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Sample records for isolated photon cross

  1. ATLAS measurements of isolated photon cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, Marcello; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    This document presents measurements of the cross-sections for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons and di-photon events in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s = 7 TeV, performed by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Photon candidates are identified by combining information from the calorimeters and from the inner tracker. Residual background in the selected sample is estimated from data based on the observed distribution of the transverse isolation energy in a narrow cone around the photon candidate. The results are compared to predictions from next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations.

  2. Measurement of the Differential Cross Section for Isolated Prompt Photon Production in pp Collisions at 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2011-09-01

    A measurement of the differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity range |eta|<2.5 and the transverse energy range 25 < ET < 400 GeV, corresponding to the kinematic region 0.007 < xT < 0.114. Photon candidates are identified with two complementary methods, one based on photon conversions in the silicon tracker and the other on isolated energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measured cross section is presented as a function of ET in four pseudorapidity regions. The next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations are consistent with the measured cross section.

  3. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina

    2009-04-01

    In this thesis we present the measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section with a total integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb-1 of data collected with the CDF Run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The prompt photon cross section is a classic measurement to test perturbative QCD (pQCD) with potential to provide information on the parton distribution function (PDF), and sensitive to the presence of new physics at large photon transverse momentum. Prompt photons also constitute an irreducible background for important searches such as H → γγ, or SUSY and extra-dimensions with energetic photons in the final state. The Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, U.S.A.) is currently the hadron collider that operates at the highest energies in the world. It collides protons and antiprotons with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The CDF and the D0 experiments are located in two of its four interaction regions. In Run I at the Tevatron, the direct photon production cross section was measured by both CDF and DO, and first results in Run II have been presented by the DO Collaboration based on 380 pb-1. Both Run I and Run II results show agreement with the theoretical predictions except for the low pTγ region, where the observed and predicted shapes are different. Prompt photon production has been also extensively measured at fixed-target experiments in lower pTγ ranges, showing excess of data compared to the theory, particularly at high xT. From an experimental point of view, the study of the direct photon production has several advantages compared to QCD studies using jets. Electromagnetic calorimeters have better energy resolution than hadronic calorimeters, and the systematic uncertainty on the photon absolute energy scale is smaller. Furthermore, the determination of the photon kinematics does not require the use of jet algorithms. However, the measurements using photons

  4. Measurement of the Isolated Prompt Photon Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-02-01

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy E_T-gamma in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV using data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. Photons are required to have a pseudorapidity |eta_gamma|<1.45 and E_T-gamma > 21 GeV, covering the kinematic region 0.006 < x_T < 0.086. The measured cross section is found to be in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  5. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-03-18

    A measurement of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV is presented. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity ranges |ηγ|<1.37 and 1.52≤|ηγ|<1.81 in the transverse energy range 15≤EγT<100 GeV. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 880 nb-1, collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Photon candidates are identified by combining information from the calorimeters and from the inner tracker. Residual background in the selected sample is estimated from data based on the observed distribution of the transverse isolation energy in a narrowmore » cone around the photon candidate. The results are compared to predictions from next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.« less

  6. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section in pp collisions at s=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, J.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, S. R.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocci, A.; Bock, R.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P.; Booth, J. R. A.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Braccini, S.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Brambilla, E.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy s=7TeV is presented. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity ranges |ηγ|<1.37 and 1.52≤|ηγ|<1.81 in the transverse energy range 15≤ETγ<100GeV. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 880nb-1, collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Photon candidates are identified by combining information from the calorimeters and from the inner tracker. Residual background in the selected sample is estimated from data based on the observed distribution of the transverse isolation energy in a narrow cone around the photon candidate. The results are compared to predictions from next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  7. Measurement of the isolated prompt photon production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hartl, C; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Benucci, L; Ceard, L; Cerny, K; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Devroede, O; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F; Dias, F A; Dias, M A F; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Marinho, F; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dyulendarova, M; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xu, M; Yang, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Li, W; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Assran, Y; Mahmoud, M A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Wyslouch, B; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Mikami, Y; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Falkiewicz, A; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Xiao, H; Roinishvili, V; Anagnostou, G; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Mohr, N; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Ata, M; Bender, W; Erdmann, M; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Magass, C; Masetti, G; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Heydhausen, D; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Rennefeld, J; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Thomas, M; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bergholz, M; Borras, K; Cakir, A; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Glushkov, I; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; 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    2011-02-25

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy E(T)(γ) in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV using data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9  pb(-1). Photons are required to have a pseudorapidity |η(γ)|<1.45 and E(T)(γ)>21  GeV, covering the kinematic region 0.006cross section is found to be in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  8. Measurement of the isolated prompt photon production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV.

    PubMed

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    2011-02-25

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy E(T)(γ) in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV using data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9  pb(-1). Photons are required to have a pseudorapidity |η(γ)|<1.45 and E(T)(γ)>21  GeV, covering the kinematic region 0.006cross section is found to be in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations. PMID:21405566

  9. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  10. Measurement of the Production Cross Section for Pairs of Isolated Photons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    The integrated and differential cross sections for the production of pairs of isolated photons is measured in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns is analysed. A next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation is compared to the measurements. A discrepancy is observed for regions of the phase space where the two photons have an azimuthal angle difference, $\\Delta(\\phi)$, less than approximately 2.8.

  11. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at √s=7TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in proton–proton collisions at √s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |η|<2.5, |η|ϵ[1.44,1.57] and with an angular separation ΔR>0.45, is 17.2±0.2(stat)±1.9(syst)±0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthal angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the Collins–Soper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.

  12. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at √s=7TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in proton–proton collisions at √s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |η|<2.5, |η|ϵ[1.44,1.57] and with an angular separation ΔR>0.45, is 17.2±0.2(stat)±1.9(syst)±0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthalmore » angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the Collins–Soper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.« less

  13. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. 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E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. 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A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. 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G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. 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A.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-08-01

    A measurement of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=8 TeV is presented. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity ranges | η γ | < 1 .37 and 1 .56 ≤ | η γ | < 2 .37 in the transverse energy range 25 < E T γ < 1500 GeV. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb-1, recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Photon candidates are identified by combining information from the calorimeters and the inner tracker. The background is subtracted using a data-driven technique, based on the observed calorimeter shower-shape variables and the deposition of hadronic energy in a narrow cone around the photon candidate. The measured cross sections are compared with leading-order and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and are found to be in a good agreement over ten orders of magnitude. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2016-08-01

    A measurement of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV is presented. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity ranges |ηγ | < 1.37 and 1.56 ≤ |ηγ | < 2.37 in the transverse energy range 25 < ETγ < 1500 GeV. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb–1, recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Photon candidates are identified by combining information from the calorimeters and the inner tracker. The background is subtracted using a data-driven technique, based on themore » observed calorimeter shower-shape variables and the deposition of hadronic energy in a narrow cone around the photon candidate. In conclusion, the measured cross sections are compared with leading-order and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and are found to be in a good agreement over ten orders of magnitude.« less

  15. Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections

    2014-11-01

    Version 00 The Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections, EPICS, provides the atomic data needed to perform coupled Electron-Photon transport calculations, to produce accurate macroscopic results, such as energy deposit and dose. Atomic data is provided for elements, Z = 1 to 100, over the energy range 10 eV to 100 GeV; note that nuclear data, such as photo-nuclear, and data for compounds, are not included. All data is in a simple computer independent text formatmore » that is standard and presented to a high precision that can be easily read by computer codes written in any computer language, e.g., C, C++, and FORTRAN. EPICS includes four separate data bases that are designed to be used in combination, these include, • The Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), to describe the interaction of electrons with matter. • The Evaluated Photon Data Library (EPDL), to describe the interaction of photons with matter. • The Evaluated Atomic Data Library (EADL), to describe the emission of electrons and photons back to neutrality following an ionizing event, caused by either electron or photon interactions. • The Evaluated Excitation Data Library (EXDL), to describe the excitation of atoms due to photon interaction. All of these are available in the Extended ENDL format (ENDLX) in which the evaluations were originally performed. The first three are also available in the ENDF format; as yet ENDF does not include formats to handle excitation data (EXDL).« less

  16. Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. E.

    2014-11-01

    Version 00 The Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections, EPICS, provides the atomic data needed to perform coupled Electron-Photon transport calculations, to produce accurate macroscopic results, such as energy deposit and dose. Atomic data is provided for elements, Z = 1 to 100, over the energy range 10 eV to 100 GeV; note that nuclear data, such as photo-nuclear, and data for compounds, are not included. All data is in a simple computer independent text format that is standard and presented to a high precision that can be easily read by computer codes written in any computer language, e.g., C, C++, and FORTRAN. EPICS includes four separate data bases that are designed to be used in combination, these include, • The Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), to describe the interaction of electrons with matter. • The Evaluated Photon Data Library (EPDL), to describe the interaction of photons with matter. • The Evaluated Atomic Data Library (EADL), to describe the emission of electrons and photons back to neutrality following an ionizing event, caused by either electron or photon interactions. • The Evaluated Excitation Data Library (EXDL), to describe the excitation of atoms due to photon interaction. All of these are available in the Extended ENDL format (ENDLX) in which the evaluations were originally performed. The first three are also available in the ENDF format; as yet ENDF does not include formats to handle excitation data (EXDL).

  17. Measurement of the Inclusive Isolated Prompt Photon Cross Section in ppbar Collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV using the CDF Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-10-01

    A measurement of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated photons by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider is presented. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity region |{eta}{sup {gamma}}| < 1.0 and the transverse energy range E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} > 30 GeV and is based on 2.5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The sample is almost a factor of seven larger than those used for recent published results and extends the E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} coverage by 100 GeV. The result agrees with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations within uncertainties over the range 50 < E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} < 400 GeV, though the energy spectrum in the data shows a steeper slope at lower E{sub T}{sup {gamma}}.

  18. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV using the CDF detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-12-01

    A measurement of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated photons by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider is presented. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity region |ηγ|<1.0 and the transverse energy range ETγ>30GeV and is based on 2.5fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The sample is almost a factor of 7 larger than those used for recent published results and extends the ETγ coverage by 100 GeV. The result agrees with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations within uncertainties over the range 50

  19. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$1.96~TeV, using the full CDF data sample

    SciTech Connect

    Luca, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=1.96~TeV is presented. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.5~fb$^{-1}$, collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run~II. The measurement is performed as a function of the photon transverse energy ($E_T^{\\gamma}$) covering the range of 30~GeV$< E_T^{\\gamma} <$500~GeV in the pseudorapidity region $|\\eta^{\\gamma}|<$1.0. To reduce the background coming from the decays of $\\pi^0$'s, $\\eta$'s and other hadrons, photons are required to be isolated in the calorimeter. The output distributions of an Artificial Neural Network are exploited to estimate the remaining contamination from jets faking isolated photons. Results are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  20. Isolating prompt photons with narrow cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, S.; Fontannaz, M.; Guillet, J. Ph.; Pilon, E.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the isolation of prompt photons in hadronic collisions by means of narrow isolation cones and the QCD computation of the corresponding cross sections. We reconsider the occurence of large perturbative terms with logarithmic dependence on the cone size and their impact on the fragmentation scale dependence. We cure the apparent perturbative violation of unitarity for small cone sizes, which had been noticed earlier in next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculations, by resumming the leading logarithmic dependence on the cone size. We discuss possible implications regarding the implementation of some hollow cone variants of the cone criterion, which simulate the experimental difficulty to impose isolation inside the region filled by the electromagnetic shower that develops in the calorimeter.

  1. Erratum: Photon isolation effects at NLO in γγ + jet final states in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrmann, T.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.

    2014-06-01

    We present the NLO QCD corrections to pp → γγj production at hadron colliders. Our calculation includes contributions from the fragmentation of a hadronic jet into a highly energetic photon, and consequently allows the implementation of arbitrary infrared-safe photon isolation definitions. We compare different photon isolation criteria and perform a detailed study of the dependence of the γγj cross section on the photon isolation parameters.

  2. Photon isolation effects at NLO in γγ+jet final states in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrmann, T.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.

    2013-06-01

    We present the NLO QCD corrections to pp → γγj production at hadron colliders. Our calculation includes contributions from the fragmentation of a hadronic jet into a highly energetic photon, and consequently allows the implementation of arbitrary infrared-safe photon isolation definitions. We compare different photon isolation criteria and perform a detailed study of the dependence of the γγj cross section on the photon isolation parameters.

  3. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photons cross section in pp collisions at √s =7 TeV with the ATLAS detector using 4.6 fb-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. 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A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Daniells, A. C.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Taille, C.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Nooij, L.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; de Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dewilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Luise, S.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dinut, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. 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A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pashapour, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Pretzl, K.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quilty, D.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radloff, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarrazin, B.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, Hs.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tuna, A. N.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    A measurement of the cross section for the production of isolated prompt photons in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy √s =7 TeV is presented. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb-1 collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured as a function of photon pseudorapidity ηγ and transverse energy ETγ in the kinematic range 100≤ETγ<1000 GeV and in the regions |ηγ|<1.37 and 1.52≤|ηγ|<2.37. The results are compared to leading-order parton-shower Monte Carlo models and next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations. Next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations agree well with the measured cross sections as a function of ETγ and ηγ.

  4. Isolated prompt photon production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maas, P.A. )

    1992-11-01

    This note describes measurements of isolated prompt photon production at [radical]s = 1.8 TeV using the CDF experiment. The measurements are compared to recent NLO QCD calculations, including recently obtained parton distribution functions. Qualitatively, the QCD calculation with the new parton distribution functions agrees better with the data than the previous parton distribution functions.

  5. Measurement of the production cross section of an isolated photon associated with jets in proton-proton collisions at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, OS; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adamczyk, L; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky

    2012-05-23

    A measurement of the cross section for the production of an isolated photon in association with jets in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 7 TeV is presented. Photons are reconstructed in the pseudorapidity range |{eta}{sup y}| < 1.37 and with a transverse energy E{sub T}{sup y} > 25 GeV. Jets are reconstructed in the rapidity range |y{sup jet}| < 4.4 and with a transverse momentum p{sub T}{sup jet} > 20 GeV. The differential cross section d{sigma}/dE{sub T}{sup y} is measured, as a function of the photon transverse energy, for three different rapidity ranges of the leading-p{sub T} jet: |y{sup jet}| < 1.2, 1.2 {le} |y{sup jet}| < 2.8 and 2.8 {le} |y{sup jet}| < 4.4. For each rapidity configuration the same-sign ({eta}{sup y} y{sup jet} {ge} 0) and opposite-sign ({eta}{sup y} y{sup jet} < 0) cases are studied separately. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 37 pb{sup -1}, collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations are found to be in fair agreement with the data, except for E{sub T}{sup y} {approx}< 45 GeV, where the theoretical predictions overestimate the measured cross sections.

  6. Optical isolation via unidirectional resonant photon tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Moccia, Massimo; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Galdi, Vincenzo; Alù, Andrea; Engheta, Nader

    2014-01-28

    We show that tri-layer structures combining epsilon-negative and magneto-optical material layers can exhibit unidirectional resonant photon tunneling phenomena that can discriminate between circularly polarized (CP) waves of given handedness impinging from opposite directions, or between CP waves with different handedness impinging from the same direction. This physical principle, which can also be interpreted in terms of a Fabry-Perot-type resonance, may be utilized to design compact optical isolators for CP waves. Within this framework, we derive simple analytical conditions and design formulae, and quantitatively assess the isolation performance, also taking into account the unavoidable imperfections and nonidealities.

  7. Isolated hard photon radiation in multijet production at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, E. W. N.; Stirling, W. J.

    1992-11-01

    We present a detailed, quantitative analysis of isolated hard photon radiation in multiparton final states at LEP energies. Since a perfectly isolated photon is not an infrared safe quantity different definitions of an “isolated photon” can influence the relative production rates for photon plus jets events. We argue that there is no obvious discrepancy between recent experimental measurements and the theoretical predictions and compute the next-to-leading order corrections to photon +1, 2 jet production, using a clustering algorithm more closely matched to the experimental procedure.

  8. Intelligent optical networking with photonic cross connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceuppens, L.; Jerphagnon, Olivier L.; Lang, Jonathan; Banerjee, Ayan; Blumenthal, Daniel J.

    2002-09-01

    Optical amplification and dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) have fundamentally changed optical transport networks. Now that these technologies are widely adopted, the bottleneck has moved from the outside line plant to nodal central offices, where electrical switching equipment has not kept pace. While OEO technology was (and still is) necessary for grooming and traffic aggregation, the transport network has dramatically changed, requiring a dramatic rethinking of how networks need to be designed and operated. While todays transport networks carry remarkable amounts of bandwidth, their optical layer is fundamentally static and provides for only simple point-to-point transport. Efficiently managing the growing number of wavelengths can only be achieved through a new breed of networking element. Photonic switching systems (PSS) can efficiently execute these functions because they are bit rate, wavelength, and protocol transparent. With their all-optical switch cores and interfaces, PSS can switch optical signals at various levels of granularity wavelength, sub band, and composite DWDM fiber levels. Though cross-connect systems with electrical switch cores are available, they perform these functions at very high capital costs and operational inefficiencies. This paper examines enabling technologies for deployment of intelligent optical transport networks (OTN), and takes a practical perspective on survivability architecture migration and implementation issues.

  9. Large conditional single-photon cross-phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kristin M; Hosseini, Mahdi; Duan, Yiheng; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-08-30

    Deterministic optical quantum logic requires a nonlinear quantum process that alters the phase of a quantum optical state by π through interaction with only one photon. Here, we demonstrate a large conditional cross-phase modulation between a signal field, stored inside an atomic quantum memory, and a control photon that traverses a high-finesse optical cavity containing the atomic memory. This approach avoids fundamental limitations associated with multimode effects for traveling optical photons. We measure a conditional cross-phase shift of [Formula: see text] (and up to [Formula: see text] by postselection on photons that remain in the system longer than average) between the retrieved signal and control photons, and confirm deterministic entanglement between the signal and control modes by extracting a positive concurrence. By upgrading to a state-of-the-art cavity, our system can reach a coherent phase shift of π at low loss, enabling deterministic and universal photonic quantum logic.

  10. Large conditional single-photon cross-phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kristin M; Hosseini, Mahdi; Duan, Yiheng; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-08-30

    Deterministic optical quantum logic requires a nonlinear quantum process that alters the phase of a quantum optical state by π through interaction with only one photon. Here, we demonstrate a large conditional cross-phase modulation between a signal field, stored inside an atomic quantum memory, and a control photon that traverses a high-finesse optical cavity containing the atomic memory. This approach avoids fundamental limitations associated with multimode effects for traveling optical photons. We measure a conditional cross-phase shift of [Formula: see text] (and up to [Formula: see text] by postselection on photons that remain in the system longer than average) between the retrieved signal and control photons, and confirm deterministic entanglement between the signal and control modes by extracting a positive concurrence. By upgrading to a state-of-the-art cavity, our system can reach a coherent phase shift of π at low loss, enabling deterministic and universal photonic quantum logic. PMID:27519798

  11. Further studies of the photoproduction of isolated photons with a jet at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-08-01

    In this extended analysis using the ZEUS detector at HERA, the photoproduction of isolated photons together with a jet is measured for different ranges of the fractional photon energy, x {/γ meas}, contributing to the photon-jet final state. Cross sections are evaluated in the photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 6 < E {/T γ } < 15 GeV and -0 .7 < η γ < 0 .9, and for jet transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 4 < E {/T jet} < 35 GeV and -1 .5 < η jet < 1 .8, for an integrated luminosity of 374 pb-1. The kinematic observables studied comprise the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the photon and the jet, the azimuthal difference between them, the fraction of proton energy taking part in the interaction, and the difference between the pseudorapidities of the photon and the jet. Higher-order theoretical calculations are compared to the results.

  12. Large conditional single-photon cross-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kristin; Hosseini, Mahdi; Duan, Yiheng; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    Deterministic optical quantum logic requires a nonlinear quantum process that alters the phase of a quantum optical state by π through interaction with only one photon. Here, we demonstrate a large conditional cross-phase modulation between a signal field, stored inside an atomic quantum memory, and a control photon that traverses a high-finesse optical cavity containing the atomic memory. This approach avoids fundamental limitations associated with multimode effects for traveling optical photons. We measure a conditional cross-phase shift of up to π / 3 between the retrieved signal and control photons, and confirm deterministic entanglement between the signal and control modes by extracting a positive concurrence. With a moderate improvement in cavity finesse, our system can reach a coherent phase shift of p at low loss, enabling deterministic and universal photonic quantum logic. Preprint: arXiv:1512.02166 [quant-ph

  13. Large conditional single-photon cross-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kristin M.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Duan, Yiheng; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-08-01

    Deterministic optical quantum logic requires a nonlinear quantum process that alters the phase of a quantum optical state by π through interaction with only one photon. Here, we demonstrate a large conditional cross-phase modulation between a signal field, stored inside an atomic quantum memory, and a control photon that traverses a high-finesse optical cavity containing the atomic memory. This approach avoids fundamental limitations associated with multimode effects for traveling optical photons. We measure a conditional cross-phase shift of π/6π/6 (and up to π/3π/3 by postselection on photons that remain in the system longer than average) between the retrieved signal and control photons, and confirm deterministic entanglement between the signal and control modes by extracting a positive concurrence. By upgrading to a state-of-the-art cavity, our system can reach a coherent phase shift of π at low loss, enabling deterministic and universal photonic quantum logic.

  14. Measurement of prompt photon cross sections in photoproduction at H1

    SciTech Connect

    Ferencei, Jozef

    2005-10-06

    Cross section measurements of isolated prompt photons, inclusively and associated with jets, have been made at the HERA ep collider with the H1 detector, using the data taken in the years 1996-2000 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 105 pb-1. The results are compared to a perturbative QCD calculations in next to leading order and to predictions of the event generators PYTHIA and HERWIG.

  15. Di-photon and photon + b/c production cross sections at Ecm = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gajjar, Anant; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    Measurements of the di-photon cross section have been made in the central region and are found to be in good agreement with NLO QCD predictions. The cross section of events containing a photon and additional heavy flavor jet have also been measured, as well as the ratio of photon + b to photon + c. The statistically limited sample shows good agreement with Leading Order predictions.

  16. Photon-phonon anti-stokes upconversion of a photonically, electronically, and thermally isolated opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stem, Michelle R.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the present research was to investigate an intense violet shift displayed by a non-toxic, natural silicate material with a highly ordered nanostructure. The material displayed an unexpected, nonlinear 2:3 photon-phonon anti-Stokes upconversion while photonically, electronically, and thermally isolated. Conducted aphotonically and at ambient temperatures, the specimen upconverted a low-power, 650 nm constant wave red laser to an internally highly dispersed 433 nm violet wavelength. The strong dispersion was largely due to nearly total internal reflection of the laser. The upconversion had an efficiency of about 78 %, based on specimen volume, with no detectable thermal variance. The 2:3 anti-Stokes upconversion displayed by this material is likely the result of a previously unknown photon-phonon evanescence response that amplified the energy of a portion of the incident laser photons. Thus, a portion of the incident laser photons were upconverted, and the material converted another portion into an amplified energy that caused the upconversion. Internal micro-lasing appeared to be a means of photon-phonon evanescent energy redistribution, enabling dispersed photonic upconversion. Additional analyses also found an unexpectedly rhythmic photonic structure in spectrophotometric scans, polariscopic color changing, and previously undocumented ultraviolet responses.

  17. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A.; Hemmers, O.

    1997-04-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He{sup +}nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energy at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al.

  18. THK: CLB Crossed Linear Bearing Seismic Isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Toniolo, Roberto

    2008-07-08

    This text highlights the new seismic isolation technology called CLB (Crossed Linear Bearing), which is made of linear guides with recirculating steel ball technology. It describes specifications and building characteristics, provides examples of seismic isolation and application functionalities and shows experimental data. Since 1994, the constant commitment by Japan to develop diversified anti-seismic systems based on the precise needs of the structures to protect and the areas where they were built has led to the creation of important synergy between the research institutions of leading Japanese companies and THK's Centre for Research and Development. Their goal has been to develop new technology and solutions to allow seismic isolation to be effective in the following cases:.

  19. Cross two photon absorption in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide fiber taper coupler with a physical junction

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkissian, Raymond O'Brien, John

    2015-01-21

    Cross two photon absorption in silicon is characterized using a tapered fiber photonic crystal silicon waveguide coupler. There is a physical junction between the tapered fiber and the waveguide constituting a stand-alone device. This device is used to obtain the spectrum for cross two photon absorption coefficient per unit volume of interaction between photons of nondegenerate energy. The corresponding Kerr coefficient per unit volume of interaction is also experimentally extracted. The thermal resistance of the device is also experimentally determined and the response time of the device is estimated for on-chip all-optical signal processing and data transfer between optical signals of different photon energies.

  20. Dynamics of isolated-photon plus jet production in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Daniells, A. C.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dinut, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. 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A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pashapour, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Pretzl, K.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quilty, D.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radloff, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarrazin, B.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tuna, A. N.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of isolated-photon plus jet production in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been studied with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb. Measurements of isolated-photon plus jet bin-averaged cross sections are presented as functions of photon transverse energy, jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. In addition, the bin-averaged cross sections as functions of the difference between the azimuthal angles of the photon and the jet, the photon-jet invariant mass and the scattering angle in the photon-jet centre-of-mass frame have been measured. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations are compared to the measurements and provide a good description of the data, except for the case of the azimuthal opening angle.

  1. Single-Photon-Resolved Cross-Kerr Interaction for Autonomous Stabilization of Photon-Number States.

    PubMed

    Holland, E T; Vlastakis, B; Heeres, R W; Reagor, M J; Vool, U; Leghtas, Z; Frunzio, L; Kirchmair, G; Devoret, M H; Mirrahimi, M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2015-10-30

    Quantum states can be stabilized in the presence of intrinsic and environmental losses by either applying an active feedback condition on an ancillary system or through reservoir engineering. Reservoir engineering maintains a desired quantum state through a combination of drives and designed entropy evacuation. We propose and implement a quantum-reservoir engineering protocol that stabilizes Fock states in a microwave cavity. This protocol is realized with a circuit quantum electrodynamics platform where a Josephson junction provides direct, nonlinear coupling between two superconducting waveguide cavities. The nonlinear coupling results in a single-photon-resolved cross-Kerr effect between the two cavities enabling a photon-number-dependent coupling to a lossy environment. The quantum state of the microwave cavity is discussed in terms of a net polarization and is analyzed by a measurement of its steady state Wigner function. PMID:26565448

  2. Transitional behavior between self-Kerr and cross-Kerr effects by two photons

    SciTech Connect

    Koshino, Kazuki

    2007-06-15

    The transitional behavior of the two-photon Kerr effect between the self-Kerr and cross-Kerr cases is investigated. To this end, we have developed a semiclassical method for evaluating the two-photon Kerr effect that is applicable to any two-photon input state. It is revealed that the maximum Kerr effect is obtained when the second photon is input with a delay time that corresponds to the absorption time of the first photon by the optical material.

  3. Measurement of inclusive isolated prompt photon production at center of mass energy = 7 TeV with the ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hance, Michael

    Prompt photons at hadron colliders are useful probes of perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD), and are also found in signatures of new physics. A precise measurement of prompt photon production is both a useful test of theoretical models as well as an important step towards understanding final states that contain energetic photons. This thesis presents a measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of s = 7 TeV. The data are collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, and correspond to 35 pb-1 of integrated luminosity. The measurement is made in four photon pseudorapidity (etagamma) regions: 0 ≤ |etagamma| < 0.6; 0.6 ≤ |etagamma| < 1.37; 1.52 ≤ |eta gamma| < 1.81; and 1.81 ≤ |etagamma| < 2.37; and covers photon transverse energies ( EgT ) in the range 15 GeV ≤ EgT < 400 GeV. Photon candidates are reconstructed and identified through the use of the ATLAS calorimeter and tracking systems. The residual background, primarily from neutral meson decays, is estimated using in-situ techniques based on observed distributions of the total transverse energy in a narrow cone around the photon candidate. The measurements are compared to predictions from next-to-leading order pQCD calculations, with good agreement for photon transverse energies greater than 25 GeV.

  4. Momentum imbalance of isolated photon-tagged jet production at RHIC and LHC.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Vitev, Ivan; Zhang, Ben-Wei

    2013-04-01

    In collisions of ultrarelativistic nuclei, photon-tagged jets provide a unique opportunity to compare jet production and modification due to parton shower formation and propagation in strongly interacting matter at vastly different center-of-mass energies. We present first results for the cross sections of jets tagged by an isolated photon to O(α(em)α(s)(2)) in central Au+Au reactions with sqrt[s(NN)] = 200 GeV at RHIC and central Pb + Pb reactions with sqrt[s(NN)] = 2.76 TeV at LHC. We evaluate the increase in the transverse momentum imbalance of the observed γ + jet state, induced by the dissipation of the parton shower energy due to strong final-state interactions. Theoretical predictions to help interpret recent and upcoming experimental data are presented.

  5. Nonlinear Propagation of Crossing Electromagnetic Waves in Vacuum due to Photon-Photon Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, Daniele; Michinel, Humberto; Ferrando, Albert; Seco, Marcos

    2008-10-15

    We review the theory for photon-photon scattering in vacuum, and some of the proposals for its experimental search, including the results of our recent works on the subject. We then describe a very simple and sensitive proposal of an experiment and discuss how it can be used at the present (HERCULES) and the future (ELI) ultrahigh power laser facilities either to find the first evidence of photon-photon scattering in vacuum, or to significantly improve the current experimental limits.

  6. The two-photon excitation cross section of 6MAP, a fluorescent adenine analogue.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Robert J; Hou, Zhanjia; Yang, Aiping; Hawkins, Mary E

    2005-03-01

    6MAP is a fluorescent analogue of adenine that undergoes Watson-Crick base pairing and base stacking in double-stranded DNA. The one-photon absorption spectrum of 6MAP is characterized by a maximum around 330 nm with moderate quantum yield fluorescence centered at about 420 nm. To take advantage of this probe for confocal and single-molecule microscopy, it would be advantageous to be able to excite the analogue via two photons. We report the first determination of the two-photon excitation cross section and spectrum for 6MAP from 614 to 700 nm. The power dependence of the fluorescence indicates that emission results from the absorption of two photons. The one-photon and two-photon emission line shapes are identical within experimental error. A study of the concentration dependence of the fluorescence yield for one-photon excitation shows no measurable quenching up to about 5 microM. The maximum in the two-photon excitation spectrum gives a two-photon cross section, delta(TPE), of 3.4 +/- 0.1 Goeppert-Mayer (G.M.) at 659 nm, which correlates well with the one-photon absorption maximum. This compares quite favorably with cross sections of various naturally fluorescent biological molecules such as flavins and nicotiamide. In addition, we have also obtained the two-photon-induced fluorescence emission spectrum of quinine sulfate. It is approximately the same as that for one-photon excitation, suggesting that two-photon excitation of quinine sulfate may be used for calibration purposes.

  7. The two-photon excitation cross section of 6MAP, a fluorescent adenine analogue.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Robert J; Hou, Zhanjia; Yang, Aiping; Hawkins, Mary E

    2005-03-01

    6MAP is a fluorescent analogue of adenine that undergoes Watson-Crick base pairing and base stacking in double-stranded DNA. The one-photon absorption spectrum of 6MAP is characterized by a maximum around 330 nm with moderate quantum yield fluorescence centered at about 420 nm. To take advantage of this probe for confocal and single-molecule microscopy, it would be advantageous to be able to excite the analogue via two photons. We report the first determination of the two-photon excitation cross section and spectrum for 6MAP from 614 to 700 nm. The power dependence of the fluorescence indicates that emission results from the absorption of two photons. The one-photon and two-photon emission line shapes are identical within experimental error. A study of the concentration dependence of the fluorescence yield for one-photon excitation shows no measurable quenching up to about 5 microM. The maximum in the two-photon excitation spectrum gives a two-photon cross section, delta(TPE), of 3.4 +/- 0.1 Goeppert-Mayer (G.M.) at 659 nm, which correlates well with the one-photon absorption maximum. This compares quite favorably with cross sections of various naturally fluorescent biological molecules such as flavins and nicotiamide. In addition, we have also obtained the two-photon-induced fluorescence emission spectrum of quinine sulfate. It is approximately the same as that for one-photon excitation, suggesting that two-photon excitation of quinine sulfate may be used for calibration purposes. PMID:16851408

  8. Production of heralded pure single photons from imperfect sources using cross-phase-modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, Thomas; Nock, Michael; Scherer, Artur; Audretsch, Juergen

    2006-09-15

    Realistic single-photon sources do not generate single photons with certainty. Instead they produce statistical mixtures of photons in Fock states |1> and vacuum (noise). We describe how to eliminate the noise in the output of the sources by means of another noisy source or a coherent state and cross-phase-modulation (XPM). We present a scheme that announces the production of pure single photons and thus eliminates the vacuum contribution. This is done by verifying a XPM-related phase shift with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  9. Coherent destruction of tunneling in two-level system driven across avoided crossing via photon statistics

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Qiang; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the multi-order resonance and coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) for two-level system driven cross avoided crossing is investigated by employing the emitted photons 〈N〉 and the Mandel’s Q parameter based on the photon counting statistics. An asymmetric feature of CDT is shown in the spectrum of Mandel’s Q parameter. Also, the CDT can be employed to suppress the spontaneous decay and prolong waiting time noticeably. The photon emission pattern is of monotonicity in strong relaxation, and homogeneity in pure dephasing regime, respectively. PMID:27353375

  10. Coherent destruction of tunneling in two-level system driven across avoided crossing via photon statistics.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qiang; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the multi-order resonance and coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) for two-level system driven cross avoided crossing is investigated by employing the emitted photons 〈N〉 and the Mandel's Q parameter based on the photon counting statistics. An asymmetric feature of CDT is shown in the spectrum of Mandel's Q parameter. Also, the CDT can be employed to suppress the spontaneous decay and prolong waiting time noticeably. The photon emission pattern is of monotonicity in strong relaxation, and homogeneity in pure dephasing regime, respectively. PMID:27353375

  11. Ultra-low crosstalk, CMOS compatible waveguide crossings for densely integrated photonic interconnection networks.

    PubMed

    Jones, Adam M; DeRose, Christopher T; Lentine, Anthony L; Trotter, Douglas C; Starbuck, Andrew L; Norwood, Robert A

    2013-05-20

    We explore the design space for optimizing CMOS compatible waveguide crossings on a silicon photonics platform. This paper presents simulated and experimental excess loss and crosstalk suppression data for vertically integrated silicon nitride over silicon-on-insulator waveguide crossings. Experimental results show crosstalk suppression exceeding -49/-44 dB with simulation results as low as -65/-60 dB for the TE/TM mode in a waveguide crossing with a 410 nm vertical gap. PMID:23736422

  12. Ultra-low crosstalk, CMOS compatible waveguide crossings for densely integrated photonic interconnection networks.

    PubMed

    Jones, Adam M; DeRose, Christopher T; Lentine, Anthony L; Trotter, Douglas C; Starbuck, Andrew L; Norwood, Robert A

    2013-05-20

    We explore the design space for optimizing CMOS compatible waveguide crossings on a silicon photonics platform. This paper presents simulated and experimental excess loss and crosstalk suppression data for vertically integrated silicon nitride over silicon-on-insulator waveguide crossings. Experimental results show crosstalk suppression exceeding -49/-44 dB with simulation results as low as -65/-60 dB for the TE/TM mode in a waveguide crossing with a 410 nm vertical gap.

  13. Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Section of Metal Ions by a Mass Sedimentation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Song, Jun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The photo-reduction of metal ions in solution induced by femtosecond laser is an important and novel method for fabricating three-dimensional metal microstructures. However, the nonlinear absorption cross section of metal ions remains unknown because its measurement is difficult. In the present study, a method based on Two-Photon Excited Sedimentation (TPES) is proposed to measure the two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of metal ions in solution. The power-squared dependence of the amount of sediment on the excitation intensity was confirmed, revealing that 800 nm femtosecond laser induced reduction of metal ions was a two photon absorption process. We believe that the proposed method may be applied to measure the TPACS of several metal ions, thereby opening a new avenue towards future analysis of two-photon absorption materials. PMID:26657990

  14. Physics guide to CEPXS: A multigroup coupled electron-photon cross-section generating code

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Morel, J.E.; Valdez, G.D.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Applied Methods, Inc., Albuquerque, NM )

    1989-10-01

    CEPXS is a multigroup-Legendre cross-section generating code. The multigroup-Legendre cross sections produced by CEPXS enable coupled electron-photon transport calculations to be performed with the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code, ONEDANT. We recommend that the 1989 version of ONEDANT that contains linear-discontinuous spatial differencing and S2 synthetic acceleration be used for such calculations. CEPXS/ONEDANT effectively solves the Boltzmann-CSD transport equation for electrons and the Boltzmann transport equation for photons over the energy range from 100 MeV to 1.0 keV. The continuous slowing-down approximation is used for those electron interactions that result in small-energy losses. The extended transport correction is applied to the forward-peaked elastic scattering cross section for electrons. A standard multigroup-Legendre treatment is used for the other coupled electron-photon cross sections. CEPXS extracts electron cross-section information from the DATAPAC data set and photon cross-section information from Biggs-Lighthill data. The model that is used for ionization/relaxation in CEPXS is essentially the same as that employed in ITS. 43 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Total cross section for photon absorption by two protons in [sup 3]He

    SciTech Connect

    Emura, T.; Endo, S.; Huber, G.M.; Itoh, H.; Kato, S.; Koike, M.; Konno, O.; Lasiuk, B.; Lolos, G.J.; Maeda, K.; Maki, T.; Maruyama, K.; Miyamoto, H.; Naridomi, R.; Niki, K.; Ogata, T.; Rangacharyulu, C.; Sasaki, A.; Suda, T.; Sumi, Y.; Wada, Y.; Yamazaki, H. Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 724 Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, SK, S4S0A2 Department of Physics, Saga University, Saga 840 Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tanashi, Tokyo 188 Laboratory of Nuclear Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 982 Department of Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N0W0 Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980 University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushi 807 College of General Education, Akita University, Akita, 010

    1994-07-18

    The [sup 3]He([gamma],[ital pp])[ital n] reaction was investigated in the photon energy range 200--500 MeV using the spectrometer TAGX, which has a solid angle for protons of [pi] sr. Two types of photon absorption, one by two protons and the other by three nucleons, were observed by looking at the undetected neutron momentum distributions. The total cross section for photon absorption by two protons shows that this process is consistent with the [ital E]2 transition.

  16. Photon scattering cross sections of H2 and He measured with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ice, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    Total (elastic + inelastic) differential photon scattering cross sections have been measured for H2 gas and He, using an X-ray beam. Absolute measured cross sections agree with theory within the probable errors. Relative cross sections (normalized to theory at large S) agree to better than one percent with theoretical values calculated from wave functions that include the effect of electron-electron Coulomb correlation, but the data deviate significantly from theoretical independent-particle (e.g., Hartree-Fock) results. The ratios of measured absolute He cross sections to those of H2, at any given S, also agree to better than one percent with theoretical He-to-H2 cross-section ratios computed from correlated wave functions. It appears that photon scattering constitutes a very promising tool for probing electron correlation in light atoms and molecules.

  17. Bidirectional transfer of quantum information for unknown photons via cross-Kerr nonlinearity and photon-number-resolving measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jino, Heo; Chang-Ho, Hong; Dong-Hoon, Lee; Hyung-Jin, Yang

    2016-02-01

    We propose an arbitrary controlled-unitary (CU) gate and a bidirectional transfer scheme of quantum information (BTQI) for unknown photons. The proposed CU gate utilizes quantum non-demolition photon-number-resolving measurement based on the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities (XKNLs) and two quantum bus beams; the proposed CU gate consists of consecutive operations of a controlled-path gate and a gathering-path gate. It is almost deterministic and is feasible with current technology when a strong amplitude of the coherent state and weak XKNLs are employed. Compared with the existing optical multi-qubit or controlled gates, which utilize XKNLs and homodyne detectors, the proposed CU gate can increase experimental realization feasibility and enhance robustness against decoherence. According to the CU gate, we present a BTQI scheme in which the two unknown states of photons between two parties (Alice and Bob) are mutually swapped by transferring only a single photon. Consequently, by using the proposed CU gate, it is possible to experimentally implement the BTQI scheme with a certain probability of success.

  18. Two-photon excitation cross-section in light and intermediate atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1980-01-01

    The method of explicit summation over the intermediate states is used along with LS coupling to derive an expression for two-photon absorption cross section in light and intermediate atoms in terms of integrals over radial wave functions. Two selection rules, one exact and one approximate, are also derived. In evaluating the radial integrals, for low-lying levels, the Hartree-Fock wave functions, and for high-lying levels, hydrogenic wave functions obtained by the quantum defect method are used. A relationship between the cross section and the oscillator strengths is derived. Cross sections due to selected transitions in nitrogen, oxygen, and chlorine are given. The expression for the cross section is useful in calculating the two-photon absorption in light and intermediate atoms.

  19. Quantum teleportation of a generic two-photon state with weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meiyu; Yan, Fengli

    2016-08-01

    We present a scheme for teleporting a generic two-photon polarization state by using two EPR states as quantum channel based on weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities. As the core component of the present framework, the quantum nondemolition detector based on the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity acts as an EPR entangler as well as the Bell-state analyzer. This makes the teleportation protocol be achieved near deterministically and be feasible in the current experimental technology.

  20. CT14QED parton distribution functions from isolated photon production in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Pumplin, Jon; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the implementation of quantum electrodynamic (QED) evolution at leading order (LO) along with quantum chromodynamic (QCD) evolution at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the CTEQ-TEA global analysis package. The inelastic contribution to the photon parton distribution function (PDF) is described by a two-parameter ansatz, coming from radiation off the valence quarks, and based on the CT14 NLO PDFs. Setting the two parameters to be equal allows us to completely specify the inelastic photon PDF in terms of the inelastic momentum fraction carried by the photon, p0γ, at the initial scale Q0=1.295 GeV . We obtain constraints on the photon PDF by comparing with ZEUS data [S. Chekanov et al. (ZEUS Collaboration), Phys. Lett. B 687, 16 (2010)] on the production of isolated photons in deep inelastic scattering, e p →e γ +X . For this comparison we present a new perturbative calculation of the process that consistently combines the photon-initiated contribution with the quark-initiated contribution. Comparison with the data allows us to put a constraint at the 90% confidence level of p0γ≲0.14 % for the inelastic photon PDF at the initial scale of Q0=1.295 GeV in the one-parameter radiative ansatz. The resulting inelastic CT14QED PDFs will be made available to the public. In addition, we also provide CT14QEDinc PDFs, in which the inclusive photon PDF at the scale Q0 is defined by the sum of the inelastic photon PDF and the elastic photon distribution obtained from the equivalent photon approximation.

  1. Probabilistically cloning two single-photon states using weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Rui, Pinshu; Zhang, Ziyun; Yang, Qun

    2014-08-01

    By using quantum nondemolition detectors (QNDs) based on weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities, we propose an experimental scheme for achieving 1\\to 2 probabilistic quantum cloning (PQC) of a single-photon state, secretly choosing from a two-state set. In our scheme, after a QND is performed on the to-be-cloned photon and the assistant photon, a single-photon projection measurement is performed by a polarization beam splitter (PBS) and two single-photon trigger detectors (SPTDs). The measurement is to judge whether the PQC should be continued. If the cloning fails, a cutoff is carried out and some operations are omitted. This makes our scheme economical. If the PQC is continued according to the measurement result, two more QNDs and some unitary operations are performed on the to-be-cloned photon and the cloning photon to achieve the PQC in a nearly deterministic way. Our experimental scheme for PQC is feasible for future technology. Furthermore, the quantum logic network of our PQC scheme is presented. In comparison with similar networks, our PQC network is simpler and more economical.

  2. Photonic arbitrary waveform generation based on crossed frequency to time mapping.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H-Y; Yan, L-S; Sun, Y-F; Ye, J; Pan, W; Luo, B; Zou, X-H

    2013-03-11

    Microwave photonic arbitrary waveform generation based on incoherent frequency-to-time-mapping (FTTM) accompanied by intersymbol interference, so called crossed FTTM (CFTTM). The pulse shape can be defined and tuned by properly adjusting the spectrum shaper (symbol shape) and the degree of intersymbol interference. UWB-, triangular-, rectangle-, comb- and user-defined pulse shapes are experimentally obtained.

  3. Hadroproduction of t-anti-t pair with two isolated photons with PowHel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardos, A.; Trócsányi, Z.

    2015-08-01

    We simulate the hadroproduction of a t t bar pair in association with two isolated hard photons at 13 TeV LHC using the PowHel package. We use the generated events, stored according to the Les-Houches event format, to make predictions for differential distributions formally at the next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy. We present predictions at the hadron level employing the cone-type isolation of the photons used by experiments. We also compare the kinematic distributions to the same distributions obtained in the t t bar H final state when the Higgs-boson decays into a photon pair, to which the process discussed here is an irreducible background.

  4. Exceptionally large two- and three-photon absorption cross-sections by OPV organometalation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Beibei; Mazur, Leszek M; Morshedi, Mahbod; Barlow, Adam; Wang, Huan; Quintana, Cristóbal; Zhang, Chi; Samoc, Marek; Cifuentes, Marie P; Humphrey, Mark G

    2016-07-01

    Oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs) containing up to 8 PV units and end-functionalized by ruthenium alkynyl groups have been prepared and their nonlinear absorption properties assessed using the Z-scan technique and employing low repetition rate femtosecond pulses. Exceptionally large two-photon absorption (ca. 12 500 GM at 725 nm) and three-photon absorption cross sections (ca. 1.6 × 10(-76) cm(6) s(2) at 1100 nm) are found for the 8PV-containing example, highlighting the potential of an "organometalation" approach to NLO-efficient organic materials. PMID:27297290

  5. Synthetic dimensions in integrated photonics: From optical isolation to four-dimensional quantum Hall physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Goldman, Nathan; Zilberberg, Oded; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-04-01

    Recent technological advances in integrated photonics have spurred on the study of topological phenomena in engineered bosonic systems. Indeed, the controllability of silicon ring-resonator arrays has opened up new perspectives for building lattices for photons with topologically nontrivial bands and integrating them into photonic devices for practical applications. Here, we push these developments even further by exploiting the different modes of a silicon ring resonator as an extra dimension for photons. Tunneling along this synthetic dimension is implemented via an external time-dependent modulation that allows for the generation of engineered gauge fields. We show how this approach can be used to generate a variety of exciting topological phenomena in integrated photonics, ranging from a topologically-robust optical isolator in a spatially one-dimensional (1D) ring-resonator chain to a driven-dissipative analog of the 4D quantum Hall effect in a spatially 3D resonator lattice. Our proposal paves the way towards the use of topological effects in the design of novel photonic lattices supporting many frequency channels and displaying higher connectivities.

  6. Deterministic reshaping of single-photon spectra using cross-phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    The frequency conversion of light has proved to be a crucial technology for communication, spectroscopy, imaging, and signal processing. In the quantum regime, it also offers great potential for realizing quantum networks incorporating disparate physical systems and quantum-enhanced information processing over a large computational space. The frequency conversion of quantum light, such as single photons, has been extensively investigated for the last two decades using all-optical frequency mixing, with the ultimate goal of realizing lossless and noiseless conversion. I demonstrate another route to this target using frequency conversion induced by cross-phase modulation in a dispersion-managed photonic crystal fiber. Owing to the deterministic and all-optical nature of the process, the lossless and low-noise spectral reshaping of a single-photon wave packet in the telecommunication band has been readily achieved with a modulation bandwidth as large as 0.4 THz. I further demonstrate that the scheme is applicable to manipulations of a nonclassical frequency correlation, wave packet interference, and entanglement between two photons. This approach presents a new coherent frequency interface for photons for quantum information processing.

  7. Deterministic reshaping of single-photon spectra using cross-phase modulation

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The frequency conversion of light has proved to be a crucial technology for communication, spectroscopy, imaging, and signal processing. In the quantum regime, it also offers great potential for realizing quantum networks incorporating disparate physical systems and quantum-enhanced information processing over a large computational space. The frequency conversion of quantum light, such as single photons, has been extensively investigated for the last two decades using all-optical frequency mixing, with the ultimate goal of realizing lossless and noiseless conversion. I demonstrate another route to this target using frequency conversion induced by cross-phase modulation in a dispersion-managed photonic crystal fiber. Owing to the deterministic and all-optical nature of the process, the lossless and low-noise spectral reshaping of a single-photon wave packet in the telecommunication band has been readily achieved with a modulation bandwidth as large as 0.4 THz. I further demonstrate that the scheme is applicable to manipulations of a nonclassical frequency correlation, wave packet interference, and entanglement between two photons. This approach presents a new coherent frequency interface for photons for quantum information processing. PMID:27051862

  8. Diphoton and photon + b/c cross sections at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Bocci, A.; /Rockefeller U.

    2004-12-01

    A measurement of the rate of prompt diphoton production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF detector is presented. The results are compared to a NLO calculation. they also measured the {gamma} + b and {gamma} + c cross sections comparing the results with PYTHIA LO predictions. The background from non-prompt sources is estimated using a statistical method based on differences in electromagnetic showers initiated by photons and by the background.

  9. Photoneutron Cross Section Measurements on {sup 9}Be Using Laser-Induced Compton-Backscattered Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, Hiroaki; Yonezawa, Yoriko; Akimune, Hidetoshi; Yamagata, Tamio; Ohta, Masahisa; Fujishiro, Masatoshi; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2000-12-31

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for {sup 9}Be in the energy range from 1.77 to 3.75 MeV using quasi-monochromatic {gamma}-rays produced in laser-induced Compton backscattering. These cross sections are relevant to the reaction rate of the first step of the {alpha}-process of Type II and Type Ib supernovae, i.e. {alpha}({alpha}n,{gamma}){sup 9}Be. Results are compared to the data taken with other photon sources like radioactive isotopes and Bremsstrahlung.

  10. Determination of Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Section of Noble Gases for Calibration of Laser Spectroscopic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M. I. de la; Perez, C.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.

    2008-10-22

    The objective of our work is to apply two-photon polarization spectroscopy as a new calibration method for the determination of two-photon excitation cross-sections of noble gases, like Xe and Kr, which are commonly used for calibrations of MP-LIF techniques in other laboratories.

  11. Review of photon interaction cross section data in the medical and biological context.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, J H

    1999-01-01

    The probability of a photon (x-ray, gamma-ray, bremsstrahlung, etc) of a given energy E undergoing absorption or scattering when traversing a layer of material Z can be expressed quantitatively in terms of a linear attenuation coefficient mu (cm(-1)). Since mu is dependent on the material's density, rho (g cm(-3)), which can be variable, the quantity usually tabulated is the mass attenuation coefficient mu/rho (cm2 g(-1)) in which the dependence on the density has been removed. Mu/rho, in turn, can be obtained as the sum of the different types of possible interactions of photons with atoms of the material. For photon energies below 1 MeV the major interaction processes to be considered are incoherent (Compton) scattering, coherent (Rayleigh) scattering and atomic photoeffect absorption. Above 1 MeV one must also include nuclear-field pair production and atomic-field (triplet) production, and above 5 MeV one in principle should include photonuclear absorption, although the latter is neglected in data tabulations up to the present time. This review includes a selective history of measurements and theory relating to mu/rho from the turn of the century up to the present time, and is intended to provide a basis for further calculations and critical tabulations of photon cross section data, particularly as required by users in radiation medicine and biology. The mass energy-absorption coefficient mu(en)/rho is also briefly discussed.

  12. Microfluidic channels with ultralow-loss waveguide crossings for various chip-integrated photonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Yan, Hai; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Subbaraman, Harish; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, D L; Wang, Alan X; Chen, Ray T

    2015-04-01

    Traditional silicon waveguides are defined by waveguide trenches on either side of the high-index silicon core that leads to fluid leakage orifices for over-layed microfluidic channels. Closing the orifices needs additional fabrication steps which may include oxide deposition and planarization. We experimentally demonstrated a new type of microfluidic channel design with ultralow-loss waveguide crossings (0.00248 dB per crossings). The waveguide crossings and all other on-chip passive-waveguide components are fabricated in one step with no additional planarization steps which eliminates any orifices and leads to leak-free fluid flow. Such designs are applicable in all optical-waveguide-based sensing applications where the analyte must be flowed over the sensor. The new channel design was demonstrated in a L55 photonic crystal sensor operating between 1540 and 1580 nm.

  13. Microfluidic channels with ultralow-loss waveguide crossings for various chip-integrated photonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Yan, Hai; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Subbaraman, Harish; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, D L; Wang, Alan X; Chen, Ray T

    2015-04-01

    Traditional silicon waveguides are defined by waveguide trenches on either side of the high-index silicon core that leads to fluid leakage orifices for over-layed microfluidic channels. Closing the orifices needs additional fabrication steps which may include oxide deposition and planarization. We experimentally demonstrated a new type of microfluidic channel design with ultralow-loss waveguide crossings (0.00248 dB per crossings). The waveguide crossings and all other on-chip passive-waveguide components are fabricated in one step with no additional planarization steps which eliminates any orifices and leads to leak-free fluid flow. Such designs are applicable in all optical-waveguide-based sensing applications where the analyte must be flowed over the sensor. The new channel design was demonstrated in a L55 photonic crystal sensor operating between 1540 and 1580 nm. PMID:25831385

  14. Deterministic distribution of four-photon Dicke state over an arbitrary collective-noise channel with cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Yan, Feng-Li; Gao, Ting

    2016-07-01

    We present two deterministic quantum entanglement distribution protocols for a four-photon Dicke polarization entangled state resorting to the frequency and spatial degrees of freedom, which are immune to an arbitrary collective-noise channel. Both of the protocols adopt the X homodyne measurement based on the cross-Kerr nonlinearity to complete the task of the single-photon detection with nearly unit probability in principle. After the four receivers share the photons, they add some local unitary operations to obtain a standard four-photon Dicke polarization entangled state.

  15. Deterministic distribution of four-photon Dicke state over an arbitrary collective-noise channel with cross-Kerr nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Yan, Feng-Li; Gao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    We present two deterministic quantum entanglement distribution protocols for a four-photon Dicke polarization entangled state resorting to the frequency and spatial degrees of freedom, which are immune to an arbitrary collective-noise channel. Both of the protocols adopt the X homodyne measurement based on the cross-Kerr nonlinearity to complete the task of the single-photon detection with nearly unit probability in principle. After the four receivers share the photons, they add some local unitary operations to obtain a standard four-photon Dicke polarization entangled state. PMID:27412489

  16. Deterministic distribution of four-photon Dicke state over an arbitrary collective-noise channel with cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Yan, Feng-Li; Gao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    We present two deterministic quantum entanglement distribution protocols for a four-photon Dicke polarization entangled state resorting to the frequency and spatial degrees of freedom, which are immune to an arbitrary collective-noise channel. Both of the protocols adopt the X homodyne measurement based on the cross-Kerr nonlinearity to complete the task of the single-photon detection with nearly unit probability in principle. After the four receivers share the photons, they add some local unitary operations to obtain a standard four-photon Dicke polarization entangled state. PMID:27412489

  17. Two-photon induced collagen cross-linking in bioartificial cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuetemeyer, Kai; Kensah, George; Heidrich, Marko; Meyer, Heiko; Martin, Ulrich; Gruh, Ina; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising strategy for regenerative therapies to overcome the shortage of donor organs for transplantation. Besides contractile function, the stiffness of tissue engineered constructs is crucial to generate transplantable tissue surrogates with sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the high pressure present in the heart. Although several collagen cross-linking techniques have proven to be efficient in stabilizing biomaterials, they cannot be applied to cardiac tissue engineering, as cell death occurs in the treated area. Here, we present a novel method using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to increase the stiffness of collagen-based tissue constructs without impairing cell viability. Raster scanning of the fs laser beam over riboflavin-treated tissue induced collagen cross-linking by two-photon photosensitized singlet oxygen production. One day post-irradiation, stress-strain measurements revealed increased tissue stiffness by around 40% being dependent on the fibroblast content in the tissue. At the same time, cells remained viable and fully functional as demonstrated by fluorescence imaging of cardiomyocyte mitochondrial activity and preservation of active contraction force. Our results indicate that two-photon induced collagen cross-linking has great potential for studying and improving artificially engineered tissue for regenerative therapies.

  18. Using DNA origami nanostructures to determine absolute cross sections for UV photon-induced DNA strand breakage.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stefanie; Rackwitz, Jenny; Schürman, Robin; Prinz, Julia; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Bald, Ilko

    2015-11-19

    We have characterized ultraviolet (UV) photon-induced DNA strand break processes by determination of absolute cross sections for photoabsorption and for sequence-specific DNA single strand breakage induced by photons in an energy range from 6.50 to 8.94 eV. These represent the lowest-energy photons able to induce DNA strand breaks. Oligonucleotide targets are immobilized on a UV transparent substrate in controlled quantities through attachment to DNA origami templates. Photon-induced dissociation of single DNA strands is visualized and quantified using atomic force microscopy. The obtained quantum yields for strand breakage vary between 0.06 and 0.5, indicating highly efficient DNA strand breakage by UV photons, which is clearly dependent on the photon energy. Above the ionization threshold strand breakage becomes clearly the dominant form of DNA radiation damage, which is then also dependent on the nucleotide sequence.

  19. Quantum computation based on photonic systems with two degrees of freedom assisted by the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Most of previous quantum computations only take use of one degree of freedom (DoF) of photons. An experimental system may possess various DoFs simultaneously. In this paper, with the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity, we investigate the parallel quantum computation dependent on photonic systems with two DoFs. We construct nearly deterministic controlled-not (CNOT) gates operating on the polarization spatial DoFs of the two-photon or one-photon system. These CNOT gates show that two photonic DoFs can be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoF in theory. Only the coherent states are required. Thus one half of quantum simulation resources may be saved in quantum applications if more complicated circuits are involved. Hence, one may trade off the implementation complexity and simulation resources by using different photonic systems. These CNOT gates are also used to complete various applications including the quantum teleportation and quantum superdense coding.

  20. Two-photon double ionization of the H2 molecule: Cross sections and amplitude analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.

    2013-02-01

    We perform time-dependent calculations of triply differential cross sections (TDCS) of two-photon double-electron ionization of the aligned H2 molecule. Our TDCS results for equal energy sharing between photoelectrons agree quite well with a recent time-dependent calculation by Guan [X. Guan, K. Bartschat, and B. I. Schneider, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.77.043421 77, 043421 (2008)] who employed a slightly different numerical technique. We supplement these studies by calculating TDCS at an unequal energy sharing and by generating symmetrized ionization amplitudes.

  1. Detection of single nano-defects in photonic crystals between crossed polarizers.

    PubMed

    Grepstad, Jon Olav; Kaspar, Peter; Johansen, Ib-Rune; Solgaard, Olav; Sudbø, Aasmund

    2013-12-16

    We investigate, by simulations and experiments, the light scattering of small particles trapped in photonic crystal membranes supporting guided resonance modes. Our results show that, due to amplified Rayleigh small particle scattering, such membranes can be utilized to make a sensor that can detect single nano-particles. We have designed a biomolecule sensor that uses cross-polarized excitation and detection for increased sensitivity. Estimated using Rayleigh scattering theory and simulation results, the current fabricated sensor has a detection limit of 26 nm, corresponding to the size of a single virus. The sensor can potentially be made both cheap and compact, to facilitate use at point-of-care.

  2. High-energy behavior of photon, neutrino, and proton cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles, Carlos A.; Halzen, Francis; Wille, Logan; Kroll, Mike; Reno, Mary Hall

    2015-10-01

    By combining the color dipole model of the nucleon with the assumption that cross sections behave asymptotically as ln2(s ), we are able to describe the data for photon, neutrino and hadron interactions with protons at all energies; s is the center-of-mass energy of the interacting particles. Specifically, we extrapolate the perturbative QCD calculations into the regime of small fractional parton momenta x using a color dipole description of the proton target that guarantees an asymptotic ln2(s ) behavior of all cross sections. The ambiguity of introducing a parametrization associated with the dipole approximation is mitigated by the requirement that the saturation of the small-x structure functions produce ln2(s )-behaved asymptotic cross sections, in agreement with the data. The same formalism allows us to calculate the cross section for the hadronic pair production of charm particles. The results, in particular those for the high-energy neutrino and charm cross sections, are relevant for evaluating the sensitivity as well as the background in neutrino telescopes.

  3. Negative refraction in a photonic crystal with a metallic cross lattice basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Mark S.; Aitchison, J. Stewart; Mojahedi, Mohammad

    2005-04-01

    A metamaterial with a negative effective index of refraction is made from a two-dimensional square lattice photonic crystal with a metallic cross lattice basis. A simple procedure is given to design a negative index band within a desired frequency range. The operating frequency is made sufficiently low so as to avoid high orders of diffraction from a slab. An effective index of -1 , which is a requirement for perfect lensing, is designed. In addition, the structure is optimized to exhibit the largest possible bandwidth of negative refraction, while ensuring an isotropic response and efficient coupling from free space. Simulation results show negative refraction of a Gaussian beam through a prism of such a metamaterial. The simplicity and versatility of the structure make it a suitable candidate for frequencies into the infrared region. The dispersive nature of the metallic crosses and planar fabrication are also discussed.

  4. Cross sections of one- and two-photon detachment of the hydrogen negative ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazdzersky, V. A.; Usachenko, V. I.; Ushnurtsev, A. V.

    2000-03-01

    The model non-local separable Yamaguchi potential is proposed as being particularly appropriate for the description of the interaction of a detached electron with its parent residual atomic core in a theoretical treatment of the processes of H- negative ion multiphoton detachment in a monochromatic electromagnetic (EM) field of both linear and circular polarization. Within the framework of that model we derive exact analytical expressions for the cross sections of the one- and two-photon H- detachment processes in the lowest orders of perturbation theory on EM interaction of the detached electron with an ionizing field and studied the effect of various values of the problem parameters. We show that both obtained cross sections are in good agreement with the values measured in relevant experiments and the best results calculated by other authors with different (but much more sophisticated and complicated) approaches and methods.

  5. Adjoint ITS calculations using the CEPXS electron-photon cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.J.; Kensek, R.P.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    Continuous-energy Monte Carlo Codes are not generally suited for adjoint coupled electron-photon transport. Line radiation (e.g., fluorescence) is especially difficult to implement in adjoint mode with continuous-energy codes. The only published work on adjoint electron Monte Carlo transport is Jordan. The adjoint capability of his NOVICE code is expedited by a multigroup approximation. More recently, a Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck (BFP) Monte Carlo technique has been developed for adjoint electron transport. As in NOVICE, particle transport with BFP Monte Carlo is neither entirely continuous energy nor entirely multigroup. The BFP method has been tested in the multigroup version of MCNP and is being integrated into the ITS code package. Multigroup data produced by the CEPXS cross-section-generating code is needed to operate the BFP codes in adjoint electron-photon mode. In this paper, we present adjoint electron-photon transport results obtained with a new version of CEPXS and a new multigroup version of ITS.

  6. Two-photon absorption cross section measurement in the gamma band system of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, J.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A dye laser with a single longitudinal mode and very stable spatial mode structure has been constructed. With this laser system a four-wave mixing experiment was done in the gamma bands of nitric oxide using two photon resonance. Another four-wave mixing experiment was done in nitrogen using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and the two signals ratioed. Using accurately known values of the Raman scattering cross section, the third order susceptibility in NO was determined without needing to know the spatial and temporal properties of the dye lasers. From this susceptibility, the two photon absorption cross section was calculated with the explicit dependence of sigma/sup (2)/ upon X/sup (3)/ shown. For the R/sub 22/ + S/sub 12/(J'' = 9 1/2) (A/sup 2/..sigma..+(v' = 0) -- X/sup 2/..pi..(v'' = 0)) line, sigma/sup (2)/ = (1.0 +/- 0.6) x 10/sup -38/cm/sup 4/g(2/sub 1/-Vertical Barsub f/ is the normalized lineshape. Branching ratios for the A/sup 2/..sigma..+(v' = n) ..-->.. X/sup 2/..omega..(v'' = n)(n = o,...9) transitions of NO were also measured, Franck-Condon factors calculated and the lifetime of the A state determined.

  7. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production using the full CDF run II data sample.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; De Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-03-01

    This Letter reports a measurement of the cross section for producing pairs of central prompt isolated photons in proton-antiproton collisions at a total energy sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to 9.5 fb(-1) integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measured differential cross section is compared to three calculations derived from the theory of strong interactions. These include a prediction based on a leading order matrix element calculation merged with a parton shower model, a next-to-leading order calculation, and a next-to-next-to-leading order calculation. The first and last calculations reproduce most aspects of the data, thus showing the importance of higher-order contributions for understanding the theory of strong interaction and improving measurements of the Higgs boson and searches for new phenomena in diphoton final states.

  8. Measurement of the Cross Section for Prompt Isolated Diphoton Production Using the Full CDF Run II Data Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-03-01

    This Letter reports a measurement of the cross section for producing pairs of central prompt isolated photons in proton-antiproton collisions at a total energy s=1.96TeV using data corresponding to 9.5fb-1 integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measured differential cross section is compared to three calculations derived from the theory of strong interactions. These include a prediction based on a leading order matrix element calculation merged with a parton shower model, a next-to-leading order calculation, and a next-to-next-to-leading order calculation. The first and last calculations reproduce most aspects of the data, thus showing the importance of higher-order contributions for understanding the theory of strong interaction and improving measurements of the Higgs boson and searches for new phenomena in diphoton final states.

  9. Thermo-optically tuned photonic resonators with concurrent electrical connection and thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Zortman, William A.; Savignon, Daniel J.

    2016-06-14

    A photonic resonator system is designed to use thermal tuning to adjust the resonant wavelength of each resonator in the system, with a separate tuning circuit associated with each resonator so that individual adjustments may be made. The common electrical ground connection between the tuning circuits is particularly formed to provide thermal isolation between adjacent resonators by including a capacitor along each return path to ground, where the presence of the capacitor's dielectric material provides the thermal isolation. The use of capacitively coupling necessarily requires the use of an AC current as an input to the heater element (conductor/resistor) of each resonator, where the RMS value of the AC signal is indicative of the amount of heat that is generated along the element and the degree of wavelength tuning that is obtained.

  10. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  11. Generation of broad-group neutron/photon cross-section libraries for shielding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Roussin, R.W.; Fu, C.Y.; White, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The generation and use of multigroup cross-section libraries with broad energy group structures is primarily for the economy of computer resources. Also, the establishment of reference broad-group libraries is desirable in order to avoid duplication of effort, both in terms of the data generation and verification, and to assure a common data base for all participants in a specific project. Uncertainties are inevitably introduced into the broad-group cross sections due to approximations in the grouping procedure. The dominant uncertainty is generally with regard to the energy weighting function used to average the pointwise or fine-group data within a single broad group. Intelligent choice of the weighting functions can reduce such uncertainties. Also, judicious selection of the energy group structure can help to reduce the sensitivity of the computed responses to the weighting function, at least for a selected set of problems. Two new multigroup cross section libraries have been recently generated from ENDF/B-V data for two specific shielding applications. The first library was prepared for use in sodium-cooled reactor systems and is available in both broad-group structures. The second library, just recently completed, was prepared for use in air-over-ground environments and is available in a broad-group (46-neutron, 23-photon) energy structure. The selection of the specific group structures and weighting functions was an important part of the generation of both libraries.

  12. Molecular differential cross sections for low angle photon scattering in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartari, Agostino

    1999-08-01

    Measurements of molecular cross sections of coherently scattered photons were obtained by means of powder diffraction data analysis in the interval χ=0-6.4 nm -1 ( χ=sin( θ/2)/ λ; where θ is the scattering angle and λ the incident wavelength in units of nm). Accurate correction procedures were applied to the raw diffraction data. Data for fat and PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate)—reported in a previous analysis (Tartari A, Casnati E, Bonifazzi C, Baraldi C, 1997b. Phys. Med. Biol. 42, 2551-2560.—were found to agree quite well when compared to the results obtained with different quality of beams and analysis techniques. Investigation on bony tissue is presented for the first time, and a simple model has been carried out in order to segment the mineral and non-mineral components. Finally, a basic set of curves for the linear differential scattering coefficient is proposed in order to simulate photons scattering by tissue in terms of linear combination of such curves.

  13. All-optical transistor action with bistable switching in a photonic crystal cross-waveguide geometry.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih; Fan, Shanhui; Soljacić, Marin; Joannopoulos, J D

    2003-12-15

    We demonstrate all-optical switching action in a nonlinear photonic crystal cross-waveguide geometry with instantaneous Kerr nonlinearity, in which the transmission of a signal can be reversibly switched on and off by a control input. Our geometry accomplishes both spatial and spectral separation between the signal and the control in the nonlinear regime. The device occupies a small footprint of a few micrometers squared and requires only a few milliwatts of power at a 10-Gbit/s switching rate by use of Kerr nonlinearity in AlGaAs below half the electronic bandgap. We also show that the switching dynamics, as revealed by both coupled-mode theory and finite-difference time domain simulations, exhibits collective behavior that can be exploited to generate high-contrast logic levels and all-optical memory.

  14. Absolute Rb one-color two-photon ionization cross-section measurement near a quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Takekoshi, T.; Brooke, G.M.; Patterson, B.M.; Knize, R.J.

    2004-05-01

    We observe destructive interference in the ground-state Rb two-photon ionization cross section when the single photon energy is tuned between the 5S{yields}5P and 5S{yields}6P transition energies. The minimum cross section is 5.9(1.5)x10{sup -52} cm{sup 4} s and it occurs at a wavelength of 441.0(3) nm (in vacuo). Relative measurements of these cross sections are made at various wavelengths by counting ions produced when magneto-optically trapped Rb atoms are exposed to light from a tunable pulsed laser. This relative curve is calibrated to an absolute cross-section measurement at 532 nm using the trap loss method. A simple calculation agrees reasonably with our results.

  15. Measurement of the photon electroproduction cross section at JLAB with the goal of performing a Rosenbluth separation of the DVCS contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Arguello, Alejandro Marti

    2014-07-11

    experiment is the isolation of the contribution from the term coming form the DVCS from the interference term, resulting from the BH contribution. This isolation is known as "Rosenbluth Separation". The work presented in this thesis focuses on the analysis of the data stored by the electromagnetic calorimeter, employed for the detection of real photons. There is also a a theoretical introduction to the study of the nucleon structure, reviewing the concepts of form factors and parton distributions through elastic and inelastic processes. The computation of the photon leptoproduction cross section is described in detail, as well as the goals of experiment E07-007. This thesis also describes the analysis of the data stored by the electromagnetic calorimeter, with the purpose of obtaining the kinematic variables of the real photons resulting from DVCS reactions. Finally, it describes the selection of events from stored data, the applied cuts to kinematical variables and the background subtraction. Also, the process of extraction of the necessary observables for computing the photon leptoproduction cross section is described, along with the main steps followed to perform the Monte Carlo simulation used in this computation. The resulting cross sections are shown at the end of this thesis.

  16. Complete nondestructive analysis of two-photon six-qubit hyperentangled Bell states assisted by cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Guan-Yu; Ai, Qing; Zhang, Mei; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Hyperentanglement, the entanglement in several degrees of freedom (DOFs) of a quantum system, has attracted much attention as it can be used to increase both the channel capacity of quantum communication and its security largely. Here, we present the first scheme to completely distinguish the hyperentangled Bell states of two-photon systems in three DOFs with the help of cross-Kerr nonlinearity without destruction, including two longitudinal momentum DOFs and the polarization DOF. We use cross-Kerr nonlinearity to construct quantum nondemolition detectors which can be used to make a parity-check measurement and analyze Bell states of two-photon systems in different DOFs. Our complete scheme for two-photon six-qubit hyperentangled Bell-state analysis may be useful for the practical applications in quantum information, especially in long-distance high-capacity quantum communication. PMID:26912172

  17. Determination of single photon ionization cross sections for quantitative analysis of complex organic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Adam, Thomas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2007-11-01

    Soft single photon ionization (SPI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) is well suited for fast and comprehensive analysis of complex organic gas mixtures, which has been demonstrated in various applications. This work describes a calibration scheme for SPI, which enables quantification of a large number of compounds by only calibrating one compound of choice, in this case benzene. Photoionization cross sections of 22 substances were determined and related to the yield of benzene. These substances included six alkanes (pentane, hexane, heptane, octane, nonane, decane), three alkenes (propene, butane, pentene), two alkynes (propyne, butyne), two dienes (butadiene, isoprene), five monoaromatic species (benzene, toluene, xylene, styrene, monochlorobenzene) and NO. The cross sections of organic compounds differ by about one order of magnitude but the photoionization properties of compounds belonging to one compound class are rather similar. Therefore, the scheme can also be used for an approximate quantification of compound classes. This is demonstrated by a fast characterization and pattern recognition of two gasoline samples with different origins (Germany and South Africa) and a diesel sample (Germany). The on-line capability of the technique and the scheme is demonstrated by quantitatively monitoring and comparing the cold engine start of four vehicles: a gasoline passenger car, a diesel van, a motorbike and a two-stroke scooter.

  18. Measurement of the Cross Section for Prompt Isolated Diphoton Production in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at \\sqrt s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Vellidis, Costas; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    This article reports a measurement of the cross section of prompt isolated photon pair production in p{bar p} collisions at a total energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data of 5.36 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measured cross section, differential in basic kinematic variables, is compared with three perturbative QCD predictions, a leading order (LO) parton shower calculation and two next-to-leading order (NLO) calculations. The NLO calculations reproduce most aspects of the data. By including photon radiation from quarks before and after hard scattering, the parton shower prediction becomes competitive with the NLO predictions.

  19. Two-photon excitation cross section in light and intermediate atoms in frozen-core LS-coupling approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1980-01-01

    Using the method of explicit summation over the intermediate states two-photon absorption cross sections in light and intermediate atoms based on the simplistic frozen-core approximation and LS coupling have been formulated. Formulas for the cross section in terms of integrals over radial wave functions are given. Two selection rules, one exact and one approximate, valid within the stated approximations are derived. The formulas are applied to two-photon absorptions in nitrogen, oxygen, and chlorine. In evaluating the radial integrals, for low-lying levels, the Hartree-Fock wave functions, and for high-lying levels, hydrogenic wave functions obtained by the quantum-defect method have been used. A relationship between the cross section and the oscillator strengths is derived.

  20. Brominated 7-hydroxycoumarin-4-ylmethyls: Photolabile protecting groups with biologically useful cross-sections for two photon photolysis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Toshiaki; Wang, Samuel S.-H.; Dantzker, Jami L.; Dore, Timothy M.; Bybee, Wendy J.; Callaway, Edward M.; Denk, Winfried; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1999-01-01

    Photochemical release (uncaging) of bioactive messengers with three-dimensional spatial resolution in light-scattering media would be greatly facilitated if the photolysis could be powered by pairs of IR photons rather than the customary single UV photons. The quadratic dependence on light intensity would confine the photolysis to the focus point of the laser, and the longer wavelengths would be much less affected by scattering. However, previous caged messengers have had very small cross sections for two-photon excitation in the IR region. We now show that brominated 7-hydroxycoumarin-4-ylmethyl esters and carbamates efficiently release carboxylates and amines on photolysis, with one- and two-photon cross sections up to one or two orders of magnitude better than previously available. These advantages are demonstrated on neurons in brain slices from rat cortex and hippocampus excited by glutamate uncaged from N-(6-bromo-7-hydroxycoumarin-4-ylmethoxycarbonyl)-l-glutamate (Bhc-glu). Conventional UV photolysis of Bhc-glu requires less than one-fifth the intensities needed by one of the best previous caged glutamates, γ-(α-carboxy-2-nitrobenzyl)-l-glutamate (CNB-glu). Two-photon photolysis with raster-scanned femtosecond IR pulses gives the first three-dimensionally resolved maps of the glutamate sensitivity of neurons in intact slices. Bhc-glu and analogs should allow more efficient and three-dimensionally localized uncaging and photocleavage, not only in cell biology and neurobiology but also in many technological applications. PMID:9990000

  1. Quantum computation based on photonic systems with two degrees of freedom assisted by the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Most of previous quantum computations only take use of one degree of freedom (DoF) of photons. An experimental system may possess various DoFs simultaneously. In this paper, with the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity, we investigate the parallel quantum computation dependent on photonic systems with two DoFs. We construct nearly deterministic controlled-not (CNOT) gates operating on the polarization spatial DoFs of the two-photon or one-photon system. These CNOT gates show that two photonic DoFs can be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoF in theory. Only the coherent states are required. Thus one half of quantum simulation resources may be saved in quantum applications if more complicated circuits are involved. Hence, one may trade off the implementation complexity and simulation resources by using different photonic systems. These CNOT gates are also used to complete various applications including the quantum teleportation and quantum superdense coding. PMID:27424767

  2. Quantum computation based on photonic systems with two degrees of freedom assisted by the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Most of previous quantum computations only take use of one degree of freedom (DoF) of photons. An experimental system may possess various DoFs simultaneously. In this paper, with the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity, we investigate the parallel quantum computation dependent on photonic systems with two DoFs. We construct nearly deterministic controlled-not (CNOT) gates operating on the polarization spatial DoFs of the two-photon or one-photon system. These CNOT gates show that two photonic DoFs can be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoF in theory. Only the coherent states are required. Thus one half of quantum simulation resources may be saved in quantum applications if more complicated circuits are involved. Hence, one may trade off the implementation complexity and simulation resources by using different photonic systems. These CNOT gates are also used to complete various applications including the quantum teleportation and quantum superdense coding. PMID:27424767

  3. Biomolecular imaging based on far-red fluorescent protein with a high two-photon excitation action cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Lin, Cheng-Yung; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Chen, Szu-Yu; Tai, Shih-Peng; Lin, Kung-Hsuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2006-04-01

    The two-photon excitation action cross section of Hc-Red fluorescent proteins (Hc-RFPs) is measured and found to be of the same order as that of enhanced green fluorescent proteins. With a 618 nm emission wavelength in the far-red region and with an excitation wavelength around 1200 nm, Hc-RPF-based two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) can offer deep penetration capability inside live samples and is ideal for in vivo gene expression study and biomolecular imaging in live objects. In vivo 2PFM of the developing heart deep inside a transgenic zebrafish embryo tagged by Hc-RFP is also successfully demonstrated.

  4. Off-Resonant Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Section Enhancement of an Organic Chromophore on Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Sivapalan, Sean T.; Vella, Jarrett H.; Yang, Timothy K.; Dalton, Matthew J.; Haley, Joy E.; Cooper, Thomas M.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Tan, Loon-Seng; Murphy, Catherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Surface-plasmon-initiated interference effects of polyelectrolyte-coated gold nanorods on the two-photon absorption of an organic chromophore were investigated. With polyelectrolyte bearing gold nanorods of 2,4,6 and 8 layers, the role of the plasmonic fields as function of distance on such effects was examined. An unusual distance dependence was found: enhancements in the two-photon cross-section were at a minimum at an intermediate distance, then rose again at a further distance. The observed values of enhancement were compared to theoretical predictions using finite element analysis and showed good agreementdue to constructive and destructive interference effects. PMID:23687561

  5. Measurements of partial cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions for the photodetachment of Fe- and Cu- at visible photon wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, A. M.; Duvvuri, Srividya S.; Emmons, E. D.; Kraus, R. G.; Williams, W. W.; Thompson, J. S.; Calabrese, D.; Carpenter, D. L.; Collier, R. D.; Kvale, T. J.; Davis, V. T.

    2007-02-01

    Photodetachment cross sections and the angular distributions of photoelectrons produced by the single-photon detachment of the transition metal negative ions Fe- and Cu- have been measured at four discrete photon wavelengths ranging from 457.9 to 647.1nm (2.71-1.92eV) using a crossed-beams laser photodetachment electron spectrometry (LPES) apparatus. Photodetachment cross sections were determined by comparing the photoelectron yields from the photodetachment of Fe- to those of Cu- and C- , which have known absolute photodetachment cross sections. Using the measured photodetachment cross sections, radiative electron attachment cross sections were calculated using the principle of detailed balance. Angular distributions were determined by measurements of laboratory frame, angle-, and energy-resolved photoelectrons as a function of the angle between the linear laser polarization vector and the momentum vector of the collected photoelectrons. Values of the asymmetry parameter have been determined by nonlinear least-squares fits to these angular distributions. The measured asymmetry parameters are compared to predictions of photodetachment models including Cooper and Zare’s dipole approximation theory [J. Cooper and R. N. Zare, J. Chem. Phys. 48, 942 (1968)], and the angular momentum transfer theory developed by Fano and Dill [Phys. Rev. A 6, 185 (1972)].

  6. Increasing quantum yield of sodium salicylate above 80 eV photon energy: Implications for photoemission cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Lindle, D.W.; Ferrett, T.A.; Heimann, P.A.; Shirley, D.A.

    1986-08-01

    The quantum yield of the visible scintillator sodium salicylate is found to increase in the incident photon-energy range 80--270 eV. Because of its use as a photon-flux monitor in recent gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, previously reported partial cross sections for Hg (4f-italic, 5p-italic, and 5d-italic subshells) and CH/sub 3/I (I 4d-italic subshell) in this energy range are corrected, and new values are reported. For Hg, the correction brings the experimental data into better overall agreement with theory. However, considerable uncertainty remains in the absolute scale derived from previous Hg photoabsorption measurements, and no single rescaling of the subshell cross sections could simultaneously bring all three into agreement with available theoretical calculations.

  7. Photo-assisted intersystem crossing: The predominant triplet formation mechanism in some isolated polycyclic aromatic molecules excited with pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Philip M.; Sears, Trevor J.

    2015-07-28

    Naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene are shown to have very long-lived triplet lifetimes when the isolated molecules are excited with nanosecond pulsed lasers resonant with the lowest singlet state. For naphthalene, triplet state populations are created only during the laser pulse, excluding the possibility of normal intersystem crossing at the one photon level, and all molecules have triplet lifetimes greater than hundreds of microseconds, similar to the behavior previously reported for phenylacetylene. Although containing 7–12 thousand cm{sup −1} of vibrational energy, the triplet molecules have ionization thresholds appropriate to vibrationless T{sub 1} states. The laser power dependences (slopes of log-log power plots) of the excited singlet and triplet populations are about 0.7 for naphthalene and about 0.5 for anthracene. Kinetic modeling of the power dependences successfully reproduces the experimental results and suggests that the triplet formation mechanism involves an enhanced spin orbit coupling caused by sigma character in states at the 2-photon level. Symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations produced excited state absorption spectra to provide guidance for estimating kinetic rates and the sigma character present in higher electronic states. It is concluded that higher excited state populations are significant when larger molecules are excited with pulsed lasers and need to be taken into account whenever discussing the molecular photodynamics.

  8. Photo-assisted intersystem crossing: The predominant triplet formation mechanism in some isolated polycyclic aromatic molecules excited with pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Philip M.; Sears, Trevor J.

    2015-07-01

    Naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene are shown to have very long-lived triplet lifetimes when the isolated molecules are excited with nanosecond pulsed lasers resonant with the lowest singlet state. For naphthalene, triplet state populations are created only during the laser pulse, excluding the possibility of normal intersystem crossing at the one photon level, and all molecules have triplet lifetimes greater than hundreds of microseconds, similar to the behavior previously reported for phenylacetylene. Although containing 7-12 thousand cm-1 of vibrational energy, the triplet molecules have ionization thresholds appropriate to vibrationless T1 states. The laser power dependences (slopes of log-log power plots) of the excited singlet and triplet populations are about 0.7 for naphthalene and about 0.5 for anthracene. Kinetic modeling of the power dependences successfully reproduces the experimental results and suggests that the triplet formation mechanism involves an enhanced spin orbit coupling caused by sigma character in states at the 2-photon level. Symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations produced excited state absorption spectra to provide guidance for estimating kinetic rates and the sigma character present in higher electronic states. It is concluded that higher excited state populations are significant when larger molecules are excited with pulsed lasers and need to be taken into account whenever discussing the molecular photodynamics.

  9. Photo-assisted intersystem crossing: The predominant triplet formation mechanism in some isolated polycyclic aromatic molecules excited with pulsed lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Philip M.; Sears, Trevor J.

    2015-07-28

    Naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene are shown to have very long-lived triplet lifetimes when the isolated molecules are excited with nanosecond pulsed lasers resonant with the lowest singlet state. For naphthalene, triplet state populations are created only during the laser pulse, excluding the possibility of normal intersystem crossing at the one photon level, and all molecules have triplet lifetimes greater than hundreds of microseconds, similar to the behavior previously reported for phenylacetylene. Although containing 7–12 thousand cm⁻¹ of vibrational energy, the triplet molecules have ionization thresholds appropriate to vibrationless T₁ states. The laser power dependences (slopes of log-log power plots) ofmore » the excited singlet and triplet populations are about 0.7 for naphthalene and about 0.5 for anthracene. Kinetic modeling of the power dependences successfully reproduces the experimental results and suggests that the triplet formation mechanism involves an enhanced spin orbit coupling caused by sigma character in states at the 2-photon level. Symmetry Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction calculations produced excited state absorption spectra to provide guidance for estimating kinetic rates and the sigma character present in higher electronic states. It is concluded that higher excited state populations are significant when larger molecules are excited with pulsed lasers and need to be taken into account whenever discussing the molecular photodynamics.« less

  10. Photo-assisted intersystem crossing: The predominant triplet formation mechanism in some isolated polycyclic aromatic molecules excited with pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Philip M.; Sears, Trevor J.

    2015-07-28

    Naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene are shown to have very long-lived triplet lifetimes when the isolated molecules are excited with nanosecond pulsed lasers resonant with the lowest singlet state. For naphthalene, triplet state populations are created only during the laser pulse, excluding the possibility of normal intersystem crossing at the one photon level, and all molecules have triplet lifetimes greater than hundreds of microseconds, similar to the behavior previously reported for phenylacetylene. Although containing 7–12 thousand cm⁻¹ of vibrational energy, the triplet molecules have ionization thresholds appropriate to vibrationless T₁ states. The laser power dependences (slopes of log-log power plots) of the excited singlet and triplet populations are about 0.7 for naphthalene and about 0.5 for anthracene. Kinetic modeling of the power dependences successfully reproduces the experimental results and suggests that the triplet formation mechanism involves an enhanced spin orbit coupling caused by sigma character in states at the 2-photon level. Symmetry Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction calculations produced excited state absorption spectra to provide guidance for estimating kinetic rates and the sigma character present in higher electronic states. It is concluded that higher excited state populations are significant when larger molecules are excited with pulsed lasers and need to be taken into account whenever discussing the molecular photodynamics.

  11. Photo-assisted intersystem crossing: The predominant triplet formation mechanism in some isolated polycyclic aromatic molecules excited with pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip M; Sears, Trevor J

    2015-07-28

    Naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene are shown to have very long-lived triplet lifetimes when the isolated molecules are excited with nanosecond pulsed lasers resonant with the lowest singlet state. For naphthalene, triplet state populations are created only during the laser pulse, excluding the possibility of normal intersystem crossing at the one photon level, and all molecules have triplet lifetimes greater than hundreds of microseconds, similar to the behavior previously reported for phenylacetylene. Although containing 7-12 thousand cm(-1) of vibrational energy, the triplet molecules have ionization thresholds appropriate to vibrationless T1 states. The laser power dependences (slopes of log-log power plots) of the excited singlet and triplet populations are about 0.7 for naphthalene and about 0.5 for anthracene. Kinetic modeling of the power dependences successfully reproduces the experimental results and suggests that the triplet formation mechanism involves an enhanced spin orbit coupling caused by sigma character in states at the 2-photon level. Symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations produced excited state absorption spectra to provide guidance for estimating kinetic rates and the sigma character present in higher electronic states. It is concluded that higher excited state populations are significant when larger molecules are excited with pulsed lasers and need to be taken into account whenever discussing the molecular photodynamics.

  12. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    1996-12-19

    Version 03 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code system for producing pointwise and multigroup cross sections and related quantities from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format, including the latest US library, ENDF/B-VI. The NJOY code works with neutrons, photons, and charged particles and produces libraries for a wide variety of particle transport and reactor analysis codes.

  13. Neutron-photon multigroup cross sections for neutron energies less than or equal to400 MeV. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    For a variety of applications, e.g., accelerator shielding design, neutrons in radiotherapy, radiation damage studies, etc., it is necessary to carry out transport calculations involving medium-energy (greater than or equal to20 MeV) neutrons. A previous paper described neutron-photon multigroup cross sections in the ANISN format for neutrons from thermal to 400 MeV. In the present paper the cross-section data presented previously have been revised to make them agree with available experimental data. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  14. $H \\to \\gamma\\gamma$ search and direct photon pair production differential cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Xuebing

    2010-06-01

    context of the particular fermiophobic Higgs model. The corresponding results have reached the same sensitivity as a single LEP experiement, setting a lower limit on the fermiophobic Higgs of Mhf > 102.5 GeV (Mhf > 107.5 GeV expected). We are slightly below the combined LEP limit (Mhf > 109.7 GeV). We also provide access to the Mhf > 125 GeV region which was inaccessible at LEP. During the study, we found the major and irreducible background direct γγ (DPP) production is not well modelled by the current theoretical predictions: RESBOS, DIPHOX or PYTHIA. There is ~20% theoretical uncertainty for the predicted values. Thus, for our Higgs search, we use the side-band fitting method to estimate DPP contribution directly from the data events. Furthermore, DPP production is also a significant background in searches for new phenomena, such as new heavy resonances, extra spatial dimensions, or cascade decays of heavy new particles. Thus, precise measurements of the DPP cross sections for various kinematic variables and their theoretical understanding are extremely important for future Higgs and new phenomena searches. In this thesis, we also present a precise measurement of the DPP single differential cross sections as a function of the diphoton mass, the transverse momentum of the diphoton system, the azimuthal angle between the photons, and the polar scattering angle of the photons, as well as the double differential cross sections considering the last three kinematic variables in three diphoton mass bins, using 4.2 fb-1 data. These results are the first of their kind at D0 Run II, and in fact the double differential measurements are the first of their kind at Tevatron. The results are compared with different perturbative QCD predictions and event generators.

  15. Unitarized diffractive scattering in QCD and its application to virtual photon total cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Rim; Khoury, Justin; Lam, C. S.

    1999-08-01

    The problem of restoring the Froissart bound to the Balitskiıˇ-Fadín-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) Pomeron is studied in an extended leading-log approximation of QCD. We consider the parton-parton scattering amplitude and show that the sum of all Feynman-diagram contributions can be written in an eikonal form. In this form, dynamics is determined by the phase shift, and subleading-logs of all orders needed to restore the Froissart bound are automatically provided. The main technical difficulty is to find a way to extract these subleading contributions without having to compute each Feynman diagram beyond the leading order. We solve that problem by using non-Abelian cut diagrams introduced elsewhere. They can be considered as color filters used to isolate the multi-Reggeon contributions that supply these subleading-log terms. An illustration of the formalism is given for amplitudes and phase shifts up to three loops. For diffractive scattering, only phase shifts governed by one and two Reggeon exchanges are needed. They can be computed from the leading-log-Reggeon and the BFKL Pomeron amplitudes. In applications, we argue that the dependence of the energy-growth exponent on virtuality Q2 for γ*P total cross section observed at DESY HERA can be interpreted as the first sign of a slowdown of energy growth towards satisfying the Froissart bound. An attempt to understand these exponents with the present formalism is discussed.

  16. Cross-talk characterization of dense single-photon avalanche diode arrays in CMOS 150-nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hesong; Pancheri, Lucio; C. Braga, Leo H.; Betta, Gian-Franco Dalla; Stoppa, David

    2016-06-01

    Cross-talk characterization results of high-fill-factor single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays in CMOS 150-nm technology are reported and discussed. Three different SPAD structures were designed with two different sizes (15.6 and 25.6 μm pitch) and three guard ring widths (0.6, 1.1, and 1.6 μm). Each SPAD was implemented in an array, composed of 25 (5×5) devices, which can be separately activated. Measurement results show that the average cross-talk probability is well below 1% for the shallow-junction SPAD structure with 15.6 μm pitch and 39.9% fill factor, and 1.45% for the structure with 25.6 μm pitch and 60.6% fill factor. An increase of cross-talk probability with the excess bias voltage is observed.

  17. 30-Group Neutron, 12-Group Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B-IV in MATXS Format.

    SciTech Connect

    MACFARLANE, ROBERT

    1985-12-30

    Version: 00 The library was prepared with a fusion + fission + l/E + thermal Maxwellian weight function and has proved useful for many high energy calculations, including criticals such as GODIVA. It works reasonably well for many shielding problems where resonance selfshielding is not too important. The energy group structures for MATXSl are listed in Table 1, the materials with neutron scattering data in Table 2, those with photon production data in Table 3, and those with photon scattering data in Table 4.

  18. 30-Group Neutron, 12-Group Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B-V in MATSX Format.

    SciTech Connect

    MACFARLANE, ROBERT

    1985-12-30

    Version: 00 The library was prepared with a fusion + fission + l/E + thermal Maxwellian weight function and has proved useful for many high energy calculations, including criticals such as GODIVA. It works reasonably well for many shielding problems where resonance selfshielding is not too important. The energy group structures for MATXSSA are listed in Table 1, the materials with neutron scattering data in Table 2, those with photon production data in Table 3, and those with photon scattering data In Table 4.

  19. Measurements of the total atomic differential cross section of elastic scattering of 59.54-keV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casnati, E.; Baraldi, C.; Tartari, A.

    1990-09-01

    Accurate measurements, mostly to within 2%, of the total atomic cross section for the elastic scattering of 59.54-keV photons on atoms in the 13<=Z<=82 range were carried out at 60°, 90°, and 120° scattering angles. Very good agreement with other experimental data was observed, in particular, with those of Schumacher and Stoffregen [Z. Phys. A 283, 15 (1977)]. The comparison with the theoretical results given by Kissel and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A 22, 1979 (1980); Phys. Rep. 140, 75 (1986)] confirms the validity of their procedure within the value intervals explored.

  20. 30-Group Neutron, 12-Group Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B-V in MATSX Format.

    1985-12-30

    Version: 00 The library was prepared with a fusion + fission + l/E + thermal Maxwellian weight function and has proved useful for many high energy calculations, including criticals such as GODIVA. It works reasonably well for many shielding problems where resonance selfshielding is not too important. The energy group structures for MATXSSA are listed in Table 1, the materials with neutron scattering data in Table 2, those with photon production data in Table 3,more » and those with photon scattering data In Table 4.« less

  1. 30-Group Neutron, 12-Group Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B-IV in MATXS Format.

    1985-12-30

    Version: 00 The library was prepared with a fusion + fission + l/E + thermal Maxwellian weight function and has proved useful for many high energy calculations, including criticals such as GODIVA. It works reasonably well for many shielding problems where resonance selfshielding is not too important. The energy group structures for MATXSl are listed in Table 1, the materials with neutron scattering data in Table 2, those with photon production data in Table 3,more » and those with photon scattering data in Table 4.« less

  2. Photon-photon collisions via relativisitic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James K.

    2012-07-11

    Photon-photon scattering at low energies has been predicted theoretically for many years. However, due to the extremely small cross section there has been no experimental confirmation of this. Due to the rapid increase in laser irradiances and projected peak irradiances in planned facilities regimes could be reached where photon-photon scattering could be experimentally observed. We will first review basic aspects of photon-photon collisions concentrating on the calculation of the photon-photon scattering cross section. Then we will discuss the possibilities for observing these phenomena in ultra-high irradiance laser-plasma interactions involving relativistic mirrors.

  3. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-09-15

    This article reports a measurement of the production cross section of prompt isolated photon pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.36 fb⁻¹. The cross section is presented as a function of kinematic variables sensitive to the reaction mechanisms. The results are compared with three perturbative QCD calculations: (1) a leading-order parton shower Monte Carlo, (2) a fixed next-to-leading-order calculation and (3) a next-to-leading-order/next-to-next-to-leading-log resummed calculation. The comparisons show that, within their known limitations, all calculations predict the main features of themore » data, but no calculation adequately describes all aspects of the data.« less

  4. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-09-15

    This article reports a measurement of the production cross section of prompt isolated photon pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.36 fb⁻¹. The cross section is presented as a function of kinematic variables sensitive to the reaction mechanisms. The results are compared with three perturbative QCD calculations: (1) a leading-order parton shower Monte Carlo, (2) a fixed next-to-leading-order calculation and (3) a next-to-leading-order/next-to-next-to-leading-log resummed calculation. The comparisons show that, within their known limitations, all calculations predict the main features of the data, but no calculation adequately describes all aspects of the data.

  5. 30-Group Neutron, 12-Group Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B-VI in MATXS Format.

    1994-02-28

    Version 00 MATXS10 is useful for many high-energy calculations, including coupled neutron-photon-heating calculations in fusion systems, the analysis of fast critical assemblies like GODIVA, and some shielding calculations for which resonance self shielding effects are not too important. It has the advantage of being compact, and TRANSX2 and particle transport calculations run very fast with this library.

  6. Comparative Sequence Analyses of La Crosse Virus Strain Isolated from Patient with Fatal Encephalitis, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Fryxell, Rebecca Trout; Freyman, Kimberly; Ulloa, Armando; Velez, Jason O.; Paulsen, Dave; Lanciotti, Robert S.; Moncayo, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    We characterized a La Crosse virus (LACV) isolate from the brain of a child who died of encephalitis-associated complications in eastern Tennessee, USA, during summer 2012. We compared the isolate with LACV sequences from mosquitoes collected near the child’s home just after his postmortem diagnosis. In addition, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of these and other sequences derived from LACV strains representing varied temporal, geographic, and ecologic origins. Consistent with historical findings, results of these analyses indicate that a limited range of LACV lineage I genotypes is associated with severe clinical outcomes. PMID:25898269

  7. Precision photo-induced cross-section measurements using the monoenergetic and polarized photon beams at HIγS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Howell, C. R.; Kwan, E.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Kelley, J. H.; Huibregtse, C.; Hammond, S. L.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2009-10-01

    A research program has been initiated at TUNL to perform precision (γ,γ') and (γ,xn) cross-section measurements on actinide nuclei using the novel source of radiation at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) facility. This facility provides nearly mono-energetic (E/E ± 2%) and intense (10^8 s-1) photon beams after the recent upgrade. A precision knowledge of photoinduced processes is of practical importance for new reactor technologies, nuclear transmutation, and nuclear forensics. Our recent photodisintegration cross section measurements on radioactive ^241Am targets in the energy range from 9 < Eγ < 16 MeV will be presented. The experimental data for the ^241Am(γ,n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region will be compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  8. A 32-channel photon counting module with embedded auto/cross-correlators for real-time parallel fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, S.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2014-10-15

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established technique to study binding interactions or the diffusion of fluorescently labeled biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. Fast FCS experiments require parallel data acquisition and analysis which can be achieved by exploiting a multi-channel Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array and a corresponding multi-input correlator. This paper reports a 32-channel FPGA based correlator able to perform 32 auto/cross-correlations simultaneously over a lag-time ranging from 10 ns up to 150 ms. The correlator is included in a 32 × 1 SPAD array module, providing a compact and flexible instrument for high throughput FCS experiments. However, some inherent features of SPAD arrays, namely afterpulsing and optical crosstalk effects, may introduce distortions in the measurement of auto- and cross-correlation functions. We investigated these limitations to assess their impact on the module and evaluate possible workarounds.

  9. A 32-channel photon counting module with embedded auto/cross-correlators for real-time parallel fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, S.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established technique to study binding interactions or the diffusion of fluorescently labeled biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. Fast FCS experiments require parallel data acquisition and analysis which can be achieved by exploiting a multi-channel Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array and a corresponding multi-input correlator. This paper reports a 32-channel FPGA based correlator able to perform 32 auto/cross-correlations simultaneously over a lag-time ranging from 10 ns up to 150 ms. The correlator is included in a 32 × 1 SPAD array module, providing a compact and flexible instrument for high throughput FCS experiments. However, some inherent features of SPAD arrays, namely afterpulsing and optical crosstalk effects, may introduce distortions in the measurement of auto- and cross-correlation functions. We investigated these limitations to assess their impact on the module and evaluate possible workarounds. PMID:25362365

  10. o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption: syntheses and uncaging cross-sections for one- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Aujard, Isabelle; Benbrahim, Chouaha; Gouget, Marine; Ruel, Odile; Baudin, Jean-Bernard; Neveu, Pierre; Jullien, Ludovic

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated the o-nitrobenzyl platform for designing photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption that could be photolyzed upon one- and two-photon excitation. Several synthetic pathways to build different conjugated o-nitrobenzyl backbones, as well as to vary the benzylic position, are reported. Relative to the reference 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl group, several o-nitrobenzyl derivatives exhibit a large and red-shifted one-photon absorption within the near-UV range. Uncaging after one-photon excitation was studied by measuring UV-visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence emission on model caged ethers and esters. In the whole series investigated, the caged substrates were released cleanly upon photolysis. Quantum yields of uncaging after one-photon absorption lie within the 0.1-1 % range. We observed that these drop as the maximum wavelength absorption of the o-nitrobenzyl protecting group is increased. A new method based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) after two-photon excitation was used to measure the action uncaging cross section for two-photon excitation. The series of o-nitrobenzyl caged fluorescent coumarins investigated exhibit values within the 0.1-0.01 Goeppert-Mayer (GM) range. Such results are in line with the low quantum yields of uncaging associated with cross-sections of 1-50 GM for two-photon absorption. Although the cross-sections for one- and two-photon absorption of o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups can be readily improved, we emphasize the difficulty in enlarging the corresponding action uncaging cross-sections in view of the observed trend of their quantum yield of uncaging.

  11. o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption: syntheses and uncaging cross-sections for one- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Aujard, Isabelle; Benbrahim, Chouaha; Gouget, Marine; Ruel, Odile; Baudin, Jean-Bernard; Neveu, Pierre; Jullien, Ludovic

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated the o-nitrobenzyl platform for designing photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption that could be photolyzed upon one- and two-photon excitation. Several synthetic pathways to build different conjugated o-nitrobenzyl backbones, as well as to vary the benzylic position, are reported. Relative to the reference 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl group, several o-nitrobenzyl derivatives exhibit a large and red-shifted one-photon absorption within the near-UV range. Uncaging after one-photon excitation was studied by measuring UV-visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence emission on model caged ethers and esters. In the whole series investigated, the caged substrates were released cleanly upon photolysis. Quantum yields of uncaging after one-photon absorption lie within the 0.1-1 % range. We observed that these drop as the maximum wavelength absorption of the o-nitrobenzyl protecting group is increased. A new method based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) after two-photon excitation was used to measure the action uncaging cross section for two-photon excitation. The series of o-nitrobenzyl caged fluorescent coumarins investigated exhibit values within the 0.1-0.01 Goeppert-Mayer (GM) range. Such results are in line with the low quantum yields of uncaging associated with cross-sections of 1-50 GM for two-photon absorption. Although the cross-sections for one- and two-photon absorption of o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups can be readily improved, we emphasize the difficulty in enlarging the corresponding action uncaging cross-sections in view of the observed trend of their quantum yield of uncaging. PMID:16763952

  12. Intravital Two-Photon Imaging of Lymphocytes Crossing High Endothelial Venules and Cortical Lymphatics in the Inguinal Lymph Node.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung; Hwang, Il-Young; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocyte recirculation through lymph nodes (LNs) requires their crossing of endothelial barriers present in blood vessels and lymphatics by means of chemoattractant-triggered cell migration. The chemoattractant-chemoattractant receptor axes that predominately govern the trafficking of lymphocytes into, and out of, LNs are CCL19/CCR7 and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1), respectively. Blood-borne lymphocytes downregulate S1PR1 and use CCR7 signaling to adhere to high endothelial venules (HEVs) for transmigration. During their LN residency, recirculating lymphocytes reacquire S1PR1 and attenuate their sensitivity to chemokines. Eventually lymphocytes exit the LN by entering the cortical or medullary lymphatics, a process that depends upon S1PR1 signaling. Upon entering into the lymph, lymphocytes lose their polarity, downregulate their sensitivity to S1P due to the high concentration of S1P, and upregulate their sensitivity to chemokines. However, many of the details of lymphocyte transmigration across endothelial barriers remain poorly understood. Intravital two-photon imaging with advanced microscope technologies not only allows the real-time observation of immune cells in intact LN of a live mouse, but also provides a means to monitor the interactions between circulating lymphocytes and stromal barriers. Here, we describe procedures to visualize lymphocytes engaging and crossing HEVs, and approaching and crossing the cortical lymphatic endothelium to enter the efferent lymph in live mice. PMID:27271904

  13. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    1995-06-01

    Version 04 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code package for producing pointwise and multigroup neutron and photon cross sections from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data. This is the last NJOY-91 series. It uses the same module structure as the earlier versions and its graphics options depend on DISSPLA. This new release, designated NJOY91.119, includes bug fixes, improvements in several modules, and some new capabilities. Information on the changes is included inmore » the README file. A new test problem was added to test some ENDF-6 features, including Reich-Moore resonance reconstruction, energy-angle matrices in GROUPR, and energy-angle distributions in ACER. The 91.119 release is basically configured for UNIX.« less

  14. Photon + Jet production at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Deluca, Carolina

    2009-05-01

    Prompt photon production results by the CDF and D0 Collaborations in the Tevatron Run II at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are presented. Cross sections for central isolated photons, photon+jet production and photons produced in association with a heavy flavor quark are reported. The measurements are compared to Next-to-Leading order perturbative QCD predictions.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Cross-Amplification Microsatellite Panels for Species of Procapra (Bovidae; Antilopinae)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Li, Chunlin; Yang, Ji; Luo, Zhenhua; Tang, Songhua; Li, Feng; Li, Chunwang; Liu, Bingwan; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    The three Procapra species, Tibetan gazelle (P. picticaudata), Mongolian gazelle (P. gutturosa) and Przewalski’s gazelle (P. przewalskii) are endemic to Asia. Several intraspecific genetic issues have been studied with species-specific microsatellite loci in these Asian gazelles. However, cross-species microsatellite panels are absent, which inhibits comparative conservation and evolutionary studies of the Procapra. In this study, we isolated 20 cross-species microsatellite loci for Procapra from both related species and the genomic library of P. przewalskii. Fifty-three samples of the three gazelles were used to characterize the markers. Allele numbers ranged from three to 20, with a mean of 7.93 per locus. Observed heterozygosity (HO) averaged 0.680 and expected heterozygosity (HE) 0.767. The mean polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.757 for P. picticaudata, 0.803 for P. gutturosa and 0.590 for P. przewalskii. Nine loci were significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg (H-W) equilibrium in the three species. Significant linkage disequilibrium was detected in four pairs of loci in P. przewalskii, five pairs in P. gutturosa and 51 pairs in P. picticaudata. Considering the abundance of published loci and their high success rates of cross-amplification, testing and utilization of loci from related species is efficient for wild species of Bovidae. The cross-species microsatellite loci we developed will facilitate further interspecies genetic studies in Procapra. PMID:22942736

  16. Isolation and characterization of cross-amplification microsatellite panels for species of Procapra (Bovidae; Antilopinae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Chunlin; Yang, Ji; Luo, Zhenhua; Tang, Songhua; Li, Feng; Li, Chunwang; Liu, Bingwan; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    The three Procapra species, Tibetan gazelle (P. picticaudata), Mongolian gazelle (P. gutturosa) and Przewalski's gazelle (P. przewalskii) are endemic to Asia. Several intraspecific genetic issues have been studied with species-specific microsatellite loci in these Asian gazelles. However, cross-species microsatellite panels are absent, which inhibits comparative conservation and evolutionary studies of the Procapra. In this study, we isolated 20 cross-species microsatellite loci for Procapra from both related species and the genomic library of P. przewalskii. Fifty-three samples of the three gazelles were used to characterize the markers. Allele numbers ranged from three to 20, with a mean of 7.93 per locus. Observed heterozygosity (H(O)) averaged 0.680 and expected heterozygosity (H(E)) 0.767. The mean polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.757 for P. picticaudata, 0.803 for P. gutturosa and 0.590 for P. przewalskii. Nine loci were significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg (H-W) equilibrium in the three species. Significant linkage disequilibrium was detected in four pairs of loci in P. przewalskii, five pairs in P. gutturosa and 51 pairs in P. picticaudata. Considering the abundance of published loci and their high success rates of cross-amplification, testing and utilization of loci from related species is efficient for wild species of Bovidae. The cross-species microsatellite loci we developed will facilitate further interspecies genetic studies in Procapra. PMID:22942736

  17. Broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 1- and 2-photon excitations: Relaxation paths and cross sections of a triphenylamine dye in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Hecht, S. E-mail: skovale@chemie.hu-berlin.de; Kovalenko, S. A. E-mail: skovale@chemie.hu-berlin.de; Ioffe, I. N.; Granovsky, A. A.

    2015-07-14

    1-photon (382 nm) and 2-photon (752 nm) excitations to the S{sub 1} state are applied to record and compare transient absorption spectra of a push-pull triphenylamine (TrP) dye in solution. After 1-photon excitation, ultrafast vibrational and structural molecular relaxations are detected on a 0.1 ps time scale in nonpolar hexane, while in polar acetonitrile, the spectral evolution is dominated by dipolar solvation. Upon 2-photon excitation, transient spectra in hexane reveal an unexpected growth of stimulated emission (SE) and excited-state absorption (ESA) bands. The behavior is explained by strong population transfer S{sub 1} → S{sub n} due to resonant absorption of a third pump photon. Subsequent S{sub n} → S{sub 1} internal conversion (with τ{sub 1} = 1 ps) prepares a very hot S{sub 1} state which cools down with τ{sub 2} = 13 ps. The pump pulse energy dependence proves the 2-photon origin of the bleach signal. At the same time, SE and ESA are strongly affected by higher-order pump absorptions that should be taken into account in nonlinear fluorescence applications. The 2-photon excitation cross sections σ{sup (2)} = 32 ⋅ 10{sup −50} cm{sup 4} s at 752 nm are evaluated from the bleach signal.

  18. Cutoff-mesa isolated rib optical waveguide for III-V heterostructure photonic integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, Gregory A.; Smith, Robert E.

    1998-01-01

    A cutoff mesa rib waveguide provides single-mode performance regardless of any deep etches that might be used for electrical isolation between integrated electrooptic devices. Utilizing a principle of a cutoff slab waveguide with an asymmetrical refractive index profile, single mode operation is achievable with a wide range of rib widths and does not require demanding etch depth tolerances. This new waveguide design eliminates reflection effects, or self-interference, commonly seen when conventional rib waveguides are combined with deep isolation etches and thereby reduces high order mode propagation and crosstalk compared to the conventional rib waveguides.

  19. Cutoff-mesa isolated rib optical waveguide for III-V heterostructure photonic integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G.A.; Smith, R.E.

    1998-04-28

    A cutoff mesa rib waveguide provides single-mode performance regardless of any deep etches that might be used for electrical isolation between integrated electrooptic devices. Utilizing a principle of a cutoff slab waveguide with an asymmetrical refractive index profile, single mode operation is achievable with a wide range of rib widths and does not require demanding etch depth tolerances. This new waveguide design eliminates reflection effects, or self-interference, commonly seen when conventional rib waveguides are combined with deep isolation etches and thereby reduces high order mode propagation and crosstalk compared to the conventional rib waveguides. 7 figs.

  20. Molecularly imprinted photonic polymers as sensing elements for the creation of cross-reactive sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Chen; Tian, Tian; Cui, Jiecheng; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2014-12-01

    By combining molecular imprinting and colloidal crystal templating, molecularly imprinted inverse-opal photonic polymers (MIPPs) acting as sensing elements have been exploited to create sensor arrays for the first time. With this new strategy, abundant sensing elements with differential sensing abilities were easily accessible. Because of the unique hierarchical porous structure integrated in each sensing element, high sensitivity and selectivity, fast response and self-reporting (label-free) detection could be simultaneously achieved. All these fascinating features indicate that MIPPs are ideal sensing elements for creating sensor arrays. By integrating the individual sensing elements on a substrate, the formed array chip delivers better portability and high-throughput capability. As a demonstration, six kinds of contaminants were selected as analytes. The detection and discrimination of these analytes and even their mixtures in a wide range of concentrations, particularly trace amounts of analyte against a high background of other components, could be achieved, indicating the powerful capability of MIPPs-based sensor array for sensing. These results suggest that the described strategy opens a new route for sensor array creation and should find important applications in a wide range of areas. PMID:25331488

  1. On the analogy between pulse-pile-up in energy-sensitive, photon-counting detectors and level-crossing of shot noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessl, Ewald; Bartels, Matthias; Daerr, Heiner; Proksa, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Shot noise processes are omnipresent in physics and many of their properties have been extensively studied in the past, including the particular problem of level crossing of shot noise. Energy-sensitive, photon-counting detectors using comparators to discriminate pulse-heights are currently heavily investigated for medical applications, e.g. for x-ray computed tomography and x-ray mammography. Surprisingly, no mention of the close relation between the two topics can be found in the literature on photon-counting detectors. In this paper, we point out the close analogy between level crossing of shot noise and the problem of determining count rates of photon- counting detectors subject to pulse pile-up. The latter is very relevant for obtaining precise forward models for photon-counting detectors operated under conditions of very high x-ray flux employed in clinical x-ray computed tomography. Although several attempts have been made to provide reasonably accurate, approximative models for the registered number of counts in x-ray detectors under conditions of high flux and arbitrary x-ray spectra, see, e.g., no exact, analytic solution is given in the literature for general continuous pulse shapes. In this paper we present such a solution for arbitrary response functions, x-ray spectra and continuous pulse shapes based on a result from the theory of level crossing. We briefly outline the theory of level crossing including the famous Rice theorem and translate from the language of level crossing to the language of photon-counting detection.

  2. Cross Sections for the Exclusive Photon Electroproduction on the Proton and Generalized Parton Distributions.

    PubMed

    Jo, H S; Girod, F X; Avakian, H; Burkert, V D; Garçon, M; Guidal, M; Kubarovsky, V; Niccolai, S; Stoler, P; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Anefalos Pereira, S; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Compton, N; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dupre, R; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Elouadrhiri, L; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Garillon, B; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Hirlinger Saylor, N; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; McKinnon, B; Meziani, Z E; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Net, L A; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phillips, J J; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2015-11-20

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized fourfold cross sections (d^{4}σ/dQ^{2}dx_{B}dtdϕ) for the ep→e^{'}p^{'}γ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 (Q^{2},x_{B},t) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD H, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Through a leading-twist extraction of Compton form factors, these results support the model predictions of a larger nucleon size at lower quark-momentum fraction x_{B}.

  3. Cross sections for the exclusive photon electroproduction on the proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jo, Hyon -Suk

    2015-11-17

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized four-fold cross sectionsmore » $$\\frac{d^4 \\sigma}{dQ^2 dx_B dt d\\phi}$$ for the $$ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\gamma$$ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 ($Q^2,x_B,t$) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD $H$, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Thus, through a leading-twist extraction of Compton Form Factors, these results reveal a tomographic image of the nucleon.« less

  4. Cross sections for the exclusive photon electroproduction on the proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Hyon -Suk

    2015-11-17

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized four-fold cross sections $\\frac{d^4 \\sigma}{dQ^2 dx_B dt d\\phi}$ for the $ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\gamma$ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 ($Q^2,x_B,t$) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD $H$, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Thus, through a leading-twist extraction of Compton Form Factors, these results reveal a tomographic image of the nucleon.

  5. Cross strip microchannel plate imaging photon counters with high time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Stonehill, Laura C; Shirey, Robert; Rabin, Michael W; Thompson, David C; Siegmund, Oswald H W; Vallerga, John V; Tremsin, Anton S

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented cross strip readout microchannel plate detectors in 18 mm active area format including open face (UV/particle) and sealed tube (optical) configurations. These have been tested with a field programmable gate array based parallel channel electronics for event encoding which can process high input event rates (> 5 MHz) with high spatial resolution. Using small pore MCPs (6 {micro}m) operated in a pair, we achieve gains of >5 x 10{sup 5} which is sufficient to provide spatial resolution of <35 {micro}m FHWM, with self triggered event timing accuracy of {approx}2 ns for sealed tube optical sensors. A peak quantum efficiency of {approx}19% at 500 nm has been achieved with SuperGenII photocathodes that have response over the 400 nm to 900 nm range. Local area counting rates of up to >200 events/mcp pore sec{sup -1} have been attained, along with image linearity and stability to better than 50 {micro}m.

  6. Cross-Comparison of Leaching Strains Isolated from Two Different Regions: Chambishi and Dexing Copper Mines

    PubMed Central

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa) and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia), was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different strains were characterized and compared at physiological level. The results revealed that, except for copper tolerance, strains within species presented almost similar physiological traits with slight advantages of Chambishi strains. However, in terms of leaching efficiency, native strains always achieved higher cell density and greater iron and copper extraction rates than the foreign microorganisms. In addition, microbial community analysis revealed that the different mixed cultures shared almost the same profile, and At. ferrooxidans strains always outcompeted the other strains. PMID:25478575

  7. Cross-comparison of leaching strains isolated from two different regions: Chambishi and Dexing copper mines.

    PubMed

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa) and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia), was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different strains were characterized and compared at physiological level. The results revealed that, except for copper tolerance, strains within species presented almost similar physiological traits with slight advantages of Chambishi strains. However, in terms of leaching efficiency, native strains always achieved higher cell density and greater iron and copper extraction rates than the foreign microorganisms. In addition, microbial community analysis revealed that the different mixed cultures shared almost the same profile, and At. ferrooxidans strains always outcompeted the other strains.

  8. The irreducible minimum in cross-infection control and isolation nursing

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W. Howard

    1970-01-01

    This is a survey of 10 years experience in trying to find out how to control hospital sepsis economically. We appear to have obtained reasonable improvements in hygiene by applying the teaching which has been given to students since the time of Leonard Colebrook. For our investigations we used only routine methods. The order of importance of the factors in reducing cross-infection would appear to be: (1) single rooms for all septic cases and for those requiring protective isolation; (2) a sister supported in complete authority over anyone entering the unit; (3) a simple, inflexible drill to introduce an impermeable layer between the nurse or doctor and the patient—gloves and apron provide this; (4) overshoes and barrier mats; (5) hygienic disposal of linen; (6) an efficient wet dusting and floor cleaning system. Anything beyond this must be justified by saving of nursing time or some factor other than prevention of infection. PMID:5272343

  9. Measurements of partial cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions for the photodetachment of Fe{sup -} and Cu{sup -} at visible photon wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, A. M.; Duvvuri, Srividya S.; Emmons, E. D.; Kraus, R. G.; Williams, W. W.; Thompson, J. S.; Calabrese, D.; Carpenter, D. L.; Collier, R. D.; Kvale, T. J.; Davis, V. T.

    2007-02-15

    Photodetachment cross sections and the angular distributions of photoelectrons produced by the single-photon detachment of the transition metal negative ions Fe{sup -} and Cu{sup -} have been measured at four discrete photon wavelengths ranging from 457.9 to 647.1 nm (2.71-1.92 eV) using a crossed-beams laser photodetachment electron spectrometry (LPES) apparatus. Photodetachment cross sections were determined by comparing the photoelectron yields from the photodetachment of Fe{sup -} to those of Cu{sup -} and C{sup -}, which have known absolute photodetachment cross sections. Using the measured photodetachment cross sections, radiative electron attachment cross sections were calculated using the principle of detailed balance. Angular distributions were determined by measurements of laboratory frame, angle-, and energy-resolved photoelectrons as a function of the angle between the linear laser polarization vector and the momentum vector of the collected photoelectrons. Values of the asymmetry parameter have been determined by nonlinear least-squares fits to these angular distributions. The measured asymmetry parameters are compared to predictions of photodetachment models including Cooper and Zare's dipole approximation theory [J. Cooper and R. N. Zare, J. Chem. Phys. 48, 942 (1968)], and the angular momentum transfer theory developed by Fano and Dill [Phys. Rev. A 6, 185 (1972)].

  10. Measurement of differential cross sections and Cx and Cz for gamma photon-proton going to kaon-lambda baryon and gamma photon-proton going to kaon-sigma baryon using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Robert K., Jr.

    This work presents several observables for the reactions gamma p → K+Λ and gamma p → K+Sigma°. In addition to measuring differential cross sections, we have made first measurements of the double polarization observables Cx and Cz. Cx and C z characterize the transfer of polarization from the incident photon to the produced hyperons. Data were obtained at Jefferson Lab using a circularly polarized photon beam at endpoint energies of 2.4, 2.9, and 3.1 GeV. Events were detected with the CLAS spectrometer. In the Λ channel, the cross sections support the recent observation of new resonant structure at W = 1900 MeV. Studies of the invariant cross section, dsdd show scaling behavior suggesting that the production mechanism becomes t-channel dominated near threshold at forward kaon angles. The double polarization observables show that the recoiling Λ is almost maximally polarized along the direction of the incident photon from mid to forward kaon angles. While Sigmao differential cross sections are of the same magnitude as the Λ differential cross sections, there is evidence of different physics dominating the production mechanism. The Sigma° invariant cross sections do not show the same t-scaling behavior present in the Λ results. The double polarization observables indicate that the Sigma° is not polarized as strongly as the Λ. They also fail to identify one preferred polarization axis. Complete interpretation of these results will rely on model calculations. Currently available isobar models obtain varying degrees of success while attempting to predict the double polarization observables. While the models are in better agreement with the differential cross sections, discrepancies with our cross sections indicate that they must be re-optimized in light of the new data. While the data suggest that a Regge model would provide a good description of K+Λ over most of the range in W, the available Regge calculation overstates the strength of the cross section

  11. Biocompatible Green and Red Fluorescent Organic Dots with Remarkably Large Two-Photon Action Cross Sections for Targeted Cellular Imaging and Real-Time Intravital Blood Vascular Visualization.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jiayun; Cai, Xiaolei; Lou, Xiaoding; Feng, Guangxue; Min, Xuehong; Luo, Wenwen; He, Bairong; Goh, Chi Ching; Ng, Lai Guan; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-07-15

    Fluorescent organic dots are emerging as promising bioimaging reagents because of their high brightness, good photostability, excellent biocompatibility, and facile surface functionalization. Organic dots with large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross sections are highly desired for two-photon fluorescence microscopy. In this work, we report two biocompatible and photostable organic dots fabricated by encapsulating tetraphenylethene derivatives within DSPE-PEG matrix. The two organic dots show absorption maxima at 425 and 483 nm and emit green and red fluorescence at 560 and 645 nm, with high fluorescence quantum yields of 64% and 22%, respectively. Both organic dots exhibit excellent TPA property in the range of 800-960 nm, affording upon excitation at 820 nm remarkably large TPA cross sections of 1.2×10(6) and 2.5×10(6) GM on the basis of dot concentration. The bare fluorophores and their organic dots are biocompatible and have been used to stain living cells for one- and two-photon fluorescence bioimagings. The cRGD-modified organic dots can selectively target integrin αvβ3 overexpressing breast cancer cells for targeted imaging. The organic dots are also applied for real-time two-photon fluorescence in vivo visualization of the blood vasculature of mouse ear, providing the spatiotemporal information about the whole blood vascular network. These results demonstrate that the present fluorescent organic dots are promising candidates for living cell and tissue imaging.

  12. Measurement of the photon plus b-jet production differential cross section in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ =1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Aoki, M; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bartosik, N; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besancon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazeay, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Perez, E; Casey, B C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chevalier-Thery, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M -C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Deliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Garcia-Gonzalez, J A; Garcia-Guerra, G A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, R; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J -F; Grohsjean, A; Gruenendahl, S; Gruenewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffre, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, R; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; de Sa, R Lopes; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K. A.; Madar, R; Magana-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martinez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; et al.

    2012-07-24

    We present measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dργτ for the inclusive production of a photon in association with a b -quark jet for photons with rapidities |yγ| < 1.0 and 30 < ργτ < 300 GeV , as well as for photons with 1.5 <|yγ| < 2.5 and 30 < ργτ < 200 GeV, where ργτ is the photon transverse momentum. The b -quark jets are required to have pT > 15 GeV and rapidity |yjet| < 1.5. The results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1, recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ Collider at $\\sqrt{s}$ =1.96 TeV. The measured cross sections are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations using different sets of parton distribution functions as well as to predictions based on the kT-factorization QCD approach, and those from the SHERPA and PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generators.

  13. Measurement of the photon+b-jet production differential cross section in ppbar collisions at √{s}=1.96 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartosik, N.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    We present measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dpTγ for the inclusive production of a photon in association with a b-quark jet for photons with rapidities |yγ|<1.0 and 30photons with 1.5<|yγ|<2.5 and 30photon transverse momentum. The b-quark jets are required to have pT>15 GeV and rapidity |yjet|<1.5. The results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1, recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron ppbar Collider at √{s}=1.96 TeV. The measured cross sections are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations using different sets of parton distribution functions as well as to predictions based on the kT-factorization QCD approach, and those from the SHERPA and PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generators.

  14. Measurement of the photon+b-jet production differential cross section in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D0 Collaboration; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartosik, N.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dpTγ for the inclusive production of a photon in association with a b-quark jet for photons with rapidities |yγ|<1.0 and 30photons with 1.5<|yγ|<2.5 and 30photon transverse momentum. The b-quark jets are required to have pT>15 GeV and rapidity |yjet|<1.5. The results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1, recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ Collider at s=1.96 TeV. The measured cross sections are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations using different sets of parton distribution functions as well as to predictions based on the kT-factorization QCD approach, and those from the SHERPA and PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generators.

  15. Two-photon excitation and excited-state absorption cross sections for H2 E,F 1Sigma sub g (v=6) - Measurement and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Jesse D.; Robie, Daniel C.; Hickman, A. P.; Bamford, Douglas J.; Bischel, William K.

    1989-04-01

    Observations of the E,F 1Sigma sub g (+) (v-prime=6)-to-B 1Sigma sub u (+) (v-double-prime=0) fluorescence transition at about 750 nm have been conducted to determine the absolute two-photon excitation cross section for the H2 E,F 1Sigma sub g (v-prime=6)-from-X 1Sigma sub g (v-double-prime=0) Q(1) transition at 193 nm. The 2.0 + or - 0.9 x 10 to the -36th cm exp 4 integrated two-photon excitation cross-section obtained is in good agreement with Huo and Jaffe's (1983) theoretical calculation result of 2.8 x 10 to the -36th cm exp 4.

  16. Theoretical X-ray production cross sections at incident photon energies across Li (i=1-3) absorption edges of Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Sanjiv

    2015-08-01

    The X-ray production (XRP) cross sections, σLk (k = l, η, α, β6, β1, β3, β4, β9,10, γ1,5, γ2,3) have been evaluated at incident photon energies across the Li(i=1-3) absorption edge energies of 35Br using theoretical data sets of different physical parameters, namely, the Li(i=1-3) sub-shell the X-ray emission rates based on the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, the fluorescence and Coster Kronig yields based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater (DHS) model, and two sets of the photoionisation cross sections based on the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (RHFS) model and the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, in order to highlight the importance of electron exchange effects at photon energies in vicinity of absorption edge energies.

  17. X-ray production cross sections at incident photon energies across the Mi (i=1-5) edges of 90Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajnish; Shehla, Kumar, Anil; Puri, Sanjiv

    2015-08-01

    The X-ray production cross sections for the Mk (k= ξ, δ, α, β, ζ, γ, m1, m2) groups of X-rays have been evaluated at incident photon energies across the Mi (i =1-5) edges of 90Th using the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater model based photoionisation cross sections and recently reported values of the M-shell X-ray emission rates, fluorescence and Coster Kronig yields. Further, the energies of the prominent (Mi-Sj) (Sj=Nj, Oj and i =1-3, j =1-7) resonant Raman scattered (RRS) peaks at different incident photon energies have also been evaluated using the neutral-atom electron binding energies (Esj) based on the relaxed orbital relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater model.

  18. X-ray production cross sections at incident photon energies across the M{sub i} (i=1-5) edges of {sub 90}Th

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Rajnish; Shehla,; Kumar, Anil; Puri, Sanjiv

    2015-08-28

    The X-ray production cross sections for the M{sub k} (k= ξ, δ, α, β, ζ, γ, m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}) groups of X-rays have been evaluated at incident photon energies across the M{sub i} (i =1-5) edges of {sub 90}Th using the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater model based photoionisation cross sections and recently reported values of the M-shell X-ray emission rates, fluorescence and Coster Kronig yields. Further, the energies of the prominent (M{sub i}-S{sub j}) (S{sub j}=N{sub j}, O{sub j} and i =1-3, j =1-7) resonant Raman scattered (RRS) peaks at different incident photon energies have also been evaluated using the neutral-atom electron binding energies (E{sub sj}) based on the relaxed orbital relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater model.

  19. Spectrally resolved time-correlated single photon counting: a novel approach for characterization of endogenous fluorescence in isolated cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chorvat, D; Chorvatova, A

    2006-12-01

    A new setup for time-resolved fluorescence micro-spectroscopy of cells, based on multi-dimensional time-correlated single photon counting, was designed and tested. Here we demonstrate that the spectrometer allows fast and reproducible measurements of endogenous flavin fluorescence measured directly in living cardiac cells after excitation with visible picosecond laser diodes. Two complementary approaches for the analysis of spectrally- and time-resolved autofluorescence data are presented, comprising the fluorescence decay fitting by exponential series and the time-resolved emission spectroscopy analysis. In isolated cardiac myocytes, we observed three distinct lifetime pools with characteristic lifetime values spanning from picosecond to nanosecond range and the time-dependent red shift of the autofluorescence emission spectra. We compared obtained results to in vitro recordings of free flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and FAD in lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH). The developed setup combines the strength of both spectral and fluorescence lifetime analysis and provides a solid base for the study of complex systems with intrinsic fluorescence, such as identification of the individual flavinoprotein components in living cardiac cells. This approach therefore constitutes an important instrumental advancement towards redox fluorimetry of living cardiomyocytes, with the perspective of its applications in the investigation of oxidative metabolic state under pathophysiological conditions, such as ischemia and/or metabolic disorders. PMID:17033778

  20. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ≤SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (≤SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  1. Proposal and demonstration of lambda-based internet exchange (IX) point using GMPLS protocols and photonic cross-connect (PXC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuritani, Takehiro; Okamoto, Shuichi; Ogino, Nagao; Otani, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2004-10-01

    This paper proposes an architecture of a next-generation Internet eXchange (IX) based on the Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) technologies and the photonic cross-connect (PXC), hereafter referred to a Lambda-IX. At first, we investigate a basic Lambda-IX model where the PXC provides a GMPLS-controlled lambda label-switched path (LSP) to interconnect different ISPs' border routers. We verify that the proposed Lambda-IX model can achieve the lambda-based and resilient interconnection for the ISPs, thanks to the PXC's bit-rate insensitive operation as well as fast restoration operation. In addition, once GMPLS functionalities are introduced on the border routers as well as the PXC, very flexible interconnection can be achieved such as demand-based creation and deletion of lambda LSPs. Next, we initiatively demonstrate an experimental Lambda-IX using a PXC and IP/MPLS routers. A Lambda-LSP with OC-192 bandwidth can be successfully created by using the GMPLS RSVP-TE signaling protocol via a control plane, and an EGP session of Border Gateway Protocol 4 (BGP-4) can be established over the Lambda-LSP created between the GMPLS-enabled border routers via a data plane. We also evaluate the fault recovery operation in the case where such Lambda-IXs are consisted of several PXCs and demonstrate that the Lambda-LSP as well as the corresponding BGP session can be restored with a fast recovery time of less than 1s. Through these investigation and demonstration, it is revealed that the Lambda-IX can be put to practical use aiming at inter-exchanging a large traffic in a near future, while enriching the functions of IX.

  2. Molecular characterization of Cirus tristeza virus isolates associated with stem pitting CTV cross-protection in Peru

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, the Peruvian citrus industry was destroyed by severe Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains spread by the brown citrus aphid. The Topara Nursery, located 180 km south of Lima Peru, selected and identified CTV isolates that confer cross-protection against virulent stem...

  3. Broadband photonic single sideband frequency up-converter based on the cross polarization modulation effect in a semiconductor optical amplifier for radio-over-fiber systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Jong-In

    2014-01-13

    A broadband photonic single sideband (SSB) frequency up-converter based on the cross polarization modulation (XPolM) effect in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. An optical radio frequency (RF) signal in the form of an optical single sideband (OSSB) is generated by the photonic SSB frequency up-converter to solve the power fading problem caused by fiber chromatic dispersion. The generated OSSB RF signal has almost identical optical carrier power and optical sideband power. This SSB frequency up-conversion scheme shows an almost flat electrical RF power response as a function of the RF frequency in a range from 31 GHz to 75 GHz after 40 km single mode fiber (SMF) transmission. The photonic SSB frequency up-conversion technique shows negligible phase noise degradation. The phase noise of the up-converted RF signal at 49 GHz for an offset of 10 kHz is -93.17 dBc/Hz. Linearity analysis shows that the photonic SSB frequency up-converter has a spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) value of 79.51 dB · Hz(2/3).

  4. Making baryons dark: the quantum prediction of the variation of photon-particle scattering cross section with the approach to equilibrium in deep gravity wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, Alllan David; Collins, Matthew P.

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of astrophysical phenomena relies on knowledge of cross sections. These cross sections are measured in scattering experiments, or calculated using theoretical techniques such as partial wave analysis. It has been recently shown [1,2,3] however that photon scattering cross sections depend also on the degree of localization of the target particle, and that particles in large-scale, deep-gravity wells can exhibit lower cross sections than those measured in lab-based experiments where particles are implicitly localized. This purely quantum effect arises as a consequence of differences in the gravitational eigenspectral distribution of a particle’s wavefunction in different situations, and is in addition to the obvious notion that delocalized particle scattering is less likely simply because the target particles are ‘in a bigger box’.In this presentation we consider the quantum equilibrium statistics of particles in gravitational potentials corresponding to dark matter density profiles. We show that as galactic halos approach equilibrium, the dark eigenstates of the eigenspectral ensemble are favoured and baryons exhibit lower photon scattering cross sections, rendering halos less visible than expected from currently accepted cross sections. Traditional quantum theory thus predicts that baryons that have not coalesced into self-bound macroscopic structures such as stars, can essentially behave as dark matter simply by equilibrating within a deep gravity well. We will discuss this effect and the consequences for microwave anisotropy analysis and primordial nucleosynthesis.[1] Ernest, A. D., and Collins, M. P., 2014, Australian Institute of Physics, AIP Congress, Canberra, December, 2014.[2] Ernest, A. D., 2009, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor., 42, 115207, 115208.[3] Ernest, A. D., 2012, In Prof. Ion Cotaescu (Ed) Advances in Quantum Theory (pp 221-248). Rijeka: InTech. ISBN 978-953-51-0087-4

  5. A package for the ab-initio calculation of one- and two-photon cross sections of two-electron atoms, using a CI B-splines method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.

    2003-02-01

    A package is presented for the fully ab-initio calculation of one- and two-photon ionization cross sections for two-electron atomic systems (H -, He, Mg, Ca, …) under strong laser fields, within lowest-order perturbation theory (LOPT) and in the dipole approximation. The atomic structure is obtained through configuration interaction (CI) of antisymmetrized two-electron states expanded in a B-spline finite basis. The formulation of the theory and the relevant codes presented here represent the accumulation of work over the last ten years [1-11,13-15]. Extensions to more than two-photon ionization is straightforward. Calculation is possible for both the length and velocity form of the laser-atom interaction operator. The package is mainly, written in standard FORTRAN language and uses the publicly available libraries SLATEC, LAPACK and BLAS.

  6. Differential cross section of γn→K+Σ- on bound neutrons with incident photons from 1.1 to 3.6 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pereira, S. Anefalos; Mirazita, M.; Rossi, P.; De Sanctis, E.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; et al

    2010-05-01

    Differential cross sections of the reaction γd → K+Σ–(p) have been measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab using incident photons with energies between 1.1 and 3.6 GeV. This is the first complete set of strangeness photoproduction data on the neutron covering a broad angular range. At energies close to threshold and up to Eγ ~ 1.8 GeV, the shape of the angular distribution is suggestive of the presence of s -channel production mechanisms. For Eγ > 1.8 GeV, a clear forward peak appears and becomes more prominent as the photon energy increases, suggesting contributions from t-channel production mechanisms.more » Furthermore, these data can be used to constrain future analysis of this reaction.« less

  7. Discrete quantum Fourier transform using weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity and displacement operator and photon-number-resolving measurement under the decoherence effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jino; Kang, Min-Sung; Hong, Chang-Ho; Yang, Hyeon; Choi, Seong-Gon

    2016-09-01

    We present a scheme for implementing discrete quantum Fourier transform (DQFT) with robustness against the decoherence effect using weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities (XKNLs). The multi-photon DQFT scheme can be achieved by operating the controlled path and merging path gates that are formed with weak XKNLs and linear optical devices. To enhance feasibility under the decoherence effect, in practice, we utilize a displacement operator and photon-number-resolving measurement in the optical gate using XKNLs. Consequently, when there is a strong amplitude of the coherent state, we demonstrate that it is possible to experimentally implement the DQFT scheme, utilizing current technology, with a certain probability of success under the decoherence effect.

  8. Cross-linking of soybean protein isolate-chitosan coacervate with transglutaminase utilizing capsanthin as the model core.

    PubMed

    Huang, G Q; Xiao, J X; Qiu, H W; Yang, J

    2014-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) is an alternative coacervate cross-linking agent to aldehydes due to its safety. In this work, the cross-linking conditions of soybean protein isolate (SPI)-chitosan coacervates with TG-utilizing capsanthin as the model core were optimized and its cross-linking effectiveness was compared with that of glutaraldehyde. Results indicated that the optimum capsanthin microcapsule cross-linking conditions were as follows: a suspension pH of 6.0, an incubation duration of 3 h, a TG concentration of 18.75 U/g SPI and a reaction temperature of 45 °C. Under these conditions, TG provided a cross-linking effectiveness comparable with that of glutaraldehyde in regards to microcapsule stability against swelling in 80 °C water and heating at 150 °C. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis revealed that TG cross-linking increased the integrity of the microcapsule walls. It was concluded that the SPI-chitosan coacervation pair has potential applications in the food industry in terms of cross-linker safety and effectiveness.

  9. Novel 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-based red-fluorescent dyes with enhanced two-photon absorption cross-sections.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shin-ichiro; Matsumoto, Taisuke; Shigeiwa, Motoyuki; Gorohmaru, Hideki; Maeda, Shuuichi; Ishi-i, Tsutomu; Mataka, Shuntaro

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports the two-photon absorbing and orange-red fluorescence emitting properties of a series of new 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BTD)-based D-pi-A-pi-D-type and star-burst-type fluorescent dyes. In the D-pi-A-pi-D-type dyes 1-6, a central BTD core was connected with two terminal N,N-disubstituted amino groups via various pi-conjugated spacers. The star-burst-type dyes 8 and 10 have a three-branched structure composed of a central core (benzene core in 8 and triphenylamine core in 10) and three triphenylamine-containing BTD branches. All the BTD-based dyes displayed intense orange-red color fluorescence in a region of 550-689 nm, which was obtained by single-photon excitation with good fluorescent quantum yield up to 0.98 as well as by two-photon excitation. Large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections (110-800 GM) of these BTD dyes were evaluated by open aperture Z-scan technique with a femtosecond Ti/sapphire laser. The TPA cross-sections of D-pi-A-pi-D-type dyes 2-6 with a benzene, thiophene, ethene, ethyne, and styrene moiety, respectively, as an additional pi-conjugated spacer are about 1.5-2.5 times larger than that of 1c with only a benzene spacer. The TPA cross-sections significantly increased in three-branched star-burst-type BTDs 8 (780 GM) with a benzene core and 10 (800 GM) with a triphenylamine core, which are about 3-5 times larger than those of the corresponding one-dimensional sub-units 9 (170 GM) and 11 (230 GM), respectively. The ratios of sigma/e(pi) between three-branched and one-dimensional dyes were 6.5:3.8 (for 8 and 9) and 6.0:4.0 (for 10 and 11), which are larger than those predicted simply on the basis of the chromophore number density (1:1), according to a cooperative enhancement of the two-photon absorbing nature in the three-branched system.

  10. Ion collision cross sections with transport and reaction coefficients in Ar, Cl2 and N2 and their mixtures for photonic crystal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennad, A.; Yousfi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The ion swarm transport coefficients such as reduced mobility, diffusion coefficients and reaction rates of the following systems Ar+/Cl2, Ar+/N2, N_2^+/Cl_{2} and N_2^+/Ar have been determined from a Monte Carlo simulation using calculated elastic and experimentally estimated inelastic collision cross sections. The elastic momentum transfer cross sections have been determined from a semi-classical JWKB approximation based on a rigid core interaction potential model. The inelastic cross sections have been fitted using the measured reaction coefficients as for instance ion conversion reaction coefficients. Then, the cross section sets are fitted using either the measured reduced mobility when available in the literature or the zero-field mobility calculated from Satoh's relation. From the sets of elastic and inelastic collision cross sections thus obtained in Ar+/Cl2, Ar+/N2, N_2^+/Cl_{2} and N_2^+/Ar systems, the ion transport and reaction coefficients are then calculated in pure gases and also in binary and ternary mixtures involving Cl2, Ar and N2 over a wide range of reduced electric field. These ion data are very useful for modelling and simulation of non-equilibrium low pressure electrical discharges used more particularly for etching of the III-V compounds in the case of crystal photonic applications.

  11. Mercury-mediated cross-resistance to tellurite in Pseudomonas spp. isolated from the Chilean Antarctic territory.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rojas, F; Díaz-Vásquez, W; Undabarrena, A; Muñoz-Díaz, P; Arenas, F; Vásquez, C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury salts and tellurite are among the most toxic compounds for microorganisms on Earth. Bacterial mercury resistance is established mainly via mercury reduction by the mer operon system. However, specific mechanisms underlying tellurite resistance are unknown to date. To identify new mechanisms for tellurite detoxification we demonstrate that mercury resistance mechanisms can trigger cross-protection against tellurite to a group of Pseudomonads isolated from the Chilean Antarctic territory. Sequencing of 16S rRNA of four isolated strains resulted in the identification of three Pseudomonads (ATH-5, ATH-41 and ATH-43) and a Psychrobacter (ATH-62) bacteria species. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ATH strains were related to other species previously isolated from cold aquatic and soil environments. Furthermore, the identified merA genes were related to merA sequences belonging to transposons commonly found in isolated bacteria from mercury contaminated sites. Pseudomonas ATH isolates exhibited increased tellurite resistance only in the presence of mercury, especially ATH-43. Determination of the growth curves, minimal inhibitory concentrations and growth inhibition zones showed different tellurite cross-resistance of the ATH strains and suggested a correlation with the presence of a mer operon. On the other hand, reactive oxygen species levels decreased while the thiol content increased when the isolates were grown in the presence of both toxicants. Finally, qPCR determinations of merA, merC and rpoS transcripts from ATH-43 showed a synergic expression pattern upon combined tellurite and mercury treatments. Altogether, the results suggest that mercury could trigger a cell response that confers mercury and tellurite resistance, and that the underlying mechanism participates in protection against oxidative damage.

  12. Theoretical X-ray production cross sections at incident photon energies across L{sub i} (i=1-3) absorption edges of Br

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Sanjiv

    2015-08-28

    The X-ray production (XRP) cross sections, σ{sub Lk} (k = l, η, α, β{sub 6}, β{sub 1}, β{sub 3}, β{sub 4}, β{sub 9,10}, γ{sub 1,5}, γ{sub 2,3}) have been evaluated at incident photon energies across the L{sub i}(i=1-3) absorption edge energies of {sub 35}Br using theoretical data sets of different physical parameters, namely, the L{sub i}(i=1-3) sub-shell the X-ray emission rates based on the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, the fluorescence and Coster Kronig yields based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater (DHS) model, and two sets of the photoionisation cross sections based on the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (RHFS) model and the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, in order to highlight the importance of electron exchange effects at photon energies in vicinity of absorption edge energies.

  13. Charging a Battery-Powered Device with a Fiber-Optically Connected Photonic Power System for Achieving High-Voltage Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Lizon, David C; Gioria, Jack G; Dale, Gregory E; Snyder, Hans R

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a system to provide isolated power to the cathode-subsystem electronics of an x-ray tube. These components are located at the cathode potential of several hundred kilovolts, requiring a supply of power isolated from this high voltage. In this design a fiber-optically connected photonic power system (PPS) is used to recharge a lithium-ion battery pack, which will subsequently supply power to the cathode-subsystem electronics. The suitability of the commercially available JDSU PPS for this application is evaluated. The output of the ppe converter is characterized. The technical aspects of its use for charging a variety of Li-Ion batteries are discussed. Battery charge protection requirements and safety concerns are also addressed.

  14. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation dose received from high energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a limiting factor in the design of long duration space flights and the building of lunar and martian habitats. It is of vital importance to have an accurate understanding of the interactions of GCR in order to assess the radiation environment that the astronauts will be exposed to. Although previous studies have concentrated on the strong interaction process in GCR, there are also very large effects due to electromagnetic (EM) interactions. In this report we describe our first efforts at understanding these EM production processes due to two-photon collisions. More specifically, we shall consider particle production processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHICs) through two-photon exchange.

  15. Epichlorohydrin-Cross-linked Hydroxyethyl Cellulose/Soy Protein Isolate Composite Films as Biocompatible and Biodegradable Implants for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanteng; He, Meng; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Shiqun; Li, Yinping; Gan, Li; Li, Mingming; Xu, Li; Chang, Peter R; Anderson, Debbie P; Chen, Yun

    2016-02-01

    A series of epichlorohydrin-cross-linked hydroxyethyl cellulose/soy protein isolate composite films (EHSF) was fabricated from hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) and soy protein isolate (SPI) using a process involving blending, cross-linking, solution casting, and evaporation. The films were characterized with FTIR, solid-state (13)C NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy, and mechanical testing. The results indicated that cross-linking interactions occurred in the inter- and intramolecules of HEC and SPI during the fabrication process. The EHSF films exhibited homogeneous structure and relative high light transmittance, indicating there was a certain degree of miscibility between HEC and SPI. The EHSF films exhibited a relative high mechanical strength in humid state and an adjustable water uptake ratio and moisture absorption ratio. Cytocompatibility, hemocompatibility and biodegradability were evaluated by a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. These results showed that the EHSF films had good biocompatibility, hemocompatibility, and anticoagulant effect. Furthermore, EHSF films could be degraded in vitro and in vivo, and the degradation rate could be controlled by adjusting the SPI content. Hence, EHSF films might have a great potential for use in the biomedical field.

  16. Photonic-crystal diplexers for terahertz-wave applications.

    PubMed

    Yata, Masahiro; Fujita, Masayuki; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2016-04-01

    A compact diplexer is designed using a silicon photonic-crystal directional coupler of length comparable to the incident wavelength. The diplexer theoretically and experimentally exhibits a cross state bandwidth as broad as 2% of the operation frequency, with over 40-dB isolation between the cross and bar ports. We also demonstrate 1.5-Gbit/s frequency-division communication in the 0.32- and 0.33-THz bands using a single-wavelength-sized diplexer, and discuss the transmission bandwidth. Our study demonstrates the potential for application of photonic crystals as terahertz-wave integration platforms.

  17. A cross strain Plasmodium falciparum microarray optimized for the transcriptome analysis of Plasmodium falciparum patient derived isolates.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, P A; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Rao, Sudha Narayana; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Sirohi, Paramendra; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2016-09-01

    Malarial parasite P. falciparum, an apicomplexan protozoan has a 23.3 MB nuclear genome and encodes ~ 5600 transcripts. The genetic diversity of the parasite within and across geographical zones is a challenge to gene expression studies which are essential for understanding of disease process, outcome and developing markers for diagnostics and prognostics. Here, we describe the strategy involved in designing a custom P. falciparum 15K array using the Agilent platform and Genotypic's Right Design methodology to study the transcriptome of Indian field isolates for which genome sequence information is limited. The array contains probes representing genome sequences of two distinct geographical isolates (i.e. 3D7 and HB3) and sub-telomeric var gene sequences of a third isolate (IT4) known to adhere in culture condition. Probes in the array have been selected based on their efficiency to detect transcripts through a 244K array experimentation. Array performance for the 15K array, was evaluated and validated using RNA materials from P. falciparum clinical isolates. A large percentage (91%) of the represented transcripts was detected from Indian P. falciparum patient isolates. Replicated probes and multiple probes representing the same gene showed perfect correlation between them suggesting good probe performance. Additional transcripts could be detected due to inclusion of unique probes representing HB3 strain transcripts. Variant surface antigen (VSA) transcripts were detected by optimized probes representing the VSA genes of three geographically distinct strains. The 15K cross strain P. falciparum array has shown good efficiency in detecting transcripts from P. falciparum parasite samples isolated from patients. The low parasite loads and presence of host RNA makes arrays a preferred platform for gene expression studies over RNA-Seq. PMID:27489776

  18. Isolation Facilities for Highly Infectious Diseases in Europe – A Cross-Sectional Analysis in 16 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Stefan; Fusco, Francesco Maria; De Iaco, Giuseppina; Bannister, Barbara; Maltezou, Helena C.; Carson, Gail; Gottschalk, Rene; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Brouqui, Philippe; Puro, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background Highly Infectious Diseases (HIDs) are (i) easily transmissible form person to person; (ii) cause a life-threatening illness with no or few treatment options; and (iii) pose a threat for both personnel and the public. Hence, even suspected HID cases should be managed in specialised facilities minimizing infection risks but allowing state-of-the-art critical care. Consensus statements on the operational management of isolation facilities have been published recently. The study presented was set up to compare the operational management, resources, and technical equipment among European isolation facilities. Due to differences in geography, population density, and national response plans it was hypothesized that adherence to recommendations will vary. Methods and Findings Until mid of 2010 the European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases conducted a cross-sectional analysis of isolation facilities in Europe, recruiting 48 isolation facilities in 16 countries. Three checklists were disseminated, assessing 44 items and 148 specific questions. The median feedback rate for specific questions was 97.9% (n = 47/48) (range: n = 7/48 (14.6%) to n = 48/48 (100%). Although all facilities enrolled were nominated specialised facilities' serving countries or regions, their design, equipment and personnel management varied. Eighteen facilities fulfilled the definition of a High Level Isolation Unit'. In contrast, 24 facilities could not operate independently from their co-located hospital, and five could not ensure access to equipment essential for infection control. Data presented are not representative for the EU in general, as only 16/27 (59.3%) of all Member States agreed to participate. Another limitation of this study is the time elapsed between data collection and publication; e.g. in Germany one additional facility opened in the meantime. Conclusion There are disparities both within and between European countries regarding the design and equipment

  19. Pulse-shaping based two-photon FRET stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Daniel C; Bhagwat, Amar R; Brenner, Meredith H; Núñez, Marcos F; Mork, Briana E; Cai, Dawen; Swanson, Joel A; Ogilvie, Jennifer P

    2015-02-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) based measurements that calculate the stoichiometry of intermolecular interactions in living cells have recently been demonstrated, where the technique utilizes selective one-photon excitation of donor and acceptor fluorophores to isolate the pure FRET signal. Here, we present work towards extending this FRET stoichiometry method to employ two-photon excitation using a pulse-shaping methodology. In pulse-shaping, frequency-dependent phases are applied to a broadband femtosecond laser pulse to tailor the two-photon excitation conditions to preferentially excite donor and acceptor fluorophores. We have also generalized the existing stoichiometry theory to account for additional cross-talk terms that are non-vanishing under two-photon excitation conditions. Using the generalized theory we demonstrate two-photon FRET stoichiometry in live COS-7 cells expressing fluorescent proteins mAmetrine as the donor and tdTomato as the acceptor.

  20. Spatio-energetic cross-talks in photon counting detectors: detector model and correlated Poisson data generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Polster, Christoph; Lee, Okkyun; Kappler, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    An x-ray photon interacts with photon counting detectors (PCDs) and generates an electron charge cloud or multiple clouds. The clouds (thus, the photon energy) may be split between two adjacent PCD pixels when the interaction occurs near pixel boundaries, producing a count at both of the two pixels. This is called double-counting with charge sharing. The output of individual PCD pixel is Poisson distributed integer counts; however, the outputs of adjacent pixels are correlated due to double-counting. Major problems are the lack of detector noise model for the spatio-energetic crosstalk and the lack of an efficient simulation tool. Monte Carlo simulation can accurately simulate these phenomena and produce noisy data; however, it is not computationally efficient. In this study, we developed a new detector model and implemented into an efficient software simulator which uses a Poisson random number generator to produce correlated noisy integer counts. The detector model takes the following effects into account effects: (1) detection efficiency and incomplete charge collection; (2) photoelectric effect with total absorption; (3) photoelectric effect with fluorescence x-ray emission and re-absorption; (4) photoelectric effect with fluorescence x-ray emission which leaves PCD completely; and (5) electric noise. The model produced total detector spectrum similar to previous MC simulation data. The model can be used to predict spectrum and correlation with various different settings. The simulated noisy data demonstrated the expected performance: (a) data were integers; (b) the mean and covariance matrix was close to the target values; (c) noisy data generation was very efficient

  1. Anomalously strong two-electron one-photon X-ray decay transitions in CO caused by avoided crossing.

    PubMed

    Couto, Rafael C; Guarise, Marco; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Jaouen, Nicolas; Chiuzbăian, Gheorghe S; Lüning, Jan; Ekholm, Victor; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Såthe, Conny; Hennies, Franz; Kimberg, Victor; Guimarães, Freddy F; Agren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Journel, Loïc; Simon, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The unique opportunity to study and control electron-nuclear quantum dynamics in coupled potentials offered by the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) technique is utilized to unravel an anomalously strong two-electron one-photon transition from core-excited to Rydberg final states in the CO molecule. High-resolution RIXS measurements of CO in the energy region of 12-14 eV are presented and analyzed by means of quantum simulations using the wave packet propagation formalism and ab initio calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments. The very good overall agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions allows an in-depth interpretation of the salient spectral features in terms of Coulomb mixing of "dark" with "bright" final states leading to an effective two-electron one-photon transition. The present work illustrates that the improved spectral resolution of RIXS spectra achievable today may call for more advanced theories than what has been used in the past.

  2. The effect of entanglement in gravitational photon-photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätzel, Dennis; Wilkens, Martin; Menzel, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    The differential cross-section for gravitational photon-photon scattering calculated in perturbative quantum gravity is shown to depend on the degree of polarization entanglement of the two photons. The interaction between photons in the symmetric Bell state is stronger than between not entangled photons. In contrast, the interaction between photons in the anti-symmetric Bell state is weaker than between not entangled photons. The results are interpreted in terms of quantum interference, and it is shown how they fit into the idea of distance-dependent forces.

  3. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-06-03

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section, $ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |η| < 2.5, and are required to have transverse momenta in the range 40 < $ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $ < 300 GeV and $ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $ > 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements are compared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. Lastly, the predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.

  4. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-06-03

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section,more » $$ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $$ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s} $$ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$$^{-1}$$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |η| < 2.5, and are required to have transverse momenta in the range 40 < $$ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $$ < 300 GeV and $$ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $$ > 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements are compared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. Lastly, the predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.« less

  5. Observation of top-quark pair production in association with a photon and measurement of the t t ¯ γ production cross section in p p collisions at √{s }=7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. 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B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A search is performed for top-quark pairs (t t ¯) produced together with a photon (γ ) with transverse energy greater than 20 GeV using a sample of t t ¯ candidate events in final states with jets, missing transverse momentum, and one isolated electron or muon. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.59 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. In total, 140 and 222 t t ¯γ candidate events are observed in the electron and muon channels, to be compared to the expectation of 79 ±26 and 120 ±39 non-t t ¯γ background events, respectively. The production of t t ¯γ events is observed with a significance of 5.3 standard deviations away from the null hypothesis. The t t ¯γ production cross section times the branching ratio (BR) of the single-lepton decay channel is measured in a fiducial kinematic region within the ATLAS acceptance. The measured value is σtt ¯ γ fid×BR =63 ±8 (stat)-13+17(syst)±1 (lumi) fb per lepton flavor, in good agreement with the leading-order theoretical calculation normalized to the next-to-leading-order theoretical prediction of 48 ±10 fb .

  6. Epidemic diffusion of OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in Italy: results of the first cross-sectional countrywide survey.

    PubMed

    Principe, Luigi; Piazza, Aurora; Giani, Tommaso; Bracco, Silvia; Caltagirone, Maria Sofia; Arena, Fabio; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Tammaro, Federica; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Pagani, Laura; Luzzaro, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) is emerging worldwide as a public health problem in various settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of CRAb isolates in Italy and to characterize their resistance mechanisms and genetic relatedness. A countrywide cross-sectional survey was carried out at 25 centers in mid-2011. CRAb isolates were reported from all participating centers, with overall proportions of 45.7% and 22.2% among consecutive nonreplicate clinical isolates of A. baumannii from inpatients (n = 508) and outpatients (n = 63), respectively. Most of them were resistant to multiple antibiotics, whereas all remained susceptible to colistin, with MIC50 and MIC90 values of ≤ 0.5 mg/liter. The genes coding for carbapenemase production were identified by PCR and sequencing. OXA-23 enzymes (found in all centers) were by far the most common carbapenemases (81.7%), followed by OXA-58 oxacillinases (4.5%), which were found in 7 of the 25 centers. In 6 cases, CRAb isolates carried both bla(OXA-23-like) and bla(OXA-58-like) genes. A repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR technique, multiplex PCRs for group identification, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to determine the genetic relationships among representative isolates (n = 55). Two different clonal lineages were identified, including a dominant clone of sequence type 2 (ST2) related to the international clone II (sequence group 1 [SG1], SG4, and SG5) and a clone of ST78 (SG6) previously described in Italy. Overall, our results demonstrate that OXA-23 enzymes have become the most prevalent carbapenemases and are now endemic in Italy. In addition, molecular typing profiles showed the presence of international and national clonal lineages in Italy.

  7. Cross-polarized photon-pair generation and bi-chromatically pumped optical parametric oscillation on a chip.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Christian; Kues, Michael; Caspani, Lucia; Wetzel, Benjamin; Roztocki, Piotr; Clerici, Matteo; Jestin, Yoann; Ferrera, Marcello; Peccianti, Marco; Pasquazi, Alessia; Little, Brent E; Chu, Sai T; Moss, David J; Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes are one of the most important tools in modern optics with a broad spectrum of applications in, for example, frequency conversion, spectroscopy, signal processing and quantum optics. For practical and ultimately widespread implementation, on-chip devices compatible with electronic integrated circuit technology offer great advantages in terms of low cost, small footprint, high performance and low energy consumption. While many on-chip key components have been realized, to date polarization has not been fully exploited as a degree of freedom for integrated nonlinear devices. In particular, frequency conversion based on orthogonally polarized beams has not yet been demonstrated on chip. Here we show frequency mixing between orthogonal polarization modes in a compact integrated microring resonator and demonstrate a bi-chromatically pumped optical parametric oscillator. Operating the device above and below threshold, we directly generate orthogonally polarized beams, as well as photon pairs, respectively, that can find applications, for example, in optical communication and quantum optics.

  8. Cross-polarized photon-pair generation and bi-chromatically pumped optical parametric oscillation on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Christian; Kues, Michael; Caspani, Lucia; Wetzel, Benjamin; Roztocki, Piotr; Clerici, Matteo; Jestin, Yoann; Ferrera, Marcello; Peccianti, Marco; Pasquazi, Alessia; Little, Brent E.; Chu, Sai T.; Moss, David J.; Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes are one of the most important tools in modern optics with a broad spectrum of applications in, for example, frequency conversion, spectroscopy, signal processing and quantum optics. For practical and ultimately widespread implementation, on-chip devices compatible with electronic integrated circuit technology offer great advantages in terms of low cost, small footprint, high performance and low energy consumption. While many on-chip key components have been realized, to date polarization has not been fully exploited as a degree of freedom for integrated nonlinear devices. In particular, frequency conversion based on orthogonally polarized beams has not yet been demonstrated on chip. Here we show frequency mixing between orthogonal polarization modes in a compact integrated microring resonator and demonstrate a bi-chromatically pumped optical parametric oscillator. Operating the device above and below threshold, we directly generate orthogonally polarized beams, as well as photon pairs, respectively, that can find applications, for example, in optical communication and quantum optics. PMID:26364999

  9. Non-linear mixing in coupled photonic crystal nanobeam cavities due to cross-coupling opto-mechanical mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Daniel Frank, Ian W.; Deotare, Parag B.; Bulu, Irfan; Lončar, Marko

    2014-11-03

    We investigate the coupling between mechanical and optical modes supported by coupled, freestanding, photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. We show that localized cavity modes for a given gap between the nanobeams provide weak optomechanical coupling with out-of-plane mechanical modes. However, we show that the coupling can be significantly increased, more than an order of magnitude for the symmetric mechanical mode, due to optical resonances that arise from the interaction of the localized cavity modes with standing waves formed by the reflection from thesubstrate. Finally, amplification of motion for the symmetric mode has been observed and attributed to the strong optomechanical interaction of our hybrid system. The amplitude of these self-sustained oscillations is large enough to put the system into a non-linear oscillation regime where a mixing between the mechanical modes is experimentally observed and theoretically explained.

  10. Photoionization cross-section of isotropic defects or impurity centers in isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, H.; Batista, J. V.; Couto dos Santos, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    An analytical expression to calculate the photoionization cross-section of isotropic defects or impurity centers is being proposed by using the time-dependent perturbation theory. The ground-state wave function of the electron captured in the impurity state is described by a three-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator and the electron excited state in the continuum conduction band is described by a plane wave. The expression has been obtained considering all multipoles terms in the Hamiltonian, and that the radiation field which interacts with electrons is semi-classical and linearly polarized. This approximation is assumed because the effects of the linear contribution are dominant. The available data of the Al2O3:C and Lu2SiO5:Ce systems are in good agreement with our predictions. Such satisfactory comparison is a strong indication that the present model can be used to provide good predictions of the photoionization cross-section in several areas.

  11. Measurement of the cross section for direct-photon production in association with a heavy quark in pp[over ¯] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; De Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-07-26

    We report on a measurement of the cross section for direct-photon production in association with a heavy quark using the full data set of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to 9.1  fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurements are performed as a function of the photon transverse momentum, covering a photon transverse momentum between 30 and 300 GeV, photon rapidities |yγ|<1.0, a heavy-quark-jet transverse momentum pTjet>20  GeV, and jet rapidities |yjet|<1.5. The results are compared with several theoretical predictions.

  12. Measurement of the Cross Section for Direct-Photon Production in Association with a Heavy Quark in pp¯ Collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucà, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a measurement of the cross section for direct-photon production in association with a heavy quark using the full data set of s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to 9.1fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurements are performed as a function of the photon transverse momentum, covering a photon transverse momentum between 30 and 300 GeV, photon rapidities |yγ|<1.0, a heavy-quark-jet transverse momentum pTjet>20GeV, and jet rapidities |yjet|<1.5. The results are compared with several theoretical predictions.

  13. Empirical parametrization of the two-photon-exchange effect contributions to the electron-proton elastic scattering cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qattan, I. A.; Alsaad, A.

    2011-05-01

    The most recent electron-proton elastic scattering data were re-analyzed using an empirical parametrization of the two-photon-exchange (TPE) effect contributions to σR. The TPE effect contribution F(Q2,ɛ) was double Taylor series expanded as a polynomial of order n keeping only terms linear in ɛ to account for the experimentally observed and verified linearity of the Rosenbluth plots. We fix the ratio R=GEp/GMp to be that obtained from a fit to the recoil-polarization data and parametrize σR first by a three-parameter formula (fit I) and then by a two-parameter formula (fit III). In contrast to previous analyses, the fit parameter GMp2 as obtained from these fits is either smaller or equal to the values obtained from our conventional Rosenbluth fit (fit II) but never larger. The ratio g(Q2)/GMp2 which represents the ratio of the TPE and one-photon-exchange (OPE) effect contributions to the intercept of σR is large and it ranges 3%-88%. The ratio R1γ⊗2γ=τf(Q2)/GEp2 which represents the ratio of the TPE and OPE effect contributions to the slope of σR is also large, reaching a value of 12.0-14.4 at Q2= 5.25 (GeV/c)2. The ratio R1γ⊗2γ as obtained from fits I and III is consistent, within error, with those obtained from previous analyses. Our formulas seem to explain the linearity of σR. Moreover, our analysis shows that the extracted GEp2 and GMp2 using the conventional Rosenbluth separation method can in fact be broken into the usual OPE and TPE contributions. Therefore, σR can in fact be derived under weaker conditions than those imposed by the Born approximation. Our results show that the TPE amplitudes, g(Q2)/GMp2 and f(Q2)/GMp2, are sizable and grow with Q2 value up to Q2~ 6 (GeV/c)2 in agreement with previous studies. A revision of and comparison to previous analyses are also presented.

  14. In vivo imaging flow cytometry based on laser scanning two-photon microscopy at kHz cross-sectional frame rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    In vivo flow cytometry has found numerous applications in biology and pharmacology. However, conventional cytometry does not provide the detailed morphological information that is needed to fully determine the phenotype of individual circulating cells. Imaging cytometry, capable of visualizing the morphology and dynamics of the circulating cells at high spatiotemporal resolution, is highly desired. Current wide-field based image cytometers are limited in the imaging depth and provide only two-dimensional resolution. For deep tissue imaging, laser scanning two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) is widely adopted. However, for applications in flow cytometry, the axial scanning speed of current TPMs is inadequate to provide high-speed cross-sectional imaging of vasculature. We have integrated an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens into a standard TPM and achieved microsecond-scale axial scanning. With a galvo scanner for transverse scanning, we achieved kHz cross-sectional frame rate. Here we report its applications for in vivo deformability cytometry and in vivo imaging flow cytometry, and demonstrate the capability of imaging dynamical morphologies of flowing cells, distinguishing cells and cellular clusters, and simultaneously quantifying different cell populations based on their fluorescent labels.

  15. Absolute cross sections and branching ratios for the radiative decay of doubly excited helium determined by photon-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickat, S.; Schartner, K.-H.; Kammer, Sv; Schill, R.; Werner, L.; Klumpp, S.; Ehresmann, A.; Schmoranzer, H.; Sukhorukov, V. L.

    2005-08-01

    The decay of doubly excited helium states below the N = 2 threshold, cascading radiatively over three steps, were investigated using the photon-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (PIFS) at BESSY II. Absolute cross sections as the product of the resonance excitation cross section of the doubly excited states and their fluorescence rate to decay into the singly excited 1sms(1S) and 1smd(1D) states were measured. The experiments showed that the (sp,2n+)(1P) states decay predominantly into the 1sns(1S) states, whereas the (pd,2n)(1P) states prefer to decay into the 1snd(1D) states. For the (sp,2n-)(1P) states with n = 4, 5 and 6 we observed a broad and complex decay pattern. In addition the angular distribution of the fluorescence radiation was measured. The results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the weakening of the LS coupling scheme and the mixing between singlet and triplet states in helium was confirmed by observation of the 1s6d(3D0,1,2) → 1s2p(3P0,1,2) transition on a doubly excited singlet state.

  16. A cross sectional study on antibiotic resistance pattern of Salmonella typhi clinical isolates from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Mannan, Adnan; Shohel, Mohammad; Rajia, Sultana; Mahmud, Niaz Uddin; Kabir, Sanjana; Hasan, Imtiaj

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate and compare the resistance and sensitivity of Salmonella typhi samples to commonly used antibiotics in three major divisions of Bangladesh and to evaluate the gradually developing resistance pattern. Methods The antibiotic susceptibility of 70 clinical isolates collected from blood, sputum, urine and pus samples were identified by specific antisera and with standard biochemical tests. The patients were divided into 5 age groups. Susceptibility and resistance was also tested by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method using 12 regularly used antibiotics. Results Antibiotic susceptibility test demonstrated that 64.28% isolates of Salmonella typhi were multidrug resistant. Present study suggests that the clinical samples were mostly resistant against nalidixic acid with all age groups and in all three divisions with similar resistance pattern. Resistance is more common among adult people (30-40 years) and children (0-10 years). Salmonella typhi was mostly sensitive against gentamycin, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin. Conclusions Although the population density of Dhaka region is markedly higher than Rajshahi and Chittagong regions, no significant difference in resistance pattern was found. The rate of multidrug resistance is a matter of concern. Physicians should reconsider before prescribing nalidixic acid and cefixime. Further molecular study is needed to reveal the genomic and proteomic basis of resistance. PMID:25182556

  17. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    1998-05-13

    Version 00 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a modular computer code used for converting evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format into libraries useful for applications calculations. Because the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format is used all around the world (e.g., ENDF/B-VI in the US, JEF-2.2 in Europe, JENDL-3.2 in Japan, BROND-2.2 in Russia), NJOY gives its users access to a wide variety of the most up-to-date nuclear data. NJOY provides comprehensivemore » capabilities for processing evaluated data, and it can serve applications ranging from continuous-energy Monte Carlo (MCNP), through deterministic transport codes (DANT, ANISN, DORT), to reactor lattice codes (WIMS, EPRI). NJOY handles a wide variety of nuclear effects, including resonances, Doppler broadening, heating (KERMA), radiation damage, thermal scattering (even cold moderators), gas production, neutrons and charged particles, photoatomic interactions, self shielding, probability tables, photon production, and high-energy interactions (to 150 MeV). Output can include printed listings, special library files for applications, and Postscript graphics (plus color). More information on NJOY is available from the developer's home page at http://t2.lanl.gov. Follow the Tourbus section of the Tour area to find notes from the ICTP lectures held at Trieste in March 1998 on the ENDF format and on the NJOY code.« less

  18. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    2000-03-28

    Version 00 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a modular computer code used for converting evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format into libraries useful for applications calculations. Because the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format is used all around the world (e.g., ENDF/B‑VI in the US, JEF‑2.2 in Europe, JENDL‑3.2 in Japan, BROND‑2.2 in Russia), NJOY gives its users access to a wide variety of the most up‑to‑date nuclear data. NJOY provides comprehensivemore » capabilities for processing evaluated data, and it can serve applications ranging from continuous‑energy Monte Carlo (MCNP), through deterministic transport codes (DANT, ANISN, DORT), to reactor lattice codes (WIMS, EPRI). NJOY handles a wide variety of nuclear effects, including resonances, Doppler broadening, heating (KERMA), radiation damage, thermal scattering (even cold moderators), gas production, neutrons and charged particles, photoatomic interactions, self shielding, probability tables, photon production, and high‑energy interactions (to 150 MeV). Output can include printed listings, special library files for applications, and Postscript graphics (plus color).« less

  19. Influence of the spatial shape of nonspherical symmetric dielectric microparticles on morphology of photonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yurii E.; Panina, Ekaterina K.; Zemlyanov, Alexander A.

    2015-11-01

    The results of numerical modeling of the near-field scattering of the light wave (photonic (nano)jet - PNJ) on the composite particles, representing a truncated circular cone with attached hemispheres are presented. For the first time it is shown that the combination of spherical and conical light focusing by composite particles leads to the formation of highly localized photonic jets with peak intensity being considerable higher than that for isolated microaxicons of the same cross-section.

  20. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  1. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  2. Impact of the γ _{ν }NN* Electrocoupling Parameters at High Photon Virtualities and Preliminary Cross Sections off the Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothe, Ralf W.; Tian, Ye

    2016-10-01

    Meson-photoproduction measurements and their reaction-amplitude analyses can establish more sensitively, and in some cases in an almost model-independent way, nucleon excitations and non-resonant reaction amplitudes. However, to investigate the strong interaction from already explored—where meson-cloud degrees of freedom contribute substantially to the baryon structure—to still unexplored distance scales—where quark degrees of freedom dominate and the transition from dressed to current quarks occurs—we depend on experiments that allow us to measure observables that are probing this evolving non-perturbative QCD regime over its full range. Elastic and transition form factors are uniquely suited to trace this evolution by measuring elastic electron scattering and exclusive single-meson and double-pion electroproduction cross sections off the nucleon. These exclusive measurements will be extended to higher momentum transfers with the energy-upgraded CEBAF beam at JLab to study the quark degrees of freedom, where their strong interaction is responsible for the ground and excited nucleon state formations. After establishing unprecedented high-precision data, the imminent next challenge is a high-quality analysis to extract these relevant electrocoupling parameters for various resonances that can then be compared to state-of-the-art models and QCD-based calculations. The vast majority of the available exclusive electroproduction cross sections are off the proton. Hence flavor-dependent analyses of excited light-quark baryons are lacking experimental data off the neutron. The goal is to close this gap by providing exclusive {γ }_{ν }(n) → p+ {π }- reaction cross section off deuterium and to establish a kinematical final-state-interaction (FSI) correction factor (R) map that can be determined from the data set itself. The "e1e" Jefferson Lab CLAS data set, that is analyzed, includes both a hydrogen and deuterium target run period, which allows a combined

  3. Impact of the γ _{ν } NN* Electrocoupling Parameters at High Photon Virtualities and Preliminary Cross Sections off the Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothe, Ralf W.; Tian, Ye

    2016-06-01

    Meson-photoproduction measurements and their reaction-amplitude analyses can establish more sensitively, and in some cases in an almost model-independent way, nucleon excitations and non-resonant reaction amplitudes. However, to investigate the strong interaction from already explored—where meson-cloud degrees of freedom contribute substantially to the baryon structure—to still unexplored distance scales—where quark degrees of freedom dominate and the transition from dressed to current quarks occurs—we depend on experiments that allow us to measure observables that are probing this evolving non-perturbative QCD regime over its full range. Elastic and transition form factors are uniquely suited to trace this evolution by measuring elastic electron scattering and exclusive single-meson and double-pion electroproduction cross sections off the nucleon. These exclusive measurements will be extended to higher momentum transfers with the energy-upgraded CEBAF beam at JLab to study the quark degrees of freedom, where their strong interaction is responsible for the ground and excited nucleon state formations. After establishing unprecedented high-precision data, the imminent next challenge is a high-quality analysis to extract these relevant electrocoupling parameters for various resonances that can then be compared to state-of-the-art models and QCD-based calculations. The vast majority of the available exclusive electroproduction cross sections are off the proton. Hence flavor-dependent analyses of excited light-quark baryons are lacking experimental data off the neutron. The goal is to close this gap by providing exclusive {γ }_{ν }(n) → p+ {π }- reaction cross section off deuterium and to establish a kinematical final-state-interaction (FSI) correction factor (R) map that can be determined from the data set itself. The "e1e" Jefferson Lab CLAS data set, that is analyzed, includes both a hydrogen and deuterium target run period, which allows a combined

  4. Isolation and cross-familial amplification of 41 microsatellites for the brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, G.M.L.; King, T.L.; St. -Cyr, J.; Valcourt, M.; Bernatchez, L.

    2005-01-01

    The brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis; Osteichthyes: Salmonidae) is a phenotypically diverse fish species inhabiting much of North America. But relatively few genetic diagnostic resources are available for this fish species. We isolated 41 microsatellites from S. fontinalis polymorphic in one or more species of salmonid fish. Thirty-seven were polymorphic in brook charr, 15 in the congener Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) and 14 in the lake charr (Salvelinus namaycush). Polymorphism was also relatively high in Oncorhynchus, where 21 loci were polymorphic in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and 16 in cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) but only seven and four microsatellite loci were polymorphic in the more distantly related lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), respectively. One duplicated locus (Sfo228Lav) was polymorphic at both duplicates in S. fontinalis. ?? 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K L; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment. PMID:26786559

  6. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K. L.; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment.

  7. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K.L.; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment. PMID:26786559

  8. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K L; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-20

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment.

  9. Quantitation of serological cross-reactivity between two geographical isolates of Oryctes baculovirus by a modified ELISA.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K S; Gopinathan, K P

    1989-01-01

    An assay was developed for quantitation of the antigenic relationship between viruses, by modification of the indirect ELISA. The principle of this method is to estimate the epitopes not shared between the related viruses, after titration of the antibodies specific to the common epitopes as in a blocking ELISA. In practice, varying concentrations of purified virus are preincubated with a fixed dilution of heterologous or homologous antiserum and the unbound antibodies present in the mixture are back titrated with virus particles bound to microtitre plates. The antigenic relationship is described in terms of differentiation index (DI) and total antigenic reactivity (TAR). This method has been used to quantitate cross-reactivity between two geographically different isolates of Oryctes baculovirus.

  10. Topological Photonic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cheng; Lin, Liang; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    As exotic phenomena in optics, topological states in photonic crystals have drawn much attention due to their fundamental significance and great potential applications. Because of the broken time-reversal symmetry under the influence of an external magnetic field, the photonic crystals composed of magneto-optical materials will lead to the degeneracy lifting and show particular topological characters of energy bands. The upper and lower bulk bands have nonzero integer topological numbers. The gapless edge states can be realized to connect two bulk states. This topological photonic states originated from the topological property can be analogous to the integer quantum Hall effect in an electronic system. The gapless edge state only possesses a single sign of gradient in the whole Brillouin zone, and thus the group velocity is only in one direction leading to the one-way energy flow, which is robust to disorder and impurity due to the nontrivial topological nature of the corresponding electromagnetic states. Furthermore, this one-way edge state would cross the Brillouin center with nonzero group velocity, where the negative-zero-positive phase velocity can be used to realize some interesting phenomena such as tunneling and backward phase propagation. On the other hand, under the protection of time-reversal symmetry, a pair of gapless edge states can also be constructed by using magnetic-electric coupling meta-materials, exhibiting Fermion-like spin helix topological edge states, which can be regarded as an optical counterpart of topological insulator originating from the spin-orbit coupling. The aim of this article is to have a comprehensive review of recent research literatures published in this emerging field of photonic topological phenomena. Photonic topological states and their related phenomena are presented and analyzed, including the chiral edge states, polarization dependent transportation, unidirectional waveguide and nonreciprocal optical transmission, all

  11. Chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Fabrice E.; Baker, Nicola; Munday, Jane C.; de Koning, Harry P.; Horn, David; Mäser, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2–aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2–AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates. PMID:26042196

  12. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et al., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention [1]. A 1990 article by V.I. Telnov describes the situation at that time [2]. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held [3]. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons—the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  13. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Heterosis and combining ability: a diallel cross of three geographically isolated populations of Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuewen; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Guofan; Wu, Fucun

    2010-11-01

    We conducted a complete diallel cross among three geographically isolated populations of Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino to determine the heterosis and the combining ability of growth traits at the spat stage. The three populations were collected from Qingdao (Q) and Dalian (D) in China, and Miyagi (M) in Japan. We measured the shell length, shell width, and total weight. The magnitude of the general combining ability (GCA) variance was more pronounced than the specific combining ability (SCA) variance, which is evidenced by both the ratio of the genetic component in total variation and the GCA/SCA values. The component variances of GCA and SCA were significant for all three traits ( P<0.05), indicating the importance of additive and non-additive genetic effects in determining the expression of these traits. The reciprocal maternal effects (RE) were also significant for these traits ( P<0.05). Our results suggest that population D was the best general combiner in breeding programs to improve growth traits. The DM cross had the highest heterosis values for all three traits.

  15. Isolation from individual A/J mice of anti-rho-azophenylarsonate antibodies bearing a cross-reactive idiotype

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Immuization of A/J mice with a KLH-p-azophenylarsonate conjugate induces the formation of antihapten antibodies, some of which share idiotypic specificity common to all recipients. The subpopulation carrying the idiotype generally comprises 20-70% of the total antibody content. Large quantities of antihapten antibody (occasionally over 100 mg) were obtained from individual mice through the induction of an ascites fluid. This facilitated isolation of antibodies with the cross- reactive idiotype by isoelectric focusing. Most of this subpopulation has pI values between 6.65 and 6.95 and essentially all is of the IgG1 subclass. Two peaks, near pI 6.7 and 6.9, were frequently observed. Upon refocusing, the protein artifact of the procedure, but indicates microheterogeneity. The antibodies in the two peaks were found to be idiotypically identical by measurements of cross-inhibition. Preliminary studies have indicated that it is feasible to initiate investigations of primary structure with antibodies from individual inbred mice. PMID:46907

  16. Development of a novel cross-streaking method for isolation, confirmation, and enumeration of Salmonella from irrigation ponds.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiyao; Gu, Ganyu; Giurcanu, Mihai C; Adams, Paige; Vellidis, George; van Bruggen, Ariena H C; Wright, Anita C

    2014-06-01

    The 2013 Produce Safety Rules in Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) require regular testing for generic Escherichia coli in agricultural water intended for pre-harvest contact with the edible portion of fresh produce. However, the use of fecal contamination indicators frequently does not correctly reflect distribution of foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella enterica, and ensuring food safety may require direct detection and enumeration of pathogens in agricultural settings. Herein we report the evaluation of different cost-effective methods for quantification, isolation, and confirmation of Salmonella in irrigation pond water and sediment samples. A most probably number (MPN) dual enrichment culture method was used in combination with differential and selective agars, XLT4 and CHROMagar™ Salmonella plus (CSP). The necessity for PCR confirmation was evaluated, and methods were compared by cost and performance measures (i.e., sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value). Statistical analyses showed that using XLT4 as the initial selective agar to isolate Salmonella colonies improved recovery compared to CSP agar; however, PCR confirmation was required to avoid false positive results on either agar. Therefore, a novel cross-streaking method utilizing CHROMagar™ agar for individual colony confirmation of Salmonella presence/absence on XLT4 was developed. This method classifies the colony as positive if typical Salmonella appearance is observed on both agars. Statistical analysis showed that this method was as effective as PCR for species confirmation of pure individual strains isolated from enrichment cultures (sensitivity=0.99, specificity=1.00, relative to PCR). This method offers a cost-effective alternative to PCR that would increase the capacity and sensitivity of Salmonella evaluation. PMID:24732066

  17. Development of a novel cross-streaking method for isolation, confirmation, and enumeration of Salmonella from irrigation ponds.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiyao; Gu, Ganyu; Giurcanu, Mihai C; Adams, Paige; Vellidis, George; van Bruggen, Ariena H C; Wright, Anita C

    2014-06-01

    The 2013 Produce Safety Rules in Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) require regular testing for generic Escherichia coli in agricultural water intended for pre-harvest contact with the edible portion of fresh produce. However, the use of fecal contamination indicators frequently does not correctly reflect distribution of foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella enterica, and ensuring food safety may require direct detection and enumeration of pathogens in agricultural settings. Herein we report the evaluation of different cost-effective methods for quantification, isolation, and confirmation of Salmonella in irrigation pond water and sediment samples. A most probably number (MPN) dual enrichment culture method was used in combination with differential and selective agars, XLT4 and CHROMagar™ Salmonella plus (CSP). The necessity for PCR confirmation was evaluated, and methods were compared by cost and performance measures (i.e., sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value). Statistical analyses showed that using XLT4 as the initial selective agar to isolate Salmonella colonies improved recovery compared to CSP agar; however, PCR confirmation was required to avoid false positive results on either agar. Therefore, a novel cross-streaking method utilizing CHROMagar™ agar for individual colony confirmation of Salmonella presence/absence on XLT4 was developed. This method classifies the colony as positive if typical Salmonella appearance is observed on both agars. Statistical analysis showed that this method was as effective as PCR for species confirmation of pure individual strains isolated from enrichment cultures (sensitivity=0.99, specificity=1.00, relative to PCR). This method offers a cost-effective alternative to PCR that would increase the capacity and sensitivity of Salmonella evaluation.

  18. An Isolated Circular Synthetic Jet in Cross-Flow at Low Momentum-Flux Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.; Zaman, Khairul B. M. Q.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2005-01-01

    A joint experimental and computational investigation was carried out for a round synthetic jet issuing normal to a turbulent boundary layer at a momentum-flux ratio of one. Distributions of velocity and turbulence intensity were measured by hot-wire anemometry. Numerical results were obtained using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations. Time and phase-averaged flow properties were compared on the cross sectional plane at x/D = 0.53, 5 and 10 as well as on the axial plane of symmetry. Overall, the numerical results agreed well with the experimental data. CFD predicted a somewhat larger velocity deficit in regions of low-momentum fluid pulled up from the boundary layer. Phase- averaged velocity contours at the plane of symmetry indicated good match between experiments and CFD regarding the size and the position of the periodic flow structure. However, some differences occurred in details such as the shape and inclination of the low-speed flow structure.

  19. Isolation of a novel bone glycosylated phosphoprotein with disulphide cross-links to osteonectin.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H Y; Salih, E; Glimcher, M J

    1998-01-01

    An 80 kDa protein was purified from calf bone by HCl-demineralization followed by 0.5 M EDTA/1.0 M NaCl extraction and sequential chromatography on DE-52, hydroxyapatite, and TSK-gel G3000SW HPLC columns. From the DE-52 column the protein was eluted at three different fractions, of which one further separated into two fractions on the hydroxyapatite column, indicating that the protein is present in four different molecular forms designated as 80 k-I-1, k-I-2, k-II, k-III. The N-terminal sequence analysis of all four forms gave the same sequence, SEQYNQEPNNV. Several tryptic internal peptides were also generated, purified and sequenced, leading to the identification of several repeat sequences, IFLGXXEI. Homology searching of the N-terminal and internal sequences indicates that this is a novel protein. Both 80 k-I-2 and k-III had similar amino acid composition with high contents of Asx, Glx and Leu and contained 7 and 16 phosphoserines per 1000 total amino acids, respectively. The 80 k-I-1 and 80 k-II forms were stained with Rhodamine B specific for phosphoproteins. The four forms contained different contents of neutral sugars ranging from 5.5 to 26% (w/w protein) and approximately 1.7% sialic acid. These data indicated that the 80 kDa protein exists in four isomeric forms, at least based on the different post-translational modifications. The evaluation of the 80 kDa glycosylated phosphoprotein under alkylating, reducing and non-reducing conditions indicated that this protein undergoes polymerization through intermolecular disulphide bonds. Furthermore, the 80 kDa protein and osteonectin (ON), both of which are cysteine-rich proteins, can cross-link with each other via disulphide bonds, and this process can be induced to take place in vitro under experimental conditions. The occurrence of such a phenomenon in vivo was confirmed from the presence of similar high Mr components containing both 80 kDa and ON in the same SDS/PAGE bands, detected by the respective

  20. Lysine directed cross-linking of viral DNA-RNA:DNA hybrid substrate to the isolated RNase H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Guaitiao, Juan P; Zúñiga, Roberto A; Roth, Monica J; Leon, Oscar

    2004-02-10

    An isolated ribonuclease H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is capable of specifically removing the tRNA primer within an oligonucleotide mimic. The determinants for substrate specificity are located in a region within the terminal octanucleotide of the acceptor stem of the tRNA. Recognition of the substrate by HIV-1 RNase H was analyzed by the introduction of a cross-linking reagent directed toward lysines on the thymine residue complementary to the scissile bond, facing the major groove of the DNA-RNA:DNA substrate. Cross-linking of the modified substrate to RNase H required the presence of Mn(2+). The Mn(2+) titration of cross-linking paralleled the Mn(2+) requirement for activity. Modified substrate quenched with glycine prior to binding of substrate was efficiently cleaved, whereas the RNA within the cross-linked product was intact. Tryptic digestion of the isolated RNase H-nucleic acid covalent complex revealed a main cross-linked peptide whose N-terminal peptide sequence is VVTLTDTTNQ, indicating that the cross-linked lysine corresponds to Lys476. Cross-linking to K476 was confirmed by analysis of K476C RNase H. Mutation of K476C disrupted the chemical cross-linking while maintaining activity. On the basis of the size of the cross-linker arm, the results indicate that K476 is in closer proximity to the tRNA mimic substrate within the isolated RNase H domain than observed for the RNase H-resistant polypurine tract (PPT) substrate within the HIV-1 RT.

  1. Characterization of a novel citrus tristeza virus genotype within three cross-protecting source GFMS12 sub-isolates in South Africa by means of Illumina sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zablocki, Olivier; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    Tristeza disease (caused by citrus tristeza virus, CTV) is currently controlled in South Africa by means of cross-protection. In this study, we characterized the CTV populations of three grapefruit mild strain 12 (GFMS12) single-aphid-transmission-derived sub-isolates at the whole-genome level using Illumina sequencing technology. A novel South African isolate (CT-ZA3, of the T68 genotype) was shown to be the dominant genotype in all GFMS12 sub-isolates tested, along with reads unique to various other genotypes occurring as minor components. Uncertainty remains as to the significance of these minor components. PMID:24623089

  2. Cross strip anode readouts for large format, photon counting microchannel plate detectors: developing flight qualified prototypes of the detector and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Raffanti, Rick; Cooney, Michael; Cumming, Harley; Varner, Gary; Seljak, Andrej

    2014-07-01

    Photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) imagers have been the detector of choice for most UV astronomical missions over the last two decades (e.g. EUVE, FUSE, COS on Hubble etc.). Over this duration, improvements in the MCP laboratory readout technology have resulted in better spatial resolution (x10), temporal resolution (x1000) and output event rate (x100), all the while operating at lower gain (x 10) resulting in lower high voltage requirements and longer MCP lifetimes. One such technology is the parallel cross strip (PXS) readout. Laboratory versions of PXS electronics have demonstrated < 20 μm FWHM spatial resolution, count rates on the order of 2 MHz, and temporal resolution of ~ 1ns. In 2012 our group at U.C. Berkeley, along with our partners at the U. Hawaii, received a Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant to raise the TRL of the PXS detector and electronics from 4 to 6 by replacing most of the high powered electronics with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) which will lower the power, mass and volume requirements of the PXS detector. We were also tasked to design and fabricate a "standard" 50mm square active area MCP detector incorporating these electronics that can be environmentally qualified for flight (temperature, vacuum, vibration). The first ASICs designed for this program have been fabricated and are undergoing testing. We present the latest progress on these ASIC designs and performance and show imaging results from the new 50 x 50 mm XS detector.

  3. Large Femtosecond Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Sections of Fullerosome Vesicle Nanostructures Derived from Highly Photoresponsive Amphiphilic C60-Light-Harvesting Fluorene Dyad

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Nalla, Venkatram; Jeon, Seaho; Mamidala, Venkatesh; Ji, Wei; Tan, Loon-Seng; Cooper, Thomas; Chiang, Long Y.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated ultrafast femtosecond nonlinear optical (NLO) absorption characteristics of bilayered fullerosome vesicle nanostructures derived from molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic oligo(ethylene glycolated) C60-(light-harvesting diphenylaminofluorene antenna). Fullerene conjugates were designed to enhance photoresponse in a femtosecond time scale by applying an isomerizable periconjugation linker between the C60 cage and diphenylaminofluorene antenna subunit in an intramolecular contact distance of only < 3.0 Å. Morphology of C60(>DPAF-EG12C1)-based fullerosome nanovesicles in H2O was characterized to consist of a bilayered shell with a sphere diameter of 20–70 nm and a chromophore shell-width of 9.0–10 nm, fitting well with a head-to-head packing configuration of the molecular length. At the estimated effective nanovesicle concentration as low as 5.5 × 10−8 MV (molecular molar concentration of 5.0 × 10−4 M) in H2O, two-photon absorption (2PA) phenomena were found to be the dominating photophysical events showing a large molar concentration-insensitive 2PA cross-section value equivalent to 8500 GM in a form of nanovesicles, on average. The observed NLO characteristics led to a sharp trend of efficient light-transmittance intensity reduction at the input laser intensity above 100 GW/cm2. PMID:22022620

  4. Photon-neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, D.A.; Repko, W.W.

    1997-12-01

    The cross sections for the processes {gamma}{nu} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {nu}{anti {nu}} are calculated with the aid of an effective Lagrangian derived from the Standard model. These cross sections are shown to be much larger than the elastic cross section {sigma}({gamma}{nu} {yields} {gamma}{nu}) for photon energies {omega} {ge} 1 keV. Possible astrophysical implications are discussed.

  5. Isolation and characterization of 45 Polymorphie microsatellite loci of turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus) and cross-species amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shiying; Ma, Aijun; Wang, Xin'an; Huang, Zhihui; Xue, Baogui; Yang, Zhi; Qu, Jiangbo

    2011-03-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus) is a flatfish species commercially important for aquaculture. In this study, we generated a microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library for Scophthalmus maximus, and then isolated and characterized 45 microsatellite loci by genotyping 30 individuals. The observed number of alleles ranged from 2 to 19 with an average of 6.24, while the effective number of alleles ranged from 1.30 to 11.11 with an average of 3.66. The expected heterozygosities varied from 0.235 to 0.925 4 and Polymorphie information content ranged from 0.2044 to 0.903 3, with an average of 0.622. Twelve loci deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed between any pair of loci after Bonferroni correction. In cross-species amplification, five flatfish species ( Paralichthys lethostigma, Verasper moseri, platichthys stellatus, Hippoglossoides dubius and Cynoglossus semilaevis) showed at least one Polymorphie locus. These Polymorphie microsatellite loci should prove useful for Population analysis of turbot and other related species.

  6. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  7. Deoxyribonucleic acid-protein and deoxyribonucleic acid interstrand cross-links induced in isolated chromatin by hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate chelates

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, S.A.; Drocourt, J.; Yang, S.

    1982-01-01

    DNA-protein and DNA interstrand cross-links were induced in isolated chromatin after treatment with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA). Retention of DNA on membrane filters after heating of chromatin in a dissociating solvent indicated the presence of a stable linkage between DNA and protein. Treatment of protein-free DNA with H/sub 2/O/sub 2//Fe/sup 2 +/-EDTA did not result in enhanced filter retention. Incubation of cross-linked chromatin with proteinase K completely eliminated filter retention. Resistance to S/sub 1/ nuclease after a denaturation-renaturation cycle was used to detect DNA interstrand cross-links. Heating the treated chromatin at 45/sup 0/C for 16 h and NaBH/sub 4/ reduction enhanced the extent of interstrand cross-linking. The following data are consistent with, but do not totally prove, the hypothesis that cross-links are induced by hydroxyl radicals generated in Fenton-type reactions: (1) cross-linking was inhibited by hydroxyl radical scavengers; (2) the degree of inhibition of DNA interstrand cross-links correlated very closely with the rate constants of the scavengers for reaction with hydroxyl radicals; (3) cross-linking was eliminated or greatly reduced by catalase; (4) the extent of cross-linking was directly related to the concentration of Fe/sup 2 +/-EDTA. Partial inhibition of cross-linking by superoxide dismutase indicates that super-oxide-driven Fenton chemistry is involved. The data indicate that DNA cross-linking may play a role in the manifestation of the biological activity of agents of systems that generate reactive hydroxyl radicals.

  8. Further considerations for the setting up of a low background whole-body counter for internal dosimetry at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Carlsbad, NM, USA: transmitted photon component.

    PubMed

    Pillalamarri, Ila; Jagam, P

    2015-04-01

    One of the further considerations in the present work, while setting up a low background whole-body counter (WBC) underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to reduce the background in the energy region of interest <100 keV. The goal of the present work is to determine the adequacy of a chamber located underground at WIPP of dimensions 1.83 m × 1.22 m at the base, 1.83 m high, with 15 cm thick pre-world-war II steel shielding. The objective of the present work is to estimate the transmitted photon flux into this chamber for setting up the low background WBC. The transmitted photon flux is simulated with the GEANT code for an incident photon flux consisting only of 1461 keV photons. The results are discussed with respect to a detector of choice for detecting <50 mBq emitting photons in the energy region <100 keV.

  9. Photon + jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  10. Random photonic crystal optical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth Lima, A., Jr.; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2012-10-01

    Currently, optical cross-connects working on wavelength division multiplexing systems are based on optical fiber delay lines buffering. We designed and analyzed a novel photonic crystal optical memory, which replaces the fiber delay lines of the current optical cross-connect buffer. Optical buffering systems based on random photonic crystal optical memory have similar behavior to the electronic buffering systems based on electronic RAM memory. In this paper, we show that OXCs working with optical buffering based on random photonic crystal optical memories provides better performance than the current optical cross-connects.

  11. Genotypic Analysis of Genes Associated with Independent Resistance and Cross-Resistance to Isoniazid and Ethionamide in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Johana; Realpe, Teresa; Mejia, Gloria Isabel; Zapata, Elsa; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Ferro, Beatriz Eugenia; Robledo, Jaime

    2015-12-01

    Ethionamide (ETH) is an antibiotic used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) (MDR-TB), and its use may be limited with the emergence of resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis population. ETH resistance in M. tuberculosis is phenomenon independent or cross related when accompanied with isoniazid (INH) resistance. In most cases, resistance to INH and ETH is explained by mutations in the inhA promoter and in the following genes: katG, ethA, ethR, mshA, ndh, and inhA. We sequenced the above genes in 64 M. tuberculosis isolates (n = 57 ETH-resistant MDR-TB isolates; n = 3 ETH-susceptible MDR-TB isolates; and n = 4 fully susceptible isolates). Each isolate was tested for susceptibility to first- and second-line drugs using the agar proportion method. Mutations were observed in ETH-resistant MDR-TB isolates at the following rates: 100% in katG, 72% in ethA, 45.6% in mshA, 8.7% in ndh, and 33.3% in inhA or its promoter. Of the three ETH-susceptible MDR-TB isolates, all showed mutations in katG; one had a mutation in ethA, and another, in mshA and inhA. Finally, of the four fully susceptible isolates, two showed no detectable mutation in the studied genes, and two had mutations in mshA gene unrelated to the resistance. Mutations not previously reported were found in the ethA, mshA, katG, and ndh genes. The concordance between the phenotypic susceptibility testing to INH and ETH and the sequencing was 1 and 0.45, respectively. Among isolates exhibiting INH resistance, the high frequency of independent resistance and cross-resistance with ETH in the M. tuberculosis isolates suggests the need to confirm the susceptibility to ETH before considering it in the treatment of patients with MDR-TB.

  12. Genotypic Analysis of Genes Associated with Independent Resistance and Cross-Resistance to Isoniazid and Ethionamide in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Realpe, Teresa; Mejia, Gloria Isabel; Zapata, Elsa; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Ferro, Beatriz Eugenia; Robledo, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Ethionamide (ETH) is an antibiotic used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) (MDR-TB), and its use may be limited with the emergence of resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis population. ETH resistance in M. tuberculosis is phenomenon independent or cross related when accompanied with isoniazid (INH) resistance. In most cases, resistance to INH and ETH is explained by mutations in the inhA promoter and in the following genes: katG, ethA, ethR, mshA, ndh, and inhA. We sequenced the above genes in 64 M. tuberculosis isolates (n = 57 ETH-resistant MDR-TB isolates; n = 3 ETH-susceptible MDR-TB isolates; and n = 4 fully susceptible isolates). Each isolate was tested for susceptibility to first- and second-line drugs using the agar proportion method. Mutations were observed in ETH-resistant MDR-TB isolates at the following rates: 100% in katG, 72% in ethA, 45.6% in mshA, 8.7% in ndh, and 33.3% in inhA or its promoter. Of the three ETH-susceptible MDR-TB isolates, all showed mutations in katG; one had a mutation in ethA, and another, in mshA and inhA. Finally, of the four fully susceptible isolates, two showed no detectable mutation in the studied genes, and two had mutations in mshA gene unrelated to the resistance. Mutations not previously reported were found in the ethA, mshA, katG, and ndh genes. The concordance between the phenotypic susceptibility testing to INH and ETH and the sequencing was 1 and 0.45, respectively. Among isolates exhibiting INH resistance, the high frequency of independent resistance and cross-resistance with ETH in the M. tuberculosis isolates suggests the need to confirm the susceptibility to ETH before considering it in the treatment of patients with MDR-TB. PMID:26369965

  13. Vaccine Potential of Two Previously Uncharacterized African Swine Fever Virus Isolates from Southern Africa and Heterologous Cross Protection of an Avirulent European Isolate.

    PubMed

    Souto, R; Mutowembwa, P; van Heerden, J; Fosgate, G T; Heath, L; Vosloo, W

    2016-04-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a mostly fatal viral infection of domestic pigs for which there is no vaccine available. The disease is endemic to most of sub-Saharan Africa, causes severe losses and threatens food security in large parts of the continent. Naturally occurring attenuated ASF viruses have been tested as vaccine candidates, but protection was variable depending on the challenge virus. In this study, the virulence of two African isolates, one from a tick vector and the other from an indigenous pig, was determined in domestic pigs to identify a potential vaccine strain for southern Africa. Neither isolate was suitable as the tick isolate was moderately virulent and the indigenous pig virus was highly virulent. The latter was subsequently used as heterologous challenge in pigs first vaccinated with a naturally attenuated isolate previously isolated in Portugal. Although a statistically significant reduction in death rate and virus load was observed compared with unvaccinated pigs post-challenge, all pigs succumbed to infection and died.

  14. In-vitro digestibility and amino acid composition of soy protein isolate cross-linked with microbial transglutaminase followed by heating with ribose.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chee-Yuen; Cheng, Lai-Hoong; Azahari, Baharin; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2009-01-01

    Cross-linked soy protein isolate (SPI) gels were produced via single-treatment of SPI with microbial transglutaminase (MTG) for 5 h or 24 h, or with ribose for 2 h, or via combined-treatments of SPI with MTG followed by heating with ribose. Assessment of gel strength and solubility concluded that measures which increased protein cross-links resulted in improved gel strength; however, in most cases the digestibility and amino acid content of the gels were reduced. The combined treated gel of SPI/MTG for 24 h/ribose was more easily digested by digestive enzymes and retained higher amounts of amino acids compared with the control Maillard gels of SPI with ribose. MTG consumed lysine and glutamine and reduced the availability of amino acids for the Maillard reaction with ribose. MTG was able to preserve the nutritional value of SPI against the destructive effect of the Maillard reaction and cross-links.

  15. Tables and graphs of photon-interaction cross sections from 0. 1 keV to 100 MeV derived from the LLL evaluated-nuclear-data library

    SciTech Connect

    Plechaty, E.F.; Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.

    1981-11-11

    Energy-dependent evaluated photon interaction cross sections and related parameters are presented for elements H through Cf(Z = 1 to 98). Data are given over the energy range from 0.1 keV to 100 MeV. The related parameters include form factors and average energy deposits per collision (with and without fluorescence). Fluorescence information is given for all atomic shells that can emit a photon with a kinetic energy of 0.1 keV or more. In addition, the following macroscopic properties are given: total mean free path and energy deposit per centimeter. This information is derived from the Livermore Evaluated-Nuclear-Data Library (ENDL) as of October 1978.

  16. Centrality, rapidity and pT dependence of isolated prompt photon production in lead-lead collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured prompt photon production in √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV Pb + Pb collisions using data collected in 2011 with an integrated luminosity of 0.14nb-1. The measurement is performed with a hermetic, longitudinally segmented calorimeter, which gives excellent spatial and energy resolution, and detailed information about the shower shape of each measured photon. Using a selection based on shower shapes and an isolation criterion gives measured purities between approximately 50-90%, depending on pT, η and centrality. Photon yields, scaled by the mean nuclear thickness function, are determined as a function of collision centrality, pseudorapidity (in two intervals | η | < 1.37 and 1.52 < | η | < 2.37) and transverse momentum (22 photon yields agree well with the predictions for proton-proton within statistical and systematic uncertainties, but are unable to distinguish between these calculations and others including isospin and nuclear PDF effects.

  17. Photonic crystal beam splitters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chii-Chang; Chien, Hung-Da; Luan, Pi-Gang

    2004-11-20

    This work studies two-dimensional photonic crystal beam splitters with two input ports and two output ports. The beam splitter structure consists of two orthogonally crossed line defects and one point defect in square-lattice photonic crystals. The point defect is positioned at the intersection of the line defects to divide the input power into output ports. If the position and the size of the point defect are varied, the power of two output ports can be identical. The beam splitters can be used in photonic crystal Mach-Zehnder interferometers or switches. The simulation results show that a large bandwidth of the extinction ratio larger than 20 dB can be obtained while two beams are interfered in the beam splitters. This enables photonic crystal beam splitters to be used in fiber optic communication systems.

  18. Cross-resistance of Leishmania infantum isolates to nitric oxide from patients refractory to antimony treatment, and greater tolerance to antileishmanial responses by macrophages.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Tatiana R; Santos, Micheli Luize Barbosa; Braz, Juciene M; Santos, Luis Felipe V C; Aragão, Matheus T; de Oliveira, Fabricia A; Santos, Priscila L; da Silva, Ângela Maria; de Jesus, Amélia Ribeiro; de Almeida, Roque P

    2016-02-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a life-threatening disease characterized by intense parasitism of the spleen, liver, and bone marrow. Antimonials have served as front-line antileishmanial therapeutics for decades, but the increasing failure rates under antimonial treatment have challenged the continued use of these drugs. Pentavalent antimonials are known to reinforce the killing mechanisms of macrophages, although the associated mechanism remains unclear. Here, for the first time, we determined whether Leishmania infantum strains isolated from patients refractory to antimony treatment (relapse cases) were cross-resistant to antimonials, liposomal amphotericin B, and/or nitric oxide, and also whether these strains modulate macrophage infection. We selected four clinical isolates from relapse cases and two clinical isolates from antimony-responsive patients (control group) for the present study. The L. infantum promastigotes from all four relapse cases were resistant to trivalent antimonial treatment and nitric oxide, while only one isolate was resistant to liposomal amphotericin B. We evaluated whether the resistant strains from relapse cases showed enhanced infectivity and amastigote survival in macrophages, or macrophage-killing mechanisms in macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide plus interferon gamma. Infection indexes calculated using macrophages infected with isolates from relapse were higher than those observed with control strains that were stimulated independently. Macrophage infection was higher with L. infantum isolates from relapse cases and correlated with enhanced interleukin 1-β production but showed similar nitrite production. Our results demonstrate that L. infantum field isolates from relapse cases were resistant to antimonials and nitric oxide and that these parasites stimulated inflammatory cytokines and were resistant to macrophage-killing mechanisms, factors that may contribute to disease severity.

  19. Two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanines

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Alfimov, E E; Makukha, V K; Vasil'ev, N E; Denisov, A N; Ogirenko, A P

    1999-12-31

    A demonstration is given of the feasibility of two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanine and of the pharmaceutical preparation 'Fotosens', used in photodynamic therapy. The excitation source was an Nd:YAG laser emitting at the 1064 nm wavelength. The spectra of the two-photon-excited luminescence were obtained and the two-photon absorption cross sections were determined. (lasers in medicine)

  20. Photon correlation in single-photon frequency upconversion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaorong; Huang, Kun; Pan, Haifeng; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2012-01-30

    We experimentally investigated the intensity cross-correlation between the upconverted photons and the unconverted photons in the single-photon frequency upconversion process with multi-longitudinal mode pump and signal sources. In theoretical analysis, with this multi-longitudinal mode of both signal and pump sources system, the properties of the signal photons could also be maintained as in the single-mode frequency upconversion system. Experimentally, based on the conversion efficiency of 80.5%, the joint probability of simultaneously detecting at upconverted and unconverted photons showed an anti-correlation as a function of conversion efficiency which indicated the upconverted photons were one-to-one from the signal photons. While due to the coherent state of the signal photons, the intensity cross-correlation function g(2)(0) was shown to be equal to unity at any conversion efficiency, agreeing with the theoretical prediction. This study will benefit the high-speed wavelength-tunable quantum state translation or photonic quantum interface together with the mature frequency tuning or longitudinal mode selection techniques.

  1. Isolation, Identification, and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Salmonella from Slaughtered Bovines and Ovines in Addis Ababa Abattoir Enterprise, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Abe; Alemayehu, Haile

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellae are ubiquitous, found in animals, humans, and the environment, a condition which facilitates transmission and cross contamination. Salmonella enterica serotypes exert huge health and economic impacts due to their virulence or carriage of antibiotic resistance traits. To address this significant issues with regard to public health, availability of adequate information on the prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of Salmonella, and establishment of adequate measures to control contamination and infection are needed. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the level of Salmonella infection in slaughtered bovines and ovines at Addis Ababa abattoir. Samples were collected randomly and processed for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Salmonella spp. From 280 animals examined, 13 (4.64%) (8 bovines and 5 ovines) were positive, with most samples (12/13, 92%) comprising Salmonella Dublin. Very high level of resistance to some antibiotics used in human medicine was detected. Most isolates were susceptible to gentamycin and amikacin. Nine (69%) of all isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Serotyping revealed 12 of 13 isolates to be of the Dublin serotype with 9,12:g,p:- antigenic formula. This study emphasizes the importance of improving the evisceration practice during slaughtering and restricting the use of antibiotics in farm animals. PMID:27660816

  2. Isolation, Identification, and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Salmonella from Slaughtered Bovines and Ovines in Addis Ababa Abattoir Enterprise, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Abe; Alemayehu, Haile

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellae are ubiquitous, found in animals, humans, and the environment, a condition which facilitates transmission and cross contamination. Salmonella enterica serotypes exert huge health and economic impacts due to their virulence or carriage of antibiotic resistance traits. To address this significant issues with regard to public health, availability of adequate information on the prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of Salmonella, and establishment of adequate measures to control contamination and infection are needed. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the level of Salmonella infection in slaughtered bovines and ovines at Addis Ababa abattoir. Samples were collected randomly and processed for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Salmonella spp. From 280 animals examined, 13 (4.64%) (8 bovines and 5 ovines) were positive, with most samples (12/13, 92%) comprising Salmonella Dublin. Very high level of resistance to some antibiotics used in human medicine was detected. Most isolates were susceptible to gentamycin and amikacin. Nine (69%) of all isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Serotyping revealed 12 of 13 isolates to be of the Dublin serotype with 9,12:g,p:- antigenic formula. This study emphasizes the importance of improving the evisceration practice during slaughtering and restricting the use of antibiotics in farm animals.

  3. Isolation, Identification, and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Salmonella from Slaughtered Bovines and Ovines in Addis Ababa Abattoir Enterprise, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Abe; Kemal, Jelalu; Alemayehu, Haile; Habte Mariam, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellae are ubiquitous, found in animals, humans, and the environment, a condition which facilitates transmission and cross contamination. Salmonella enterica serotypes exert huge health and economic impacts due to their virulence or carriage of antibiotic resistance traits. To address this significant issues with regard to public health, availability of adequate information on the prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of Salmonella, and establishment of adequate measures to control contamination and infection are needed. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the level of Salmonella infection in slaughtered bovines and ovines at Addis Ababa abattoir. Samples were collected randomly and processed for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Salmonella spp. From 280 animals examined, 13 (4.64%) (8 bovines and 5 ovines) were positive, with most samples (12/13, 92%) comprising Salmonella Dublin. Very high level of resistance to some antibiotics used in human medicine was detected. Most isolates were susceptible to gentamycin and amikacin. Nine (69%) of all isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Serotyping revealed 12 of 13 isolates to be of the Dublin serotype with 9,12:g,p:- antigenic formula. This study emphasizes the importance of improving the evisceration practice during slaughtering and restricting the use of antibiotics in farm animals. PMID:27660816

  4. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates from horses with synovial sepsis: A cross-sectional study of 95 cases.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C S; Timofte, D; Singer, E R; Rimmington, L; Rubio-Martínez, L M

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of septic synovial samples allows instigation of targeted antimicrobial therapy; however, bacterial culture takes more than 24 h and has low sensitivity. This study aimed to identify the most frequently cultured bacteria and their antimicrobial susceptibility profile from septic synovial samples in our referral equine hospital, to allow recommendations regarding appropriate initial antimicrobial therapy prior to culture results. Hospital records for all horses with synovial sepsis and a synovial sample submitted to the microbiology laboratory between 2004 and 2013 were retrieved (n= 379 samples). One horse had positive cultures from more than one synovial structure, and two horses had positive cultures obtained from repeat samples. Overall, 114 bacterial isolates were obtained. Gram-positive bacteria were isolated in 75% of cases, of which 22% were haemolytic Staphylococcus spp., and 52% were Staphylococcus aureus including two multidrug-resistant isolates. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 25% of cases. Anaerobic Clostridium spp. was isolated in 3% of cases. Of the first line antimicrobials, oxytetracycline and doxycycline were effective against 70-100% of the Gram-positive bacteria and 20-100% of the Gram-negative organisms, whilst trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and gentamicin efficacy ranged between 50% and 88% for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Of the equine protected antimicrobials, ceftiofur was effective against 70-90% of all bacterial isolates whilst 80% of isolates were susceptible to enrofloxacin. These results indicate that tetracyclines, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole or gentamicin may be suitable first-line antimicrobials for treatment of synovial sepsis cases while awaiting laboratory results, findings which support current recommendations for antimicrobial stewardship in equine medicine. PMID:27687937

  5. Isolation of Labile Multi-protein Complexes by in vivo Controlled Cellular Cross-Linking and Immuno-magnetic Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Ryder, Pearl V.; Salazar, Gloria; Faundez, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic nature of cellular machineries is frequently built on transient and/or weak protein associations. These low affinity interactions preclude stringent methods for the isolation and identification of protein networks around a protein of interest. The use of chemical crosslinkers allows the selective stabilization of labile interactions, thus bypassing biochemical limitations for purification. Here we present a protocol amenable for cells in culture that uses a homobifunctional crosslinker with a spacer arm of 12 Å, dithiobis-(succinimidyl proprionate) (DSP). DSP is cleaved by reduction of a disulphide bond present in the molecule. Cross-linking combined with immunoaffinity chromatography of proteins of interest with magnetic beads allows the isolation of protein complexes that otherwise would not withstand purification. This protocol is compatible with regular western blot techniques and it can be scaled up for protein identification by mass spectrometry1. Stephanie A. Zlatic and Pearl V. Ryder contributed equally to this work. PMID:20216526

  6. Isolation and purification of chemical constituents from the pericarp of Sophora japonica L. by chromatography on a 12% cross-linked agarose gel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renmin; Qi, Yuanying; Sun, Ailing; Xie, Hongyan

    2007-08-01

    A chromatographic method using 12% cross-linked agarose gel Superose 12 as the separation medium was developed for isolation and purification of the chemical constituents from the pericarp of Sophora japonica L. The mobile phase used for the separation was 2% acetic acid and 7% acetic acid in gradient elution. As a result, eight compounds including four kinds of flavonoids and four kinds of isoflavonoids were obtained in a one-step separation. A straightforward explanation of the separation mechanism of flavonoids and isoflavonoids on Superose 12 is also given. The flavonoids and isoflavonoids are retained on Superose 12 by a combination of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions between the hydroxyl groups of aglycone and the residues of the cross-linking reagents used in the manufacture of Superose 12. PMID:17638350

  7. Perceived social isolation makes me sad: 5-year cross-lagged analyses of loneliness and depressive symptomatology in the Chicago Health, Aging, and Social Relations Study.

    PubMed

    Cacioppo, John T; Hawkley, Louise C; Thisted, Ronald A

    2010-06-01

    We present evidence from a 5-year longitudinal study for the prospective associations between loneliness and depressive symptoms in a population-based, ethnically diverse sample of 229 men and women who were 50-68 years old at study onset. Cross-lagged panel models were used in which the criterion variables were loneliness and depressive symptoms, considered simultaneously. We used variations on this model to evaluate the possible effects of gender, ethnicity, education, physical functioning, medications, social network size, neuroticism, stressful life events, perceived stress, and social support on the observed associations between loneliness and depressive symptoms. Cross-lagged analyses indicated that loneliness predicted subsequent changes in depressive symptomatology, but not vice versa, and that this temporal association was not attributable to demographic variables, objective social isolation, dispositional negativity, stress, or social support. The importance of distinguishing between loneliness and depressive symptoms and the implications for loneliness and depressive symptomatology in older adults are discussed.

  8. Internal conversion and intersystem crossing pathways in UV excited, isolated uracils and their implications in prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Jose A; Pollum, Marvin; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia; Ullrich, Susanne

    2016-07-27

    The photodynamic properties of molecules determine their ability to survive in harsh radiation environments. As such, the photostability of heterocyclic aromatic compounds to electromagnetic radiation is expected to have been one of the selection pressures influencing the prebiotic chemistry on early Earth. In the present study, the gas-phase photodynamics of uracil, 5-methyluracil (thymine) and 2-thiouracil-three heterocyclic compounds thought to be present during this era-are assessed in the context of their recently proposed intersystem crossing pathways that compete with internal conversion to the ground state. Specifically, time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements evidence femtosecond to picosecond timescales for relaxation of the singlet (1)ππ* and (1)nπ* states as well as for intersystem crossing to the triplet manifold. Trapping in the excited triplet state and intersystem crossing back to the ground state are investigated as potential factors contributing to the susceptibility of these molecules to ultraviolet photodamage.

  9. Improved Enzyme Catalytic Characteristics upon Glutaraldehyde Cross-Linking of Alginate Entrapped Xylanase Isolated from Aspergillus flavus MTCC 9390

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Bharat; Pal, Ajay; Jain, Veena

    2015-01-01

    Purified fungal xylanase was entrapped in alginate beads. Its further cross-linking using glutaraldehyde resulted in large enzyme aggregates which may function as both a catalyst and a support material for numerous substrate molecules. Enzyme cross-linking presented a negative impact on enzyme leaching during repeated washings and recovery of enzyme activity was substantial after twelve cycles of usage. The entrapment followed by cross-linking doubled the total bound activity and also greatly improved the enzyme stability at extreme chemical environment. The wide pH stability, better thermo- and storage stability, lowered Km value, and protection from some metal ions are salient achievements of present immobilization. The study shows the efficacy, durability, and sustainability of immobilized catalytic system which could be efficiently used for various juice processing operations. PMID:26347814

  10. Internal conversion and intersystem crossing pathways in UV excited, isolated uracils and their implications in prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Jose A; Pollum, Marvin; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia; Ullrich, Susanne

    2016-07-27

    The photodynamic properties of molecules determine their ability to survive in harsh radiation environments. As such, the photostability of heterocyclic aromatic compounds to electromagnetic radiation is expected to have been one of the selection pressures influencing the prebiotic chemistry on early Earth. In the present study, the gas-phase photodynamics of uracil, 5-methyluracil (thymine) and 2-thiouracil-three heterocyclic compounds thought to be present during this era-are assessed in the context of their recently proposed intersystem crossing pathways that compete with internal conversion to the ground state. Specifically, time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements evidence femtosecond to picosecond timescales for relaxation of the singlet (1)ππ* and (1)nπ* states as well as for intersystem crossing to the triplet manifold. Trapping in the excited triplet state and intersystem crossing back to the ground state are investigated as potential factors contributing to the susceptibility of these molecules to ultraviolet photodamage. PMID:27189184

  11. Energy dependence of photon-induced Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections for some elements with 42≤Z≤68 in the energy range 38-80 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seven, Sabriye; Erdoğan, Hasan

    2015-12-01

    The energy dependence of photon-induced Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections for Mo, Ru, Pd, In, Sb, Cs, La, Pr, Sm, Tb and Er elements has been studied in the energy range of 38-80 keV with secondary excitation method. K x-ray intensities were measured using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometry. The measurements have been made by observing the x-ray emissions, with the help of HPGe detector coupled with a multichannel analyzer. The areas of the Kα and Kβ spectral peaks, as well as the net peak areas, have been determined by a fitting process. The measured Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections have been compared with calculated theoretical values in this energy regime. The results have been plotted versus excitation energy. The present experimental Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-section values for all the elements were in general agreement with the theoretical values calculated using photoionization cross-sections, fluorescence yields and fractional rates based on Hartree-Slater potentials.

  12. Two-photon absorption cross sections within equation-of-motion coupled-cluster formalism using resolution-of-the-identity and Cholesky decomposition representations: Theory, implementation, and benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Kaushik D.; Krylov, Anna I.

    2015-02-01

    The equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) methods provide a robust description of electronically excited states and their properties. Here, we present a formalism for two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections for the equation-of-motion for excitation energies CC with single and double substitutions (EOM-CC for electronically excited states with single and double substitutions) wave functions. Rather than the response theory formulation, we employ the expectation-value approach which is commonly used within EOM-CC, configuration interaction, and algebraic diagrammatic construction frameworks. In addition to canonical implementation, we also exploit resolution-of-the-identity (RI) and Cholesky decomposition (CD) for the electron-repulsion integrals to reduce memory requirements and to increase parallel efficiency. The new methods are benchmarked against the CCSD and CC3 response theories for several small molecules. We found that the expectation-value 2PA cross sections are within 5% from the quadratic response CCSD values. The RI and CD approximations lead to small errors relative to the canonical implementation (less than 4%) while affording computational savings. RI/CD successfully address the well-known issue of large basis set requirements for 2PA cross sections calculations. The capabilities of the new code are illustrated by calculations of the 2PA cross sections for model chromophores of the photoactive yellow and green fluorescent proteins.

  13. Two-photon absorption cross sections within equation-of-motion coupled-cluster formalism using resolution-of-the-identity and Cholesky decomposition representations: Theory, implementation, and benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Kaushik D.; Krylov, Anna I.

    2015-02-14

    The equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) methods provide a robust description of electronically excited states and their properties. Here, we present a formalism for two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections for the equation-of-motion for excitation energies CC with single and double substitutions (EOM-CC for electronically excited states with single and double substitutions) wave functions. Rather than the response theory formulation, we employ the expectation-value approach which is commonly used within EOM-CC, configuration interaction, and algebraic diagrammatic construction frameworks. In addition to canonical implementation, we also exploit resolution-of-the-identity (RI) and Cholesky decomposition (CD) for the electron-repulsion integrals to reduce memory requirements and to increase parallel efficiency. The new methods are benchmarked against the CCSD and CC3 response theories for several small molecules. We found that the expectation-value 2PA cross sections are within 5% from the quadratic response CCSD values. The RI and CD approximations lead to small errors relative to the canonical implementation (less than 4%) while affording computational savings. RI/CD successfully address the well-known issue of large basis set requirements for 2PA cross sections calculations. The capabilities of the new code are illustrated by calculations of the 2PA cross sections for model chromophores of the photoactive yellow and green fluorescent proteins.

  14. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  15. Isolation, identification and enrichment of type a spermatogonia from the testis of chinese cross-bred buffaloes (swamp × river).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S; Xiao, Y; Han, L; Hua, H; Riaz, H; Liang, A; Yang, L-G

    2013-06-01

    The proportion of type A spermatogonia in the isolated testis cells is a prerequisite for conducting experiments and the manipulation of these germ cells. Thus, this study was designed to examine the wide range of strategies for the isolation, identification and enrichment of type A spermatogonia in pre-pubertal buffalo calves (3-6 months). Histological findings revealed the presence of maximum number of type A spermatogonia at 5 months, which was further confirmed by DBA immunohistochemistry. In a newly modified strategy for the isolation of testis tissues, mincing followed by trituration and two rounds of digestion with collagenase, hyaluronidase and DNase yielded more than 95% testis cell population. Differential plating with laminin, poly-l-lysine and gelatin significantly (p < 0.05) affected the purity of type A spermatogonia. Among these extracellular matrix (ECMs) molecules, laminin and gelatin performed well and reached at a purity of 39.38 ± 1.21% and 32.15 ± 1.60%, respectively. In addition, combination of laminin and gelatin followed by Percoll centrifugation performed the best and yielded >90% type A spermatogonial purity. Moreover, viability of the cells was not affected (p > 0.05) irrespective of different enrichment methods. In conclusion, type A spermatogonia isolation and enrichment system was developed using different ECM molecules in buffaloes, which will aid in solving wide range of problems especially fertility-related problems and transgenic animal production in buffaloes.

  16. Highly birefringent suspended-core photonic microcells for refractive-index sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chao; Jin, Wa; Ma, Jun; Jin, Wei Yang, Fan; Ho, Hoi Lut; Liao, Changrui; Wang, Yiping

    2014-08-11

    An in-line photonic microcell with a highly birefringent suspended microfiber core is fabricated by locally heating and pressurizing selected air-holes of an endless single mode photonic crystal fiber. The microfiber core has rhombus-like cross-sectional geometry and could achieve a high birefringence of up to 10{sup −2}. The microfiber core is fixed at the center of the microcell by thin struts attached to an outer jacket tube, which protects and isolates the microfiber from environmental contaminations. Highly sensitive and robust refractive index sensors based on such microcells are experimentally demonstrated.

  17. Theoretical and experimental quantification of doubly and singly differential cross sections for electron-induced ionization of isolated tetrahydrofuran molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Bug, Marion U.; Baek, Woon Y.; Weck, Philippe F.

    2014-07-29

    Electron-induced ionization of the commonly used surrogate of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, namely, the tetrahydrofuran molecule, is here theoretically described within the 1st Born approximation by means of quantum-mechanical approach. Comparisons between theory and recent experiments are reported in terms of doubly and singly differential cross sections.

  18. Theoretical and experimental quantification of doubly and singly differential cross sections for electron-induced ionization of isolated tetrahydrofuran molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Bug, Marion U.; Baek, Woon Y.; Weck, Philippe F.

    2014-07-29

    Electron-induced ionization of the commonly used surrogate of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, namely, the tetrahydrofuran molecule, is here theoretically described within the 1st Born approximation by means of quantum-mechanical approach. Comparisons between theory and recent experiments are reported in terms of doubly and singly differential cross sections.

  19. Theoretical and experimental quantification of doubly and singly differential cross sections for electron-induced ionization of isolated tetrahydrofuran molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Bug, Marion U.; Baek, Woon Y.; Weck, Philippe F.

    2014-07-01

    Electron-induced ionization of the tetrahydrofuran molecule, the commonly used surrogate of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, is theoretically described in this study within the 1st Born approximation. Comparisons between theory and recent experiments are reported in terms of doubly and singly differential cross sections.

  20. Genetic divergence and reproductive isolation in the genus Fejervarya (Amphibia: Anura) from Bangladesh inferred from morphological observations, crossing experiments, and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Kurose, Naoko; Khan, Mdmukhlesur Rahman; Nishizawa, Toshitaka; Kuramoto, Mitsuru; Alam, Mohammad Shafiqul; Hasan, Mahmudul; Kurniawan, Nia; Nishioka, Midori; Sumida, Masayuki

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, morphological examinations, crossing experiments and molecular analyses were performed to elucidate the degree of genetic divergence and phylogenetic relationships within the genus Fejervarya from Bangladesh and other Asian countries. Morphological characteristics revealed that Fejervarya species from Bangladesh were divided into four distinct groups: large, medium, small, and mangrove types. Crossing experiments indicated the involvement of three reproductive isolating mechanisms: gametic isolation between the large type and mangrove type, hybrid inviability between the large type and two other types, and hybrid sterility between the medium and small types. Experimental results also indicated that these four types of frogs merit the status of individual species of Fejervarya . Molecular analyses based on mtDNA gene sequences showed that the Bangladesh Fejervarya species were largely divided into three groups: the mangrove type, large type, and others, with the last further subdivided into the medium and small types. Comparison with other Asian Fejervarya species revealed that the Bangladesh mangrove type (which resembled F. cancrivora in morphology) was closely related to F. cancrivora from India, Thailand, and the Philippines; the large type belonged to the F. iskandari group and closely resembled F. orissaensis ; the small type was included in the South Asian or Indian group, and was closest to F. syhadrensis from India and Sri Lanka, whereas the medium type was most closely related to F. limnocharis from Myanmar among all described species of this genus.

  1. Genetic divergence and reproductive isolation in the genus Fejervarya (Amphibia: Anura) from Bangladesh inferred from morphological observations, crossing experiments, and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Kurose, Naoko; Khan, Mdmukhlesur Rahman; Nishizawa, Toshitaka; Kuramoto, Mitsuru; Alam, Mohammad Shafiqul; Hasan, Mahmudul; Kurniawan, Nia; Nishioka, Midori; Sumida, Masayuki

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, morphological examinations, crossing experiments and molecular analyses were performed to elucidate the degree of genetic divergence and phylogenetic relationships within the genus Fejervarya from Bangladesh and other Asian countries. Morphological characteristics revealed that Fejervarya species from Bangladesh were divided into four distinct groups: large, medium, small, and mangrove types. Crossing experiments indicated the involvement of three reproductive isolating mechanisms: gametic isolation between the large type and mangrove type, hybrid inviability between the large type and two other types, and hybrid sterility between the medium and small types. Experimental results also indicated that these four types of frogs merit the status of individual species of Fejervarya . Molecular analyses based on mtDNA gene sequences showed that the Bangladesh Fejervarya species were largely divided into three groups: the mangrove type, large type, and others, with the last further subdivided into the medium and small types. Comparison with other Asian Fejervarya species revealed that the Bangladesh mangrove type (which resembled F. cancrivora in morphology) was closely related to F. cancrivora from India, Thailand, and the Philippines; the large type belonged to the F. iskandari group and closely resembled F. orissaensis ; the small type was included in the South Asian or Indian group, and was closest to F. syhadrensis from India and Sri Lanka, whereas the medium type was most closely related to F. limnocharis from Myanmar among all described species of this genus. PMID:19267620

  2. Sensing individual terahertz photons.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, Hideomi; Antonov, Vladimir; Kulik, Leonid; Tzalenchuk, Alexander; Komiyama, Susumu

    2010-04-23

    One of the promising ways to perform single-photon counting of terahertz radiation consists in sensitive probing of plasma excitation in the electron gas upon photon absorption. We demonstrate the ultimate sensor operating on this principle. It is assembled from a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot, electron reservoir and superconducting single-electron transistor. The quantum dot is isolated from the surrounding electron reservoir in such a way that when the excited plasma wave decays, an electron could tunnel off the dot to the reservoir. The resulting charge polarization of the dot is detected with the single-electron transistor. Such a system forms an easy-to-use sensor enabling single-photon counting in a very obscure wavelength region.

  3. Cross-sectional survey of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from diseased farm livestock in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Cheney, T E A; Smith, R P; Hutchinson, J P; Brunton, L A; Pritchard, G; Teale, C J

    2015-09-01

    Between 2005 and 2007, E. coli obtained from clinical diagnostic submissions from cattle, goats, pigs and sheep to government laboratories in England and Wales were tested for sensitivity to 16 antimicrobials. Resistance was most commonly observed against ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracyclines. Resistance levels varied significantly between species, with isolates from cattle frequently showing the highest levels. Verocytotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) expressed less resistance than non-VTEC. Only 19·3% of non-VTEC and 43·5% of VTEC were susceptible to all antimicrobials, while 47·1% and 30·4%, respectively, were resistant to ⩾5 antimicrobials. The resistance phenotype SSuT was commonly observed, and isolates resistant to third-generation cephalosporins were also identified. We recommend judicious antimicrobial usage in the livestock industry in order to preserve efficacy.

  4. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  5. Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG by Transglutaminase Cross-Linked Soy Protein Isolate to Improve Survival in Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions and Yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Wang, Chun-Ling; Sun, Yu; Li, Ai-Li; Liu, Fei; Meng, Xiang-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Microencapsulation is an effective way to improve the survival of probiotics in simulated gastrointestinal (GI) conditions and yoghurt. In this study, microencapsulation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) was prepared by first cross-linking of soy protein isolate (SPI) using transglutaminase (TGase), followed by embedding the bacteria in cross-linked SPI, and then freeze-drying. The survival of microencapsulated LGG was evaluated in simulated GI conditions and yoghurt. The results showed that a high microencapsulation yield of 67.4% was obtained. The diameter of the microencapsulated LGG was in the range of 52.83 to 275.16 μm. Water activity did not differ between free and microencapsulated LGG after freeze-drying. The survival of microencapsulated LGG under simulated gastric juice (pH 2.5 and 3.6), intestinal juice (0.3% and 2% bile salt) and storage at 4 °C were significantly higher than that of free cells. The survival of LGG in TGase cross-linked SPI microcapsules was also improved to 14.5 ± 0.5% during storage in yoghurt. The microencapsulation of probiotics by TGase-treated SPI can be a suitable alternative to polysaccharide gelation technologies.

  6. Optoelectronic cross-injection locking of a dual-wavelength photonic integrated circuit for low-phase-noise millimeter-wave generation.

    PubMed

    Kervella, Gaël; Van Dijk, Frederic; Pillet, Grégoire; Lamponi, Marco; Chtioui, Mourad; Morvan, Loïc; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    We report on the stabilization of a 90-GHz millimeter-wave signal generated from a fully integrated photonic circuit. The chip consists of two DFB single-mode lasers whose optical signals are combined on a fast photodiode to generate a largely tunable heterodyne beat note. We generate an optical comb from each laser with a microwave synthesizer, and by self-injecting the resulting signal, we mutually correlate the phase noise of each DFB and stabilize the beatnote on a multiple of the frequency delivered by the synthesizer. The performances achieved beat note linewidth below 30 Hz.

  7. Cross-Canada survey of resistance of 2747 aerobic blood culture isolates to piperacillin/tazobactam and other antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Forward, Kevin R; Franks, Patricia A; Low, Donald E; Rennie, Robert; Simor, Andrew E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the activity of piperacillin/tazobactam with that of other broad parenteral antibiotics against aerobic and facultative anaerobic blood culture isolates in a Canada-wide survey. DESIGN: Fifty-eight laboratories in nine provinces each contributed up to 50 consecutive clinically significant aerobic and facultative anaerobic isolates for susceptibility testing. SETTING: Participating hospitals included both tertiary care and community hospitals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Testing was performed in five regional centres by using the same microbroth dilution method, and results were interpreted according to National Commitee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M7-A3 and M100-S5 guidelines. RESULTS: Piperacillin/tazobactam and imipenem were both active against more than 99% of the 1616 strains of Enterobacteriaceae species tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 90% of isolates (MIC90) of all Enterobacteriaceae species was 2 mg/L for piperacillin/tazobactam compared with 64 mg/L for piperacillin alone. Seventeen per cent of strains of Enterobacteriaceae species were susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam but resistant to piperacillin. Piperacillin/tazobactam was highly active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibiting 99.1% of strains. MIC90 was 8 mg/L. Nine per cent of P aeruginosa strains were not susceptible to imipenem. Most of these strains had a MIC of 8 mg/L, which falls in the intermediate category. Ninety-seven per cent of P aeruginosa were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and 97.3% to tobramycin. Ninety-six per cent of strains of Actinobacter species were susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam, whereas only 76% of strains were susceptible to piperacillin alone. Overall, piperacillin/tazobactam was the most active agent tested; 98% of all strains were susceptible, followed closely by imipenem, to which 97.8% of strains were susceptible. CONCLUSIONS: Aerobic blood culture isolates from Canadian centres continue to be highly susceptible to a

  8. Photon scattering in muon collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Klasen, M.

    1997-12-18

    The authors estimate the benefit of muon colliders for photon physics. They calculate the rate at which photons are emitted from muon beams in different production mechanisms. Bremsstrahlung is reduced, beamstrahlung disappears, and laser backscattering suffers from a bad conversion of the incoming to the outgoing photon beam in addition to requiring very short wavelengths. As a consequence, the cross sections for jet photoproduction in {mu}p and {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collisions are reduced by factors of 2.2 and 5 compared to ep and e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} machines. However, the cross sections remain sizable and measurable giving access to the photon and proton parton densities down to x values of 10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup {minus}4}.

  9. Fabrication of sharp-needled conical polymer tip on the cross-section of optical fiber via two-photon polymerization for tuning-fork-based atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Byung Je; Kong, Hong Jin; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Kyu-Seung; Park, Chung Hyun; Yang, Dong-Yol; Lee, Kwang-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at the use in tuning-fork-based atomic force microscopy (TF-based AFM), we propose and demonstrate fabrication methods of polymer tips on the cross-section of optical fibers by two-photon polymerization (TPP) using SCR500 resin. This method can be applied to any optical fibers or other bases regardless of the type. The specified polymer tips are fabricated with high reproducibility by this method. First, a conical polymer tip was fabricated via a continuous-scanning method and layer-by-layer accumulation of circular layers which reduce to a point along with the growth from the cross-section of optical fibers, by using a five-axis optical fiber mount combined with a two-photon nanofabrication system. A sharp-needled conical polymer tip of a 45 nm radius of curvature was fabricated with attachment of four voxels. These voxels were fabricated by the gradually-decreasing-exposure-time method on the apex of the simple conical tip. We have also designed and fabricated a triple-tapered polymer tip to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating various tip shapes by the TPP method for the TF-based AFM. Moreover, the photoluminous polymer tip was fabricated using ORMOCER mixed with quantum dots. The sharp-needled polymer tip was utilized for the TF-based AFM using an optical fiber probe to investigate the performance of the polymer tip fabricated by the TPP method, and we have obtained a topographic image of a pitted sample. Finally, the near-field image of the 30-nm-thick gold layer with holes of 250-nm-radius was successfully obtained by the aluminum-coated NSOM probe fabricated on the TPP conical polymer tip with a radius of curvature of 45 nm in NSOM system.

  10. Isolation and characterization of microsatellites for the yam Dioscorea cayenensis (Dioscoreaceae) and cross-amplification in D. rotundata.

    PubMed

    Silva, L R G; Bajay, M M; Monteiro, M; Mezette, T F; Nascimento, W F; Zucchi, M I; Pinheiro, J B; Veasey, E A

    2014-04-14

    Dioscorea cayenensis and Dioscorea rotundata are among the most important yam species for the humid and sub-humid tropics. We isolated nine polymorphic microsatellite markers using a microsatellite-enriched genomic library technique. The nine primer pairs were validated in 22 D. cayenensis accessions, and were tested for transferability in 26 D. rotundata accessions. The number of bands ranged from 2 to 4, with a mean of 3.11. D. cayenensis gave primer polymorphism information content values ranging from 0.37 to 0.62, while for D. rotundata the values ranged from 0.15 to 0.66. The D parameter in D. cayenensis ranged from 0.14 to 0.40, while in D. rotundata it ranged from 0.05 to 0.34. These SSR markers will be useful to characterize genetic diversity in D. cayenensis and D. rotundata accessions.

  11. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 4. Driller's logs, stratigraphic cross section and utility routines

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrichs, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for use by the hydrologic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System is a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display. This is the fourth of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

  12. Isolation and purification of flavonoid and isoflavonoid compounds from the pericarp of Sophora japonica L. by adsorption chromatography on 12% cross-linked agarose gel media.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuanying; Sun, Ailing; Liu, Renmin; Meng, Zhaoling; Xie, Hongyan

    2007-01-26

    A method for isolation and purification of flavonoid and isoflavonoid compounds in extracts of the pericarp of Sophora japonica L. was established by adsorption chromatography on the 12% cross-linked agarose gel Superose 12. The crude extracts were pre-separated to two parts, sample A and sample B, on a D-101 macroporous resin column by elution with 20% ethanol and 40% ethanol, respectively. Samples A and B were then separated by adsorption chromatography on Superose 12 with 40% methanol as the mobile phase. Eight compounds including four kinds of flavonoids and four kinds of isoflavonoids were obtained by the proposed method. The adsorption mechanisms of flavonoids and isoflavonoids on Superose 12 were also discussed. PMID:17174318

  13. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  14. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  15. Centrality, rapidity, and transverse momentum dependence of isolated prompt photon production in lead-lead collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV measured with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. 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I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mitsui, S.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Moraes, A.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, T.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Nanava, G.; Narayan, R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolics, K.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'Grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olchevski, A. G.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero Y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Qureshi, A.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodrigues, L.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, M.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales de Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savard, P.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. 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M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Prompt photon production in √{sN N}=2.76 -TeV Pb +Pb collisions has been measured by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider using data collected in 2011 with an integrated luminosity of 0.14 nb-1. Inclusive photon yields, scaled by the mean nuclear thickness function, are presented as a function of collision centrality and transverse momentum in two pseudorapidity intervals, |η |<1.37 and 1.52 ≤|η |<2.37 . The scaled yields in the two pseudorapidity intervals, as well as the ratios of the forward yields to those at midrapidity, are compared to the expectations from next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations. The measured cross sections agree well with the predictions for proton-proton collisions within statistical and systematic uncertainties. Both the yields and the ratios are also compared to two other pQCD calculations, one which uses the isospin content appropriate to colliding lead nuclei and another which includes nuclear modifications to the nucleon parton distribution functions.

  16. Evidence for the reproductive isolation of Dermacentor marginatus and Dermacentor reticulatus (Acari: Ixodidae) ticks based on cross-breeding, morphology and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Zahler, M; Gothe, R

    1997-01-01

    The species status of Dermacentor marginatus and Dermacentor reticulatus was evaluated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of adult ticks, cross-breeding experiments and molecular biological analysis of eggs derived from transspecific pairings. The SEM investigations including the morphometric quantification of phenotypic features resulted in an unequivocal differentiation of adult D. marginatus and D. reticulatus ticks. The cross-breeding experiments demonstrated that irrespective of whether female ticks of both species were applied with con- or transspecific male ticks or without males to sheep, they engorged and laid eggs. The larvae, however, developed only in eggs which originated from conspecific matings. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) using the DNA of eggs from transspecific pairings and sequencing of the PCR products revealed two different genotypes. The genotypes of eggs originating from D. marginatus and D. reticulatus females of these pairings differed. However, the eggs deposited by D. marginatus always possessed the same two genotypes as did the eggs produced by D. reticulatus. These results argue for a strict reproductive isolation of D. marginatus and D. reticulatus and, therefore, for a separate species status. PMID:9363622

  17. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration, 1: Temperature-dependent cross section for charge changing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Laville, A.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    The study of charge changing cross sections of fast ions colliding with matter provides the fundamental basis for the analysis of the charge states produced in such interactions. Given the high degree of complexity of the phenomena, there is no theoretical treatment able to give a comprehensive description. In fact, the involved processes are very dependent on the basic parameters of the projectile, such as velocity charge state, and atomic number, and on the target parameters, the physical state (molecular, atomic or ionized matter) and density. The target velocity, may have also incidence on the process, through the temperature of the traversed medium. In addition, multiple electron transfer in single collisions intrincates more the phenomena. Though, in simplified cases, such as protons moving through atomic hydrogen, considerable agreement has been obtained between theory and experiments However, in general the available theoretical approaches have only limited validity in restricted regions of the basic parameters. Since most measurements of charge changing cross sections are performed in atomic matter at ambient temperature, models are commonly based on the assumption of targets at rest, however at Astrophysical scales, temperature displays a wide range in atomic and ionized matter. Therefore, due to the lack of experimental data , an attempt is made here to quantify temperature dependent cross sections on basis to somewhat arbitrary, but physically reasonable assumptions.

  18. Cross-sectional study of sociodemographic patterning of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in three isolated-based subgroups of the Uyghur population in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingmei; Wufuer, Mayila; Simayi, Amuti; Nijiati, Muyesai; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Pengcheng; Chen, Fenghui; Shan, Guangliang; Xue, Fang; Tian, Xiaobing; Li, Feng; Hou, Lei; Han, Wei; Cheng, Zuheng; Qiu, Changchun

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the sociodemographic patterning of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in three isolated-based subgroups of the Uyghur population in Xinjiang, China. Design A cross-sectional study. Between 2005 and 2008, a non-probability sampling design method was used to select three specific groups of the Uyghur rural populations based on their potential socioeconomic status (ie, isolated, semi-isolated and open-environment status). Setting Three communities (named Desert, Turpan and Yuli Rob) in Southern Xinjiang autonomous region, China. Participants 1656 people were included in this study. The inclusion criteria were that all participants were 18 years or older, they were descendants of at least three generations living in the same region, and there was no history of intermarriage. Main outcome measures The prevalence of CVD risk factors (ie, tobacco use, alcohol use, obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, etc) was assessed. Results Compared with the Desert and Turpan communities, Yuli Rob had the highest levels of obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension, and the Desert had the lowest levels of CVD risk factors. Age standardisation slightly altered the estimates, though the patterns remained unchanged. Some unique characteristics were also found. For example, the Desert group displayed significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) level compared with Yuli Rob and Turpan groups. The mean values were 0.63, 1.06 and 1.45 mmol/l for men and 0.64, 1.22 and 1.51 mmol/l for women (p<0.0001). The HDLC levels in the Desert group increased with increase in body mass index and fasting glucose levels, which was inconsistent with previous studies. Conclusions Identifying the unique CVD risk factors of the ethnic-specific populations is very important in development of tailored strategies for the prevention of CVD. PMID:23503578

  19. Primate retroviruses: immunological cross-reactivity between major structural proteins of new and old world primate virus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Devare, S G; Arthur, L O; Fine, D L; Stephenson, J R

    1978-01-01

    The major 35,000-molecular-weight internal antigen (p35) of the squirrel monkey retrovirus (SMRV) was isolated and partially characterized. Immunological analysis of SMRV p35 led to the demonstration of antigenic determinants common to SMRV and the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV). A broadly reactive competition immunoassay was developed utilizing antiserum to MPMV to precipitate 125I-labeled SMRV p35. Although the major structural proteins of MPMV and SMRV competed with equal efficiency in this assay, type B and type C oncornavirus proteins lacked detectable reactivity. Antibodies reactive with the major structural proteins of both MPMV and SMRV were observed in sera of several normal rhesus monkeys with known prior exposure to MPMV-infected animals. These findings demonstrate the ability of sera from naturally immunized primates to recognize broadly reactive interspecies antigenic determinants shared by the major structural proteins of type D oncornaviruses, and they suggest possible horizontal transmission of MPMV among rhesus monkeys. Although sera from a number of squirrel monkeys contained antibody to SMRV p35, the possibility that this latter reactivity was due to endogenous virus activation rather than horizontal transmission cannot be ruled out. PMID:76686

  20. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan C. White

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  1. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  2. Do antibodies to myelin basic protein isolated from multiple sclerosis cross-react with measles and other common virus antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, C C; Townsend, E; Randell, V B; Williamson, H G

    1983-01-01

    Immunological activity to various antigens, including brain components, measles and other viruses, has been associated with IgG in multiple sclerosis (MS). One possible explanation for the presence of anti-viral antibodies and antibody to myelin basic protein (MBP) in MS patients is that there are antigenic determinants common to certain viruses and MBP. To assess this possibility, IgG from individual brains and sera from patients with MS, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls was isolated by protein A and MBP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Antibody to MBP was measured with a solid phase radioimmunoassay and antibody to measles and other viruses by immunofluorescence and/or complement fixation. Anti-MBP activity was detected in brain extracts and sera of all MS patients tested. In contrast to the low levels of antibody to MBP in control brains, high levels of anti-MBP antibodies were found in most of the normal sera. There was no correlation between the presence and levels of serum anti-measles antibodies and the anti-MBP activity. None of the anti-MBP antibodies affinity purified from brain and serum of MS patients reacted with any of the viruses tested, including measles. IgG purified from SSPE patients or from a rabbit hyperimmunized with measles antigen had no reactivity to MBP, despite high levels of anti-measles antibody. It is concluded that there is not direct link between the presence of antibody to MBP and antibody to measles and other viruses in MS patients. PMID:6190599

  3. Isolating and quantifying cross-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. K.; Cao, D.; Michel, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-05-01

    The angularly resolved mass ablation rates and ablation-front trajectories for Si-coated CH targets were measured in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments to quantify cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) while constraining the hydrodynamic coupling. A polar-direct-drive laser configuration, where the equatorial laser beams were dropped and the polar beams were repointed from a symmetric direct-drive configuration, was used to limit CBET at the pole while allowing it to persist at the equator. The combination of low- and high-CBET conditions observed in the same implosion allowed for the effects of CBET on the ablation rate and ablation pressure to be determined. Hydrodynamic simulations performed without CBET agreed with the measured ablation rate and ablation-front trajectory at the pole of the target, confirming that the CBET effects on the pole are small. The simulated mass ablation rates and ablation-front trajectories were in excellent agreement with the measurements at all angles when a CBET model based on Randall's equations [C. J. Randall et al., Phys. Fluids 24, 1474 (1981)] was included into the simulations with a multiplier on the CBET gain factor. These measurements were performed on OMEGA and at the National Ignition Facility to access a wide range of plasma conditions, laser intensities, and laser beam geometries. The presence of the CBET gain multiplier required to match the data in all of the configurations tested suggests that additional physics effects, such as intensity variations caused by diffraction, polarization effects, or shortcomings of extending the 1-D Randall model to 3-D, should be explored to explain the differences in observed and predicted drive.

  4. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  5. Providing reference standards and metrology for the few photon-photon counting community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Andrew R.; Cheung, Jessica Y.; Chunnilall, Christopher J.; Ireland, Jane; White, Malcolm G.

    2009-10-01

    The main drivers for developing few-photon metrological techniques are the rapidly progressing field of quantum information processing, which requires the development of high-efficiency photon-counting detectors, and the wider use of photon-counting technology in biology, medical physics and nuclear physics. This paper will focus on the provision of standards for the few photon community and the development of techniques for the characterisation of photon-counting detectors. At the high-power end, microwatts, we are developing a low-power absolute radiometer as a primary standard that will be used to provide traceability over a much broader spectral range. At the few photon-photon-counting level we are developing a conventional calibration technique, which is traceable to the primary standard through a reference trap detector. This method can be used in both analogue and photon-counting modes and provides a convenient route for providing customer calibration at few-photon levels across the optical spectrum. At the photon-counting/single-photon level we are developing a technique based on correlated photons. These are produced via parametric downconversion and can be used to measure directly the detection efficiency of photon-counting detectors. A cross-validation of the correlated photon and conventional technique is reported. Finally we discuss this work in the context of an EU project, that is aimed at establishing the route towards the re-definition of the candela, the SI unit for optical radiation.

  6. Pion wave functions from holographic QCD and the role of infrared renormalons in photon-photon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Aydin, C.; Keskin, F.

    2012-02-01

    In this article, we calculate the contribution of the higher-twist Feynman diagrams to the large-pT inclusive single pion production cross section in photon-photon collisions in case of the running coupling and frozen coupling approaches within holographic QCD. We compare the resummed higher-twist cross sections with the ones obtained in the framework of the frozen coupling approach and leading-twist cross section. Also, we show that in the context of the frozen coupling approach a higher-twist contribution to the photon-photon collisions cross section is normalized in terms of the pion electromagnetic form factor.

  7. The low-energy photon tagger NEPTUN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savran, D.; Lindenberg, K.; Glorius, J.; Löher, B.; Müller, S.; Pietralla, N.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Simon, V.; Sonnabend, K.; Wälzlein, C.; Elvers, M.; Endres, J.; Hasper, J.; Zilges, A.

    2010-02-01

    A new photon tagging spectrometer was built at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC). The system is designed for tagging photons in an energy range from 6 to 20 MeV with the emphasis on best possible energy resolution and intensity. The absolute energy resolution of photons at 10 MeV is expected to be about 20 keV. With scintillating fibres as focal-plane detectors a maximum rate of tagged photons of 104 keV -1s -1 will be achieved. Detailed design studies including Monte Carlo simulations are presented, as well as results for the measured tagged photon energy profile of the system realized so far. This photon-tagging facility will allow to determine the photon absorption cross-sections as a function of excitation energy and to study the decay patterns of nuclear photo-excitations in great detail.

  8. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  9. Photons Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, Matej; Begalli, Marcia; Han, Min Cheol; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Han Sung; Grazia Pia, Maria; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review of methods and data for the Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions is in progress: it concerns a wide set of theoretical modeling approaches and data libraries available for this purpose. Models and data libraries are assessed quantitatively with respect to an extensive collection of experimental measurements documented in the literature to determine their accuracy; this evaluation exploits rigorous statistical analysis methods. The computational performance of the associated modeling algorithms is evaluated as well. An overview of the assessment of photon interaction models and results of the experimental validation are presented.

  10. Green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  11. Variations of SSU rDNA group I introns in different isolates of Cordyceps militaris and the loss of an intron during cross-mating.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde; Guo, Suping; Yang, Huaijun; Dong, Caihong

    2014-08-01

    Cordyceps militaris, the type species of genus Cordyceps, is one of the most popular mushrooms and a nutraceutical in eastern Asia. It is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species because it can complete its life cycle when cultured in vitro. In the present study, the occurrence and sequence variation of SSU rDNA group I introns, Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, among different isolates of C. militaris were analyzed. Based on the secondary structure predictions, the Cmi.S943 intron has been placed in subgroup IC1, and the Cmi.S1199 intron has been placed in subgroup IE. No significant similarity between Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199 suggested different origins. Three genotypes, based on the frequency and distribution of introns, were described to discriminate the 57 surveyed C. militaris strains. It was found that the genotype was related to the stroma characteristics. The stromata of all of the genotype II strains, which possessed only Cmi.S943, could produce perithecium. In contrast, the stromata of all genotype III strains, which had both Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, could not produce perithecium. Cmi.S1199 showed the lowest level of intra-specific variation among the tested strains. Group I introns can be lost during strain cross-mating. Therefore, we presumed that during cross-mating and recombination, intron loss could be driven by positive Darwinian selection due to the energetic cost of transcribing long introns.

  12. Variations of SSU rDNA group I introns in different isolates of Cordyceps militaris and the loss of an intron during cross-mating.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde; Guo, Suping; Yang, Huaijun; Dong, Caihong

    2014-08-01

    Cordyceps militaris, the type species of genus Cordyceps, is one of the most popular mushrooms and a nutraceutical in eastern Asia. It is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species because it can complete its life cycle when cultured in vitro. In the present study, the occurrence and sequence variation of SSU rDNA group I introns, Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, among different isolates of C. militaris were analyzed. Based on the secondary structure predictions, the Cmi.S943 intron has been placed in subgroup IC1, and the Cmi.S1199 intron has been placed in subgroup IE. No significant similarity between Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199 suggested different origins. Three genotypes, based on the frequency and distribution of introns, were described to discriminate the 57 surveyed C. militaris strains. It was found that the genotype was related to the stroma characteristics. The stromata of all of the genotype II strains, which possessed only Cmi.S943, could produce perithecium. In contrast, the stromata of all genotype III strains, which had both Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, could not produce perithecium. Cmi.S1199 showed the lowest level of intra-specific variation among the tested strains. Group I introns can be lost during strain cross-mating. Therefore, we presumed that during cross-mating and recombination, intron loss could be driven by positive Darwinian selection due to the energetic cost of transcribing long introns. PMID:24996897

  13. Isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark) and cross-amplification in Carcharhinus leucas, Carcharhinus brevipinna, Carcharhinus plumbeus and Sphyrna lewini.

    PubMed

    Pirog, Agathe; Jaquemet, Sébastien; Blaison, Antonin; Soria, Marc; Magalon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhinidae) is a large elasmobranch suspected to have, as other apex predators, a keystone function in marine ecosystems and is currently considered Near Threatened (Red list IUCN). Knowledge on its ecology, which is crucial to design proper conservation and management plans, is very scarce. Here we describe the isolation of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries. Their characteristics were tested on a population of tiger shark (n = 101) from Reunion Island (South-Western Indian Ocean). All loci were polymorphic with a number of alleles ranging from two to eight. No null alleles were detected and no linkage disequilibrium was detected after Bonferroni correction. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.03 to 0.76 and from 0.03 to 0.77, respectively. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the global F IS of the population was of 0.04 (NS) . Some of the eight loci developed here successfully cross-amplified in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (one locus), the spinner shark Carcharhinus brevipinna (four loci), the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus (five loci) and the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini (two loci). We also designed primers to amplify and sequence a mitochondrial marker, the control region. We sequenced 862 bp and found a low genetic diversity, with four polymorphic sites, a haplotype diversity of 0.15 and a nucleotide diversity of 2 × 10(-4). PMID:27231661

  14. Isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark) and cross-amplification in Carcharhinus leucas, Carcharhinus brevipinna, Carcharhinus plumbeus and Sphyrna lewini

    PubMed Central

    Jaquemet, Sébastien; Blaison, Antonin; Soria, Marc; Magalon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhinidae) is a large elasmobranch suspected to have, as other apex predators, a keystone function in marine ecosystems and is currently considered Near Threatened (Red list IUCN). Knowledge on its ecology, which is crucial to design proper conservation and management plans, is very scarce. Here we describe the isolation of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries. Their characteristics were tested on a population of tiger shark (n = 101) from Reunion Island (South-Western Indian Ocean). All loci were polymorphic with a number of alleles ranging from two to eight. No null alleles were detected and no linkage disequilibrium was detected after Bonferroni correction. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.03 to 0.76 and from 0.03 to 0.77, respectively. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the global FIS of the population was of 0.04NS. Some of the eight loci developed here successfully cross-amplified in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (one locus), the spinner shark Carcharhinus brevipinna (four loci), the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus (five loci) and the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini (two loci). We also designed primers to amplify and sequence a mitochondrial marker, the control region. We sequenced 862 bp and found a low genetic diversity, with four polymorphic sites, a haplotype diversity of 0.15 and a nucleotide diversity of 2 × 10−4. PMID:27231661

  15. Isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark) and cross-amplification in Carcharhinus leucas, Carcharhinus brevipinna, Carcharhinus plumbeus and Sphyrna lewini.

    PubMed

    Pirog, Agathe; Jaquemet, Sébastien; Blaison, Antonin; Soria, Marc; Magalon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhinidae) is a large elasmobranch suspected to have, as other apex predators, a keystone function in marine ecosystems and is currently considered Near Threatened (Red list IUCN). Knowledge on its ecology, which is crucial to design proper conservation and management plans, is very scarce. Here we describe the isolation of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries. Their characteristics were tested on a population of tiger shark (n = 101) from Reunion Island (South-Western Indian Ocean). All loci were polymorphic with a number of alleles ranging from two to eight. No null alleles were detected and no linkage disequilibrium was detected after Bonferroni correction. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.03 to 0.76 and from 0.03 to 0.77, respectively. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the global F IS of the population was of 0.04 (NS) . Some of the eight loci developed here successfully cross-amplified in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (one locus), the spinner shark Carcharhinus brevipinna (four loci), the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus (five loci) and the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini (two loci). We also designed primers to amplify and sequence a mitochondrial marker, the control region. We sequenced 862 bp and found a low genetic diversity, with four polymorphic sites, a haplotype diversity of 0.15 and a nucleotide diversity of 2 × 10(-4).

  16. LASERS IN MEDICINE: Two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkin, Yu P.; Alfimov, E. E.; Vasil'ev, N. E.; Denisov, A. N.; Makukha, V. K.; Ogirenko, A. P.

    1999-12-01

    A demonstration is given of the feasibility of two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanine and of the pharmaceutical preparation 'Fotosens', used in photodynamic therapy. The excitation source was an Nd:YAG laser emitting at the 1064 nm wavelength. The spectra of the two-photon-excited luminescence were obtained and the two-photon absorption cross sections were determined.

  17. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  18. Prompt photon production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-07-01

    Prompt photon production has been studied by the CDF and D0{sup -} experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at the centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavor jet, and diphoton production cross sections are discussed. The analyses use data sample corresponding to integrated luminosity between 0.2 fb{sup -1} and 1.02 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to the next to leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations.

  19. Microalgae photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Coquil, Thomas; Sylvestre, Julien

    2011-05-01

    Due to their metabolic flexibility and fast growth rate, microscopic aquatic phototrophs like algae have a potential to become industrial photochemical converters. Algae photosynthesis could enable the large scale production of clean and renewable liquid fuels and chemicals with major environmental, economic and societal benefits. Capital and operational costs are the main issues to address through optical, process and biochemical engineering improvements. In this perspective, a variety of photonic approaches have been proposed - we introduce them here and describe their potential, limitations and compatibility with separate biotechnology and engineering progresses. We show that only sunlight-based approaches are economically realistic. One of photonics' main goals in the algae field is to dilute light to overcome photosaturation effects that impact upon cultures exposed to full sunlight. Among other approaches, we introduce a widely-compatible broadband spectral adaptation technique called AlgoSun® that uses luminescence to optimize sunlight spectrum in view of the bioconverter's requirements.

  20. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  1. Isolation and partial structural characterization of an equine fibrinogen CNBr fragment that exhibits immunologic cross-reactivity with an A alpha-chain cross-linking region of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Sobel, J H; Thibodeau, C A; Kolks, M A; Canfield, R E

    1990-09-25

    Immunochemical studies of equine fibrinogen were conducted to characterize the structural basis for the immunologic cross-reactivity observed between human and equine A alpha chains when employing an antiserum to the 26K, human cyanogen bromide (CNBr) fragment, A alpha 241-476 (CNBr VIII). A 38K, equine CNBr fragment that reacts with this antiserum was isolated from CNBr-digested equine fibrinogen by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. It was further purified by sequential hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, followed by reversed-phased (C-8) high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). NH2-Terminal analysis of the purified fragment, designated EqA alpha CNBr, identified one major sequence whose first three residues, E-L-E, were identical with those of human CNBr VIII. Tryptic and staphylococcal protease digests of the equine fragment were resolved by reversed-phase HPLC (C-4, C-18), and the separated components were characterized by amino acid analysis and automated Edman degradation. A total of 34 tryptic and 20 staph protease peptides yielded sequence information that permitted the alignment of 271 equine residues with residues A alpha 241-517 from the COOH-terminal two-thirds of the human A alpha chain so that 63% of the possible matches were identical. Other features of interest included (1) an amino acid substitution in which the methionine residue at A alpha 476 in the human A alpha chain was replaced by a valine residue, thus accounting, in part, for the larger EqA alpha CNBr fragment obtained from the equine molecule, and (2) a region of striking homology in which 36 successive residues, corresponding to A alpha 428-464 in the human A alpha chain, were identical in both species. These findings, together with available structural data for the COOH-terminal portion of the rat and bovine A alpha chains, indicate that the region corresponding to (human) A alpha 240-517 represents a conserved portion of the fibrinogen molecule. This may, in turn

  2. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae, and their cross-species amplification in the Tephritidae family

    PubMed Central

    Augustinos, Antonios A; Stratikopoulos, Elias E; Drosopoulou, Eleni; Kakani, Evdoxia G; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Mathiopoulos, Kostas D

    2008-01-01

    Background The Tephritidae family of insects includes the most important agricultural pests of fruits and vegetables, belonging mainly to four genera (Bactrocera, Ceratitis, Anastrepha and Rhagoletis). The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the major pest of the olive fruit. Currently, its control is based on chemical insecticides. Environmentally friendlier methods have been attempted in the past (Sterile Insect Technique), albeit with limited success. This was mainly attributed to the lack of knowledge on the insect's behaviour, ecology and genetic structure of natural populations. The development of molecular markers could facilitate the access in the genome and contribute to the solution of the aforementioned problems. We chose to focus on microsatellite markers due to their abundance in the genome, high degree of polymorphism and easiness of isolation. Results Fifty-eight microsatellite-containing clones were isolated from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae, bearing a total of sixty-two discrete microsatellite motifs. Forty-two primer pairs were designed on the unique sequences flanking the microsatellite motif and thirty-one of them amplified a PCR product of the expected size. The level of polymorphism was evaluated against wild and laboratory flies and the majority of the markers (93.5%) proved highly polymorphic. Thirteen of them presented a unique position on the olive fly polytene chromosomes by in situ hybridization, which can serve as anchors to correlate future genetic and cytological maps of the species, as well as entry points to the genome. Cross-species amplification of these markers to eleven Tephritidae species and sequencing of thirty-one of the amplified products revealed a varying degree of conservation that declines outside the Bactrocera genus. Conclusion Microsatellite markers are very powerful tools for genetic and population analyses, particularly in species deprived of any other means of genetic analysis. The presented set of

  3. Detection of Recurrent Fluorescence Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebara, Yuta; Furukawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Jun; Tanuma, Hajime; Azuma, Toshiyuki; Shiromaru, Haruo; Hansen, Klavs

    2016-09-01

    We have detected visible photons emitted from the thermally populated electronic excited state, namely recurrent fluorescence (RF), of C6- stored in an electrostatic ion storage ring. Clear evidence is provided to distinguish RF from normal fluorescence, based on the temporal profile of detected photons synchronized with the revolution of C6- in the ring, for which the time scale is far longer than the lifetime of the intact photoexcited state. The relaxation (cooling) process via RF is likely to be commonplace for isolated molecular systems and crucial to the stabilization of molecules in interstellar environments.

  4. Isolation of Insertion Sequence ISRLdTAL1145-1 from a Rhizobium sp. (Leucaena diversifolia) and Distribution of Homologous Sequences Identifying Cross-Inoculation Group Relationships †

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas J.; Somasegaran, Padma; MacGlashan, Kathryn; Bohlool, B. Ben

    1994-01-01

    Insertion sequence (IS) element ISRLdTAL1145-1 from Rhizobium sp. (Leucaena diversifolia) strain TAL 1145 was entrapped in the sacB gene of the positive selection vector pUCD800 by insertional inactivation. A hybridization probe prepared from the whole 2.5-kb element was used to determine the distribution of homologous sequences in a diverse collection of 135 Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium strains. The IS probe hybridized strongly to Southern blots of genomic DNAs from 10 rhizobial strains that nodulate both Phaseolus vulgaris (beans) and Leucaena leucocephala (leguminous trees), 1 Rhizobium sp. that nodulates Leucaena spp., 9 R. meliloti (alfalfa) strains, 4 Rhizobium spp. that nodulate Sophora chrysophylla (leguminous trees), and 1 nonnodulating bacterium associated with the nodules of Pithecellobium dulce from the Leucaena cross-inoculation group, producing distinguishing IS patterns for each strain. Hybridization analysis revealed that ISRLdTAL1145-1 was strongly homologous with and closely related to a previously isolated element, ISRm USDA1024-1 from R. meliloti, while restriction enzyme analysis found structural similarities and differences between the two IS homologs. Two internal segments of these IS elements were used to construct hybridization probes of 1.2 kb and 380 bp that delineate a structural similarity and a difference, respectively, of the two IS homologs. The internal segment probes were used to analyze the structures of homologous IS elements in other strains. Five types of structural variation in homolog IS elements were found. The predominate IS structural type naturally occurring in a strain can reasonably identify the strain's cross-inoculation group relationships. Three IS structural types were found in Rhizobium species that nodulate beans and Leucaena species, one of which included the designated type IIB strain of R. tropici (CIAT 899). Weak homology to the whole IS probe, but not with the internal segments, was found with two

  5. Polarisation singularities in photonic crystals for an on-chip spin-photon interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggs, Daryl M.; Young, Andrew B.; Thijssen, Arthur C. T.; Oulton, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    Integrated quantum photonic chips are a leading contender for future quantum technologies, which aim to use the entanglement and superposition properties of quantum physics to speed up the manipulation of data. Quantum information may be stored and transmitted in photons, which make excellent flying qubits. Photons suffer little from decoherence, and single qubit gates performed by changing photon phase, are straightforward. Less straightforward is the ability to create two qubit gates, where one photon is used to switch another's state; inherently difficult due to the extremely small interaction cross-section between photons. The required deterministic two-qubit interactions will likely need a hybrid scheme with the ``flying'' photonic qubit interacting with a ``static'' matter qubit. Here we present the design of a photonic crystal waveguide structure that can couple electron-spin to photon path, thus providing an interface between a static and a flying qubit. We will show that the complex polarization properties inherent in the photonic crystal eigenmodes supports polarization singularities - positions in the electric field vector where one of the parameters describing the local polarization ellipse is singular - and that these singularities are ideal for a range of quantum information applications. In particular, we will show that by placing a quantum dot at one of these singularities, the electron-spin becomes correlated with the photon emission direction, creating an in-plane spin-photon interface that can transfer quantum information from static to flying qubits.

  6. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  7. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  8. Design of photonic crystal splitters/combiners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangin; Park, Ikmo; Lim, Hanjo

    2004-10-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) structures or photonic crystals have attracted a lot of interest since one of their promising applications is to build compact photonic integrated circuits (PIC). One of key components in PICs is a 1 x 2 optical power splitter or a 2 x 1 combiner. Design of 1 x 2 optical power splitters based on photonic crystal has been investigated by several research groups, but no attention has been paid to the design of 2 x 1 optical combiners. In conventional dielectric waveguide based circuits, optical combiners are obtained just by operating the splitters in the opposite direction and the isolation between two input ports in the combiners is naturally achieved. In photonic crystal based circuits, however, we have found that reciprocal operation of the splitters as combiners will not provide proper isolation between the input ports of the combiners. In this work, microwave-circuit concept has been adopted to obtain isolation between two input ports of the combiner and compact optical power splitters/combiners of good performance have been designed using 2-D photonic crystal. Numerical analysis of the designed splitters/combiners has been performed with the finite-difference time-domain method. The designed splitters/combiners show good isolation between input ports in combiner operation with small return losses.

  9. Photon-energy dependence of single-photon simultaneous core ionization and core excitation in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniato, S.; Selles, P.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Andric, L.; Nakano, M.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.; Marchenko, T.; Travnikova, O.; Goldsztejn, G.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Céolin, D.; Simon, M.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Penent, F.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the K-2V process corresponding to simultaneous K -shell ionization and K -shell excitation in the C O2 molecule. We define these K-2V states as super shake-up, at variance with the "conventional" K-1v-1V shake-up states. While the nature and evolution with photon energy of the conventional shake-up satellites has been the object of many studies, no such data on a large photon-energy range were previously reported on super shake-up. The C O2 molecule is a textbook example because it exhibits two well-isolated K-2V resonances (with V being 2 πu* and 5 σg* ) with different symmetries resulting from shake-up processes of different origin populated in comparable proportions. The variation of the excitation cross section of these two resonances with photon energy is reported, using two different experimental approaches, which sheds light on the excitation mechanisms. Furthermore, double-core-hole spectroscopy is shown to be able to integrate and even expand information provided by conventional single-core-hole X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) techniques, revealing, for instance, g -g dipole forbidden transitions which are only excited in NEXAFS spectra through vibronic coupling.

  10. Studies on clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to methicillin. Evidence of cross-resistance between methicillin and cephalothin.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Nord, M; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Siboni, K

    1988-02-01

    The in vitro susceptibility to cephalothin and cefuroxime of 195 isolates of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci was determined by the agar-diffusion test, using 7.5% NaCl-supplemented agar. The distribution of the inhibition zone diameters for isolates of S. epidermidis (S. biotype 1) as well as for S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4) was trimodal. While 4% of the isolates were found susceptible to cefuroxime, 39% of the S. epidermidis/S. hominis (S. biotype 1) isolates and 34% of the S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4) isolates were found susceptible to cephalothin by this method. Eight of these isolates (six S. epidermidis, two S. haemolyticus) were selected for susceptibility testing by the tube-dilution method, together with four isolates (three S. haemolyticus, one S. epidermidis) found resistant to cephalothin by the agar-diffusion test. The first-mentioned isolates were all found susceptible to cephalothin with MICs less than or equal to 2 micrograms/l, while the last-named all were resistant with MICs greater than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml. Population analyses revealed sub-populations of highly resistant bacteria in all methicillin-resistant isolates of S. epidermidis (S. biotype 1), as well as in all isolates of S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4). We thus concluded that methicillin-resistance in isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci implies resistance to cephalosporins and that the difference between S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus as regards cephalosporin-susceptibility is quantitative and not qualitative. Eighty-nine per cent of the 195 methicillin-resistant isolates in this study were resistant to penicillin and at least one more antibiotic. We therefore think that resistance to penicillin and one or more non-beta-lactam antibiotics strongly suggests methicillin-resistance and that such isolates should be further tested on hypertonic media.

  11. Studies on clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to methicillin. Evidence of cross-resistance between methicillin and cephalothin.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Nord, M; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Siboni, K

    1988-02-01

    The in vitro susceptibility to cephalothin and cefuroxime of 195 isolates of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci was determined by the agar-diffusion test, using 7.5% NaCl-supplemented agar. The distribution of the inhibition zone diameters for isolates of S. epidermidis (S. biotype 1) as well as for S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4) was trimodal. While 4% of the isolates were found susceptible to cefuroxime, 39% of the S. epidermidis/S. hominis (S. biotype 1) isolates and 34% of the S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4) isolates were found susceptible to cephalothin by this method. Eight of these isolates (six S. epidermidis, two S. haemolyticus) were selected for susceptibility testing by the tube-dilution method, together with four isolates (three S. haemolyticus, one S. epidermidis) found resistant to cephalothin by the agar-diffusion test. The first-mentioned isolates were all found susceptible to cephalothin with MICs less than or equal to 2 micrograms/l, while the last-named all were resistant with MICs greater than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml. Population analyses revealed sub-populations of highly resistant bacteria in all methicillin-resistant isolates of S. epidermidis (S. biotype 1), as well as in all isolates of S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4). We thus concluded that methicillin-resistance in isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci implies resistance to cephalosporins and that the difference between S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus as regards cephalosporin-susceptibility is quantitative and not qualitative. Eighty-nine per cent of the 195 methicillin-resistant isolates in this study were resistant to penicillin and at least one more antibiotic. We therefore think that resistance to penicillin and one or more non-beta-lactam antibiotics strongly suggests methicillin-resistance and that such isolates should be further tested on hypertonic media. PMID:3345258

  12. Jets and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-03-01

    This Letter applies the concept of “jets,” as constructed from calorimeter cell four-vectors, to jets composed (primarily) of photons (or leptons). Thus jets become a superset of both traditional objects such as QCD jets, photons, and electrons, and more unconventional objects such as photon jets and electron jets, defined as collinear photons and electrons, respectively. Since standard objects such as single photons become a subset of jets in this approach, standard jet substructure techniques are incorporated into the photon finder toolbox. Using a (reasonably) realistic calorimeter model we demonstrate that, for a single photon identification efficiency of 80% or above, the use of jet substructure techniques reduces the number of QCD jets faking photons by factors of 2.5 to 4. Depending on the topology of the photon jets, the substructure variables reduce the number of photon jets faking single photons by factors of 10 to 103 at a single photon identification efficiency of 80%.

  13. High-Energy QCD Asymptotics of Photon--Photon Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-07-26

    The high-energy behavior of the total cross section for highly virtual photons, as predicted by the BFKL equation at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD, is discussed. The NLO BFKL predictions, improved by the BLM optimal scale setting, are in good agreement with recent OPAL and L3 data at CERN LEP2. NLO BFKL predictions for future linear colliders are presented.

  14. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Photonic Nanonanojets from Nonspherical Dielectric Microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geintz, Yu. E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Panina, E. K.

    2015-11-01

    Results of numerical simulation of light wave scattering on conical dielectric micron particles shaped as axicons and on combined particles shaped as truncated cones with adjacent hemispheres in the near field (photonic nanojet) region are presented. The spatial dimensions and the intensity of the photonic nanojets from particles with different spatial orientations are investigated. It is first shown that a combination of spherical and conical focusing in combined particles allows highly localized photonic nanojets to be formed with the peak intensity exceeding by several times the peak intensity for isolated microaxicons.

  16. Indistinguishable Photons from Independent Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaka, Kaoru; Pawlis, Alexander; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Lischka, Klaus; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate quantum interference between photons generated by the radiative decay processes of excitons that are bound to isolated fluorine donor impurities in ZnSe/ZnMgSe quantum-well nanostructures. The ability to generate single photons from these devices is confirmed by autocorrelation experiments, and the indistinguishability of photons emitted from two independent nanostructures is confirmed via a Hong-Ou-Mandel dip. These results indicate that donor impurities in appropriately engineered semiconductor structures can portray atomlike homogeneity and coherence properties, potentially enabling scalable technologies for future large-scale optical quantum computers and quantum communication networks.

  17. Experimental realization of a two-photon Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, William J.

    1999-11-01

    This thesis describes the development of a novel quantum oscillator known as a two-photon Raman laser. It is based on two-photon stimulated emission in strongly driven potassium atoms. Two-photon lasers were first proposed in the 1960's, but only recently have such devices been experimentally realized. The two-photon Raman laser is an important step forward as it provides the first opportunity to study the turn-on behavior, instabilities, and noise properties of a pure two-photon optical device. The necessary ingredients for a two-photon laser are a medium displaying two-photon laser beam amplification and an optical resonator. In my two-photon Raman laser the amplification arises from a multi-photon process in which state-prepared potassium atoms undergo two-photon Raman transitions. This amplification process was studied using a high-density, small-Doppler-width potassium atomic beam that was driven by a strong pump laser and probed by a weak probe laser. I observed two-photon Raman amplification for a range of pump laser frequencies, atomic beam number densities, and probe beam powers. The two-photon Raman gain is linearly dependent on the input probe power as expected for a two-photon process. This gain mechanism is also spectrally isolated from other mechanisms occurring in strongly driven potassium atoms. The optical resonator consists of a sub-confocal high finesse cavity. The cavity is constructed so that the two-photon Raman process will lase while all other processes are suppressed. The cavity buildup is sufficient to support lasing given the maximum two-photon Raman gain observed in the amplification experiment. Using this apparatus I have observed two-photon lasing. In agreement with theoretical predictions, an external photon source is required to initiate two-photon lasing. I initiated the two-photon laser using an externally injected pulse of light and using a frequency degenerate one-photon process. The two-photon Raman laser threshold was mapped as

  18. Photon pair generation in birefringent optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Brian J.; Mahou, P.; Cohen, Offir; Lundeen, J. S.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2009-12-01

    We study both experimentally and theoretically the generation of photon pairs by spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) in standard birefringent optical fibers. The ability to produce a range of two-photon spectral states, from highly correlated (entangled) to completely factorable, by means of cross-polarized birefringent phase matching, is explored. A simple model is developed to predict the spectral state of the photon pair which shows how this can be adjusted by choosing the appropriate pump bandwidth, fiber length and birefringence. Spontaneous Raman scattering is modeled to determine the tradeoff between SFWM and background Raman noise, and the predicted results are shown to agree with experimental data.

  19. Isolation of cross-linked peptides by diagonal strong cation exchange chromatography for protein complex topology studies by peptide fragment fingerprinting from large sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Buncherd, Hansuk; Roseboom, Winfried; Ghavim, Behrad; Du, Weina; de Koning, Leo J; de Koster, Chris G; de Jong, Luitzen

    2014-06-27

    Knowledge of spatial proximity of amino acid residues obtained by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometric analysis provides information about protein folding, protein-protein interactions and topology of macromolecular assemblies. We show that the use of bis(succinimidyl)-3-azidomethyl glutarate as a cross-linker provides a solution for two major analytical problems of cross-link mapping by peptide fragment fingerprinting (PFF) from complex sequence databases, i.e., low abundance of protease-generated target peptides and lack of knowledge of the masses of linked peptides. Tris(carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) reduces the azido group in cross-linked peptides to an amine group in competition with cleavage of an amide bond formed in the cross-link reaction. TCEP-induced reaction products were separated by diagonal strong cation exchange (SCX) from unmodified peptides. The relation between the sum of the masses of the cleavage products and the mass of the parent cross-linked peptide enables determination of the masses of candidate linked peptides. By reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis of secondary SCX fractions, we identified several intraprotein and interprotein cross-links in a HeLa cell nuclear extract, aided by software tools supporting PFF from the entire human sequence database. The data provide new information about interacting protein domains, among others from assemblies involved in splicing.

  20. Beamlike photon pairs entangled by a 2x2 fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Hsin-Pin; Yabushita, Atsushi; Luo, Chih-Wei; Chen, Pochung; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2011-08-15

    Polarization-entangled photon pairs have been widely used as a light source of quantum communication. The polarization-entangled photon pairs are generally obtained at the crossing points of the light cones that are generated from a type-II nonlinear crystal. However, it is hard to pick up the photon pairs coming out from the crossing points because of their invisible wavelength and low intensity. In our previous work, we succeeded in generating polarization-entangled photon pairs by overlapping two light paths for the photon-pair generation. The photon pairs could be entangled in all of the generated photon pairs without clipping the crossing points, even with some difficulty in its alignment to overlap the two light paths. In this paper, we have developed an optical system which generates polarization-entangled photon pairs using a beamlike photon pair, without the difficulty in alignment. The measured results show that the photon pairs generated in the system are entangled in their polarizations.

  1. Evolutionary relationships and reproductive isolating mechanisms in the rice frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) species complex from Sri Lanka, Thailand, Taiwan and Japan, inferred from mtDNA gene sequences, allozymes, and crossing experiments.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Masayuki; Kotaki, Manabu; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Djong, Tjong Hon; Igawa, Takeshi; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Matsui, Masafumi; Anslem, De Silva; Khonsue, Wichase; Nishioka, Midori

    2007-06-01

    The rice frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) species complex is widely distributed, from India to Japan, and most prevalently in Southeast Asia. Conspicuous morphological variation has been reported for this species complex throughout its distribution range. In the present study, we used mtDNA gene sequence and allozyme analyses to infer evolutionary affinities within this species complex using eight populations (Sri Lanka; Bangkok and Ranong in Thailand; Taiwan; and Hiroshima, Okinawa, Ishigaki and Iriomote in Japan). We also conducted crossing experiments among four populations from Japan, Thailand, and Sri Lanka in order to find out more about the reproductive isolating mechanisms that might exist among the East, Southeast, and South Asian populations of this species complex. The crossing experiments revealed that the Sri Lanka population is reproductively isolated from the Hiroshima, Bangkok, and Ranong populations by complete hybrid inviability, and that the Bangkok population may be reproductively isolated from the Hiroshima population by partial hybrid inviability. Thus, it is not unreasonable to regard the Sri Lanka population as a species separated from F. limnocharis. The mtDNA and allozyme data showed that the Ranong population is most closely related to the Bangkok population in nuclear genome, but more similar to the Okinawa and Taiwan populations in mtDNA genome. The present, preliminary survey may raise questions about the species status of these particular populations and also about the nature of the biological species concept.

  2. RR photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámara, Pablo G.; Ibáñez, Luis E.; Marchesano, Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Type II string compactifications to 4d generically contain massless Ramond-Ramond U(1) gauge symmetries. However there is no massless matter charged under these U(1)'s, which makes a priori difficult to measure any physical consequences of their existence. There is however a window of opportunity if these RR U(1)'s mix with the hypercharge U(1) Y (hence with the photon). In this paper we study in detail different avenues by which U(1) RR bosons may mix with D-brane U(1)'s. We concentrate on Type IIA orientifolds and their M-theory lift, and provide geometric criteria for the existence of such mixing, which may occur either via standard kinetic mixing or via the mass terms induced by Stückelberg couplings. The latter case is particularly interesting, and appears whenever D-branes wrap torsional p-cycles in the compactification manifold. We also show that in the presence of torsional cycles discrete gauge symmetries and Aharanov-Bohm strings and particles appear in the 4d effective action, and that type IIA Stückelberg couplings can be understood in terms of torsional (co)homology in M-theory. We provide examples of Type IIA Calabi-Yau orientifolds in which the required torsional cycles exist and kinetic mixing induced by mass mixing is present. We discuss some phenomenological consequences of our findings. In particular, we find that mass mixing may induce corrections relevant for hypercharge gauge coupling unification in F-theory SU(5) GUT's.

  3. Photon-Photon Collisions -- Past and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-02

    I give a brief review of the history of photon-photon physics and a survey of its potential at future electron-positron colliders. Exclusive hadron production processes in photon-photon and electron-photon collisions provide important tests of QCD at the amplitude level, particularly as measures of hadron distribution amplitudes. There are also important high energy {gamma}{gamma} and e{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, including the production of jets in photon-photon collisions, deeply virtual Compton scattering on a photon target, and leading-twist single-spin asymmetries for a photon polarized normal to a production plane. Since photons couple directly to all fundamental fields carrying the electromagnetic current including leptons, quarks, W's and supersymmetric particles, high energy {gamma}{gamma} collisions will provide a comprehensive laboratory for Higgs production and exploring virtually every aspect of the Standard Model and its extensions. High energy back-scattered laser beams will thus greatly extend the range of physics of the International Linear Collider.

  4. Photon induced L3 vacancy alignment at tuned photon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Himani; Kaur, Gurpreet; Tiwari, Manoj K.; Mittal, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Photon induced L3 X-ray measurements for Lα/Lℓ cross-section ratios in elements, 66 ⩽ Z ⩽ 83, at tuned photon energies on synchrotron Beamline-16 at Indus-2, India have been used to study the effect of Coster-Kronig (CK) transitions and photon energies on alignment of L3 vacancies. Certainty and reliability of the measurements were checked from comparison of measured Lα and Lℓ fluorescence cross-sections at E1 excitation with available theoretical/empirical/experimental values that required additional measurements for source, geometry and efficiency factor S0GɛLα/ℓ in the used set-up. Fall/rise trend of the ratios with energy for different Z's was found to resemble the off/on-set pattern of CK transitions as pointed out by Bambynek et al. and Campbell. Evaluated alignment parameter A2 values are very much within the limits, 0.05

  5. Silicon photonics: Design, fabrication, and characterization of on-chip optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, I.-Wei

    devices are quite different from those of electronic devices. Minimizing propagation losses by reducing sidewall roughness to nanometer scale over a device length of several millimeters or even centimeters has prompted researchers in academia and industry to refine the fabrication process. Chapter 3 of this thesis summarizes our efforts in fabricating silicon photonic devices using standard CMOS technology. Chapter 4 describes the characterization of nonlinear effects, including self-phase modulation (SPM), cross-phase modulation (XPM), and supercontinuum generation in silicon-wire waveguides. Silicon-wire waveguides are strip waveguides with submicron transverse dimensions, which allow strong light confinement inside the silicon core. This strong optical confinement, in addition to the large third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of crystalline silicon, leads to a net nonlinearity which is several orders of magnitude higher than the nonlinearity of silica fiber. Significant nonlinear effects can be observed and characterized over a device length of only several millimeters in silicon wires with very small input power. These effects provide opportunities for engineers to design active silicon photonic devices which are compact and energy-efficient. Chapter 5 presents a realization of an integrated SOI optical isolator, which is a critical yet often overlooked component in photonic integrated circuits. This study shows the feasibility to make a hybrid garnet/SOI active device with very promising results. Finally, Chapter 6 summarizes our demonstration of transmitting terabit-scale data streams in silicon-wire waveguides, which is an important first-step towards enabling intra-chip interconnection networks with ultra-high bandwidths. Although the scope of this thesis is limited to providing only fractional views of the whole silicon photonics area, it provides enough references for interested readers to conduct further literature research in other aspects of silicon

  6. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  7. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  8. Highly Compact Circulators in Square-Lattice Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Wang, Qiong; Lin, Mi; Wen, Guohua; Wang, Jingjing

    2014-01-01

    We propose, demonstrate and investigate highly compact circulators with ultra-low insertion loss in square-lattice- square-rod-photonic-crystal waveguides. Only a single magneto- optical square rod is required to be inserted into the cross center of waveguides, making the structure very compact and ultra efficient. The square rods around the center defect rod are replaced by several right-angled-triangle rods, reducing the insertion loss further and promoting the isolations as well. By choosing a linear-dispersion region and considering the mode patterns in the square magneto-optical rod, the operating mechanism of the circulator is analyzed. By applying the finite-element method together with the Nelder-Mead optimization method, an extremely low insertion loss of 0.02 dB for the transmitted wave and ultra high isolation of 46 dB∼48 dB for the isolated port are obtained. The idea presented can be applied to build circulators in different wavebands, e.g., microwave or Tera-Hertz. PMID:25415417

  9. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Cao, Guoshuai; Schäfer, Christian G; Zhao, Qibin; Gallei, Markus; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-06-24

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their "smartness" arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core-shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core-shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  10. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their “smartness” arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core–shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core–shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  11. A PD-SOI based DTI-LOCOS combined cross isolation technique for minimizing TID radiation induced leakage in high density memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengying, Qiao; Liyang, Pan; Dong, Wu; Lifang, Liu; Jun, Xu

    2014-02-01

    In order to minimize leakage current increase under total ionizing dose (TID) radiation in high density memory circuits, a new isolation technique, combining deep trench isolation (DTI) between the wells, local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) isolation between the devices within the well, and a P-diffused area in order to limit leakage at the isolation edge is implemented in partly-depleted silicon-on-insulator (PD-SOI) technology. This radiation hardening technique can minimize the layout area by more than 60%, and allows flexible placement of the body contact. Radiation hardened transistors and 256 Kb flash memory chips are designed and fabricated in a 0.6 μm PD-SOI process. Experiments show that no obvious increase in leakage current is observed for single transistors under 1 Mrad(Si) radiation, and that the 256 Kb memory chip still functions well after a TID of 100 krad(Si), with only 50% increase of the active power consumption in read mode.

  12. Updated Photonuclear Data Library and Database for Photon Strength Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, Paraskevi; Firestone, Richard B.; Siem, Sunniva; Bečvár, František; Krtička, Milan; Varlamov, Vladimir V.; Wiedeking, Mathis

    2015-05-01

    Photonuclear cross sections and gamma-ray data used to extract Photon Strength Functions are important for a large range of applications including basic sciences. The recommendations of an IAEA Consultant's Meeting to update the IAEA Photonuclear Data Library and create a Reference Database for Photon Strength Functions are presented.

  13. rho/sup 0/. omega. production in photon photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Derby, K.A.

    1987-08-01

    The subject of this dissertation is the production of the rho/sup 0/..omega.. final state in photon photon interactions. The production of the rho/sup 0/..omega.. final state has been of interest primarily because of its similarity to the related process ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/. The cross section for rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/ production demonstrates a peaking near threshold, the mechanism of which has been the subject of considerable speculation. The data sample used for the analysis was obtained using the TPC detector facility at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring, and corresponds to an integrated e/sup +/e/sup -/ luminosity of 64 pb/sup -1/ at 29 GeV center of mass energy. Our estimate of the rho/sup 0/..omega.. cross section is compared to the predictions of several models which have been used to account for the observed rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/ cross section. The experimental results are consistent with the predictions of a threshold enhancement model, as well as those of a four quark (qq anti q anti q) resonance model. However, they disagree with the predictions of a t-channel factorization approach.

  14. Isolation of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli O157 from Goats in the Somali Region of Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional, Abattoir-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Dulo, Fitsum; Feleke, Aklilu; Szonyi, Barbara; Fries, Reinhard; Baumann, Maximilian P O; Grace, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Toxigenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) are an important cause of gastroenteritis in developing countries. In Ethiopia, gastroenteritis due to food-borne disease is a leading cause of death. Yet, there is no surveillance for E. coli O157 and little is known about the carriage of this pathogen in Ethiopia's livestock. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and levels of antimicrobial resistance of E. coli O157 in goat meat, feces, and environmental samples collected at a large abattoir in the Somali region of Ethiopia. The samples were enriched in modified tryptone broth containing novobiocin, and plated onto sorbitol MacConkey agar. Isolates were confirmed using indole test and latex agglutination. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted using the disk diffusion method. A total of 235 samples, including 93 goat carcass swabs, 93 cecal contents, 14 water, 20 hand, and 15 knife swabs were collected. Overall, six (2.5%) samples were contaminated with E. coli O157 of which two (2.1%) were isolated from cecal contents, three (3.2%) from carcass swabs, and one (7.1%) from water. All isolates were resistant to at least two of the 18 antimicrobials tested. Two isolates (33.3%) were resistant to more than five antimicrobials. Abattoir facilities and slaughter techniques were conducive to carcass contamination. This study highlights how poor hygiene and slaughter practice can result in contaminated meat, which is especially risky in Ethiopia because of the common practice of eating raw meat. We detect multi-resistance to drugs not used in goats, suggesting that drugs used to treat human infections may be the originators of antimicrobial resistance in livestock in this ecosystem. The isolation of multidrug-resistant E. coli O157 from goats from a remote pastoralist system highlights the need for global action on regulating and monitoring antimicrobial use in both human and animal populations. PMID:26561414

  15. Isolation of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli O157 from Goats in the Somali Region of Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional, Abattoir-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Dulo, Fitsum; Feleke, Aklilu; Szonyi, Barbara; Fries, Reinhard; Baumann, Maximilian P. O.; Grace, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Toxigenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) are an important cause of gastroenteritis in developing countries. In Ethiopia, gastroenteritis due to food-borne disease is a leading cause of death. Yet, there is no surveillance for E. coli O157 and little is known about the carriage of this pathogen in Ethiopia’s livestock. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and levels of antimicrobial resistance of E. coli O157 in goat meat, feces, and environmental samples collected at a large abattoir in the Somali region of Ethiopia. The samples were enriched in modified tryptone broth containing novobiocin, and plated onto sorbitol MacConkey agar. Isolates were confirmed using indole test and latex agglutination. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted using the disk diffusion method. A total of 235 samples, including 93 goat carcass swabs, 93 cecal contents, 14 water, 20 hand, and 15 knife swabs were collected. Overall, six (2.5%) samples were contaminated with E. coli O157 of which two (2.1%) were isolated from cecal contents, three (3.2%) from carcass swabs, and one (7.1%) from water. All isolates were resistant to at least two of the 18 antimicrobials tested. Two isolates (33.3%) were resistant to more than five antimicrobials. Abattoir facilities and slaughter techniques were conducive to carcass contamination. This study highlights how poor hygiene and slaughter practice can result in contaminated meat, which is especially risky in Ethiopia because of the common practice of eating raw meat. We detect multi-resistance to drugs not used in goats, suggesting that drugs used to treat human infections may be the originators of antimicrobial resistance in livestock in this ecosystem. The isolation of multidrug-resistant E. coli O157 from goats from a remote pastoralist system highlights the need for global action on regulating and monitoring antimicrobial use in both human and animal populations. PMID:26561414

  16. Isolation of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli O157 from Goats in the Somali Region of Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional, Abattoir-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Dulo, Fitsum; Feleke, Aklilu; Szonyi, Barbara; Fries, Reinhard; Baumann, Maximilian P O; Grace, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Toxigenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) are an important cause of gastroenteritis in developing countries. In Ethiopia, gastroenteritis due to food-borne disease is a leading cause of death. Yet, there is no surveillance for E. coli O157 and little is known about the carriage of this pathogen in Ethiopia's livestock. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and levels of antimicrobial resistance of E. coli O157 in goat meat, feces, and environmental samples collected at a large abattoir in the Somali region of Ethiopia. The samples were enriched in modified tryptone broth containing novobiocin, and plated onto sorbitol MacConkey agar. Isolates were confirmed using indole test and latex agglutination. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted using the disk diffusion method. A total of 235 samples, including 93 goat carcass swabs, 93 cecal contents, 14 water, 20 hand, and 15 knife swabs were collected. Overall, six (2.5%) samples were contaminated with E. coli O157 of which two (2.1%) were isolated from cecal contents, three (3.2%) from carcass swabs, and one (7.1%) from water. All isolates were resistant to at least two of the 18 antimicrobials tested. Two isolates (33.3%) were resistant to more than five antimicrobials. Abattoir facilities and slaughter techniques were conducive to carcass contamination. This study highlights how poor hygiene and slaughter practice can result in contaminated meat, which is especially risky in Ethiopia because of the common practice of eating raw meat. We detect multi-resistance to drugs not used in goats, suggesting that drugs used to treat human infections may be the originators of antimicrobial resistance in livestock in this ecosystem. The isolation of multidrug-resistant E. coli O157 from goats from a remote pastoralist system highlights the need for global action on regulating and monitoring antimicrobial use in both human and animal populations.

  17. Jet production and high p/sub T/ phenomena in photon-photon reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wermes, N.

    1983-05-01

    The status of experimental investigations of high p/sub T/ phenomena and jet production in photon-photon collisions is reviewed. Taking the challenging questions on hard scattering processes in ..gamma gamma.. reactions as a guide, the experimental approach to these questions is summarized. Results from the PETRA experiments CELLO, JADE, PLUTO, and TASSO are presented including preliminary results on the Q/sup 2/-dependence of jet cross sections. Experimental limitations and background problems are discussed. 36 references.

  18. Controllable photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszetzky, Dániel; Nagy, Attila; Czitrovszky, Aladár

    2006-10-01

    We have developed our pervious experimental setup using correlated photon pairs (to the calibration of photo detectors) to realize a controllable photon source. For the generation of such photon pairs we use the non-linear process of parametric down conversion. When a photon of the pump beam is incident to a nonlinear crystal with phase matching condition, a pair of photons (signal and idler) is created at the same time with certain probability. We detect the photons in the signal beam with a single photon counting module (SPCM), while delaying those in the idler beam. Recently we have developed a fast electronic unit to control an optical shutter (a Pockels cell) placed to the optical output of the idler beam. When we detect a signal photon with the controlling electronic unit we are also able to open or close the fast optical shutter. Thus we can control which idler photons can propagate through the Pockels cell. So with this photon source we are able to program the number of photons in a certain time window. This controllable photon source that is able to generate a known number of photons with specified wavelength, direction, and polarization could be useful for applications in high-accuracy optical characterisation of photometric devices at the ultra-low intensities. This light source can also serve as a standard in testing of optical image intensifiers, night vision devices, and in the accurate measurement of spectral distribution of transmission and absorption in optical materials.

  19. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  20. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  1. Cross-clade neutralization of primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by human monoclonal antibodies and tetrameric CD4-IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Trkola, A; Pomales, A B; Yuan, H; Korber, B; Maddon, P J; Allaway, G P; Katinger, H; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Ho, D D

    1995-01-01

    We have tested three human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) IgG1b12, 2G12, and 2F5) to the envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and a tetrameric CD4-IgG molecule (CD4-IgG2), for the ability to neutralize primary HIV-1 isolates from the genetic clades A through F and from group O. Each of the reagents broadly and potently neutralized B-clade isolates. The 2F5 MAb and the CD4-IgG2 molecule also neutralized strains from outside the B clade, with the same breadth and potency that they showed against B-clade strains. The other two MAbs were able to neutralize a significant proportion of strains from outside the B clade, although there was a reduction in their efficacy compared with their activity against B-clade isolates. Neutralization of isolates by 2F5 correlated with their possession of the LDKW motif in a segment of gp41 near the membrane-spanning domain. The other two MAbs and CD4-IgG2 recognize discontinuous binding sites on gp120, and so no comparison between genetic sequence and virus neutralization was possible. Our data show that a vaccine based on the induction of humoral immunity that is broadly active across the genetic clades is not impossible if immunogens that express the epitopes for MAbs such as 2F5, 2G12, and IgG1b12 in immunogenic configurations can be created. Furthermore, if the three MAbs and CD4-IgG2 produce clinical benefit in immunotherapeutic trials in the United States or Europe, they may also do so elsewhere in the world. PMID:7474069

  2. Cross-Infection of Solid Organ Transplant Recipients by a Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate Producing the OXA-48 Carbapenemase, Likely Derived from a Multiorgan Donor

    PubMed Central

    Giani, Tommaso; Conte, Viola; Mandalà, Salvatore; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Luzzaro, Francesco; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; Grossi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cases of bacteremic infections caused by a multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate producing the OXA-48 carbapenemase that occurred in two solid organ transplant (liver and kidney) recipients, which was apparently transmitted with the allografts. This finding underscores the risk of donor-derived infections by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens in solid organ transplant recipients and emphasizes the need for rapid screening of organ donors for carriage of similar pathogens. PMID:24759725

  3. Cross-resistance profile determination of two second-generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using a panel of recombinant viruses derived from raltegravir-treated clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Van Wesenbeeck, L; Rondelez, E; Feyaerts, M; Verheyen, A; Van der Borght, K; Smits, V; Cleybergh, C; De Wolf, H; Van Baelen, K; Stuyver, L J

    2011-01-01

    The integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL) is currently used for the treatment of both treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients. Elvitegravir (EVG) is in late phases of clinical development. Since significant cross-resistance between RAL and EVG is observed, there is a need for second-generation integrase inhibitors (INIs) with a higher genetic barrier and limited cross-resistance to RAL/EVG. A panel of HIV-1 integrase recombinants, derived from plasma samples from raltegravir-treated patients (baseline and follow-up samples), were used to study the cross-resistance profile of two second-generation integrase inhibitors, MK-2048 and compound G. Samples with Q148H/R mutations had elevated fold change values with all compounds tested. Although samples with the Y143R/C mutation had reduced susceptibility to RAL, they remained susceptible to MK-2048 and compound G. Samples with the N155H mutation had no reduced susceptibility to compound G. In conclusion, our results allowed ranking of the INIs on the basis of the antiviral activities using recombinant virus stocks from RAL-treated patient viruses. The order according to decreasing susceptibility is compound G, MK-2048, and EVG.

  4. Localization of the cross-linking sites of RGD and KQAGDV peptides to the isolated fibrinogen receptor, the human platelet integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Influence of peptide length.

    PubMed

    Calvete, J J; Schäfer, W; Mann, K; Henschen, A; González-Rodríguez, J

    1992-06-15

    The non-covalent and Ca(2+)-dependent heterodimer GPIIb/IIIa, formed by platelet glycoproteins IIb (GPIIb) and IIIa (GPIIIa), also known as the integrin alpha IIb beta 3, is the inducible receptor for fibrinogen and other adhesive proteins on the surface of activated platelets. A fraction of the isolated GPIIb/IIIa in solution binds RGD or KQAGDV inhibitory peptides and, upon peptide removal, apparently acquires the capacity to bind fibrinogen ('activated' GPIIb/IIIa) [Du, X., Plow, E. F., Frelinger, A. L., III, O'Toole, T. E., Loftus, J. C. & Ginsberg, M. H. (1991) Cell 65, 409-416]. Photoaffinity labelling was used here to study the ligand binding site(s) of GPIIb/IIIa in solution, for which the peptides CKRKRKRKRRGDV (alpha 1), CGRGDF (alpha 2), CYHHLGGAKQAGDV (gamma 1) and CGAKQAGDV (gamma 2) were synthesized with a photoactivable cross-linker group and a fluorescent reporter group attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue. Contrary to the situation in activated platelets, both GPIIb and GPIIIa were equally labelled by the four peptides and the cross-linking sites were localized by protein chemical analyses of the fluorescently labelled tryptic peptides of both subunits. Thus, the localization of the cross-linking sites in GPIIb varies considerably with the peptide length and is very different from that localization observed in activated platelets: alpha 2 and gamma 2 were found cross-linked to the N-terminal of both the heavy (GPIIbH 42-73) and the light (GPIIbL2 30-75) chains of GPIIb; while the longer peptides alpha 1 and gamma 1 were cross-linked to the C-terminal of GPIIbH within the 696-724 and 752-768 peptide stretches, respectively. On the other hand, the cross-linking sites of the four inhibitory peptides in GPIIIa were found mainly within the proteolysis susceptible region, between the N-terminal (GPIIIa 1-52) and the core (GPIIb 423-622) highly disulphide-bonded domains, observing that the longer the peptide the closer the cross-linking site is to

  5. Effects of autoionizing states on two-photon double ionization of the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus; Koesterke, Lars; Schneider, Barry I.

    2014-04-01

    We report angle-resolved and angle-integrated cross sections for two-photon double-ionization of H by a strong laser pulse. The effect of doubly excited states on the predicted cross sections is addressed.

  6. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gaugemore » couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.« less

  7. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.

  8. All-Si valley-Hall photonic topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tzuhsuan; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-02-01

    An all-Si photonic structure emulating the quantum-valley-Hall effect is proposed. We show that it acts as a photonic topological insulator (PTI), and that an interface between two such PTIs can support edge states that are free from scattering. The conservation of the valley degree of freedom enables efficient in- and out-coupling of light between the free space and the photonic structure. The topological protection of the edge waves can be utilized for designing arrays of resonant time-delay photonic cavities that do not suffer from reflections and cross-talk.

  9. Formation of ions by high-energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Drukarev, E. G.; Mikhailov, A. I.; Mikhailov, I. A.; Rakhimov, Kh. Yu.; Scheid, W.

    2007-03-15

    We calculate the electron energy spectrum of ionization by a high-energy photon, accompanied by creation of an e{sup -}e{sup +} pair. The total cross section of the process is also obtained. The asymptotics of the cross section does not depend on the photon energy. At the photon energies exceeding a certain value {omega}{sub 0} this appears to be the dominant mechanism of formation of the ions. The dependence of {omega}{sub 0} on the value of nuclear charge is obtained. Our results are consistent with experimental data.

  10. Frequency of factor H-binding protein modular groups and susceptibility to cross-reactive bactericidal activity in invasive meningococcal isolates.

    PubMed

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Harrison, Lee H; Granoff, Dan M

    2010-02-25

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is a promising vaccine candidate that elicits serum bactericidal antibodies in humans. Based on sequence variability of the entire protein, fHbp has been divided into three variant groups or two sub-families. We recently reported that the fHbp architecture was modular, consisting of five variable segments, each encoded by genes from one of two lineages. Based on combinations of segments from different lineages, all 70 known fHbp sequence variants could be classified into one of six modular groups. In this study, we analyzed sequences of 172 new fHbp variants that were available from public databases. All but three variants could be classified into one of the six previously described modular groups. Among systematically collected invasive group B isolates from the U.S. and Europe, modular group I overall was most common (60%) but group IV (natural chimeras) accounted for 23% of UK isolates and <1% of U.S. isolates (P<0.0001). Mouse antisera to recombinant fHbp from each of the modular groups showed modular group-specific bactericidal activity against strains with low fHbp expression but had broader activity against strains with higher fHbp expression. Thus both modular group and relative expression of fHbp affected strain susceptibility to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. The results confirmed the modular architecture of fHbp and underscored its importance for the design of broadly protective group B vaccines in different regions.

  11. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in the black spiny tailed iguana (Ctenosaura pectinata) and their cross-utility in other Ctenosaura.

    PubMed

    Zarza, Eugenia; Pereyra, Ricardo T; Reynoso, Victor H; Emerson, Brent C

    2009-01-01

    We isolated and characterized 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci from the Mexican black iguana (Ctenosaura pectinata) and assessed levels of polymorphism in sampling sites located in the northern areas of the species' distribution range. Two to 19 alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.15 to 0.96 were detected. These markers will be useful to describe population genetic structure, the extent of gene flow in contact zones, to study the mating system of the species and to address conservation genetics issues. Additionally, we evaluated the potential utility of these markers for studies of other species within the genus Ctenosaura (i.e. C. hemilopha, C. similis and C. oaxacana).

  12. Anti-Kibble-Zurek Behavior in Crossing the Quantum Critical Point of a Thermally Isolated System Driven by a Noisy Control Field.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Rahmani, Armin; Del Campo, Adolfo

    2016-08-19

    We show that a thermally isolated system driven across a quantum phase transition by a noisy control field exhibits anti-Kibble-Zurek behavior, whereby slower driving results in higher excitations. We characterize the density of excitations as a function of the ramping rate and the noise strength. The optimal driving time to minimize excitations is shown to scale as a universal power law of the noise strength. Our findings reveal the limitations of adiabatic protocols such as quantum annealing and demonstrate the universality of the optimal ramping rate. PMID:27588838

  13. Anti-Kibble-Zurek Behavior in Crossing the Quantum Critical Point of a Thermally Isolated System Driven by a Noisy Control Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Anirban; Rahmani, Armin; del Campo, Adolfo

    2016-08-01

    We show that a thermally isolated system driven across a quantum phase transition by a noisy control field exhibits anti-Kibble-Zurek behavior, whereby slower driving results in higher excitations. We characterize the density of excitations as a function of the ramping rate and the noise strength. The optimal driving time to minimize excitations is shown to scale as a universal power law of the noise strength. Our findings reveal the limitations of adiabatic protocols such as quantum annealing and demonstrate the universality of the optimal ramping rate.

  14. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for the ornamental discus fish Symphysodon discus and cross-species amplification in other Heroini cichlid species.

    PubMed

    Amado, Manuella Villar; Hrbek, Tomas; Gravena, Waleska; Fantin, Cleiton; DE Assunção, Enedina Nogueira; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Farias, Izeni P

    2008-11-01

    The discus fishes (Symphysodon spp.) are economically important ornamental species. Thirteen microsatellite markers were developed from a CT(12) - and CA(12) -enriched whole genomic DNA library of Symphysodon discus. Allelic variability was tested on 44 individuals of two species (S. discus and S. aequifasciatus). Allelic richness ranged from two to 11 alleles per locus and observed heterozygosities from 0.083 to 0.998. All loci were at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and no pair of loci showed linkage disequilibrium within a species. Cross-species amplification was also successfully performed in the Neotropical cichlids Uaru amphiacanthoides, Hoplarchus psittacus, Hypselecara coryphaenoides, Pterophyllum sp., Mesonauta sp. and Heros sp.

  15. Photonic Weyl degeneracies in magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenlong; Yang, Biao; Lawrence, Mark; Fang, Fengzhou; Béri, Benjamin; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Weyl particles are elusive relativistic fermionic particles with vanishing mass. While not having been found as an elementary particle, they are found to emerge in solid-state materials where three-dimensional bands develop a topologically protected point-like crossing, a so-called Weyl point. Photonic Weyl points have been recently realised in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complex structures. Here we report the presence of a novel type of plasmonic Weyl points in a naturally existing medium-magnetized plasma, in which Weyl points arise as crossings between purely longitudinal plasma modes and transverse helical propagating modes. These photonic Weyl points are right at the critical transition between a Weyl point with the traditional closed finite equifrequency surfaces and the newly proposed 'type II' Weyl points with open equifrequency surfaces. Striking observable features of plasmon Weyl points include a half k-plane chirality manifested in electromagnetic reflection. Our study introduces Weyl physics into homogeneous photonic media, which could pave way for realizing new topological photonic devices. PMID:27506514

  16. Photonic Weyl degeneracies in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenlong; Yang, Biao; Lawrence, Mark; Fang, Fengzhou; Béri, Benjamin; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-08-01

    Weyl particles are elusive relativistic fermionic particles with vanishing mass. While not having been found as an elementary particle, they are found to emerge in solid-state materials where three-dimensional bands develop a topologically protected point-like crossing, a so-called Weyl point. Photonic Weyl points have been recently realised in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complex structures. Here we report the presence of a novel type of plasmonic Weyl points in a naturally existing medium--magnetized plasma, in which Weyl points arise as crossings between purely longitudinal plasma modes and transverse helical propagating modes. These photonic Weyl points are right at the critical transition between a Weyl point with the traditional closed finite equifrequency surfaces and the newly proposed `type II' Weyl points with open equifrequency surfaces. Striking observable features of plasmon Weyl points include a half k-plane chirality manifested in electromagnetic reflection. Our study introduces Weyl physics into homogeneous photonic media, which could pave way for realizing new topological photonic devices.

  17. Photonic Weyl degeneracies in magnetized plasma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenlong; Yang, Biao; Lawrence, Mark; Fang, Fengzhou; Béri, Benjamin; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Weyl particles are elusive relativistic fermionic particles with vanishing mass. While not having been found as an elementary particle, they are found to emerge in solid-state materials where three-dimensional bands develop a topologically protected point-like crossing, a so-called Weyl point. Photonic Weyl points have been recently realised in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complex structures. Here we report the presence of a novel type of plasmonic Weyl points in a naturally existing medium—magnetized plasma, in which Weyl points arise as crossings between purely longitudinal plasma modes and transverse helical propagating modes. These photonic Weyl points are right at the critical transition between a Weyl point with the traditional closed finite equifrequency surfaces and the newly proposed ‘type II' Weyl points with open equifrequency surfaces. Striking observable features of plasmon Weyl points include a half k-plane chirality manifested in electromagnetic reflection. Our study introduces Weyl physics into homogeneous photonic media, which could pave way for realizing new topological photonic devices. PMID:27506514

  18. Frequency upconversion and two-photon absorption of salicylaldehyde azine 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, A. B.; Alencar, M. A. R. C.; Cardoso, S. H.; Valle, M. S.; Diniz, R.; Hickmann, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Two-photon absorption and two-photon excitation fluorescence of salicylaldehyde azine 1 crystals were investigated. It was observed an intense visible fluorescence when this material was excited with a laser tuned at the near infrared region. Varying the laser intensity we characterized this phenomenon as a simultaneous two-photon laser absorption process. Using open aperture Z-scan measurements we characterized this two-photon absorption phenomenon and measured the value of the two-photon absorption cross-section of this molecule to be equal to 87 GM. Our results indicate that this is a promising organic material aiming nonlinear photonics applications.

  19. Single-photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Brahim; Orrit, Michel

    2005-05-01

    The concept of the photon, central to Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect, is exactly 100 years old. Yet, while photons have been detected individually for more than 50 years, devices producing individual photons on demand have only appeared in the last few years. New concepts for single-photon sources, or 'photon guns', have originated from recent progress in the optical detection, characterization and manipulation of single quantum objects. Single emitters usually deliver photons one at a time. This so-called antibunching of emitted photons can arise from various mechanisms, but ensures that the probability of obtaining two or more photons at the same time remains negligible. We briefly recall basic concepts in quantum optics and discuss potential applications of single-photon states to optical processing of quantum information: cryptography, computing and communication. A photon gun's properties are significantly improved by coupling it to a resonant cavity mode, either in the Purcell or strong-coupling regimes. We briefly recall early production of single photons with atomic beams, and the operation principles of macroscopic parametric sources, which are used in an overwhelming majority of quantum-optical experiments. We then review the photophysical and spectroscopic properties and compare the advantages and weaknesses of various single nanometre-scale objects used as single-photon sources: atoms or ions in the gas phase and, in condensed matter, organic molecules, defect centres, semiconductor nanocrystals and heterostructures. As new generations of sources are developed, coupling to cavities and nano-fabrication techniques lead to improved characteristics, delivery rates and spectral ranges. Judging from the brisk pace of recent progress, we expect single photons to soon proceed from demonstrations to applications and to bring with them the first practical uses of quantum information.

  20. Identification of a highly cross-reactive outer surface protein B epitope among diverse geographic isolates of Borrelia spp. causing Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shoberg, R J; Jonsson, M; Sadziene, A; Bergström, S; Thomas, D D

    1994-01-01

    The outer surface lipoprotein B (OspB) of Borrelia burgdorferi is a major component of the borrelial protein profile and has been shown to be highly immunogenic in experimentally immunized and infected mammals. However, the ospB loci of different strains show considerable heterology at the nucleic acid sequence level, and the progeny of a clonal strain of B. burgdorferi exhibited OspB polymorphisms with respect to apparent molecular weights and reactivities with monoclonal antibodies. These data suggest that OspB is not a good candidate for vaccination or diagnostic purposes. The present study describes a monoclonal antibody, designated 84C, directed against a very highly conserved domain of the OspB lipoprotein. Western immunoblot analysis with 84C demonstrated reactivity in 84.2% of human, tick, and other vertebrate isolate strains examined from widely diverse geographic regions, including strains of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and two closely related species, B. garinii and B. afzelii. The 84C-binding region was delimited to a highly conserved 11-amino-acid region in the carboxyl terminus of OspB as demonstrated by (i) DNA sequence analysis of wild-type and 84C-resistant mutant ospB alleles and (ii) deletion mutagenesis of a recombinant ospB gene in Escherichia coli. Finally, the 84C epitope was demonstrated to be exposed on the borrelial surface in situ as (i) the monoclonal antibody 84C was able to agglutinate borrelias in culture and (ii) 84C-resistant escape variants were isolated. These data suggest that the potential value of OspB as a vaccine candidate or diagnostic tool be examined more closely, in the context of the 84C-reactive domain. Images PMID:7512097

  1. Quantum information processing with atoms and photons.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C

    2002-03-14

    Quantum information processors exploit the quantum features of superposition and entanglement for applications not possible in classical devices, offering the potential for significant improvements in the communication and processing of information. Experimental realization of large-scale quantum information processors remains a long-term vision, as the required nearly pure quantum behaviour is observed only in exotic hardware such as individual laser-cooled atoms and isolated photons. But recent theoretical and experimental advances suggest that cold atoms and individual photons may lead the way towards bigger and better quantum information processors, effectively building mesoscopic versions of 'Schrödinger's cat' from the bottom up.

  2. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  3. Higher Twist Effects in Photon-Photon Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Boztosun, I.; Soylu, A.; Dadashov, E. A.

    In this article, we investigate the contribution of the high twist Feynman diagrams to the large-pT single pseudoscalar and vector mesons inclusive production cross section in two-photon collisions and we present the general formulae for the high and leading twist differential cross sections. The pion wave function where two non-trivial Gegenbauer coefficients a2 and a4 have been extracted from the CLEO data, Braun-Filyanov pion wave function, the asymptotic and the Chernyak-Zhitnitsky wave functions are all used in the calculations. For ρ-meson we used the Ball-Braun wave function. The results of the calculations reveal that the high twist cross sections, the ratio R, the dependence transverse momentum pT and the rapidity y of meson in the ΦCLEO(x, Q2) wave function case is very close to the Φasy(x) asymptotic wave function case. It is shown that the high twist contribution to the cross section depends on the choice of the meson wave functions.

  4. Photon+jets measurements at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, Dmitry

    2009-12-17

    In this paper, we present a few measurements done at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These measurements include the triple differential cross sections (d{sup 3}{sigma}/dp{sub T}{sup {gamma}}dy{sup {gamma}}dy{sup jet}) of the photon and associated jet production, the photon and heavy flavour (b and c) jet, and finally, study of the double parton events using {gamma}+3 jet events. Each section below presents the motivations and a description of those measurements.

  5. Photonic crystal electro-optical switching cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, A. Wirth; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the physical mechanism of a photonic crystal (PhC) switching cell based on an optical directional coupler (ODC). This ODC is driven by a low power external electrical command signal, inserted in the central coupling region, which causes the changes in the refractive index. The switching process is based on the change of the bar state to the cross state owing to the external command signal. In our simulations we used the following methods: Plane Wave Expansion by MPB (MIT Photonic-Bands), Finite-Difference Time-Domain by MEEP (MIT Electromagnetic Equation Propagation), Finite Element by COMSOL Multiphysics and our own Binary Propagation Method.

  6. Function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Ba, Nuo; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new kind of function photonic crystals (PCs), whose refractive index is a function of space position. Conventional PCs structure grows from two materials, A and B, with different dielectric constants εA and εB. Based on Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional function photonic crystals. For one-dimensional function photonic crystals, we give the dispersion relation, band gap structure and transmissivity, and compare them with conventional photonic crystals, and we find the following: (1) For the vertical and non-vertical incidence light of function photonic crystals, there are band gap structures, and for only the vertical incidence light, the conventional PCs have band gap structures. (2) By choosing various refractive index distribution functions n( z), we can obtain more wider or more narrower band gap structure than conventional photonic crystals.

  7. First-photon imaging.

    PubMed

    Kirmani, Ahmed; Venkatraman, Dheera; Shin, Dongeek; Colaço, Andrea; Wong, Franco N C; Shapiro, Jeffrey H; Goyal, Vivek K

    2014-01-01

    Imagers that use their own illumination can capture three-dimensional (3D) structure and reflectivity information. With photon-counting detectors, images can be acquired at extremely low photon fluxes. To suppress the Poisson noise inherent in low-flux operation, such imagers typically require hundreds of detected photons per pixel for accurate range and reflectivity determination. We introduce a low-flux imaging technique, called first-photon imaging, which is a computational imager that exploits spatial correlations found in real-world scenes and the physics of low-flux measurements. Our technique recovers 3D structure and reflectivity from the first detected photon at each pixel. We demonstrate simultaneous acquisition of sub-pulse duration range and 4-bit reflectivity information in the presence of high background noise. First-photon imaging may be of considerable value to both microscopy and remote sensing.

  8. Emergence of high ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates in a kidney transplant ward: role of antibiotic pressure and cross transmission.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Olivier; Corvec, Stéphane; Dantal, Jacques; Reynaud, Alain; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Bémer, Pascale; Lepelletier, Didier

    2010-06-01

    The epidemiology of patients associated with ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (ARE) was investigated by combining both clinical approach and molecular analysis in a kidney transplant patient's ward. A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors for ARE by matching each patient with ARE with two control patients without any isolated E. faecium strain. ARE isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. From June 2004 to May 2006, 18 cases with clinical ARE samples were detected and compared with 35 control patients. By univariate analysis, recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) (odds ratio [OR], 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-25.6), mean number of hospitalization days in the last year (p < 0.003), pyelonephritis or UTI (OR, 9.6; 95% CI, 2.2-46.1), oral third-generation cephalosporin use (OR, 12.42; 95% CI, 2.04-109.1), and fluoroquinolone use (OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.1-18.2) were significantly associated with ARE urinary tract colonization. By conditional logistic regression, hospitalization >21 days within 1 year (adjusted OR [aOR], 6.9; 95% CI, 1.0-46.5), recent medical history of pyelonephritis or UTI (aOR, 8.6; 95% CI, 1.5-49.1), and prior oral third-generation cephalosporin use (aOR, 13.1; 95% CI, 1.2-142.6) were identified as independent factors associated with ARE urinary tract colonization. Genotyping revealed a heterogeneous epidemiological situation with two major clones in patients hospitalized in successive rooms and 10 different single pulsotypes. Emergence of highly resistant enterococcal strains is a collateral damage from antibiotic prescription and represents a potential source of patient-to-patient transmission. Combining epidemiological approach and molecular analysis is a powerful tool to delineate mechanisms of emerging resistance. Improving our knowledge on ARE emergence in high antibiotic pressure hospital wards is a key factor to better control these colonizations/infections and to prevent the

  9. Emergence of high ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates in a kidney transplant ward: role of antibiotic pressure and cross transmission.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Olivier; Corvec, Stéphane; Dantal, Jacques; Reynaud, Alain; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Bémer, Pascale; Lepelletier, Didier

    2010-06-01

    The epidemiology of patients associated with ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (ARE) was investigated by combining both clinical approach and molecular analysis in a kidney transplant patient's ward. A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors for ARE by matching each patient with ARE with two control patients without any isolated E. faecium strain. ARE isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. From June 2004 to May 2006, 18 cases with clinical ARE samples were detected and compared with 35 control patients. By univariate analysis, recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) (odds ratio [OR], 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-25.6), mean number of hospitalization days in the last year (p < 0.003), pyelonephritis or UTI (OR, 9.6; 95% CI, 2.2-46.1), oral third-generation cephalosporin use (OR, 12.42; 95% CI, 2.04-109.1), and fluoroquinolone use (OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.1-18.2) were significantly associated with ARE urinary tract colonization. By conditional logistic regression, hospitalization >21 days within 1 year (adjusted OR [aOR], 6.9; 95% CI, 1.0-46.5), recent medical history of pyelonephritis or UTI (aOR, 8.6; 95% CI, 1.5-49.1), and prior oral third-generation cephalosporin use (aOR, 13.1; 95% CI, 1.2-142.6) were identified as independent factors associated with ARE urinary tract colonization. Genotyping revealed a heterogeneous epidemiological situation with two major clones in patients hospitalized in successive rooms and 10 different single pulsotypes. Emergence of highly resistant enterococcal strains is a collateral damage from antibiotic prescription and represents a potential source of patient-to-patient transmission. Combining epidemiological approach and molecular analysis is a powerful tool to delineate mechanisms of emerging resistance. Improving our knowledge on ARE emergence in high antibiotic pressure hospital wards is a key factor to better control these colonizations/infections and to prevent the

  10. Two-photon physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1981-10-01

    A new experimental frontier has recently been opened to the study of two photon processes. The first results of many aspects of these reactions are being presented at this conference. In contrast, the theoretical development of research ito two photon processes has a much longer history. This talk reviews the many different theoretical ideas which provide a detailed framework for our understanding of two photon processes.

  11. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  12. Absolute vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption cross section studies of atomic and molecular species: Techniques and observational data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, D. L.; Wu, C. Y. R.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of a high energy photon (greater than 6 eV) by an isolated molecule results in the formation of highly excited quasi-discrete or continuum states which evolve through a wide range of direct and indirect photochemical processes. These are: photoionization and autoionization, photodissociation and predissociation, and fluorescence. The ultimate goal is to understand the dynamics of the excitation and decay processes and to quantitatively measure the absolute partial cross sections for all processes which occur in photoabsorption. Typical experimental techniques and the status of observational results of particular interest to solar system observations are presented.

  13. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Scott; Krainak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  14. Photon simulated desorption revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, D.

    A promising new method for surface investigations is discussed: Photon stimulated desorption. The electronic excitations of adsorbate complexes on surfaces, either by electron impact or photon absorption, which can lead to repulsive states of the complex and therefore to expulsion of ions and neutrals are considered. Such processes are termed electron (or photon) stimulated desorption, ESD and PSD, respectively. Apart from the primary agent (electrons or photons), these processes are similar, and common label "desorption induced by electronic transitions" (acronym DIET) was proposed. Desorption effects, intrinsic photoneffects, and some of the advantages of PSD over ESD are discussed.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for Stys's Bush-Cricket, Isophya stysi, and Cross-Species Amplification in Closely Related Species from the Phaneropteridae Family

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Elena I.; Popa, Oana P.; Krapal, Ana-Maria; Popa, Luis O.

    2013-01-01

    Ten microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for Stys's bush-cricket, Isophya stysi Cejchan (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), an endemic Orthoptera species to the Carpathian Basin, using an enriched genomic library procedure. The polymorphism of these loci were tested in two populations of I. stysi, and the number of alleles per locus varied from 4 to 16. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.612 to 0.925 and from 0.625 to 1.000, respectively. The interspecific applicability of these microsatellites was evaluated by amplification in 20 related species: Isophya camptoxypha, Isophya sicula, Isophya ciucasi, Isophya pienensis, Isophya harzi, Isophya kraussii, Isophya zubovskii, Isophya rectipennis, Isophya modesta, Isophya longicaudata, Isophya dobrogensis, Isophya hospodar, Isophya speciosa, Isophya modestior, Poecilimon fussii, Poecilimon affinis, Polysarcus denticauda, Barbitistes constrictus, Leptophyes discoidalis, Phaneroptera falcata. All primer pairs for the 10 loci yielded successful amplifications in at least one other taxon from the Isophya genus. This set of microsatellite loci would be useful for genetic studies in I. stysi and other species of the genus Isophya. PMID:23906094

  16. The Performance of Cross-linked Acellular Arterial Scaffolds as Vascular Grafts; Pre-clinical Testing in Direct and Isolation Loop Circulatory Models

    PubMed Central

    Pennel, Timothy; Fercana, George; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Simionescu, Agneta; Chuang, Ting-Hsien; Zilla, Peter; Simionescu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    There is a significant need for small diameter vascular grafts to be used in peripheral vascular surgery; however autologous grafts are not always available, synthetic grafts perform poorly and allografts and xenografts degenerate, dilate and calcify after implantation. We hypothesized that chemical stabilization of acellular xenogenic arteries would generate off-the-shelf grafts resistant to thrombosis, dilatation and calcification. To test this hypothesis, we decellularized porcine renal arteries, stabilized elastin with penta-galloyl glucose and collagen with carbodiimide / activated heparin and implanted them as transposition grafts in the abdominal aorta of rats as direct implants and separately as indirect, isolation-loop implants. All implants resulted in high patency and animal survival rates, ubiquitous encapsulation within a vascularized collagenous capsule, and exhibited lack of lumen thrombogenicity and no graft wall calcification. Peri-anastomotic neo-intimal tissue overgrowth was a normal occurrence in direct implants; however this reaction was circumvented in indirect implants. Notably, implantation of non-treated control scaffolds exhibited marked graft dilatation and elastin degeneration; however PGG significantly reduced elastin degradation and prevented aneurismal dilatation of vascular grafts. Overall these results point to the outstanding potential of crosslinked arterial scaffolds as small diameter vascular grafts. PMID:24816365

  17. Comparison of renal response parameters for juvenile membranous plus proliferative lupus nephritis versus isolated proliferative lupus nephritis: a cross-sectional analysis of the CARRA Registry.

    PubMed

    Boneparth, A; Ilowite, N T

    2014-08-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) affects many patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and is a significant cause of disease morbidity. Membranous plus proliferative LN (M + PLN) may represent a more difficult to treat subtype of juvenile LN, compared to isolated proliferative LN (PLN). In this retrospective observational study, we utilized data from the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatism Research Alliance (CARRA) registry to compare response rates for pediatric M + PLN versus PLN. Response was assessed at the most recent CARRA registry visit gathered ≥6 months after diagnostic kidney biopsy. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2), indicating renal insufficiency, was found in 16.1% of patients with M + PLN and 6.1% of patients with PLN (P = 0.071). We found no significant difference in achievement of response in either hematuria or proteinuria between PLN and M + PLN groups or between subgroups determined by presence of class III vs. class IV proliferative disease. Exposure rates to mycophenolate, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab were similar between groups. Future studies will be necessary to correlate pediatric LN renal histology data with treatment response as well as other disease outcome measures.

  18. From bis(silylene) and bis(germylene) pincer-type nickel(II) complexes to isolable intermediates of the nickel-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Daniel; Brück, Andreas; Irran, Elisabeth; Meier, Florian; Kaupp, Martin; Driess, Matthias; Hartwig, John F

    2013-10-16

    The first [ECE]Ni(II) pincer complexes with E = Si(II) and E = Ge(II) metallylene donor arms were synthesized via C-X (X = H, Br) oxidative addition, starting from the corresponding [EC(X)E] ligands. These novel complexes were fully characterized (NMR, MS, and XRD) and used as catalyst for Ni-catalyzed Sonogashira reactions. These catalysts allowed detailed information on the elementary steps of this catalytic reaction (transmetalation → oxidative addition → reductive elimination), resulting in the isolation and characterization of an unexpected intermediate in the transmetalation step. This complex, {[ECE]Ni acetylide → CuBr} contains both nickel and copper, with the copper bound to the alkyne π-system. Consistent with these unusual structural features, DFT calculations of the {[ECE]Ni acetylide → CuBr} intermediates revealed an unusual E-Cu-Ni three-center-two-electron bonding scheme. The results reveal a general reaction mechanism for the Ni-based Sonogashira coupling and broaden the application of metallylenes as strong σ-donor ligands for catalytic transformations. PMID:24053603

  19. The cross section for double Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Employing elementary methods in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics, the cross section for gamma sub 0 + e yields e + gamma + gamma is computed for arbitrary energy in the spectrum of the outgoing photons. The final result is given, differential in the energy of one of these photons, for the case where the incident photon is unpolarized and has energy E sub 0 much less than mc-squared, a polarization sum and angular integration being performed for the final-state photons. The cross section has a simple algebraic form resulting from contributions from the sum of squared direct and exchange amplitudes; interference terms from these amplitudes do not contribute to the angular-integrated cross section.

  20. Measurement of Lα and Lβ1,3,4 fluorescence cross sections of La, Ce, Pr and Nd induced by photons of energies between 7.01 keV and 8.75 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Herrera, J.; Miranda, J.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents measurement results of x-ray production cross sections of Lα and Lβ1,3,4 emitted by four lanthanoid elements (La, Ce, Pr and Nd), after irradiation with Kα and Kβ X rays of the elements Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn (covering energies between 7.01 keV and 8.75 keV). Primary x-rays were induced in turn by the irradiation of thick targets of these elements with a beam of x-rays produced by a tube with an Rh anode, operating at 50 kV and 850 μA. The experimental results are compared with theoretical cross sections predicted using known tabulations of photoelectric cross sections. Dirac-Hartree-Slater (DHS) atomic parameters were used for these calculations. An acceptable match between experiment and both sets of tabulated data is found.

  1. Recent advances in organic one-dimensional composite materials: design, construction, and photonic elements for information processing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongli; Zhang, Chuang; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2013-07-19

    Many recent activities in the use of one-dimensional nanostructures as photonic elements for optical information processing are explained by huge advantages that photonic circuits possess over traditional silicon-based electronic ones in bandwidth, heat dissipation, and resistance to electromagnetic wave interference. Organic materials are a promising candidate to support these optical-related applications, as they combine the properties of plastics with broad spectral tunability, high optical cross-section, easy fabrication, as well as low cost. Their outstanding compatibility allows organic composite structures which are made of two or more kinds of materials combined together, showing great superiority to single-component materials due to the introduced interactions among multiple constituents, such as energy transfer, electron transfer, exciton coupling, etc. The easy processability of organic 1D crystalline heterostructures enables a fine topological control of both composition and geometry, which offsets the intrinsic deficiencies of individual material. At the same time, the strong exciton-photon coupling and exciton-exciton interaction impart the excellent confinement of photons in organic microstructures, thus light can be manipulated according to our intention to realize specific functions. These collective properties indicate a potential utility of organic heterogeneous material for miniaturized photonic circuitry. Herein, focus is given on recent advances of 1D organic crystalline heterostructures, with special