protein:protein and protein:DNA interactions in the vicinity of these AT-rich binding sites, HMG-I/Y positively or negatively regulates gene expression. Several pea defence gene promoters have AT-rich tracts of DNA that are potential targets for modulation via HMG-I/Y. In this study, a comparison of the expression of a pea defence gene (DRR206) mRNA relative to the expression of HMG-I/Y mRNA was monitored by Northern analysis following the inoculation of a fungal pathogen, Fusarium solani or treatment with chitosan and a F. solani DNase (Fsph DNase). In pea pod endocarp tissue, HMG-I/Y expression was observed at high levels in untreated tissue and at lower levels 6 h following inoculation or wounding of the tissue. Western blots with an antipea HMG-I/Y polyclonal antibody also revealed that pea HMG-I/Y is expressed at decreased levels 6 h following inoculation or elicitor treatment. HMG-I/Y extracted from pea caused alterations in the gel migration of radio-labelled AT-rich sequences from the pea DRR206 promoter, suggesting that similar interactions could exist in vivo. Agroinfiltration was utilized to express the pea HMG-I/Y gene in tobacco containing a chimeric gene fusion of a promoter from the PR gene, DRR206, and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Transient expression of pea HMG-I/Y led to a decrease in GUS reporter gene activity in the heterologous tobacco system. These data implicate pea HMG-I/Y abundance in the down-regulation of DRR206 gene expression, and possibly HMG-I/Y depletion in the expression of defence genes in pea.

  5. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  6. Proton Distribution in Heavy Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Johnson, M. H; Teller, E.

    1953-11-13

    It is reasoned that, from considerations connected with beta-decay stability and Coulomb repulsion forces, a neutron excess is developed on the surface of heavy nuclei. Several consequences of this qualitative analysis in nucleon interactions are briefly noted. (K.S.)

  7. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  8. Nuclei and propeller cavitation inception

    SciTech Connect

    Gindroz, B.; Billet, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Propeller cavitation inception tests were conducted in the Grand Tunnel Hydrodynamique (GTH) of the Bassin d`Essaid des Carenes. Both acoustic and visual cavitation inception were determined for leading-edge sheet, travelling bubble, and tip vortex. These data were obtained for specific water quality conditions. The water quality was determined from cavitation susceptibility meter measurements for degassed water (maximum liquid tension, few nuclei), low injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, low nuclei concentration), medium injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, high nuclei concentration) and high injection rate of microbubbles (minimum liquid tension, high nuclei concentration). Results clearly demonstrate a different influence of water quality for each type of cavitation. Little variation in cavitation inception index for a significant increase in liquid tension and microbubble size distribution was found for leading-edge sheet; however, tip vortex cavitation inception index decreased significantly for an increase in liquid tension. In addition, a dependency on event rate was determined for tip vortex cavitation inception.

  9. Transitional nuclei near shell closures

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, G.

    2014-08-14

    High spin states in Bismuth and Thallium nuclei near the Z = 82 shell closure and Cesium nuclei near the N = 82 shell closure in A = 190 and A = 130 regions, respectively, have been experimentally investigated using heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction and by detecting the gamma rays using the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Interesting shape properties in these transitional nuclei have been observed. The results were compared with the neighboring nuclei in these two regions. The total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations have been performed for a better understanding of the observed properties. In mass region A = 190, a change in shape from spherical to deformed has been observd around neutron number N = 112 for the Bi (Z = 83) isotopes with proton number above the magic gap Z = 82, whereas, the shape of Tl (Z = 81) isotopes with proton number below the magic gap Z = 82 remains stable as a function of neutron number. An important transition from aplanar to planar configuration of angular momentum vectors leading to the occurance of nuclar chirality and magnetic rotation, respectively, has been proposed for the unique parity πh{sub 11/2}⊗νh{sub 11/2} configuration in Cs isotopes in the mass region A ∼ 130 around neutron number N = 79. These results are in commensurate with the TRS calculations.

  10. Electromagnetic structure of light nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pastore, Saori

    2016-03-25

    Here, the present understanding of nuclear electromagnetic properties including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions in nuclei with A ≤ 10 is reviewed. Emphasis is on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electromagnetic currents derived from a chiral effective field theory with pions and nucleons.

  11. International Symposium on Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Cherepanov, E. A.

    Methods of production of light exotic nuclei and study of their ptoperties -- Superheavy elements. Syhnthesis and properties -- Nuclear fission -- Nuclear reactions -- rare processes, decay and nuclear structure -- Experimental set-ups and future projects -- Radioactive beams. Production and research programmes -- Public relations.

  12. Localization of enzymes of assimilatory sulfate reduction in pea roots.

    PubMed

    Brunold, C; Suter, M

    1989-09-01

    The localization of enzymes of assimilatory sulfate reduction was examined in roots of 5-d-old pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings. During an 8-h period, roots of intact plants incorporated more label from (35)SO 4 (2-) in the nutrient solution into the amino-acid and protein fractions than shoots. Excised roots and roots of intact plants assimilated comparable amounts of radioactivity from (35)SO 4 (2-) into the amino-acid and protein fractions during a 1-h period, demonstrating that roots of pea seedlings at this stage of development were not completely dependent on the shoots for reduced sulfur compounds. Indeed, these roots contained activities of ATP-sulfurylase (EC 2.7.7.4), adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase, sulfite reductase (EC 1.8.7.1) and O-acetyl-L-serine sulfhydrylase (EC 4.2.99.8) at levels of 50, 30, 120 and 100%, respectively, of that in shoots. Most of the extractable activity of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase was detected in the first centimeter of the root tip. Using sucrose density gradients for organelle separation from this part of the root showed that almost 40% of the activity of ATP-sulfurylase, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase and sulfite reductase banded with the marker enzyme for proplastids, whereas only approximately 7% of O-acetyl-L-serine sulfhydrylase activity was detected in these fractions. Because their distributions on the gradients were very similar to that of nitrite reductase, a proplastid enzyme, it is concluded that ATP-sulfurylase, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase and sulfite reductase are also exclusively or almost exclusively localized in the proplastids of pea roots. O-Acetyl-L-serine sulfhydrylase is predominantly present in the cytoplasm.

  13. Porridge and peas: C. Stanton Hicks and Australian army rations.

    PubMed

    Collingham, Lizzie

    2009-09-01

    In 1942 Australian troops came back from fighting the Japanese in New Guinea exhausted and malnourished. The army rations of bully beef and biscuits were insufficiently rich in vitamins to sustain men in combat in tropical conditions. The nutritionist C. Stanton Hicks was one of a vast army of scientists who worked behind the scenes to maximize the war effort. He made it his mission to improve the army diet. He set up the Australian Army Catering Corps, invented combat ration packs and tried to introduce vitamin-rich foods into the soldiers' diet. Two of his more idiosyncratic innovations were wheat porridge and Tasmanian blue peas. PMID:19539373

  14. A pea mutant for the study of hydrotropism in roots.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, M J; Takahashi, H; Biro, R L

    1985-10-25

    Plant roots grow in the direction of increasing soil moisture, but studies of hydrotropism have always been difficult to interpret because of the effect of gravity. In this study it was found that roots of the mutant pea ;Ageotropum' are neither gravitropic nor phototropic, but do respond tropically to a moisture gradient, making them an ideal subject for the study of hydrotropism. When the root caps were removed, elongation was not affected but hydrotropism was blocked, suggesting that the site of sensory perception resides in the root cap.

  15. Gibberellic acid stimulates acid invertase secretion in pea ovary protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Estruch, J J; Beltrán, J P

    1991-02-25

    Protoplasts purified from mesocarp of nonpollinated pea (Pisum sativum L.) ovaries released acid invertase to the incubation medium. The association of the acid invertase with microsomal fractions, and the sensitivity to energy-metabolism inhibitors and to tunicamycin, indicated the secretory nature of the release process. In the presence of GA3 (10 microM), the protoplasts increased their invertase secretion at about 60 min, this effect being counteracted by tunicamycin but not by cycloheximide. Subcellular fractionation of GA3-treated protoplasts showed that higher invertase secretion was the result of a promotion of invertase transfer from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi apparatus. PMID:2001743

  16. Genetic analysis of pod dehiscence in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Weeden, Norman F; Brauner, Soren; Przyborowski, Jerzy A

    2002-01-01

    The inheritance of the dehiscent pod character was investigated in two recombinant inbred populations using a simplified correlation analysis. The approach identified three regions on the pea genome that affect the expression of pod dehiscence. The region on linkage group III corresponded to the expected position of Dpo, a gene known to influence pod dehiscence. A locus on linkage group V appeared to have a slightly smaller effect on expression of the phenotype. The third region was observed only in one cross, had a greater effect than Dpo, and was postulated to be yellow pod allele at the Gp locus

  17. Porridge and peas: C. Stanton Hicks and Australian army rations.

    PubMed

    Collingham, Lizzie

    2009-09-01

    In 1942 Australian troops came back from fighting the Japanese in New Guinea exhausted and malnourished. The army rations of bully beef and biscuits were insufficiently rich in vitamins to sustain men in combat in tropical conditions. The nutritionist C. Stanton Hicks was one of a vast army of scientists who worked behind the scenes to maximize the war effort. He made it his mission to improve the army diet. He set up the Australian Army Catering Corps, invented combat ration packs and tried to introduce vitamin-rich foods into the soldiers' diet. Two of his more idiosyncratic innovations were wheat porridge and Tasmanian blue peas.

  18. Observation of DNA and protein distributions in mammalian cell nuclei using STXM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohigashi, Takuji; Ito, Atsushi; Shinohara, Kunio; Tone, Shigenobu; Kado, Masataka; Inagaki, Yuichi; Wang, Yu-Fu; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A whole A549 cell and isolated nuclei of HeLa S3 cells in the apoptotic process were investigated by using a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) in the UVSOR Synchrotron (Okazaki, Japan). Near edge X-ray absorption fine structures (NEXAFS) of DNA and histone in the N K-edge region were measured as reference and their distribution in the nuclei was determined by using these reference spectra. The four stages of the apoptosis were successfully distinguished.

  19. Nuclei growth kinetics during the nucleation of gold on UHV-cleaved mica substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of crystalline sizes during nucleation of gold on mica surfaces cleaved in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) reveal the presence of symmetric, sharply peaked distributions which flatten and broaden with increasing nucleation time. When the number density of nuclei increases, the growth rate is suppressed. The time taken to reach a given size increases with increasing temperature when the nuclei are growing as isolated particles. When the nuclei are spaced so far that their diffusion fields overlap, then the time taken to reach a given size decreases with increasing temperature.

  20. Does the embryonic axis affect respiration in pea cotyledons?

    PubMed

    Parys, E; Romanowska, E; Poskuta, J

    1984-05-01

    The conditions of imbibition crucially affected respiration of the excised pea cotyledons, Pisum sativum L. var. Bördi, during subsequent incubation. When excised cotyledons were immersed in water during imbibition, their respiration rate was lower than that of attached cotyledons up to 96 h of incubation. Hydration of excised cotyledons was faster than that of attached cotyledons, particularly at early stages of imbibition. The dry weight of excised cotyledons, however, decreased more rapidly than that of attached cotyledons. When excised cotyledons were kept on moist filter paper from the onset of imbibition, their respiration rate was the same as that of attached cotyledons during later incubation. In addition, the hydration rate of both excised and attached cotyledons was the same under such conditions, whereas the dry weight of the attached cotyledons decreased more rapidly than those of excised cotyledons. It was concluded that the respiration rate of the excised cotyledons during incubation was only dependent on the conditions used during imbibition. Hence, the embryonic axis had not effect on the development and maintenance of the respiratory activity in the cotyledons of germinating peas.

  1. [Pigment composition and photosynthetic activity of pea chlorophyll mutants].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea chlorophyll mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 have been studied. The mutants differ from the initial form (pea cultivar Torsdag) in stem and leaf color (light green in the mutant 2004 and yellow-green in the mutant 2014), relative chlorophyll content (approximately 80 and 50%, respectively), and the composition of carotenoids: the mutant 2004 contains a significantly smaller amount of carotene but accumulates more lutein and violaxanthine; in the mutant 2014, the contents of all carotenoids are decreased proportionally to the decrease in chlorophyll content. It is shown that the rates of CO2 assimilation and oxygen production in the mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 plants are reduced. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants is 29-30% lower than in the control plants; in their hybrids, however, it is 1.5-2 higher. It is proposed that both the greater role of dark respiration in gas exchange and the reduced photosynthetic activity in chlorotica mutants are responsible for the decreased phytomass increment in these plants. On the basis of these results, the conclusion is drawn that the mutations chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affect the genes controlling the formation and functioning of various components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  2. Rare-earth occurrences in the Pea Ridge tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Vierrether, C.W.; Cornell, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    Tailings from the Pea Ridge iron mine contain significant amounts of apatite, which has rare-earth element values associated with it. In association with the recovery of rare-earth minerals as a secondary resource, the US Bureau of Mines conducted an investigation on the recoverability of the rare-earth minerals from the tailings. The mill tailings were subjected to a phosphate flotation to separate the apatite from other constituents. More than 70-pct recovery of the rare-earth values was achieved. Based on mineralogical characterization and prior analysis of rare-earth-bearing breccia pipe material at Pea Ridge, it is proposed that processing this phosphate concentrate on a vanner table would yield up to a 95-pct recovery of the rare earths in the concentrate, with the apatite reporting to the tailings. Intensive ore microscopy studies of the original tailings to the flotation products led to the identification of monazite, xenotime, and rare-earth-enriched apatite as the major rare-earth-bearing minerals in the tailings.

  3. Variation potential influence on photosynthetic cyclic electron flow in pea

    PubMed Central

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Surova, Lyubov; Sherstneva, Oksana; Katicheva, Lyubov; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow is an important component of the total photosynthetic electron flow and participates in adaptation to the action of stressors. Local leaf stimulation induces electrical signals, including variation potential (VP), which inactivate photosynthesis; however, their influence on cyclic electron flow has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate VP's influence on cyclic electron flow in pea (Pisum sativum L.). VP was induced in pea seedling leaves by local heating and measured in an adjacent, undamaged leaf by extracellular electrodes. CO2 assimilation was measured using a portable gas exchange measuring system. Photosystem I and II parameters were investigated using a measuring system for simultaneous assessment of P700 oxidation and chlorophyll fluorescence. Heating-induced VP reduced CO2 assimilation and electron flow through photosystem II. In response, cyclic electron flow rapidly decreased and subsequently slowly increased. Slow increases in cyclic flow were caused by decreased electron flow through photosystem II, which was mainly connected with VP-induced photosynthetic dark stage inactivation. However, direct influence by VP on photosystem I also participated in activation of cyclic electron flow. Thus, VP, induced by local leaf-heating, activated cyclic electron flow in undamaged leaves. This response was similar to photosynthetic changes observed under the direct action of stressors. Possible mechanisms of VP's influence on cyclic flow were discussed. PMID:25610447

  4. Whole shoot mineral partitioning and accumulation in pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Renuka P; Grusak, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Several grain legumes are staple food crops that are important sources of minerals for humans; unfortunately, our knowledge is incomplete with respect to the mechanisms of translocation of these minerals to the vegetative tissues and loading into seeds. Understanding the mechanism and partitioning of minerals in pea could help in developing cultivars with high mineral density. A mineral partitioning study was conducted in pea to assess whole-plant growth and mineral content and the potential source-sink remobilization of different minerals, especially during seed development. Shoot and root mineral content increased for all the minerals, although tissue-specific partitioning differed between the minerals. Net remobilization was observed for P, S, Cu, and Fe from both the vegetative tissues and pod wall, but the amounts remobilized were much below the total accumulation in the seeds. Within the mature pod, more minerals were partitioned to the seed fraction (>75%) at maturity than to the pod wall for all the minerals except Ca, where only 21% was partitioned to the seed fraction. Although there was evidence for net remobilization of some minerals from different tissues into seeds, continued uptake and translocation of minerals to source tissues during seed fill is as important, if not more important, than remobilization of previously stored minerals.

  5. Ethylene Signaling Influences Light-Regulated Development in Pea.

    PubMed

    Weller, James L; Foo, Eloise M; Hecht, Valérie; Ridge, Stephen; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K; Reid, James B

    2015-09-01

    Plant responses to light involve a complex network of interactions among multiple plant hormones. In a screen for mutants showing altered photomorphogenesis under red light, we identified a mutant with dramatically enhanced leaf expansion and delayed petal senescence. We show that this mutant exhibits reduced sensitivity to ethylene and carries a nonsense mutation in the single pea (Pisum sativum) ortholog of the ethylene signaling gene ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2). Consistent with this observation, the ein2 mutation rescues the previously described effects of ethylene overproduction in mature phytochrome-deficient plants. In seedlings, ein2 confers a marked increase in leaf expansion under monochromatic red, far-red, or blue light, and interaction with phytochromeA, phytochromeB, and long1 mutants confirms that ein2 enhances both phytochrome- and cryptochrome-dependent responses in a LONG1-dependent manner. In contrast, minimal effects of ein2 on seedling development in darkness or high-irradiance white light show that ethylene is not limiting for development under these conditions. These results indicate that ethylene signaling constrains leaf expansion during deetiolation in pea and provide further evidence that down-regulation of ethylene production may be an important component mechanism in the broader control of photomorphogenic development by phytochrome and cryptochrome.

  6. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  7. Construction and analysis of infectious transcripts synthesized from full-length cDNA clones of both genomic RNAs of pea early browning virus.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, S A; Wallis, C V; Taylor, S C; Goulden, M G; Wood, K R; Davies, J W

    1991-05-01

    Full-length cDNA clones of both RNAs of pea early browning virus have been constructed. Synthetic transcripts derived in vitro from these clones are infectious when inoculated onto plants. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of virions in transcript-inoculated plants, and both purified RNA and virions isolated from such plants could be used to infect other plants. Transcripts of RNA1 alone were able to replicate and spread systemically which is a characteristic of members of the tobravirus group of plant viruses.

  8. Characterization of a cfr-Carrying Plasmid from Porcine Escherichia coli That Closely Resembles Plasmid pEA3 from the Plant Pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongmin; Sun, Bin; Wang, Yang; Lei, Lei; Schwarz, Stefan; Wu, Congming

    2015-11-02

    The multiresistance gene cfr was found in two porcine Escherichia coli isolates, one harboring it on the conjugative 33,885-bp plasmid pFSEC-01, the other harboring it in the chromosomal DNA. Sequence analysis of pFSEC-01 revealed that a 6,769-bp fragment containing the cfr gene bracketed by two IS26 elements was inserted into a plasmid closely related to pEA3 from the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora, suggesting that pFSEC-01 may be transferred between different bacterial genera of both animal and plant origin.

  9. Genetically modified α-amylase inhibitor peas are not specifically allergenic in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rui-Yun; Reiner, Daniela; Dekan, Gerhard; Moore, Andrew E; Higgins, T J V; Epstein, Michelle M

    2013-01-01

    Weevils can devastate food legumes in developing countries, but genetically modified peas (Pisum sativum), chickpeas and cowpeas expressing the gene for alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (αAI) from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) are completely protected from weevil destruction. αAI is seed-specific, accumulated at high levels and undergoes post-translational modification as it traverses the seed endomembrane system. This modification was thought to be responsible for the reported allergenicity in mice of the transgenic pea but not the bean. Here, we observed that transgenic αAI peas, chickpeas and cowpeas as well as non-transgenic beans were all allergenic in BALB/c mice. Even consuming non-transgenic peas lacking αAI led to an anti-αAI response due to a cross-reactive response to pea lectin. Our data demonstrate that αAI transgenic peas are not more allergenic than beans or non-transgenic peas in mice. This study illustrates the importance of repeat experiments in independent laboratories and the potential for unexpected cross-reactive allergic responses upon consumption of plant products in mice.

  10. Germinated Pigeon Pea (Cajanus cajan): a novel diet for lowering oxidative stress and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Uchegbu, Nneka N; Ishiwu, Charles N

    2016-09-01

    This work studied the antioxidant activity of extract of germinated pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Germination was carried out in a dark chamber under room temperature (28°C). The total phenolic, 1,1,diphenyl-2-picrylhy-drazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase were done in vitro and blood glucose levels of the animal were investigated. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were analyzed spectrophotometrically. The total phenolic and DPPH scavenging activity increased by 30% and 63%, respectively, after germinating pigeon pea. Also after germination there was an increase in the inhibitory potential of pigeon pea extract against α-glucosidase compared with the nongerminated pigeon pea extract. There was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in fasting blood glucose level of alloxan-induced rats. Consumption of germinated pigeon pea extract gave rise to a reduced fasting blood glucose level in diabetic rats. On administration of germinated pigeon pea extract, LPO reduced drastically but there was an increase in the level of GSH. This study concluded that intake of germinated pigeon pea is a good dietary supplement for controlling hyperglycemia and LPO. PMID:27625782

  11. De Novo Assembly of the Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Nodule Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Zhukov, Vladimir A.; Zhernakov, Alexander I.; Kulaeva, Olga A.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Borisov, Alexey Y.; Tikhonovich, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    The large size and complexity of the garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) genome hamper its sequencing and the discovery of pea gene resources. Although transcriptome sequencing provides extensive information about expressed genes, some tissue-specific transcripts can only be identified from particular organs under appropriate conditions. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing of polyadenylated transcripts from young pea nodules and root tips on an Illumina GAIIx system, followed by de novo transcriptome assembly using the Trinity program. We obtained more than 58,000 and 37,000 contigs from “Nodules” and “Root Tips” assemblies, respectively. The quality of the assemblies was assessed by comparison with pea expressed sequence tags and transcriptome sequencing project data available from NCBI website. The “Nodules” assembly was compared with the “Root Tips” assembly and with pea transcriptome sequencing data from projects indicating tissue specificity. As a result, approximately 13,000 nodule-specific contigs were found and annotated by alignment to known plant protein-coding sequences and by Gene Ontology searching. Of these, 581 sequences were found to possess full CDSs and could thus be considered as novel nodule-specific transcripts of pea. The information about pea nodule-specific gene sequences can be applied for gene-based markers creation, polymorphism studies, and real-time PCR. PMID:26688806

  12. Germinated Pigeon Pea (Cajanus cajan): a novel diet for lowering oxidative stress and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Uchegbu, Nneka N; Ishiwu, Charles N

    2016-09-01

    This work studied the antioxidant activity of extract of germinated pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Germination was carried out in a dark chamber under room temperature (28°C). The total phenolic, 1,1,diphenyl-2-picrylhy-drazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase were done in vitro and blood glucose levels of the animal were investigated. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were analyzed spectrophotometrically. The total phenolic and DPPH scavenging activity increased by 30% and 63%, respectively, after germinating pigeon pea. Also after germination there was an increase in the inhibitory potential of pigeon pea extract against α-glucosidase compared with the nongerminated pigeon pea extract. There was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in fasting blood glucose level of alloxan-induced rats. Consumption of germinated pigeon pea extract gave rise to a reduced fasting blood glucose level in diabetic rats. On administration of germinated pigeon pea extract, LPO reduced drastically but there was an increase in the level of GSH. This study concluded that intake of germinated pigeon pea is a good dietary supplement for controlling hyperglycemia and LPO.

  13. Genetically Modified α-Amylase Inhibitor Peas Are Not Specifically Allergenic in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dekan, Gerhard; Moore, Andrew E.; Higgins, T. J. V.; Epstein, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Weevils can devastate food legumes in developing countries, but genetically modified peas (Pisum sativum), chickpeas and cowpeas expressing the gene for alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (αAI) from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) are completely protected from weevil destruction. αAI is seed-specific, accumulated at high levels and undergoes post-translational modification as it traverses the seed endomembrane system. This modification was thought to be responsible for the reported allergenicity in mice of the transgenic pea but not the bean. Here, we observed that transgenic αAI peas, chickpeas and cowpeas as well as non-transgenic beans were all allergenic in BALB/c mice. Even consuming non-transgenic peas lacking αAI led to an anti-αAI response due to a cross-reactive response to pea lectin. Our data demonstrate that αAI transgenic peas are not more allergenic than beans or non-transgenic peas in mice. This study illustrates the importance of repeat experiments in independent laboratories and the potential for unexpected cross-reactive allergic responses upon consumption of plant products in mice. PMID:23326368

  14. Plant growth promoting potential of the fungus Discosia sp. FIHB 571 from tea rhizosphere tested on chickpea, maize and pea.

    PubMed

    Rahi, P; Vyas, P; Sharma, S; Gulati, Ashu; Gulati, Arvind

    2009-06-01

    The ITS region sequence of a phosphate-solubilizing fungus isolated from the rhizosphere of tea growing in Kangra valley of Himachal Pradesh showed 96% identity with Discosia sp. strain HKUCC 6626 ITS 1, 5.8S rRNA gene and ITS 2 complete sequence, and 28S rRNA gene partial sequence. The fungus exhibited the multiple plant growth promoting attributes of solubilization of inorganic phosphate substrates, production of phytase and siderophores, and biosynthesis of indole acetic acid (IAA)-like auxins. The fungal inoculum significantly increased the root length, shoot length and dry matter in the test plants of maize, pea and chickpea over the uninoculated control under the controlled environment. The plant growth promoting attributes have not been previously studied for the fungus. The fungal strain with its multiple plant growth promoting activities appears attractive towards the development of microbial inoculants. PMID:23100761

  15. Physical processing of cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Stern, S. Alan

    1989-01-01

    Cometary nuclei were formed far from the Sun in the colder regions of the solar nebula, and have been stored in distant orbits in the Oort cloud over most of the history of the solar system. It had been thought that this benign environment would preserve comets in close to their original pristine state. However, recent studies have identified a number of physical processes that have likely acted to modify cometary nuclei in a variety of significant ways. It is important to consider all of these possible processes, both in deciding on a site on the nucleus for collection of cometary samples, and in interpreting the results of analyses of returned cometary samples. Although it can no longer be said that comets are pristine samples of original solar nebula material, they are still the best obtainable samples of that unique period in the formation of the planetary system.

  16. Dynamics of hot rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcias, F.; de La Mota, V.; Remaud, B.; Royer, G.; Sébille, F.

    1991-02-01

    The deexcitation of hot rotating nuclei is studied within a microscopic semiclassical transport formalism. This framework allows the study of the competition between the fission and evaporation channels of deexcitation, including the mean-field and two-body interactions, without shape constraint for the fission channel. As a function of initial angular momenta and excitation energies, the transitions between three regimes is analyzed [particle evaporation, binary (ternary) fussion and multifragmentation], which correspond to well-defined symmetry breakings in the inertia tensor of the system. The competition between evaporation and binary fission is studied, showing the progressive disappearance of the fission process with increasing excitation energies, up to a critical point where nuclei pass directly from evaporation to multifragmentation channels.

  17. Bioavailability of Phosphorus in Two Cultivars of Pea for Broiler Chicks.

    PubMed

    Woyengo, T A; Emiola, I A; Kim, I H; Nyachoti, C M

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to determine the relative bioavailability of phosphorus (P) in peas for 21-day old broiler chickens using slope-ratio assay. One hundred and sixty eight male Ross 308 broiler chicks were divided into 42 groups 4 balanced for body weight and fed 7 diets in a completely randomized design (6 groups/diet) from day 1 to 21 of age. The diets were a corn-soybean meal basal diet, and the corn-soybean meal basal diet to which monosodium phosphate, brown- or yellow-seeded pea was added at the expense of cornstarch to supply 0.5% or 1% total phosphorus. Monosodium phosphate was included as a reference, and hence the estimated bioavailability of P in pea cultivars was relative to that in the monosodium phosphate. Birds and feed were weighed weekly and on d 21 they were killed to obtain tibia. The brown-seeded pea contained 23.4% crude protein, 0.47% P, whereas the yellow-seeded pea contained 24.3% crude protein and 0.38% P. Increasing dietary P supply improved (p<0.05) chick body weight gain and tibia ash and bone density. The estimated relative bioavailability of p values for brown- and yellow-seeded peas obtained using final body weight, average daily gain, tibia ash, and bone mineral density were 31.5% and 36.2%, 35.6% and 37.3%, 23.0% and 5.60%, and 40.3% and 30.3%, respectively. The estimated relative bioavailability of p values for brown- and yellow-seeded peas did not differ within each of the response criteria measured in this study. In conclusion, the relative bioavailability of P in pea did not differ depending on the cultivar (brown- vs yellow-seed). However, the relative bioavailability of P in pea may vary depending on the response criterion used to measure the bioavailability. PMID:26950872

  18. Yellow pea fiber improves glycemia and reduces Clostridium leptum in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Amanda J; Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A

    2014-08-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the impact of functional fibers on gut microbiota and metabolic health, but some less well-studied fibers and/or fractions of foods known to be high in fiber still warrant examination. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of yellow pea-derived fractions varying in fiber and protein content on metabolic parameters and gut microbiota in diet-induced obese rats. We hypothesized that the yellow pea fiber (PF) fraction would improve glycemia and alter gut microbiota. Rats were randomized to 1 of 5 isoenergetic dietary treatments for 6 weeks: (1) control; (2) oligofructose (OFS); (3) yellow PF; (4) yellow pea flour (PFL); or (5) yellow pea starch (PS). Glycemia, plasma gut hormones, body composition, hepatic triglyceride content, gut microbiota, and messenger RNA expression of genes related to hepatic fat metabolism were examined. Pea flour attenuated weight gain compared with control, PF, and PS (P < .05). Pea flour, PS, and OFS had significantly lower final percent body fat compared with control. Oligofructose but not the pea fraction diets reduced food intake compared with control (P < .05). Pea fiber resulted in lower fasting glucose and glucose area under the curve compared with control. Changes in gut microbiota were fraction specific and included a decrease in Firmicutes (percent) for OFS, PF, and PFL compared with control (P < .05). The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was reduced with OFS, PF, and PFL when compared with PS (P < .05). Taken together, this work suggests that yellow pea-derived fractions are able to distinctly modulate metabolic parameters and gut microbiota in obese rats.

  19. Bioavailability of Phosphorus in Two Cultivars of Pea for Broiler Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Woyengo, T. A.; Emiola, I. A.; Kim, I. H.; Nyachoti, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to determine the relative bioavailability of phosphorus (P) in peas for 21-day old broiler chickens using slope-ratio assay. One hundred and sixty eight male Ross 308 broiler chicks were divided into 42 groups 4 balanced for body weight and fed 7 diets in a completely randomized design (6 groups/diet) from day 1 to 21 of age. The diets were a corn-soybean meal basal diet, and the corn-soybean meal basal diet to which monosodium phosphate, brown- or yellow-seeded pea was added at the expense of cornstarch to supply 0.5% or 1% total phosphorus. Monosodium phosphate was included as a reference, and hence the estimated bioavailability of P in pea cultivars was relative to that in the monosodium phosphate. Birds and feed were weighed weekly and on d 21 they were killed to obtain tibia. The brown-seeded pea contained 23.4% crude protein, 0.47% P, whereas the yellow-seeded pea contained 24.3% crude protein and 0.38% P. Increasing dietary P supply improved (p<0.05) chick body weight gain and tibia ash and bone density. The estimated relative bioavailability of p values for brown- and yellow-seeded peas obtained using final body weight, average daily gain, tibia ash, and bone mineral density were 31.5% and 36.2%, 35.6% and 37.3%, 23.0% and 5.60%, and 40.3% and 30.3%, respectively. The estimated relative bioavailability of p values for brown- and yellow-seeded peas did not differ within each of the response criteria measured in this study. In conclusion, the relative bioavailability of P in pea did not differ depending on the cultivar (brown- vs yellow-seed). However, the relative bioavailability of P in pea may vary depending on the response criterion used to measure the bioavailability. PMID:26950872

  20. Bioavailability of Phosphorus in Two Cultivars of Pea for Broiler Chicks.

    PubMed

    Woyengo, T A; Emiola, I A; Kim, I H; Nyachoti, C M

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to determine the relative bioavailability of phosphorus (P) in peas for 21-day old broiler chickens using slope-ratio assay. One hundred and sixty eight male Ross 308 broiler chicks were divided into 42 groups 4 balanced for body weight and fed 7 diets in a completely randomized design (6 groups/diet) from day 1 to 21 of age. The diets were a corn-soybean meal basal diet, and the corn-soybean meal basal diet to which monosodium phosphate, brown- or yellow-seeded pea was added at the expense of cornstarch to supply 0.5% or 1% total phosphorus. Monosodium phosphate was included as a reference, and hence the estimated bioavailability of P in pea cultivars was relative to that in the monosodium phosphate. Birds and feed were weighed weekly and on d 21 they were killed to obtain tibia. The brown-seeded pea contained 23.4% crude protein, 0.47% P, whereas the yellow-seeded pea contained 24.3% crude protein and 0.38% P. Increasing dietary P supply improved (p<0.05) chick body weight gain and tibia ash and bone density. The estimated relative bioavailability of p values for brown- and yellow-seeded peas obtained using final body weight, average daily gain, tibia ash, and bone mineral density were 31.5% and 36.2%, 35.6% and 37.3%, 23.0% and 5.60%, and 40.3% and 30.3%, respectively. The estimated relative bioavailability of p values for brown- and yellow-seeded peas did not differ within each of the response criteria measured in this study. In conclusion, the relative bioavailability of P in pea did not differ depending on the cultivar (brown- vs yellow-seed). However, the relative bioavailability of P in pea may vary depending on the response criterion used to measure the bioavailability.

  1. The Temperature Response and Aggressiveness of Peyronellaea pinodes Isolates Originating from Wild and Domesticated Pisum sp. in Israel.

    PubMed

    Golani, M; Abbo, S; Sherman, A; Frenkel, O; Shtienberg, D

    2016-08-01

    Domesticated pea fields are grown in relatively close proximity to wild pea species in Israel. Despite the major role attributed to ascochyta blight in causing yield losses in domesticated pea, very limited information is available on the pathogens prevailing in natural ecosystems. The objectives of this study were (i) to identify the species causing ascochyta blight symptoms on leaves, stems, and petioles of domesticated pea and wild Pisum plants in Israel, and (ii) to quantify the temperature response(s) and aggressiveness of such pathogens originating from Pisum plants growing in sympatric and allopatric contexts. Eighteen fungal isolates were examined and identified; three of them were sampled from Pisum sativum, 11 from Pisum fulvum, and four from Pisum elatius. All isolates were identified as Peyronellaea pinodes. Spore germination and mycelial growth took place over a wide range of temperatures, the lower and upper cardinal temperatures being 2 to 9 and 33 to 38°C, respectively; the optimal temperatures ranged from 22 to 26°C. At an optimal temperature, disease severity was significantly higher for plants maintained under moist conditions for 24 h postinoculation than for those exposed to humidity for 5 or 10 h. Analyses of the data revealed that temperature responses, spore germination rates, and aggressiveness of isolates sampled from domesticated pea plants did not differ from those of isolates sampled from adjacent or distant wild populations. Host specificity was not observed. These observations suggest that Israel may be inhabited by a single metapopulation of P. pinodes. PMID:27050578

  2. The Temperature Response and Aggressiveness of Peyronellaea pinodes Isolates Originating from Wild and Domesticated Pisum sp. in Israel.

    PubMed

    Golani, M; Abbo, S; Sherman, A; Frenkel, O; Shtienberg, D

    2016-08-01

    Domesticated pea fields are grown in relatively close proximity to wild pea species in Israel. Despite the major role attributed to ascochyta blight in causing yield losses in domesticated pea, very limited information is available on the pathogens prevailing in natural ecosystems. The objectives of this study were (i) to identify the species causing ascochyta blight symptoms on leaves, stems, and petioles of domesticated pea and wild Pisum plants in Israel, and (ii) to quantify the temperature response(s) and aggressiveness of such pathogens originating from Pisum plants growing in sympatric and allopatric contexts. Eighteen fungal isolates were examined and identified; three of them were sampled from Pisum sativum, 11 from Pisum fulvum, and four from Pisum elatius. All isolates were identified as Peyronellaea pinodes. Spore germination and mycelial growth took place over a wide range of temperatures, the lower and upper cardinal temperatures being 2 to 9 and 33 to 38°C, respectively; the optimal temperatures ranged from 22 to 26°C. At an optimal temperature, disease severity was significantly higher for plants maintained under moist conditions for 24 h postinoculation than for those exposed to humidity for 5 or 10 h. Analyses of the data revealed that temperature responses, spore germination rates, and aggressiveness of isolates sampled from domesticated pea plants did not differ from those of isolates sampled from adjacent or distant wild populations. Host specificity was not observed. These observations suggest that Israel may be inhabited by a single metapopulation of P. pinodes.

  3. Influence of the inclusion of cooked cereals and pea starch in diets based on soy or pea protein concentrate on nutrient digestibility and performance of young pigs.

    PubMed

    Parera, N; Lázaro, R P; Serrano, M P; Valencia, D G; Mateos, G G

    2010-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare different dietary vegetable sources of starch and protein on the coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility (CATTD) of energy and nutrients and performance of piglets from 29 to 60 d of age. The experiment was completely randomized with 6 treatments arranged factorially with 3 sources of starch (cooked-flaked corn, cooked-flaked rice, and pea starch) and 2 sources of protein [soy protein concentrate (SPC) and pea protein concentrate (PPC)]. The pea starch and the PPC used were obtained by dehulling and grinding pea seeds to a mean particle size of 30 microm. Each treatment was replicated 6 times (6 pigs per pen). For the entire experiment, piglets fed cooked rice had greater ADG than piglets fed pea starch with piglets fed cooked corn being intermediate (471, 403, and 430 g/d, respectively; P < 0.05). Protein source did not have any effect on piglet performance. The CATTD of DM, OM, and GE were greater (P < 0.05) for diets based on cooked rice than diets based on cooked corn with diets based on pea starch being intermediate. Crude protein digestibility was not affected by source of starch but was greater for the diets based on SPC than for diets based on PPC (0.836 vs. 0.821; P < 0.01). Protein source did not affect the digestibility of any of the other dietary components. It is concluded that cooked rice is an energy source of choice in diets for young pigs. The inclusion of PPC in the diet reduced protein digestibility but had no effects on energy digestibility or piglet performance. Therefore, the finely ground starch and protein fractions of peas can be used in substitution of cooked corn or SPC, respectively, in diets for young pigs.

  4. Direct Reactions with Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, G.; Typel, S.

    2005-10-14

    We discuss recent work on Coulomb dissociation and an effective-range theory of low-lying electromagnetic strength of halo nuclei. We propose to study Coulomb dissociation of a halo nucleus bound by a zero-range potential as a homework problem. We study the transition from stripping to bound and unbound states and point out in this context that the Trojan-Horse method is a suitable tool to investigate subthreshold resonances.

  5. Mass model for unstable nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1994-02-01

    We present some essential features of a macroscopic-microscopic nuclear-structure model, with special emphasis on the results of a recent global calculation of nuclear masses. We discuss what should be some minimal requirements of a nuclear mass model and study how the macroscopic-microscopic method and other nuclear mass models fulfil such basic requirements. We study in particular the reliability of nuclear mass models in regions of nuclei that were not considered in the determination of the model parameters.

  6. Destabilization of pea lectin by substitution of a single amino acid in a surface loop.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaeker, F J; van Eijsden, R R; Díaz, C L; de Pater, B S; Kijne, J W

    1993-09-01

    Legume lectins are considered to be antinutritional factors (ANF) in the animal feeding industry. Inactivation of ANF is an important element in processing of food. In our study on the stability of Pisum sativum L. lectin (PSL), a conserved hydrophobic amino acid (Val103) in a surface loop was replaced with alanine. The mutant lectin, PSL V103A, showed a decrease in unfolding temperature (Tm) by some 10 degrees C in comparison with wild-type (wt) PSL, and the denaturation energy (delta H) is only about 55% of that of wt PSL. Replacement of an adjacent amino acid (Phe104) with alanine did not result in a significant difference in stability in comparison with wt PSL. Both mutations did not change the sugar-binding properties of the lectin, as compared with wt PSL and with PSL from pea seeds, at ambient temperatures. The double mutant, PSL V103A/F104A, was produced in Escherichia coli, but could not be isolated in an active (i.e. sugar-binding) form. Interestingly, the mutation in PSL V103A reversibly affected sugar-binding at 37 degrees C, as judged from haemagglutination assays. These results open the possibility of production of lectins that are active in planta at ambient temperatures, but are inactive and possibly non-toxic at 37 degrees C in the intestines of mammals. PMID:8400124

  7. Chlorophyll formation and the development of photosynthesis in illuminated etiolated pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Dowdell, R J; Dodge, A D

    1971-03-01

    The protein synthesis inhibitors chloramphenicol and terramycin, and light of low intensity were used to retard the rate of chlorophyll formation in illuminated dark grown pea leaves. In the control leaves the onset of photosynthesis, as measured by carbon dioxide exchange of the whole leaves, and reduction of ferricyanide and metmyoglobin and photo-oxidation of ascorbate in isolated chloroplasts, was observed after 2-4 hours illumination. The photosynthetic activity of the treated leaves did not commence until 10-12 hours illumination had elapsed. In both the control and treated leaves the onset of photosynthesis occurred when the total chlorophyll content was 0.04 mg/g fresh weight. The precise point of photosynthetic inception was apparently more related to the attainment of a specific total chlorophyl content than to the ratio of chlorophyll a to chlorophyll b. A marked increase in the evolution of carbon dioxide in the light was observed in the treated leaves during the first 10 hours of greening. This observation could not be ascribed to photorespiration since the leaves did not possess an active photosystem. It is suggested that the enhanced respiration may have been due to the light-induced activation of synthetic pathways responsible for the formation of chloroplast constituents. PMID:24493304

  8. Identification of AFLP and STS markers closely linked to the def locus in pea.

    PubMed

    von Stackelberg, M; Lindemann, S; Menke, M; Riesselmann, S; Jacobsen, H-J

    2003-05-01

    The recessive mutation of the def gene of pea (Pisum sativum L.) leads to the loss of the hilum, the abscission zone between the seed and the pod. Thereby, it reduces the free dispersal of the seeds through pod shattering. As a prerequisite for a gene isolation via a map-based cloning approach, bulked segregant analysis followed by single plant analyses of over 200 homozygous individuals of a population of 476 F2 plants derived from a cross between 'DGV' (def wild-type) and 'PF' (def mutant), were used to detect markers closely linked to the def locus. The AFLP technique in combination with silver staining was used to maximize numbers of reproducible marker loci. Fifteen AFLP loci showed a genetic distance less than 5 and two of them less than 1 centiMorgans (cM) to the gene of interest. AFLPs were converted into sequence tagged sites (STSs) and into a newly refined AFLP-based single locus marker named the 'sequence specified AFLP' (ssAFLP).

  9. The stimuli evoking the aerial-righting posture of falling pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Meresman, Yonatan; Ribak, Gal; Weihs, Daniel; Inbar, Moshe

    2014-10-01

    Some wingless insects possess aerial righting reflexes, suggesting that adaptation for controlling body orientation while falling through air could have preceded flight. When threatened by natural enemies, wingless pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) may drop off their host plant and assume a stereotypic posture that rotates them in midair to land on their feet. The sensory information triggering aphids to assume this posture has so far been unknown. We subjected aphids to a series of tests, isolating the sensory cues experienced during free-fall. Falling aphids assumed the righting posture and landed upright irrespective of whether the experiments were carried out in the light or in complete darkness. Detachment of the tarsi from the substrate triggered the aphids to assume the posture rapidly, but only for a brief period. Rotation (mainly roll and yaw) of the body in air, in the light, caused aphids to assume the posture and remain in it throughout rotation. In contrast, aphids rotated in the dark did not respond. Acceleration associated with falling or airflow over the body per se did not trigger the posture. However, sensing motion relative to air heightened the aphids' responsiveness to rotation in the light. These results suggest that the righting posture of aphids is triggered by a tarsal reflex, but, once the aphid is airborne, vision and a sense of motion relative to air can augment the response. Hence, aerial righting in a wingless insect could have emerged as a basic tarsal response and developed further to include secondary sensory cues typical of falling.

  10. Binding of /sup 14/C-5-aminolevulinic acid to a stromal protein from developing pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, S.S.; Castelfranco, P.A.; Wilkinson, J.; Benson, G.

    1987-04-01

    /sup 14/-5-Aminolevulinic acid (/sup 14/C-ALA) binds to a stromal protein with an apparent molecular weight of 42-43 KD on LDS and non-denaturing gels. The reaction is rapid. Binding is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents, mM concentrations of levulinic, dihydroxy heptanoic acids and gabaculine, 10 ..mu..M N-methylprotoporphyrin. Dicarboxilic acids, such as deltaKG, Glu, OAA, do not inhibit. Chloramphenicol, ATP, protoporphyrin, anoxia, light, darkness have no effect. The product, once formed, is stable to treatment with 5% conc. HCl in cold acetone. It can be chased in a second incubation with unlabeled ALA, but not with levulinic acid. No activity was detected in the subplastidic membrane fractions. Western blot analysis failed to reveal any homology between the labeled protein and either cytochrome for ALA dehydratase. This ALA-binding protein was not formed in chloroplasts isolated from fully expanded pea leaves. Therefore, it is deemed likely to participate in ALA metabolism during chloroplast development.

  11. Developmental changes in aspartate-family amino acid biosynthesis in pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.R.; Cato, L.W.; Stephens, B.W.; Reeves, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Isolated chloroplasts are known to synthesize the asp-derived amino acids (ile, hse, lys and thr) from ({sup 14}C)asp (Mills et al, 1980, Plant Physiol. 65, 1166). Now, we have studied the influence of tissue age on essential amino acid biosynthesis in pea (Pisum sativum) plastids. Chloroplasts from the younger (third and fourth) leaves of 12 day old plants, were 2-3 times more active in synthesizing lys and thr from ({sup 14}C)asp than those from older (first or second) leaves. We also examined two key pathway enzymes (aspartate kinase and homoserine dehydrogenase); with each enzyme,a activity in younger leaves was about 2 times that in plastids from older tissue. Both lys- and thr-sensitive forms of aspartate kinase are known in plants; in agreement with earlier work, we found that lys-sensitive activity was about 4 times higher in the younger tissues, while the thr-sensitive activity changed little during development (Davies and Miflin, 1977, Plant Sci. Lett. 9, 323). Recently the role of aspartate kinase and homoserine dehydrogenase in controlling asp-family amino acid synthesis has been questioned (Giovanelli et al, 1989, Plant Physiol. 90, 1584); we hope that measurements of amino acid levels in chloroplasts as well as further enzyme studies will help us to better understand the regulation of asp-family amino acid synthesis.

  12. Large-Scale Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics of the Pea aphid-Buchnera Symbiosis*

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, Anton; Russell, Calum W.; Ponnala, Lalit; Hoops, Harold J.; Sun, Qi; Douglas, Angela E.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2011-01-01

    Many insects are nutritionally dependent on symbiotic microorganisms that have tiny genomes and are housed in specialized host cells called bacteriocytes. The obligate symbiosis between the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum and the γ-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola (only 584 predicted proteins) is particularly amenable for molecular analysis because the genomes of both partners have been sequenced. To better define the symbiotic relationship between this aphid and Buchnera, we used large-scale, high accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-LTQ-Orbtrap) to identify aphid and Buchnera proteins in the whole aphid body, purified bacteriocytes, isolated Buchnera cells and the residual bacteriocyte fraction. More than 1900 aphid and 400 Buchnera proteins were identified. All enzymes in amino acid metabolism annotated in the Buchnera genome were detected, reflecting the high (68%) coverage of the proteome and supporting the core function of Buchnera in the aphid symbiosis. Transporters mediating the transport of predicted metabolites were present in the bacteriocyte. Label-free spectral counting combined with hierarchical clustering, allowed to define the quantitative distribution of a subset of these proteins across both symbiotic partners, yielding no evidence for the selective transfer of protein among the partners in either direction. This is the first quantitative proteome analysis of bacteriocyte symbiosis, providing a wealth of information about molecular function of both the host cell and bacterial symbiont. PMID:21421797

  13. Control of storage-protein synthesis during seed development in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed Central

    Gatehouse, J A; Evans, I M; Bown, D; Croy, R R; Boulter, D

    1982-01-01

    The tissue-specific syntheses of seed storage proteins in the cotyledons of developing pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds have been demonstrated by estimates of their qualitative and quantitative accumulation by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and rocket immunoelectrophoresis respectively. Vicilin-fraction proteins initially accumulated faster than legumin, but whereas legumin was accumulated throughout development, different components of the vicilin fraction had their predominant periods of synthesis at different stages of development. The translation products in vitro of polysomes isolated from cotyledons at different stages of development reflected the synthesis in vivo of storage-protein polypeptides at corresponding times. The levels of storage-protein mRNA species during development were estimated by 'Northern' hybridization using cloned complementary-DNA probes. This technique showed that the levels of legumin and vicilin (47000-Mr precursors) mRNA species increased and decreased in agreement with estimated rates of synthesis of the respective polypeptides. The relative amounts of these messages, estimated by kinetic hybridization were also consistent. Legumin mRNA was present in leaf poly(A)+ RNA at less than one-thousandth of the level in cotyledon poly(A)+ (polyadenylated) RNA, demonstrating tissue-specific expression. Evidence is presented that storage-protein mRNA species are relatively long-lived, and it is suggested that storage-protein synthesis is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6897609

  14. Involvement of Calcium and Calmodulin in Membrane Deterioration during Senescence of Pea Foliage.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Y Y; Sridhara, S; Thompson, J E

    1984-06-01

    The prospect that Ca(2+) promotes senescence by activating calmodulin has been examined using cut pea (Pisum sativum co Alaska) foliage as a model system. Senescence was induced by severing 17-day-old plants from their roots and maintaining them in aqueous test solutions in the dark for an additional 4 days. Treatment of the foliage with the Ca(2+) ionophore (A23187) during the senescence-induction period promoted a lateral phase separation of the bulk lipids in microsomal membranes indicating that internalization of Ca(2+) facilitates membrane deterioration. In addition, microsomal membranes from ionophore-treated tissue displayed an increased capacity to convert 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid to ethylene and an increased propensity to produce the superoxide anion (O(2) (tau)). Treatment of the tissue with fluphenazine during the senescence-induction period, which prevents binding of the Ca:Calmodulin complex to enzymes, delayed membrane deterioration as measured by these criteria. It also proved possible to simulate these in situ effects of the Ca(2+) ionophore on ethylene production and O(2) (tau) formation by treating microsomal membranes isolated from young tissue with phospholipase A(2) in the presence of Ca(2+) and calmodulin, and these effects of phospholipase A(2) and Ca:calmodulin were inhibited by calmodulin antagonists. The observations collectively suggest that internalized Ca(2+) promotes senescence by activating calmodulin, which in turn mediates the action of phospholipase A(2) on membranes.

  15. Structural alteration of cell wall pectins accompanies pea development in response to cold.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Laëtitia; Domon, Jean-Marc; Klimek, John F; Fournet, Françoise; Sellier, Hélène; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Carpita, Nicholas C; Rayon, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum) cell wall metabolism in response to chilling was investigated in a frost-sensitive genotype 'Terese' and a frost-tolerant genotype 'Champagne'. Cell walls isolated from stipules of cold acclimated and non-acclimated plants showed that cold temperatures induce changes in polymers containing xylose, arabinose, galactose and galacturonic acid residues. In the tolerant cultivar Champagne, acclimation is accompanied by increases in homogalacturonan, xylogalacturonan and highly branched Rhamnogalacturonan I with branched and unbranched (1→5)-α-arabinans and (1→4)-β-galactans. In contrast, the sensitive cultivar Terese accumulates substantial amounts of (1→4)-β-xylans and glucuronoxylan, but not the pectins. Greater JIM7 labeling was observed in Champagne compared to Terese, indicating that cold acclimation also induces an increase in the degree of methylesterification of pectins. Significant decrease in polygalacturonase activities in both genotypes were observed at the end of cold acclimation. These data indicate a role for esterified pectins in cold tolerance. The possible functions for pectins and their associated arabinans and galactans in cold acclimation are discussed. PMID:24837358

  16. Structural alteration of cell wall pectins accompanies pea development in response to cold.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Laëtitia; Domon, Jean-Marc; Klimek, John F; Fournet, Françoise; Sellier, Hélène; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Carpita, Nicholas C; Rayon, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum) cell wall metabolism in response to chilling was investigated in a frost-sensitive genotype 'Terese' and a frost-tolerant genotype 'Champagne'. Cell walls isolated from stipules of cold acclimated and non-acclimated plants showed that cold temperatures induce changes in polymers containing xylose, arabinose, galactose and galacturonic acid residues. In the tolerant cultivar Champagne, acclimation is accompanied by increases in homogalacturonan, xylogalacturonan and highly branched Rhamnogalacturonan I with branched and unbranched (1→5)-α-arabinans and (1→4)-β-galactans. In contrast, the sensitive cultivar Terese accumulates substantial amounts of (1→4)-β-xylans and glucuronoxylan, but not the pectins. Greater JIM7 labeling was observed in Champagne compared to Terese, indicating that cold acclimation also induces an increase in the degree of methylesterification of pectins. Significant decrease in polygalacturonase activities in both genotypes were observed at the end of cold acclimation. These data indicate a role for esterified pectins in cold tolerance. The possible functions for pectins and their associated arabinans and galactans in cold acclimation are discussed.

  17. Grafting and gibberellin effects on the growth of tall and dwarf peas.

    PubMed

    Lockard, R G; Grunwald, C

    1970-02-01

    Tall peas var. Alaska and dwarf peas var. Progress No. 9 were grafted onto their own roots or reciprocally grafted to determine the rootstock effect on the growth of the stem. In all cases the grafted stems grew the same as their ungrafted controls regardless of which rootstock they were grown on. When similarly grafted plants were supplied with gibberellic acid, good graft unions did not inhibit its translocation. This evidence supports the thesis that the mechanism controlling stem growth in peas is located in the stem and that the roots have no direct control over this mechanism. PMID:16657295

  18. Thermochemical characterization of pigeon pea stalk for its efficient utilization as an energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Katyal, S.K.; Iyer, P.V.R.

    2000-05-01

    Pigeon pea stalk is a widely available biomass species in India. In this article the potential use of pigeon pea stalk as a fuel source through thermochemical conversion methods such as combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis has been investigated through experimentation using a thermogravimetric analyzer and pilot-plant-scale equipment. It has been proposed that pigeon pea stalks can be effectively utilized in two ways. The first is to pyrolyze the material to produce value-added products such as char, tar, and fuel gas. The second alternative is to partially pyrolyze the material to remove tar-forming volatiles, followed by gasification of reactive char to generate producer gas.

  19. Analysis of the accumulation of Pea enation mosaic virus genomes in seed tissues and lack of evidence for seed transmission in pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail; Larsen, Richard; Murray, Sarah; McPhee, Kevin; Coyne, Clarice

    2009-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is an important virus disease of pea. International movement of commercial pea cultivars and germplasm can be problematic due to uncertainty about seed transmission of the viruses responsible for the disease. Whether PEMV is seedborne was assessed by collecting developing seed from infected plants and determining the relative concentrations of the PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 viral genomes using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relative accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 was approximately 1,240 and 13,000 times higher, respectively, in leaf than in embryo tissues. Accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 RNA was also significantly higher in pod walls and seed coats than in cotyledons or embryo axes. No evidence was obtained for seed transmission of PEMV in pea. Although PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 genomic RNAs were found in developing seed, no PEMV symptoms were observed in the field on more than 50,000 plants from seed derived from PEMV-infected source plants. These data demonstrate that PEMV is seedborne in pea but do not support a previous report that PEMV is seed transmitted. Absence of seed transmission may result from the low abundance of PEMV viral genomes in embryo tissue.

  20. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei far from stability at TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The ISOL facility, TRISTAN, is a user facility located at Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor. Short-lived, neutron-rich nuclei, far from stability, are produced by thermal neutron fission of /sup 235/U. An extensive array of experimental end stations are available for nuclear structure studies. These studies are augmented by a variety of long-lived ion sources suitable for use at a reactor facility. Some recent results at TRISTAN are presented as examples of using an ISOL facility to study series of nuclei, whereby an effective means of conducting nuclear structure investigations is available.

  1. Effect of Root-Zone Moisture Variations on Growth of Lettuce and Pea Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, Iliana; Ivanova, Tania

    2008-06-01

    Variations in substrate moisture lead to changes in water and oxygen availability to plant roots. Ground experiments were carried out in the laboratory prototype of SVET-2 Space Greenhouse to study the effect of variation of root-zone moisture conditions on growth of lettuce and pea plants. The effect of transient increase (for 1 day) and drastic increase (waterlogging for 10 days) of substrate moisture was studied with 16-day old pea and 21-day old lettuce plants respectively. Pea height and fresh biomass accumulation were not affected by transient substrate moisture increase. Net photosynthetic rate (Pn) of pea plants showed fast response to substrate moisture variation, while chlorophyll content did not change. Drastic change of substrate moisture suppressed lettuce Pn, chlorophyll biosynthesis and plant growth. These parameters slowly recovered after termination of waterlogging treatment but lettuce yield was greatly affected. The results showed that the most sensitive physiological parameter to substrate moisture variations is photosynthesis.

  2. Wrinkled Peas and White-Eyed Fruit Flies: The Molecular Basis of Two Classical Genetic Traits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on bridging the gap between classical and molecular genetics for two traits: wrinkled seeds in garden peas and white eye color in fruit flies. Discusses the molecular details of the underlying basis of these traits. Contains 15 references. (JRH)

  3. Coupling of solute transport and cell expansion in pea stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalstig, J. G.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    As cells expand and are displaced through the elongation zone of the epicotyl of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) seedlings, there is little net dilution of the cell sap, implying a coordination between cell expansion and solute uptake from the phloem. Using [14C] sucrose as a phloem tracer (applied to the hypogeous cotyledons), the pattern of label accumulation along the stem closely matched the growth rate pattern: high accumulation in the growing zone, little accumulation in nongrowing regions. Several results suggest that a major portion of phloem contents enters elongating cells through the symplast. We propose that the coordination between phloem transport and cell expansion is accomplished via regulatory pathways affecting both plasmodesmata conductivity and cell expansion.

  4. Characterization of Starch-Debranching Enzymes in Pea Embryos1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhi-Ping; Hylton, Christopher M.; Rössner, Ute; Smith, Alison M.

    1998-01-01

    Two distinct types of debranching enzymes have been identified in developing pea (Pisum sativum L.) embryos using native gel analysis and tests of substrate preference on purified or partially purified activities. An isoamylase-like activity capable of hydrolyzing amylopectin and glycogen but not pullulan is present throughout development and is largely or entirely confined to the plastid. Activities capable of hydrolyzing pullulan are present both inside and outside of the plastid, and extraplastidial activity increases relative to the plastidial activity during development. Both types of debranching enzyme are also present in germinating embryos. We argue that debranching enzymes are likely to have a role in starch metabolism in the plastid of the developing embryo and in starch degradation during germination. PMID:9765544

  5. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Thermotolerance of Pea Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, L.

    2008-06-01

    A coordinated plant response to simulated microgravity (clinorotation) and heat stress was analyzed. 5-d pea seedlings grown on a horizontal clinostat or in the stationary conditions were exposed to different heat treatments (mild, severe and severe after pretreatment). Temperature-dependent quantitative changes in the heat stress response were revealed in the clinorotated seedlings comparatively to the stationary grown ones: less growth activity, an increase in the production of high levels of heat shock proteins Hsp70 and Hsp90, a higher extent of the membrane damage. Thus, clinorotated seedlings were more sensitive to heat stress. The data suggest that clinorotation may influence distinct functions, including Hsps synthesis and protection of membrane integrity, that affect plant growth activity and thermotolerance as a result.

  6. Phloem unloading and cell expansion in pea stems

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalstig, J.G.; Cosgrove, D.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Phloem unloading into elongating stems of dark-grown pea seedlings was greater in regions with higher relative growth rates. Phloem transport was monitored over 1 h by measuring accumulation of radiolabel from {sup 14}C-sucrose added between the cotyledons. The apical hook and plumule and 8 mm of the growing region of an intact plant were sealed in a pressure chamber and the pressure was raised to stop elongation. Phloem unloading was inhibited in the pressurized zone of elongation and accelerated in the apical hook and plumule, with the result that the magnitude of phloem transport into the stem was unchanged. The results demonstrate a coupling between cell expansion and phloem unloading.

  7. A technique for collection of exudate from pea seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, S. D.; Cohen, J. D.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), at concentrations higher than 1.0 millimolar, is phytotoxic to etiolated seedlings of Pisum sativum. Substantial vascular exudation from pea epicotyls could be obtained without tissue damage at 0.5 millimolar EDTA if the solution was buffered at pH 7.5 with sodium N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid. Treated seedlings exuded 950 micrograms (leucine equivalents) of ninhydrin-positive material per day and 870 micrograms (glucose equivalents) of anthrone-positive material per day. Amino acid analysis showed the exudate to have glutamine as the major amido nitrogen containing compound and sucrose was shown to be the major sugar. Radiolabeled tryptophan and sucrose applied to cotyledons were transferred through the epicotyl and into the collection medium. The pH profile for exudation shows half maximal exudation at pH 7.2, indicating the promotion of exudation by EDTA is probably not due simply to Ca2+ chelation.

  8. Inhibition of raffinose oligosaccharide breakdown delays germination of pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Blöchl, Andreas; Peterbauer, Thomas; Richter, Andreas

    2007-08-01

    Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) are almost ubiquitous in seeds and have been hypothesized to constitute an important energy source during germination. To test this hypothesis we applied a specific alpha-galactosidase inhibitor (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, DGJ) to germinating pea seeds, resulting in a complete blocking of RFO breakdown. The germination rates of DGJ-treated seeds dropped drastically to about 25% of controls two days after imbibition. Similarly, the activities of the key enzymes in the galactose salvage pathway galactokinase, UDP-galactose pyrophosphorylase and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase, were also significantly lower in seeds treated with the inhibitor. The inhibitory effect on germination could be relieved by galactose but only partially by sucrose, indicating that galactose, in addition to providing easily available energy for growth, may also be an important component of the sugar signaling pathway during germination. Taken together our study, for the first time, provides clear evidence that RFOs play an important role for early germination.

  9. New lv Mutants of Pea Are Deficient in Phytochrome B.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, J. L.; Nagatani, A.; Kendrick, R. E.; Murfet, I. C.; Reid, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The lv-1 mutant of pea (Pisum sativum L.) is deficient in responses regulated by phytochrome B (phyB) in other species but has normal levels of spectrally active phyB. We have characterized three further lv mutants (lv-2, lv-3, and lv-4), which are all elongated under red (R) and white light but are indistinguishable from wild type under far-red light. The phyB apoprotein present in the lv-1 mutant was undetectable in all three new lv mutants. The identification of allelic mutants with and without phyB apoprotein suggests that Lv may be a structural gene for a B-type phytochrome. Furthermore, it indicates that the lv-1 mutation results specifically in the loss of normal biological activity of this phytochrome. Red-light-pulse and fluence-rate-response experiments suggest that lv plants are deficient in the low-fluence response (LFR) but retain a normal very-low-fluence-rate-dependent response for leaflet expansion and inhibition of stem elongation. Comparison of lv alleles of differing severity indicates that the LFR for stem elongation can be mediated by a lower level of phyB than the LFR for leaflet expansion. The retention of a strong response to continuous low-fluence-rate R in all four lv mutants suggests that there may be an additional phytochrome controlling responses to R in pea. The kinetics of phytochrome destruction and reaccumulation in the lv mutant indicate that phyB may be involved in the light regulation of phyA levels. PMID:12228490

  10. Thiamine treatments alleviate aphid infestations in barley and pea.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Afaf M; Jonsson, Lisbeth M V

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of plants with thiamine (Vitamin B1) has before been shown to activate plant defence against microorganisms. Here, we have studied the effects of thiamine treatments of plants on aphid reproduction and behaviour. The work was mainly carried out with bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Aphid population growth and aphid acceptance on plants grown from seeds soaked in a 150μM thiamine solution were reduced to ca. 60% of that on control plants. R. padi life span and the total number of offspring were reduced on barley plants treated with thiamine. Healthy aphids and aphids infected with the R. padi virus were similarly affected. Spraying or addition of thiamine at 150μM to nutrient solutions likewise resulted in reduced aphid population growth to ca. 60%, as did plant exposure to thiamine odour at 4mM. Thiamine treatments resulted in reduced aphid population growth also when tested with grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.) on barley and pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum H.) on pea (Pisum sativum L.). There was no direct effect of thiamine on aphid reproduction or thiamine odour on aphid behaviour, as evaluated using artificial diets and by olfactometer tests, respectively. Two gene sequences regulated by salicylic acid showed higher transcript abundance and one gene sequence regulated by methyl jasmonate showed lower transcript abundance in thiamine-treated plants but not in control plants after aphid infestation. These results suggest that the aphid antibiosis and antixenosis effects may be related to priming of defence, but more studies are needed to explain the effects against aphids.

  11. Gibberellin Concentration and Transport in Genetic Lines of Pea 1

    PubMed Central

    Proebsting, William M.; Hedden, Peter; Lewis, Mervyn J.; Croker, Stephen J.; Proebsting, Lena N.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of the Na and Le loci on gibberellin (GA) content and transport in pea (Pisum sativum L.) shoots were studied. GA1, GA8, GA17, GA19, GA20, GA29, GA44, GA8 catabolite, and GA29 catabolite were identified by full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in extracts of expanding and fully expanded tissues of line C79-338 (Na Le). Quantification of GAs by gas chromatography-single-ion monitoring using deuterated internal standards in lines differing at the Na and Le alleles showed that na reduced the contents of GA19, GA20, and GA29 on average to <3% and of GA1 and GA8 to <30% of those in corresponding Na lines. In expanding tissues from Na le lines, GA1 and GA8 concentrations were reduced to approximately 10 and 2%, respectively, and GA29 content increased 2- to 3-fold compared with those in Na Le plants. There was a close correlation between stem length and the concentrations of GA1 or GA8 in shoot apices in all six genotypes investigated. In na/Na grafts, internode length and GA1 concentration of nana scions were normalized, the GA20 content increased slightly, but GA19 levels were unaffected. Movement of labeled GAs applied to leaves on Na rootstocks indicated that GA19 was transported poorly to apices of na scions compared with GA20 and GA1. Our evidence suggests that GA20 is the major transported GA in peas. Images Figure 2 PMID:16653128

  12. Recruitment of the parasitic pea crab Nepinnotheres novaezelandiae into green-lipped mussels Perna canaliculus.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Oliver; Jeffs, Andrew G

    2015-01-15

    Pea crab species are globally ubiquitous parasites of marine bivalves including several major aquaculture species. However, little is known about the environmental factors that affect their recruitment into aquacultured mussels. The effect of depth and distance from shore on the recruitment of the parasitic pea crab Nepinnotheres novaezelandiae into New Zealand green-lipped mussels Perna canaliculus was examined with a field experiment. The incidence of pea crab infection of mussels over 295 d was nearly double when deployed at 5-10 m depth (1.97%) compared to 20-30 m depth (0.96%), although it was not significantly different due to the overall low period prevalence in the experimental population. The sex ratio of crabs recovered was significantly skewed towards females with a ratio of 1:14 (χ = 11.3, p < 0.001). Infection with pea crabs was found to significantly reduce final mussel shell height on average by 28% (21.0 mm) over 295 d (Mann-Whitney U = 6.0, p < 0.0001). This study confirms that parasitism of green-lipped mussels by pea crabs has a significant impact on the growth of the mussels and suggests that the incidence of pea crabs will be higher in shallower water and when mussels are in closer proximity to the shore. With no control methods available for preventing pea crab infection, these results suggest that moving mussel farms offshore has the potential to reduce the incidence of pea crabs in mussels and warrants larger-scale assessment.

  13. Ground states of larger nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S.C.; Wiringa, R.B.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1995-08-01

    The methods used for the few-body nuclei require operations on the complete spin-isospin vector; the size of this vector makes such methods impractical for nuclei with A > 8. During the last few years we developed cluster expansion methods that do not require operations on the complete vector. We use the same Hamiltonians as for the few-body nuclei and variational wave functions of form similar to the few-body wave functions. The cluster expansions are made for the noncentral parts of the wave functions and for the operators whose expectation values are being evaluated. The central pair correlations in the wave functions are treated exactly and this requires the evaluation of 3A-dimensional integrals which are done with Monte Carlo techniques. Most of our effort was on {sup 16}O, other p-shell nuclei, and {sup 40}Ca. In 1993 the Mathematics and Computer Science Division acquired a 128-processor IBM SP which has a theoretical peak speed of 16 Gigaflops (GFLOPS). We converted our program to run on this machine. Because of the large memory on each node of the SP, it was easy to convert the program to parallel form with very low communication overhead. Considerably more effort was needed to restructure the program from one oriented towards long vectors for the Cray computers at NERSC to one that makes efficient use of the cache of the RS6000 architecture. The SP made possible complete five-body cluster calculations of {sup 16}O for the first time; previously we could only do four-body cluster calculations. These calculations show that the expectation value of the two-body potential is converging less rapidly than we had thought, while that of the three-body potential is more rapidly convergent; the net result is no significant change to our predicted binding energy for {sup 16}O using the new Argonne v{sub 18} potential and the Urbana IX three-nucleon potential. This result is in good agreement with experiment.

  14. Chitosan as a Component of Pea-Fusarium solani Interactions 12

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Lee A.; Beckman, Jean M.

    1980-01-01

    Chitosan, a polymer of β-1,4-linked glucosamine residues with a strong affinity for DNA, was implicated in the pea pod-Fusarium solani interaction as an elicitor of phytoalexin production, an inhibitor of fungal growth and a chemical which can protect pea tissue from infection by F. solani f. sp. pisi. Purified Fusarium fungal cell walls can elicit phytoalexin production in pea pod tissue. Enzymes from acetone powders of pea tissue release eliciting components from the F. solani f. sp. phaseoli cell walls. Hydrochloric acid-hydrolyzed F. solani cell walls are about 20% glucosamine. The actual chitosan content of F. solani cell walls is about 1%. However, chitosan assays and histochemical observations indicate that chitosan content of F. solani spores and adjacent pea cells increases following inoculation. Dormant F. solani spores also accumulate chitosan. Concentrations of nitrous acid-cleaved chitosan as low as 0.9 microgram per milliliter and 3 micrograms per milliliter elicit phytoalexin induction and inhibit germination of F. solani macroconidia, respectively. When chitosan is applied to pea pod tissue with or prior to F. solani f. sp. pisi, the tissue is protected from infection. Images PMID:16661405

  15. Nutritional assessment in vitro and in vivo of raw and extruded peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Alonso, R; Grant, G; Dewey, P; Marzo, F

    2000-06-01

    The effects of extrusion cooking on the nutritional properties of Pisum sativum L. have been evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The treatment greatly elevated protein and starch digestibility in vitro. Also, the amounts of intact starch diminished while total free sugars increased. In addition, the levels of antinutritional factors, such as protease inhibitors and lectins, were greatly decreased. Concentrations of methionine and cystine were low in raw peas and were further reduced by extrusion treatment. The nutritional performance of rats fed extruded pea diets for 15 days was no better than that of rats given raw pea diet. This was due to the overriding effects of amino acid deficiencies in the diets. Weight gains by rats fed extruded pea diets supplemented with amino acids were, however, much higher than those achieved by rats fed supplemented raw pea diets. Food transformation index and protein efficiency ratio values were also greatly improved. Extrusion treatment did therefore significantly improve the nutritional quality of peas. PMID:10888538

  16. Oxidative processes in soybean and pea seeds: effect of light, temperature, and water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Oxidative processes are probable determinants of longevity of seeds in storage. Measurements of actual oxygen uptake rates were made for soybean and pea seeds as a comparison of short and long lived seeds when light, temperature, and moisture contents were varied. In both peas and soybeans, the oxygen uptake was depressed at low temperatures (<16 degrees C) and low water contents (< 0.25 gram H2O per gram dry weight). Apparent activation energies under these conditions are very high, while apparent activation energies of seeds at higher water contents and at temperatures greater than 22 degrees C are much less. Light enhances the level of oxygen uptake in pea, but reduces the level of oxygen uptake in soybean. The complexities of the interactions of oxygen uptake with environmental conditions in soybean compared to pea suggest that oxidative processes occur in soybean at low water contents, but are essentially absent in pea. It is suggested that the additional oxidative processes in soybean with moisture contents between 0.10 and 0.24 gram per gram may contribute to the poorer longevity of soybean seed compared to pea seed.

  17. [Photosynthetic responses of wheat and pea seedlings to enhanced UV-C radiation and their resistances].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Li-Hong; He, Xing-Yuan; Hao, Lin

    2007-03-01

    With wheat and pea seedlings as test materials, this paper studied the effects of UV-C radiation on their leaf photosynthetic characteristics and antioxidant enzyme activities. The results showed that enhanced UV-C radiation could markedly decrease the photosynthetic rate (Pn) , stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), transpiration rate (Tr) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of pea leaves, but for wheat leaves, these parameters were increased first and decreased then. Under UV-C condition, the CO2 compensation point of leaf was increased for pea, but decreased first and increased then for wheat. With the increasing duration of UV-C radiation, the antioxidant enzyme activities of both test plants increased first and decreased then, except that the POD activity of pea and SOD activity of wheat decreased gradually. All of these suggested that wheat had a stronger resistance to short-time UV-C radiation than pea, but, with the prolonged duration of UV-C radiation, the photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities of wheat and pea were all decreased.

  18. Changes in the germination process and growth of pea in effect of laser seed irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podleśna, Anna; Gładyszewska, Bożena; Podleśny, Janusz; Zgrajka, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pre-sowing helium-neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation of pea seeds on changes in seed biochemical processes, germination rate, seedling emergence, growth rate, and yield. The first experimental factor was exposure to laser radiation: D0 - no irradiation, D3 - three exposures, D5 - five exposures, and the harvest dates were the second factor. Pre-sowing treatment of pea seeds with He-Ne laser light increased the concentrations of amylolytic enzymes and the content of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in pea seeds and seedlings. The exposure of seeds to He-Ne laser light improved the germination rate and uniformity and modified growth stages, which caused acceleration of flowering and ripening of pea plants. Laser light stimulation improved the morphological characteristics of plants by increasing plant height and leaf surface area. Irradiation improved the yield of vegetative and reproductive organs of pea, although the effects varied at the different growth stages. The increase in the seed yield resulted from a higher number of pods and seeds per plant, whereas no significant changes were observed in the number of seeds per pod. Both radiation doses exerted similarly stimulating effects on pea growth, development, and yield.

  19. PEAS V1.0: a package for elementary analysis of SNP data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuhua; Gupta, Sanchit; Jin, Li

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a software package named PEAS to facilitate analyses of large data sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for population genetics and molecular phylogenetics studies. PEAS reads SNP data in various formats as input and is versatile in data formatting; using PEAS, it is easy to create input files for many popular packages, such as STRUCTURE, frappe, Arlequin, Haploview, LDhat, PLINK, EIGENSOFT, PHASE, fastPHASE, MEGA and PHYLIP. In addition, PEAS fills up several analysis gaps in currently available computer programs in population genetics and molecular phylogenetics. Notably, (i) It calculates genetic distance matrices with bootstrapping for both individuals and populations from genome-wide high-density SNP data, and the output can be streamlined to MEGA and PHYLIP programs for further processing; (ii) It calculates genetic distances from STRUCTURE output and generates MEGA file to reconstruct component trees; (iii) It provides tools to conduct haplotype sharing analysis for phylogenetic studies based on high-density SNP data. To our knowledge, these analyses are not available in any other computer program. PEAS for Windows is freely available for academic users from http://www.picb.ac.cn/~xushua/index.files/Download_PEAS.htm. PMID:21565121

  20. Cell type-specific affinity purification of nuclei for chromatin profiling in whole animals.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian A; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing cell differentiation during development in a complex organism requires the analysis of expression and chromatin profiles in individual cell types. Our laboratory has developed a simple and generally applicable strategy to purify specific cell types from whole organisms for simultaneous analysis of chromatin and expression. The method, termed INTACT for Isolation of Nuclei TAgged in specific Cell Types, depends on the expression of an affinity-tagged nuclear envelope protein in the cell type of interest. These nuclei can be affinity-purified from the total pool of nuclei and used as a source for RNA and chromatin. The method serves as a simple and scalable alternative to FACS sorting or laser capture microscopy to circumvent the need for expensive equipment and specialized skills. This chapter provides detailed protocols for the cell-type specific purification of nuclei from Caenorhabditis elegans.

  1. Evaluation of Legumes Common to the Pacific Northwest as Hosts for the Pea Cyst Nematode, Heterodera goettingiana.

    PubMed

    Tedford, E C; Inglis, D A

    1999-06-01

    Seventeen leguminous species common to the Pacific Northwest were evaluated as potential hosts of the pea cyst nematode, Heterodera goettingiana, in both greenhouse and field experiments. In all experiments, juveniles of H. goettingiana penetrated roots of these 17 species with the exception of greenhouse-grown chickpea. Nematodes molted and developed into swollen third-stage or fourth-stage juveniles in many of the plants, but cyst development occurred only in the field on green pea, edible dry pea, and faba bean. More H. goettingiana cysts developed on fava bean than on green pea or edible dry pea. In H. goettingiana-infested soils, cropping sequences that include fava bean and pea should be avoided. However, certain legumes, such as winter vetch, may have the potential of serving as trap crops for H. goettingiana in this region.

  2. Evaluation of Legumes Common to the Pacific Northwest as Hosts for the Pea Cyst Nematode, Heterodera goettingiana.

    PubMed

    Tedford, E C; Inglis, D A

    1999-06-01

    Seventeen leguminous species common to the Pacific Northwest were evaluated as potential hosts of the pea cyst nematode, Heterodera goettingiana, in both greenhouse and field experiments. In all experiments, juveniles of H. goettingiana penetrated roots of these 17 species with the exception of greenhouse-grown chickpea. Nematodes molted and developed into swollen third-stage or fourth-stage juveniles in many of the plants, but cyst development occurred only in the field on green pea, edible dry pea, and faba bean. More H. goettingiana cysts developed on fava bean than on green pea or edible dry pea. In H. goettingiana-infested soils, cropping sequences that include fava bean and pea should be avoided. However, certain legumes, such as winter vetch, may have the potential of serving as trap crops for H. goettingiana in this region. PMID:19270885

  3. ERβ and PEA3 co-activate IL-8 expression and promote the invasion of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Li; Li, Ji-Yu; Mukaida, Naofumi; Wang, Qiaoqiao; Yang, Chen; Yin, Wen-Jin; Zeng, Xiao-Hua; Jin, Wei; Shao, Zhi-ming

    2011-03-01

    Metastasis represents the major remaining cause of mortality in human breast cancer. Interleukin-8 (IL-8), a proinflammatory chemokine, plays an important role during tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, we found that IL-8 and ERβ showed positive association. Overexpression of ERβ or PEA3 could up-regulate IL-8 promoter activity, mRNA and secretion; silencing of ERβ or PEA3 decreased IL-8 mRNA and secretion. ERβ and PEA3 increased IL-8 expression through binding to the IL-8 promoter and increased cell invasion. HER2 could increase ERβ and PEA3 expression and their binding to the IL-8 promoter. We conclude that ERβ and PEA3 play important roles in tumor invasion by regulating IL-8 expression, and HER2 maybe the upstream of ERβ and PEA3 - IL-8 pathway.

  4. Pasting and extrusion properties of mixed carbohydrates and whey protein isolate matrices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed systems of whey protein isolate (WPI) or texturized WPI (tWPI) and different starches may form weak or strong gel pastes or rigid matrices depending on interactions. The paste viscoelasticity of starches from amioca, barley, corn starch, Hylon VII, plantain, and pea starch, mixed with whey pro...

  5. Shape Coexistence in Transitional Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, W. D.; Schmelzenbach, P.; Wood, J. L.; Allmond, J. M.; Krane, K. S.; Loats, J.; Stapels, C. J.; Norman, E. B.

    2007-10-01

    The ``transitional'' nuclei near N=90 have long been a focus of experimental and theoretical investigations. We report on a program of study of the N=90 and N=88 nuclei with a focus on the structure of ^150Sm elucidated through new high-statistics, precision γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy and γ-γ angular correlation data from the radioactive decay of ^150Pm (T1/2= 2.68 h, Q^- = 3454 keV, J^π= 1^-) and ^150m,gEu (T1/2= 12.8 h, J^π= 0^- and T1/2= 36.9 y, J^π= 5^(-), respectively, Q^+(g.s.)= 2261 keV). In particular, very weak key collective transitions (e.g., the 2^+2(1046) ->4^+1(773) 272 keV γ ray) are observed and precision δ(E2/M1) mixing ratios are extracted (determining δJ = 0 transitions). This data, when combined with published results from conversion electron measurements, two-neutron transfer studies, and Coulomb excitation supports the results from detailed multiple-spectroscopy studies of ^152Sm [1] indicating that shape coexistence underlies the structure at N=88, 90. [1] W. D. Kulp, et al., arXiv:0706.4129 [nucl-ex].

  6. Thermal instability of cell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmt, Enrico; Kießling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2014-07-01

    DNA is known to be a mechanically and thermally stable structure. In its double stranded form it is densely packed within the cell nucleus and is thermo-resistant up to 70\\:^\\circ {\\rm{C}}. In contrast, we found a sudden loss of cell nuclei integrity at relatively moderate temperatures ranging from 45 to 55\\:^\\circ {\\rm{C}}. In our study, suspended cells held in an optical double beam trap were heated under controlled conditions while monitoring the nuclear shape. At specific critical temperatures, an irreversible sudden shape transition of the nuclei was observed. These temperature induced transitions differ in abundance and intensity for various normal and cancerous epithelial breast cells, which clearly characterizes different cell types. Our results show that temperatures slightly higher than physiological conditions are able to induce instabilities of nuclear structures, eventually leading to cell death. This is a surprising finding since recent thermorheological cell studies have shown that cells have a lower viscosity and are thus more deformable upon temperature increase. Since the nucleus is tightly coupled to the outer cell shape via the cytoskeleton, the force propagation of nuclear reshaping to the cell membrane was investigated in combination with the application of cytoskeletal drugs.

  7. Physical Processing of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Stern, S. Alan

    1997-01-01

    Cometary nuclei preserve a cosmo-chemical record of conditions and processes in the primordial solar nebula, and possibly even the interstellar medium. However, that record is not perfectly preserved over the age of the solar system due to a variety of physical processes which act to modify cometary surfaces and interiors. Possible structural and/or internal processes include: collisional accretion, disruption, and reassembly during formation; internal heating by long and short-lived radionuclides; amorphous to crystalline phase transitions, and thermal stresses. Identified surface modification processes include: irradiation by galactic cosmic rays, solar protons, UV photons, and the Sun's T Tauri stage mass outflow; heating by passing stars and nearby supernovae; gardening by debris impacts; the accretion of interstellar dust and gas and accompanying erosion by hypervelocity dust impacts and sputtering; and solar heating with accompanying crust formation. These modification processes must be taken into account in both the planning and the interpretation of the results of a Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission. Sampling of nuclei should be done at as great a depth below the surface crust as technically feasible, and at vents or fissures leading to exposed volatiles at depth. Samples of the expected cometary crust and near-surface layers also need to be returned for analysis to achieve a better understanding of the effects of these physical processes. We stress that comets are still likely less modified dm any other solar system bodies, but the degree of modification can vary greatly from one comet to the next.

  8. Selfconsistent calculations for hyperdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Molique, H.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.; Luo, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Properties of the hyperdeformed nuclei in the A {approximately} 170 mass range are re-examined using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with the SOP parametrization. A comparison with the previous predictions that were based on a non-selfconsistent approach is made. The existence of the {open_quotes}hyper-deformed shell closures{close_quotes} at the proton and neutron numbers Z=70 and N=100 and their very weak dependence on the rotational frequency is suggested; the corresponding single-particle energy gaps are predicted to play a role similar to that of the Z=66 and N=86 gaps in the super-deformed nuclei of the A {approximately} 150 mass range. Selfconsistent calculations suggest also that the A {approximately} 170 hyperdeformed structures have neglegible mass asymmetry in their shapes. Very importantly for the experimental studies, both the fission barriers and the {open_quotes}inner{close_quotes} barriers (that separate the hyperdeformed structures from those with smaller deformations) are predicted to be relatively high, up to the factor of {approximately}2 higher than the corresponding ones in the {sup 152}Dy superdeformed nucleus used as a reference.

  9. Diversity of pea (Pisum sativum) accessions based on morphological data for sustainable field pea breeding in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gatti, I; Espósito, M A; Almirón, P; Cravero, V P; Cointry, E L

    2011-10-31

    We characterized 13 accessions of dry peas of different origins from various growing regions in Argentina, based on three replications of 20 plants cultivated in 2009 and 2010 in a greenhouse, with the objective of selecting those with favorable characteristics for use in breeding programs. Significant differences were found for length and width of stipule and pod, length of the internodes and leaflets, plant height, total number of nodes, number of nodes at the first pod, number of days to flowering and to harvest, number of pods and seeds per pod, 100-seed weight and grain diameter, demonstrating a high degree of genetic variability. Phenotypic correlation analysis demonstrated that large pods produced more seeds per pod, but the seed weight decreased. Plants with smaller number of nodes in the first pod were more productive. Estimates of genotypic correlation coefficients indicated a strong inherent association among the different traits. Clustering methods grouped the accessions into five clusters. Cluster 5 included two accessions and showed the highest values for length and width of stipules (4.9 and 4.5 cm, respectively), length of leaflets (7.43 cm) and days to flowering (122.6), while cluster 3, with one accession, and cluster 4, with two accessions, showed the highest values for number of seeds per pod (3.78 and 4.39), number of pods per plant (5.33 and 5.70), length of pods (5.54 and 5.72 cm), and width of pods (1.21 and 1.20 cm, respectively). We conclude that accessions in clusters 3 and 4 would be useful for crosses with other cultivars in pea breeding programs.

  10. cDNA cloning, primary structure and gene expression for H-protein, a component of the glycine-cleavage system (glycine decarboxylase) of pea (Pisum sativum) leaf mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Macherel, D; Lebrun, M; Gagnon, J; Neuburger, M; Douce, R

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA clones encoding the H-protein of the glycine-cleavage system of pea (Pisum sativum) leaf mitochondria. The deduced primary structure revealed that the 131-amino-acid polypeptide is cytoplasmically synthesized with a 34-amino-acid mitochondrial targeting peptide. The lipoate-binding site was assigned to be lysine-63, as deduced from a sequence comparison with several lipoate-bearing proteins. The expression of the gene encoding H-protein was shown to occur specifically in the leaf tissue, with light exerting an additional effect by increasing the mRNA levels severalfold. Two polyadenylation sites were found in the mRNA, and a single-copy gene encoding the H-protein was detected in pea genome. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2363710

  11. Protein synthesis in chloroplasts. Characteristics and products of protein synthesis in vitro in etioplasts and developing chloroplasts from pea leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Siddell, S G; Ellis, R J

    1975-01-01

    The function of plastid ribosomes in pea (Pisum sativum L.) was investigated by characterizing the products of protein synthesis in vitro in plastids isolated at different stages during the transition from etioplast to chloroplast. Etioplasts and plastids isolated after 24, 48 and 96h of greening in continuous white light, use added ATP to incorporate labelled amino acids into protein. Plastids isolated from greening leaves can also use light as the source of energy for protein synthesis. The labelled polypeptides synthesized in isolated plastids were analysed by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate-ureapolyacrylamide gels. Six polypeptides are synthesized in etioplasts with ATP as energy source. Only one of these polypeptides is present in a 150 000g supernatant fraction. This polypeptide has been identified as the large subunit of Fraction I protein (3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxylyase EC 4.1.1.39) by comparing the tryptic 'map' of its L-(35S)methionine-labelled peptides with the tryptic 'map' of large subunit peptides from Fraction I labelled with L-(35S)methionine in vivo. The same gel pattern of six polypeptides is seen when plastids isolated from greening leaves are incubated with either added ATP or light as the energy source. However, the rates of synthesis of particular polypeptides are different in plastids isolated at different stages of the etioplast to chloroplast transition. The results support the idea that plastid ribosomes synthesize only a small number of proteins, and that the number and molecular weight of these proteins does not alter during the formation of chloroplasts from etioplasts. Images PLATE 1 PMID:1147911

  12. Review of metastable states in heavy nuclei.

    PubMed

    Dracoulis, G D; Walker, P M; Kondev, F G

    2016-07-01

    The structure of nuclear isomeric states is reviewed in the context of their role in contemporary nuclear physics research. Emphasis is given to high-spin isomers in heavy nuclei, with [Formula: see text]. The possibility to exploit isomers to study some of the most exotic nuclei is a recurring theme. In spherical nuclei, the role of octupole collectivity is discussed in detail, while in deformed nuclei the limitations of the K quantum number are addressed. Isomer targets and isomer beams are considered, along with applications related to energy storage, astrophysics, medicine, and experimental advances. PMID:27243336

  13. Review of metastable states in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Walker, P. M.; Kondev, F. G.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of nuclear isomeric states is reviewed in the context of their role in contemporary nuclear physics research. Emphasis is given to high-spin isomers in heavy nuclei, with A≳ 150 . The possibility to exploit isomers to study some of the most exotic nuclei is a recurring theme. In spherical nuclei, the role of octupole collectivity is discussed in detail, while in deformed nuclei the limitations of the K quantum number are addressed. Isomer targets and isomer beams are considered, along with applications related to energy storage, astrophysics, medicine, and experimental advances.

  14. Vertical uniformity of cells and nuclei in epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Srujana; Hayes, Peter Robert; Zhang, Qiao; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-01-22

    Morphological variability in cytoskeletal organization, organelle position and cell boundaries is a common feature of cultured cells. Remarkable uniformity and reproducibility in structure can be accomplished by providing cells with defined geometric cues. Cells in tissues can also self-organize in the absence of directing extracellular cues; however the mechanical principles for such self-organization are not understood. We report that unlike horizontal shapes, the vertical shapes of the cell and nucleus in the z-dimension are uniform in cells in cultured monolayers compared to isolated cells. Apical surfaces of cells and their nuclei in monolayers were flat and heights were uniform. In contrast, isolated cells, or cells with disrupted cell-cell adhesions had nuclei with curved apical surfaces and variable heights. Isolated cells cultured within micron-sized square wells displayed flat cell and nuclear shapes similar to cells in monolayers. Local disruption of nuclear-cytoskeletal linkages resulted in spatial variation in vertical uniformity. These results suggest that competition between cell-cell pulling forces that expand and shorten the vertical cell cross-section, thereby widening and flattening the nucleus, and the resistance of the nucleus to further flattening results in uniform cell and nuclear cross-sections. Our results reveal the mechanical principles of self-organized vertical uniformity in cell monolayers.

  15. Vertical uniformity of cells and nuclei in epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Srujana; Hayes, Peter Robert; Zhang, Qiao; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-01-01

    Morphological variability in cytoskeletal organization, organelle position and cell boundaries is a common feature of cultured cells. Remarkable uniformity and reproducibility in structure can be accomplished by providing cells with defined geometric cues. Cells in tissues can also self-organize in the absence of directing extracellular cues; however the mechanical principles for such self-organization are not understood. We report that unlike horizontal shapes, the vertical shapes of the cell and nucleus in the z-dimension are uniform in cells in cultured monolayers compared to isolated cells. Apical surfaces of cells and their nuclei in monolayers were flat and heights were uniform. In contrast, isolated cells, or cells with disrupted cell-cell adhesions had nuclei with curved apical surfaces and variable heights. Isolated cells cultured within micron-sized square wells displayed flat cell and nuclear shapes similar to cells in monolayers. Local disruption of nuclear-cytoskeletal linkages resulted in spatial variation in vertical uniformity. These results suggest that competition between cell-cell pulling forces that expand and shorten the vertical cell cross-section, thereby widening and flattening the nucleus, and the resistance of the nucleus to further flattening results in uniform cell and nuclear cross-sections. Our results reveal the mechanical principles of self-organized vertical uniformity in cell monolayers. PMID:26795751

  16. Vertical uniformity of cells and nuclei in epithelial monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Neelam, Srujana; Hayes, Peter Robert; Zhang, Qiao; Dickinson, Richard B.; Lele, Tanmay P.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological variability in cytoskeletal organization, organelle position and cell boundaries is a common feature of cultured cells. Remarkable uniformity and reproducibility in structure can be accomplished by providing cells with defined geometric cues. Cells in tissues can also self-organize in the absence of directing extracellular cues; however the mechanical principles for such self-organization are not understood. We report that unlike horizontal shapes, the vertical shapes of the cell and nucleus in the z-dimension are uniform in cells in cultured monolayers compared to isolated cells. Apical surfaces of cells and their nuclei in monolayers were flat and heights were uniform. In contrast, isolated cells, or cells with disrupted cell-cell adhesions had nuclei with curved apical surfaces and variable heights. Isolated cells cultured within micron-sized square wells displayed flat cell and nuclear shapes similar to cells in monolayers. Local disruption of nuclear-cytoskeletal linkages resulted in spatial variation in vertical uniformity. These results suggest that competition between cell-cell pulling forces that expand and shorten the vertical cell cross-section, thereby widening and flattening the nucleus, and the resistance of the nucleus to further flattening results in uniform cell and nuclear cross-sections. Our results reveal the mechanical principles of self-organized vertical uniformity in cell monolayers. PMID:26795751

  17. Digestion by pigs of non-starch polysaccharides in wheat and raw peas (Pisum sativum) fed in mixed diets.

    PubMed

    Goodlad, J S; Mathers, J C

    1991-03-01

    The digestion by pigs of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) in wheat and raw peas (Pisum sativum) fed in mixed diets was measured. In the four experimental diets, wheat was included at a constant 500 g/kg whilst peas contributed 0-300 g/kg and these were the only dietary sources of NSP. Separate estimates of digestibility for wheat and peas were obtained by using a multiple linear regression technique which also tested the possibility that the presence of peas might influence the digestibility of wheat NSP. There was little evidence of the latter and it was found that the digestibility of peas NSP (0.84) was considerably greater than that of wheat (0.65). The non-cellulosic polysaccharides (NCP) had twofold greater digestibilities than had cellulose for both foods with essentially all the peas NCP being digested. Faecal alpha, epsilon-diaminopimelic acid concentration increased with feeding of peas, suggesting stimulation of bacterial biomass production in the large intestine using the readily fermented peas NSP. All three major volatile fatty acids produced by large intestinal fermentation were detected in jugular blood and increased significantly with increasing peas inclusion rate in the diet.

  18. Response of mitochondrial thioredoxin PsTrxo1, antioxidant enzymes, and respiration to salinity in pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Martí, María C; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Camejo, Daymi; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Lázaro, Juan J; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal transduction in plants. Redox regulation is an essential feature of mitochondrial function, with thioredoxin (Trx), involved in disulphide/dithiol interchange, playing a prominent role. To explore the participation of mitochondrial PsTrxo1, Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), peroxiredoxin (PsPrxII F), and alternative oxidase (AOX) under salt stress, their transcriptional and protein levels were analysed in pea plants growing under 150 mM NaCl for a short and a long period. The activities of mitochondrial Mn-SOD and Trx together with the in vivo activities of the alternative pathway (AP) and the cytochrome pathway (CP) were also determined, combined with the characterization of the plant physiological status as well as the mitochondrial oxidative indicators. The analysis of protein and mRNA levels and activities revealed the importance of the post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of these proteins in the response to salt stress. Increases in AOX protein amount correlated with increases in AP capacity, whereas in vivo AP activity was maintained under salt stress. Similarly, Mn-SOD activity was also maintained. Under all the stress treatments, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and CP activity were decreased although the oxidative stress in leaves was only moderate. However, an increase in lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation was found in mitochondria isolated from leaves under the short-term salinity conditions. In addition, an increase in mitochondrial Trx activity was produced in response to the long-term NaCl treatment. The results support a role for PsTrxo1 as a component of the defence system induced by NaCl in pea mitochondria, providing the cell with a mechanism by which it can respond to changing environment protecting mitochondria from oxidative stress together with Mn-SOD, AOX, and PrxII F.

  19. A Chemically Induced New Pea (Pisum sativum) Mutant SGECdt with Increased Tolerance to, and Accumulation of, Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Tsyganov, Viktor E.; Belimov, Andrei A.; Borisov, Alexey Y.; Safronova, Vera I.; Georgi, Manfred; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Tikhonovich, Igor A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims To date, there are no crop mutants described in the literature that display both Cd accumulation and tolerance. In the present study a unique pea (Pisum sativum) mutant SGECdt with increased Cd tolerance and accumulation was isolated and characterized. Methods Ethylmethane sulfonate mutagenesis of the pea line SGE was used to obtain the mutant. Screening for Cd-tolerant seedlings in the M2 generation was performed using hydroponics in the presence of 6 µm CdCl2. Hybridological analysis was used to identify the inheritance of the mutant phenotype. Several physiological and biochemical characteristics of SGECdt were studied in hydroponic experiments in the presence of 3 µm CdCl2, and elemental analysis was conducted. Key Results The mutant SGECdt was characterized as having a monogenic inheritance and a recessive phenotype. It showed increased Cd concentrations in roots and shoots but no obvious morphological defects, demonstrating its capability to cope well with increased Cd levels in its tissues. The enhanced Cd accumulation in the mutant was accompanied by maintenance of homeostasis of shoot Ca, Mg, Zn and Mn contents, and root Ca and Mg contents. Through the application of La+3 and the exclusion of Ca from the nutrient solution, maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in Cd-stressed SGECdt was shown to contribute to the increased Cd tolerance. Control plants of the mutant (i.e. no Cd treatment) had elevated concentrations of glutathione (GSH) in the roots. Through measurements of chitinase and guaiacol-dependent peroxidase activities, as well as proline and non-protein thiol (NPT) levels, it was shown that there were lower levels of Cd stress both in roots and shoots of SGECdt. Accumulation of phytochelatins [(PCcalculated) = (NPT)−(GSH)] could be excluded as a cause of the increased Cd tolerance in the mutant. Conclusions The SGECdt mutant represents a novel and unique model to study adaptation of plants to toxic heavy metal concentrations

  20. Indole-3-acetic acid UDP-glucosyltransferase from immature seeds of pea is involved in modification of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Hetmann, Anna; Jakubowska, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The glycosylation of auxin is one of mechanisms contributing to hormonal homeostasis. The enzyme UDPG: indole-3-ylacetyl-β-D-glucosyltransferase (IAA glucosyltransferase, IAGlc synthase) catalyzes the reversible reaction: IAA+UDPG↔1-O-IA-glucose+UDP, which is the first step in the biosynthesis of IAA-ester conjugates in monocotyledonous plants. In this study, we report IAA-glucosyltransferase isolated using a biochemical approach from immature seed of pea (Pisum sativum). The enzyme was purified by PEG fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel anion-exchange chromatography and preparative PAGE. LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides of the enzyme revealed the high identity with maize IAGlc synthase, but lack of homology with other IAA-glucosyltransferases from dicots. Biochemical characterization showed that of several acyl acceptors tested, the enzyme had the highest activity on IAA as the glucosyl acceptor (Km=0.52 mM, Vmax=161 nmol min(-1), kcat/Km=4.36 mM s(-1)) and lower activity on indole-3-propionic acid and 1-naphthalene acetic acid. Whereas indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-propionic acid were competitive inhibitors of IAGlc synthase, D-gluconic acid lactone, an inhibitor of β-glucosidase activity, potentiated the enzyme activity at the optimal concentration of 0.3mM. Moreover, we demonstrated that the 1-O-IA-glucose synthesized by IAGlc synthase is the substrate for IAA labeling of glycoproteins from pea seeds indicating a possible role of this enzyme in the covalent modification of a class of proteins by a plant hormone.

  1. Indole-3-acetic acid UDP-glucosyltransferase from immature seeds of pea is involved in modification of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Hetmann, Anna; Jakubowska, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The glycosylation of auxin is one of mechanisms contributing to hormonal homeostasis. The enzyme UDPG: indole-3-ylacetyl-β-D-glucosyltransferase (IAA glucosyltransferase, IAGlc synthase) catalyzes the reversible reaction: IAA+UDPG↔1-O-IA-glucose+UDP, which is the first step in the biosynthesis of IAA-ester conjugates in monocotyledonous plants. In this study, we report IAA-glucosyltransferase isolated using a biochemical approach from immature seed of pea (Pisum sativum). The enzyme was purified by PEG fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel anion-exchange chromatography and preparative PAGE. LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides of the enzyme revealed the high identity with maize IAGlc synthase, but lack of homology with other IAA-glucosyltransferases from dicots. Biochemical characterization showed that of several acyl acceptors tested, the enzyme had the highest activity on IAA as the glucosyl acceptor (Km=0.52 mM, Vmax=161 nmol min(-1), kcat/Km=4.36 mM s(-1)) and lower activity on indole-3-propionic acid and 1-naphthalene acetic acid. Whereas indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-propionic acid were competitive inhibitors of IAGlc synthase, D-gluconic acid lactone, an inhibitor of β-glucosidase activity, potentiated the enzyme activity at the optimal concentration of 0.3mM. Moreover, we demonstrated that the 1-O-IA-glucose synthesized by IAGlc synthase is the substrate for IAA labeling of glycoproteins from pea seeds indicating a possible role of this enzyme in the covalent modification of a class of proteins by a plant hormone. PMID:26057226

  2. The Physics of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, Fred L.

    1997-01-01

    The recent developments in cometary studies suggest rather low mean densities and weak structures for the nuclei. They appear to be accumulations of fairly discrete units loosely bound together, as deduced from the observations of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 during its encounter with Jupiter. The compressive strengths deduced from comet splitting by Opik and Sekanina are extremely low. These values are confirmed by theory developed here. assuming that Comet P/Holmes had a companion that collided with it in 1892. There follows a short discussion that suggests that the mean densities of comets should increase with comet dimensions. The place of origin of short-period comets may relate to these properties.

  3. Theory of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The involvement of accretion disks around supermassive black holes in the theory of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is discussed. The physics of thin and thick accretion disks is discussed and the partition between thermal and nonthermal energy production in supermassive disks is seen as uncertain. The thermal limit cycle may operate in supermassive disks (Shields, 1985), with accumulation of gas in the disk for periods of 10 to the 4th to 10 to the 7th years, punctuated by briefer outbursts during which the mass is rapidly transferred to smaller radii. An extended X-ray source in AGN is consistent with observations (Tennant and Mushotsky, 1983), and a large wind mass loss rate exceeding the central accretion rate means that only a fraction of the mass entering the disk will reach the central object; the rest being lost to the wind. Controversy in the relationship between the broad lines and the disk is also discussed.

  4. Single Pion production from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. K.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Ahmed, S.

    2007-12-21

    We have studied charged current one pion production induced by {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}-bar{sub {mu}}) from some nuclei. The calculations have been done for the incoherent pion production processes from these nuclear targets in the {delta} dominance model and take into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and renormalization of {delta} properties in the nuclear medium. The effect of final state interactions of pions has also been taken into account. The numerical results have been compared with the recent results from the MiniBooNE experiment for the charged current 1{pi} production, and also with some of the older experiments in Freon and Freon-Propane from CERN.

  5. Rapid targeting of plasmid DNA to zebrafish embryo nuclei by the nuclear localization signal of SV40 T antigen.

    PubMed

    Collas, P; Aleström, P

    1997-03-01

    Binding SV40 T antigen nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to plasmid DNA promotes transgene expression following injection of DNA-NLS complexes into the cytoplasm of zebrafish eggs. We now demonstrate that NLS peptides mediate import of DNA from the cytoplasm into embryo nuclei, under conditions in which naked DNA is not imported. Plasmid DNA was localized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in isolated nuclei, and relative amounts were quantified by densitometry. Binding DNA to NLSs, but not to nuclear-import-deficient peptides, promoted rapid targeting of DNA-NLS complexes to nuclei, and transport across the nuclear envelope. Import of DNA-NLS complexes was competed by co-injected albumin-NLS conjugates. NLS, but not reverse NLS, was detected on blots of nuclei probed with 32P-labeled DNA. The results suggest that NLS-mediated DNA transfer into nuclei may constitute a valuable tool for several gene transfer applications. PMID:9116870

  6. Nitrous oxide emissions from crop rotations including wheat, oilseed rape and dry peas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeuffroy, M. H.; Baranger, E.; Carrouée, B.; de Chezelles, E.; Gosme, M.; Hénault, C.; Schneider, A.; Cellier, P.

    2013-03-01

    Approximately 65% of anthropogenic emissions of N2O, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG), originate from soils at a global scale, and particularly after N fertilisation of the main crops in Europe. Thanks to their capacity to fix atmospheric N2 through biological fixation, legumes can reduce N fertilizer use, and possibly N2O emissions. Nevertheless, the decomposition of crop organic matter during the crop cycle and residue decomposition, and possibly the N fixation process itself, could lead to N2O emissions. The objective of this study was to quantify N2O emissions from a dry pea crop (Pisum sativum, harvested at maturity) and from the subsequent crops in comparison with N2O emissions from wheat and oilseed rape crops, fertilized or not, in various rotations. A field experiment was conducted over 4 consecutive years to compare the emissions during the pea crop, in comparison with those during the wheat (fertilized or not) or oilseed rape crops, and after the pea crop, in comparison with other preceding crops. N2O fluxes were measured using static chambers. In spite of low N2O fluxes, mainly due to the site's soil characteristics, fluxes during the crop were significantly lower for pea and unfertilized wheat than for fertilized wheat and oilseed rape. The effect of the preceding crop was not significant, while soil mineral N at harvest was higher after the pea crop. These results should be confirmed over a wider range of soil types. Nevertheless, they demonstrate the absence of N2O emissions linked to the symbiotic N fixation process, and allow us to estimate the decrease in N2O emissions by 20-25% through including one pea crop in a three-year rotation. On a larger scale, this reduction of GHG emissions at field level has to be added to the decrease due to the reduced production and transport of the N fertilizer not applied to the pea crop.

  7. Protective Effects of Ultramicronized Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA-um) in Myocardial Ischaemia and Reperfusion Injury in VIVO.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Rosanna; Cordaro, Marika; Crupi, Rosalia; Siracusa, Rosalba; Campolo, Michela; Bruschetta, Giuseppe; Fusco, Roberta; Pugliatti, Pietro; Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death, occurs after prolonged ischemia of the coronary arteries. Restore blood flow is the first intervention help against heart attack. However, reperfusion of the arteries leads to ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R). The fatty acid amide palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous compound widely present in living organisms, with analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study evaluated the effect of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide (PEA-um) treatment on the inflammatory process associated with myocardial I/R. Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury was induced by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 30 min followed by 2 h of reperfusion. PEA-um, was administered (10 mg/kg) 15 min after ischemia and 1 h after reperfusion. In this study, we demonstrated that PEA-um treatment reduces myocardial tissue injury, neutrophil infiltration, adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, P-selectin) expression, proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) production, nitrotyrosine and PAR formation, nuclear factor kB expression, and apoptosis (Fas-L, Bcl-2) activation. In addition to study whether the protective effect of PEA-um on myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury is also related to the activation of PPAR-α, in a separate set of experiments it has been performed myocardial I/R in PPARα mice. Genetic ablation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α in PPAR-αKO mice exacerbated Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury when compared with PPAR-αWT mice. PEA-um induced cardioprotection in PPAR-α wild-type mice, but the same effect cannot be observed in PPAR-αKO mice. Our results have clearly shown a modulation of the inflammatory process, associated with myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, following administration of PEA-um. PMID:26844976

  8. Effect of an extruded pea or rice diet on postprandial insulin and cardiovascular responses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Adolphe, J L; Drew, M D; Silver, T I; Fouhse, J; Childs, H; Weber, L P

    2015-08-01

    Peas are increasing in popularity as a source of carbohydrate, protein and fibre in extruded canine diets. The aim of this study was to test the health effects of two canine diets with identical macronutrient profiles, but containing either yellow field peas or white rice as the carbohydrate source on metabolism, cardiovascular outcomes and adiposity. First, the acute glycemic, insulinemic and cardiovascular responses to the pea- or rice-based diets were determined in normal weight beagles (n = 7 dogs). The glycemic index did not differ between the pea diet (56 ± 12) and rice diet (63 ± 9). Next, obese beagles (n = 9) were fed the yellow field pea diet or white rice diet ad libitum for 12 weeks in a crossover study. Adiposity (measured using computed tomography), metabolic (oral glucose tolerance test, plasma leptin, adiponectin, C-reactive protein) and cardiovascular assessments (echocardiography and blood pressure) were performed before and after each crossover study period. After 12 weeks on each diet, peak insulin (p = 0.05) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin after a 10 g oral glucose tolerance test (p = 0.05) were lower with the pea than the rice diet. Diet did not show a significant effect on body weight, fat distribution, cardiovascular variables, adiponectin or leptin. In conclusion, a diet containing yellow field peas reduced the postprandial insulin response after glucose challenge in dogs despite continued obesity, indicating improved metabolic health.

  9. Nutritional evaluation of low-phytate peas (Pisum sativum L.) for young broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Philip; Deep, Aman; Petri, Daniel; Warkentin, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    This experiment determined the effects of including normal and low-phytate peas in diets fed to young broiler chickens on performance, phosphorus availability and bone strength. A total of 180, day-old, male broilers (Ross-308 line) were assigned to six treatments. The control was based on corn and soybean meal while two additional corn-based diets were formulated containing 30% of either normal or low-phytate pea providing 0.45% available phosphorus. For each of these three diets, a similar diet was formulated by reducing the amount of dicalcium phosphate to produce a diet with 0.3% available phosphorus. The total tract apparent availability (TTAA) of phosphorus was higher (p = 0.02) for broilers fed the low-phytate pea than for birds fed the normal pea diets. Birds fed diets containing the lower level of phosphorus had a higher TTAA of phosphorus (50.64 vs. 46.68%) than broilers fed diets adequate in phosphorus. Protein source had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. Broilers fed the low phosphorus diets had lower weight gain (p = 0.04) and feed intake (p < 0.01) than broilers fed the higher phosphorus level. Bone strength was higher (p < 0.01) for broilers fed diets based on low-phytate pea than for those fed diets based on normal pea or soybean meal. Increasing the availability of the phosphorus in peas could mean that less inorganic phosphorus would be required in order to meet the nutritional requirements of broilers. Since inorganic phosphorus sources tend to be expensive, a reduction in their use would lower ration costs. In addition, increased availability of phosphorus would reduce the amount of phosphorus excreted thus reducing the amount of phosphorus that can potentially pollute the environment.

  10. The mysterious microcircuitry of the cerebellar nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Uusisaari, Marylka; De Schutter, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The microcircuitry of cerebellar cortex and, in particular, the physiology of its main element, the Purkinje neuron, has been extensively investigated and described. However, activity in Purkinje neurons, either as single cells or populations, does not directly mediate the cerebellar effects on the motor effector systems. Rather, the result of the entire cerebellar cortical computation is passed to the relatively small cerebellar nuclei that act as the final, integrative processing unit in the cerebellar circuitry. The nuclei ultimately control the temporal and spatial features of the cerebellar output. Given this key role, it is striking that the internal organization and the connectivity with afferent and efferent pathways in the cerebellar nuclei are rather poorly known. In the present review, we discuss some of the many critical shortcomings in the understanding of cerebellar nuclei microcircuitry: the extent of convergence and divergence of the cerebellar cortical pathway to the various cerebellar nuclei neurons and subareas, the possible (lack of) conservation of the finely-divided topographical organization in the cerebellar cortex at the level of the nuclei, as well as the absence of knowledge of the synaptic circuitry within the cerebellar nuclei. All these issues are important for predicting the pattern-extraction and encoding capabilities of the cerebellar nuclei and, until resolved, theories and models of cerebellar motor control and learning may err considerably. PMID:21521761

  11. The fishes of Pea Ridge National Military Park, Arkansas, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.G.; Petersen, James C.

    2005-01-01

    A fish inventory was conducted at Pea Ridge National Military Park, Arkansas, during base-flow conditions in September 2003. Six sites including four streams and two ponds were sampled using conventional electrofishing equipment (a seine also was used at one site). There were 653 individuals collected comprising 18 species (plus 1 hybrid) and 15 genera. The number of species collected at the four stream sites ranged from 1 16. Most fish species collected generally are associated with small streams in the Ozark Plateaus. The two most common species were the banded sculpin and the southern redbelly dace. Three species and a sunfish hybrid were collected from the quarry pond. No fish were collected from the unnamed pond. A preliminary expected species list incorrectly listed 42 species because of incorrect species range or habitat requirements. One species not on the original list was added to the revised list. Upon revising this list, the inventory yielded 18 the 40 species (45 percent) and 1 hybrid. No previous fish inventories have been completed for park but some observations can be made relative to species distributions. There were only five fish species collected in three headwater streams, and it is unlikely that many other species would occur in these three streams because of constraints imposed on the fish community by stream size. Little Sugar Creek, a medium-sized stream, had the most species collected, and it is likely that additional species would be collected from this stream if additional sampling were to occur. Distribution records indicate that all 18 species occur in the general area. Although no species collected in this study are federallylisted threatened or endangered species, three species collected at Pea Ridge National Military Park may be of some special interest to National Park Service managers and others. Two the species collected (cardinal shiner and stippled darter) are endemic to the Ozark Plateaus; both are rather common in certain

  12. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration of pea leaves under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brykov, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    Respiration is essential for growth, maintenance, and carbon balance of all plant cells. Mitochondrial respiration in plants provides energy for biosynthesis, and its balance with photosynthesis determines the rate of plant biomass accumulation (production). Mitochondria are not only the energetic organelles in a cell but they play an essential regulatory role in many basic cellular processes. As plants adapt to real and simulated microgravity, it is very important to understand the state of mitochondria in these conditions. Disturbance of respiratory metabolism can significantly affect the productivity of plants in long-term space flights. We have established earlier that the rate of respiration in root apices of pea etiolated seedlings rose after 7 days of clinorotation. These data indicate the oxygen increased requirement by root apices under clinorotation, that confirms the necessity of sufficient substrate aeration in space greenhouses to provide normal respiratory metabolism and supply of energy for root growth. In etiolated seedlings, substrate supply of mitochondria occurs at the expense of the mobilization of cotyledon nutrients. A goal of our work was to study the ultrastructure and respiration of mitochondria in pea leaves after 12 days of clinorotation during (2 rpm/min). Plants grew at a light level of 180 μµmol m ^{-2} s ^{-1} PAR and a photoperiod of 16 h light/4 h dark. It was showed an essential increase in the mitochondrion area on 53% in palisade parenchyma cells at the sections. Such phenomenon can not be described as swelling of mitochondria, since enlarged mitochondria contained a more quantity of crista 1.76 times. In addition, the cristae total area per organelle also increased in comparison with that in control. An increase in a size of mitochondria in the experimental conditions is supposed to occur by a partial alteration of the chondriom. Thus, a size of 49% mitochondria in control was 0.1 - 0.3 μµm ^{2}, whereas only 26

  13. NUTRALYS® pea protein: characterization of in vitro gastric digestion and in vivo gastrointestinal peptide responses relevant to satiety

    PubMed Central

    Overduin, Joost; Guérin-Deremaux, Laetitia; Wils, Daniel; Lambers, Tim T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pea protein (from Pisum sativum) is under consideration as a sustainable, satiety-inducing food ingredient. Objective In the current study, pea-protein-induced physiological signals relevant to satiety were characterized in vitro via gastric digestion kinetics and in vivo by monitoring post-meal gastrointestinal hormonal responses in rats. Design Under in vitro simulated gastric conditions, the digestion of NUTRALYS® pea protein was compared to that of two dairy proteins, slow-digestible casein and fast-digestible whey. In vivo, blood glucose and gastrointestinal hormonal (insulin, ghrelin, cholecystokinin [CCK], glucagon-like peptide 1 [GLP-1], and peptide YY [PYY]) responses were monitored in nine male Wistar rats following isocaloric (11 kcal) meals containing 35 energy% of either NUTRALYS® pea protein, whey protein, or carbohydrate (non-protein). Results In vitro, pea protein transiently aggregated into particles, whereas casein formed a more enduring protein network and whey protein remained dissolved. Pea-protein particle size ranged from 50 to 500 µm, well below the 2 mm threshold for gastric retention in humans. In vivo, pea-protein and whey-protein meals induced comparable responses for CCK, GLP-1, and PYY, that is, the anorexigenic hormones. Pea protein induced weaker initial, but equal 3-h integrated ghrelin and insulin responses than whey protein, possibly due to the slower gastric breakdown of pea protein observed in vitro. Two hours after meals, CCK levels were more elevated in the case of protein meals compared to that of non-protein meals. Conclusions These results indicate that 1) pea protein transiently aggregates in the stomach and has an intermediately fast intestinal bioavailability in between that of whey and casein; 2) pea-protein- and dairy-protein-containing meals were comparably efficacious in triggering gastrointestinal satiety signals. PMID:25882536

  14. Light-Dependent Reduction of Hydrogen Peroxide by Ruptured Pea Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Peter P.; Anderson, John W.

    1982-01-01

    Ruptured pea (Pisum sativum cv. Massey Gem) chloroplasts exhibited ascorbate peroxidase activity as determined by H2O2-dependent oxidation of ascorbate and ascorbate-dependent reduction of H2O2. The ratio of ascorbate peroxidase to NADP-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was constant during repeated washing of isolated chloroplasts. This indicates that the ascorbate peroxidase is a chloroplast enzyme. The pH optimum of ascorbate peroxidase activity was 8.2 and the Km value for ascorbate was 0.6 millimolar. Pyrogallol, glutathione, and NAD(P)H did not substitute for ascorbate in the enzyme catalyzed reaction. The enzyme was inhibited by NaN3, KCN, and 8-hydroxyquinoline but not ZnCl2 or iodoacetate. The ascorbate peroxidase activity of sonicated chloroplasts was inhibited by light but not in the presence of substrate concentrations of ascorbate. Illuminated ruptured chloroplasts, in the presence of 50 micromolar NADP(H), 2 millimolar l-ascorbate, and substrate concentrations of oxidized or reduced glutathione, catalyzed O2 evolution when H2O2 was added. Since the reaction was not inhibited by 0.1 millimolar NaN3 and did not occur in the dark, it was concluded that catalase was not involved. Light-plus-H2O2-dependent O2 evolution consisted of two distinct phases. The first phase was ascorbate-dependent and typically represented 10% of the total amount of O2 evolved. The second phase was dependent on ascorbate and glutathione. The properties of the second phase were consistent with the operation of light-coupled glutathione reductase sequentially coupled to glutathione dehydrogenase and ascorbate peroxidase. PMID:16662413

  15. H2O2 intensifies CN(-)-induced apoptosis in pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, V D; Kiselevsky, D B; Sinitsyn, S V; Shestak, A A; Lagunova, E M; Nesov, A V

    2006-04-01

    H2O2 intensifies CN(-)-induced apoptosis in stoma guard cells and to lesser degree in basic epidermal cells in peels of the lower epidermis isolated from pea leaves. The maximum effect of H2O2 on guard cells was observed at 10(-4) M. By switching on non-cyclic electron transfer in chloroplasts menadione and methyl viologen intensified H2O2 generation in the light, but prevented the CN--induced apoptosis in guard cells. The light stimulation of CN- effect on guard cell apoptosis cannot be caused by disturbance of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase function and associated OH* generation in chloroplasts with participation of free transition metals in the Fenton or Haber-Weiss type reactions as well as with participation of the FeS clusters of the electron acceptor side of Photosystem I. Menadione and methyl viologen did not suppress the CN(-)-induced apoptosis in epidermal cells that, unlike guard cells, contain mitochondria only, but not chloroplasts. Quinacrine and diphenylene iodonium, inhibitors of NAD(P)H oxidase of cell plasma membrane, had no effect on the respiration and photosynthetic O2 evolution by leaf slices, but prevented the CN(-)-induced guard cell death. The data suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase of guard cell plasma membrane is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) needed for execution of CN(-)-induced programmed cell death. Chloroplasts and mitochondria were inefficient as ROS sources in the programmed death of guard cells. When ROS generation is insufficient, exogenous H2O2 exhibits a stimulating effect on programmed cell death. H2O2 decreased the inhibitory effects of DCMU and DNP-INT on the CN(-)-induced apoptosis of guard cells. Quinacrine, DCMU, and DNP-INT had no effect on CN(-)-induced death of epidermal cells.

  16. Response of mitochondrial antioxidant system and respiratory pathways to reactive nitrogen species in pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Martí, María C; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Camejo, Daymi; Pallol, Beatriz; Ortiz, Ana; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Jiménez, Ana; Sevilla, Francisca

    2013-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as an important signaling molecule in plants, but little is known about the effects of reactive nitrogen species in plant mitochondria. In this study, the effects of DETA-NONOate, a pure NO slow generator, and of SIN-1 (3-morpholinosydnonimine), a peroxynitrite producer, on the activities of respiratory pathways, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants have been investigated in isolated mitochondria from pea leaves. No significant changes in lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation or in ascorbate and glutathione redox state were observed after DETA-NONOate treatments whereas cytochrome pathway (CP) respiration was reversibly inhibited and alternative pathway (AP) respiration showed little inhibition. On the other hand, NO did not affect neither activities of Mn superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) nor enzymes involved in the ascorbate and glutathione regeneration in mitochondria except for ascorbate peroxidase (APX), which was reversely inhibited depending on ascorbate concentration. Finally, SIN-1 treatment of mitochondria produced a decrease in CP respiration, an increase in protein oxidation and strongly inhibited APX activity (90%), with glutathione reductase and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) being moderately inhibited (30 and 20%, respectively). This treatment did not affect monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and Mn-SOD activities. Results showed that mitochondrial nitrosative stress was not necessarily accompanied by oxidative stress. We suggest that NO-resistant AP and mitochondrial APX may be important components of the H(2) O(2) -signaling pathways under nitrosative stress induced by NO in this organelle. Also, MDHAR and DHAR, via ascorbate regeneration, could constitute an essential antioxidant defense together with Mn-SOD, against NO and ONOO(-) stress in plant mitochondria.

  17. The stimuli evoking the aerial-righting posture of falling pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Meresman, Yonatan; Ribak, Gal; Weihs, Daniel; Inbar, Moshe

    2014-10-01

    Some wingless insects possess aerial righting reflexes, suggesting that adaptation for controlling body orientation while falling through air could have preceded flight. When threatened by natural enemies, wingless pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) may drop off their host plant and assume a stereotypic posture that rotates them in midair to land on their feet. The sensory information triggering aphids to assume this posture has so far been unknown. We subjected aphids to a series of tests, isolating the sensory cues experienced during free-fall. Falling aphids assumed the righting posture and landed upright irrespective of whether the experiments were carried out in the light or in complete darkness. Detachment of the tarsi from the substrate triggered the aphids to assume the posture rapidly, but only for a brief period. Rotation (mainly roll and yaw) of the body in air, in the light, caused aphids to assume the posture and remain in it throughout rotation. In contrast, aphids rotated in the dark did not respond. Acceleration associated with falling or airflow over the body per se did not trigger the posture. However, sensing motion relative to air heightened the aphids' responsiveness to rotation in the light. These results suggest that the righting posture of aphids is triggered by a tarsal reflex, but, once the aphid is airborne, vision and a sense of motion relative to air can augment the response. Hence, aerial righting in a wingless insect could have emerged as a basic tarsal response and developed further to include secondary sensory cues typical of falling. PMID:25104755

  18. Structure and expression of a pea nuclear gene encoding a chlorophyll a/b-binding polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, A.R.

    1984-05-01

    A nuclear gene AB80 has been isolated from a phage lambda Charon 4 library of pea DNA. The sequence of the gene has been determined and it has been shown to contain an interrupted reading frame of 269 amino acids, corresponding to a precursor to a constituent polypeptide of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complex. Primer extension and S1 nuclease studies defined a cap site for AB80. The first methionine codon 3' from this site is 69 nucleotides away and is the initiating codon of the open reading frame. A TATA sequence occurs 31 nucleotides 5' from the cap site. A second TATA sequence is found 7 nucleotides on the 5' side of the initiating methionine codon and the sequences surrounding this TATA sequence are strikingly similar to those surrounding the first TATA sequence. The mature polypeptide encoded by AB80 differs by 5 amino acids from the polypeptide corresponding to a previously characterized cDNA sequence pAB96. This result is indicative of heterogeneity within the constituent polypeptides of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complex. The sequence Arg-Lys-Ser-Ala-Thr-Thr-Lys-Lys occurs at, or near, the NH/sub 2/-terminus of the mature polypeptide encoded by AB80. This basic peptide is of interest because of its apparent involvement in changes in excitation-energy distribution in chloroplast membranes. Some general similarities, but no extensive sequence homology, is found on comparing the transit sequence for the precursor to the chlorophyll a/b-binding polypeptide with the transit sequences previously determined for the precursors to the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. 40 references, 3 figures.

  19. Effects of tillage practices on pea leaf weevil (Sitona lineatus L., Coleoptera: Curculionidae) biology and crop damage: a farm-scale study in the US Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Hanavan, R P; Bosque-Pérez, N A

    2012-12-01

    The pea leaf weevil, Sitona lineatus L., is periodically a significant pest of pea, Pisum sativum L., in the Palouse region of northern Idaho and eastern Washington, USA. Previous on-station research demonstrated significantly greater adult pea leaf weevil colonization, immature survival, adult emergence and plant damage in conventional-tillage compared to no-tillage plots of pea. In experiments conducted during the 2006 and 2007 growing seasons, aerial and ground adult pea leaf weevil colonization of large-scale commercial pea fields under different tillage regimes in northern Idaho and eastern Washington was examined for the first time. Initial pea leaf weevil feeding damage, immature weevil densities and subsequent adult emergence from the fields were also assessed. During both years, significantly more adult pea leaf weevils were captured in conventional-tillage than in no-tillage fields during the crop establishment period in May. No-tillage soils remained wet longer in the spring and could not be planted by growers until later than conventional-tillage fields. Pea planted under conventional-tillage emerged earlier and had significantly greater feeding damage by the pea leaf weevil than no-tillage pea. Significantly, greater immature pea leaf weevil densities and subsequent adult emergence were observed in conventional-tillage than in no-tillage pea fields. Delayed development of root nodules in the cooler, moister conditions of no-tillage pea fields likely resulted in escape from attack and injury during the critical growth stages that ultimately influence yield. Results indicate that large-scale commercial no-tillage pea fields are less suitable for colonization and survival of the pea leaf weevil and suffer less weevil damage than fields under conventional tillage.

  20. Development of two major resources for pea genomics: the GenoPea 13.2K SNP Array and a high-density, high-resolution consensus genetic map.

    PubMed

    Tayeh, Nadim; Aluome, Christelle; Falque, Matthieu; Jacquin, Françoise; Klein, Anthony; Chauveau, Aurélie; Bérard, Aurélie; Houtin, Hervé; Rond, Céline; Kreplak, Jonathan; Boucherot, Karen; Martin, Chantal; Baranger, Alain; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Warkentin, Thomas D; Brunel, Dominique; Marget, Pascal; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; Aubert, Grégoire; Burstin, Judith

    2015-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays represent important genotyping tools for innovative strategies in both basic research and applied breeding. Pea is an important food, feed and sustainable crop with a large (about 4.45 Gbp) but not yet available genome sequence. In the present study, 12 pea recombinant inbred line populations were genotyped using the newly developed GenoPea 13.2K SNP Array. Individual and consensus genetic maps were built providing insights into the structure and organization of the pea genome. Largely collinear genetic maps of 3918-8503 SNPs were obtained from all mapping populations, and only two of these exhibited putative chromosomal rearrangement signatures. Similar distortion patterns in different populations were noted. A total of 12 802 transcript-derived SNP markers placed on a 15 079-marker high-density, high-resolution consensus map allowed the identification of ohnologue-rich regions within the pea genome and the localization of local duplicates. Dense syntenic networks with sequenced legume genomes were further established, paving the way for the identification of the molecular bases of important agronomic traits segregating in the mapping populations. The information gained on the structure and organization of the genome from this research will undoubtedly contribute to the understanding of the evolution of the pea genome and to its assembly. The GenoPea 13.2K SNP Array and individual and consensus genetic maps are valuable genomic tools for plant scientists to strengthen pea as a model for genetics and physiology and enhance breeding.

  1. Fluorescence-activated sorting of fixed nuclei: a general method for studying nuclei from specific cell populations that preserves post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Marion-Poll, Lucile; Montalban, Enrica; Munier, Annie; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2014-04-01

    Long-lasting brain alterations that underlie learning and memory are triggered by synaptic activity. How activity can exert long-lasting effects on neurons is a major question in neuroscience. Signalling pathways from cytoplasm to nucleus and the resulting changes in transcription and epigenetic modifications are particularly relevant in this context. However, a major difficulty in their study comes from the cellular heterogeneity of brain tissue. A promising approach is to directly purify identified nuclei. Using mouse striatum we have developed a rapid and efficient method for isolating cell type-specific nuclei from fixed adult brain (fluorescence-activated sorting of fixed nuclei; FAST-FIN). Animals are quickly perfused with a formaldehyde fixative that stops enzymatic reactions and maintains the tissue in the state it was at the time of death, including nuclear localisation of soluble proteins such as GFP and differences in nuclear size between cell types. Tissue is subsequently dissociated with a Dounce homogeniser and nuclei prepared by centrifugation in an iodixanol density gradient. The purified fixed nuclei can then be immunostained with specific antibodies and analysed or sorted by flow cytometry. Simple criteria allow distinction of neurons and non-neuronal cells. Immunolabelling and transgenic mice that express fluorescent proteins can be used to identify specific cell populations, and the nuclei from these populations can be efficiently isolated, even rare cell types such as parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. FAST-FIN allows the preservation and study of dynamic and labile post-translational protein modifications. It should be applicable to other tissues and species, and allow study of DNA and its modifications.

  2. Oxidative Phosphorylation in Pea Cotyledon Submitochondrial Particles 1

    PubMed Central

    Grubmeyer, Charles; Melanson, Dara; Duncan, Ian; Spencer, Mary

    1979-01-01

    Mitochondria and submitochondrial particles (SMP) from pea cotyledons were shown to catalyze oxidative phosphorylation as measured by 32Pi uptake into phosphate esters. ATP synthesis was sensitive to the electron transport inhibitor KCN, the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, and the coupling factor inhibitor oligomycin. Experiments with the adenine nucleotide translocator inhibitor atractyloside indicated the SMP were inside-out. Mersalyl completely inhibited ATP synthesis by SMP, and a separate experiment indicated that mersalyl has a direct effect on the ATPase complex. The kinetics of ATP synthesis indicated a high affinity for phosphate (Km = 0.18 millimolar). ADP kinetics gave a biphasic curve with Km values of about 4.8 and 160 micromolar. O2 uptake and ATP synthesis had a pH maximum of 7.6 while the ratio of micromoles phosphate esterified to microatoms O2 taken up was highest at pH 7.2. Sodium chloride inhibited both ATP synthesis and O2 uptake but stimulated the ATPase reaction. The SMP also catalyzed a slow ATP-phosphate exchange reaction. PMID:16661049

  3. Ethylene-Induced Lateral Expansion in Etiolated Pea Stems 1

    PubMed Central

    Eisinger, William; Croner, Lisa J.; Taiz, Lincoln

    1983-01-01

    Treatment of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) internode tissue with ethylene gas inhibits elongation and induces lateral expansion. Precise kinetics of the induction of this altered mode of growth of excised internode segments were recorded using a double laser optical monitoring device. Inhibition of elongation and promotion of lateral expansion began after about 1 hour of treatment and achieved a maximum by 3 hours. Similar induction kinetics were observed after treating internodes with colchicine and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, an inhibitor of cellulose synthesis. In sealed flask experiments, ethylene had no detectable effect on incorporation of label from [14C]glucose into any of the classical pectin, hemicellulose, or cellulose wall fractions. Ethylene inhibited fresh weight increase (total cell expansion) of both excised internode segments (in sealed flasks) and intact seedlings. Ethylene treatment resulted in an increase in cell sap osmolality in those tissues (intact and excised) which are inhibited by the gas. A model for ethylene-induced inhibition of elongation and induction of lateral expansion is presented. PMID:16663229

  4. Ethylene-Induced Lateral Expansion in Etiolated Pea Stems 1

    PubMed Central

    Taiz, Lincoln; Rayle, David L.; Eisinger, William

    1983-01-01

    Ethylene-induced inhibition of elongation and promotion of lateral expansion in the stems of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) seedlings is not associated with any alteration of auxin-stimulated proton extrusion. Indeed, lateral expansion in response to ethylene apparently requires an acidified wall since it is prevented by strong neutral buffers and by the ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. Ethylene treatment reduces the capacity of live and frozen-thawed sections to extend in the longitudinal direction in response to acid. The effect of ethylene on lateral acid growth capacity is more complicated. Ethylene-treated internodes do not exhibit acid-induced lateral expansion. Ethylene-treated segments which have been frozen-thawed do show an enhanced capacity to extend in the transverse direction at acid pH, but only when the inner tissues have been removed by coring. We conclude that two of the factors which control the directionality of expansion during ethylene treatment are a decrease in the sensitivity of the walls to acid longitudinally and an increase in the sensitivity of the outer cortical parenchyma walls to acid in the transverse direction. PMID:16663230

  5. Genetic control of contagious asexuality in the pea aphid.

    PubMed

    Jaquiéry, Julie; Stoeckel, Solenn; Larose, Chloé; Nouhaud, Pierre; Rispe, Claude; Mieuzet, Lucie; Bonhomme, Joël; Mahéo, Frédérique; Legeai, Fabrice; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Prunier-Leterme, Nathalie; Tagu, Denis; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2014-12-01

    Although evolutionary transitions from sexual to asexual reproduction are frequent in eukaryotes, the genetic bases of such shifts toward asexuality remain largely unknown. We addressed this issue in an aphid species where both sexual and obligate asexual lineages coexist in natural populations. These sexual and asexual lineages may occasionally interbreed because some asexual lineages maintain a residual production of males potentially able to mate with the females produced by sexual lineages. Hence, this species is an ideal model to study the genetic basis of the loss of sexual reproduction with quantitative genetic and population genomic approaches. Our analysis of the co-segregation of ∼ 300 molecular markers and reproductive phenotype in experimental crosses pinpointed an X-linked region controlling obligate asexuality, this state of character being recessive. A population genetic analysis (>400-marker genome scan) on wild sexual and asexual genotypes from geographically distant populations under divergent selection for reproductive strategies detected a strong signature of divergent selection in the genomic region identified by the experimental crosses. These population genetic data confirm the implication of the candidate region in the control of reproductive mode in wild populations originating from 700 km apart. Patterns of genetic differentiation along chromosomes suggest bidirectional gene flow between populations with distinct reproductive modes, supporting contagious asexuality as a prevailing route to permanent parthenogenesis in pea aphids. This genetic system provides new insights into the mechanisms of coexistence of sexual and asexual aphid lineages.

  6. Gibberellic Acid effects on greening in pea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Mathis, J N; Bradburne, J A; Dupree, M A

    1989-09-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid (GA) on light-induced greening of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum [L.] cultivars Alaska and Progress) was characterized. Progress, a GA-deficient dwarf of Alaska, was found to accumulate chlorophyll and light harvesting chlorophyll protein associated with photosystem II (LHC-II) more rapidly than Alaska, Alaska treated with GA, or Progress treated with GA. A slightly lower chlorophyll content was noted after 24 hours of light induced greening for Alaska treated with GA relative to untreated Alaska. GA-treated Progress, Alaska, and GA-treated Alaska all gave essentially identical patterns for LHC-II accumulation. Similar patterns of LHC-II mRNA induction were found in all four treatments indicating that differences in mRNA induction did not cause differences in LHC-II accumulation. Chlorophyll and LHC-II accumulation in each treatment followed the same patterns of accumulation and a significant correlation (at the 0.01 level of significance) was found between chlorophyll and LHC-II content. Since Progress treated with GA accumulated LHC-II and chlorophyll in a manner similar to that of Alaska, it is clear that GA alters the process of greening either directly or indirectly. PMID:16666994

  7. Accelerated evolution of morph-biased genes in pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Purandare, Swapna R; Bickel, Ryan D; Jaquiery, Julie; Rispe, Claude; Brisson, Jennifer A

    2014-08-01

    Phenotypic plasticity, the production of alternative phenotypes (or morphs) from the same genotype due to environmental factors, results in some genes being expressed in a morph-biased manner. Theoretically, these morph-biased genes experience relaxed selection, the consequence of which is the buildup of slightly deleterious mutations at these genes. Over time, this is expected to result in increased protein divergence at these genes between species and a signature of relaxed purifying selection within species. Here we test these theoretical expectations using morph-biased genes in the pea aphid, a species that produces multiple morphs via polyphenism. We find that morph-biased genes exhibit faster rates of evolution (in terms of dN/dS) relative to unbiased genes and that divergence generally increases with increasing morph bias. Further, genes with expression biased toward rarer morphs (sexual females and males) show faster rates of evolution than genes expressed in the more common morph (asexual females), demonstrating that the amount of time a gene spends being expressed in a morph is associated with its rate of evolution. And finally, we show that genes expressed in the rarer morphs experience decreased purifying selection relative to unbiased genes, suggesting that it is a relaxation of purifying selection that contributes to their faster rates of evolution. Our results provide an important empirical look at the impact of phenotypic plasticity on gene evolution.

  8. Pea protein provides a promising matrix for microencapsulating iron.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Luciana Linhares de Azevedo; Pedrosa, Cristiana; Sousa, Valéria Pereira de; Pierucci, Anna Paola Trindade; Citelli, Marta

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, the most prevalent nutritional deficiency is iron. The strategies for iron supplementation often fail due to poor adherence to supplementation methods contributed to unpleasant sensory characteristics. An alternative is the use of microencapsulated nutrients for home fortification in order to mask undesirable tastes and to allow its release in strategic sites of the gastrointestinal tract. Toward this end, pea protein concentrate was tested as a natural, edible and alternative material and the spray-drying technique was utilized for the preparation of microparticles containing ferrous sulfate. Their physical and chemical characteristics were evaluated. The microparticles had a spherical shape and grooves with an average size ranging between 2 and 3 μm. Analysis by in vitro assays tested the release of iron in simulated salivary and gastric fluids and its intestinal absorption in Caco-2 cells. No dissolution of iron occurred in the salivary medium whereas the sensory analysis showed good acceptance of a product which incorporated 5.5 mg of iron per 100 g portion of food. Thus, the effectiveness of microencapsulation was demonstrated by utilizing a plant protein as an encapsulating matrix for the controlled release of iron and capable of preserving the bioaccessibility of ferrous sulfate. PMID:23990387

  9. The effect of seeds on GA metabolism in pea pericarp

    SciTech Connect

    Ozga, J.A.; Brenner, M.L. )

    1990-05-01

    To determine the effect of seeds on GA metabolism in pea (Pisum sativum) pericarp tissue, a method was developed that allowed access to the seeds while maintaining pericarp growth. Pericarp tissue of ovaries (3 DAA) was split down the across from the seeds, and seeds were removed. After 24 h. ({sup 14}C)-GA{sub 12} was applied to the inside surface of the pericarp of opened ovaries with or without seeds and to intact ovaries (control). Pericarp tissue was harvested 24 h after ({sup 14}C)-GA{sub 12} application, extracted and chromatographed on C18 HPLC. Wounding (opening ovaries) reduced accumulation of ({sup 14}C)-GA{sub 20}. Notably, removal of seeds significantly decreased ({sup 14}C)-GA{sub 20} accumulation when compared to the wounded controls. ({sup 14}C)-GA{sub 53} was present int he highest amount in the control ovaries attached to the plant, 1.5 {plus minus} 1.0% was found in opened ovaries with seeds and none was detected in ovaries without seeds. Metabolism of ({sup 14}C)-GA{sub 12} was similar in ovaries attached or removed from the plant. Application of GA{sub 3} (2.5 {mu}g/ml) to the ovaries in each treatment did not affect ({sup 14}C)-GA{sub 12} metabolism. These results suggest that the presence of seeds may stimulate GA metabolism in the pericarp.

  10. Strigolactones suppress adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis and pea.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Amanda; Mason, Michael Glenn; De Cuyper, Carolien; Brewer, Philip B; Herold, Silvia; Agusti, Javier; Geelen, Danny; Greb, Thomas; Goormachtig, Sofie; Beeckman, Tom; Beveridge, Christine Anne

    2012-04-01

    Adventitious root formation is essential for the propagation of many commercially important plant species and involves the formation of roots from nonroot tissues such as stems or leaves. Here, we demonstrate that the plant hormone strigolactone suppresses adventitious root formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and pea (Pisum sativum). Strigolactone-deficient and response mutants of both species have enhanced adventitious rooting. CYCLIN B1 expression, an early marker for the initiation of adventitious root primordia in Arabidopsis, is enhanced in more axillary growth2 (max2), a strigolactone response mutant, suggesting that strigolactones restrain the number of adventitious roots by inhibiting the very first formative divisions of the founder cells. Strigolactones and cytokinins appear to act independently to suppress adventitious rooting, as cytokinin mutants are strigolactone responsive and strigolactone mutants are cytokinin responsive. In contrast, the interaction between the strigolactone and auxin signaling pathways in regulating adventitious rooting appears to be more complex. Strigolactone can at least partially revert the stimulatory effect of auxin on adventitious rooting, and auxin can further increase the number of adventitious roots in max mutants. We present a model depicting the interaction of strigolactones, cytokinins, and auxin in regulating adventitious root formation. PMID:22323776

  11. The Propagation of Slow Wave Potentials in Pea Epicotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Stahlberg, R.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Slow wave potentials are considered to be electric long-distance signals specific for plants, although there are conflicting ideas about a chemical, electrical, or hydraulic mode of propagation. These ideas were tested by comparing the propagation of hydraulic and electric signals in epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L). A hydraulic signal in the form of a defined step increase in xylem pressure (Px) was applied to the root of intact seedlings and propagated nearly instantly through the epicotyl axis while its amplitude decreased with distance from the pressure chamber. This decremental propagation was caused by a leaky xylem and created an axial Px gradient in the epicotyl. Simultaneously along the epicotyl surface, depolarizations appeared with lag times that increased acropetally with distance from the pressure chamber from 5 s to 3 min. When measured at a constant distance, the lag times increased as the size of the applied pressure steps decreased. We conclude that the Px gradient in the epicotyl caused local depolarizations with acropetally increasing lag times, which have the appearance of an electric signal propagating with a rate of 20 to 30 mm min-1. This static description of the slow wave potentials challenges its traditional classification as a propagating electric signal. PMID:12223601

  12. Purification and characterization of ornithine transcarbamylase from pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Richardson, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum) ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) was purified to homogeneity from leaf homogenates in a single-step procedure, using delta-N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-ornithine-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The 1581-fold purified OTC enzyme exhibited a specific activity of 139 micromoles citrulline per minute per milligram of protein at 37 degrees C, pH 8.5. Pea OTC represents approximately 0.05% of the total soluble protein in the leaf. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was approximately 108,200, as estimated by Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein ran as a single molecular weight band of 36,500 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the pea OTC is a trimer of identical subunits. The overall amino acid composition of pea OTC is similar to that found in other eukaryotic and prokaryotic OTCs, but the number of arginine residues is approximately twofold higher. The increased number of arginine residues probably accounts for the observed isoelectric point of 7.6 for the pea enzyme, which is considerably more basic than isoelectric point values that have been reported for other OTCs.

  13. An Evaluation of the Pea Pod System for Assessing Body Composition of Moderately Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Forsum, Elisabet; Olhager, Elisabeth; Törnqvist, Caroline

    2016-04-22

    (1) BACKGROUND: Assessing the quality of growth in premature infants is important in order to be able to provide them with optimal nutrition. The Pea Pod device, based on air displacement plethysmography, is able to assess body composition of infants. However, this method has not been sufficiently evaluated in premature infants; (2) METHODS: In 14 infants in an age range of 3-7 days, born after 32-35 completed weeks of gestation, body weight, body volume, fat-free mass density (predicted by the Pea Pod software), and total body water (isotope dilution) were assessed. Reference estimates of fat-free mass density and body composition were obtained using a three-component model; (3) RESULTS: Fat-free mass density values, predicted using Pea Pod, were biased but not significantly (p > 0.05) different from reference estimates. Body fat (%), assessed using Pea Pod, was not significantly different from reference estimates. The biological variability of fat-free mass density was 0.55% of the average value (1.0627 g/mL); (4) CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the Pea Pod system is accurate for groups of newborn, moderately premature infants. However, more studies where this system is used for premature infants are needed, and we provide suggestions regarding how to develop this area.

  14. An Evaluation of the Pea Pod System for Assessing Body Composition of Moderately Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Forsum, Elisabet; Olhager, Elisabeth; Törnqvist, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Assessing the quality of growth in premature infants is important in order to be able to provide them with optimal nutrition. The Pea Pod device, based on air displacement plethysmography, is able to assess body composition of infants. However, this method has not been sufficiently evaluated in premature infants; (2) Methods: In 14 infants in an age range of 3–7 days, born after 32–35 completed weeks of gestation, body weight, body volume, fat-free mass density (predicted by the Pea Pod software), and total body water (isotope dilution) were assessed. Reference estimates of fat-free mass density and body composition were obtained using a three-component model; (3) Results: Fat-free mass density values, predicted using Pea Pod, were biased but not significantly (p > 0.05) different from reference estimates. Body fat (%), assessed using Pea Pod, was not significantly different from reference estimates. The biological variability of fat-free mass density was 0.55% of the average value (1.0627 g/mL); (4) Conclusion: The results indicate that the Pea Pod system is accurate for groups of newborn, moderately premature infants. However, more studies where this system is used for premature infants are needed, and we provide suggestions regarding how to develop this area. PMID:27110820

  15. High-Frequency Pulsed-Electro-Acoustic (PEA) Measurements for Mapping Charge Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, Kristina; Pearson, Lee; Dennison, J. R.; Doyle, Timothy; Hartley, Kent

    2012-10-01

    High-frequency pulsed-electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements are a non-destructive method used to investigate internal charge distributions in dielectric materials. This presentation discusses the theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments and shows results of PEA measurements. PEA experiments involve a thin dielectric positioned between two conducting electrodes. A voltage signal on the two electrodes generates an electric field across the dielectric, which stimulates embedded charge and creates a pressure wave that propagates within the capacitor. A coupled acoustic sensor then measures the ensuing pressure pulse response. Spatial distributions of the charge profile are obtained from the resultant pressure waveform. Gaussian filters and other signal processing methods are used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in this waveform. Estimates of the charge distribution inside the dielectric are extracted from this analysis. Our ultimate objective is to develop high resolution PEA methods to investigate in vacuo charge deposition in thin film polymeric, ceramic, or glass dielectric materials using medium to high energy (approximately 103 to 107 eV) electron beams.

  16. Role of Polyamines in Gibberellin-Induced Internode Growth in Peas

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mary A.; Davies, Peter J.; Reid, James B.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the requirement for polyamines in gibberellin (GA) induced internode growth polyamine content was measured in internodes of peas of various internode phenotypes (slender, tall, dwarf, nana) with and without applied gibberellin (GA3) and polyamine synthesis inhibitors. Polyamines were assayed as dansyl derivatives which were separated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and detected by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The amounts of polyamines in the different genetic lines of peas, which differed in internode lengths and extractable GA content, correlated with the extent of internode elongation. High polyamine concentrations were associated with young internodes and decreased with internode expansion. Extremely short internodes of nana plants without GA exhibited equal or higher amine concentrations relative to internodes of other lines of peas and GA-stimulated nana seedlings. The polyamine synthesis inhibitors, α-difluoromethylornithine and α-difluoromethylarginine, independently or in combination, inhibited polyamine accumulation and internode elongation of tall peas and GA-stimulated nana plants. Agmatine and putrescine restored growth and endogenous polyamine content to variable degrees. However, exogenous polyamines were not effective in promoting growth unless intracellular amines were partially depleted. These results suggest that polyamines do not have a role in cell elongation, but may be required to support cell proliferation. Polyamines do not mediate the entire action of GA in internode growth of peas since GA induction of growth involves both cell division and cell elongation, whereas polyamines appear to affect cell division only. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:16664217

  17. Asparagine Synthesis in Pea Leaves, and the Occurrence of an Asparagine Synthetase Inhibitor 1

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Kenneth W.; Ireland, Robert J.; Lea, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    Asparagine is present in the mature leaves of young pea (Pisum sativum cv Little Marvel) seedlings, and is synthesized in detached shoots. This accumulation and synthesis is greatly enhanced by darkening. In detached control shoots, [14C]aspartate was metabolized predominantly to organic acids and, as other workers have shown, there was little labeling of asparagine (after 5 hours, 3.1% of metabolized label). Addition of the aminotransferase inhibitor aminooxyacetate decreased the flow of aspartate carbon to organic acids and enhanced (about 3-fold) the labeling of asparagine. The same treatment applied to darkened shoots resulted in a substantial conversion of [14C]aspartate to asparagine, over 10-fold greater than in control shoots (66% of metabolized label), suggesting that aspartate is the normal precursor of asparagine. Only traces of glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase activity could be detected in pea leaf or root extracts; activity was not enhanced by sulfhydryl reagents, oxidizing conditions, or protease inhibitors. Asparagine synthetase is readily extracted from lupin cotyledons, but yield was greatly reduced by extraction in the presence of pea leaf tissue; pea leaf homogenates contained an inhibitor which produced over 95% inhibition of an asparagine synthetase preparation from lupin cotyledons. The inhibitor was heat stable, with a low molecular weight. Presence of an inhibitor may prevent detection of asparagine synthetase in pea extracts and in Asparagus, where a cyanide-dependent pathway has been proposed to account for asparagine synthesis: an inhibitor with similar properties was present in Asparagus shoot tissue. PMID:16663168

  18. Role of polyamines in gibberellin-induced internode growth in peas.

    PubMed

    Smith, M A; Davies, P J; Reid, J B

    1985-05-01

    To determine the requirement for polyamines in gibberellin (GA) induced internode growth polyamine content was measured in internodes of peas of various internode phenotypes (slender, tall, dwarf, nana) with and without applied gibberellin (GA(3)) and polyamine synthesis inhibitors. Polyamines were assayed as dansyl derivatives which were separated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and detected by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The amounts of polyamines in the different genetic lines of peas, which differed in internode lengths and extractable GA content, correlated with the extent of internode elongation. High polyamine concentrations were associated with young internodes and decreased with internode expansion. Extremely short internodes of nana plants without GA exhibited equal or higher amine concentrations relative to internodes of other lines of peas and GA-stimulated nana seedlings. The polyamine synthesis inhibitors, alpha-difluoromethylornithine and alpha-difluoromethylarginine, independently or in combination, inhibited polyamine accumulation and internode elongation of tall peas and GA-stimulated nana plants. Agmatine and putrescine restored growth and endogenous polyamine content to variable degrees. However, exogenous polyamines were not effective in promoting growth unless intracellular amines were partially depleted.These results suggest that polyamines do not have a role in cell elongation, but may be required to support cell proliferation. Polyamines do not mediate the entire action of GA in internode growth of peas since GA induction of growth involves both cell division and cell elongation, whereas polyamines appear to affect cell division only.

  19. Large-scale evaluation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) germplasm for cold tolerance in the open field during winter in Qingdao.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a cool season crop, pea (Pisum sativum L.) can tolerate frost at the vegetative stage but has yield loss when freezing stress occurs at reproductive stage. Cold tolerance improvement of pea varieties is important for the stable yield and the expansion of winter pea planting area. Under the natura...

  20. High-throughput development of SSR markers from pea (Pisum sativum L.) based on next generation sequencing of a purified Chinese commercial variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important food legume globally, and is the plant species that J.G. Mendel used to lay the foundation of modern genetics. However, genomics resources of pea are limited comparing to other crop species. Application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in pea breeding has lag...

  1. Nuclear proteins of quiescent Xenopus laevis cells inhibit DNA replication in intact and permeabilized nuclei

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Quiescent cells from adult vertebrate liver and contact-inhibited or serum-deprived tissue cultures are active metabolically but do not carry out nuclear DNA replication and cell division. Replication of intact nuclei isolated from either quiescent Xenopus liver or cultured Xenopus A6 cells in quiescence was barely detectable in interphase extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs, although Xenopus sperm chromatin was replicated with approximately 100% efficiency in the same extracts. Permeabilization of nuclei from quiescent Xenopus liver or cultured Xenopus epithelial A6 cells did not facilitate efficient replication in egg extracts. Moreover, replication of Xenopus sperm chromatin in egg extracts was strongly inhibited by a soluble extract of isolated Xenopus liver nuclei; in contrast, complementary-strand synthesis on single-stranded DNA templates in egg extracts was not affected. Inhibition was specific to endogenous molecules localized preferentially in quiescent as opposed to proliferating cell nuclei, and was not due to suppression of cdk2 kinase activity. Extracts of Xenopus liver nuclei also inhibited growth of sperm nuclei formed in egg extracts. However, the rate and extent of decondensation of sperm chromatin in egg extracts were not affected. The formation of prereplication centers detected by anti-RP-A antibody was not affected by extracts of liver nuclei, but formation of active replication foci was blocked by the same extracts. Inhibition of DNA replication was alleviated when liver nuclear extracts were added to metaphase egg extracts before or immediately after Ca++ ion-induced transition to interphase. A plausible interpretation of our data is that endogenous inhibitors of DNA replication play an important role in establishing and maintaining a quiescent state in Xenopus cells, both in vivo and in cultured cells, perhaps by negatively regulating positive modulators of the replication machinery. PMID:8655587

  2. Fusion probability in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Pal, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    Background: Fusion between two massive nuclei is a very complex process and is characterized by three stages: (a) capture inside the potential barrier, (b) formation of an equilibrated compound nucleus (CN), and (c) statistical decay of the CN leading to a cold evaporation residue (ER) or fission. The second stage is the least understood of the three and is the most crucial in predicting yield of superheavy elements (SHE) formed in complete fusion reactions. Purpose: A systematic study of average fusion probability, , is undertaken to obtain a better understanding of its dependence on various reaction parameters. The study may also help to clearly demarcate onset of non-CN fission (NCNF), which causes fusion probability, PCN, to deviate from unity. Method: ER excitation functions for 52 reactions leading to CN in the mass region 170-220, which are available in the literature, have been compared with statistical model (SM) calculations. Capture cross sections have been obtained from a coupled-channels code. In the SM, shell corrections in both the level density and the fission barrier have been included. for these reactions has been extracted by comparing experimental and theoretical ER excitation functions in the energy range ˜5 %-35% above the potential barrier, where known effects of nuclear structure are insignificant. Results: has been shown to vary with entrance channel mass asymmetry, η (or charge product, ZpZt ), as well as with fissility of the CN, χCN. No parameter has been found to be adequate as a single scaling variable to determine . Approximate boundaries have been obtained from where starts deviating from unity. Conclusions: This study quite clearly reveals the limits of applicability of the SM in interpreting experimental observables from fusion reactions involving two massive nuclei. Deviation of from unity marks the beginning of the domain of dynamical models of fusion. Availability of precise ER cross

  3. Thermal evolution of cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prialnik, D.

    2014-07-01

    Thermal modeling of comet nuclei and similar objects involves the solution of conservation equations for energy and masses of the various components over time. For simplicity, the body is generally, but not necessarily, assumed to be of spherical shape. The processes included in such calculations are heat transfer, gas flow, dust drag, phase transitions, internal heating by various sources, internal structure alterations, surface sublimation. Physical properties --- such as the thermal conductivity, permeability, material strength, and porous structure --- are assumed, based on the best available estimates from laboratory experiments and space-mission results. Calculations employ various numerical procedures and require significant computational power, data analysis, and often sophisticated methods of graphical presentation. They start with a body of given size, mass, and composition, as well as a given orbit. The results yield properties and activity patterns that can be confronted with observations. Initial parameters may be adjusted until agreement is achieved. A glimpse into the internal structure of the object, which is inaccessible to direct observation, is thus obtained. The last decade, since the extensive overview of the subject was published (Modeling the structure and activity of comet nuclei, Prialnik, D.; Benkhoff, J.; Podolak, M., in Comets II, M. C. Festou, H. U. Keller, and H. A. Weaver, eds., University of Arizona Press, Tucson, p.359-387), thermal modeling has significantly advanced. This was prompted both by new properties and phenomena gleaned from observations, one example being main-belt comets, and the continual increase in computational power and performance. Progress was made on two fronts. On the computational side, multi-dimensional models have been developed, adaptive-grid and moving-boundaries techniques have been adopted, and long-term evolutionary calculations have become possible, even spanning the lifetime of the Solar System. On

  4. Fumonisin production by Fusarium species isolated from cereals and feeds in Spain.

    PubMed

    Castellá, G; Bragulat, M R; Cabañes, F J

    1999-07-01

    The ability of Fusarium species to produce fumonisins was studied with 145 isolates of the following species: F. moniliforme (119 isolates), F. subglutinans (12 isolates), F. proliferatum (9 isolates), F. avenaceum (1 isolate), F. oxysporum (1 isolate), and F. semitectum (3 isolates). All isolates were cultured on autoclaved corn kernels. The production of fumonisins was determined by a high-performance liquid chromatography-o-phthaldialdehyde-fluorescence method. Fumonisin production was restricted to isolates of F. moniliforme (94.1%) and F. proliferatum (100%), in the section Liseola, including all strains isolated from wheat, barley, peas, and soybean. One strain of F. proliferatum isolated from maize produced 30,949 microg/g of fumonisin B1 and 16,966 microg/g of fumonisin B2.

  5. Development of SCAR markers linked to sin-2, the stringless pod locus in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing consumer demand for vegetables, edible-podded peas have become more popular. Stringlessness is one of most important traits for snap peas. A single recessive gene, sin-2, controls this trait. Because pollen carrying the stringless gene is less competitive than pollen carrying the str...

  6. Sensory and nutritional quality of split peas (Pisum sativum) stored up to 34 y in residential storage.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J S; Jefferies, L K; Pike, O A

    2010-04-01

    The sensory and nutritional quality of split peas stored up to 34 y was determined. Nine samples of split peas representing 5 retail brands packaged in Nr 10 cans and stored at room temperature were obtained from donors. Duplicate cans of a fresh sample of split peas were purchased as controls. Can head space oxygen ranged from 0.255% to 20.1%. Water activity of the raw split peas ranged from 0.41 to 0.56. The green color of the raw split peas decreased over time as shown by increasing CIE a* values. Flavor, appearance, texture, and overall liking hedonic scores (9-point scale) of split-pea soup made from each sample ranged from 3.7 to 6.7 and decreased over time. Hedonic scores for appearance were correlated with the decrease in raw product green color (r(2)= 0.65). Hedonic scores for soup texture declined over time, which corresponded with increasing hardness of the cooked peas as measured by a TA.XT2 texture analyzer. All samples were judged to be acceptable in an emergency situation by over 75% of sensory panelists. Available thiamin was significantly lower in older samples while riboflavin remained unchanged. The results indicate that split pea quality declines over time, but the product maintains sufficient sensory acceptance to be considered for potential use in emergency storage and other applications where minimal stock rotation is a common practice. PMID:20492313

  7. In vitro inhibition of ETEC K88 adhesion by pea hulls and of LT enterotoxin binding by faba bean hulls.

    PubMed

    Becker, P M; van der Meulen, J; Jansman, A J M; van Wikselaar, P G

    2012-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing K88 (F4) adhesins are associated with post-weaning diarrhoea in piglets. Different grain fractions from pea (Pisum sativum) and faba bean (Vicia faba) were tested in vitro for their capacity to counteract aetiological factors, which contribute to the development of diarrhoea. In detail, adhesion of E. coli O149:K91:K88ac (ETEC K88ac) to grain legume products, intended to impair the colonization of the host, was studied as well as interference with receptor binding of the pathogen's heat-labile enterotoxin LT, intended to reduce toxin-inflicted gut cell damage. When comparing different pea and faba bean products tested for their binding capacity of ETEC K88ac, especially pea hulls, but also whole pea meal, starch-enriched and protein-enriched pea meal, and digestion-resistant pea hull and meal fractions showed a higher binding of ETEC K88ac than faba bean products. In contrast to the ETEC K88ac adhesion results, bean hulls proved more effective than pea hulls in preventing GM1 receptor binding of LT. Previous small intestinal segment perfusion experiments we performed with ETEC K88ac-challenged piglets indicated that both pea and bean hulls have the potential for successful application in diarrhoea prophylaxis and treatment, which is in agreement with and refined by our detection of their different modes of functioning. PMID:21929729

  8. Identification of QTL controlling high levels of partial resistance to Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi in pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium root rot is a common biotic restraint on pea yields worldwide and genetic resistance is the most feasible method for improving pea production. This study was conducted to discover quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling genetic partial resistance to Fusarium root rot caused by Fusarium s...

  9. Sequence and expression of the mRNA encoding HSP22, the mitochondrial small heat-shock protein in pea leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Lenne, C; Block, M A; Garin, J; Douce, R

    1995-01-01

    A 3 h treatment at 40 degrees C of pea (Pisum sativum var. Douce Provence) plants induces production and accumulation of a small heat-shock protein of 22 kDa apparent molecular mass, designated HSP22, in the matrix compartment of mitochondria [Lenne and Douce (1994) Plant Physiol. 105, 1255-1261]. We show here that the HSP22 precursor (i.e. the mature protein plus the transit peptide) has an apparent molecular mass of 26 kDa after in vitro translation of mRNA extracted from heat-stressed pea plants and immunodetection. We have isolated, cloned and sequenced the full-length cDNA encoding the precursor of the mitochondrial HSP22. An analysis of the amino acid sequence of the mitochondrial HSP22 reveals that this protein is a representative member of the low-molecular-mass heat shock protein (HSP) superfamily, exhibiting the specific consensus regions that are typical of the small HSPs. Most importantly, comparison of the mitochondrial HSP22 sequence with that of chloroplast small HSPs indicates that HSP22 does not contain the typical chloroplast consensus region III. We have also analysed the kinetics of HSP22 induction, and report results on the temporal expression of HSP22 at the transcriptional level. HSP22 mRNA was detected as soon as 10 min after the temperature was raised to a high temperature of 40 degrees C. Then the amount of HSP22 mRNA declined considerably even though pea plants were still submitted to the heat treatment. These results are discussed in light of the translation data previously published [Lenne and Douce (1994) Plant Physiol. 105, 1255-1261], particularly concerning the physiological behaviour of mitochondria when plants are heat-stressed. Furthermore, we have studied the dependence of HSP22 accumulation with temperature and demonstrate that the pea mitochondrial heat-shock response is only developed under extreme environmental growth conditions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7487935

  10. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  11. Response to water deficit and high temperature of transgenic peas (Pisum sativum L.) containing a seed-specific alpha-amylase inhibitor and the subsequent effects on pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L.) survival.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Majer, Maria José de; Turner, Neil C; Hardie, Darryl C; Morton, Roger L; Lamont, Byron; Higgins, Thomas J V

    2004-02-01

    The effects of water deficit and high temperature on the production of alpha-amylase inhibitor 1 (alpha-AI-1) were studied in transgenic peas (Pisum sativum L.) that were developed to control the seed-feeding pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L., Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Transgenic and non-transgenic plants were subjected to water-deficit and high-temperature treatments under controlled conditions in the glasshouse and growth cabinet, beginning 1 week after the first pods were formed. In the water-deficit treatments, the peas were either adequately watered (control) or water was withheld after first pod formation. The high-temperature experiments were performed in two growth cabinets, one maintained at 27/22 degrees C (control) and one at 32/27 degrees C day/night temperatures, with the vapour pressure deficit maintained at 1.3 kPa. The plants exposure to high temperatures and water deficit produced 27% and 79% fewer seeds, respectively, than the controls. In the transgenic peas the level of alpha-AI-1 as a percentage of total protein was not influenced by water stress, but was reduced on average by 36.3% (the range in two experiments was 11-50%) in the high-temperature treatment. Transgenic and non-transgenic pods of plants grown at 27/22 degrees C and 32/27 degrees C were inoculated with pea weevil eggs to evaluate whether the reduction in level of alpha-AI-1 in the transgenic pea seeds affected pea weevil development and survival. At the higher temperatures, 39% of adult pea weevil emerged, compared to 1.2% in the transgenic peas grown at the lower temperatures, indicating that high temperature reduced the protective capacity of the transgenic peas.

  12. Subsets of Visceral Adipose Tissue Nuclei with Distinct Levels of 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ping; Ji, Lexiang; Lee, Kevin J.; Yu, Miao; He, Chuan; Ambati, Suresh; McKinney, Elizabeth C.; Jackson, Crystal; Schmitz, Robert J.; Meagher, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    The reprogramming of cellular memory in specific cell types, and in visceral adipocytes in particular, appears to be a fundamental aspect of obesity and its related negative health outcomes. We explored the hypothesis that adipose tissue contains epigenetically distinct subpopulations of adipocytes that are differentially potentiated to record cellular memories of their environment. Adipocytes are large, fragile, and technically difficult to efficiently isolate and fractionate. We developed fluorescence nuclear cytometry (FNC) and fluorescence activated nuclear sorting (FANS) of cellular nuclei from visceral adipose tissue (VAT) using the levels of the pan-adipocyte protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-2 (PPARg2), to distinguish classes of PPARg2-Positive (PPARg2-Pos) adipocyte nuclei from PPARg2-Negative (PPARg2-Neg) leukocyte and endothelial cell nuclei. PPARg2-Pos nuclei were 10-fold enriched for most adipocyte marker transcripts relative to PPARg2-Neg nuclei. PPARg2-Pos nuclei showed 2- to 50-fold higher levels of transcripts encoding most of the chromatin-remodeling factors assayed, which regulate the methylation of histones and DNA cytosine (e.g., DNMT1, TET1, TET2, KDM4A, KMT2C, SETDB1, PAXIP1, ARID1A, JMJD6, CARM1, and PRMT5). PPARg2-Pos nuclei were large with decondensed chromatin. TAB-seq demonstrated 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) levels were remarkably dynamic in gene bodies of various classes of VAT nuclei, dropping 3.8-fold from the highest quintile of expressed genes to the lowest. In short, VAT-derived adipocytes appear to be more actively remodeling their chromatin than non-adipocytes. PMID:27171244

  13. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scale height z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that a SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  14. Unbound Resonances in Light Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, Elizabeth; Finck, Joseph; Gueye, Paul; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Currently there has been no comprehensive study undertaken to compile experimental results from neutron unbound spectroscopy using invariant mass measurements, gamma resolutions, and half-lives. At Central Michigan University, Hampton University, and the NSCL, a project was initiated to catalog all unbound resonances in light nuclei (Z = 1-12). Unbound resonances were characterized by having a confirmed neutron decay branch and/or an energy level greater than the neutron binding energy listed for that isotope according to either the National Nuclear Data Center's Evaluated Nuclear Structure Files or Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List and the referred journals therein. Unbound resonances will be presented for twelve elements: H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, Fl, Ne, Na, and Mg. The isotopes in which unbound resonances occur will be identified, along with unbound energy levels for these isotopes. If known, each unbound resonance's gamma resolution, half-life, method of production and journal reference were also determined and a selection of these will be presented.

  15. Neurotransmitters of the suprachiasmatic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Reghunandanan, Vallath; Reghunandanan, Rajalaxmy

    2006-01-01

    There has been extensive research in the recent past looking into the molecular basis and mechanisms of the biological clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. Neurotransmitters are a very important component of SCN function. Thorough knowledge of neurotransmitters is not only essential for the understanding of the clock but also for the successful manipulation of the clock with experimental chemicals and therapeutical drugs. This article reviews the current knowledge about neurotransmitters in the SCN, including neurotransmitters that have been identified only recently. An attempt was made to describe the neurotransmitters and hormonal/diffusible signals of the SCN efference, which are necessary for the master clock to exert its overt function. The expression of robust circadian rhythms depends on the integrity of the biological clock and on the integration of thousands of individual cellular clocks found in the clock. Neurotransmitters are required at all levels, at the input, in the clock itself, and in its efferent output for the normal function of the clock. The relationship between neurotransmitter function and gene expression is also discussed because clock gene transcription forms the molecular basis of the clock and its working. PMID:16480518

  16. The morphology of cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, H. U.; Jorda, L.

    comets display residual activity or clouds of dust grains around their nuclei. Taking the residual signal into account (mostly using simple models for the brightness distribution) the size estimates of the nuclei could be improved. The (nuclear) magnitude of a comet depends on the product of its albedo and cross-section. Only in a few cases could the albedo and size of a cometary nucleus be separated by additional observation of its thermal emission at infrared wavelengths. By comparison with outer Solar System asteroids Cruikshank et al. (1985) derived a surprisingly low albedo of about 0.04. A value in clear contradiction to the perception of an icy surface but fully confirmed by the first resolved images of a cometary nucleus during the flybys of the Vega and Giotto spacecraft of comet Halley (Sagdeev et al. 1986, Keller et al. 1986). The improvements of radar techniques led to the detection of reflected signals and finally to the derivation of nuclear dimensions and rotation rates. The observations, however, are also model dependent (rotation and size are similarly interwoven as are albedo and size) and sensitive to large dust grains in the vicinity of a nucleus. As an example, Kamoun et al. (1982) determined the radius of comet Encke to 1.5 (2.3, 1.0) km using the spin axis determination of Whipple and Sekanina (1979). The superb spatial resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is not quite sufficient to resolve a cometary nucleus. The intensity distribution of the inner coma, however, can be observed and extrapolated toward the nucleus based on models of the dust distribution. If this contribution is subtracted from the central brightness the signal of the nucleus can be derived and hence its product of albedo times cross-section (Lamy and Toth 1995, Rembor 1998, Keller and Rembor 1998; Section 4.3). It has become clear that cometary nuclei are dark, small, often irregular bodies with dimensions ranging from about a kilometre (comet Wirtanen, the target of

  17. Dissipation of pendimethalin in the soil of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and detection of terminal residues in plants.

    PubMed

    Sondhia, Shobha

    2013-01-01

    Dissipation of pendimethalin in the soil of field peas (Pisum sativum L.) at 0 to 110 days, and terminal residues in green and mature pea were studied under field conditions. Pendimethalin was applied as pre-emergence herbicide at 750, to 185 g a.i. ha(-1) in winter, in field peas. Dissipation of pendimethalin in the soil at 0 to 110 days followed first-order kinetics showing a half-life of 19.83 days averaged over all doses. Low pendimethalin residues were found in mature pea grain (0.004, 0.003, <0.001 μg g(-1)), and straw (0.007, 0.002, <0.001 μg g(-1)) at 750, 350 and 185 g a.i. ha(-1) treatments, respectively. The study indicated that residues of pendimethalin in green and mature pea were within the prescribed MRL limits.

  18. Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

    2012-09-12

    It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

  19. Characterisation of a pea hsp70 gene which is both developmentally and stress-regulated.

    PubMed

    Dhankher, O P; Drew, J E; Gatehouse, J A

    1997-05-01

    A pea pod cDNA library was screened for sequences specific to lignifying tissue. A cDNA clone (pLP19) encoding the C-terminal region of a hsp70 heat shock protein hybridised only to pod mRNA from pea lines where pod lignification occurred. Expression of pLP19 was induced by heat shock in leaves, stems and roots of pea and chickpea plants. Four different poly(A) addition sites were observed in cDNAs derived from the same gene as pLP19. This gene was fully sequenced; unlike most hsp70 genes, it contains no introns. The 5'-flanking sequence contains heat shock elements and other potential regulatory sequences.

  20. Pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, suppress induced plant volatiles in broad bean, Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Schwartzberg, Ezra G; Böröczky, Katalin; Tumlinson, James H

    2011-10-01

    Plants defend themselves against herbivory through several means, including the production of airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These VOCs benefit plants by attracting natural enemies of their herbivores. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, is able to feed on its host plant, Vicia faba, without inducing detectable changes in plant VOC emission. Levels of VOCs emission are not significantly different between control plants and those fed upon by aphids for up to 5 days. Using a second herbivore, the beet armyworm caterpillar, Spodoptera exigua, we demonstrate that several expected caterpillar-induced VOCs are reduced when co-infested with pea aphids, thus demonstrating that pea aphids have the ability to inhibit the release of certain VOCs. This study shows, for the first time, that aphids not only avoid triggering plant volatile emission, but also can actively inhibit herbivore-induced volatiles.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of urease from pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan)

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, Anuradha; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2008-07-01

    Urease from pigeon pea was purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected at 2.5 Å resolution. Urease is a seed protein that is common to most Leguminosae. It also occurs in many bacteria, fungi and several species of yeast. Urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide, thus allowing organisms to use exogenous and internally generated urea as a nitrogen source. Urease from pigeon pea seeds has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity using a series of steps involving ammonium sulfate fractionation, acid precipitation, ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography techniques. The pigeon pea urease was crystallized and the resulting crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution. The crystals belong to the rhombohedral space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 176.29, c = 346.44 Å.

  2. Occurrence of Ditylenchus weischeri and Not D. dipsaci in Field Pea Harvest Samples and Cirsium arvense in the Canadian Prairies

    PubMed Central

    Tenuta, Mario; Madani, Mehrdad; Briar, Shabeg; Molina, Oscar; Gulden, Robert; Subbotin, Sergei A.

    2014-01-01

    The stem nematode, a parasite of the herbaceous perennial weed, Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop. and identified as Ditylenchus dipsaci (Kühn) Filipjev, was reported in the Canadian prairies in 1979. Recently, D. weischeri Chizhov parasitizing Cirsium arvense was described in Russia, and it has been shown that this species is not an agricultural pest. In this study, we examined Ditylenchus species found in field pea (Pisum sativum L.) grain harvest samples in 2009 and 2010 and from C. arvense shoots in pea fields in the Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Manitoba provinces. Samples from 538 fields (mainly yellow pea) were provided by 151 growers throughout the main pea-growing area of the Canadian prairies. Of the samples collected, 2% were positive for Ditylenchus. The population density of the nematode ranged between 4 and 1,500 nematodes kg-1 pea harvest sample and related to presence of C. arvense seeds. Positive samples occurred in 2009 but not in 2010 and were from throughout the pea-growing area of the Canadian prairies and not related to cropping history. C. arvense collected from yellow pea fields in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, but not Alberta, were infested with Ditylenchus. Morphological and molecular (ITS-PCR-RFLP) traits indicated that this species belongs to D. weischeri. The results indicated the stem nematode found in yellow pea grain is D. weischeri which resided with C. arvense seeds and debris to pea samples. Unlike D. dipsaci, D. weischeri is not a nematode pest of economic importance; therefore, its presence in the pea harvest samples was not a concern. PMID:25580031

  3. Occurrence of Ditylenchus weischeri and Not D. dipsaci in Field Pea Harvest Samples and Cirsium arvense in the Canadian Prairies.

    PubMed

    Tenuta, Mario; Madani, Mehrdad; Briar, Shabeg; Molina, Oscar; Gulden, Robert; Subbotin, Sergei A

    2014-12-01

    The stem nematode, a parasite of the herbaceous perennial weed, Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop. and identified as Ditylenchus dipsaci (Kühn) Filipjev, was reported in the Canadian prairies in 1979. Recently, D. weischeri Chizhov parasitizing Cirsium arvense was described in Russia, and it has been shown that this species is not an agricultural pest. In this study, we examined Ditylenchus species found in field pea (Pisum sativum L.) grain harvest samples in 2009 and 2010 and from C. arvense shoots in pea fields in the Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Manitoba provinces. Samples from 538 fields (mainly yellow pea) were provided by 151 growers throughout the main pea-growing area of the Canadian prairies. Of the samples collected, 2% were positive for Ditylenchus. The population density of the nematode ranged between 4 and 1,500 nematodes kg(-1) pea harvest sample and related to presence of C. arvense seeds. Positive samples occurred in 2009 but not in 2010 and were from throughout the pea-growing area of the Canadian prairies and not related to cropping history. C. arvense collected from yellow pea fields in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, but not Alberta, were infested with Ditylenchus. Morphological and molecular (ITS-PCR-RFLP) traits indicated that this species belongs to D. weischeri. The results indicated the stem nematode found in yellow pea grain is D. weischeri which resided with C. arvense seeds and debris to pea samples. Unlike D. dipsaci, D. weischeri is not a nematode pest of economic importance; therefore, its presence in the pea harvest samples was not a concern. PMID:25580031

  4. Expression dynamics of the pea rbcS multigene family and organ distribution of the transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Fluhr, Robert; Moses, Phyllis; Morelli, Giorgio; Coruzzi, Gloria; Chua, Nam-Hai

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of two members (rbcS-3A and -3C) of the pea nuclear gene family encoding the small subunit (rbcS) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. Both rbcS-3A and -3C are interrupted by two introns located at the same positions as those of the other three pea rbcS genes. Compared with the other pea rbcS genes the rbcS-3C gene has the most divergent 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences while the rbcS-3A gene has a larger and highly divergent intron 1. All five pea rbcS genes are conserved in their coding regions but show considerable sequence differences in their 3'-untranslated portion. The 3' sequence divergence of the rbcS genes has allowed us to use S1 nuclease mapping procedures to compare their expression levels in different organs and during light induction. All the rbcS genes are differentially expressed in various organs of the pea plants; moreover, specific rbcS transcripts are under-represented in seeds and petals. In leaves there is a 10-fold difference between the highest and lowest specific rbcS transcript levels. By quantitating the distribution of rbcS transcripts during light, phytochrome and blue light induction of immature (etiolated), and mature (green), pea leaves, we show that the genes are differentially activated during leaf development. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:16453702

  5. Transcriptome sequencing for high throughput SNP development and genetic mapping in Pea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pea has a complex genome of 4.3 Gb for which only limited genomic resources are available to date. Although SNP markers are now highly valuable for research and modern breeding, only a few are described and used in pea for genetic diversity and linkage analysis. Results We developed a large resource by cDNA sequencing of 8 genotypes representative of modern breeding material using the Roche 454 technology, combining both long reads (400 bp) and high coverage (3.8 million reads, reaching a total of 1,369 megabases). Sequencing data were assembled and generated a 68 K unigene set, from which 41 K were annotated from their best blast hit against the model species Medicago truncatula. Annotated contigs showed an even distribution along M. truncatula pseudochromosomes, suggesting a good representation of the pea genome. 10 K pea contigs were found to be polymorphic among the genetic material surveyed, corresponding to 35 K SNPs. We validated a subset of 1538 SNPs through the GoldenGate assay, proving their ability to structure a diversity panel of breeding germplasm. Among them, 1340 were genetically mapped and used to build a new consensus map comprising a total of 2070 markers. Based on blast analysis, we could establish 1252 bridges between our pea consensus map and the pseudochromosomes of M. truncatula, which provides new insight on synteny between the two species. Conclusions Our approach created significant new resources in pea, i.e. the most comprehensive genetic map to date tightly linked to the model species M. truncatula and a large SNP resource for both academic research and breeding. PMID:24521263

  6. Effect of extrusion on the nutritional value of peas for broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hejdysz, Marcin; Kaczmarek, Sebastian Andrzej; Rutkowski, Andrzej

    2016-10-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the nutritional value of five samples of raw and extruded pea seeds (Pisum sativum L., Tarachalska cv.) from different experimental fields. The study included 150 male 1-day-old Ross 308 chickens, which were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments (50 replications each) and kept in individual cages. From days 1 to 16, all birds received only the basal diets. From days 17 to 21, the control group received still the basal diet, but for the two other groups, 20% of basal diet was replaced by raw or extruded peas. Furthermore, the groups receiving raw or extruded peas were divided into five subgroups of 10 animals each, where the diets contained one of the five pea samples of the same cultivar grown at different locations, respectively. On days 19 and 20, excreta were individually collected, and then all chickens were sacrificed and ileal digesta were sampled for determination of ileal digestibility, which was calculated by the difference method. Extrusion of pea seeds decreased the contents of crude fibre, acid and neutral detergent fibre, trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA), phytic P and resistant starch (RS) (p ≤ 0.05), but increased the contents of apparent metabolisable energy (AMEN) by approximately 2.25 MJ/kg dry matter (DM). Furthermore, extrusion improved the DM and crude protein digestibility significantly by about 21.3% and 11.6%, respectively. Similar results were observed for the digestibility of all analysed amino acids. In conclusion, extrusion markedly influenced the chemical composition of peas, reduced their contents of phytic P, TIA and RS and consequently had a positive impact on nutrient digestibility and AMEN values.

  7. Effect of extrusion on the nutritional value of peas for broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hejdysz, Marcin; Kaczmarek, Sebastian Andrzej; Rutkowski, Andrzej

    2016-10-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the nutritional value of five samples of raw and extruded pea seeds (Pisum sativum L., Tarachalska cv.) from different experimental fields. The study included 150 male 1-day-old Ross 308 chickens, which were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments (50 replications each) and kept in individual cages. From days 1 to 16, all birds received only the basal diets. From days 17 to 21, the control group received still the basal diet, but for the two other groups, 20% of basal diet was replaced by raw or extruded peas. Furthermore, the groups receiving raw or extruded peas were divided into five subgroups of 10 animals each, where the diets contained one of the five pea samples of the same cultivar grown at different locations, respectively. On days 19 and 20, excreta were individually collected, and then all chickens were sacrificed and ileal digesta were sampled for determination of ileal digestibility, which was calculated by the difference method. Extrusion of pea seeds decreased the contents of crude fibre, acid and neutral detergent fibre, trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA), phytic P and resistant starch (RS) (p ≤ 0.05), but increased the contents of apparent metabolisable energy (AMEN) by approximately 2.25 MJ/kg dry matter (DM). Furthermore, extrusion improved the DM and crude protein digestibility significantly by about 21.3% and 11.6%, respectively. Similar results were observed for the digestibility of all analysed amino acids. In conclusion, extrusion markedly influenced the chemical composition of peas, reduced their contents of phytic P, TIA and RS and consequently had a positive impact on nutrient digestibility and AMEN values. PMID:27434309

  8. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  9. Effects of hormonal priming on seed germination of pigeon pea under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Sneideris, Larissa C; Gavassi, Marina A; Campos, Marcelo L; D'Amico-Damião, Victor; Carvalho, Rogério F

    2015-09-01

    In this work we investigated whether priming with auxin, cytokinin, gibberellin, abscisic acid and ethylene, alters the physiological responses of seeds of pigeon pea germinated under water and cadmium stress. Seeds treated with water or non-treated seeds were used as control. Although compared to non-treated seeds we found that the hormone treatments improve the germination of pigeon pea under cadmium stress, however, these treatments did not differ from water. However, we also observed a trend of tolerance to the effects of cadmium in the presence of ethylene, suggesting that the use of this hormone may be an efficient method to overcome seed germination under metal stress. PMID:26221985

  10. Effects of hormonal priming on seed germination of pigeon pea under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Sneideris, Larissa C; Gavassi, Marina A; Campos, Marcelo L; D'Amico-Damião, Victor; Carvalho, Rogério F

    2015-09-01

    In this work we investigated whether priming with auxin, cytokinin, gibberellin, abscisic acid and ethylene, alters the physiological responses of seeds of pigeon pea germinated under water and cadmium stress. Seeds treated with water or non-treated seeds were used as control. Although compared to non-treated seeds we found that the hormone treatments improve the germination of pigeon pea under cadmium stress, however, these treatments did not differ from water. However, we also observed a trend of tolerance to the effects of cadmium in the presence of ethylene, suggesting that the use of this hormone may be an efficient method to overcome seed germination under metal stress.

  11. Nitrous oxide emissions from crop rotations including wheat, rapeseed and dry pea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeuffroy, M. H.; Baranger, E.; Carrouée, B.; de Chezelles, E.; Gosme, M.; Hénault, C.; Schneider, A.; Cellier, P.

    2012-07-01

    Approximately 65% of anthropogenic emissions of N2O, a potent greenhouse gas, originate from soils at global scale, and particularly after N fertilisation of the main crops in Europe. Thanks to their capacity to fix atmospheric N2 through biological fixation, legumes allow to reduce N fertilizer use, and possibly N2O emission. Nevertheless, the decomposition of crop organic matter during the crop cycle and during the residue decomposition, and possibly the N fixation process itself, could lead to N2O emissions. The objective of this study was to quantify N2O emissions from a dry pea crop (Pisum sativum, harvested at maturity) and from the subsequent crops in comparison with N2O emissions from wheat and oilseed-rape crops, fertilized or not, in various rotations. A field experiment was conducted during 4 consecutive years, aiming at comparing the emissions during the pea crop, in comparison with those during the wheat (fertilized or not) or oilseed rape crops, and after the pea crop, in comparison with other preceding crops. N2O fluxes were measured using static chambers. In spite of low N2O fluxes, mainly linked with the site soil characteristics, fluxes during the crop were significantly lower for pea and unfertilized wheat than for fertilized wheat and oilseed rape. The effect of the preceding crop was not significant, while soil mineral N at harvest was higher after pea. These results, combined with the emission reduction allowed by the production and transport of the N fertiliser not applied on the pea crop, should be confirmed in a larger range of soil types. Nevertheless, they demonstrate the absence of N2O emission linked to the symbiotic N fixation process, and allow us to estimate the decrease of N2O emissions to 20-25% by including one pea crop in a three-year rotation. At a larger scale, this reduction of GHG emissions at field level has to be cumulated with the reduction of GHG emissions linked with the lower level of production and transport of the N

  12. Size measuring techniques as tool to monitor pea proteins intramolecular crosslinking by transglutaminase treatment.

    PubMed

    Djoullah, Attaf; Krechiche, Ghali; Husson, Florence; Saurel, Rémi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, techniques for monitoring the intramolecular transglutaminase cross-links of pea proteins, based on protein size determination, were developed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles of transglutaminase-treated low concentration (0.01% w/w) pea albumin samples, compared to the untreated one (control), showed a higher electrophoretic migration of the major albumin fraction band (26 kDa), reflecting a decrease in protein size. This protein size decrease was confirmed, after DEAE column purification, by dynamic light scattering (DLS) where the hydrodynamic radius of treated samples appears to be reduced compared to the control one.

  13. Masculinization of the x chromosome in the pea aphid.

    PubMed

    Jaquiéry, Julie; Rispe, Claude; Roze, Denis; Legeai, Fabrice; Le Trionnaire, Gaël; Stoeckel, Solenn; Mieuzet, Lucie; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Prunier-Leterme, Nathalie; Ségurens, Béatrice; Tagu, Denis; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that sexually antagonistic mutations accumulate differentially on the X chromosome and autosomes in species with an XY sex-determination system, with effects (masculinization or feminization of the X) depending on the dominance of mutations. Organisms with alternative modes of inheritance of sex chromosomes offer interesting opportunities for studying sexual conflicts and their resolution, because expectations for the preferred genomic location of sexually antagonistic alleles may differ from standard systems. Aphids display an XX/X0 system and combine an unusual inheritance of the X chromosome with the alternation of sexual and asexual reproduction. In this study, we first investigated theoretically the accumulation of sexually antagonistic mutations on the aphid X chromosome. Our results show that i) the X is always more favourable to the spread of male-beneficial alleles than autosomes, and should thus be enriched in sexually antagonistic alleles beneficial for males, ii) sexually antagonistic mutations beneficial for asexual females accumulate preferentially on autosomes, iii) in contrast to predictions for standard systems, these qualitative results are not affected by the dominance of mutations. Under the assumption that sex-biased gene expression evolves to solve conflicts raised by the spread of sexually antagonistic alleles, one expects that male-biased genes should be enriched on the X while asexual female-biased genes should be enriched on autosomes. Using gene expression data (RNA-Seq) in males, sexual females and asexual females of the pea aphid, we confirm these theoretical predictions. Although other mechanisms than the resolution of sexual antagonism may lead to sex-biased gene expression, we argue that they could hardly explain the observed difference between X and autosomes. On top of reporting a strong masculinization of the aphid X chromosome, our study highlights the relevance of organisms displaying an alternative

  14. The genomewide transcriptional response underlying the pea aphid wing polyphenism.

    PubMed

    Vellichirammal, Neetha N; Madayiputhiya, Nandakumar; Brisson, Jennifer A

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is a key life history strategy used by many plants and animals living in heterogeneous environments. A multitude of studies have investigated the costs and limits of plasticity, as well as the conditions under which it evolves. Much less well understood are the molecular genetic mechanisms that enable an organism to sense its environment and respond in a plastic manner. The pea aphid wing polyphenism is a compelling laboratory model to study these mechanisms. In this polyphenism, environmental stressors like high density cause asexual, viviparous adult female aphids to change the development of their embryos from wingless to winged morphs. The life history trade-offs between the two morphs have been intensively studied, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain largely unknown. We therefore performed a genomewide study of the maternal transcriptome at two time points with and without a crowding stress to discover the maternal molecular changes that lead to the development of winged vs. wingless offspring. We observed significant transcriptional changes in genes associated with odorant binding, neurotransmitter transport, hormonal activity and chromatin remodelling in the maternal transcriptome. We also found that titres of serotonin, dopamine and octopamine were higher in solitary compared to crowded aphids. We use these results to posit a model for how maternal signals inform a developing embryo to be winged or wingless. Our findings add significant insights into the identity of the molecular mechanisms that underlie environmentally induced morph determination and suggest a possible role for biogenic amine regulation in polyphenisms generally. PMID:27393739

  15. Green Pea Galaxies Reveal Secrets of Lyα Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Gronke, Max; Rhoads, James E.; Jaskot, Anne; Zheng, Zhenya; Dijkstra, Mark; Wang, JunXian

    2016-01-01

    In star-forming galaxies, a lot of Lyα photons were generated in HII regions surrounding massive stars. The escape of Lyα photons from galaxies is a key issue in studying high redshift galaxies and probing cosmic reionization with Lyα. To understand Lyα escape, it is valuable to study high quality Lyα profiles in Lyα emitters. However, such studies are rare due to the faintness of high-z Lyα emitters and the lack of local analogs with high Lyα equivalent width. Here we show that "Green Pea" galaxies are the best local analogs of high-z Lyα emitters and their high quality Lyα profiles demonstrate low HI column density is the key to Lyα escape. The Lyα escape fraction shows correlations with the ratio of Lyα blue peak velocity to Hα line width, the normalized flux density at valley of Lyα profile, and a few other features of Lyα profiles. We compared the Lyα profiles with outflowing HI shell radiative transfer model and found that the best-fit HI column density is anti-correlated with the Lyα escape fraction. We also found an anti-correlation between Lyα escape fraction and galactic metallicity. Our results support that LAEs with high Lyα escape fraction have low metallicity, low HI column density, and mild HI gas outflow.

  16. ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC NUCLEI: A NEW FRONTIER

    SciTech Connect

    MCLERRAN,L.

    1999-10-29

    The collisions of ultra-relativistic nuclei provide a window on the behavior of strong interactions at asymptotically high energies. They also will allow the authors to study the bulk properties of hadronic matter at very high densities.

  17. GDR in Hot Nuclei: New Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, F.; Kmiecik, M.; Wieland, O.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F.; Mason, P.; Moroni, A.; Million, B.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Styczen, J.; Brekiesz, M.; Meczynski, W.; Zieblinski, M.; Gramegna, F.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lanchais, A. L.; Mastinu, P. F.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Geraci, E.; Ordine, A.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.

    2005-04-01

    The measured properties of the Giant Dipole Resonance in hot rotating nuclei are successfully described with the model of thermal fluctuations, even though there are still some open problems especially at very low (T < 1.2MeV), very high (T >2.5MeV) temperatures and missing data in some mass regions. Recent experimental works have addressed more specific problems regarding the nuclear shape and its behaviour in very particular and delimited phase space regions. In this paper will be discussed new exclusive measurements of the GDR γ decay in heavy 216Rn nuclei (where the shape of nuclei surviving fission have been probed) and some preliminary data on the 132Ce nuclei at very high excitation energy.

  18. Clusterization and quadrupole deformation in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Algora, A.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Scheid, W.; Darai, J.; Hess, P. O.

    2006-04-26

    We study the interrelation of the clusterization and quadrupole deformation of atomic nuclei, by applying cluster models. Both the energetic stability and the exclusion principle is investigated. Special attention is paid to the relative orientations of deformed clusters.

  19. From Nucleons To Nuclei To Fusion Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R; Horiuchi, W

    2012-02-15

    Nuclei are prototypes of many-body open quantum systems. Complex aggregates of protons and neutrons that interact through forces arising from quantum chromo-dynamics, nuclei exhibit both bound and unbound states, which can be strongly coupled. In this respect, one of the major challenges for computational nuclear physics, is to provide a unified description of structural and reaction properties of nuclei that is based on the fundamental underlying physics: the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them. This requires a combination of innovative theoretical approaches and high-performance computing. In this contribution, we present one of such promising techniques, the ab initio no-core shell model/resonating-group method, and discuss applications to light nuclei scattering and fusion reactions that power stars and Earth-base fusion facilities.

  20. A focus on shape coexistence in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. L.; Heyde, K.

    2016-02-01

    The present collection of articles focuses on new directions and developments under the title of shape coexistence in nuclei, following our 2011 Reviews of Modern Physics article (K Heyde and J L Wood).